Science.gov

Sample records for potential energy anomaly

  1. Revisiting Gravitational Anomalies and a Potential Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, P. A.

    2009-03-01

    Gravitational anomalies require investigation and resolution to understand the space environment if man is to travel beyond trans-lunar or trans-Mars region. This paper will provide a framework for further and more detailed evaluations. These anomalies include, a slight change in the sun's gravitational attraction observed by two Pioneer probes based upon trajectory deviations detected after being in flight for over a decade and, several events where other long-range spacecraft undergoing flybys of the Earth experience increases in velocity that could not be predicted by Newtonian gravitation. Moreover, the assumption of dark energy and dark matter supposedly explain some astronomical observations to include expansion of the cosmos on a scale of the order of galaxies, galaxy clusters and other celestial bodies at considerable distances from the Earth. If, however, gravitational waves exist, then gravity should obey a wavelike partial differential equation implying that gravity is a function of both spatial and temporal dimensions. If true, then gravity may grow or decay as a function of time in contrast to Newtonian gravitation, which has propulsion implications that may also provide a partial explanation to some of these anomalies.

  2. Understanding Anomalies to Extract Vacuum Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, P.A

    2004-02-04

    Recent Russian literature contains some interesting speculations of potentially wide applicability regarding the physical vacuum. These investigations examined and applied a theory to various anomalies to try and understand what these events may represent. Data were collected by Dmitriev to quantify these events and identify commonalties that indicate the anomalies might have a natural origin. Dyatlov created theories on the Polarized Inhomogeneous Physical Vacuum where he claimed that each anomaly possessed a distinct boundary separate from its surroundings. Within this inhomogeneous boundary, the theory suggests that the magnetic, electric, gravitic, and spin fields would be different from its surroundings. From these findings, he developed equations that resemble the London equations for a superconductor and are somewhat similar to those developed later by Puthoff. The importance of these events is that with additional understanding, they may offer a means for extracting energy from the physical vacuum. Moreover, one may speculate that these anomalies may represent a gravitational vortex or even a portal or a wormhole to look into potential travel within other dimensions.

  3. Singularity analysis of potential fields to enhance weak anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Cheng, Q.; Liu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geoanomalies generally are nonlinear, non-stationary and weak, especially in the land cover areas, however, the traditional methods of geoanomaly identification are usually based on linear theory. In past two decades, many power-law function models have been developed based on fractal concept in mineral exploration and mineral resource assessment, such that the density-area (C-A) model and spectrum-area model (S-A) suggested by Qiuming Cheng have played important roles in extracting geophysical and geochemical anomalies. Several power-law relationships are evident in geophysical potential fields, such as field value-distance, power spectrum-wave number as well as density-area models. The singularity index based on density-area model involves the first derivative transformation of the measure. Hence, we introduce the singularity analysis to develop a novel high-pass filter for extracting gravity and magnetic anomalies with the advantage of scale invariance. Furthermore, we suggest that the statistics of singularity indices can provide a new edge detection scheme for the gravity or magnetic source bodies. Meanwhile, theoretical magnetic anomalies are established to verify these assertions. In the case study from Nanling mineral district in south China and Qikou Depression in east China, compared with traditional geophysical filtering methods including multiscale wavelet analysis and total horizontal gradient methods, the singularity method enhances and extracts the weak anomalies caused by buried magmatic rocks more effectively, and provides more distinct boundary information of rocks. Moreover, the singularity mapping results have good correspondence relationship with both the outcropping rocks and known mineral deposits to support future mineral resource exploration. The singularity method based on fractal analysis has potential to be a new useful theory and technique for processing gravity and magnetic anomaly data.

  4. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  5. Zero-point energies and the multiplicative anomaly

    E-print Network

    McKenzie-Smith, J J

    2000-01-01

    For the case of a relativistic scalar field at finite temperature with a chemical potential, we calculate an exact expression for the one-loop effective action using the full fourth order determinant and zeta-function regularisation. We find that it agrees with the exact expression for the factored operator and thus there appears to be no mulitplicative anomaly. The appearance of the anomaly for the fourth order operator in the high temperature limit is explained and we show that the multiplicative anomaly can be calculated as the difference between two zeta-regularised zero-point energies. This difference is a result of using a charge operator in the Hamiltonian which has not been normal ordered.

  6. Spectral action, Weyl anomaly and the Higgs-Dilaton potential

    E-print Network

    A. A. Andrianov; M. A. Kurkov; Fedele Lizzi

    2011-06-16

    We show how the bosonic spectral action emerges from the fermionic action by the renormalization group flow in the presence of a dilaton and the Weyl anomaly. The induced action comes out to be basically the Chamseddine-Connes spectral action introduced in the context of noncommutative geometry. The entire spectral action describes gauge and Higgs fields coupled with gravity. We then consider the effective potential and show, that it has the desired features of a broken and an unbroken phase, with the roll down.

  7. Supersymmetric Casimir energy and the anomaly polynomial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobev, Nikolay; Bullimore, Mathew; Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    We conjecture that for superconformal field theories in even dimensions, the supersymmetric Casimir energy on a space with topology S 1 × S D-1 is equal to an equivariant integral of the anomaly polynomial. The equivariant integration is defined with respect to the Cartan subalgebra of the global symmetry algebra that commutes with a given supercharge. We test our proposal extensively by computing the supersymmetric Casimir energy for large classes of superconformal field theories, with and without known Lagrangian descriptions, in two, four and six dimensions.

  8. Laboratory investigation of lunar surface electric potentials in magnetic anomaly regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, C. T.; Wang, X.; Deca, J.; Horányi, M.

    2015-06-01

    To gain insight into lunar surface charging in the magnetic anomaly regions, we present the results of laboratory experiments with a flowing plasma engulfing a magnetic dipole field above an insulating surface. When the dipole moment is perpendicular to the surface, large positive potentials (close to ion flow energies in eV) are measured on the surface in the dipole lobe regions, charged by the unmagnetized ions while the electrons are magnetically excluded. The potential decreases exponentially with distance from the surface on the ion (flow) Debye length scale. The surface potentials become much smaller when the dipole moment is parallel to the surface, likely due to collisionality. We discuss the implications of our laboratory results for the lunar surface charging in the magnetic anomaly regions, suggesting that the surface potential may be much higher than the generally expected several volts positive due to photoemission.

  9. Structural anomalies for a three dimensional isotropic core-softened potential

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    cooling, water expands below T = 4o C at ambient pressure1 . This is known as the density anomaly of water density structure takes place. The gain of thermal energy breaks a considerable number of hydrogen bonds,13 that exhibit thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. Thermodynamic anomalies were also found in liquid metals14

  10. Softness dependence of the Anomalies for the Continuous Shouldered Well potential

    E-print Network

    Pol Vilaseca; Giancarlo Franzese

    2010-04-19

    By molecular dynamic simulations we study a system of particles interacting through a continuous isotropic pairwise core-softened potential consisting of a repulsive shoulder and an attractive well. The model displays a phase diagram with three fluid phases, a gas-liquid critical point, a liquid-liquid critical point, and anomalies in density, diffusion and structure. The hierarchy of the anomalies is the same as for water. We study the effect on the anomalies of varying the softness of the potential. We find that, making the soft-core steeper, the regions of density and diffusion anomalies contract in the T - {\\rho} plane, while the region of structural anomaly is weakly affected. Therefore, a liquid can have anomalous structural behavior without density or diffusion anomalies. We show that, by considering as effective distances those corresponding to the maxima of the first two peaks of the radial distribution function g(r) in the high-density liquid, we can generalize to continuous two-scales potentials a criterion for the occurrence of the anomalies of density and diffusion, originally proposed for discontinuous potentials. We observe that the knowledge of the structural behavior within the first two coordination shells of the liquid is not enough to establish the occurrence of the anomalies. By introducing the density derivative of the the cumulative order integral of the excess entropy we show that the anomalous behavior is regulated by the structural order at distances as large as the fourth coordination shell. By comparing the results for different softness of the potential, we conclude that the disappearing of the density and diffusion anomalies for the steeper potentials is due to a more structured short-range order. All these results increase our understanding on how, knowing the interaction potential, we can evaluate the possible presence of anomalies for a liquid.

  11. LAAS Study of Slow-Moving Ionosphere Anomalies and Their Potential Impacts

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    LAAS Study of Slow-Moving Ionosphere Anomalies and Their Potential Impacts Ming Luo, Sam Pullen by several severe ionosphere storms that have occurred in recent years, research has been done to studying. In previous work [1-5], it was found that such ionosphere anomalies can threaten LAAS users under extreme

  12. EVAREST - Evaluation of geological models by joint interpretation of potential field anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Peter; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Structural geological models are often based on the integration of different geophysical datasets. During the last years an increasing interest in the potential field methods, i.e. gravimetry and magnetic, can be observed, even though data acquisition can cause considerable costs and logistic effort. Therefore, the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different methods were analyzed. In a case study, which was conducted in cooperation with RWE Dea and which is located in northern Germany, it was studied to which level of detail gravity and magnetic anomalies can be interpreted jointly by 3D forward modelling. Special attention was paid to the individual residuals, i.e. those parts of the gravity and magnetic anomalies which could not be interpreted satisfactorily by the joint structural / physical model. In a subsequent stage of the workflow this information was analyzed individually for each dataset to improve the geological interpretation and to identify and localize the sources of the anomalies in more detail. For the discussed study several potential field datasets of different resolution were available, which were first analyzed by means of field transformation. While the gravity anomalies are mainly related to the occurrence of salt structures, the magnetic anomalies seem to be controlled by deep structures, most probably by the magnetic basement. Some local magnetic anomalies with amplitudes of less than 10 nT can be related to the rim synclines of the salt structures as well as to buried Pleistocene subglacial valleys. 3D forward models, constrained by existing structural information and rock physical data, have shown that, e.g., a common fitting of both anomaly fields is not possible if homogenous densities and magnetizations are assigned to the different lithological units and while considering the geometry of the source bodies to be the same for both potential field anomalies. To explain the magnetic anomalies a more detailed differentiation of the source bodies in terms of thin layers is required, while for the interpretation of the gravity anomalies vertical density gradients must be considered for specific lithologies. Furthermore, from the magnetic anomalies ideas about the maximum depth of source bodies can be derived.

  13. Insights on the Cuprate High Energy Anomaly Observed in ARPES

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, Brian

    2011-08-16

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). The anomaly is present for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates as well as the half-filled parent insulators with different energy scales arising on either side of the phase diagram. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. creating a 'waterfall'-like appearance, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram. We find that the anomaly demarcates a transition, or cross-over, from a quasiparticle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character.

  14. Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like anomalies of a core-softened model potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com

    2013-12-28

    It is now well established that water-like anomalies can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric potential with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened potential. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened potential on the existence and location of various water-like anomalies in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the potentials. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic anomalies. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened potentials have concluded that the structural anomaly region encloses the diffusion anomaly region, which in turn, encloses the density anomaly region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion anomaly region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural anomaly region. Also, density anomaly region is not completely enclosed by diffusion anomaly region in this case.

  15. Automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data

    E-print Network

    Simon de Visscher; Michel Herquet

    2011-04-13

    We address the problem of automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data. Our approach is based on the random generation of analytic expressions for kinematical variables, which can then be evolved following a genetic programming procedure to enhance their discriminating power. We apply this approach to three concrete scenarios to demonstrate its possible usefulness, both as a detailed check of reference Monte-Carlo simulations and as a model independent tool for the detection of New Physics signatures.

  16. The trace anomaly and dynamical vacuum energy in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, Emil

    2010-01-01

    The trace anomaly of conformal matter implies the existence of massless scalar poles in physical amplitudes involving the stress-energy tensor. These poles may be described by a local effective action with massless scalar fields, which couple to classical sources, contribute to gravitational scattering processes, and can have long range gravitational effects at macroscopic scales. In an effective field theory approach, the effective action of the anomaly is an infrared relevant term that should be added to the Einstein-Hilbert action of classical General Relativity to take account of macroscopic quantum effects. The additional scalar degrees of freedom contained in this effective action may be understood as responsible for both the Casimir effect in flat spacetime and large quantum backreaction effects at the horizon scale of cosmological spacetimes. These effects of the trace anomaly imply that the cosmological vacuum energy is dynamical, and its value depends on macroscopic boundary conditions at the cosmological horizon scale, rather than sensitivity to the extreme ultraviolet Planck scale.

  17. On the gravitational potential and field anomalies due to thin mass layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockendon, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The gravitational potential and field anomalies for thin mass layers are derived using the technique of matched asymptotic expansions. An inner solution is obtained using an expansion in powers of the thickness and it is shown that the outer solution is given by a surface distribution of mass sources and dipoles. Coefficients are evaluated by matching the inner expansion of the outer solution with the outer expansion of the inner solution. The leading term in the inner expansion for the normal gravitational field gives the Bouguer formula. The leading term in the expansion for the gravitational potential gives an expression for the perturbation to the geoid. The predictions given by this term are compared with measurements by satellite altimetry. The second-order terms in the expansion for the gravitational field are required to predict the gravity anomaly at a continental margin. The results are compared with observations.

  18. Multiple liquid-liquid critical points and anomalies in core-softened potentials

    E-print Network

    Marco Aurélio A. Barbosa; Evy Salcedo; Marcia Barbosa

    2012-06-19

    The relation between liquid-liquid phase transitions and waterlike density anomalies in core-softened potentials of fluids was investigated in an exactly solvable one dimensional lattice model and a in a three dimensional fluid with fermi-like potential, the latter by molecular dynamics. Both systems were shown to present three liquid phases, two liquid-liquid phase transitions closely connected to two distinct regions of anomalous density increase. We propose that an oscillatory behavior observed on the thermal expansion coefficient as a function of pressure can be used as a signature of the connection between liquid-liquid phase and density.

  19. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  20. Global Climate Anomalies and Potential Infectious Disease Risks: 2014-2015

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, Jean-Paul; Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer; Britch, Seth; Sanchez, Jose L.; Halbach, Alaina C.; Tucker, Compton; Linthicum, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global climate phenomenon that impacts human infectious disease risk worldwide through droughts, floods, and other climate extremes. Throughout summer and fall 2014 and winter 2015, El Niño Watch, issued by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, assessed likely El Niño development during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter, persisting into spring 2015. Methods: We identified geographic regions where environmental conditions may increase infectious disease transmission if the predicted El Niño occurs using El Niño indicators (Sea Surface Temperature [SST], Outgoing Longwave Radiation [OLR], and rainfall anomalies) and literature review of El Niño-infectious disease associations. Results: SSTs in the equatorial Pacific and western Indian Oceans were anomalously elevated during August-October 2014, consistent with a developing weak El Niño event. Teleconnections with local climate is evident in global precipitation patterns, with positive OLR anomalies (drier than average conditions) across Indonesia and coastal southeast Asia, and negative anomalies across northern China, the western Indian Ocean, central Asia, north-central and northeast Africa, Mexico/Central America, the southwestern United States, and the northeastern and southwestern tropical Pacific. Persistence of these conditions could produce environmental settings conducive to increased transmission of cholera, dengue, malaria, Rift Valley fever, and other infectious diseases in regional hotspots as during previous El Niño events. Discussion and Conclusions: The current development of weak El Niño conditions may have significant potential implications for global public health in winter 2014-spring 2015. Enhanced surveillance and other preparedness measures in predicted infectious disease hotspots could mitigate health impacts. PMID:25685635

  1. Impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of moist potential vorticity anomaly during torrential rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shouting; Zhou, Yushu; Cui, Xiaopeng; Dai, Guoping

    2004-12-01

    The impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of the moist potential vorticity (MPV) anomaly associated with torrential rains are investigated by using NCEP/NCAR 1° × 1° data. The MPV tendency equation with the cloud-induced mass forcing is derived, and applied to the torrential rain event over the Changjiang River-Huaihe River Valleys during 26 30 June 1999. The result shows that positive anomalies are located mainly between 850 hPa and 500 hPa, while the maximum MPV, maximum positive tendency of the MPV, and maximum surface rainfall are nearly collocated. The cloud-induced mass forcing contributes to the positive tendency of the moist potential vorticity anomaly. The results indicate that the MPV may be used to track the propagation of rain systems for operational applications.

  2. Self-energy anomaly of an electric pointlike dipole in three-dimensional static spacetimes

    E-print Network

    Valeri P. Frolov; Andrey A. Shoom; Andrei Zelnikov

    2013-03-07

    We calculate the self-energy anomaly of a pointlike electric dipole located in a static $(2+1)$-dimensional curved spacetime. The energy functional for this problem is invariant under an infinite-dimensional (gauge) group of transformations parameterized by one scalar function of two variables. We demonstrate that the problem of the calculation of the self-energy anomaly for a pointlike dipole can be reduced to the calculation of quantum fluctuations of an effective two-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory. We reduced the problem in question to the calculation of the conformal anomaly of an effective scalar field in two dimensions and obtained an explicit expression for the self-energy anomaly of an electric dipole in an asymptotically flat, regular $(2+1)$-dimensional spacetime which may have electrically neutral black-hole-like metrics with regular Killing horizon.

  3. Multiple liquid-liquid critical points and density anomaly in core-softened potentials

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    REV IEW CO PY N O T FO R D ISTRIBU TIO N Multiple liquid-liquid critical points and density anomaly Abstract The relation between liquid-liquid phase transitions and waterlike density anomalies in core shown to present three liquid phases, two liquid-liquid phase transitions closely connected to two

  4. Mining Building Energy Management System Data Using Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dumidu Wijayasekara; Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2014-08-01

    Building Energy Management Systems (BEMSs) are essential components of modern buildings that utilize digital control technologies to minimize energy consumption while maintaining high levels of occupant comfort. However, BEMSs can only achieve these energy savings when properly tuned and controlled. Since indoor environment is dependent on uncertain criteria such as weather, occupancy, and thermal state, performance of BEMS can be sub-optimal at times. Unfortunately, the complexity of BEMS control mechanism, the large amount of data available and inter-relations between the data can make identifying these sub-optimal behaviors difficult. This paper proposes a novel Fuzzy Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Description (Fuzzy-ADLD) based method for improving the understandability of BEMS behavior for improved state-awareness. The presented method is composed of two main parts: 1) detection of anomalous BEMS behavior and 2) linguistic representation of BEMS behavior. The first part utilizes modified nearest neighbor clustering algorithm and fuzzy logic rule extraction technique to build a model of normal BEMS behavior. The second part of the presented method computes the most relevant linguistic description of the identified anomalies. The presented Fuzzy-ADLD method was applied to real-world BEMS system and compared against a traditional alarm based BEMS. In six different scenarios, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified anomalous behavior either as fast as or faster (an hour or more), that the alarm based BEMS. In addition, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified cases that were missed by the alarm based system, demonstrating potential for increased state-awareness of abnormal building behavior.

  5. Physics 321 Energy Conservation Potential Energy in

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Physics 321 Hour 7 Energy Conservation ­ Potential Energy in One Dimension Bottom Line · Energy is conserved. · Kinetic energy is a definite concept. · If we can determine the kinetic energy at all points in space by knowing it at one point in space, we can invent a potential energy so that energy can

  6. Addressing the Challenges of Anomaly Detection for Cyber Physical Energy Grid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Melin, Alexander M; Czejdo, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of cyber communications networks and physical control systems within the energy smart grid introduces a number of new risks. Unfortunately, these risks are largely unknown and poorly understood, yet include very high impact losses from attack and component failures. One important aspect of risk management is the detection of anomalies and changes. However, anomaly detection within cyber security remains a difficult, open problem, with special challenges in dealing with false alert rates and heterogeneous data. Furthermore, the integration of cyber and physical dynamics is often intractable. And, because of their broad scope, energy grid cyber-physical systems must be analyzed at multiple scales, from individual components, up to network level dynamics. We describe an improved approach to anomaly detection that combines three important aspects. First, system dynamics are modeled using a reduced order model for greater computational tractability. Second, a probabilistic and principled approach to anomaly detection is adopted that allows for regulation of false alerts and comparison of anomalies across heterogeneous data sources. Third, a hierarchy of aggregations are constructed to support interactive and automated analyses of anomalies at multiple scales.

  7. Dependence of the 0.7 anomaly on the curvature of the potential barrier in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Hamilton, A. R.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-06-01

    Ninety-eight one-dimensional channels defined using split gates fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure are measured during one cooldown at 1.4 K. The devices are arranged in an array on a single chip and are individually addressed using a multiplexing technique. The anomalous conductance feature known as the "0.7 structure" is studied using statistical techniques. The ensemble of data shows that the 0.7 anomaly becomes more pronounced and occurs at lower values as the curvature of the potential barrier in the transport direction decreases. This corresponds to an increase in the effective length of the device. The 0.7 anomaly is not strongly influenced by other properties of the conductance related to density. The curvature of the potential barrier appears to be the primary factor governing the shape of the 0.7 structure at a given T and B .

  8. Breakup threshold anomaly for the {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni system at near-Coulomb barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2011-09-15

    By using recent fusion cross section measurements for the system {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni, a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering, fusion, and total reaction cross sections is performed for the weakly bound system {sup 8}B + {sup 58}Ni at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. The analysis is carried out with an optical potential with fusion and direct reaction parts (i.e., the nuclear polarization potential U is split into a volume part U{sub F}, which accounts for fusion reactions and a surface part U{sub DR}, responsible for direct reactions). The parameters of the Woods-Saxon potentials are determined by a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of the data. The presence of the threshold anomaly is investigated from the energy dependence of both the fusion and direct reaction parts of the polarization potential.

  9. ANNALS OF PHYSICS 113, 294-303 (1978) Trace Anomaly of the Stress-Energy Tensor for Massless Vector

    E-print Network

    Lieberman, Judy

    1978-01-01

    ANNALS OF PHYSICS 113, 294-303 (1978) Trace Anomaly of the Stress-Energy Tensor for Massless Vector 60510 Received October 4. 1977 We reanalyze the problem of regularization of the stress-energy tensor, in the earlier formulation of Adler, Lieberman, and Ng, and find a stress-energy tensor trace anomaly agreeing

  10. Thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies for dumbbell molecules interacting with a repulsive ramplike potential

    E-print Network

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    of SPC/E Simple Point Charge-Extended water. The regions in the pressure-temperature plane and diffusion anomalies, a negatively sloped freezing line and possibly a second critical point in a deeply point at the terminus of a liquid-liquid line, in the unstable supercooled liquid region 13 . The study

  11. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: POTENTIAL ROLE OF HORMONAL ALTERATIONS IN INITIATING ADULT REPRODUCTIVE ANOMALIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary hypothesis to be tested in this series of studies is whether or not exposure to environmental agents, during certain key periods of development, will increase the risk of specific anomalies of the reproductive system. Embedded in this hypothesis is the assumption that...

  12. Rapid 3-D forward model of potential fields with application to the Palinuro Seamount magnetic anomaly (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.

    2009-02-01

    We show a set of forward model equations in the Fourier domain for calculating the 3-D gravity and magnetic anomalies of a given 3-D distribution of density or magnetization. One property of the potential field equations is that they are given by convolution products, providing a very simple analytic expression in the Fourier domain. Under this assumption, the domain of the density or magnetization parameters is connected by a biunivoc relationship with the data space, and potential field anomalies can be seen as filtered versions of the corresponding density or magnetization distributions. A very fine spatial discretization can be obtained by using a large number of points within a unique 3-D grid, where both the source distributions and field data are defined. The main advantage of this formulation is that it dramatically reduces execution times, providing a very fast forward model tool useful for modeling anomalies at different altitudes. We use this method to evaluate an average magnetization of 8 A/m for the Palinuro Seamount in the Tyrrhenian Sea (southern Italy), thus performing a joint interpretation of morphological and newly acquired magnetic data.

  13. Woods-Saxon and São Paulo optical model calculations of the threshold anomaly of the 6,7Li+28Si systems near Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2011-10-01

    Two types of optical model interactions, namely the double-folding density dependent São Paulo potential (SPP) and the Woods-Saxon potential (WSP) are used to study the appearance of the Theshold Anomaly (TA) or the Breakup Threshold Anomaly (BTA) for the nuclear systems 6,7Li+28Si for energies around the Coulomb barrier. In the first case, the presence of the anomaly is determined from the energy dependence of the normalization parameters NR and NI as found from fittings to elastic scattering angular distributions. In the second case, the presence of the anomaly is investigated by the energy variation of the fusion and direct reaction parts of the Woods-Saxon potential. In this case, the parameters of the fusion and direct reaction potentials are calculated by a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering, fusion and total reaction cross sections. It is found in both cases that the BTA appears for the 6Li+28Si reaction. As for 7Li+28Si, the calculation with the SPP shows that the usual TA appears but the dispersion relation is not satisfied, however the WSP indicates that indeed the BTA shows up.

  14. Two key parameters for the El Niño continuum: zonal wind anomalies and Western Pacific subsurface potential temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Andy Wang-Chun; Herzog, Michael; Graf, Hans-F.

    2015-03-01

    Different types of El Niño (EN) events have recently been discussed. Based on NCEP-NOAA reanalysis data this analysis explores a number of key parameters that cause a range of EN types over the period 1980-2013. EN events are divided into three types depending on the spatial and temporal evolution of the sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA): Central Pacific (CPEN), Eastern Pacific (EPEN), and Hybrid (HBEN). We find that EN is a continuous spectrum of events with CPEN and EPEN as the end members. This spectrum mainly depends on two key parameters: the 130°E-160°E Western Pacific 5-250 m subsurface oceanic potential temperature anomaly about 1 year before the EN peak (typically January and February), and the 140°E-160°W cumulative zonal wind anomaly (ZWA) between onset and peak of the EN event. Using these two parameters, about 70 % of the total variance of the maximum SSTA realised in different Niño regions can already be explained up to 6 months before the maximum SSTA occurs. This offers a rather simple potential for ENSO prediction. A necessary condition for the evolution of an EPEN, the Western Pacific is in the recharged state. Strong and sustained westerly wind anomalies in Western Pacific can then trigger a Kelvin wave propagating to the eastern Pacific. Both parameters, potential temperature and zonal wind anomaly, constructively interfere. For a CPEN, these parameters are much less important. Kelvin wave propagation is not involved in the evolution of the event. Instead, the Central Pacific warming is caused locally by a zonal advection feedback and local air-sea interaction as already demonstrated in previous studies. The HBEN occurs when both parameters interfere in different ways: (1) Western Pacific is weakly charged, but strong westerly ZWA are observed that reduce the equatorial upwelling in the Central Pacific while the triggered Kelvin wave is too weak to have a significant effect; (2) Western Pacific is strongly charged but only weak westerly ZWA develop, so that the resulting Kelvin wave cannot fully extend into the eastern-most Pacific.

  15. Florida's renewable energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Developments in the commercialization of biomass, solar energy conversion, and other renewable energy sources are considered. The role and performance of the Southern Solar Energy Center are reviewed, and solar energy conversion projects surveyed. The production of fuel alcohol from biomass is discussed. The use of forest biomass and tree farming for biomass is considered for cogeneration and for thermal energy production. Sources of waste biomass are identified.

  16. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  17. Whole Building Energy Performance Anomaly Detections at TU/e 

    E-print Network

    Hensen, J. L. M.; Bynum, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    Existing buildings account for the majority of energy consumption in the building sector. Surveys of existing buildings have found an estimated 10-20% reduction in energy consumption may be feasible. Research at the Eindhoven University...

  18. Potential For Energy Conservation 

    E-print Network

    Kumar, A.

    1981-01-01

    The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters...

  19. Examining the Potential of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    This outreach document goes to potential partners for NREL's Renewable Energy Potential Initiative, which will explore the long-term potential of Renewable Energy to meet a substantial share of U.S. energy needs.

  20. Anomaly transform methods based on total energy and ocean heat content norms for generating ocean dynamic disturbances for ensemble climate forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Vanya; Hense, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    In our study we use the anomaly transform, a special case of ensemble transform method, in which a selected set of initial oceanic anomalies in space, time and variables are defined and orthogonalized. The resulting orthogonal perturbation patterns are designed such that they pick up typical balanced anomaly structures in space and time and between variables. The metric used to set up the eigen problem is taken either as the weighted total energy with its zonal, meridional kinetic and available potential energy terms having equal contributions, or the weighted ocean heat content in which a disturbance is applied only to the initial temperature fields. The choices of a reference state for defining the initial anomalies are such that either perturbations on seasonal timescales and or on interannual timescales are constructed. These project a-priori only the slow modes of the ocean physical processes, such that the disturbances grow mainly in the Western Boundary Currents, in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the El Nino Southern Oscillation regions. An additional set of initial conditions is designed to fit in a least square sense data from global ocean reanalysis. Applying the AT produced sets of disturbances to oceanic initial conditions initialized by observations of the MPIOM-ESM coupled model on T63L47/GR15 resolution, four ensemble and one hind-cast experiments were performed. The weighted total energy norm is used to monitor the amplitudes and rates of the fastest growing error modes. The results showed minor dependence of the instabilities or error growth on the selected metric but considerable change due to the magnitude of the scaling amplitudes of the perturbation patterns. In contrast to similar atmospheric applications, we find an energy conversion from kinetic to available potential energy, which suggests a different source of uncertainty generation in the ocean than in the atmosphere mainly associated with changes in the density field.

  1. 1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP) anomalies

    E-print Network

    Sailhac, Pascal

    1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP with the geometry of the water table. It follows that 11 SP measurements can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic and found that we 14 are able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the depth 15 and the thickness

  2. Assessment of Triton Potential Energy

    E-print Network

    J. L. Friar; G. L. Payne

    1996-01-26

    An assessment is made of the dominant features contributing to the triton potential energy, with the objective of understanding qualitatively their origins and sensitivities. Relativistic effects, short-range repulsion, and OPEP dominance are discussed. A determination of the importance of various regions of nucleon-nucleon separation is made numerically.

  3. Global Surface Solar Energy Anomalies Including El Nino and La Nina Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Brown, D. E.; Chandler, W. S.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper synthesizes past events in an attempt to define the general magnitude, duration, and location of large surface solar anomalies over the globe. Surface solar energy values are mostly a function of solar zenith angle, cloud conditions, column atmospheric water vapor, aerosols, and surface albedo. For this study, solar and meteorological parameters for the 10-yr period July 1983 through June 1993 are used. These data were generated as part of the Release 3 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) activity under the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) effort. Release 3 SSE uses upgraded input data and methods relative to previous releases. Cloud conditions are based on recent NASA Version-D International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) global satellite radiation and cloud data. Meteorological inputs are from Version-I Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) reanalysis data that uses both weather station and satellite information. Aerosol transmission for different regions and seasons are for an 'average' year based on historic solar energy data from over 1000 ground sites courtesy of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These data are input to a new Langley Parameterized Shortwave Algorithm (LPSA) that calculates surface albedo and surface solar energy. That algorithm is an upgraded version of the 'Staylor' algorithm. Calculations are performed for a 280X280 km equal-area grid system over the globe based on 3-hourly input data. A bi-linear interpolation process is used to estimate data output values on a 1 X 1 degree grid system over the globe. Maximum anomalies are examined relative to El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Maximum year-to-year anomalies over the globe are provided for a 10-year period. The data may assist in the design of systems with increased reliability. It may also allow for better planning for emergency assistance during some atypical events.

  4. Temperature-resolution anomalies in the reconstruction of time dynamics from energy-loss experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogar, Anshul; Vig, Sean; Gan, Yu; Abbamonte, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Inelastic scattering techniques provide a powerful approach to studying electron and nuclear dynamics, via reconstruction of a propagator that quantifies the time evolution of a system. There is now growing interest in applying such methods to very low energy excitations, such as lattice vibrations, but in this limit the cross section is no longer proportional to a propagator. Significant deviations occur due to the finite temperature Bose statistics of the excitations. Here we consider this issue in the context of high-resolution electron energy-loss experiments on the copper-oxide superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. We find that simple division of a Bose factor yields an accurate propagator on energy scales greater than the resolution width. However, at low energy scales, the effects of resolution and finite temperature conspire to create anomalies in the dynamics at long times. We compare two practical ways for dealing with such anomalies, and discuss the range of validity of the technique in light of this comparison.

  5. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  6. Potential impacts of wintertime soil moisture anomalies from agricultural irrigation at low latitudes on regional and global climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wey, Hao-Wei; Lo, Min-Hui; Lee, Shih-Yu; Yu, Jin-Yi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic water management can change surface energy budgets and the water cycle. In this study, we focused on impacts of Asian low-latitude irrigation on regional and global climates during boreal wintertime. A state-of-the-art Earth system model is used to simulate the land-air interaction processes affected by irrigation and the consequent responses in atmospheric circulation. Perturbed experiments show that wet soil moisture anomalies at low latitudes can reduce the surface temperature on a continental scale through atmospheric feedback. The intensity of prevailing monsoon circulation becomes stronger because of larger land-sea thermal contrast. Furthermore, anomalous upper level convergence over South Asia and midlatitude climatic changes indicate tropical-extratropical teleconnections. The wintertime Aleutian low is deepened and an anomalous warm surface temperature is found in North America. Previous studies have noted this warming but left it unexplained, and we provide plausible mechanisms for these remote impacts coming from the irrigation over Asian low-latitude regions.

  7. On conservative models of "the pair-production anomaly" in blazar spectra at Very High Energies

    E-print Network

    Dzhatdoev, T A

    2015-01-01

    For some blazars, the gamma-ray absorption features due to pair-production on the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) are fainter than expected. The present work reviews the main models that could explain this paradox, with emphasis on conservative ones, that do not include any new physics. The models that are intrinsic to the source, do allow a very hard primary spectrum, but fail to explain a regular redshift dependence of the anomaly starting energy. The model that includes a contribution from secondary photons produced by cosmic rays (CR) near the Earth seems to require a well collimated CR beam, what is hard to achieve. Finally, the model with secondary photons produced in electromagnetic (EM) cascades initiated by primary gamma-rays is considered. In principle, it allows to decrease the statistical significance of the anomaly and, while requiring quite low EGMF strength B, does not contradict to most contemporary constraints on the B value. Additionally, it is shown that the recently observed correlati...

  8. Energy Detection Based on Undecimated Discrete Wavelet Transform and Its Application in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xinhua; Pan, Zhongming; Zhang, Dasha; Zhou, Han; Chen, Min; Zhang, Wenna

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) is a passive approach for detection of a ferromagnetic target, and its performance is often limited by external noises. In consideration of one major noise source is the fractal noise (or called 1/f noise) with a power spectral density of 1/fa (0energy detection method based on undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the foundations of magnetic anomaly detection and UDWT are introduced in brief, while a possible detection system based on giant magneto-impedance (GMI) magnetic sensor is also given out. Then our proposed energy detection based on UDWT is described in detail, and the probabilities of false alarm and detection for given the detection threshold in theory are presented. It is noticeable that no a priori assumptions regarding the ferromagnetic target or the magnetic noise probability are necessary for our method, and different from the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the UDWT is shift invariant. Finally, some simulations are performed and the results show that the detection performance of our proposed detector is better than that of the conventional energy detector even utilized in the Gaussian white noise, especially when the spectral parameter ? is less than 1.0. In addition, a real-world experiment was done to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:25343484

  9. A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect potential thermal anomalies before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), have been proposed to quantify potential thermal anomalies around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4). The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST) night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT) data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i) ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii) A multilayer perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii) Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an anomaly. (iv) ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying potential anomalies in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the potential thermal anomalies derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and potentialities of the four integrated methods.

  10. A possible solution to the Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Pioneer Anomaly problems via a VSL approach

    E-print Network

    Roee Amit

    2008-02-15

    I apply the equations of motion derived in the accompanying manuscript for the classical approximation of the vsl-path integral to the Newtonian gravitational field in simple geometries. The vsl classical-action, a complex quantity in this case, yields modified Euler-Lagrange equations. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of two equations of motions that must be satisfied concomitantly in order to minimize the complex action. The solutions obtained to the doublet equation of motion include the MOND force law, a dark-energy-like omni-present repulsive gravitational force, a pioneer-like anomaly at the solar system level, and additional predictions, which can be verified with either careful observations or via additional probes to the outer solar system. The exercise carried out in this paper exemplifies the explanatory potential of the vsl-approach, pointing to a potentially new physics paradigm. Finally, the vsl-approach is not only predictive, but highly falsifiable, an important ingredient of any physics theory.

  11. FERMI CONSTRAINS DARK-MATTER ORIGIN OF HIGH-ENERGY POSITRON ANOMALY This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    FERMI CONSTRAINS DARK-MATTER ORIGIN OF HIGH-ENERGY POSITRON ANOMALY This article has been Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. FERMI CONSTRAINS DARK-MATTER ORIGIN OF HIGH-ENERGY background strongly constrain a decaying-dark-matter origin for the 1­100 GeV Galactic positron anomaly

  12. Surface and internal energy of hydrocarbon gas bubbles as a factor of formation of gas deposits and related heat anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that, during coalescence of bubbles, the mechanical energy of the surface tension transits to the heat energy sufficient to increase the temperature of the bed-reservoir by several tens of degrees. The positive heat anomalies and anomalously high formation pressure in the petroleum regions may be caused by energy released during the amalgamation of a small-disperse gas phase into economic deposits.

  13. Potential of geothermal energy in China

    E-print Network

    Sung, Peter On

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of geothermal power generation and the potential for geothermal energy utilization in China. Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in the earth's crust and currently the only ubiquitously ...

  14. Holonomy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.

    1985-05-01

    A new type of anomaly is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This anomaly is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational anomalies since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. Anomalies arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)

  15. Energy dependence of nucleon-nucleon potentials

    E-print Network

    Sinya Aoki; Janos Balog; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Noriyoshi Ishii; Keiko Murano; Hidekatsu Nemura; Peter Weisz

    2008-12-03

    We investigate the energy dependence of potentials defined through the Bethe-Salpeter wave functions. We analytically evaluate such a potential in the Ising field theory in 2 dimensions and show that its energy dependence is weak at low energy. We then numerically calculate the nucleon-nucleon potential at non-zero energy using quenched QCD with anti-periodic boundary condition. In this case we also observe that the potentials are almost identical at $E\\simeq 0$ and $E\\simeq 50$ MeV, where $E$ is the center of mass kinetic energy.

  16. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  17. Potential Energy and the Body Electric

    E-print Network

    Helmreich, Stefan

    Physics tells us that potential energy is the capacity to do work that a body possesses as a result of its position in electric, magnetic, or gravitational fields. Thinking of “potentiality” in an electric idiom and with ...

  18. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  19. Geothermal Energy: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Ground source geothermal energy enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable energy for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building energy utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy

  20. LEAN ENERGY ANALYSIS: IDENTIFYING, DISCOVERING AND TRACKING ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL

    E-print Network

    Kissock, Kelly

    LEAN ENERGY ANALYSIS: IDENTIFYING, DISCOVERING AND TRACKING ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIAL KELLY KISSOCK DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON DAYTON, OHIO JOHN SERYAK ENERGY AND RESOURCE SOLUTIONS HAVERHILL, MASSECHUTSETTS ABSTRACT Energy in manufacturing facilities is used for direct

  1. Available potential energy of an isolated feature

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, D.

    1988-01-15

    The true available potential energy (APE) of an isolated feature (e.g. a warm-core ring) in a basin is the difference in the potential plus internal energy between the observed and reference state. The reference state is that in which the same fluid is redistributed adiabatically to a stably stratified state and the isopycnals are on constant geopotential surfaces. For an isolated feature in an infinitely wide basin, it would seem reasonable to assume that the far-field density structure is a good approximation of the reference state. This approximation to the reference state will be examined in this paper. Four different methods of calculating the available potential of an isolated feature are compared. These are (1) the gravitational available potential energy using the reference state (APE/sub G/), (2) the gravitational available potential energy using the far-field density structure as an approximation for the reference state, (3) the Boussinesq available potential energy using the reference state (APE/sub B/), and (4) the Boussinesq available potential energy using the far-field density structure instead of the reference state. The gravitational available potential energy using the the reference state (APE/sub G/) is the true available potential energy for an incompressible fluid.

  2. Symmetryand Potential EnergySurfaces

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    2.1-2.3 are obeyed, the potential wen loeated at this minimum may not be deep enough to hold a bound vibrational state (if the zero-pointvibrational energyis greaterthan the dissociationenergyof the wen

  3. On the Chemical Potential of Dark Energy

    E-print Network

    S. H. Pereira

    2008-06-23

    It is widely assumed that the observed universe is accelerating due to the existence of a new fluid component called dark energy. In this article, the thermodynamics consequences of a nonzero chemical potential on the dark energy component is discussed with special emphasis to the phantom fluid case. It is found that if the dark energy fluid is endowed with a negative chemical potential, the phantom field hypothesis becomes thermodynamically consistent with no need of negative temperatures as recently assumed in the literature.

  4. Geothermal Energy Potential in Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryde, Philip R.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews types of geothermal energy sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical energy is a major potential use of geothermal energy, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)

  5. Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport

    E-print Network

    Robert W. Finkel

    2007-02-11

    All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

  6. Anomaly in the cosmic-ray energy spectrum at GeV-TeV energies

    E-print Network

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2015-01-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic rays by various experiments have found that the energy spectrum of cosmic rays is harder in the TeV region than at GeV energies. The origin of the spectral hardening is not clearly understood. In this paper, we discuss the possibility that the spectral hardening might be due to the effect of re-acceleration of cosmic rays by weak shocks associated with old supernova remnants in the Galaxy.

  7. Energy saving potential of various roof technologies

    E-print Network

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2010-01-01

    Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

  8. Multivessel Batch Distillation Potential Energy Savings

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Multivessel Batch Distillation ­ Potential Energy Savings Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT ­ A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  9. Multivessel Batch Distillation -Potential Energy Savings

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Multivessel Batch Distillation - Potential Energy Savings Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT - A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  10. Bohm's Quantum Potential as an Internal Energy

    E-print Network

    Glen Dennis; Maurice de Gosson; Basil Hiley

    2014-12-15

    We pursue our discussion of Fermi's surface initiated in Dennis, de Gosson and Hiley and show that Bohm's quantum potential can be viewed as an internal energy of a quantum system. This gives further insight into the role it played by the quantum potential in stationary states. It also allows us to provide a physically motivated derivation of Schr\\"odinger's equation for a particle in an external potential.

  11. Potential of energy production from conserved forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forages have a potential role in meeting the demand for energy. Perennial forages are attractive for various reasons. One, both the monetary and energy cost of planting is spread over many years. Two, we already have the equipment for harvesting, storing and transporting this source of biomass. Thre...

  12. Physics 321 Potential Energy in Three Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    , and . Newton's Laws A sphere rolls without slipping down an incline. Given m, R, and , find the accelerationPhysics 321 Hour 8 Potential Energy in Three Dimensions Gradient, Divergence, and Curl Bottom Line We can use conservation of energy in three ways to describe the motion of an object: 1) 2

  13. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  14. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  15. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  16. Industrial Energy Conservation Potentials in North Carolina 

    E-print Network

    Barakat, M. G.; Singh, H.; Mallik, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    CONSERVATION POTENTIALS IN NORTH CAROLINA MONJED G. BARAKAT Chief Engineer Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center North Carolina A & T State University HARMOHINDAR SINGH Associate Professor Architectural Engineering Department North Carolina A... & T State University ARUP K. MALLIK Professor & Chairman Industrial Engineering Department North Carolina A & T State University ABSTRACT The energy crisis has been of concern to us all since the early seventies, yet energy inefficiency in many...

  17. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  18. Search for dark energy potentials in quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromachi, Yusuke; Okabayashi, Akira; Okada, Daiki; Hara, Tetsuya; Itoh, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The time evolution of the equation of state w for quintessence models with a scalar field as dark energy is studied up to the third derivative big (d^3w/da^3big ) with respect to the scale factor a, in order to predict future observations and specify the scalar potential parameters with the observables. The third derivative of w for general potential V is derived and applied to several types of potentials. They are the inverse power law big (V=M^{4+? }/Q^{? }big ), the exponential big (V=M^4exp {? M/Q}big ), the mixed big (V=M^{4+? }exp {? M/Q}/Q^{? }big ), the cosine big (V=M^4[cos (Q/f)+1]big ), and the Gaussian types big (V=M^4exp big {-Q^2/? ^2big }big ), which are prototypical potentials for the freezing and thawing models. If the parameter number for a potential form is n, it is necessary to find at least n+2 independent observations to identify the potential form and the evolution of the scalar field (Q and dot {Q}). Such observations would be the values of ? _Q, w, dw/da,ldots , dw^n/da^n. From these specific potentials, we can predict the n+1 and higher derivatives of w: dw^{n+1}/da^{n+1},ldots . Since four of the abovementioned potentials have two parameters, it is necessary to calculate the third derivative of w for them to estimate the predicted values. If they are tested observationally, it will be understood whether the dark energy can be described by a scalar field with this potential. At least it will satisfy the necessary conditions. Numerical analysis for d^3w/da^3 is performed with some specified parameters in the investigated potentials, except for the mixed one. It becomes possible to distinguish the potentials by accurately observing dw/da and d^2w/da^2 for some parameters.

  19. Quantum Potential Energy as Concealed Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Peter

    2015-02-01

    It is known that the Schrödinger equation may be derived from a hydrodynamic model in which the Lagrangian position coordinates of a continuum of particles represent the quantum state. Using Routh's method of ignorable coordinates it is shown that the quantum potential energy of particle interaction that represents quantum effects in this model may be regarded as the kinetic energy of additional `concealed' freedoms. The method brings an alternative perspective to Planck's constant, which plays the role of a hidden variable, and to the canonical quantization procedure, since what is termed `kinetic energy' in quantum mechanics may be regarded literally as energy due to motion.

  20. Gravitational anomalies in the solar system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2015-02-01

    Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known matter-energy distributions have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in either cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century, and technology itself. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational anomalies in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: (a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia. (b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab). (c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon. (d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox. (e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun. (f) The Flyby Anomaly. (g) The Pioneer Anomaly. (h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit.

  1. Potential gradients produced by pore-space heterogeneities: Application to isothermal frost damage and submarine hydrate anomalies

    E-print Network

    Rempel, Alan W.

    Potential gradients produced by pore-space heterogeneities: Application to isothermal frost damage@gmail.com ABSTRACT Deformation that results from crystallization in material pores commonly re- quires temperature and pressure fields. Here, we show that under nearly isothermal and isobaric conditions, changes

  2. Potential energy function for the hydroperoxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, W.J.; Hase, W.L.

    1987-03-12

    A switching function formalism is used to derive an analytic potential energy surface for the O + OH in equilibrium HO/sub 2/ in equilibrium H + O/sub 2/ reactive system. Both experimental and ab initio data are used to derive parameters for the potential energy surface. Trajectory calculations for highly excited HO/sub 2/ are performed on this surface. From these trajectories quasi-periodic eigentrajectories are found for vibrational levels near the HO/sub 2/ dissociation threshold with small amounts of quanta in the OH stretch mode and large amounts of quanta in the OO stretch mode.

  3. POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT ­ A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  4. POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT - A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  5. Potential reduction of DSN uplink energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinsky, S.; Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    DSN Earth stations typically transmit more power than that required to meet minimum specifications for uplink performance. Energy and cost savings that could result from matching the uplink power to the amount required for specified performance are studied. The Galileo mission was selected as a case study. Although substantial reduction in transmitted energy is possible, potential savings in source energy (oil or electricity) savings are much less. This is because of the rising inefficiency in power conversion and radio frequency power generation that accompanies reduced power output.

  6. Biomass resource potential using energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

  7. Self-potential Anomalies Around the Earthquake Swarm Area in the Southeastern Flank of Ontake Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, R.; Yamazaki, K.; Okada, Y.; Oshiman, N.

    2006-12-01

    Ontake Volcano is located in the southern end of the Norikura Volcanic Chain, central Japan, close to the junction of the Izu Bonin and Mariana and Southwestern Japan volcanic arcs. It is almost conical and made of andesite. Earthquake swarm activity has been continuously observed around the southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake since 1976. A phreatic explosion occurred in 1979 at a fissure on the southwestern slope of the Kengamine, the main peak of Mt. Ontake. And a large earthquake with the depth about 2 km and a magnitude of 6.8 occurred in 1984 in the southeastern flank of the volcano. Recently, Kimata et al. (2004) revealed uplift ground deformation above the earthquake swarm area by using repeated leveling. Furthermore, Magnetotelluric soundings estimated a low resistivity region with the depth about 2km beneath the uplift area [Kasaya et al., 2002]. In order to investigate a relationship between tectonic movements and subsurface low resistivity zone, we carried out self-potential(SP) measurements from 2003 and 2006 around the focal region of the 1984 Earthquake and the summit area of Mt. Ontake. The equipment for measuring surface self-potentials consists of a pair of non-polarizing copper-copper sulfate/silver-silver chloride electrodes, an insulated connecting conductor cable, and a high input impedance digital multimeter. In this survey, profiles totaling to about 90km length (982 sites) were made, with an average measurement interval of 100m. Two distinctive SP features are found around the active earthquake cluster and inside of the aseismic area of southeastern flank of Mt. Ontake. In this presentation, we will report a detail of SP measurements and results.

  8. Effect of Strong Correlations on the High Energy Anomaly in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Schmitt, F.; Meevasana, W.; Johnston, S.; Motoyama, E.M.; Greven, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kim, C.; Scalettar, R.T.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES

    2010-02-15

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  9. A universal high energy anomaly in angle resolved photoemissionspectra of high temperature superconductors -- possible evidence ofspinon and holon branches

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, J.; Gweon, G.-H.; McElroy, K.; Zhou, S.Y.; Jozwiak, C.; Rotenberg, E.; Bill, A.; Sasagawa, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Takagi,H.; Lee, D.-H.; Lanzara A.

    2006-12-19

    A universal high energy anomaly in the single particlespectral function is reported in three different families of hightemperature superconductors by using angle-resolved photoemissionspectroscopy. As we follow the dispersing peak of the spectral functionfrom the Fermi energy to the valence band complex, we find dispersionanomalies marked by two distinctive high energy scales, E_1 approx 0.38eV and E_2 approx 0.8 eV. E_1 marks the energy above which the dispersionsplits into two branches. One is a continuation of the near parabolicdispersion, albeit with reduced spectral weight, and reaches the bottomof the band at the Gamma point at approx 0.5 eV. The other is given by apeak in the momentum space, nearly independent of energy between E_1 andE_2. Above E_2, a band-like dispersion re-emerges. We conjecture thatthese two energies mark the disintegration of the low energyquasiparticles into a spinon and holon branch in the high T_c cuprates.

  10. Gravitational Anomalies in the Solar System?

    E-print Network

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2015-03-16

    Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by U. Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by A. Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known bodies have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the Universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational anomalies in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia; b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab); c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon; d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox; e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun; f) The Flyby Anomaly; g) The Pioneer Anomaly; and h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit

  11. Potential energy hypersurface and molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko?a, Jaroslav

    1993-02-01

    The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational potential energy(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, energy level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.

  12. Sparse representation for a potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-07-01

    We propose a simple scheme to estimate the potential energy surface (PES) for which the accuracy can be easily controlled and improved. It is based on model selection within the framework of linear regression using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique. Basis functions are selected from a systematic large set of candidate functions. The sparsity of the PES significantly reduces the computational cost of evaluating the energy and force in molecular dynamics simulations without losing accuracy. The usefulness of the scheme for describing the elemental metals Na and Mg is clearly demonstrated.

  13. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  14. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  15. A theory for the atmospheric energy spectrum: depth-limited temperature anomalies at the tropopause.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, R; Smith, K S

    2006-10-01

    The horizontal spectra of atmospheric wind and temperature at the tropopause have a steep -3 slope at synoptic scales, but transition to -5/3 at wavelengths of the order of 500-1,000 km [Nastrom, G. D. & Gage, K. S. (1985) J. Atmos. Sci. 42, 950-960]. Here we demonstrate that a model that assumes zero potential vorticity and constant stratification N over a finite-depth H in the troposphere exhibits the same type of spectra. In this model, temperature perturbations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cascade of energy with a slope of -3 at large scales, -5/3 at small scales, and a transition near horizontal wavenumber k(t) = f/NH, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Ballpark atmospheric estimates for N, f, and H give a transition wavenumber near that observed, and numerical simulations of the previously undescribed model verify the expected behavior. Despite its simplicity, the model is consistent with a number of perplexing features in the observations and demonstrates that a complete theory for mesoscale dynamics must take temperature advection at boundaries into account. PMID:17001017

  16. IRETHERM: The geothermal energy potential of Irish radiothermal granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Thomas; Jones, Alan; Muller, Mark; Feely, Martin; Brock, Andrew; Long, Mike; Waters, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The IRETHERM project is developing a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), surface heat-flow (SHF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is important to assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Galway granite in western Ireland, and the Leinster and the buried Kentstown granites in eastern Ireland. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of a 1980's geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 ?Wm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite, to the SW of Dublin. In the Galway granite batholith, on the west coast of Ireland, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 ?Wm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Rossaveal borehole. The buried Kentstown granite, 35 km NW of Dublin, has an associated negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 490 m. Heat production is measured at 2.4 ?Wm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30 m of the granite. The core of this study consists of a program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite (40 km SW of Dublin) extend to depths of 2-5 km. Preliminary results from the southern profile suggest a greater thickness of granite to a depth of 6-9 km beneath the Tullow pluton, 75 km SW of Dublin. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total of 75 sites (33 consist of only AMT data acquisition, with both MT and AMT recorded at the remaining 42). Preliminary results show a deep resistor extending to depths of 15-20 km beneath the central block, with the resistive upper layer extending to depths of 3.5-7 km west of the Shannawona fault, a major structure that cuts the batholith. MT and AMT data acquired along a profile at 22 locations over the Kentstown granite suggests that this buried granite is at a depth of 400 m beneath the centre of the gravity anomaly. The MT and AMT data will be integrated with gravity and seismic refraction data (in the case of the Leinster granite) to identify deeply penetrating faults, which may provide conduits for hydrothermal fluids, and to produce a robust estimation of the volumetric extent of the granites, which is crucial in defining their geothermal energy potential. Thermal conductivity and geochemical data will be incorporated to constrain the heat contribution of granites to the Irish crust.

  17. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open-ocean convection may arise through strong surface buoyancy fluxes (Schott et al. 1996), or by thermobaric instability (Akitomo 1999a, b). Ingersoll (2005) demonstrated that thermobaric-induced deep convection is due to the abrupt release of ocean potential energy into kinetic energy. In atmospheric dynamics, Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) has long been an important thermodynamic variable (Arakawa and Schubert 1974) that has been used to forecast moist convection (Doswell and Rasmussen 1994) and to test the performance of GCMs (Ye et al. 1998). However, the development of a similar diagnostic in the ocean has received little attention.; World Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy distribution in North-Hemisphere Autumn (J/kg)

  18. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jónasson, Kristján; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road infrastructure and the power grid, as well as due to the harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions, wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. Based on these results, 14 test sites were selected for more detailed analyses using the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). These calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plant, making wind energy a viable additional option.

  19. Potential energy surfaces of Polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, C.; Bartel, J.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the potential energy landscape is analysed in detail for ten even–even polonium isotopes in the mass range 188\\lt A\\lt 220 as obtained within the macroscopic–microscopic approach, relying on the Lublin–Strasbourg drop model and the Yukawa-folded single-particle energies for calculating the microscopic shell and pairing corrections. A variant of the modified Funny–Hills nuclear shape parametrization is used to efficiently map possible fission paths. The approach explains the main features of the fragment partition as measured in low-energy fission along the polonium chain. The latter lies in a transitional region of the nuclear chart, and will be essential to consistently understand the evolution of fission properties from neutron-deficient mercury to heavy actinides. The ability of our method to predict fission observables over such an extended region looks promising.

  20. A beacon of new physics: The Pioneer anomaly modelled as a path based speed loss driven by the externalisation of aggregate non-inertial QM energy

    E-print Network

    Boom, Paul G ten

    2012-01-01

    This treatise outlines how a real non-systematic based Pioneer anomaly, with its implied violation (re: 'low' mass bodies only) of both general relativity's weak equivalence principle and the Newtonian inverse-square law, can be successfully modelled. These theoretical hurdles and various awkward observational constraints, such as the low value of Pioneer 11's anomaly pre-Saturn encounter, have not been convincingly modelled to date. Notwithstanding the recent trend to embrace a non-constant Sun/Earth-directed heat based explanation of this anomalous deceleration, the actual: nature, direction, and temporal and spatial variation of the Pioneer anomaly remain an open arena of research. Working backwards from the observational evidence, and rethinking: time, mass, quantum entanglement and non-locality, we hypothesise a mechanism involving a quantum mechanical energy source and a new type of 'gravitational' field; neither of which lie within general relativity's domain of formulation/application. By way of a sys...

  1. Constraints on lithospheric structure from satellite potential field data: Africa and Asia. Analysis and interpretation of MAGSAT anomalies over North Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Crustal anomaly detection with MAGSAT data is frustrated by the inherent resolving power of the data and by contamination from the external and core fields. The quality of the data might be tested by modeling specific tectonic features which produce anomalies that fall within the proposed resolution and crustal amplitude capabilities of the MAGSAT fields. To test this hypothesis, the north African hotspots associated with Ahaggar, Tibestia and Darfur have been modeled as magnetic induction anomalies due solely to shallower depth to the Curie isotherm surface beneath these features. The MAGSAT data were reduced by subtracting the external and core fields to isolate the scalar and vertical component crustal signals. The predicted model magnetic signal arising from the surface topography of the uplift and the Curie isotherm surface was calculated at MAGSAT altitudes by the Fourier transform technique modified to allow for variable magnetization. In summary it is suggested that the region beneath Ahaggar is associated with a strong thermal anomaly and the predicted anomaly best fits the associated MAGSAT anomaly if the African plate is moving in a northeasterly direction.

  2. ANOMALY STRUCTURE OF SUPERGRAVITY AND ANOMALY CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.

    2009-06-10

    We display the full anomaly structure of supergravity, including new D-term contributions to the conformal anomaly. This expression has the super-Weyl and chiral U(1){sub K} transformation properties that are required for implementation of the Green-Schwarz mechanism for anomaly cancellation. We outline the procedure for full anomaly cancellation. Our results have implications for effective supergravity theories from the weakly coupled heterotic string theory.

  3. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schroedinger equation must be solved. Our approach starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wave functions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Dynamical electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. With this approach, we are able to provide chemically useful predictions of the energetics for many systems. A second aspect of this program is the development of techniques to fit multi-dimensional potential surfaces to convenient, global, analytic functions that can then be used in dynamics calculations.

  4. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  5. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  6. A beacon of new physics: The Pioneer anomaly modelled as a path based speed loss driven by the externalisation of aggregate non-inertial QM energy

    E-print Network

    Paul G. ten Boom

    2012-09-04

    This treatise outlines how a non-systematic based Pioneer anomaly, with its implied violation (re: 'low' mass bodies only) of both general relativity's weak equivalence principle and the Newtonian inverse-square law, can be successfully modelled. These theoretical hurdles and various awkward observational constraints, such as the low value of Pioneer 11's anomaly pre-Saturn encounter, have (to date) not been convincingly modelled. Notwithstanding the recent trend to embrace a non-constant Sun/Earth-directed heat based explanation of this anomalous deceleration, the actual: nature, direction, and temporal and spatial variation of the Pioneer anomaly remain an open arena of research. Working backwards from the observational evidence, and rethinking: time, mass, quantum entanglement and non-locality, we hypothesise a mechanism involving a quantum mechanical energy source and a new type of 'gravitational' field; neither of which lie within general relativity's domain of formulation/application. By way of a systemic conservation of energy principle, an internally inexpressible (aggregate) non-inertial energy discrepancy/uncertainty -- involving a myriad of quantum (lunar/third-body residing) atomic and molecular systems moving in analog curved spacetime -- is (non-locally) re-expressed externally as a (rotating) non-Euclidean spatial geometry perturbation. At a moving body each "rotating space-warp" induces sinusoidal proper acceleration and speed perturbations, as well as a path-based constant (per cycle) rate of speed shortfall relative to predictions that omit the additional effect. 'Solutions' of the new model may extend to: the Earth flyby anomaly, solar system related large-scale anomalies in the CMB radiation data, the nature of dark energy, and how a theory of everything unification agenda is inadvertently impeding a deeper understanding of physical reality and quantum entanglement.

  7. Biomass energy in China and its potential Li Jingjing

    E-print Network

    .9 Nuclear energy - - Total conventional energy 37,504 84.9 Renewable energy (RE) Traditional biomass 5Biomass energy in China and its potential Li Jingjing Asia Alternative Energy Program, Energy.R.China Zhuang Xing Center for Renewable Energy Development, Energy Research Institute, State Development

  8. A new water anomaly: the temperature dependence of the proton mean kinetic energy

    E-print Network

    Davide Flammini; Fabio Bruni; Maria Antonietta Ricci

    2009-01-28

    The mean kinetic energy of protons in water is determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments, performed above and below the temperature of maximum density and in the supercooled phase. The temperature dependence of this energy shows an anomalous behavior, as it occurs for many water properties. In particular two regions of maximum kinetic energy are identified: the first one, in the supercooled phase in the range 269 K - 272 K, and a second one above 273 K. In both these regions the measured proton kinetic energy exceedes the theoretical prediction based on a semi-classical model. Noteworthy, the proton mean kinetic energy has a maximum at 277 K, the temperature of the maximum density of water. In the supercooled metastable phase the measured mean kinetic energy and the proton momentum distribution clearly indicate proton delocalization between two H-bonded oxygens.

  9. California's biomass and its energy potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lucarelli, F.B. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The potentials for using California's biomass for energy have been assessed. The study relies on the recent work of Amory Lovins and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Distributed Energy System's Project to specify an energy future for Californians. These works identify transportation fuels as the most valuable energy conversion for biomass. Within this context, the extent of five categories of terrestial biomass is estimated, in addition to the environmental impacts and monetary cost of collecting and transporting each biomass category. Estimates of the costs of transforming biomass into different fuels as well as a survey of government's role in a biomass energy program are presented. The major findings are summarized below. (1) California's existing biomass resources are sufficient to provide only 20 percent of its future liquid fuel requirements. (2) Meeting the full transportation demand with biomass derived fuels will require the development of exotic biomass sources such as kelp farms and significant reductions in automobile travel in the State. (3) Under assumptions of moderate increases in gasoline prices and without major new government incentives, the cost of transforming biomass into transport fuels will be competitive with the price of gasoline on a Btu basis by the year 1990. (4) The environmental impacts of collecting most forms of biomass are beneficial and should reduce air pollution from agricultural burning and water pollution from feedlot and dairy farm runoff. Moreover, the collection of logging residues should improve timber stand productivity and the harvest of chaparral should reduce the risk of wildfire in the State. (5) The institutional context for implementing biomass energy projects is complex and fragmented.

  10. Development of the Potential Energy Savings Estimation (PESE) Toolkit 

    E-print Network

    Liu, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    This study has developed a prototype computer tool called the Potential Energy Savings Estimation (PESE) Toolkit. Baltazar’s methodology for potential energy savings estimation from EBCx/retrofit measures has been improved ...

  11. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  12. Energy potential of sugarcane and sweet sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Elawad, S.H.; Gascho, G.J.; Shih, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of sugarcane and sweet sorghum as raw materials for the production of ethanol and petrochemical substitutes is discussed. Both crops belong to the grass family and are classified as C/sub 4/ malateformers which have the highest rate of photosynthesis among terrestrial plants. Large amounts of biomass are required to supply a significant fraction of US energy consumption. Biomass production could be substantially increased by including tops and leaves, adopting narrow row spacing and improving cultural practices. This presents challenges for cultivating, harvesting, and hauling the biomass to processing centers. Large plants and heavy capital investment are essential for energy production. Ethanol and ammonia are the most promising candidates of a biomass program. If sugarcane were to be used for biomass production, breeding programs should be directed for more fermentable sugars and fiber. Energy research on sweet sorghum should be done with syrup varieties. Sweet sorghum needs to be incorporated with other crops because of its short growing season. The disposal of stillage from an extensive ethanol industry may pose environmental problems.

  13. An Iterative Global Optimization Algorithm for Potential Energy Minimization

    E-print Network

    An Iterative Global Optimization Algorithm for Potential Energy Minimization N. P. Moloi and M. M, potential energy, iterative, global optimization. 1 Introduction Potential energy functions are becoming and in structure-based drug design. These functions are often used as global optimization problems in search

  14. Induced Seismicity Potential of Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzman, Murray

    2013-03-01

    Earthquakes attributable to human activities-``induced seismic events''-have received heightened public attention in the United States over the past several years. Upon request from the U.S. Congress and the Department of Energy, the National Research Council was asked to assemble a committee of experts to examine the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection and withdrawal associated with geothermal energy development, oil and gas development, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The committee's report, publicly released in June 2012, indicates that induced seismicity associated with fluid injection or withdrawal is caused in most cases by change in pore fluid pressure and/or change in stress in the subsurface in the presence of faults with specific properties and orientations and a critical state of stress in the rocks. The factor that appears to have the most direct consequence in regard to induced seismicity is the net fluid balance (total balance of fluid introduced into or removed from the subsurface). Energy technology projects that are designed to maintain a balance between the amount of fluid being injected and withdrawn, such as most oil and gas development projects, appear to produce fewer seismic events than projects that do not maintain fluid balance. Major findings from the study include: (1) as presently implemented, the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events; (2) injection for disposal of waste water derived from energy technologies does pose some risk for induced seismicity, but very few events have been documented over the past several decades relative to the large number of disposal wells in operation; and (3) CCS, due to the large net volumes of injected fluids suggested for future large-scale carbon storage projects, may have potential for inducing larger seismic events.

  15. Resolving Anomalies in Predicting Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high energy conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925

  16. Resolving Anomalies in Predicting Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-10-01

    We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high energy conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories.

  17. Resolving Anomalies in Predicting Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high energy conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925

  18. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  19. Energy flux and hydrogeology of thermal anomalies in the Gulf of Mexico basin. Progress report, June 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, J.M. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    Specific project objectives are to: determine whether or not the observed thermal anomalies in the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin can be accounted for by heat conduction only; determine whether or not the present-day groundwater flow system is amenable with the heat advection hypothesis; and determine fluid and heat flux histories that are consistent with the observed data. In support of these objectives, we have collected over 25,000 data points, reflecting pressures and temperatures at depths of up to 16,000 feet in the Texas portion of the Gulf of Mexico basin. These data have been collated into a computerized data base system. In addition, we have begun collection of thermophysical data. This research provides fundamental knowledge and understanding to the geosciences and contributes to the sciences and technology base required for current and future energy technologies. Quantifying the evolution of the hydrodynamic and thermal regimes in sedimentary basins is important for predicting timing of hydrocarbon maturation and migration. The evolving subsurface temperature and hydrodynamic system also have a first-order control on sediment diagenesis, brine evolution, and the formation of ore deposits.

  20. SU(4) Skyrmions and Activation Energy Anomaly in Bilayer Quantum Hall Systems

    E-print Network

    Z. F. Ezawa; G. Tsitsishvili

    2004-06-11

    The bilayer QH system has four energy levels in the lowest Landau level, corresponding to the layer and spin degrees of freedom. We investigate the system in the regime where all four levels are nearly degenerate and equally active. The underlying group structure is SU(4). At $\

  1. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  2. Energy Consumption and Conservation Potential at a Georgia Textile Plant 

    E-print Network

    Gurta, M. E.; Brown, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    is air-conditioned, the plant is an intensive user of electricity, fossil fuel, and water. Following completion of the energy analysis, recommendations to conserve energy and water resources were developed. Potential energy savings of approximately thirty...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY RECOVERY POTENTIAL OF INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assessment was conducted to evaluate the waste heat content and energy recovery potential of flue gases from 30 industrial combustion devices. Pollution controls on nine of the devices were evaluated to estimate energy requirements and particulate reduction; energy requirement...

  4. Integrated Potential-field Studies in Support of Energy Resource Assessment in Frontier Areas of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.; Saltus, R. W.; Potter, C. J.; Stanley, R. G.; Till, A. B.

    2008-05-01

    In frontier areas of Alaska, potential-field studies play an important role in characterizing the geologic structure of sedimentary basins having potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. Two such areas are the Yukon Flats basin in the east-central interior of Alaska, and the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Yukon Flats basin is a potential source of hydrocarbon resources for local consumption and possible export. Knowledge of the subsurface configuration of the basin is restricted to a few seismic reflection profiles covering a limited area and one well. The seismic profiles were reprocessed and reinterpreted in preparation for an assessment of the oil and gas resources of the basin. The assessment effort required knowledge of the basin configuration away from the seismic profiles, as well as an understanding of the nature of the underlying basement. To extend the interpretation of the basin thickness across the entire area of the basin, an iterative Jachens-Moring gravity inversion was performed on gridded quasi-isostatic residual gravity anomaly data. The inversion was constrained to agree with the interpreted basement surface along the seismic profiles. In addition to the main sedimentary depocenter interpreted from the seismic data as having over 8 km of fill, the gravity inversion indicated a depocenter with over 7 km of fill in the Crooked Creek sub-basin. Results for the Crooked Creek sub-basin are consistent with magnetic and magnetotelluric modeling, but they await confirmation by drilling or seismic profiling. Whether hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the pre-Cenozoic basement beneath Yukon Flats is difficult to determine because extensive surficial deposits obscure the bedrock geology, and no deep boreholes penetrate basement. The color and texture patterns in a red-green-blue composite image consisting of reduced-to-the-pole aeromagnetic data (red), magnetic potential (blue), and basement gravity (green) highlight domains with common geophysical characteristics and, by inference, lithology. The observed patterns suggest that much of the basin is underlain by Devonian to Jurassic oceanic rocks that probably have little or no potential for hydrocarbon generation. The coastal plain surficial deposits in the northern part of ANWR conceal another frontier basin with hydrocarbon potential. Proprietary aeromagnetic and gravity data were used, along with seismic reflection profiles, to construct a structural and stratigraphic model of this highly deformed sedimentary basin for use in an energy resource assessment. Matched-filtering techniques were used to separate short-wavelength magnetic and gravity anomalies attributed to sources near the top of the sedimentary section from longer-wavelength anomalies attributed to deeper basin and basement sources. Models along the seismic reflection lines indicate that the primary sources of the short-wavelength anomalies are folded and faulted sedimentary beds truncated at the Pleistocene erosion surface. In map view, the aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies produced by the sedimentary units were used to identify possible structural trapping features and geometries, but they also indicated that these features may be significantly disrupted by faulting.

  5. Exploratory and spatial data analysis (EDA-SDA) for determining regional background levels and anomalies of potentially toxic elements in soils from Catorce-Matehuala, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiprés, J.A.; Castro-Larragoitia, J.; Monroy, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    The threshold between geochemical background and anomalies can be influenced by the methodology selected for its estimation. Environmental evaluations, particularly those conducted in mineralized areas, must consider this when trying to determinate the natural geochemical status of a study area, quantifying human impacts, or establishing soil restoration values for contaminated sites. Some methods in environmental geochemistry incorporate the premise that anomalies (natural or anthropogenic) and background data are characterized by their own probabilistic distributions. One of these methods uses exploratory data analysis (EDA) on regional geochemical data sets coupled with a geographic information system (GIS) to spatially understand the processes that influence the geochemical landscape in a technique that can be called a spatial data analysis (SDA). This EDA-SDA methodology was used to establish the regional background range from the area of Catorce-Matehuala in north-central Mexico. Probability plots of the data, particularly for those areas affected by human activities, show that the regional geochemical background population is composed of smaller subpopulations associated with factors such as soil type and parent material. This paper demonstrates that the EDA-SDA method offers more certainty in defining thresholds between geochemical background and anomaly than a numeric technique, making it a useful tool for regional geochemical landscape analysis and environmental geochemistry studies.

  6. Learning about Poland Anomaly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anomaly? Named after Sir Alfred Poland, Poland anomaly (PA) is described as an underdevelopment or absence of ... present at birth (congenital). For people born with PA, the breastbone portion (sternal) of the pectoralis is ...

  7. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  8. Discovering anomaly mediated supersymmetry at the LHC.

    E-print Network

    Barr, Alan; Lester, Christopher G.; Parker, Michael A.; Allanach, B. C.; Richardson, P.

    The discovery potential of the LHC is investigated for the minimal anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking (mAMSB) scenario, using the ATLAS fast detector simulator, including track reconstruction and particle identification. Generic...

  9. Peters' Anomaly – Anaesthetic Management

    PubMed Central

    M, Senthilkumar; V, Darlong; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peters' anomaly occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality, in association with other systemic abnormality or one component of a number of well-defined syndromes. We review our experience of anaesthetic management and systemic association of peters' anomaly. To the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature of Peters' anomaly with relevant to anaesthesia. PMID:20640218

  10. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  11. Lunar Orbit Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio, L.

    2012-12-01

    Independent experiments show a large anomaly in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been suggested to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An anomaly in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark energy'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;

  12. Lifshitz scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2015-02-01

    We analyse scale anomalies in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the anomalies for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the anomaly structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale anomalies are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal anomalies. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal anomalies to Lifshitz scale anomalies with a dynamical exponent equal to one.

  13. The Potential for Wind Energy in Atlantic Canada

    E-print Network

    Hughes, Larry

    of many renewable sources of energy, such as solar, biomass, hydroelectric, and wind. This paper considersThe Potential for Wind Energy in Atlantic Canada Larry Hughes and Sandy Scott Whale Lake Research World Renewable Energy Congress, Reading, September 1992. #12;Hughes/Scott: Wind Energy in Atlantic

  14. Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource

    E-print Network

    energy, and the difference in carbon stocks and reflectance of solar radiation between the biomass crop $5% of world primary energy con- sumption in 2006. The global potential for biomass energy production are real, but the con- cerns are also justified. As investments in biomass energy increase, there needs

  15. Global Horizontal Irradiance Anomalies in Long Term Series Over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using anomalies techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater anomalies and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative anomalies and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.

  16. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S8 , Se8 , and Te8 clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se8 . We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Sen(S,Te)8-n clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  17. Energy Savings Potential and Research & Development Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This study documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy savings potential of various technologies and energy efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment. The study provided an overview of CRE applications, assessed the energy-savings potential of CRE in the U.S., outline key barriers to adoption of energy-savings technologies, and recommended opportunities for advanced energy saving technology research. The study was modeled after an earlier 1996 report by Arthur D. Little, Inc., and updated key information, examined more equipment types, and outlined long-term research and development opportunities.

  18. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  19. Energy in America: Progress and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    An overview of America's energy situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the energy problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,…

  20. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  2. Potential Energy Sources Pose Mining Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as potential sources of fuel. (CC)

  3. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-12-01

    Sugarcane presents a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil producing countries of the Caribbean. The energy cane concept is sugarcane managed for maximum dry matter (total fermentable solids for alcohol fuel and combustible solids for electricity) rather than sucrose. The use of sugarcane as a renewable energy source can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the Caribbean energy problem. Sugar cane production and the use of this crop as a renewable energy source are described.

  4. Comparing energy levels in isotropic and anisotropic potentials

    E-print Network

    Alexander Pikovski

    2015-06-28

    Qualitative information about the quantized energy levels of a system can be of great value. We study the relationship between the bound-state energies of an anisotropic potential and those of its spherical average. It is shown that the two ground-state energies satisfy an inequality, and there is a similar inequality for the first excited states.

  5. Comparing energy levels in isotropic and anisotropic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikovski, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Qualitative information about the quantized energy levels of a system can be of great value. We study the relationship between the bound-state energies of an anisotropic potential and those of its spherical average. It is shown that the two ground-state energies satisfy an inequality, and there is a similar inequality for the first excited states.

  6. Taussig-Bing Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the anomaly, management of the Taussig-Bing anomaly remains challenging. A history of the original description of the anomaly, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085

  7. Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials

    E-print Network

    D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

    2014-12-11

    We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

  8. Congenital Anomalies in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tract and genital organ anomalies) • Cardiologist (heart anomalies) • Nephrologist (kidney anomalies) • Plastic surgeon (facial anomalies) • Ophthalmologist (eye anomalies) • Otolaryngologist (ear anomalies) The treatment will depend on the number and severity of ...

  9. Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

    2013-08-20

    A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

  10. Energy Stored in a Capacitor What is the potential energy, U, of a

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Energy Stored in a Capacitor What is the potential energy, U, of a charged capacitor? Think of U energy by discharging capacitor VqWU == #12;Energy Stored in a Capacitor Charge capacitor by transferring takes positive work to charge capacitor #12;Energy Stored in a Capacitor At given instance potential

  11. Testing excited-state energy-density functionals and potentials with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.

    2014-03-01

    The modified local spin density functional and the related local potential for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding potential is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ?max accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital energy ?max thus obtained is then compared with the ?SCF ionization energy calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.

  12. Exploring wind energy potential off the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingfang; Doyle, James D.; Haack, Tracy; Dvorak, Michael J.; Archer, Cristina L.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2008-10-01

    Wind energy represents the nearest term cost-effective renewable energy source. While efforts have been made to assess wind energy potential over land around the world, offshore wind energy resources are largely unexplored, in part because these regions have relatively sparse wind observations. In this study, the wind energy potential offshore of the California coast is evaluated using a well-tested high-resolution numerical model dataset. We found that along the coastline, the low-level winds exhibit strong spatial variation and are characterized by alternating windspeed maxima and minima near coastal promontories associated with the interaction between the marine boundary layer and coastal topography. Further analysis highlights the enormous and reliable wind energy development potential in these persistent offshore windspeed maxima.

  13. Conservation Anomaly in 2-d

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    What is an anomaly? Current Conservation Anomaly in 2-d QED: Schwinger model Current Matrix´alez University of California ­ Santa Cruz March 2015 1 / 23 #12;What is an anomaly? Current Conservation Anomaly, in other words quantum corrections break the symmetry. 2 / 23 #12;What is an anomaly? Current Conservation

  14. New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.

    2014-12-15

    The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

  15. Feature Article Exploring Potential Energy Surfaces for Chemical

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Feature Article Exploring Potential Energy Surfaces for Chemical Reactions: An Overview of Some Practical Methods H. BERNHARD SCHLEGEL Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan concept in the application of electronic structure methods to the study of molecular structures

  16. Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher B; Campbell, J Elliott; Lobell, David B

    2008-02-01

    Increased production of biomass for energy has the potential to offset substantial use of fossil fuels, but it also has the potential to threaten conservation areas, pollute water resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass energy agriculture on climate could be either cooling or warming, depending on the crop, the technology for converting biomass into useable energy, and the difference in carbon stocks and reflectance of solar radiation between the biomass crop and the pre-existing vegetation. The area with the greatest potential for yielding biomass energy that reduces net warming and avoids competition with food production is land that was previously used for agriculture or pasture but that has been abandoned and not converted to forest or urban areas. At the global scale, potential above-ground plant growth on these abandoned lands has an energy content representing approximately 5% of world primary energy consumption in 2006. The global potential for biomass energy production is large in absolute terms, but it is not enough to replace more than a few percent of current fossil fuel usage. Increasing biomass energy production beyond this level would probably reduce food security and exacerbate forcing of climate change. PMID:18215439

  17. Fusion at deep subbarrier energies: potential inversion revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Rowley, N.

    2009-03-04

    For a single potential barrier, the barrier penetrability can be inverted based on the WKB approximation to yield the barrier thickness. We apply this method to heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies well below the Coulomb barrier and directly determine the inter-nucleus potential between the colliding nuclei. To this end, we assume that fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies are governed by the lowest barrier in the barrier distribution. The inverted inter-nucleus potentials for the {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb reactions show that they are much thicker than phenomenological potentials. We discuss a consequence of such thick potential by fitting the inverted potentials with the Bass function.

  18. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-15

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  19. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2015-02-01

    The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero potential energy. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible potential energy. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a potential energy; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the potential energy. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial potentials is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent potential. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational potentials; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law potentials; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.

  20. Investigating energy-saving potentials in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Collecting webpage messages can serve as a sensor for investigating the energy-saving potential of buildings. Focusing on stores, a cloud sensor system is developed to collect data and determine their energy-saving potential. The owner of a store under investigation must register online, report the store address, area, and the customer ID number on the electric meter. The cloud sensor system automatically surveys the energy usage records by connecting to the power company website and calculating the energy use index (EUI) of the store. Other data includes the chain store check, company capital, location price, and the influence of weather conditions on the store; even the exposure frequency of store under investigation may impact the energy usage collected online. After collecting data from numerous stores, a multi-dimensional data array is constructed to determine energy-saving potential by identifying stores with similarity conditions. Similarity conditions refer to analyzed results that indicate that two stores have similar capital, business scale, weather conditions, and exposure frequency on web. Calculating the EUI difference or pure technical efficiency of stores, the energy-saving potential is determined. In this study, a real case study is performed. An 8-dimensional (8D) data array is constructed by surveying web data related to 67 stores. Then, this study investigated the savings potential of the 33 stores, using a site visit, and employed the cloud sensor system to determine the saving potential. The case study results show good agreement between the data obtained by the site visit and the cloud investigation, with errors within 4.17%. Among 33 the samples, eight stores have low saving potentials of less than 5%. The developed sensor on the cloud successfully identifies them as having low saving potential and avoids wasting money on the site visit. PMID:24561405

  1. Communication: Separable potential energy surfaces from multiplicative artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Werner Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-07-14

    We present a potential energy surface fitting scheme based on multiplicative artificial neural networks. It has the sum of products form required for efficient computation of the dynamics of multidimensional quantum systems with the multi configuration time dependent Hartree method. Moreover, it results in analytic potential energy matrix elements when combined with quantum dynamics methods using Gaussian basis functions, eliminating the need for a local harmonic approximation. Scaling behavior with respect to the complexity of the potential as well as the requested accuracy is discussed.

  2. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  3. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  4. Gravitational potential as a source of earthquake energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, L.; Langer, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Some degree of tectonic stress within the earth originates from gravity acting upon density structures. The work performed by this "gravitational tectonics stress" must have formerly existed as gravitational potential energy contained in the stress-causing density structure. According to the elastic rebound theory (Reid, 1910), the energy of earthquakes comes from an elastic strain field built up by fairly continuous elastic deformation in the period between events. For earthquakes resulting from gravitational tectonic stress, the elastic rebound theory requires the transfer of energy from the gravitational potential of the density structures into an elastic strain field prior to the event. An alternate theory involves partial gravitational collapse of the stress-causing density structures. The earthquake energy comes directly from a net decrease in gravitational potential energy. The gravitational potential energy released at the time of the earthquake is split between the energy released by the earthquake, including work done in the fault zone and an increase in stored elastic strain energy. The stress associated with this elastic strain field should oppose further fault slip. ?? 1981.

  5. Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in

    E-print Network

    Tailleux, Remi

    Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R´emi Tailleux in classi- cal thermodynamics, however, usually relies on the concept of exergy, and is usually measured Thermodynamic and fluid dynamics views of available energy . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Useful work, exergy

  6. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-08-01

    Sugarcane grown as energy cane presents a new potential to the Caribbean countries to provide their own energy needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving energy feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the energy cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for energy-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.

  7. Separable Representation of Energy-Dependent Optical Potentials

    E-print Network

    Linda Hlophe; Charlotte Elster

    2015-12-22

    Background. One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Results. Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n$+^{48}$Ca, n$+^{208}$Pb, and p$+^{208}$Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50~MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions. We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the $S$ matrix elements.

  8. Separable Representation of Energy-Dependent Optical Potentials

    E-print Network

    Hlophe, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background. One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy-dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity e...

  9. On the nuclear interaction. Potential, binding energy and fusion reaction

    E-print Network

    I. Casinos

    2008-05-22

    The nuclear interaction is responsible for keeping neutrons and protons joined in an atomic nucleus. Phenomenological nuclear potentials, fitted to experimental data, allow one to know about the nuclear behaviour with more or less success where quantum mechanics is hard to be used. A nuclear potential is suggested and an expression for the potential energy of two nuclear entities, either nuclei or nucleons, is developed. In order to estimate parameters in this expression, some nucleon additions to nuclei are considered and a model is suggested as a guide of the addition process. Coulomb barrier and energy for the addition of a proton to each one of several nuclei are estimated by taking into account both the nuclear and electrostatic components of energy. Studies on the binding energies of several nuclei and on the fusion reaction of two nuclei are carried out.

  10. Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2010-02-15

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

  11. Absence of the threshold anomaly in the elastic scattering of the weakly bound projectile {sup 7}Li on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J.M.; Abriola, D.; Niello, J.O. Fernandez; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O.A.; Barbara, E. de; Marti, G.V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.

    2006-05-15

    To study the conditions leading to the appearance of the threshold anomaly in systems involving weakly bound projectiles we measured elastic scattering cross sections for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al system at ten different bombarding energies. The results were exhaustively analyzed using different optical model potentials. The similar behavior observed in all these analyses allows us to conclude that no threshold anomaly is found for the present system.

  12. Evaluation of magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, R. Christopher; Athens, William P.; Saltus, Allen R., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results of testing and assessment of eleven previously recorded magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Maintenance dredging of Lower Bayou Teche may impact several of the eight anomalies evaluated in this study. Objectives of the study were to conduct detailed surveys and assessments of eight previously located anomalies. These were Anomalies 8, 13, 24a, 29, 30, 31, 33, and 58. Three orther anomalies, Anomaly nos. 23, 24b, and 55 were also briefly examined. Methods used during survey included relocation of each anomaly with a magnetometer; informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each anomaly and its vicinity, physical search of the river bottom at each anomaly location; use of a metal detector to assess the depth of the magnetic source of each anomaly; probing of the river bottom to locate buried structures; and limited excavation with a jet probe to document the source, nature, and research potential of each of the eight anomalies. Two of the anomalies, Anomaly nos. 30 and 58 could not be relocated. Four of the anomalies apparently are associated with modern debris: Anomaly nos. 8, 13, 29, and 31. Anomaly no. 33 appears to be an isolated object. Evidence of structure was observed 14 to 15 ft below water surface, however, it occurs below the project impact zone. One archeological site, the Anomaly no. 23/24 Complex (Site 16SMY76) was defined. It consists of two wooden barges and some twentieth century bridge remains.

  13. Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

  14. Anomalies on orbifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard

    2001-03-16

    We discuss the form of the chiral anomaly on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the anomaly, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional anomaly cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.

  15. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  16. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-07-06

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  17. Energy savings potential from energy-conserving irrigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report systematically compares, within a consistent framework, the technical and economic characteristics of energy-conserving irrigation systems with those of conventional irrigation systems and to determine total energy savings. Levelized annual costs of owning and operating both energy-conserving and conventional irrigation systems have been developed and compared for all 17 states to account for the differences in energy costs and irrigation conditions in each state. Market penetration of energy-conserving systems is assessed for those systems having lower levelized annual costs than conventional systems performing the same function. Annual energy savings were computed by matching the energy savings per system with an assumed maximum market penetration of 100 percent in those markets where the levelized annual costs of energy-conserving systems are lower than the levelized annual costs of conventional systems.

  18. Optimizing potential energy functions for maximal intrinsic hyperpolarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Juefei; Szafruga, Urszula B.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Watkins, David S.

    2007-11-15

    We use numerical optimization to study the properties of (1) the class of one-dimensional potential energy functions and (2) systems of point nuclei in two dimensions that yield the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizabilities, which we find to be within 30% of the fundamental limit. In all cases, we use a one-electron model. It is found that a broad range of optimized potentials, each of very different character, yield the same intrinsic hyperpolarizability ceiling of 0.709. Furthermore, all optimized potential energy functions share common features such as (1) the value of the normalized transition dipole moment to the dominant state, which forces the hyperpolarizability to be dominated by only two excited states and (2) the energy ratio between the two dominant states. All optimized potentials are found to obey the three-level ansatz to within about 1%. Many of these potential energy functions may be implementable in multiple quantum well structures. The subset of potentials with undulations reaffirm that modulation of conjugation may be an approach for making better organic molecules, though there appear to be many others. Additionally, our results suggest that one-dimensional molecules may have larger diagonal intrinsic hyperpolarizability {beta}{sub xxx}{sup int} than higher-dimensional systems.

  19. Split kinetic energy method for quantum systems with competing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Chao, Sheng D.

    2012-09-15

    For quantum systems with competing potentials, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such a kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new energy dissection idea. Instead of dividing the potential energy into 'unperturbed' and 'perturbed' terms, a partition of the kinetic energy is performed. By distributing the kinetic energy term in part into each individual potential, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing potentials. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double {delta}-function potentials. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new basis set expansion method is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Split kinetic energy method is proposed to solve quantum eigenvalue problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement has been obtained in converging to exact results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of such methods is promising and discussed.

  20. Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

    1986-06-01

    While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

  1. Extraction of analytical potential function parameters from ab initio potential energy surfaces and analytical forces*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Greer, J. C.

    2002-09-01

    The program PAROPT has been written to extract forcefield parameters from ab initio calculations of potential energy surfaces (PES) and ab initio analytical forces. The ability to use either energies or forces, or a combination of the two to determine forcefield parameters is a novel feature of the program. Simulated annealing is used within the program to minimise the difference between a set of forces and energies calculated using ab initio techniques and the same quantities calculated using an empirical forcefield. Details of the program and methods used to extract forcefield parametrizations are presented.

  2. Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

  3. Savings potential of ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling programs

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.

    1998-06-19

    In 1993 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced ENERGY STAR (registered trademark), a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products. Since then EPA, now in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has introduced programs for more than twenty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, new homes, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. We present potential energy, dollar and carbon savings forecasts for these programs for the period 1998 to 2010. Our target market penetration case represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide results under the assumption of 100% market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period. Finally, we assess the sensitivity of our target penetration case forecasts to greater or lesser marketing success by EPA and DOE, lower-than-expected future energy prices, and higher or lower rates of carbon emission by electricity generators. The potential savings of ENERGY STAR are substantial. If all purchasers chose Energy Star-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products over the next 15 years, they would save more than $100 billion on their energy bills during those 15 years. (Bill savings are in 1995 dollars, discounted at a 4% real discount rate.)

  4. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  5. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  6. The Growth and Decay of Hydrate Anomalies in Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irizarry, J. T.; Rempel, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates, stored in huge quantities beneath permafrost, and in submarine sediments on the continental shelf, have the potential to become a vital clean-burning energy source. However, clear evidence is recorded in coastal sediments worldwide that past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. Arctic permafrost is thawing, and environmental changes can alter ocean circulation to warm the seafloor, causing hydrates to dissociate or dissolve in the sediments beneath. Decades of focused research provide a firm understanding of laboratory conditions under which hydrates become unstable and dissociate, and how hydrate reserves form when microbes convert organic material into methane, which can also dissolve and be carried by pore waters into the hydrate stability zone. Despite these advances, many key questions that concern both the resource potential of hydrates and their role in causing environmental geohazards, are intimately tied to the more poorly understood behavior of hydrate anomalies, which tend to be concentrated in the large pores of sand layers and form segregated lenses and nodules in muds. We present simple models designed to unravel the importance of the diverse physical interactions (i.e. flow focusing, free-gas infiltration, and pore-scale solubility effects) that help control how hydrate anomalies form. Predicted hydrate distributions are qualitatively different when accumulation in anomalies is supplied primarily by: 1. aqueous flow through sediments with enhanced permeability, 2. free-gas transport high above the three-phase stability boundary, or 3. diffusive transport along solubility gradients associated with pore-scale effects. We discuss examples that illustrate each of these distinct generation modes, in hopes of providing a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate anomalies and their geomechanical properties in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development.

  7. Curvature of the universe and the dark energy potential

    E-print Network

    Sergio del Campo

    2002-11-25

    The flatness of an accelerating universe model (characterized by a dark energy scalar field $\\chi$) is mimicked from a curved model that is filled with, apart from the cold dark matter component, a quintessencelike scalar field $Q$. In this process, we characterize the original scalar potential $V(Q)$ and the mimicked scalar potential $V(\\chi)$ associated to the scalar fields $Q$ and $\\chi$, respectively. The parameters of the original model are fixed through the mimicked quantities that we relate to the present astronomical data, such that the equation state parameter $w_{_{\\chi}}$ and the dark energy density parameter $\\Omega_{\\chi}$.

  8. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications. PMID:24285812

  9. Atmospheric Available Potential Energy Generation from a Satellite Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, J. M.; Vonder Haar, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric available potential energy (APE) describes the total potential energy in the atmosphere that is available for conversion to kinetic energy in the form of circulations and storms. APE is defined as the difference between the total potential energy of the atmosphere and that of a reference state with a minimum possible total potential energy (i.e. a barotropic, stably stratified atmosphere). This study seeks to describe the seasonal generation of APE in the atmosphere with a particular focus on vertically-resolved observations obtained from the A-Train constellation of satellites. To calculate the rate of APE generation, three sources of diabatic heating are considered. Radiative and latent heating rates are calculated from CloudSat-based radiative flux and precipitation products. Sensible heat transfer from the surface (which is not readily calculated from A-Train based observations) is obtained from a combination of the observationally-based SEAFLUX database over the oceans and the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERAI) product over land. Zonal and eddy APE generation are then calculated using Lorenz's "exact method," which requires correlation of the heating rates with an efficiency factor related to the ERAI-derived atmospheric stratification. The spatial and temporal evolution of APE generation using this technique, and differences from the more commonly-utilized "approximate method" of calculation, will be presented and discussed.

  10. Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleux, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Lorenz's theory of available potential energy (APE) remains the main framework for studying the atmospheric and oceanic energy cycles. Because the APE generation rate is the volume integral of a thermodynamic efficiency times the local diabatic heating/cooling rate, APE theory is often regarded as an extension of the theory of heat engines. Available energetics in classical thermodynamics, however, usually relies on the concept of exergy and is usually measured relative to a reference-state maximizing entropy at constant energy, whereas APE's reference state minimizes potential energy at constant entropy. This review seeks to shed light on the two concepts; it covers local formulations of available energetics, alternative views of the dynamics/thermodynamics coupling, APE theory and the second law of thermodynamics, APE production/dissipation, extensions to binary fluids, mean/eddy decompositions, APE in incompressible fluids, APE and irreversible turbulent mixing, and the role of mechanical forcing on APE production.

  11. Threshold anomaly with weakly bound projectiles: Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Be+{sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Muri, C.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.; Chamon, L.C.; Neto, R. Liguori; Added, N.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Marti, G.V.; Capurro, O.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Abriola, D.

    2004-11-01

    Elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 9}Be on {sup 27}Al was measured at near barrier energies. The optical model data analysis with the real and imaginary parts of a global double-folding potential does not show strong evidence of the usual threshold anomaly. The same result was obtained by using a Woods-Saxon shape optical potential and calculating the potential strengths at the strong absorption radius. The reason for this behavior may be explained by the presence of break-up and/or transfer channels at low energies.

  12. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  13. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  14. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  15. Off-Shell NN Potential and Triton Binding Energy

    E-print Network

    Y. Song; R. Machleidt

    1994-03-31

    The NONLOCAL Bonn-B potential predicts 8.0 MeV binding energy for the triton (in a charge-dependent 34-channel Faddeev calculation) which is about 0.4 MeV more than the predictions by LOCAL NN potentials. We pin down origin and size of the nonlocality in the Bonn potential, in analytic and numeric form. The nonlocality is due to the use of the correct off-shell Feynman amplitude of one-boson-exchange avoiding the commonly used on-shell approximations which yield the local potentials. We also illustrate how this off-shell behavior leads to more binding energy. We emphasize that the increased binding energy is not due to on-shell differences (differences in the fit of the NN data or phase shifts). In particular, the Bonn-B potential reproduces accurately the $\\epsilon_1$ mixing parameter up to 350 MeV as determined in the recent Nijmegen multi-energy NN phase-shift analysis. Adding the relativistic effect from the relativistic nucleon propagators in the Faddeev equations, brings the Bonn-B result up to 8.2 MeV triton binding. This leaves a difference of only 0.3 MeV to experiment, which may possibly be explained by refinements in the treatment of relativity and the inclusion of other nonlocalities (e.~g., quark-gluon exchange at short range). Thus, it is conceivable that a realistic NN potential which describes the NN data up to 300 MeV correctly may explain the triton binding energy without recourse to 3-N forces; relativity would play a major role for this result.

  16. Effect of the trace anomaly on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Koksma, Jurjen F.; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2008-07-15

    It has been argued that the quantum (conformal) trace anomaly could potentially provide us with a dynamical explanation of the cosmological constant problem. In this paper, however, we show by means of a semiclassical analysis that the trace anomaly does not affect the cosmological constant. We construct the effective action of the conformal anomaly for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes consisting of local quadratic geometric curvature invariants. Counterterms are thus expected to influence the numerical value of the coefficients in the trace anomaly and we must therefore allow these parameters to vary. We calculate the evolution of the Hubble parameter in quasi-de Sitter spacetime, where we restrict our Hubble parameter to vary slowly in time, and in Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes. We show dynamically that a universe consisting of matter with a constant equation of state, a cosmological constant, and the quantum trace anomaly evolves either to the classical de Sitter attractor or to a quantum trace anomaly driven one. When considering the trace anomaly truncated to quasi-de Sitter spacetime, we find a region in parameter space where the quantum attractor destabilizes. When considering the exact expression of the trace anomaly, a stability analysis shows that whenever the trace anomaly driven attractor is stable, the classical de Sitter attractor is unstable, and vice versa. Semiclassically, the trace anomaly does not affect the classical late time de Sitter attractor, and hence it does not solve the cosmological constant problem.

  17. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  18. Teaching Field Concept and Potential Energy at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the potential energy in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)

  19. The global optimization of Morse clusters by potential energy transformations

    E-print Network

    Neumaier, Arnold

    The global optimization of Morse clusters by potential energy transformations J. P. K. Doye · R. H to be modelled. Morse clusters provide a particularly tough test system for global optimization algorithms of a biomolecule. In particular, large values are very challenging and, until now, no unbiased global optimization

  20. Study of chirally motivated low-energy $K^-$ optical potentials

    E-print Network

    A. Cieply; E. Friedman; A. Gal; J. Mares

    2001-06-09

    The $K^-$ optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space $K^-N$ $t$ matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy $\\bar K N$ data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data {\\it plus} the $K^-$ atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive $K^-$ optical potentials are relatively `shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with $\\chi^2 / N \\approx 2.2$. Relatively `deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with $\\chi^2 / N \\approx 1.5$, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep $K^-$ optical potentials. The ($K^{-}_{\\rm stop},\\pi$) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potentials. Finally, forward ($K^-,p$) differential cross sections for the production of relatively narrow deeply bound $K^-$ {\\it nuclear} states are evaluated for deep $K^-$ optical potentials, yielding values considerably lower than those estimated before.

  1. Cost-Energy Dynamics of Thermal Insulation: Potential Energy Savings and Policy Recommendations 

    E-print Network

    Phung, D. L.; Plaza, H.

    1980-01-01

    the extra cost and extra energy saving. Due to higher costs of energy at present and in the foreseeable future, good opportunities exist to retrofit existing thermal envelopes with extra insulation. Potential costs and savings in the residential, commercial...

  2. LHC Physics Potential vs. Energy: Considerations for the 2011 Run

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2011-02-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam energy from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.

  3. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  4. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  5. Heterobarrier for converting hot-phonon energy to electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungha; Melnick, Corey; Kaviany, Massoud

    2013-02-01

    We show that hot phonons emitted in energy conversion or resistive processes can be converted to electric potential in heterobarrier structures. Using phonon and electron interaction kinetics and self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo, we find the favorable conditions for unassisted absorption of hot phonons and design graded heterobarriers for their direct conversion into electric energy. Tandem barriers with nearly optical-phonon height allow for substantial potential gain without current loss. We find that 19% of hot phonons can be harvested with an optimized GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier structure over a range of current and electron densities, thus enhancing the overall energy conversion efficiency and reducing waste heat.

  6. How Deep is the Antinucleon Optical Potential at FAIR energies

    E-print Network

    T. Gaitanos; M. Kaskulov; H. Lenske

    2011-08-11

    The key question in the interaction of antinucleons in the nuclear medium concerns the deepness of the antinucleon-nucleus optical potential. In this work we study this task in the framework of the non-linear derivative (NLD) model which describes consistently bulk properties of nuclear matter and Dirac phenomenology of nucleon-nucleus interactions. We apply the NLD model to antinucleon interactions in nuclear matter and find a strong decrease of the vector and scalar self-energies in energy and density and thus a strong suppression of the optical potential at zero momentum and, in particular, at FAIR energies. This is in agreement with available empirical information and, therefore, resolves the issue concerning the incompatibility of G-parity arguments in relativistic mean-field (RMF) models. We conclude the relevance of our results for the future activities at FAIR.

  7. Turkey's High Temperature Geothermal Energy Resources and Electricity Production Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Ö.

    2012-04-01

    Turkey is in the first 7 countries in the world in terms of potential and applications. Geothermal energy which is an alternative energy resource has advantages such as low-cost, clean, safe and natural resource. Geothermal energy is defined as hot water and steam which is formed by heat that accumulated in various depths of the Earth's crust; with more than 20oC temperature and which contain more than fused minerals, various salts and gases than normal underground and ground water. It is divided into three groups as low, medium and high temperature. High-temperature fluid is used in electricity generation, low and medium temperature fluids are used in greenhouses, houses, airport runways, animal farms and places such as swimming pools heating. In this study high temperature geothermal fields in Turkey which is suitable for electricity production, properties and electricity production potential was investigated.

  8. Understanding Potential Climate Variability Impacts on the Offshore Energy Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stear, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate variability may have important implications for the offshore energy industry. Scenarios of increased storm activity and changes in sea level could require the retrofit of existing offshore platforms and coastal infrastructure, the decommissioning of facilities for which upgrade or relocation is not economically viable, and the development of new methods and equipment which are removed from or less sensitive to environmental loads. Over the past years the energy industry has been actively involved in collaborative research efforts with government and academia to identify the potential changes in the offshore operating environment, and corresponding risk implications. This presentation will review several of these efforts, and for several of the hypothetical climate variation scenarios, review the potential impacts on and possible mitigations for offshore and coastal energy infrastructure and operations.

  9. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under consideration.

  10. The GSI Time Anomaly: Facts and Fiction

    E-print Network

    Carlo Giunti

    2009-05-28

    The claims that the GSI time anomaly is due to the mixing of neutrinos in the final state of the observed electron-capture decays of hydrogen-like heavy ions are refuted with the help of an analogy with a double-slit experiment. It is a consequence of causality. It is shown that the GSI time anomaly may be caused by quantum beats due to the existence of two coherent energy levels of the decaying ion with an extremely small energy splitting (about $6\\times10^{-16} \\text{eV}$) and relative probabilities having a ratio of about 1/99.

  11. Energy Policy 32 (2004) 289297 The potential of solar electric power for meeting future US energy

    E-print Network

    Delaware, University of

    2004-01-01

    Energy Policy 32 (2004) 289­297 The potential of solar electric power for meeting future US energy of solar electric power in the form of photovoltaics to meet future US energy demand with the projected needs: a comparison of projections of solar electric energy generation and Arctic National Wildlife

  12. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient energy to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for energy and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing energy and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of energy supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous energy supply. A large potential exists for energy savings through energy and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing energy efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to energy efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired energy efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large potential for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.

  13. Hessian geometry and the holomorphic anomaly

    E-print Network

    Cardoso, Gabriel Lopes

    2015-01-01

    We present a geometrical framework which incorporates higher derivative corrections to the action of N = 2 vector multiplets in terms of an enlarged scalar manifold which includes a complex deformation parameter. This enlarged space carries a deformed version of special Kahler geometry which we characterise. The holomorphic anomaly equation arises in this framework from the integrability condition for the existence of a Hesse potential.

  14. Energy gap in graphene nanoribbons with structured external electric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W.; Pal, G.; Schweitzer, L.

    2011-03-01

    The electronic properties of graphene zigzag nanoribbons with electrostatic potentials along the edges are investigated. Using the Dirac-fermion approach, we calculate the energy spectrum of an infinitely long nanoribbon of finite width w, terminated by Dirichlet boundary conditions in the transverse direction. We show that a structured external potential that acts within the edge regions of the ribbon can induce a spectral gap and thus switch the nanoribbon from metallic to insulating behavior. The basic mechanism of this effect is the selective influence of the external potentials on the spinorial wave functions that are topological in nature and localized along the boundary of the graphene nanoribbon. Within this single-particle description, the maximal obtainable energy gap is Emax???vF/w, i.e., ?0.12 eV for w=15 nm. The stability of the spectral gap against edge disorder and the effect of disorder on the two-terminal conductance is studied numerically within a tight-binding lattice model. We find that the energy gap persists as long as the applied external effective potential is larger than ?0.55×W, where W is a measure of the disorder strength. We argue that there is a transport gap due to localization effects even in the absence of a spectral gap.

  15. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  16. Dissociation Energies and Potential Energy Functions for the Ground X 1

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    -Crossing' A 1 + States of NaH Sadru-Dean Walji, Katherine M. Sentjens and Robert J. Le Roy Department determination of centrifugal (non-adiabatic) and potential-energy (adiabatic) Born-Oppenheimer breakdown potential energy function and Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) correction functions that explain all

  17. Single-nucleon potential decomposition of the nuclear symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    Rong Chen; Bao-Jun Cai; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Xiao-Hua Li; Chang Xu

    2012-03-24

    The nuclear symmetry energy $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ and its density slope $L(\\rho)$ can be decomposed analytically in terms of the single-nucleon potential in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. Using three popular nuclear effective interaction models which have been extensively used in nuclear structure and reaction studies, namely, the isospin and momentum dependent MDI interaction model, the Skyrme Hartree-Fock approach and the Gogny Hartree-Fock approach, we analyze the contribution of different terms in the single-nucleon potential to the $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ and $L(\\rho)$. Our results show that the observed different density behaviors of $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ for different interactions are essentially due to the variation of the symmetry potential $U_{sym,1}(\\rho,k)$. Furthermore, we find that the contribution of the second-order symmetry potential $U_{sym,2}(\\rho,k)$ to the $L(\\rho)$ generally cannot be neglected. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the magnitude of the $U_{sym,2}(\\rho,k)$ is generally comparable with that of $U_{sym,1}(\\rho,k)$, indicating the second-order symmetry potential $U_{sym,2}(\\rho,k)$ may have significant corrections to the widely used Lane approximation to the single-nucleon potential in extremely neutron(proton)-rich nuclear matter.

  18. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O?O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup ?1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  19. Geochemical energy potentially available to organisms in martian hydrothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnes, E. S.; Jakosky, B. M.; McCollom, T. M.

    2001-11-01

    Although a global average of energy available to potentially support life from chemosynthesis on Mars has been estimated, issues of how the energy is distributed and which environments have the greatest potential to support life remain unresolved. We have begun to address these questions by developing numerical geochemical models of martian hydrothermal systems using the software package EQ3/6. In order to model hydrothermal systems, the elemental composition of the initial fluid (the groundwater) and the initial host rock with which it interacts must be defined. The host rock was defined using the composition of LEW 88516, which is similar to the martian mantle. This host rock was reacted at high temperature (350 deg C) with a series of groundwaters. Groundwaters are either pure water in equilibrium with present martian atmosphere or in equilibrium with Pathfinder-composition soils and the atmosphere. The hot fluid resulting from the rock/groundwater reaction was then reacted with increments of fresh groundwater, simulating the mixing that occurs in hydrothermal systems. During mixing, oxidation and reduction reactions are kinetically inhibited; organisms may exploit this inhibition to derive metabolic energy. The maximum amount of energy an organism can obtain from a given reaction is determined from the Gibbs free energy of that reaction. For each model run, we have calculated the Gibbs free energy of reactions that are important for terrestrial chemosynthetic organisms and likely representative for putative martians. Our results indicate that substantial amounts of energy may be derived from these reactions, but they depend sensitively on the oxidation state of the groundwater and whether saturated species precipitate to equilibrium. Thus, it is unknown whether sufficient energy is available to support martian life, although it is likely that suitable environments exist.

  20. Parallel unconstrained minimization of potential energy in LAMMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Plantenga, T.

    1997-10-13

    This report describes a new minimization capability added to LAMMPS V4.0. Minimization of potential energy is used to find molecular conformations that are close to structures found in nature. The new minimization algorithm uses LAMMPS subroutines for calculating energy and force vectors, and follows the LAMMPS partitioning scheme for distributing large data objects on multiprocessor machines. Since gradient-based algorithms cannot tolerate nonsmoothness, a new Coulomb style that smoothly cuts off to zero at a finite distance is provided. This report explains the minimization algorithm and its parallel implementation within LAMMPS. Guidelines are given for invoking the algorithm and interpreting results.

  1. Quintom dark energy models with nearly flat potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Setare, M. R.; Saridakis, E. N.

    2009-02-15

    We examine quintom dark energy models, produced by the combined consideration of a canonical and a phantom field, with nearly flat potentials and dark energy equation-of-state parameter w{sub DE} close to -1. We find that all such models converge to a single expression for w{sub DE}(z), depending only on the initial field values and their derivatives. We show that this quintom paradigm allows for a description of the transition through -1 in the near cosmological past. In addition, we provide the necessary conditions for the determination of the direction of the -1 crossing.

  2. Free Energy Generalization of the Peierls Potential in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Schuck, P.; Sadigh, B.; Marian, J.

    2013-08-01

    In body-centered-cubic (bcc) crystals, 1/2?111? screw dislocations exhibit high intrinsic lattice friction as a consequence of their nonplanar core structure, which results in a periodic energy landscape known as the Peierls potential UP. The main features determining plastic flow, including its stress and temperature dependences, can be derived directly from this potential, hence its importance. In this Letter, we use thermodynamic integration to provide a full thermodynamic extension of UP for bcc Fe. We compute the Peierls free energy path as a function of stress and temperature and show that the critical stress vanishes at 700 K, supplying the qualitative elements that explain plastic behavior in the athermal limit.

  3. Nuclear momentum distribution and potential energy surface in hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-03-01

    The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and potential energy surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The potential experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the potential acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.

  4. IRETHERM: Magnetotelluric studies of Irish radiothermal granites and their geothermal energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. F.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Feely, M.

    2013-12-01

    The IRETHERM project seeks to develop a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modeling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), heat-flow (HF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is of key importance in assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Leinster granite, the Galway granite and the buried Kentstown granite. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of an early 1980's EU-funded geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 ?Wm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite. In the Galway granite batholith, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 ?Wm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Ros a Mhil borehole. The lower heat-flow encountered at the Ros a Mhil borehole suggests that the associated high heat production does not extend to great depth. The buried Kentstown granite has associated with it a significant negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 485 m. Heat production has been measured at 2.4 ?Wm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30m of the granite. The core of this study consists of an ambitious program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, extending over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite extend to depths of 2-5 km. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total of 29 sites, with a further 46 sites to be collected in August 2013 (of these 75 sites, 33 will consist of AMT-only data acquisition, with both MT and AMT recorded at the remaining 42). Preliminary results derived from the 29 sites recorded in 2012 show a deep resistor extending to depths of 15-20 km beneath the central block of the batholith, with the resistive body extending to depths of 3.5-7.0 km west of the Shannawona fault. MT and AMT data acquired along a profile at 22 locations over the Kentstown granite suggests that the top of this buried granite is at a depth of 380m beneath the center of the gravity anomaly. The MT and AMT data will be integrated with gravity data and seismic refraction data (in the case of the Leinster granite) to identify deeply penetrating faults, which may provide pathways for hydrothermal fluids, and to produce a robust estimation of the volumetric extent of the granites. Geochemical data will also be incorporated to ultimately constrain the local and regional thermal contribution and geothermal energy potential of the granites.

  5. Multidetector CT urography of renal fusion anomalies.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, Aysel; Olçer, Tülay; Cumhur, Turhan

    2009-06-01

    Renal fusion anomalies, in which both kidneys are fused togeher in early embyronic life, are rarely encountered. Once a fused kidney is diagnosed or suspected, further laboratory and imaging evaluation should be performed to assess the status of the kidneys and to look for treatable causes of renal pathology. The early dignosis of potential complications that can accompany this anomaly must be made in order to prevent permanent renal damage. The advantage of multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) urography is its ability to depict the normal urinary tract anatomy, including both the renal parenchyma, and collecting structures and ureters. MDCT urography is helpful to screen for the presence of stones, hydronephrosis or masses. Additionally, it provides information about the vascular supply of the fused kidneys. Therefore, MDCT urography enables a comprehensive evaluation of patients with renal fusion anomalies in a single examination. Especially three-dimensional reformatted images can provide good delineation of congenital fusion anomalies of the kidney. In this study we report our experience with MDCT urography for the anatomic demonstration of renal fusion anomalies. PMID:19517383

  6. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  7. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  8. Antler anomalies in tule elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.P.; Jessup, David A.; Barrett, Reginald H.

    1988-01-01

    Antler anomalies were evident in tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) within 1 yr of reintroduction to Point Reyes, California (USA). These anomalies are consistent with previously described mineral deficiency-induced anomalies in cervids. The elk were judged deficient in copper. Low levels of copper in soils and vegetation at the release site, exacerbated by possible protein deficiency due to poor range conditions, are postulated as likely causes of the antler anomalies.

  9. Threshold anomaly in the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A. R.; Padron, I.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lacerda, T.; Garcia, V. N.

    2007-12-15

    The energy dependence of the optical potential for the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi at near and subbarrier energies is studied. Elastic angular distributions and the reaction cross section were simultaneously fitted by performing some modifications in the ECIS code. A phenomenological optical model potential with the Woods-Saxon form was used. There are signatures that the so-called breakup threshold anomaly (BTA) is present in this system having a halo projectile {sup 6}He, as it had been found earlier for systems involving stable weakly bound nuclei.

  10. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the technical potential of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address energy poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  11. The quasi-Gaussian entropy theory: Free energy calculations based on the potential energy distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadei, A.; Apol, M. E. F.; Di Nola, A.; Berendsen, H. J. C.

    1996-01-01

    A new theory is presented for calculating the Helmholtz free energy based on the potential energy distribution function. The usual expressions of free energy, internal energy and entropy involving the partition function are rephrased in terms of the potential energy distribution function, which must be a near Gaussian one, according to the central limit theorem. We obtained expressions for the free energy and entropy with respect to the ideal gas, in terms of the potential energy moments. These can be linked to the average potential energy and its derivatives in temperature. Using thermodynamical relationships we also produce a general differential equation for the free energy as a function of temperature at fixed volume. In this paper we investigate possible exact and approximated solutions. The method was tested on a theoretical model for a solid (classical harmonic solid) and some experimental liquids. The harmonic solid has an energy distribution, which can be derived exactly from the theory. Experimental free energies of water and methanol could be reproduced very well over a temperature range of more than 300 K. For water, where the appropriate experimental data were available, also the energy and heat capacity could be reproduced very well.

  12. Breakup threshold anomaly in the elastic scattering of {sup 6}Li on {sup 27}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Correa, T.; Paes, B.

    2007-01-15

    Elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6}Li on {sup 27}Al was measured at near-barrier energies. The data analysis was performed using a Woods-Saxon shape optical potential and also using the double-folding Sao Paulo potential. The results show the presence of the breakup threshold anomaly (BTA), an anomalous behavior when compared with the scattering of tightly bound nuclei. This behavior is attributed to a repulsive polarization potential produced by the coupling to the continuum breakup states.

  13. The Potential for Renewable Energy Development to Benefit Restoration of the Salton Sea. Analysis of Technical and Market Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Douglas; Haase, Scott; Oakleaf, Brett; Hurlbut, David; Akar, Sertac; Wall, Anna; Turchi, Craig; Pienkos, Philip; Melius, Jennifer; Melaina, Marc

    2015-11-01

    This report summarizes the potential for renewable energy development in the Salton Sea region, as well as the potential for revenues from this development to contribute financially to Salton Sea restoration costs. It considers solar, geothermal, biofuels or nutraceutical production from algae pond cultivation, desalination using renewable energy, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.


  14. Impact of Sampling on Anomaly Detection

    E-print Network

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    1 Impact of Sampling on Anomaly Detection DIMACS/DyDan Workshop on Internet Tomography Chen of Sampling on Anomaly Detection ­ Volume Anomaly Detection ­ Portscan Detection ­ Entropy-based Traffic Profiling Towards Accurate Measurements for Anomaly Detection ­ Filtered Sampling ­ Programmable

  15. Onshore wind energy potential over Iberia: present and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable energy sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the potential power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that potential wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest potential energy outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power potential are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  16. Reliable prediction of micro-anomalies from macro-observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonjoy; Chakravarty, Sourish

    2014-03-01

    A stochastic multi-scale based approach is presented in this work to detect signatures of micro-anomalies from macrolevel response variables. By micro-anomalies, we primarily refer to micro-cracks of size 10-100 ?m (depending on the material), while macro-level response variables imply, e.g., strains, strain energy density of macro-level structures (typical size often varying in the order of 10-100 m). The micro-anomalies referred above are not discernible to the naked eyes. Nevertheless, they can cause catastrophic failures of structural systems due to fatigue cyclic loading that results in initiation of fatigue cracks. Analysis of such precursory state of internal damage evolution, before amacro-crack visibly appears (say, size of a few cms), is beyond the scope of the conventional crack propagation analysis, e.g., classical fracture mechanics. The present work addresses this issue in a certain sense by incorporating the effects of micro-cracks into the macro-scale constitutive material properties (e.g., constitutive elasticity tensors) within a probabilistic formalism based on random matrix theory, maximum entropy principle, and principles of minimum complementary energy and minimum potential energy. Distinct differences are observed in the macro-level response characteristics depending on the presence or absence of micro-cracks. This particular feature can now be used to reliably detect micro-cracks from experimental measurements of macro-observables. The present work, therefore, further proposes an efficient and robust optimization scheme: (1) to identify locations of micro-cracks in macroscopic structural systems, say, in an aircraft wing which is of the size of 10- 100 m, and (2) to determine the weakened (due to the presence of micro-cracks) macroscopic material properties which will be useful in predicting the remaining useful life of structural systems. The proposed optimization scheme achieves better convergence rate and accuracy by exploiting positive-definite structure of the macroscopic constitutive matrices.

  17. Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-06-09

    Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

  18. Mashreq Arab interconnected power system potential for economic energy trading

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shehri, A.M.; El-Amin, I.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Mashreq Arab countries covered in this study are Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. A feasibility study for the interconnection of the electrical networks of the Mashreq Arab countries, sponsored by the Arab Fund, was completed in June 1992. Each country is served by one utility except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The Mashreq Arab region has a considerable mix of energy resources. Egypt and Syria have some limited amounts of hydropower resources, and the Arabian Gulf region is abundant in fossil fuel reserves. Owing to the differences in energy production costs, a potential exists for substantial energy trading between electric utilities in the region. The major objective of this project is to study the feasibility of electric energy trading between the Mashreq Arab countries. The basis, assumptions, and methodologies on which this energy trading study is based relate to the results and conclusions arising out of the previous study, power plant characteristics and costs, assumptions on economic parameters, rules for economy energy exchange, etc. This paper presents the basis, methodology, and major findings of the study.

  19. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of yttrium carbide (YC).

    PubMed

    Suo, Bingbing; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2007-06-14

    The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of yttrium carbide (YC) and its cation are calculated at the complete active space self-consistent field and the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) levels of theory. Fifteen low-lying electronic states of YC with different spin and spatial symmetries were identified. The X (4)Sigma- state prevails as the ground state of YC, and a low-lying excited A (4)Pi state is found to be 1661 cm(-1) higher at the MRSDCI level. The computations of the authors support the assignment of the observed spectra to a B (4)Delta(Omega=72)<--A (4)Pi(Omega=52) transition with a reinterpretation that the A (4)Pi state is appreciably populated under the experimental conditions as it is less than 2000 cm(-1) of the X (4)Sigma- ground state, and the previously suggested (4)Pi ground state is reassigned to the first low-lying excited state of YC. The potential energy curves of YC+ confirm a previous prediction by Seivers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6322 (1996)] that the ground state of YC+ is formed through a second pathway at higher energies. The calculated ionization energy of YC is 6.00 eV, while the adiabatic electron affinity is 0.95 eV at the MRSDCI level. The computed ionization energy of YC and dissociation energy of YC+ confirm the revised experimental estimates provided by Seivers et al. although direct experimental measurements yielded results with greater errors due to uncertainty in collisional cross sections for YC+ formation. PMID:17581052

  20. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of yttrium carbide (YC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Bingbing; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2007-06-01

    The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of yttrium carbide (YC) and its cation are calculated at the complete active space self-consistent field and the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) levels of theory. Fifteen low-lying electronic states of YC with different spin and spatial symmetries were identified. The X?-4 state prevails as the ground state of YC, and a low-lying excited A?4 state is found to be 1661cm-1 higher at the MRSDCI level. The computations of the authors support the assignment of the observed spectra to a B?4(? =7/2)?A?4(?=5/2) transition with a reinterpretation that the A?4 state is appreciably populated under the experimental conditions as it is less than 2000cm-1 of the X?-4 ground state, and the previously suggested ?4 ground state is reassigned to the first low-lying excited state of YC. The potential energy curves of YC + confirm a previous prediction by Seivers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6322 (1996)] that the ground state of YC+ is formed through a second pathway at higher energies. The calculated ionization energy of YC is 6.00eV, while the adiabatic electron affinity is 0.95eV at the MRSDCI level. The computed ionization energy of YC and dissociation energy of YC+ confirm the revised experimental estimates provided by Seivers et al. although direct experimental measurements yielded results with greater errors due to uncertainty in collisional cross sections for YC+ formation.

  1. GIS Assessment of Wind Energy Potential in California and Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, R. K.; Snow, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Energy efficiency coupled with renewable energy technologies can provide most of the U.S. carbon emissions reductions needed to contain atmospheric carbon concentrations at 450-500 parts per million, considered by many to be a tipping point in mitigating climate change. Among the leaders in the alternative energy sector is wind power, which is now one of the largest sources of new power generation in the U.S. creating jobs and revenue for rural communities while powering our economy with an emissions-free source of energy. In 2006, wind turbines capable of generating more than 2,400 megawatts of electricity were installed in the U.S. and by 2007 this number had risen to 3,000 megawatts. The U.S. generated 31 billion kilowatt-hours of wind power in 2007, which is enough electricity to power the equivalent of nearly 3 million average homes. It is estimated that generating the same amount of electricity would require burning 16 million tons of coal or 50 million barrels of oil. This study examines the wind power potential of sites near populated areas in Florida and California to determine the practicability of installing wind turbines at these locations. A GIS was developed in order to conduct a spatial analysis of these sites based on mean annual wind speed measured in meters per second and wind power density ratings measured in watts per square meter. The analysis indicates that coastal areas of Cocoa Beach, Key West, Hollywood, and West Palm Beach, respectively, possess the greatest potential for wind energy in Florida with mean annual wind speeds of 4.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 171 w/m2 peaking at Cocoa Beach followed by wind speeds of 4.64 m/s and wind power ratings of 115 w/m2 at Key West. California wind energy potential is even greater than that of Florida with Fairfield exhibiting mean annual wind speeds of 5.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 327 w/m2 followed by the Mojave and Palmdale areas with mean annual wind speeds of 5.0 m/s and 4.6 m/s, respectively. Wind power density ratings for Mojave are 240 w/m2 and 153 w/m2 at Palmdale. These results help confirm that wind energy continues to offer a clean, cost-effective, inexhaustible, and readily available means of helping to curb global warming while answering the increasing demand for electricity.

  2. Potential impacts of nanotechnology on energy transmission applications and needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-30

    The application of nanotechnologies to energy transmission has the potential to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of energy, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce potential ROW impacts. Potential environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.

  3. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  4. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  5. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    2006-01-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces (PES) involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. Most of our work focuses on general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of molecular geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  6. Conformal Anomaly and Counterterms in Designer Gravity

    E-print Network

    Andres Anabalon; Dumitru Astefanesei; David Choque; Cristian Martinez

    2015-11-27

    We construct concrete counterterms of the Balasubramanian-Kraus type for Einstein-scalar theories with designer gravity boundary conditions in AdS$_{4}$, so that the total action is finite on-shell and satisfy a well defined variational principle for an arbitrary scalar field potential. We focus on scalar fields with the conformal mass, $m^{2}=-2l^{-2}$, and show that the holographic mass matches the Hamiltonian mass for any boundary conditions. We compute the conformal anomaly of the dual field theory in the generic case, as well as when there exist logarithmic branches of non-linear origin. As expected, the conformal anomaly vanishes for the boundary conditions that are AdS invariant. When the anomaly does not vanish, the dual stress tensor describes a thermal gas with an equation of state related to the boundary conditions of the scalar field. When the anomaly vanishes, we recover the dual theory of a massless thermal gas. As an application of the formalism, we consider a general family of exact hairy black hole solutions that, for some particular values of the parameters in the moduli potential, contains solutions of four-dimensional gauged $\\mathcal{N}=8$ supergravity and its $\\omega$-deformation. Using the AdS/CFT duality dictionary, they correspond to triple trace deformations of the dual field theory.

  7. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on the Gogny interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrödinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.

  8. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2014-10-28

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction energies for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site potential function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction energies and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.

  9. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  10. Algebraic versus Topologic Anomalies

    E-print Network

    V. Aldaya; M. Calixto; J. Guerrero

    1997-02-08

    Within the frame of a Group Approach to Quantization anomalies arise in a quite natural way. We present in this talk an analysis of the basic obstructions that can be found when we try to translate symmetries of the Newton equations to the Quantum Theory. They fall into two classes: algebraic and topologic according to the local or global character of the obstruction. We present here one explicit example of each.

  11. Anomaly for Model Building

    E-print Network

    Utpal Sarkar

    2006-06-19

    A simple algorithm to calculate the group theory factor entering in anomalies at four and six dimensions for SU(N) and SO(N) groups in terms of the Casimir invariants of their subgroups is presented. Explicit examples of some of the lower dimensional representations of $SU(n), n \\leq 5$ and SO(10) groups are presented, which could be used for model building in four and six dimensions.

  12. Gravitational potential energy of the earth - A spherical harmonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic expansion agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the crust and mantle of -2.77 x 10 to the 29th ergs, an order of magnitude below McKenzie's (1966) estimate. McKenzie's result stems from mathematical error. Our figure is almost identical with Kaula's (1963) estimate of the minimum shear strain energy in the mantle, a not unexpected result on the basis of the virial theorem. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the 20th P is found by assuming that the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation of energy. This number is almost six orders of magnitude below MacDonald's (1966) estimate of the viscosity and removes his objection to convection. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at 1% efficiency, then the viscosity is 10 to the 22nd P, a number preferred by Cathles (1975) and Peltier and Andrew (1976) as the viscosity of the mantle.

  13. Potential energy surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Tyng

    1991-11-01

    A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global potential energy surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous potential surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.

  14. NN inversion potentials intermediate energy proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Love, W.G.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1995-10-01

    Recently developed nucleon-nucleon interactions using the quantum inverse scattering method shed new fight on the off-shell properties of the internucleon effective force for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Calculations of proton elastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the 500 MeV region show that variations in off-shell contributions are determined to a great extent by the accuracy with which the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts are reproduced. The study is based on the full-folding approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical potential which allows a deep understanding of the interplay between on- and off-shell effects in nucleon scattering. Results and the promising extension offered by the inversion potentials beyond the range of validity of the low-energy internucleon forces will be discussed.

  15. Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, D.S.

    1996-08-01

    The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

  16. Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. )

    1990-05-01

    This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac anomalies in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac anomaly and 176 mothers of children born without such an anomaly. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac anomalies in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac anomalies among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a potential causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.

  17. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  18. Freezing of energy of a soliton in an external potential

    E-print Network

    Dario Bambusi; Alberto Maspero

    2015-03-30

    In this paper we study the dynamics of a soliton in the generalized NLS with a small external potential $\\epsilon V$ of Schwartz class. We prove that there exists an effective mechanical system describing the dynamics of the soliton and that, for any positive integer $r$, the energy of such a mechanical system is almost conserved up to times of order $\\epsilon^{-r}$. In the rotational invariant case we deduce that the true orbit of the soliton remains close to the mechanical one up to times of order $\\epsilon^{-r}$.

  19. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave.

  20. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu

    2015-01-21

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods.

  1. Hawking radiation from rotating black holes in anti-de Sitter spaces via gauge and gravitational anomalies

    E-print Network

    Qing-Quan Jiang; Shuang-Qing Wu

    2007-01-19

    Robinson-Wilczek's recent work, which treats Hawking radiation as a compensating flux to cancel gravitational anomaly at the horizon of a Schwarzschild-type black hole, is extended to study Hawking radiation of rotating black holes in anti-de Sitter spaces, especially that in dragging coordinate system, via gauge and gravitational anomalies. The results show that in order to restore gauge invariance and general coordinate covariance at the quantum level in the effective field theory, the charge and energy flux by requiring to cancel gauge and gravitational anomalies at the horizon, must have a form equivalent to that of a $(1+1)$-dimensional blackbody radiation at Hawking temperature with an appropriate chemical potential.

  2. Satellite magnetic anomalies over subduction zones - The Aleutian Arc anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. C.; Frey, H.; Thomas, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Positive magnetic anomalies seen in MAGSAT average scalar anomaly data overlying some subduction zones can be explained in terms of the magnetization contrast between the cold subducted oceanic slab and the surrounding hotter, nonmagnetic mantle. Three-dimensional modeling studies show that peak anomaly amplitude and location depend on slab length and dip. A model for the Aleutian Arc anomaly matches the general trend of the observed MAGSAT anomaly if a slab thickness of 7 km and a relatively high (induced plus viscous) magnetization contrast of 4 A/m are used. A second source body along the present day continental margin is required to match the observed anomaly in detail, and may be modeled as a relic slab from subduction prior to 60 m.y. ago.

  3. Colloidal particles driven across periodic optical potential energy landscapes

    E-print Network

    Michael P. N. Juniper; Arthur V. Straube; Dirk G. A. L. Aarts; Roel P. A. Dullens

    2015-12-17

    We study the motion of colloidal particles driven by a constant force over a periodic optical potential energy landscape. Firstly, the average particle velocity is found as a function of the driving velocity and the wavelength of the optical potential energy landscape. The relationship between average particle velocity and driving velocity is found to be well described by a theoretical model treating the landscape as sinusoidal, but only at small trap spacings. At larger trap spacings, a non-sinusoidal model for the landscape must be used. Subsequently, the critical velocity required for a particle to move across the landscape is determined as a function of the wavelength of the landscape. Finally, the velocity of a particle driven at a velocity far exceeding the critical driving velocity is examined. Both of these results are again well described by the two theoretical routes, for small and large trap spacings respectively. Brownian motion is found to have a significant effect on the critical driving velocity, but a negligible effect when the driving velocity is high.

  4. An Ab Initio Based Potential Energy Surface for Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We report a new determination of the water potential energy surface. A high quality ab initio potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function of water have been computed. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base. The adjustment is small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Of the 27,245 assigned transitions in the HITRAN 92 data base for H2(O-16), the overall root mean square (rms) deviation between the computed and observed line positions is 0.125/cm. However the deviations do not correspond to a normal distribution: 69% of the lines have errors less than 0.05/cm. Overall, the agreement between the line intensities computed in the present work and those contained in the data base is quite good, however there are a significant number of line strengths which differ greatly.

  5. Gravitational potential energy and active deformation in the Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, N.; England, P.; Hunstad, I.; Selvaggi, G.

    2014-07-01

    We use velocity measurements from a network of continuous GPS sites spanning the Apennines of peninsular Italy to test the hypothesis that the active deformation of the region is explained by variations in gravitational potential energy of the lithosphere. The simple geometry of the mountain chain allows us to treat the deformation as two-dimensional, neglecting gradients of velocity along the strike of the chain. Under this assumption, the integral of gravitational potential energy per unit area of the lithosphere (GPE) in the direction perpendicular to the chain is related by a simple expression to the velocity in the same direction. We show that the observed velocities match this expression with an RMS misfit of 0.5 mm/yr. This agreement suggests that deformation of the Apennines reflects a balance, within the mountain chain itself, between lateral variations in GPE and the stresses required to deform the lithosphere. Forces arising from processes external to the belt are not required to explain the observations.

  6. Solar energy and urban morphology: Scenarios for increasing the renewable energy potential of neighbourhoods in London

    E-print Network

    Sarralde, Juan José; Quinn, David James; Wiesmann, Daniel; Steemers, Koen

    2014-07-07

    the consumption and the generation of resources need to be assessed. In terms of urban environmental sustainability, the potential to generate renewable energy within the city boundaries is a research topic of growing interest, being solar energy one of the main...

  7. Potential of Using Poultry Litter as a Feedstock for Energy Production Rangika Perera, Graduate Research Assistant

    E-print Network

    Wu, Qinglin

    Potential of Using Poultry Litter as a Feedstock for Energy Production Rangika Perera, Graduate .......................................................................................................................................................................... 3 2. Potential of Poultry Litter for Energy Generation ......................................................................................................................................................... 5 4. Current Markets and Demand for Poultry Litter

  8. Morphed Potential Energy Surfaces from the Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Complexes 

    E-print Network

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.

    2012-07-16

    In this research the so-called potential morphing method was used to generate reliable interaction potential energy surfaces for weakly bound complexes. The potential morphing method is based on the optimization of modified ...

  9. Physicochemical isotope anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, T.M.

    1988-06-01

    Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual anomalies. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium anomalies. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the anomalies in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.

  10. Conformal Anomaly and Counterterms in Designer Gravity

    E-print Network

    Anabalon, Andres; Choque, David; Martinez, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    We construct concrete counterterms of the Balasubramanian-Kraus type for Einstein-scalar theories with designer gravity boundary conditions in AdS$_{4}$, so that the total action is finite on-shell and satisfy a well defined variational principle for an arbitrary scalar field potential. We focus on scalar fields with the conformal mass, $m^{2}=-2l^{-2}$, and show that the holographic mass matches the Hamiltonian mass for any boundary conditions. We compute the conformal anomaly of the dual field theory in the generic case, as well as when there exist logarithmic branches of non-linear origin. As expected, the conformal anomaly vanishes for the boundary conditions that are AdS invariant. When the anomaly does not vanish, the dual stress tensor describes a thermal gas with an equation of state related to the boundary conditions of the scalar field. When the anomaly vanishes, we recover the dual theory of a massless thermal gas. As an application of the formalism, we consider a general family of exact hairy blac...

  11. Hypercharged anomaly mediation.

    PubMed

    Dermísek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2008-04-01

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio alpha between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or = |alpha| < or = 0.25 and m(3/2) > or = 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario. PMID:18517937

  12. Hypercharged Anomaly Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermíšek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2008-04-01

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio ? between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05?|?|?0.25 and m3/2?35TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario.

  13. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation in eight potential energy crops.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gangrong; Cai, Qingsheng

    2009-01-01

    The production of energy crops that can be used for biodiesel production is a sustainable approach for the removal of metal pollutants by phytoremediation. This study investigated the cadmium (Cd) accumulation and tolerance of eight potential energy crops. After growth for 28 days in substrates containing 0, 50, 100 or 200 mg Cd x kg(-1), seedlings were evaluated for growth parameters, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and Cd accumulation. All eight crops were moderately tolerant to Cd toxicity, with four [i.e., hemp (Cannabis sativa), flax (Linum usitatissimum), castor (Ricinus communis) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea)] being more tolerant than the others. Three of these crops (hemp, flax and peanut) had higher Cd accumulation capacities. The roots of peanut and hemp had high bioconcentration factors (BCF>1000), while flax shoots accumulated a higher concentration of Cd (>100 mg/kg). These results demonstrate that it is possible to grow energy crops on Cd-contaminated soil. Hemp, flax and peanut are excellent candidates for phytoremediation. PMID:19393309

  14. Epicardial Application Of Laser Energy In Vivo: Acute Arrhythmogenic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Mark H.; Ben-Shachar, Giora; Beder, Stanley D.; Sivakoff, Mark; Riemenschneider, Thomas A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of laser energy on the heart's rhythm, 7 newborn pigs each had 3 two-second applications of laser energy directly to the left ventricular epicardial surface. A quartz fiberoptic delivery system was used. All piglets (in all 21 applications) had ventricular arrhythmia induced. This varied from single premature ventricular contractions to sustained(112 seconds) ventricular tachycardia (6/7 piglets). The sustained ventri-cular tachycardia exhibited electrophysiologic criteria of a "re-entrant" mechanism. Fifteen minutes following lasing, programmed ventricular stimulation, a technique that indicates whether a substrate may be present for spontaneous re-entrant arrhythmias, showed induced arrhythmia in only 2/7 pigs, neither sustained. We conclude that epicardial application of laser energy frequently results in significant ventricular arrhythmia. This arrhythmia appears to be re-entrant in nature. Fowever, shortly following lasing, sustained arrhythmia could not be induced. Therefore, we feel that more knowledge about the arrhythmogenic potential of laser lesions is needed prior to wide-spread clinical application.

  15. Transition Metal Oxide Alloys as Potential Solar Energy Conversion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-02-21

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are inexpensive potentia alternative materials for solar energy conversion devices. However, some TMOs, such as manganese(II) oxide, have band gaps that are too large for efficiently absorbing solar energy. Other TMOs, such as iron(II) oxide, have conduction and valence band edges with the same orbital character that may lead to unfavorably high electron–hole recombination rates. Another limitation of iron(II) oxide is that the calculated valence band edge is not positioned well for oxidizing water. We predict that key properties, including band gaps, band edge positions, and possibly electron–hole recombination rates, may be improved by alloying TMOs that have different band alignments. A new metric, the band gap center offset, is introduced for simple screening of potential parent materials. The concept is illustrated by calculating the electronic structure of binary oxide alloys that contain manganese, nickel, iron, zinc, and/or magnesium, within density functional theory (DFT)+U and hybrid DFT theories. We conclude that alloys of iron(II) oxide are worth evaluating further as solar energy conversion materials.

  16. Gravitational potential energy of the earth: A spherical harmonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic equation agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the mantle and crust of -2.77 x 10 to the twenty-ninth power ergs, an order of magnitude. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the twentieth power poises is found by assuming the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at one per cent efficiency, then the viscosity is ten to the twenty second power poises, a number preferred by some as the viscosity of the mantle.

  17. A General Method for Conserving Energy and Potential Enstrophy in Shallow-Water Models

    E-print Network

    Salmon, Rick

    A General Method for Conserving Energy and Potential Enstrophy in Shallow-Water Models RICK SALMON numerical models that conserve analogs of the energy and potential enstrophy; one need only discretize, in the inviscid limit, conserve energy and an arbitrary ad- ditional invariant related to the potential vorticity

  18. Einstein, Entropy and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own anomalies, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an anomaly that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.

  19. Automated anomaly detection processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiman, James B.; Arouh, Scott L.; Webb, Michael L.

    2002-07-01

    Robust exploitation of tracking and surveillance data will provide an early warning and cueing capability for military and civilian Law Enforcement Agency operations. This will improve dynamic tasking of limited resources and hence operational efficiency. The challenge is to rapidly identify threat activity within a huge background of noncombatant traffic. We discuss development of an Automated Anomaly Detection Processor (AADP) that exploits multi-INT, multi-sensor tracking and surveillance data to rapidly identify and characterize events and/or objects of military interest, without requiring operators to specify threat behaviors or templates. The AADP has successfully detected an anomaly in traffic patterns in Los Angeles, analyzed ship track data collected during a Fleet Battle Experiment to detect simulated mine laying behavior amongst maritime noncombatants, and is currently under development for surface vessel tracking within the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service to support port security, ship inspection, and harbor traffic control missions, and to monitor medical surveillance databases for early alert of a bioterrorist attack. The AADP can also be integrated into combat simulations to enhance model fidelity of multi-sensor fusion effects in military operations.

  20. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this case the spectra and cross spectra show that the source of the noise is instability in the gyro platform. Spectral techniques should always be applied to vector data in order to avoid overinterpretation of short-wavelength features.

  1. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  2. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves for OsH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides-Garcia, M.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1991-11-01

    Complete active space (CASSCF) followed by first-order configuration interaction (FOCI) and second-order CI (SOCI) are carried out on 21 low-lying electronic states of OsH. Spin-orbit effects are investigated using the relativistic CI (RCI) methodology. The ground state of OsH is found to be 4? symmetry with R e = 1.606 Å, ?e = 2138 cm -1, De = 2.317 eV, and ?e = -1.651 D in the absence of spin-orbit interactions, while the ground state is found to be a strong mixture of 4?( {5}/{2}) and 4?( {5}/{2}) including spin-orbit coupling. Potential energy surfaces for 21 low-lying electronic states are reported. Allowed electronic transitions from the ground X4? and some other low-lying states are predicted. The nature and bonding of the low-lying electronic states are analyzed through Mulliken populations.

  3. Potential energy surface discontinuities in local correlation methods.

    PubMed

    Russ, Nicholas J; Crawford, T Daniel

    2004-07-01

    We have examined the occurrence of discontinuities in bond-breaking potential energy surfaces given by local correlation methods based on the Pulay-Saebø orbital domain approach. Our analysis focuses on three prototypical dissociating systems: the C-F bond in fluoromethane, the C-C bond in singlet, ketene, and the central C-C bond in propadienone. We find that such discontinuities do not occur in cases of homolytic bond cleavage due to the inability of the Pipek-Mezey orbital localization method to separate singlet-coupled charges on distant fragments. However, for heterolytic bond cleavage, such as that observed in singlet ketene and propadienone, discontinuities occur both at stretched geometries and near equilibrium. These discontinuities are usually small, but may be of the same order of magnitude as the localization error in some cases. PMID:15260595

  4. Potential energy surface discontinuities in local correlation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Nicholas J.; Crawford, T. Daniel

    2004-07-01

    We have examined the occurence of discontinuities in bond-breaking potential energy surfaces given by local correlation methods based on the Pulay-Saebø orbital domain approach. Our analysis focuses on three prototypical dissociating systems: the C-F bond in fluoromethane, the C-C bond in singlet, ketene, and the central C-C bond in propadienone. We find that such discontinuities do not occur in cases of homolytic bond cleavage due to the inability of the Pipek-Mezey orbital localization method to separate singlet-coupled charges on distant fragments. However, for heterolytic bond cleavage, such as that observed in singlet ketene and propadienone, discontinuities occur both at stretched geometries and near equilibrium. These discontinuities are usually small, but may be of the same order of magnitude as the localization error in some cases.

  5. Osmosis, colligative properties, entropy, free energy and the chemical potential

    E-print Network

    Peter Hugo Nelson

    2014-09-13

    A diffusive model of osmosis is presented that explains currently available experimental data. It makes predictions that distinguish it from the traditional convective flow model of osmosis, some of which have already been confirmed experimentally and others have yet to be tested. It also provides a simple kinetic explanation of Raoult's law and the colligative properties of dilute aqueous solutions. The diffusive model explains that when a water molecule jumps from low to high osmolarity at equilibrium, the free energy change is zero because the work done pressurizing the water molecule is balanced by the entropy of mixing. It also explains that equal chemical potentials are required for particle exchange equilibrium in analogy with the familiar requirement of equal temperatures at thermal equilibrium.

  6. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between auroral electron energy flux and the inferred accelerating potential drop for accelerated Maxwellian distributions is investigated on the basis of Atmospheric Explorer D spectral measurements. An analytical approximation for the total downward energy flux carried by an isotropic Maxwellian electron population accelerated by a field-aligned electrostatic potential drop is derived which is valid for values of the electron energy/characteristic accelerated Maxwellian distribution energy which are less than the difference between the ratio of the magnetic field strengths at the altitude of observation and the altitude of potential drop, and unity. Data from the Low Energy Electron Experiment on board AE D obtained on both the dayside and the nightside during periods of significant inverted-V type electron precipitation shows that the 455 energy spectra considered, 160 of them, obtained between 60 and 85 deg invariant latitude, could be fit to accelerated Maxwellian distributions. The 160 Maxwellian spectra are then shown to be in agreement with the predictions of the accelerated Maxwellian model. Finally, analysis of individual spectra suggests that the altitude of the inferred potential drop is at a maximum near the center of the inverted-V structures.

  7. Steam systems in industry: Energy use and energy efficiency improvement potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Dan; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    2001-07-22

    Steam systems are a part of almost every major industrial process today. Thirty-seven percent of the fossil fuel burned in US industry is burned to produce steam. In this paper we will establish baseline energy consumption for steam systems. Based on a detailed analysis of boiler energy use we estimate current energy use in boilers in U.S. industry at 6.1 Quads (6.4 EJ), emitting almost 66 MtC in CO{sub 2} emissions. We will discuss fuels used and boiler size distribution. We also describe potential savings measures, and estimate the economic energy savings potential in U.S. industry (i.e. having payback period of 3 years or less). We estimate the nationwide economic potential, based on the evaluation of 16 individual measures in steam generation and distribution. The analysis excludes the efficient use of steam and increased heat recovery. Based on the analysis we estimate the economic potential at 18-20% of total boiler energy use, resulting in energy savings approximately 1120-1190 TBtu ( 1180-1260 PJ). This results in a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions equivalent to 12-13 MtC.

  8. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  9. Study of hyperfine anomaly in 9,11Be isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parfenova, Y. L.; Leclercq-Willain, Ch.

    2006-04-26

    The hyperfine structure anomaly in Be+ ions is calculated with electronic wave functions, obtained as a solution of the Dirac equation with the Coulomb potential modified by the charge distribution of the clustered nucleus and two electrons in the 1s2 configuration. The nuclear wave function is obtained in the cluster model of Be isotopes. The sensitivity of the hyperfine structure anomaly to the clustering effects, in particular, to the extended neutron distribution is studied.

  10. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  11. An Accurate Potential Energy Surface for H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have carried out extensive high quality ab initio electronic structure calculations of the ground state potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function (DMF) for H2O. A small adjustment is made to the PES to improve the agreement of line positions from theory and experiment. The theoretical line positions are obtained from variational ro-vibrational calculations using the exact kinetic energy operator. For the lines being fitted, the root-mean-square error was reduced from 6.9 to 0.08 /cm. We were then able to match 30,092 of the 30,117 lines from the HITRAN 96 data base to theoretical lines, and 80% of the line positions differed less than 0.1 /cm. About 3% of the line positions in the experimental data base appear to be incorrect. Theory predicts the existence of many additional weak lines with intensities above the cutoff used in the data base. To obtain results of similar accuracy for HDO, a mass dependent correction to the PH is introduced and is parameterized by simultaneously fitting line positions for HDO and D2O. The mass dependent PH has good predictive value for T2O and HTO. Nonadiabatic effects are not explicitly included. Line strengths for vibrational bands summed over rotational levels usually agree well between theory and experiment, but individual line strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature line list containing about 380 million lines has been generated using the present PES and DMF

  12. Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations

    SciTech Connect

    May, E.K.

    1980-04-01

    Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

  13. The GSI Time Anomaly: Facts and Fiction

    E-print Network

    Carlo Giunti

    2008-12-10

    The claims that the GSI time anomaly is due to the mixing of neutrinos in the final state of the observed electron-capture processes are refuted. With the help of an analogy with a double-slit experiment, it is shown that the standard method of calculation of the rate of an interaction process by adding the rates of production of all the allowed final states, regardless of a possible coherence among them, is correct. It is a consequence of causality. It is shown that the GSI time anomaly may be caused by quantum beats due to the existence of two coherent energy levels of the decaying ion with an extremely small energy splitting (about $6\\times10^{-16} \\text{eV}$) and relative probabilities having a ratio of about 1/99.

  14. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Bytautas, L.; Ruedenberg, K.

    2008-06-06

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  15. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  16. Algebraic classification of Weyl anomalies in arbitrary dimensions.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Nicolas

    2007-06-29

    Conformally invariant systems involving only dimensionless parameters are known to describe particle physics at very high energy. In the presence of an external gravitational field, the conformal symmetry may generalize to the Weyl invariance of classical massless field systems in interaction with gravity. In the quantum theory, the latter symmetry no longer survives: A Weyl anomaly appears. Anomalies are a cornerstone of quantum field theory, and, for the first time, a general, purely algebraic understanding of the universal structure of the Weyl anomalies is obtained, in arbitrary dimensions and independently of any regularization scheme. PMID:17678079

  17. Molecular spinless energies of the modified Rosen-Morse potential energy model in higher spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chun-Sheng; Dai, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    We solve the Klein-Gordon equation with the modified Rosen-Morse potential energy model in D spatial dimensions. The bound state energy equation has been obtained by using the supersymmetric WKB approximation approach. We find that the inter-dimensional degeneracy symmetry exists for the molecular system represented by the modified Rosen-Morse potential. For fixed vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, the relativistic energies for the 61?u state of the 7Li2 molecule and the X3? state of the SiC radical increase as D increases. We observe that the behavior of the relativistic vibrational energies in higher dimensions remains similar to that of the three-dimensional system.

  18. Potential energy, free energy, and entropy barriers in a minimal glassy model

    E-print Network

    Xin Du; Eric R. Weeks

    2015-11-30

    We study glassy dynamics using a model of three soft Brownian particles confined to a two-dimensional circular region. If the circular region is large, the disks freely rearrange, but rearrangements are rarer for smaller system sizes. We directly measure a one-dimensional free energy landscape characterizing the dynamics. This landscape has two local minima corresponding to the two distinct disk configurations, separated by a free energy barrier which governs the rearrangement rate. We study several different interaction potentials and demonstrate that the free energy barrier is composed of a potential energy barrier and an entropic barrier. The heights of both of these barriers depend on temperature and system size, demonstrating how non-Arrhenius behavior can arise close to the glass transition.

  19. Genetics of lymphatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic anomalies include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274

  20. Effect of ? potential on the ?-/?+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-Mei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zuo, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, effects of the ? resonance potential on the free n /p and ?-/?+ ratios in the central collision of 197Au+197Au at beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV/nucleon are studied. It is found that the effect of the ? potential on the ratio of pre-equilibrium free n /p is invisible. The effect of ? isovector potential on the kinetic-energy-integrating ratio of ?-/?+ may be observable only at lower incident beam energies and with stiffer symmetry energy. The strength of the ? isoscalar potential affects the height of the ?-/?+ ratio around the Coulomb peak but does not affect the kinetic-energy-integrating ratio ?-/?+ . In heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, relating to the question of nonconservation of energy on ? or ? productions, one can replace the ? potential by the nucleon isoscalar potential especially when a soft symmetry energy is employed.

  1. Energy Analysis of a Kraft Pulp Mill: Potential for Energy Efficiency and Advanced Biomass Cogeneration 

    E-print Network

    Subbiah, A.; Nilsson, L. J.; Larson, E. D.

    1995-01-01

    KRAFT PULP MILL: POTENTIAL FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ADVANCED BIOMASS COGENERATION Anand Subbiah Lars 1. Nilsson' Eric D. Larson" Senior Engineer Visiting Research Fellow Research Engineer Synergic Resources Corp. Center for Energy and Center..., 1994. 3. Aho, W.O., and Boner, T., BPA Industrial Test Program: SIC Repon on the Nonhwest Pulp and Paper Industry, Prepared by EKONO Inc., Bellevue, Washington, for Northwest Pulp and Paper Association, August, 1985. 4. Consonni, S., and Larson, E...

  2. An explicit Z '-boson explanation of the B ? K ? ? + ? - anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Goertz, Florian; Haisch, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    A global fit to the recent B ? K ? ? + ? - data shows indications for a large new-physics contribution to the Wilson coefficient of the semi-leptonic vector operator. In this article we consider a simple Z '-boson model of 3-3-1 type that can accommodate such an effect without violating any other constraint from quark-flavour physics. Implications for yet unobserved decay modes such as B ? X s ? and longstanding puzzles like B ? ?K are also discussed. The Z '-boson masses required to address the observed anomaly lie in the range of 7 TeV. Such heavy Z ' bosons evade the existing bounds from precision data and direct searches, and will remain difficult to discover even at a high-luminosity LHC. The potential of an ILC as well as the next generation of low-energy parity-violation experiments in constraining the Z '-boson parameter space is also examined.

  3. Reexamination of an anomaly in near-threshold pair production

    SciTech Connect

    De Braeckeleer, L.; Adelberger, E.G.; Garcia, A. )

    1992-11-01

    We investigated a reported anomaly in near-threshold pair production, using radioactive sources to measure the {gamma}+Ge{r arrow}{ital e}{sup +}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}+Ge cross-section at {ital E}{sub {gamma}}=1063, 1086, 1112, 1173, 1213, 1299, 1332, and 1408 keV. Although the data agree with the theory (numerical calculations based on an exact partial-wave formulation for a screened central potential) at the higher energies, the data lie above the theory at 1063, 1082, and 1112 keV. The discrepancy is reduced by including the final-state Coulomb interaction between the {ital e}{sup +} and {ital e}{sup {minus}}.

  4. Energy conservation potential of the US Department of Energy interim commercial building standards

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes a project conducted to demonstrate the whole-building energy conservation potential achievable from full implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Interim Energy Conservation Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings. DOE`s development and implementation of energy performance standards for commercial buildings were established by the Energy Conservation Standards for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, Public Law (PL) 94-385, 42 USC 6831 et seq., hereinafter referred to as the Act. In accordance with the Act, DOE was to establish performance standards for both federal and private sector buildings ``to achieve the maximum practicable improvements in energy efficiency and use of non-depletable resources for all new buildings``.

  5. Holographic models and the QCD trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Jose L. Goity, Roberto C. Trinchero

    2012-08-01

    Five dimensional dilaton models are considered as possible holographic duals of the pure gauge QCD vacuum. In the framework of these models, the QCD trace anomaly equation is considered. Each quantity appearing in that equation is computed by holographic means. Two exact solutions for different dilaton potentials corresponding to perturbative and non-perturbative {beta}-functions are studied. It is shown that in the perturbative case, where the {beta}-function is the QCD one at leading order, the resulting space is not asymptotically AdS. In the non-perturbative case, the model considered presents confinement of static quarks and leads to a non-vanishing gluon condensate, although it does not correspond to an asymptotically free theory. In both cases analyses based on the trace anomaly and on Wilson loops are carried out.

  6. A new local theory of available potential energy for quantifying energy pathways in the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleux, Remi

    2013-04-01

    Lorenz's theory of available potential energy (APE) has recently received much attention in the context of ocean energetics, for it is increasingly realized to be a key tool for clarifying the relative importance of the surface buoyancy fluxes in powering the ocean circulation, a controversial issue over the past 15 years or so. So far, however, most recent approaches have been restricted to global APE budgets, often for idealized equations of state, which is arguably of limited interest to understand the precise nature of the energy pathways in the oceans. Here, we will present a local extension of the theory of available potential energy, which is developed for the primitive equations that form the basis of most current general ocean circulation models, and which is valid for an arbitrary nonlinear equation of state. Another advantage of the new theory is that it does not require the reference state underlying Lorenz's APE theory to be necessarily the state of minimum potential energy obtained in an adiabatic re-arrangement of the fluid parcels, and hence does not suffer from traditional difficulties pertaining to how to do the sorting of the fluid parcels. The main result of this work is the ability in some instances to link local conversion of APE into kinetic energy directly to the local production of APE by surface fluxes. The framework is also shown to be useful to provide an energy-based characterization of oceanic water masses.

  7. Uncertainties of optical-model parameters for the study of the threshold anomaly

    E-print Network

    Daniel Abriola; A. Arazi; J. Testoni; F. Gollan; G. V. Martí

    2015-03-13

    In the analysis of elastic-scattering experimental data, optical-model parameters (usually, depths of real and imaginary potentials) are fitted and conclusions are drawn analyzing their variations at bombardment energies close to the Coulomb barrier (threshold anomaly). The judgement about the shape of this variation (related to the physical processes producing this anomaly) depends on these fitted values but the robustness of the conclusions strongly depends on the uncertainties with which these parameters are derived. We will show that previous published studies have not used a common criterium for the evaluation of the parameter uncertainties. In this work, a study of these uncertainties is presented, using conventional statistic tools as well as bootstrapping techniques. As case studies, these procedures are applied to re-analyze detailed elastic-scattering data for the $^{12}$C + $^{208}$Pb and the $^6$Li + $^{80}$Se systems.

  8. Uncertainties of optical-model parameters for the study of the threshold anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Testoni, J.; Gollan, F.; Martí, G. V.

    2015-07-01

    In the analysis of elastic-scattering experimental data, optical-model parameters (usually, depths of real and imaginary potentials) are fitted and conclusions are drawn analyzing their variations at bombardment energies close to the Coulomb barrier (threshold anomaly). The judgement about the shape of this variation (related to the physical processes producing this anomaly) depends on these fitted values but the robustness of the conclusions strongly depends on the uncertainties with which these parameters are derived. We will show that previous published studies have not used a common criteriumfor the evaluation of the parameter uncertainties. In this work, a study of these uncertainties is presented, using conventional statistic tools as well as bootstrapping techniques. As case studies, these procedures are applied to re-analyze detailed elastic-scattering data for the 12C + 208Pb and the 6Li + 80Se systems.

  9. On the potential energy in an electrostatically bound two-body system

    E-print Network

    K. Wilhelm; B. N. Dwivedi

    2014-08-30

    The potential energy problem in an electrostatically bound two-body system is studied in the framework of a recently proposed impact model of the electrostatic force and in analogy to the potential energy in a gravitationally bound system. The physical processes are described that result in the variation of the potential energy as a function of the distance between the charged bodies. The energy is extracted from distributions of hypothetical interaction entities modified by the charged bodies.

  10. Space weather conditions and spacecraft anomalies in different orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Dorman, L. I.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    A large database of anomalies, registered by 220 satellites in different orbits over the period 1971-1994, has been compiled. For the first time, data of 49 Russian Kosmos satellites have been included in a statistical analysis. The database also contains a large set of daily and hourly space weather parameters. A series of statistical analyses made it possible to quantify, for different satellite orbits, space weather conditions in the days characterized by anomaly occurrences. In particular, very intense fluxes (>1000 particles cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (pfu) at energy >10 MeV) of solar protons are linked to anomalies registered by satellites in high-altitude (>15,000 km) near-polar (inclination >55°) orbits typical for navigation satellites such as those used in the GPS network, NAVSTAR, etc. (the rate of anomalies increases by a factor of ~20) and to a much smaller extent to anomalies in geostationary orbits (the rate increases by a factor of ~4). The efficiency in producing anomalies is found to be negligible for proton fluences <100 pfu at energies >10 MeV. Elevated fluxes of energetic (>2 MeV) electrons >108 cm-2 d-1 sr-1 are observed by GOES on days with satellite anomalies occurring at geostationary (GOES, SCATHA, METEOSAT, MARECS A, etc.) and low-altitude (<1500 km) near-polar (>55°) orbits (Kosmos, SAMPEX, etc.). These elevated fluxes are not observed on days of anomalies registered in high-altitude near-polar orbits. Direct and indirect connections between anomaly occurrence and geomagnetic perturbations are also discussed.

  11. Space weather conditions and spacecraft anomalies in different orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Dorman, L. I.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    A large database of anomalies, registered by 220 satellites in different orbits over the period 1971-1994, has been compiled. For the first time, data of 49 Russian Kosmos satellites have been included in a statistical analysis. The database also contains a large set of daily and hourly space weather parameters. A series of statistical analyses made it possible to quantify, for different satellite orbits, space weather conditions in the days characterized by anomaly occurrences. In particular, very intense fluxes (>1000 particles cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (pfu) at energy >10 MeV) of solar protons are linked to anomalies registered by satellites in high-altitude (>15,000 km) near-polar (inclination >55°) orbits typical for navigation satellites such as those used in the GPS network, NAVSTAR, etc. (the rate of anomalies increases by a factor of ˜20) and to a much smaller extent to anomalies in geostationary orbits (the rate increases by a factor of ˜4). The efficiency in producing anomalies is found to be negligible for proton fluences <100 pfu at energies >10 MeV. Elevated fluxes of energetic (>2 MeV) electrons >108 cm-2 d-1 sr-1 are observed by GOES on days with satellite anomalies occurring at geostationary (GOES, SCATHA, METEOSAT, MARECS A, etc.) and low-altitude (<1500 km) near-polar (>55°) orbits (Kosmos, SAMPEX, etc.). These elevated fluxes are not observed on days of anomalies registered in high-altitude near-polar orbits. Direct and indirect connections between anomaly occurrence and geomagnetic perturbations are also discussed.

  12. Design of an Artificial Immune System as a Novel Anomaly Detector Combating Financial Fraud in the Retail Sector

    E-print Network

    Overill, Richard E.

    Design of an Artificial Immune System as a Novel Anomaly Detector for Combating Financial Fraud sector often does not possess sufficient knowledge about potential or actual frauds. This requires the retail sector to employ an anomaly detection approach to fraud detection. To detect anomalies in retail

  13. Wind and Solar Energy Potential Assessment for Development of Renewables Energies Applications in Bucaramanga, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez, G.; Osma, G.; Vergara, P.; Rey, J.

    2014-06-01

    Currently, the trend of micro-grids and small-scale renewable generation systems implementation in urban environments requires to have historical and detailed information about the energy potential resource in site. In Colombia, this information is limited and do not favor the design of these applications; for this reason, must be made detailed studies of the energy potential in their cities. In this paper is presented the wind and solar energy resource assessment for the city of Bucaramanga, based on the monitoring on four strategic points during the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. According to the analysis, is evidenced a significant solar resource throughout the year ascending on average to 1 734 kWh/m2, equivalent to 4.8 kWh/m2/day. Also, from a wind statistical study based on the Weibull probability distribution and Wind Power Density (WPD) was established the wind potential as Class 1 according to the scale of the Department of Energy of the United States (DOE), since the average speed is near 1.4 m/s. Due this, it is technically unfeasible the using of micro-turbines in the city, even so their potential for natural ventilation of building was analyzed. Finally, is presented a methodology to analyze solar harvesting by sectors in the city, according to the solar motion and shadowing caused by existing structures.

  14. Stress Tensors from Trace Anomalies in Conformal Field Theories

    E-print Network

    Christopher P. Herzog; Kuo-Wei Huang

    2013-04-08

    Using trace anomalies, we determine the vacuum stress tensors of arbitrary even dimensional conformal field theories in Weyl flat backgrounds. We demonstrate a simple relation between the Casimir energy on the real line times a sphere and the type A anomaly coefficient. This relation generalizes earlier results in two and four dimensions. These field theory results for the Casimir are shown to be consistent with holographic predictions in two, four, and six dimensions.

  15. Anomaly Analysis of Hawking Radiation from Acoustic Black Hole

    E-print Network

    Wontae Kim; Hyeonjoon Shin

    2007-07-27

    The Hawking radiation from the three dimensional rotating acoustic black hole is considered from the viewpoint of anomaly cancellation method initiated by Robinson and Wilczek. Quantum field near the horizon is effectively described by two dimensional charged field with a charge identified as the angular momentum m. The fluxes of charge and energy are obtained from the anomaly cancellation condition and regularity at the horizon, and are shown to match with those of the two dimensional black body radiation at the Hawking temperature.

  16. Testing an excited-state energy density functional and the associated potential with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanadhan, M.; Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K.

    2014-06-01

    The modified local spin density (MLSD) functional and the related local potential for excited states is tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The exchange functional for an excited state is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding exchange potential is given by an analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ?max accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behaviour by employing the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) correction to it. ?max so obtained is then compared with the ?SCF ionization energy calculated using the MLSD functional with self-interaction correction for the orbitals involved in the transition. It is shown that the two match quite accurately. The match becomes even better by tuning the LB correction with respect to a parameter in it.

  17. A Nano-Power Class-AB Current Multiplier for Energy-based Action Potential Detector

    E-print Network

    Serdijn, Wouter A.

    A Nano-Power Class-AB Current Multiplier for Energy-based Action Potential Detector Chutham Sawigun designed to be used in an energy-based action potential detector is presented. The multiplier is considered An action potential or spike detector is an important part of neural recording implants. The detector

  18. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for NH + NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1992-01-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) for NH + NO was characterized using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) gradient calculations to determine the stationary point geometries and frequencies followed by CASSCF/internally contracted configuration interaction (CCI) calculations to refine the energetics. The present results are in qualitative accord with the BAC-MP4 calculations, but there are differences as large as 8 kcal/mol in the detailed energetics. Addition of NH to NO on a (2)A' surface, which correlated with N2 + OH or H + N2O products, involves barriers of 3.2 kcal/mol (trans) and 6.3 kcal/mol (cis). Experimental evidence for these barriers is found in earlier works. The (2)A' surface has no barrier to addition, but does not correlate with products. Surface crossings between the barrierless (2)A' surface and the (2)A' surface may be important. Production of N2 + OH products is predicted to occur via a planar saddle point of (2)A' symmetry. This is in accord with the preferential formation of II(A') lambda doublet levels of OH in earlier experiments. Addition of NH (1)delta to NO is found to occur on an excited state surface and is predicted to lead to N2O product as observed in earlier works.

  19. An energy balance model based on potential vorticity homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk-Davidoff, D.B.; Lindzen, R.S.

    2000-01-15

    It has long been suggested that the extratropical eddies originating in baroclinic instability act to neutralize the atmosphere with respect to baroclinic instability. These studies focused on the Charney-Stern condition for stability, and since the implication of this condition was the elimination of meridional temperature gradients at the surface, contrary to observations, there appeared little possibility that the hypothesis was correct. However, Lindzen found that potential vorticity (PV) mixing along isentropic surfaces accompanied by elevated tropopause height and/or reduced jet width could also lead to baroclinic neutralization. Since it is not obvious what implications such a neutral state would have for meridional structure of wind and especially temperature, the authors examine, as a first step, in this paper the implications of an assumed fixed PV gradient in the extratropical troposphere. It is shown that this assumption, combined with an assumption of a moist adiabatic temperature structure in the Tropics, a constraint on surface static stability, and overall radiative equilibrium, suffices to constrain a model earth's zonal mean climate. Comparison of the model climate with the observed climate, and variation of certain of the model's assumptions to resolve differences, allow the authors to consider the role of deep convection in the climate of the midlatitudes, to investigate the connection between surface turbulent heat fluxes and meridional energy fluxes carried by baroclinic eddies, and to deduce the role of the stratosphere's overturning circulation in determining the height of the tropopause.

  20. (Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods)

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of our work has been, for many year, to elucidate on a molecular level at atomic resolution the structures of DNAs modified by highly mutagenic polycyclic aromatic amines and hydrocarbons, and their less mutagenic chemically related analogs and unmodified DNAs, as controls. The ultimate purpose of this undertaking is to obtain an understanding of the relationship DNA structures and mutagenicity. Our methods for elucidating structures are computational, but we keep in close contact with experimental developments, and have, very recently, been able to incorporate the first experimental information from NMR studies by other workers in our calculations. The specific computational methods we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space program DUPLEX, developed and written by Dr. Brain Hingerty to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations of the important static structures with full solvation and salt are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a milieu that best mimics the natural environment of the cell. In addition, we have been developing new strategies for searching conformation space and building DNA duplexes from favored subunit structures. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.

    1992-07-01

    Our objective, has been to elucidate on a molecular level, at atomic resolution, the structures of DNAs modified by 2-aminofluorene and its N-acetyl derivative, 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). The underlying hypothesis is that DNA replicates with reduced fidelity when its normal right-handed B-structure is altered, and one result is a higher mutation rate. This change in structure may occur normally at a low incidence, for example by the formation of hairpin loops in appropriate sequences, but it may be enhanced greatly after covalent modification by a mutagenic substance. We use computational methods and have been able to incorporate the first data from NMR studies in our calculations. Computational approaches are important because x-ray and spectroscopic studies have not succeeded in producing atomic resolution views of mutagen and carcinogen-oligonucleotide adducts. The specific methods that we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations, with full solvent and salt, of the important static structures are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a medium that mimics the natural aqueous environment of the cell as well as can be done with current available computing resources.

  2. Reliability of CHAMP Anomaly Continuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.

    2003-01-01

    CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, anomaly continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite anomaly errors. Indeed, our numerical anomaly simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the anomaly details are to be exploited most fully. Given current anomaly error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface anomalies is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling suggests that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic anomalies are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.

  3. The potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The use of energy forms to provide future sources of energy for California is considered. Marginal desert lands in southeastern California are proposed for the siting of energy farms using acacia, eucalyptus, euphorbia, guayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk.

  4. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.

  5. Anomalies and Graded Coisotropic Branes

    E-print Network

    Yi Li

    2004-05-30

    We compute the anomaly of the axial U(1) current in the A-model on a Calabi-Yau manifold, in the presence of coisotropic branes discovered by Kapustin and Orlov. Our results relate the anomaly-free condition to a recently proposed definition of graded coisotropic branes in Calabi-Yau manifolds. More specifically, we find that a coisotropic brane is anomaly-free if and only if it is gradable. We also comment on a different grading for coisotropic submanifolds introduced recently by Oh.

  6. Topographies and dynamics on multidimensional potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Keith Douglas

    The stochastic master equation is a valuable tool for elucidating potential energy surface (PES) details that govern structural relaxation in clusters, bulk systems, and protein folding. This work develops a comprehensive framework for studying non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics using the master equation. Since our master equations depend upon accurate partition function models for use in Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRK(M) transition state theory, this work introduces several such models employing various harmonic and anharmonic approximations and compares their predicted equilibrium population distributions with those determined from molecular dynamics. This comparison is performed for the fully-delineated surfaces (KCl)5 and Ar9 to evaluate model performance for potential surfaces with long- and short-range interactions, respectively. For each system, several models perform better than a simple harmonic approximation. While no model gives acceptable results for all minima, and optimal modeling strategies differ for (KCl)5 and Ar9, a particular one-parameter model gives the best agreement with simulation for both systems. We then construct master equations from these models and compare their isothermal relaxation predictions for (KCl)5 and Ar9 with molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first comprehensive test of the kinetic performance of partition function models of its kind. Our results show that accurate modeling of transition-state partition functions is more important for (KCl)5 than for Ar9 in reproducing simulation results, due to a marked stiffening anharmonicity in the transition-state normal modes of (KCl)5. For both systems, several models yield qualitative agreement with simulation over a large temperature range. To examine the robustness of the master equation when applied to larger systems, for which full topographical descriptions would be either impossible or infeasible, we compute relaxation predictions for Ar11 using a master equation constructed from data representing the full PES, and compare these predictions to those of reduced master equations based on statistical samples of the full PES. We introduce a sampling method which generates random, Boltzmann-weighted, energetically 'downhill' sequences. The study reveals that, at moderate temperatures, the slowest relaxation timescale converges as the number of sequences in a sample grows to ~1000. Furthermore, the asymptotic timescale is comparable to the full-PES value.

  7. Energy of Cohesion, Compressibility, and the Potential Energy Functions of the Graphite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Lad, R. A.

    1956-01-01

    The lattice summations of the potential energy of importance in the graphite system have been computed by direct summation assuming a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential between carbon atoms. From these summations, potential energy curves were constructed for interactions between a carbon atom and a graphite monolayer, between a carbon atom and a graphite surface, between a graphite monolayer and a semi-infinite graphite crystal and between two graphite semi-infinite crystals. Using these curves, the equilibrium distance between two isolated physically interacting carbon atoms was found to be 2.70 a, where a is the carbon-carbon distance in a graphite sheet. The distance between a surface plane and the rest of the crystal was found to be 1.7% greater than the interlayer spacing. Theoretical values of the energy of cohesion and the compressibility were calculated from the potential curve for the interaction between two semi-infinite crystals. They were (delta)E(sub c) = -330 ergs/sq cm and beta =3.18x10(exp -12)sq cm/dyne, respectively. These compared favorably with the experimental values of (delta)E(sub c) = -260 ergs/sq cm and beta = 2.97 X 10(exp -2) sq cm/dyne.

  8. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: the potential for energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Stefano; Viganò, Federico

    2011-01-01

    This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on "Material and energy recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)". An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and energy balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the energy content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and energy balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the energy potential of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the energy potential only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL energy recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its energy and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of energy recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa). PMID:21689919

  9. A potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.; Lamb, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    To improve the simulation of nonlinear aspects of the flow over steep topography, a potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for the shallow water equations is derived. It is pointed out that a family of schemes can conserve total energy for general flow and potential enstrophy for flow with no mass flux divergence. The newly derived scheme is a unique member of this family, that conserves both potential enstrophy and energy for general flow. Comparison by means of numerical experiment with a scheme that conserves (potential) enstrophy for purely horizontal nondivergent flow demonstrated the considerable superiority of the newly derived potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme, not only in suppressing a spurious energy cascade but also in determining the overall flow regime. The potential enstrophy and energy conserving scheme for a spherical grid is also presented.

  10. Potential Ambient Energy-Harvesting Sources and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Ambient energy harvesting is also known as energy scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where energy is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for energy scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…

  11. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  12. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: The potential for energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, Stefano; Vigano, Federico

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > The amount of waste available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW). > Its energy potential is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). > Increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery. > Variations in the composition of the waste fed to WtE plants affect only marginally their performances. > A large WtE plant with a treatment capacity some times higher than a small plant achieves electric efficiency appreciably higher. - Abstract: This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on 'Material and energy recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)'. An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and energy balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the energy content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and energy balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for energy recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the energy potential of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the potential for energy recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the energy potential only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL energy recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its energy and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of energy recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa).

  13. Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

    1993-01-01

    A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

  14. Energy expressions for model exchange potentials: Beyond the Levy--Perdew virial relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiduk, Alex P.; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2012-02-01

    The common way to assign energies to Kohn--Sham exchange potentials is by using the Levy--Perdew virial relation. However, for model potentials that are not functional derivatives, this approach leads to energy expressions that lack translational invariance. We point out that there is a more general procedure for constructing density functionals from model potentials, of which the Levy--Perdew relation is just a special case. Using this generalization we propose a method for converting model potentials into density functionals that ensures translational invariance of the energy. To illustrate our approach we construct a competitively accurate exchange functional from the model potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Peters anomaly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the anterior segment is abnormal, leading to incomplete separation of the cornea from the iris or the ... anomaly type I is characterized by an incomplete separation of the cornea and iris and mild to ...

  16. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  19. Free energy versus potential energy landscapes of drug-like molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Yonas; Harris, Rebecca; Hammond, Philip S.; Schmitt, Jeffrey D.

    2006-03-01

    To gain information about molecular shape tendencies, the life science community has traditionally focused primarily on conformational search methodologies that explore the Potential Energy Surface (PES). The output of these methods is a collation of so-called minimum energy conformers. In our effort to gain more insight into molecular shape and overall behavior, we have used both PES conformational search techniques and ab initio molecular dynamics to study a set of neuronal nicotinic receptor (NNR) ligands that possess a non-trivial structure-affinity relationship. This latter method, properly executed, provides the free energy landscape. In this poster we show the sometimes dramatic difference in predicted behavior between these two methods. Significantly, conformers predicted to be highly populated in one method are disallowed in the other method. This work constitutes our first exploration into the use of an ab initio derived free energy landscape to better understand small molecules of biological interest.

  20. Earth flyby anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    In the planet-centric system, a spacecraft should have the same initial and final energies, even though its energy and angular momentum will change in the barycenter of the solar system. However, without explanation, a number of earth flybys have yielded small energy changes.

  1. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  2. Methodology for the Determination of Potential Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings 

    E-print Network

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology to determine potential energy savings of buildings with limited information. This methodology is based upon the simplified energy analysis procedure of heating, ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems...

  3. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  4. Flavorful hybrid anomaly-gravity mediation

    E-print Network

    Christian Gross; Gudrun Hiller

    2011-05-26

    We consider supersymmetric models where anomaly and gravity mediation give comparable contributions to the soft terms and discuss how this can be realized in a five-dimensional brane world. The gaugino mass pattern of anomaly mediation is preserved in such a hybrid setup. The flavorful gravity-mediated contribution cures the tachyonic slepton problem of anomaly mediation. The supersymmetric flavor puzzle is solved by alignment. We explicitly show how a working flavor-tachyon link can be realized with Abelian flavor symmetries and give the characteristic signatures of the framework, including O(1) slepton mass splittings between different generations and between doublets and singlets. This provides opportunities for same flavor dilepton edge measurements with missing energy at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Rare lepton decay rates could be close to their current experimental limit. Compared to pure gravity mediation, the hybrid model is advantageous because it features a heavy gravitino which can avoid the cosmological gravitino problem of gravity-mediated models combined with leptogenesis.

  5. Energy and Education: Planning for Higher Prices and Potential Shortages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrock, Edith M.; Bauman, Paul C.

    This document provides information and suggestions to enable education officials to better control rising energy costs and to plan appropriate reactions to energy supply disruptions. Information is also provided on major changes in federal policies addressing energy shortages and the implications of these policies for state and local…

  6. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (principal investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  7. CO2 Mitigation Potential of Biomass Energy Plantations in DevelopingRegions

    E-print Network

    CO2 Mitigation Potential of Biomass Energy Plantations in DevelopingRegions Eric D. Larson Availability for Biomass Energy 5 --Using Degraded Lands for Biomass Energy 6 --Food Versus Fuel 7 --A --Latin America and Asia 11 --A Case Study of Biomass Energy Plantations in the Northeast of Brazil 12 5

  8. Potential of energy farming in the southeastern California desert

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, V.

    1980-04-01

    The California Energy Commission is currently analyzing the use of energy farms to provide future sources of energy for California. Energy farms can be defined as growing plants and converting them to various forms of energy. The use of marginal desert lands in southeastern California for the siting of energy farms using acacia, Eucalyptus, euphorbia, quayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk is considered. Two hypothetical scenarios using either rainfall, or rainfall and groundwater as water sources were described to determine the maximum amount of energy produced from estimated amounts of suitable land in this area. Considering both scenarios, the maximum range of energy produced is .03 to 0.4 Quads. It is recommended that (1) genetic research be continued to increase biomass yields of these and other candidate plants grown in the desert; and (2) small test plots be established at varying desert locations to collect yield growth, and survival data. Once this information is known, the identification of the best plant(s) to use for energy farming in the California desert area will be known, as well as the cost and quantity of energy produced.

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Surface/Near Surface Indication - Characterization of Surface Anomalies from Magnetic Particle and Liquid Penetrant Indications

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, John

    2014-02-20

    The systematic study and characterization of surface indications has never been conducted. Producers and users of castings do not have any data on which they can reliably communicate the nature of these indications or their effect on the performance of parts. Clearly, the ultimate intent of any work in this area is to eliminate indications that do in fact degrade properties. However, it may be impractical physically and/or financially to eliminate all surface imperfections. This project focused on the ones that actually degrade properties. The initial work was to identify those that degrade properties. Accurate numerical simulations of casting service performance allow designers to use the geometric flexibility of castings and the superior properties of steel to produce lighter weight and more energy efficient components for transportation systems (cars and trucks), construction, and mining. Accurate simulations increase the net melting energy efficiency by improving casting yield and reducing rework and scrap. Conservatively assuming a 10% improvement in yield, approximately 1.33 x 1012 BTU/year can be saved with this technology. In addition, CO2 emissions will be reduced by approximately 117,050 tons per year.

  10. Nonlinear time-varying potential bistable energy harvesting from human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junyi; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Shengxi; Inman, Daniel J.; Lin, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into nonlinear bistable energy harvesting with time-varying potential energy is presented. The motivation for examining time-varying potentials comes from the desire to harvest energy from human motion. Time-varying potential energy function of bistable oscillator with respect to the swing angle are established to derive the governing electromechanical model for harvesting vibration energy from the swaying motion during human walking or running. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental potential energy function under different swing angles. Various motion speed treadmill tests are performed to demonstrate the advantage of time-varying bistable harvesters over linear and monostable ones in harvesting energy from human motion.

  11. Exploring wind energy potential off the California coast Qingfang Jiang,1

    E-print Network

    Jacobson, Mark

    , onshore turbines are usually located in remote areas and offshore turbines can operate in sites close potential over land around the world, offshore wind energy resources are largely unexplored, in part because these regions have relatively sparse wind observations. In this study, the wind energy potential offshore

  12. Determining the electron energy distribution near the plasma potential in the earth's ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.; Cutler, J. R.; Dobbs, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    A determination of the plasma potential using an electrostatic analyzer is described in which the potential difference between the instrument slit system and surrounding plasma is minimized. Data obtained from rocket-borne instrumentation demonstrate the viability of this technique for electron fluxes between thermal energies (about 0.5 V) and suprathermal energies (many volts).

  13. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  14. Calculation of Protein Conformation by Global Optimization of a Potential Energy Function

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jooyoung

    Calculation of Protein Conformation by Global Optimization of a Potential Energy Function Jooyoung- vided by CASP3. The approach is based exclusively on the global optimization of a potential energy;3:204­208. 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: protein folding; global optimization; con- formational search

  15. Spherical earth gravity and magnetic anomaly analysis by equivalent point source inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field anomalies to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal anomalies, pseudo-anomalies, vector anomaly components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity anomalies of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  16. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li

    2005-12-07

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons and protons in asymmetric nuclear matter. From the resulting Schr\\"{o}% dinger-equivalent potential, the high energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential is studied. We find that the symmetry potential at fixed baryon density is essentially constant once the nucleon kinetic energy is greater than about 500 MeV. Moreover, for such high energy nucleon, the symmetry potential is slightly negative below a baryon density of about $% \\rho =0.22$ fm$^{-3}$ and then increases almost linearly to positive values at high densities. Our results thus provide an important constraint on the energy and density dependence of nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter.

  17. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 142, 044305 (2015) Dissociation energies and potential energy functions for the ground X 1

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    . Sentjens, and Robert J. Le Roy Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 of centrifugal (non-adiabatic) and potential-energy (adiabatic) Born-Oppenheimer breakdown correction functions quantum-mechanically accurate analytic potential energy function and Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB

  18. An Extreme-Value Approach to Anomaly Vulnerability Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Chris; Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a method for importance analysis in parametric probabilistic modeling where the result of interest is the identification of potential engineering vulnerabilities associated with postulated anomalies in system behavior. In the context of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), under which this method has been developed, these vulnerabilities, designated as anomaly vulnerabilities, are conditions that produce high risk in the presence of anomalous system behavior. The method defines a parameter-specific Parameter Vulnerability Importance measure (PVI), which identifies anomaly risk-model parameter values that indicate the potential presence of anomaly vulnerabilities, and allows them to be prioritized for further investigation. This entails analyzing each uncertain risk-model parameter over its credible range of values to determine where it produces the maximum risk. A parameter that produces high system risk for a particular range of values suggests that the system is vulnerable to the modeled anomalous conditions, if indeed the true parameter value lies in that range. Thus, PVI analysis provides a means of identifying and prioritizing anomaly-related engineering issues that at the very least warrant improved understanding to reduce uncertainty, such that true vulnerabilities may be identified and proper corrective actions taken.

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large! · Environmental impacts *Coastal Response Resarch Center Report, 2010 #12;OTEC development on Oahu OTEC Plants #12;OTEC Environmental Impact OTEC Warm Water Intake: ·Entrainment ·Impingement Cold water intake

  20. Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S

    1989-01-01

    The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention. PMID:2819634

  1. Anomaly Detection in Gamma-Ray Vehicle Spectra with Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis Distances

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, Mark F.; Runkle, Robert C.; Anderson, K. K.; Smith, L. E.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of primary radiation monitoring in support of routine screening and emergency response is to detect characteristics in vehicle radiation signatures that indicate the presence of potential threats. Two conceptual approaches to analyzing gamma-ray spectra for threat detection are isotope identification and anomaly detection. While isotope identification is the time-honored method, an emerging technique is anomaly detection that uses benign vehicle gamma ray signatures to define an expectation of the radiation signature for vehicles that do not pose a threat. Newly acquired spectra are then compared to this expectation using statistical criteria that reflect acceptable false alarm rates and probabilities of detection. The gamma-ray spectra analyzed here were collected at a U.S. land Port of Entry (POE) using a NaI-based radiation portal monitor (RPM). The raw data were analyzed to develop a benign vehicle expectation by decimating the original pulse-height channels to 35 energy bins, extracting composite variables via principal components analysis (PCA), and estimating statistically weighted distances from the mean vehicle spectrum with the mahalanobis distance (MD) metric. This paper reviews the methods used to establish the anomaly identification criteria and presents a systematic analysis of the response of the combined PCA and MD algorithm to modeled mono-energetic gamma-ray sources.

  2. Current status and future potential of energy derived from Chinese agricultural land: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ningning; Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    Energy crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new energy resources to optimize the energy supply structure has become an important measure to prevent energy shortage as well as achieving energy conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of energy agriculture and constructed an energy agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of energy supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on energy resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the energy field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry energy, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future potential of China's marginal land resources, energy crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste energy-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve energy saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229

  3. Current Status and Future Potential of Energy Derived from Chinese Agricultural Land: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    Energy crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new energy resources to optimize the energy supply structure has become an important measure to prevent energy shortage as well as achieving energy conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of energy agriculture and constructed an energy agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of energy supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on energy resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the energy field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry energy, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future potential of China's marginal land resources, energy crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste energy-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve energy saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229

  4. The sea surface currents as a potential factor in the estimation and monitoring of wave energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianoy, Stavros; Liakatas, Aristotelis

    2015-04-01

    The use of wave energy as an alternative renewable is receiving attention the last years under the shadow of the economic crisis in Europe and in the light of the promising corresponding potential especially for countries with extended coastline. Monitoring and studying the corresponding resources is further supported by a number of critical advantages of wave energy compared to other renewable forms, like the reduced variability and the easier adaptation to the general grid, especially when is jointly approached with wind power. Within the framework, a number of countries worldwide have launched research and development projects and a significant number of corresponding studies have been presented the last decades. However, in most of them the impact of wave-sea surface currents interaction on the wave energy potential has not been taken into account neglecting in this way a factor of potential importance. The present work aims at filling this gap for a sea area with increased scientific and economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Based on a combination of high resolution numerical modeling approach with advanced statistical tools, a detailed analysis is proposed for the quantification of the impact of sea surface currents, which produced from downscaling the MyOcean-FO regional data, to wave energy potential. The results although spatially sensitive, as expected, prove beyond any doubt that the wave- sea surface currents interaction should be taken into account for similar resource analysis and site selection approaches since the percentage of impact to the available wave power may reach or even exceed 20% at selected areas.

  5. The Pioneer Anomaly and a Machian Universe

    E-print Network

    Marcelo Samuel Berman

    2008-08-06

    We discuss astronomical and astrophysical evidence, which we relate to the principle of zero-total energy of the Universe, that imply several relations among the mass M, the radius R and the angular momentum L of a "large" sphere representing a Machian Universe. By calculating the angular speed, we find a peculiar centripetal acceleration for the Universe. This is an ubiquituous property that relates one observer to any observable. It turns out that this is exactly the anomalous acceleration observed on the Pioneers spaceships. We have thus, shown that this anomaly is to be considered a property of the Machian Universe. We discuss several possible arguments against our proposal.

  6. The Pioneer Anomaly and a Machian Universe

    E-print Network

    Berman, M S

    2006-01-01

    The principle of zero-total energy of the Universe implies several relations among the mass M, the radius R and the angular momentum L of a "large" sphere representing a Machian Universe. By calculating the angular speed, we find a peculiar centripetal acceleration for the Universe. This is an ubiquituous property that relates one observer to any observable. It turns out that this is exactly the anomalous acceleration observed on the Pioneers spaceships. We have thus, shown that this anomaly is to be considered a property of the Machian Universe.

  7. Dark matter relic from muon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Geneviève; Delaunay, Cédric; Westhoff, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    We show that the recently reported anomalies in b ?s ?+?- transitions, as well as the long-standing g?-2 discrepancy, can be addressed simultaneously by a new massive Abelian gauge boson with loop-induced coupling to muons. Such a scenario typically leads to a stable dark matter candidate with a thermal relic density close to the observed value. Dark matter in our model couples dominantly to leptons, hence signals in direct detection experiments lie well below the current sensitivity. The LHC, in combination with indirect detection searches, can test this scenario through distinctive signatures with muon pairs and missing energy.

  8. The Pioneer anomaly and a Machian universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marcelo Samuel

    2007-12-01

    We discuss astronomical and astrophysical evidence, which we relate to the principle of zero-total energy of the Universe, that imply several relations among the mass M, the radius R and the angular momentum L of a “large” sphere representing a Machian Universe. By calculating the angular speed, we find a peculiar centripetal acceleration for the Universe. This is an ubiquituous property that relates one observer to any observable. It turns out that this is exactly the anomalous acceleration observed on the Pioneers spaceships. We have thus shown that this anomaly is to be considered a property of the Machian Universe. We discuss several possible arguments against our proposal.

  9. Konishi Anomalies and N=1 Curves

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, K

    2004-01-01

    We present a brief summary of exact results on the non-perturbative effective superpotential of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories based on generalized Konishi anomaly equations. In particular we consider theories with classical gauge groups and chiral matter in two-index tensor representations. All these theories can be embedded into theories with unitary gauge group and adjoint matter. This embedding can be used to derive expressions for the exact non-perturbative superpotential in terms of the 1/N expansion of the free energy of the related matrix models.

  10. Konishi Anomalies and N=1 Curves

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner

    2005-01-13

    We present a brief summary of exact results on the non-perturbative effective superpotential of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories based on generalized Konishi anomaly equations. In particular we consider theories with classical gauge groups and chiral matter in two-index tensor representations. All these theories can be embedded into theories with unitary gauge group and adjoint matter. This embedding can be used to derive expressions for the exact non-perturbative superpotential in terms of the 1/N expansion of the free energy of the related matrix models.

  11. Vibrational Levels and Resonances on a New Potential Energy Surface for the Ground Electronic State of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengue, Steve Alexandre; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic ratios for ozone observed in laboratory and atmospheric measurements, known as the ozone isotopic anomaly,[1,2] have been an open question in physical and atmospheric chemistry for the past 30 years. The biggest limitation in achieving agreement between theory and experiment has been the availability of a satisfactory[3-5] ground state potential energy surface (PES). The presence of a spurious reef feature in the asymptotic region of most PESs has been associated with large discrepancies between calculated and observed rates of formation especially at low temperature. We recently proposed a new global potential energy surface for ozone[6,7] possessing 4 features that make it suitable for kinetics and dynamics studies: excellent equilibrium parameters, good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, accurate dissociation energy and a transition region with accurate topography (without the reef artifact). This PES has been used recently to simulate the temperature dependent exchange reaction (16O+16O2) with a quantum statistical model[6,7], and, for the first time, a negative temperature dependence which agrees with experiments was obtained, indicating the good quality of this global surface. A quantum description of the ozone exchange and recombination reaction requires knowledge of the resonances but also the rovibrational levels just below the dissociation. We present results of global 3-well vibrational-state calculations up to the dissociation threshold and (J = 0) resonances up to 1000 wn beyond. The calculations were done using a large DVR basis ( 24 million functions) with a symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm as well as MCTDH. Results indicate the presence of localized bound states at energies close to the dissociation threshold beyond which some long-lived resonances follow, contrasted with a few delocalized bound states with density at large values of the stretching coordinates. References: 1- K. Mauersberger et al., Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 50, 1 (2005) 2- R. Schinke et al., Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 57, 625 (2006) 3- R. Siebert et al., J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9749 (2002) 4- M. Ayouz and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164311 (2013) 5- V.G. Tyuterev et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134307 (2013) 6- R. Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011) 7- R. Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 201103 (2013)

  12. Airports offer unrealized potential for alternative energy production.

    PubMed

    DeVault, Travis L; Belant, Jerrold L; Blackwell, Bradley F; Martin, James A; Schmidt, Jason A; Wes Burger, L; Patterson, James W

    2012-03-01

    Scaling up for alternative energy such as solar, wind, and biofuel raises a number of environmental issues, notably changes in land use and adverse effects on wildlife. Airports offer one of the few land uses where reductions in wildlife abundance and habitat quality are necessary and socially acceptable, due to risk of wildlife collisions with aircraft. There are several uncertainties and limitations to establishing alternative energy production at airports, such as ensuring these facilities do not create wildlife attractants or other hazards. However, with careful planning, locating alternative energy projects at airports could help mitigate many of the challenges currently facing policy makers, developers, and conservationists. PMID:22245856

  13. Investigations of a nonlinear energy harvester with a bistable potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. P.; Owens, B. A.

    2010-04-01

    This paper investigates a nonlinear energy harvester that uses magnetic interactions to create an inertial generator with a bistable potential well. The motivating hypothesis for this work was that nonlinear behavior could be used to improve the performance of an energy harvester by broadening its frequency response. Theoretical investigations study the harvester's response when directly powering an electrical load. Both theoretical and experimental tests show that the potential well escape phenomenon can be used to broaden the frequency response of an energy harvester.

  14. Rivers of Energy: The Hydropower Potential. Worldwatch Paper No. 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deudney, Daniel

    Described are the history, current status and future potential of hydroelectric power in the world. Issues discussed include the environmental and social impacts of dam construction, and the use of small-scale hydroelectric installations in developing nations. Also considered are hydroelectric development of the world's remote regions, the need to…

  15. Determining Equilibrium Structures and Potential Energy Functions for

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Robert J. Le Roy CONTENTS 1 6.0 Introduction 6.1 Quantum Mechanics of Vibration and Rotation 6 potential fits 6.4 Born-Oppenheimer Breakdown Effects 6.5 Concluding Remarks Appendix: What terms contribute, a combined-isotopologue data analysis allows one to account for Born-Oppenheimer breakdown effects. 6

  16. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  17. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons-Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  18. Potential displacement of petroleum imports by solar energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleon, P.; Jackson, B. L.; McNown, R. F.; Mahrenholz, G. J.

    1980-05-01

    The United States currently imports close to half of its petroleum requirements. The economic, social, and political costs of a foreign oil dependency are discussed. Development of alternative, domestic energy sources, such as solar energy technologies, which can displace foreign petroleum is discussed. It is estimated that by the year 2000, solar energy technologies can displace 3.6 quads of petroleum. This figure includes solar energy applications in utilities, industrial and agricultural process heat, and transportation. The estimate can be treated as a lower bound; if the United States were to achieve the proposed goal of 20 quads by 2000, the amount of displaced oil probably would be greater. Although all the displaced oil would not be imported, the reduction in imported petroleum would relieve many of the conditions that increase the present cost of foreign oil to the American consumer.

  19. An Integrated Assessment of China’s Wind Energy Potential

    E-print Network

    Zhang, D.

    Computable general equilibrium (CGE) models seeking to evaluate the impacts of electricity policy face difficulties incorporating detail on the variable nature of renewable energy resources. To improve the accuracy of ...

  20. Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control

    SciTech Connect

    Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particles size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical energy requirements for cement manufacturing.

  1. The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass 

    E-print Network

    Jerko, Christine

    1996-01-01

    Agricultural biomass is a substitute for fossil fuels, which could provide a sustained energy feedstock and possibly reduce further accumulations of greenhouse gases. However, these feedstocks currently face a market dominated by low cost fossil...

  2. Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, E. K.

    1980-04-01

    Adoption of solar thermal technology, considered in terms of the end use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations was studied. The use of low temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology were studied. The adoption of solar technology is favored by the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. High temperature hot water systems are more compatible with solar technology.

  3. Anomaly Detection in Brain Connectivity Structure: An Application to Epilepsy

    E-print Network

    Golland, Polina

    Anomaly Detection in Brain Connectivity Structure: An Application to Epilepsy by Andrew Sweet B to Epilepsy by Andrew Sweet Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science-surgical epilepsy patients. Our goal is to investigate the potential of these non-invasive connectivity approaches

  4. The Potential for Energy Retrofits within the City of Sacramento's Rental Housing Inspection Program

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Megan M.; Sande, Susan; Britt, Michelle L.

    2011-04-15

    This report presents the results of an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the City of Sacramento--under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Projects Technical Assistance Program--to help determine the potential for incorporating energy efficiency standards into the City’s existing Rental Housing Inspection Program as part of Sacramento’s efforts to create a Climate Action Plan.

  5. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  6. Analysis of DSN software anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN anomaly reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 anomalies were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.

  7. Anomalies, Beta Functions, and GUT's

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, Alfredo; Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Rojas, Alma D.

    2009-04-20

    In the framework of supersymmetric Grand Unified theories it is possible to extend the minimal Higgs sectors of the models by introducing high dimension (anomaly free) representations. For example, in the minimal SU(5) supersymmetric Grand Unified Model, this is done to obtain phenomenological viable fermion mass relations and/or to solve the doublet-triplet splitting problem. In this work we explore models with different anomaly free combinations of SU(5) representations motivated by the flavour problem as well as their effect on perturbative validity of the gauge coupling evolution.

  8. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  9. The Potential for Harvesting Energy from the Movement of Trees

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Scott; Knight, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, wireless devices have decreased in size and power requirements. These devices generally use batteries as a power source but can employ additional means of power, such as solar, thermal or wind energy. However, sensor networks are often deployed in conditions of minimal lighting and thermal gradient such as densely wooded environments, where even normal wind energy harvesting is limited. In these cases a possible source of energy is from the motion of the trees themselves. We investigated the amount of energy and power available from the motion of a tree in a sheltered position, during Beaufort 4 winds. We measured the work performed by the tree to lift a mass, we measured horizontal acceleration of free movement, and we determined the angular deflection of the movement of the tree trunk, to determine the energy and power available to various types of harvesting devices. We found that the amount of power available from the tree, as demonstrated by lifting a mass, compares favourably with the power required to run a wireless sensor node. PMID:22163695

  10. Energy Potential of Biomass from Conservation Grasslands in Minnesota, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jungers, Jacob M.; Fargione, Joseph E.; Sheaffer, Craig C.; Wyse, Donald L.; Lehman, Clarence

    2013-01-01

    Perennial biomass from grasslands managed for conservation of soil and biodiversity can be harvested for bioenergy. Until now, the quantity and quality of harvestable biomass from conservation grasslands in Minnesota, USA, was not known, and the factors that affect bioenergy potential from these systems have not been identified. We measured biomass yield, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency, and plant tissue nitrogen (N) as metrics of bioenergy potential from mixed-species conservation grasslands harvested with commercial-scale equipment. With three years of data, we used mixed-effects models to determine factors that influence bioenergy potential. Sixty conservation grassland plots, each about 8 ha in size, were distributed among three locations in Minnesota. Harvest treatments were applied annually in autumn as a completely randomized block design. Biomass yield ranged from 0.5 to 5.7 Mg ha?1. May precipitation increased biomass yield while precipitation in all other growing season months showed no affect. Averaged across all locations and years, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency was 450 l Mg?1 and the concentration of plant N was 7.1 g kg?1, both similar to dedicated herbaceous bioenergy crops such as switchgrass. Biomass yield did not decline in the second or third year of harvest. Across years, biomass yields fluctuated 23% around the average. Surprisingly, forb cover was a better predictor of biomass yield than warm-season grass with a positive correlation with biomass yield in the south and a negative correlation at other locations. Variation in land ethanol yield was almost exclusively due to variation in biomass yield rather than biomass quality; therefore, efforts to increase biomass yield might be more economical than altering biomass composition when managing conservation grasslands for ethanol production. Our measurements of bioenergy potential, and the factors that control it, can serve as parameters for assessing the economic viability of harvesting conservation grasslands for bioenergy. PMID:23577208

  11. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi, Cari, Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto

    2014-09-01

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analitically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitary l-state (l ? 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of diferential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  12. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ? 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  13. New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations accurate free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic integration scheme is often used to calculate changes in the free energy of a system by integrating the change

  14. Use of Empirically-Based Models to Evaluate the Potential of Energy Efficiency and

    E-print Network

    Use of Empirically-Based Models to Evaluate the Potential of Energy Efficiency and Forest Carbon of Energy Efficiency and Forest Carbon Sequestration for Mitigating Climate Change Examining Committee in energy efficiency and increasing carbon sequestration in forests. Analysts using what is known

  15. The Potential of Utilizing Chaparral for Energy1 James R. S. Toland2

    E-print Network

    production from direct utilization, con- version to alternative energy crops such as Jojoba, and by providing energy production sites for techniques such as wind generator farms and solar arrays. This would approachThe Potential of Utilizing Chaparral for Energy1 James R. S. Toland2 1 Presented at the Symposium

  16. Sources and Sinks of Available Potential Energy in a Moist Atmosphere OLIVIER PAULUIS

    E-print Network

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    Sources and Sinks of Available Potential Energy in a Moist Atmosphere OLIVIER PAULUIS Courant as the difference between the total static energy of the atmosphere and that of a reference state that minimizes at which APE is generated in the atmosphere allows one to estimate the amount of kinetic energy that can

  17. Mexico's Energy Reform and the Potential Impact on Texas' Transportation System

    E-print Network

    social, environmental, and economic impact · Production Phase (20+ years) ­ Develop oil & gas fieldsMexico's Energy Reform and the Potential Impact on Texas' Transportation System Jolanda Prozzi foreign investment in energy sector · Hand over regulatory authority of oil and gas sector: ­ Energy

  18. Potential of Development and Application of Wave Energy Conversion Technology in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Guiberteau, K. L.; Liu, Y.; Lee, J.; Kozman, T.

    2014-01-01

    energy in the GOM is explored and verified. Based on the findings, there is great potential in the GOM for wave energy technology and it is expected that the wave energy captured from the GOM can provide a considerable portion of power required by oil...

  19. Potential impact of contrails on solar energy gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Rennhofer, M.; Baumgartner, D.; Gadermaier, J.; Wagner, J.; Laube, W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the effect of contrails on global shortwave radiation and on solar energy gain. The study was done for days with a high contrail persistence and looking at situations where the contrails were obstructing the sun. Measurements of cloudiness using a fish eye camera, diffuse and direct shortwave measurements and measurements of the short circuit current of three different types of photovoltaic (PV) modules were performed at the solar observatory Kanzelhöhe (1540 m a.s.l.) during a period of one year with a time resolution of one minute. Our results show that contrails moving between sun and observer/sensor may reduce the global radiation by up to 72%. A statistic of contrail persistence and influence of contrails on global irradiance and solar energy gain is presented. The losses in solar energy gain that were recorded may even be critical under some circumstances for PV system performance.

  20. Potential impact of contrails on solar energy gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Rennhofer, M.; Baumgartner, D. J.; Gadermaier, J.; Wagner, J. E.; Gehring, J. E.; Laube, W.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of contrails on global short-wave radiation (sum of direct and downward diffuse solar radiation) and on solar energy gain was investigated. The study was performed during days with high contrail persistence and focused on situations where the contrails were obstructing the sun. Measurements of cloudiness using a fish-eye camera, diffuse and direct short-wave measurements and measurements of the short circuit current of three different types of photovoltaic (PV) modules were performed at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory (1540 m a.s.l.) with a time resolution of 1 min over a period of 1 year. The results show that contrails moving between sun and observer/sensor may reduce the global radiation by up to 72%. An analysis of contrail persistence and the influence of contrails on global irradiance and solar energy gain is presented. The losses in solar energy gain that were recorded may be critical under specific circumstances.

  1. Langer's arch: a rare anomaly affects axillary lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed M.; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Langer's arch is the best-known anatomic variant of definite surgical implication in the region of the axilla. This rare anomaly is a muscular slip extending from the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle to the tendons, muscles or fasciae around the superior part of the humerus. In this report, we present a rare case of left axillary arch. During modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, we encountered an abnormal muscle slip crossing the axilla from the LD muscle to the posterior surface of the pectoralis major muscle anterior to the neurovascular structures. Preoperative knowledge is essential to identify such unusual anomaly and avoid potential complications both intra- and postoperatively. PMID:26712801

  2. Langer's arch: a rare anomaly affects axillary lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed M; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Langer's arch is the best-known anatomic variant of definite surgical implication in the region of the axilla. This rare anomaly is a muscular slip extending from the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle to the tendons, muscles or fasciae around the superior part of the humerus. In this report, we present a rare case of left axillary arch. During modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, we encountered an abnormal muscle slip crossing the axilla from the LD muscle to the posterior surface of the pectoralis major muscle anterior to the neurovascular structures. Preoperative knowledge is essential to identify such unusual anomaly and avoid potential complications both intra- and postoperatively. PMID:26712801

  3. Channels of potential energy dissipation during multiply charged argon-ion bombardment of copper.

    PubMed

    Kost, D; Facsko, S; Möller, W; Hellhammer, R; Stolterfoht, N

    2007-06-01

    The dissipation of potential energy of multiply charged Ar ions incident on Cu has been studied by complementary electron spectroscopy and calorimetry at charge states between 2 and 10 and kinetic energies between 100 eV and 1 keV. The emitted and deposited fractions of potential energy increase at increasing charge state, showing a significant jump for charge states q>8 due to the presence of L-shell vacancies in the ion. Both fractions balance the total potential energy, thus rendering former hypotheses of a significant deficit of potential energy obsolete. The experimental data are reproduced by computer simulations based on the extended dynamic classical-over-the-barrier model. PMID:17677857

  4. Optical Potential Approach to $K^{+}d$ Scattering at Low Energies

    E-print Network

    Takashi Takaki

    2009-12-15

    We study the $K^{+}d$ scattering at low energies using the optical potential. Our optical potential consists of the first-order and second-order terms. The total, integrated elastic and elastic differential cross sections at incident kaon momenta below 800 MeV/c are calculated using our optical potential. We found that our results are consistent with the Faddeev calculation as well as the data and especially the second-order optical potential is essential to reproduce them at low energies. We also discuss the multiple scattering effects in this process.

  5. Potential displacement of petroleum imports by solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeon, P.; Jackson, B.L.; McNown, R.F.; Mahrenholz, G.J.

    1980-05-01

    The United States currently imports close to half of its petroleum requirements. This report delineates the economic, social, and political costs of such a foreign oil dependency. These costs are often intangible, but combined they clearly constitute a greater price for imported petroleum than the strictly economic cost. If we can assume that imported oil imposes significant socioeconomic costs upon the American economy and society, one way to reduce these costs is to develop alternative, domestic energy sources - such as solar energy technologies - which can displace foreign petroleum. The second half of this report estimates that by the year 2000, solar energy technologies can displace 3.6 quads of petroleum. This figure includes solar energy applications in utilities, industrial and agricultural process heat, and transportation. The estimate can be treated as a lower bound; if the United States were to achieve the proposed goal of 20 quads by 2000, the amount of displaced oil probably would be greater. Although all the displaced oil would not be imported, the reduction in imported petroleum would relieve many of the conditions that increase the present cost of foreign oil to the American consumer.

  6. Sustainable Development and Energy Geotechnology Potential Roles for Geotechnical Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    FragaszyProgram Dire, Dr. R. J.; Santamarina, Carlos; Espinoza, N.; Jang, J.W.; Jung, J.W.; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The world is facing unprecedented challenges related to energy resources, global climate change, material use, and waste generation. Failure to address these challenges will inhibit the growth of the developing world and will negatively impact the standard of living and security of future generations in all nations. The solutions to these challenges will require multidisciplinary research across the social and physical sciences and engineering. Although perhaps not always recognized, geotechnical engineering expertise is critical to the solution of many energy and sustainability-related problems. Hence, geotechnical engineers and academicians have opportunity and responsibility to contribute to the solution of these worldwide problems. Research will need to be extended to non-standard issues such as thermal properties of soils; sediment and rock response to extreme conditions and at very long time scales; coupled hydro-chemo-thermo-bio-mechanical processes; positive feedback systems; the development of discontinuities; biological modification of soil properties; spatial variability; and emergent phenomena. Clearly, the challenges facing geotechnical engineering in the future will require a much broader knowledge base than our traditional educational programs provide. The geotechnical engineering curricula, from undergraduate education through continuing professional education, must address the changing needs of a profession that will increasingly be engaged in alternative/renewable energy production; energy efficiency; sustainable design, enhanced and more efficient use of natural resources, waste management, and underground utilization.

  7. Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control

    SciTech Connect

    Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical energy requirements for cement manufacturing. Because of its scope, the work of Phase 3 will be carried out in 10 main tasks, which will be discussed in this report.

  8. Energy conservation potential of Portland Cement particle size distribution control

    SciTech Connect

    Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using exiting or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical energy requirements for cement manufacturing. Because of its scope, the work of Phase 3 will be carried out in 10 main tasks, which will be discussed in this report.

  9. Interpreting fluid pressure anomalies in shallow intraplate argillaceous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C. E.

    2015-06-01

    Investigations have revealed several instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid potential in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. Formations with the pressure anomalies are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without anomalies. This is consistent with transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10-17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 annum or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the anomalies provide constraints on formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 annum and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10-19-10-22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.

  10. Attention focusing and anomaly detection in systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.

  11. Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric anomalies that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization anomaly the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric anomalies. Preliminary results suggest that such anomalies may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.

  12. Critical point and conformal anomaly

    E-print Network

    G. A. Kozlov

    2015-03-17

    We study the critical point (CP) phenomenon through the increase of fluctuations related to characteristic critical mode. CP would also be identified through the production of primary photons induced by conformal anomaly of strong and electromagnetic interactions. The novel approach to an approximate scale symmetry breaking is developed for this.

  13. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  14. Correlation of cerium anomalies with indicators of paleoenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, K.G.; Irving, A.J.

    1996-09-01

    Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce anomaly), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce anomalies in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce anomalies, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce anomalies is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. Potential interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce anomalies through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.

  15. Automatic Construction of Anomaly Detectors from Graphical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ferragut, Erik M; Darmon, David M; Shue, Craig A; Kelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Detection of rare or previously unseen attacks in cyber security presents a central challenge: how does one search for a sufficiently wide variety of types of anomalies and yet allow the process to scale to increasingly complex data? In particular, creating each anomaly detector manually and training each one separately presents untenable strains on both human and computer resources. In this paper we propose a systematic method for constructing a potentially very large number of complementary anomaly detectors from a single probabilistic model of the data. Only one model needs to be trained, but numerous detectors can then be implemented. This approach promises to scale better than manual methods to the complex heterogeneity of real-life data. As an example, we develop a Latent Dirichlet Allocation probability model of TCP connections entering Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We show that several detectors can be automatically constructed from the model and will provide anomaly detection at flow, sub-flow, and host (both server and client) levels. This demonstrates how the fundamental connection between anomaly detection and probabilistic modeling can be exploited to develop more robust operational solutions.

  16. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-07-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

  17. Energy Use Reduction Potential in the Beet Sugar Industry 

    E-print Network

    Barron, T. S.; Heist, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    0 L CD ..... J_ ..~..~.~ 0 0 III 0 w ::> QPa U'l o : 'B o L a: 0 w c f- U'l III :--flY~.s ~T ,,; 10 20 30 1i0 ELECTRICITY USE (KWH/TON SLICEl FIGURE 5 493 ESL-IE-84-04-84 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy... stream_source_info ESL-IE-84-04-84.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 18382 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-84-04-84.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ENERGY USE REDUCTION...

  18. Gravitational Anomaly and Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Melgar, Luis; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We study the anomalous induced current of a vortex in a relativistic fluid via the chiral vortical effect, which is analogous to the anomalous current induced by a magnetic field via the chiral magnetic effect. We perform this analysis at weak and strong coupling. We discuss inequivalent implementations to the chemical potential for an anomalous symmetry. At strong coupling we use a holographic model with a pure gauge and mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the Chern-Simons terms do not induce new divergences. Strong and weak coupling results agree precisely. We also point out that the holographic calculation can be done without a singular gauge field configuration on the horizon of the black hole.

  19. Gravitational Anomaly and Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Luis Melgar; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-11-18

    We study the anomalous induced current of a vortex in a relativistic fluid via the chiral vortical effect, which is analogous to the anomalous current induced by a magnetic field via the chiral magnetic effect. We perform this analysis at weak and strong coupling. We discuss inequivalent implementations to the chemical potential for an anomalous symmetry. At strong coupling we use a holographic model with a pure gauge and mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the Chern-Simons terms do not induce new divergences. Strong and weak coupling results agree precisely. We also point out that the holographic calculation can be done without a singular gauge field configuration on the horizon of the black hole.

  20. Kinetic and available potential energy transport during the stratospheric sudden warming in January 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Qunjie; Gao, Shouting; Lü, Daren

    2012-11-01

    The local features of transient kinetic energy and available potential energy were investigated using ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) Interim Reanalysis data for the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event of January 2009. The Western Europe high plays important roles in the propagation of the energy from North America to Eurasian. When the Western Europe high appeared and shifted eastward, energy conversions increased and energy propagated from North America to Eurasian as a form of interaction energy flow. The baroclinic conversion between transient-eddy kinetic energy ( K e) and transient-eddy available potential energy ( A e) and the horizontal advection of geopotential height were approximately one order of magnitude less than K e and A e generation terms. So, these terms were less important to this SSW event.

  1. Energy potential from livestock and poultry wastes in the South. Agricultural Economic Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H.B.; Ogden, E.A.

    1984-11-01

    Livestock and poultry wastes could produce significant amounts of biomass energy if conventional energy prices continue to rise. This study estimates the economically recoverable energy available through anaerobic digestion or direct burning of animal wastes in the South for the base year 1980 with projections for 1985 and 1990. Potential thermal energy from livestock and poultry wastes in 1990 could total more than 79.5 trillion Btu, or about 30 percent of the energy from such sources nationwide. The total potential farm value of biomass energy from livestock and poultry enterprises in the South could range from $344 million to $1.08 billion in 1990 depending upon the types of conventional energy displaced. Energy products from these wastes attained their highest value when substituted for LP gas.

  2. Geothermal energy: a proven resource with costly potential

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The commercial use of geothermal energy to generate electricity has been spreading across the country since the California Geyser site was developed in 1960. Petroleum companies see geothermal power generation as a way to broaden their own base. The binary-cycle technology to use hydrothermal resources will be ready by 1985. Power generation from geothermal heat will be costly even though the resource itself is free and renewable; but the economics will improve as fossil-fuel prices increase. (DCK)

  3. Energy conservation potential of Portland Cement particle size distribution control

    SciTech Connect

    Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical energy requirements for cement manufacturing. The work of Phase 3, because of its scope, will be carried out in 10 main tasks, some of which will be handled simultaneously. Progress on each of these tasks is discussed in this paper.

  4. Relation between quark-antiquark potential and quark-antiquark free energy in hadronic matter

    E-print Network

    Zhen-Yu Shen; Xiao-Ming Xu

    2015-07-07

    In the high-temperature quark-gluon plasma and its subsequent hadronic matter created in a high-energy nucleus-nucleus collision, the quark-antiquark potential depends on the temperature. The temperature-dependent potential is expected to be derived from the free energy obtained in lattice gauge theory calculations. This requires one to study the relation between the quark-antiquark potential and the quark-antiquark free energy. When the system's temperature is above the critical temperature, the potential of a heavy quark and a heavy antiquark almost equals the free energy, but the potential of a light quark and a light antiquark, of a heavy quark and a light antiquark and of a light quark and a heavy antiquark is substantially larger than the free energy. When the system's temperature is below the critical temperature, the quark-antiquark free energy can be taken as the quark-antiquark potential. This allows one to apply the quark-antiquark free energy to study hadron properties and hadron-hadron reactions in hadronic matter.

  5. Proton Size Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Keung, Wai-Yee; Marfatia, Danny

    2011-04-15

    A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low energy data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.

  6. Generation of available potential energy and the energy cycle during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, D. A.; Rosen, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two major themes were pursued during this research period. The first of these involved examining the impacts of satellite-based data and the forecast model used by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) on general circulation statistics. For the other major topic, the diabatic heating fields produced by GLA were examined for one month during the FGGE First Special Observing Period. As part of that effort, the three-dimensional distribution of the four component heating fields were studied, namely those due to shortwave radiation, Q sub SW, longwave radiation, Q sub LW, sensible heating, Q sub S, and latent heating, Q sub L. These components were calculated as part of the GLA analysis/forecast system and archived every quarter day; from these archives cross products with temperature were computed to enable the direct calculation of certain terms of the large-scale atmospheric energy cycle, namely those involving the generation of available potential energy (APE). The decision to archive the diabatic heating components separately has enabled researchers to study the role of the various processes that drive the energy cycle of the atmosphere.

  7. Top-down free-energy minimization on protein potential energy landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Church, Bruce W.; Shalloway, David

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical properties of potential energy landscapes have been used to gain insight into thermodynamic and kinetic properties of protein ensembles. It also may be possible to use them to direct computational searches for thermodynamically stable macroscopic states, i.e., computational protein folding. To this end, we have developed a top-down search procedure in which conformation space is recursively dissected according to the intrinsic hierarchical structure of a landscape's effective-energy barriers. This procedure generates an inverted tree similar to the disconnectivity graphs generated by local minima-clustering methods, but it fundamentally differs in the manner in which the portion of the tree that is to be computationally explored is selected. A key ingredient is a branch-selection algorithm that takes advantage of statistically predictive properties of the landscape to guide searches down the tree branches that are most likely to lead to the physically relevant macroscopic states. Using the computational folding of a ?-hairpin-forming peptide as an example, we show that such predictive properties indeed exist and can be used for structure prediction by free-energy global minimization. PMID:11344256

  8. Local gravity anomalies produced by dislocation sources.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Dilatancy, in general, does not correspond to the absence of a free air anomaly, as might be suggested by the special case of a spherical source of dilatation. For two-dimensional models a cylindrical source of dilatation produces no free air gravity anomaly, dip-slip faulting produces no Bouguer anomaly, and open cracks produce a Bouguer anomaly equal to that which would be produced had the material within the crack been mined out without deforming the solid. -from Author

  9. Maximal Potential Energy Transport: AVariational Principle for Solidification Problems A. J. Wells,1,4

    E-print Network

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Maximal Potential Energy Transport: AVariational Principle for Solidification Problems A. J. Wells solidification rate, the chimneys are regularly spaced (e.g., [6]), whereas during transient growth the mean

  10. Appearance Potentials and Kinetic Energies of Ions from N2, CO, and NO

    E-print Network

    Hierl, Peter M.; Franklin, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    A recently developed method has permitted the measurement of excess translational energy of ions formed in a time?of?flight mass spectrometer. The method, in conjunction with the RPD technique for determining appearance potentials, has been applied...

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of the vibrational potential energy surfaces in electronic ground and excited states 

    E-print Network

    Yang, Juan

    2007-09-17

    The vibrational potential energy surfaces in electronic ground and excited states of several ring molecules were investigated using several different spectroscopic methods, including far-infrared (IR), Raman, ultraviolet ...

  12. Potential Energy Savings from Optimized Schedule and Economizer Cycles in the Moody Library at UTMB 

    E-print Network

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study which was initiated in order to estimate the potential energy savings due to optimizing the HVAC operation schedule and using economizer cycles in the Moody Library Building ...

  13. Determining the Intermolecular Potential Energy in a Gas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olbregts, J.; Walgraeve, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which gas viscosity coefficients over a large temperature range are used to determine the parameters of the intermolecular potential energy and other properties such as virial coefficients. (MLH)

  14. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on National Forest System Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-01-01

    This technical report and CD for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), evaluates the potential for renewable energy resource development on National Forest System (NFS) lands. USFS can use the report findings to consider potential for development of solar and wind energy resources on NFS lands, in land management decisions. The Geographical Information System (GIS) based analysis resulted in the following findings: (1) Ninety-nine National Forest Units have high potential for power production from one or more of these solar and wind energy sources; and (2) Twenty National Forest Units in nine states have high potential for power production from two or more of these solar and wind energy sources.

  15. Calibrated energy simulations of potential energy savings in actual retail buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhafi, Zuhaira

    Retail stores are commercial buildings with high energy consumption due to their typically large volumes and long hours of operation. This dissertation assesses heating, ventilating and air conditioning saving strategies based on energy simulations with input parameters from actual retail buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is that "Retail store buildings will save a significant amount of energy by (1) modifying ventilation rates, and/or (2) resetting set point temperatures. These strategies have shown to be beneficial in previous studies. As presented in the literature review, potential energy savings ranged from 0.5% to 30% without compromising indoor thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The retail store buildings can be ventilated at rates significantly lower than rates called for in the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010 while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Therefore, two dissertation objectives are addressed: (1) Investigate opportunities to reduce ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality in retail stores located in Central Pennsylvania, (2) Investigate opportunities to increase (in summer) and decrease (in winter) set point temperatures that do not compromise thermal comfort. This study conducted experimental measurements of ventilation rates required to maintain acceptable air quality and indoor environmental conditions requirements for two retail stores using ASHRAE Standard 62.1_2012. More specifically, among other parameters, occupancy density, indoor and outdoor pollutant concentrations, and indoor temperatures were measured continuously for one week interval. One of these retail stores were tested four times for a yearlong time period. Pollutants monitored were formaldehyde, carbon dioxide, particle size distributions and concentrations, as well as total volatile organic compounds. As a part of the base protocol, the number of occupants in each store was hourly counted during the test, and the results reveal that the occupant densities were approximately 20% to 30% of that called by ASHRAE 62.1. Formaldehyde was the most important contaminant of concern in retail stores investigated. Both stores exceeded the most conservative health guideline for formaldehyde (OEHHA TWA REL = 7.3 ppb). This study found that source removal and reducing the emission rate, as demonstrated in retail stores sampled in this study, is a viable strategy to meet the health guideline. Total volatile compound were present in retail stores at low concentrations well below health guidelines suggested by Molhave (1700microg /m 2) and Bridges (1000 microg /m2). Based on these results and through mass--balance modeling, different ventilation rate reduction scenarios were proposed, and for these scenarios the differences in energy consumption were estimated. Findings of all phases of this desertion have contributed to understanding (a) the trade-off between energy savings and ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality, and (b) the trade-off between energy savings and resets of indoor air temperature that do not compromise thermal comfort. Two models for retail stores were built and calibrated and validated against actual utility bills. Energy simulation results indicated that by lowering the ventilation rates from measured and minimum references would reduce natural gas energy use by estimated values of 6% to 19%. Also, this study found that the electrical cooling energy consumption was not significantly sensitive to different ventilation rates. However, increasing indoor air temperature by 3°C in summer had a significant effect on the energy savings. In winter, both energy savings strategies, ventilation reduction and decrease in set points, had a significant effect on natural gas consumption. Specially, when the indoor air temperature 21°C was decreased to 19.4°C with the same amount of ventilation rate of Molhaves guideline for both cases. Interestingly, the temperature of 23.8°C (75°F), which is the lowest value of ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort for sedentary people (cashiers) and the high

  16. Use of MAGSAT anomaly data for crustal structure and mineral resources in the US Midcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. S. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Personnel matters related to the processing and interpretation of MAGSAT data are reported. Efforts are being initiated to determine the crustal geology, structure, and potential economic consequences to be deduced from the satellite magnetic anomalies in conjuction with correlative data.

  17. [Horseshoe kidney: not a simple fusion anomaly].

    PubMed

    Caccetta, Francesco; Caroppo, Maurizio; Musio, Fernando; Mudoni, Anna; Accogli, Antonella; Zacheo, Maria Dolores; Burzo, Domenica; Bramato, Daniele; Carluccio, Giancamillo; Nuzzo, Vitale

    2015-01-01

    The horseshoe kidney is a congenital anatomical defect of the kidney that occurs in 0,25% of the population and is generally characterized by the fusion of the lower poles of the two kidneys through an isthmus and to which may be associated with urogenital and renal vascular anomalies. Asymptomatic in 1/3 of the cases and, most of time, accidentally discovered during a radiological examination, promotes nephrolithiasis, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux and pyelonephritis. We report two cases of patients with kidney horseshoe, characterized by the abrupt onset of a septic state with oligo-anuric acute renal failure, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities, rapid decay of the general conditions, with detection of nephrolithiasis, hydronephrosis and acute pyelonephritis and whose clinical management resulted in a significant and synergistic nefro-urology involvment. The kidney horseshoe not represent so only a simple fusion anomaly but rather an important anatomical condition that, once diagnosed, it would be worthy of a careful clinical, radiological and laboratory surveillance, in order to prevent the potential complications that may be also particularly severe. PMID:26252260

  18. Potentials for High-Energy Scattering from Hydrogenlike Atoms 

    E-print Network

    Reading, John F.

    1970-01-01

    contains the essential difficulties of electron-, muon-, or proton-hydrogen scattering at high energies. The wave equation describing the motion is [- (8/2m, )~?'+H, + V(r, H)] g =EN, where H, = ?(5'/2m, )&'?-e /r- IVO and V(r, 8)= e'[(I/H) I/I R ?r... perturbs the bound system from which it is scattering. The projectile is considered initially to be moving along the Z axis at some impact parameter 8; we define y, as e iks~ where k= (2mkE/h ) fan@' e V ? ?+H + V(r H) p =P. p2~ ~ m ezP If we...

  19. On the energy harvesting potential of piezoaeroelastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, A.; Vieira, W. G. R.; De Marqui, C.; Inman, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper investigates the concept of piezoaeroelasticity for energy harvesting. The focus is placed on mathematical modeling and experimental validations of the problem of generating electricity at the flutter boundary of a piezoaeroelastic airfoil. An electrical power output of 10.7 mW is delivered to a 100 k? load at the linear flutter speed of 9.30 m/s (which is 5.1% larger than the short-circuit flutter speed). The effect of piezoelectric power generation on the linear flutter speed is also discussed and a useful consequence of having nonlinearities in the system is addressed.

  20. Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades 

    E-print Network

    Meisegeier, D.; Howes, M.; King, D.; Hall, J.

    2002-01-01

    (kWh/year) 1993 MEC 6.86 9,855 2000 IECC 5.32 6,090 The primary differences between these two codes, from an energy and demand perspective, are the more stringent window and thermostat requirements in the 2000 IECC. A detailed..., and environmental impacts are estimated at the community level. INTRODUCTION Approximately 1.5 million new homes are constructed each year in the United States according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This construction is fueling a demand for electricity...

  1. Energy use reduction potential in the beet sugar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.S.; Cleary, M.

    1985-01-01

    Process energy use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.

  2. Energy use reduction potential in the beet sugar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Process energy use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.

  3. Estimation and Monitoring of Wind/Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Galanis, George; Emmanouil, George; Emmanouil, George; Hayes, Dan; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalogeri, Christina; Kallos, George

    2013-04-01

    ?he adaptation and use of innovative methodologies for the exploitation of renewable energy marine resources is one of the main issues today for the environmental science community. Within this framework, the exploitation of wind and wave energy potential for coastal and island states seems to be one of the promising solutions and highly interesting from research and technological point of view. In this work, the activities of two projects focusing on the study of wind/wave energy over the area of Eastern Mediterranean Sea are presented. The "Integrated High Resolution System for Monitoring and Quantifying the Wave Energy Potential in the EEZ of Cyprus" (Ewave project) focuses on the estimation, monitoring and forecasting of the wave energy potential over the Levantine Basin with special emphasis to the Exclusive Economical Zone of Cyprus, while the "Development and application of new mathematical and physical models for Monitoring the wind and Sea wave Energy Potential" (MOSEP project) is a platform for developing new mathematical algorithms for the estimation of the wave energy over the Aegean Sea. In both projects, high resolution digital atlases of sea wave/wind climatological characteristics and the distribution of the wind and wave energy potential are developed for the coastal and offshore areas of the East Mediterranean sea . Moreover, new models for the prediction and quantification of wave energy in short and long forecast horizons are proposed. Statistical results concerning the probability density functions of the wind speed, the significant wave height, as well as the energy potential will be presented for selected sea areas in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, while test case studies in certain regions favor to wind/wave renewable energy will be discussed.

  4. Gravitational Anomalies and Thermal Hall effect in Topological Insulators

    E-print Network

    Michael Stone

    2012-01-19

    It has been suggested that a temperature gradient will induce a Leduc-Righi, or thermal Hall, current in the Majorana quasiparticles localized on the surface of class DIII topological insulators, and that the magnitude of this current can be related {\\it via} an Einstein argument to a Hall-like energy flux induced by gravity. We critically examine this idea, and argue that the gravitational Hall effect is more complicated than its familiar analogue. A conventional Hall current is generated by a {\\it uniform} electric field, but computing the flux from the gravitational Chern-Simons functional shows that gravitational field {\\it gradients} - i.e. tidal forces - are needed to induce a energy-momentum flow. We relate the surface energy-momentum flux to a domain-wall gravitational anomaly {\\it via} the Callan-Harvey inflow mechanism. We stress that the gauge invariance of the combined bulk-plus-boundary theory ensures that the current in the domain wall always experiences a "covariant" rather than "consistent" anomaly. We use this observation to confirm that the tidally induced energy-momentum current exactly accounts for the covariant gravitational anomaly in $(1+1)$ dimensional domain-wall fermions. The same anomaly arises whether we write the Chern-Simons functional in terms of the Christofflel symbol or in terms of the the spin connection.

  5. Theory of the phase anomaly in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Volland, H.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature-density phase anomaly is discussed on the basis of a quasi-three-dimensional model in which the thermosphere dynamics (including energy advection and diffusion associated with wind circulation) is considered in a self consistent form. Included in this analysis are the first three harmonics with nonlinear coupling between diurnal and semi-diurnal tides.

  6. Non-resonant energy harvesting via an adaptive bistable potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Narrow bandwidth and easy detuning, inefficiency in broadband and non-stationary excitations, and difficulties in matching a linear harvester’s resonance frequency to low-frequency excitations at small scales, have convinced researchers to investigate nonlinear, and in particular bistable, energy harvesters in recent years. However, bistable harvesters suffer from co-existing low and high energy orbits, and sensitivity to initial conditions, and have recently been proven inefficient when subjected to many real-world random and non-stationary excitations. Here, we propose a novel non-resonant buy-low-sell-high strategy that can significantly improve the harvester’s effectiveness at low frequencies in a much more robust fashion. This strategy could be realized by a passive adaptive bistable system. Simulation results confirm the high effectiveness of the adaptive bistable system following a buy-low-sell-high logic when subjected to harmonic and random non-stationary walking excitations compared to its conventional bistable and linear counterparts.

  7. Assessment of energy potential from biomass in Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.; Ristroph, D.L.; Dionigi, C.P.; Nghiem, N.P.

    1983-12-01

    The objective of this project is to identify feasible Louisiana-grown biomass crops and residues, to combine these with technically and economically feasible conversion processes, and to provide integrated biomass energy production systems in Louisiana. Among the recommended integrated systems are: cotton gin trash and rice hull processing residues used for either direct combustion or methane or ethanol production. Steam generation via direct combustion is recommended. Hardwood chips are economically feasible despite considerable price and supply instability, while high sugar or starch content crops are easily converted to ethanol but limited by price. Possible breakthroughs in biomass production or in the hydrolysis of starch or cellulose substrates may decrease processing costs. Recommended areas for future study dealing with production include: (1) increase biomass availability and density; (2) increase harvesting, transportation and storage technologies; (3) inexpensive, efficient small scale conversion; and (4) better knowledge of the effects of removal of residues on soil fertility and erosion and other ecosociological impacts. Recommendations that concern conversion are: (5) increased understanding of optimal separation and use of molecular fractions of lignocellulose; (6) more efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulose; (7) better microorganisms for conversion to energy; and (8) more efficient technology specific to biomass. Twenty-two research topics that would enhance the above recommendations are proposed.

  8. Persistent anomaly forcing in a two-level global circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.A. )

    1993-08-15

    Perpetual January data from a simple global two-level model are used to diagnose forcing of the model's low-frequency (LF), large-scale flow. The forcing is considered within the context of a hypothetical low-order model that resolves only slowly varying planetary-scale modes. The forcing is partitioned into resolved components consisting of LF, planetary-scale processes and unresolved components that involve high-frequency (HF) transient eddy and LF synoptic-scale effects. Spatial patterns of the net tendencies of low-pass filtered, planetary-scale barotropic streamfunction and vertically averaged temperature are compared with corresponding patterns of resolved and unresolved forcing during the onset, maintenance, and decay stages of composited persistent anomalies. Growth stages of positive and negative persistent anomalies that are found in both the Atlantic (ATL) and Pacific (PAC) regions are dominated by autonomous process. For positive anomalies, the net tendencies and resolved forcing patterns resemble large-scale wave trains emanating from the subtropics upstream of the anomaly region. Negative anomaly growth is dominated in both regions by autonomous process to a greater extent that positive anomaly growth. Unresolved forcing is critical in mechanically maintaining persistent anomalies of both signs, but thermally acts in a destructive sense. Decay stages of all anomalies are dominated by resolved forcing. The extent to which local signatures of barotropic and baroclinic energy sources accompany anomaly onset is examined by constructing these terms in the context of a local kinetic energy budget. Redistribution terms in the local kinetic energy budget are important. The representativeness of composites in depicting the dynamics of persistent anomalies is called into question. An examination of the slowly varying local resolved and unresolved forcing during life cycles of individual members of positive anomaly development. 45 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Deep correlation between cosmic-ray anomaly and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Yoshioka, Koichi

    2010-09-01

    The positron anomaly recently reported by the cosmic-ray measurements suggests that, if explained by the decay of dark matter particle, the decay source is closely linked with the leptonic sector of the standard model. It is observed that, with a simple dimensional analysis, the lifetime of dark matter for the anomaly is expressed by the energy scale of neutrino masses. We present two scenarios in which these two matters at issue (the dark matter width and the tiny neutrino masses) stem from a single operator involving a gauge-singlet scalar field.

  10. New potential energy surface for the HCS(+)-He system and inelastic rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Quintas-Sánchez, Ernesto; Tuckey, Philip

    2015-07-28

    A new high quality potential energy surface is calculated at a coupled-cluster single double triple level with an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set for the HCS(+)-He system. This potential energy surface is used in low energy quantum scattering calculations to provide a set of (de)-excitation cross sections and rate coefficients among the first 20 rotational levels of HCS(+) by He in the range of temperature from 5 K to 100 K. The paper discusses the impact of the new ab initio potential energy surface on the cross sections at low energy and provides a comparison with the HCO(+)-He system. The HCS(+)-He rate coefficients for the strongest transitions differ by factors of up to 2.5 from previous rate coefficients; thus, analysis of astrophysical spectra should be reconsidered with the new rate coefficients. PMID:26233137

  11. Resolving the axial mass anomaly in ?? scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Budd, H. S.; Christy, M. E.

    2012-09-01

    We present a parametrization of the observed enhancement in the transverse electron quasielastic (QE) response function for nucleons bound in carbon as a function of the square of the four momentum transfer (Q2) in terms of a correction to the magnetic form factors of bound nucleons. The parametrization should also be applicable to the transverse cross section in neutrino scattering. If the transverse enhancement originates from meson exchange currents (MEC), then it is theoretically expected that any enhancement in the longitudinal or axial contributions is small. We present the predictions of the "Transverse Enhancement" model (which is based on electron scattering data only) for the ??, ?¯? differential and total QE cross sections for nucleons bound in carbon. The Q2 dependence of the transverse enhancement is observed to resolve much of the long standing discrepancy ("Axial Mass Anomaly") in the QE total cross sections and differential distributions between low energy and high energy neutrino experiments on nuclear targets.

  12. Axial anomaly and negative longitudinal magnetoresistance: theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Pallab; Pixley, Jed

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally axial anomaly is associated with quantum mechanical violation of U(1) axial symmetry of relativistic Dirac/Weyl fermions in odd spatial dimensions, in the presence of electromagnetic gauge fields. Recently there has been considerable interest in both condensed matter and high energy physics communities in Nielsen and Ninomiya's original proposal that the axial anomaly can lead to a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance for condensed matter realization of Weyl fermions. In this talk I will show that the axial anomaly can arise in any generic three dimensional material placed under parallel electric and quantizing magnetic fields. However, the emergence of negative magnetoresistance depends crucially on the forward scattering nature of the underlying relaxation mechanism. Therefore, sufficiently clean and dilute three dimensional materials without magnetism or magnetic impurities can be promising candidates for observing this phenomenon. I will briefly discuss concrete experimental evidence of this enigmatic effect in quasi-2D layered materials.

  13. Isotopic anomalies and proton irradiation in the early solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.; Dwek, E.; Woosley, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear cross sections relevant to the various isotopic-abundance anomalies found in solar-system objects are evaluated in an attempt to set constraints on the hypothesized mechanism of irradiation of forming planetesimals by energetic protons from the young sun. A power-law proton spectrum is adopted, attention is restricted to proton energies less than about 20 MeV, and average cross sections are calculated for several reactions that might be expected to lead to the observed anomalies. The following specific anomalies are examined in detail: Al-26, Na-22, Xe-126, I-129, Kr-80, V-50, Nb-92, La-138, Ta-180, Hg-196, K-40, Ar-36, O-17, O-18, N-15, C-13, Li, Be, and B. It is suggested that the picture of presolar-grain carriers accounts for the facts more naturally than do irradiation models.

  14. Change in the periodicity of the energy potential of watershed runoff from climate, land use and energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea; Lindström, Göran

    2013-04-01

    Recent investigations show that landuse changes and hydropower regulation has caused significant changes in the runoff statistics in Swedish rivers during the 20th century. These changes are found to be more pronounced than the corresponding change that has occurred due to climatic changes and have implications to frequency of floods as well as the effectiveness of hydropower regulation. Because of the change towards a sustainable energy system with more intermittent energy sources, like windpower, the stress on the water availability will come from several climatic, technical and management factors. Here we use the coherence spectrum in river discharge to derive information on the variability in the energy potential over different periods (annually and monthly) and estimate the energy potential associated with the different terrestrial part of the hydrological cycle, such as land potential, stream flow potential and groundwater circulation potential. The overall stream flow potential in Sweden is estimated to be 145 TWh per year, but there is a significant variation in this potential over the land surface as well as temporally. The coherence spectrum between northern and southern rivers in Sweden approaches asymptotically about 20 - 25 % for long-term variations. This means that the coefficient of variation of the in annual discharge for the entire country is enhanced in comparison the coefficient of variation of the annual discharge from individual rivers. Tentative analyses of feasible hydropower potential indicate that the coherence of discharge is a significant factor for coordination and utilization of the water availability.

  15. Energy conserving and potential-enstrophy dissipating schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Hsu, Yueh-Jiuan G.

    1990-01-01

    To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease while energy is conserved (when the mass flux is nondivergent and time is continuous). Among this family of schemes, there is a member that minimizes the spurious impact of infinite potential vorticities associated with infinitesimal fluid depth. The scheme is, therefore, useful for problems in which the free surface may intersect with the lower boundary.

  16. A mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy conserving lateral fluidland boundary scheme for the shallow water equations

    E-print Network

    Ketefian, Gerard

    A mass, energy, vorticity, and potential enstrophy conserving lateral fluid­land boundary scheme conditions Conservation Energy Vorticity Potential enstrophy a b s t r a c t A numerical scheme for treating. Introduction The use of energy, enstrophy, and/or potential enstrophy conserving numerical schemes

  17. Development Potential for California's Offshore Wind Energy Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, M. J.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Archer, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    An initial analysis was performed for areas suitable for offshore wind farm development near the California coast. The siting of an offshore wind farm is limited by water depth, with shallow water being the most preferable economically. Acceptable depths for offshore wind farms were broken up into three categories, based on current and future wind turbine tower support technology; ?20 meters depth for monopile towers, ?50 meters for water jacket tripods/quadrapods, and ? 200 meters depth for deep water floating tower technology which is likely to be developed in the next 15 years. Using the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) to predict winds aloft at high resolution (1.67 and 5 km) near the locations of interest, annual 80 meter wind speeds were found for each area. Annual 80 meter wind speeds were based on the average of January, April, July, and Octobers' 2005/2006 MM5 model data. The interannual variation is also examined. Floating buoys were used to validate the surface level winds off the California coast. Using the REpower 5M 5.0 MW, 126 meter diameter offshore wind turbine, a preliminary overall resource assessment was made for coastal California. Initial estimates show that 2-10 TWh, 9-27 TWh, and 67-293 TWh of energy could be harnessed annually using monopile, state of the art, and future turbine support technology in Northern California, the Bay Area, and Southern California respectively.

  18. Exotic muon decays and the KARMEN anomaly

    E-print Network

    S. N. Gninenko; N. V. Krasnikov

    1998-05-27

    An anomaly in time distribution of neutrinos from the ISIS pulsed beam stop source observed by the KARMEN collaboration is discussed. We show that the anomaly can be interpreted as a superposition of two exponentials, both having time constants consistent with the $\\mu^{+}$ lifetime of 2.2 $\\mu s$. % and, therefore, It is assumed that they both originate from muon decays at rest. One of them describes the time distribution of the prompt neutrino events, while the other describes the time distribution of events from delayed decays of slowly moving ($\\beta \\simeq 0.02$) particles in the KARMEN calorimeter. We propose here that these particles are produced in exotic decays of positive muons $\\mu^{+}\\to e^{+} + X$, resulting in the second exponential time distribution shifted by the time of flight with respect to the time distribution of neutrino events. This model gives an aceptable fit to the KARMEN data if $X$ has a mass of 103.9 MeV. The possible decay modes of this new massive neutral particle are discussed. This hypothesis can be experimentally tested in the near future by studying the low energy part of the $e^{+}$ spectrum in the $\\mu^{+}$ decays.

  19. Titanium isotopic anomalies in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neimeyer, S.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1984-07-01

    Studies of Ti isotopic compositions have shown that virtually every Ca-Al-rich Allende inclusion contains anomalous Ti. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a study of Ti isotopic compositions in meteorites. One objective of the study is to evaluate the possibility of a relation between oxygen and Ti anomalies, while another objective is to explore questions regarding the origin of the Ti anomalies. A summary of the major experimental findings of the study of Ti isotopic compositions is also presented. It is noted that an assessment of the implications of the Ti results favors a chemical memory type of model in which products from various nucleosynthetic sources survive in mineral grains. Isotopic heterogeneities are then preserved due to incomplete mixing and/or equilibriation with the bulk of solar system matter. Strong arguments are found to exist against a pure late supernova injection model.

  20. Circum-Arctic Magnetic Anomalies - Challenges of Compilation and the Value of Regional Interpretation in a Frontier Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltus, R. W.; Gaina, C.; Brown, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Important societal issues are driving increased attention to polar regions. The arctic, in particular, is the focus of scientific studies relating to climate change as well as resource exploration and territorial claims. The news and entertainment media are picking up on polar themes and driving interest within popular culture. Part of the attraction and mystique of the ends of the Earth lies in their relative inaccessibility and harsh environment. These same attributes make it difficult to conduct even basic scientific investigation, and therefore, the arctic remains a scientific frontier in many respects. Delineation of a robust tectonic framework for the top of the world is an essential prerequisite to resource assessment. The difficulty of making direct geologic observations beneath ice and sea requires remote measurement. Regional magnetic anomaly mapping provides important constraining information for the development of tectonic models for this structurally complex region. In addition to the obvious logistical challenges to detailed magnetic field measurement in the high arctic, noise and instability in the magnetic field itself at high latitudes presents difficulties. Nevertheless, regional magnetic anomaly data have been collected over the past 50 years for much of the arctic. The available surveys are diverse in vintage and survey design; the amplitude and frequency content of measured anomalies are widely variable. Availability of metadata and other documentation are also inconsistent for these surveys. This leads to significant challenges in constructing accurate regional magnetic anomaly maps. Preliminary maps from a new international cooperation effort (CAMP-GM, under the direction of Carmen Gaina, Geological Survey of Norway) provide the most consistent view yet of magnetic anomalies for the tectonically complex arctic basins and surrounding continents. Careful attention to digital compilation details allows the new grids to be mathematically filtered to assist in the regional characterization of magnetic domains and boundaries. The frequency content, amplitudes, and patterns of regional magnetic anomalies provide a window into the tectonic character and structure of the crust. Continental, oceanic, and various types of transitional crust each have a distinctive magnetic anomaly signature that can be used to define a fundamental tectonic framework of the circum-arctic. Interpretation can be extended by including additional data such as regional bathymetry (an indicator of crustal buoyancy and isostatic equilibrium) and free air gravity (an independent indicator of crustal density balance and composition). Used together with magnetic domains these data reveal a composite geodynamic subdivision of the arctic. This subdivision provides a framework for investigations of mineral and energy resource potential, tectonic reconstruction, and long-term climate dynamics.

  1. Environmental Conservation/Studies "focus area" (with potential courses listed) Energy and the Environment

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Environmental Conservation/Studies "focus area" (with potential courses listed) Energy areas: Materials and Methods area (minimum 6 cr) * BCT 204 Construction Methods and Materials * BCT 211 Energy Efficient Housing * BCT 304 Properties of Wood * BCT 313 Light-Frame Structure Technology * BCT

  2. Inverse Scattering at a Fixed Energy for Long-Range Potentials

    E-print Network

    Ricardo Weder; Dimitri Yafaev

    2006-10-08

    In this paper we consider the inverse scattering problem at a fixed energy for the Schr\\"odinger equation with a long-range potential in $\\ere^d, d\\geq 3$. We prove that the long-range part can be uniquely reconstructed from the leading forward singularity of the scattering amplitude at some positive energy.

  3. Untapped Power: Lost Energy Potential from Unambitious National Policy in National Parks 

    E-print Network

    Nicholas, Waldron

    2014-11-27

    visual impact, there is 2,600,000 ± 600,000kW of potential energy with 100m diameter turbines. There is a large amount of energy in and around the Lake District that could be exploited, however there is very limited space which does not visually interact...

  4. California offshore wind energy potential Michael J. Dvorak a,*, Cristina L. Archer b

    E-print Network

    % in 2008 alone to 120,798 MW of installed capacity worldwide. Offshore wind power grew at an even fasterCalifornia offshore wind energy potential Michael J. Dvorak a,*, Cristina L. Archer b , Mark Z December 2009 Keywords: Offshore wind energy California Resource assessment MM5 Bathymetry Mesoscale

  5. Potential energy, doubling and BornOppenheimer breakdown functions for the B 1

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Potential energy, doubling and Born­Oppenheimer breakdown functions for the B 1 u ``barrier'' state of Li2 Yiye Huang and Robert J. Le Roy Guelph-Waterloo Centre for Graduate Work in Chemistry, University energy function plus Born­Oppenheimer breakdown and -doubling perturbation radial strength functions

  6. Many-body and model-potential calculations of low-energy photoionization parameters for francium

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Walter R.

    Many-body and model-potential calculations of low-energy photoionization parameters for francium A parameter are calculated for the 7s state of francium for photon energies below 10 eV. Two distinct unknown p states in francium. PACS number s : 31.15.Md, 32.80.Fb, 33.60. q I. INTRODUCTION Remarkable

  7. Exploiting energy-saving potential in heterogeneous networks Lefteris Mamatas* and Vassilis Tsaoussidis

    E-print Network

    Tsaoussidis, Vassilis

    Exploiting energy-saving potential in heterogeneous networks Lefteris Mamatas* and Vassilis. Introduction Energy consumption is becoming a crucial factor for wireless, ad hoc and sensor networks, which designed for wired network infrastructure, does not cope with wireless conditions such as fading channels

  8. Analysis and Application of Potential Energy Smoothing and Search Methods for Global Optimization

    E-print Network

    Ponder, Jay

    Analysis and Application of Potential Energy Smoothing and Search Methods for Global Optimization levels of smoothing. PSS methods should serve as useful tools for global energy optimization on a variety of difficult problems of practical interest. Introduction Global optimization is an important issue

  9. Projecting yield and utilization potential of switchgrass as an energy crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential utilization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) as a cellulosic energy crop was evaluated as a component of a projected future national network of biorefineries designed to increase national reliance on renewable energy from American farms. Empirical data on current yields of switchg...

  10. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly). PMID:26395651

  11. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing predictive abilities to evaluate the potential stabilities of magnetic minerals in the Earth crust and mantle by: (1) computing oxidation state profiling as a function of temperature and pressure; (2) compiling data on basalts to establish validity of the oxidation state profiles; (3) determining Fe-Ni alloys in association with magnetitie as a function of temperature and oxidation state; and (4) acquiring large chemical data banks on the mineral ilmenite which decomposes to mineral spinel in the presence of high sulfur or carbonate environments in the lower crust upper mantle. In addition to acquiring these data which are related to constraining Curie isotherm depths, an excellent correlation was found between MAGSAT anomaly data and the geology of West Africa.

  12. Control of grating anomalies in photoactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Victor; Friesem, Asher A.; Millul, Eliahu

    1996-09-01

    Grating formation in photoactive polymers are monitored by holographic recording. The photopolymers are based on acrylamide monomers, which are dissolved together with xanthine dyes in polyvinyl alcohol. Thin plastic coatings are obtained by casing on glass substrates. Photorecording occurs quasi-real-time and in-situ, meaning that no wet- chemical or post-thermal/photochemical processing is required. Formulations have been found, which produce large enough refractive index modulations, so that very high diffraction efficiencies can be obtained, when the recording beam angles are symmetric. Unfortunately, DEs significantly drop, when recording angles are highly asymmetric. The origin of this effect is shown to stem from grating anomalies, in that the slanted fringes bend due to nonlinear shrinkage effects during recording. The introduction of cross-linking and gelling agents stabilize the formed grating structures against dimensional distortions. These photopolymer layers have potential in photonics applications, such as holographic optical elements and waveguide structures.

  13. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  14. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-30

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  15. Free-energy functionals of the electrostatic potential for Poisson-Boltzmann theory

    E-print Network

    Vikram Jadhao; Francisco J. Solis; Monica Olvera de la Cruz

    2013-09-26

    In simulating charged systems, it is often useful to treat some ionic components of the system at the mean-field level and solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation to get their respective density profiles. The numerically intensive task of solving the PB equation at each step of the simulation can be bypassed using variational methods that treat the electrostatic potential as a dynamic variable. But such approaches require the access to a true free-energy functional; a functional that not only provides the correct solution of the PB equation upon extremization, it also evaluates to the true free energy of the system at its minimum. Moreover, the numerical efficiency of such procedures is further enhanced if the free-energy functional is local and is expressed in terms of the electrostatic potential. Existing PB functionals of the electrostatic potential, while possessing the local structure, are not free-energy functionals. We present a variational formulation with a local free-energy functional of the potential. In addition, we also construct a nonlocal free-energy functional of the electrostatic potential. These functionals are suited for employment in simulation schemes based on the ideas of dynamical optimization.

  16. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Zogg, Robert; Goetzler, William; Ahlfeldt, Christopher; Hiraiwa, Hirokazu; Sathe, Amul; Sutherland, Timothy

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes and assesses the appliances used in commercial buildings. The primary objectives of this study were to document the energy consumed by commercial appliances and identify research, development and demonstration (RD&D) opportunities for efficiency improvements, excluding product categories such as HVAC, building lighting, refrigeration equipment, and distributed generation systems. The study included equipment descriptions, characteristics of the equipment’s market, national energy consumption, estimates of technical potential for energy-saving technologies, and recommendations for U.S. Department of Energy programs that can promote energy savings in commercial appliances.

  17. Residential energy use in Mexico: Structure, evolution, environmental impacts, and savings potential

    SciTech Connect

    Masera, O.; Friedmann, R.; deBuen, O.

    1993-05-01

    This article examines the characteristics of residential energy use in Mexico, its environmental impacts, and the savings potential of the major end-uses. The main options and barriers to increase the efficiency of energy use are discussed. The energy analysis is based on a disaggregation of residential energy use by end-uses. The dynamics of the evolution of the residential energy sector during the past 20 years are also addressed when the information is available. Major areas for research and for innovative decision-making are identified and prioritized.

  18. Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network 

    E-print Network

    Han, J.; Wang, D.; Tian, G.

    2006-01-01

    , Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-6-4 Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network Jibing Han Delin Wang Guansan Tian Master Professor Professor... of Large and Medium City?s Heating Manner in North China, Heating Ventilating and Air conditioning, China, 2000,30(4), 30-45. (In Chinese) [2] Weiguo HAN, Yi JIANG, Fei GUO. Energy Consumption Analysis of Several Kinds of Heating Systems. Heating...

  19. Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

  20. Potential Energy Savings by Using Alternative Technologies for the Separation of Fluid Mixtures 

    E-print Network

    Bravo, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    ~INGS BY USING ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES J. L. BRAVO CENTER FOR ENERGY STUDIES THE UNIVERSITY OF ABSTRACT The focus of this work is to analyze alternative processes and technologies for the separation... of fluid mixtures with respect to energy consumption. In an effort to illustrate the dramatic potential energy savings of various alternative separation processes, evaluations of such processes for three industrially important fluid mixtures...

  1. Cloud-generated radiative heating and its generation of available potential energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhlmann, R.; Smith, G. L.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of zonal available potential energy (APE) by cloud radiative heating is discussed. The APE concept was mathematically formulated by Lorenz (1955) as a measure of the maximum amount of total potential energy that is available for conversion by adiabatic processes to kinetic energy. The rate of change of APE is the rate of the generation of APE minus the rate of conversion between potential and kinetic energy. By radiative transfer calculations, a mean cloud-generated radiative heating for a well defined set of cloud classes is derived as a function of cloud optical thickness. The formulation is suitable for using a general cloud parameter data set and has the advantage of taking into account nonlinearities between the microphysical and macrophysical cloud properties and the related radiation field.

  2. The PyPES library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a Python-based library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces for 50 polyatomic molecules with up to six atoms. We anticipate that these surfaces will find widespread application in the testing of new potential energy surface construction algorithms and nuclear ro-vibrational structure theories. To this end, we provide the ability to generate the energy derivatives required for Taylor series expansions to sixth order about any point on the potential energy surface in a range of common coordinate systems, including curvilinear internal, Cartesian, and normal mode coordinates. The PyPES package, along with FORTRAN, C, MATLAB and Mathematica wrappers, is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib. PMID:26407838

  3. Analyzing and modeling gravity and magnetic anomalies using the SPHERE program and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    Computer codes were completed, tested, and documented for analyzing magnetic anomaly vector components by equivalent point dipole inversion. The codes are intended for use in inverting the magnetic anomaly due to a spherical prism in a horizontal geomagnetic field and for recomputing the anomaly in a vertical geomagnetic field. Modeling of potential fields at satellite elevations that are derived from three dimensional sources by program SPHERE was made significantly more efficient by improving the input routines. A preliminary model of the Andean subduction zone was used to compute the anomaly at satellite elevations using both actual geomagnetic parameters and vertical polarization. Program SPHERE is also being used to calculate satellite level magnetic and gravity anomalies from the Amazon River Aulacogen.

  4. Limb anomalies in chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, R A; Santelmann, R

    1977-01-01

    This survey shows that there are at least 6 autosomal and 2 gonosomal aberrations which may produce specific types of limb anomaly in 30%-80% of cases. The "expressivity" of these anomalies covers a wide range within the morphogenetic pattern. No entirely specific malformation type is seen. The most unusual malformation, aplasia of the thumbs with proximal synostosis of the 4th aand 5th metacarpals, is seen in 13q- (13r) but the precise cytogenetic basis is not clear. Aplasia of the thumb associated with synostosis of the 4th and 5th metacarpals was occasionally described before (unilateral [105], bilateral [106] while synostosis only (V or Y shaped) may be due to a dominant [107] or an X-linked recessive gene [108]. Reduction malformations limited to radial heminelia have been noted in 4q- (4r) and in trisomy 18. Although the number of cases is still small the pattern is similar to that of thalidomide embryopathy, radial hemimelia (AD, 17910), cardiodigital syndromes (AD, 14290), and even Fanconi panmyelopathy (AR, 22790). It ranges from hypoplasia of the thenar muscles and thumb to pseudophocomelia which should be clearly distinguished from phocomelia because of the absence of the thumb and frequently of the 2nd and 3rd fingers. Nothing has to be added to the teratologic series published by Müller [58] and, more recently, Willert and Henkel [109], but the distribution of the various manifestations may diverge. Asymmetry in 4q- (4r) is noteworthy. Postaxial polydactyly which is noted in trisomy 13 and trisomy of the terminal portions of the long arm of No. 13 is as variable in distribution and morphology as is observed in families in which the gene (AD, 17420) is transmitted. The question cannot yet be answered whether infrequent anomalies of the limbs which do not fit into the morphologic pattern of these types, eg postaxial polydactyly in + 18 or absence of the radius in + 13 are random. Syndactyly of the 3rd and 4th but also of other digits is a frequent but variable anomaly in triploidy. It is very similar to hereditary zygodactyly (AD, 18590). Peripheral hypoplasia of several digits accompanied by onychodysplasia seems to be a frequent anomaly in 9p+ syndrome. It is similar to that seen in a syndrome with mental deficiency, peculiar facies, and stunted growth [110] in which no chromosomal aberration has been found up to the present. Dysostoses have been frequently noted in gonosomal aberations. Brachymetopodia in XO females maybe confused with pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (XR, 30080) or brachydactyly type E (AD, 11330) when only the lateral metacarpals and/or metatarsals are shortened. However, further studies are needed in order to delineate these syndromes on the basis of different frequencies and radiologic patterns. The radioulnar synostosis noted in cases with supernumerary X chromosomes cannot be distinguished from the inherited anomaly (AD, 17930), but associated anomalies of the hand are uncommon. PMID:322750

  5. On the equatorial anomaly of the ionospheric total electron content near the northern anomaly crest region

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Cheng, K.; Chen, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Daily contour charts of the ionospheric total electron content in latitude versus local time coordinates have been used to study the behavior of the development of the equatorial anomaly around the northern anomaly crest region. The daily development of the equatorial anomaly shows quite large day-to-day variabilities not only on magnetically disturbed days but also on quiet days. The daily maximum anomaly crest moves poleward as the magnitude of the total electron content of the daily maximum anomaly crest increases. The increase of the equatorial electrojet strength also results in a poleward movement of the anomaly crest. No significant correlation exists between the anomaly crest and the magnetic {ital Ap} index. The monthly mean diurnal development of the equatorial anomaly shows a remarkable seasonal difference, with the anomaly largest in equinoxes and slightly larger in winter than in summer. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  6. The Price-Independent Trend in Energy Efficiency in Canada and the Potential Influence of Non-Price Policies

    E-print Network

    of energy via taxes, governments are interested in alternative policies. The Autonomous Energy EfficiencyThe Price-Independent Trend in Energy Efficiency in Canada and the Potential Influence of Non-Independent Trend in Energy Efficiency in Canada and the Potential Influence of Non-Price Policies Examining

  7. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, K.

    2011-07-15

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  8. An assessment of wind energy potential in Iberia under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Santos, João A.; Rochinha, Carlos; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy potential in Iberia is assessed for recent-past (1961-2000) and future (2041-2070) climates. For recent-past, a COSMO-CLM simulation driven by ERA-40 is used. COSMO-CLM simulations driven by ECHAM5 following the A1B scenario are used for future projections. A 2 MW rated power wind turbine is selected. Mean potentials, inter-annual variability and irregularity are discussed on annual/seasonal scales and on a grid resolution of 20 km. For detailed regional assessments eight target sites are considered. For recent-past conditions, the highest daily mean potentials are found in winter over northern and eastern Iberia, particularly on high-elevation or coastal regions. In northwestern Iberia, daily potentials frequently reach maximum wind energy output (50 MWh day-1), particularly in winter. Southern Andalucía reveals high potentials throughout the year, whereas the Ebro valley and central-western coast show high potentials in summer. The irregularity in annual potentials is moderate (<15% of mean output), but exacerbated in winter (40%). Climate change projections show significant decreases over most of Iberia (<2 MWh day-1). The strong enhancement of autumn potentials in Southern Andalucía is noteworthy (>2 MWh day-1). The northward displacement of North Atlantic westerly winds (autumn-spring) and the strengthening of easterly flows (summer) are key drivers of future projections. Santos, J.A.; Rochinha, C.; Liberato, M.L.R.; Reyers, M.; Pinto, J.G. (2015) Projected changes in wind energy potentials over Iberia. Renewable Energy, 75, 1: 68-80. doi: 10.1016/j.renene.2014.09.026 Acknowledgements: This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  9. Extracting the nuclear symmetry potential and energy from neutron-nucleus scattering data

    E-print Network

    Xiao-Hua Li; Bao-Jun Cai; Lie-Wen Chen; Rong Chen; Bao-An Li; Chang Xu

    2013-03-06

    According to the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, the symmetry energy and its density slope can be decomposed uniquely in terms of the single-nucleon potential in asymmetric nuclear matter which, at normal density, can be constrained by the nucleon optical model potential extracted from analyzing the nucleon-nucleus scattering data. To more accurately extract information on the symmetry energy and its density slope at normal density from neutron-nucleus scattering data, going beyond the well-known Lane potential, we include consistently the second order terms in isospin asymmetry in both the optical model potential and the symmetry energy decomposition. We find that the strength of the second-order symmetry potential $U_{sym,2}$ in asymmetric nuclear matter is significant compared to the first-order one U_{sym,1}$, especially at high nucleon momentum. While the $U_{sym,1}$ at normal density decreases with nucleon momentum, the $U_{sym,2}$ is found to have the opposite behavior. Moreover, we discuss effects of the $U_{sym,1}$ and $U_{sym,2}$ on determining the density dependence of the symmetry energy, and we find that the available neutron-nucleus scattering data favor a softer density dependence of the symmetry energy at normal density with a negligible contribution from the $U_{sym,2}$.

  10. Assessment of the potential of halophytes as energy crops for the electric utility industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    This technical report assesses and estimates the potential of selected halophytes as future renewable energy resources, especially by US electric utilities, and familiarizes nonspecialists with research and development problems that must be resolved before these energy sources can become dependable supplies of energy. A literature search related to both indigenous and exotic species of halophytes has been done and appropriate terrestrial species have been selected. Selection criteria include: total biomass potential, genetic constraints, establishment and cultivation requirements, regions of suitability, secondary credits, and a number of other factors. Based on these selection criteria, for the arid western states with high levels of salinity in water and/or soils, there is little potential for energy feedstocks derived from grasses and herbaceous forbs. Likewise, coastal marshes, estuaries, and mangrove swamps, although excellent biomass producers, are too limited by region and have too many ecological and environmental problems for consideration. The deep-rooted, perennial woody shrubs indigenous to many saline regions of the west provide the best potential. The number of species in this group is limited, and Atriplex canescens, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and Chrysothamnus nauseosus are the three species with the greatest biological potential. These shrubs would receive minimal energy inputs in cultivation, would not compete with agricultural land, and would restore productivity to severely disturbed sites. One might logically expect to achieve biomass feedstock yields of three to five tons/acre/yr on a long-term sustainable basis. The possibility also exists that exotic species might be introduced. 67 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  11. Experimental and Simulation Study on the Performance of Daylighting in an Industrial Building and its Energy Saving Potential

    E-print Network

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    reduce building energy consumption effectively. Studies on this topic have been mostly conducted. Keywords: Large space building, Daylighting performance, Energy saving potential, Field measurement non-residential buildings [1]. According to the United States Department of Energy, commercial

  12. Seesaw Extended MSSM and Anomaly Mediation without Tachyonic Sleptons

    E-print Network

    R. N. Mohapatra; N. Setzer; S. Spinner

    2008-12-10

    Superconformal anomalies provide an elegant and economical way to understand the soft breaking parameters in SUSY models; however, implementing them leads to the several undesirable features including: tachyonic sleptons and electroweak symmetry breaking problems in both the MSSM and the NMSSM. Since these two theories also have the additonal problem of massless neutrinos, we have reconsidered the AMSB problems in a class of models that extends the NMSSM to explain small neutrino masses via the seesaw mechanism. In a recent paper, we showed that for a class of minimal left-right extensions, a built-in mechanism exists which naturally solves the tachyonic slepton problem and provides new alternatives to the MSSM that also have automatic R-parity conservation. In this paper, we discuss how electroweak symmetry breaking arises in this model through an NMSSM-like low energy theory with a singlet VEV, induced by the structure of the left-right extension and of the right magnitude. We then study the phenomenological issues and find: the LSP is an Higgsino-wino mix, new phenomenology for chargino decays to the LSP, degenerate same generation sleptons and a potential for a mild squark-slepton degeneracy. We also discuss possible collider signatures and the feasibility of dark matter in this model.

  13. Online anomaly detection in crowd scenes via structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Fang, Jianwu; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal behavior detection in crowd scenes is continuously a challenge in the field of computer vision. For tackling this problem, this paper starts from a novel structure modeling of crowd behavior. We first propose an informative structural context descriptor (SCD) for describing the crowd individual, which originally introduces the potential energy function of particle's interforce in solid-state physics to intuitively conduct vision contextual cueing. For computing the crowd SCD variation effectively, we then design a robust multi-object tracker to associate the targets in different frames, which employs the incremental analytical ability of the 3-D discrete cosine transform (DCT). By online spatial-temporal analyzing the SCD variation of the crowd, the abnormality is finally localized. Our contribution mainly lies on three aspects: 1) the new exploration of abnormal detection from structure modeling where the motion difference between individuals is computed by a novel selective histogram of optical flow that makes the proposed method can deal with more kinds of anomalies; 2) the SCD description that can effectively represent the relationship among the individuals; and 3) the 3-D DCT multi-object tracker that can robustly associate the limited number of (instead of all) targets which makes the tracking analysis in high density crowd situation feasible. Experimental results on several publicly available crowd video datasets verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24988603

  14. Radio-anomalies: tool for earthquakes and tsunami forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino; Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake is the only among the other geophysical events that doesn't lead directly to death. Tsunami are one of the more dramatic consequences of the seism that happen on global scale. Also in this case, tsunami, we need to improve the tools that can help the forecast of this great geophysical event and the reduction of the dramatic effects on human activities. In order to explain this topic it is necessary that several methods of investigation cooperate and create a scientific network among the complementary branches of science. In this study I suggest a new strategy based on the detection of radio-anomalies and the increasing of the geomagnetic background; we can apply this method two days before the earthquake until the last few hours before it. This research and the data collection started in the 2011 and it show us that more than 400 earthquakes, occurred on global scale, were preceded by the increasing value of the geomagnetic background and the emergence of radio-anomalies in the frequency range from Elf to Self band. This last range is not globally accepted by the scientific community and it frequency between 0,001 and 3 Hz is included. The detection of radio-anomalies data, carried out by the monitoring station Radio Emission Project, in Rome (Italy), it lets us predict a strong seismic event on global scale 6 hour before. The tsunami is a great geophysical event that can embrace several areas of Earth, for this reason the detection of radio-anomalies method is useful for the experimentation in operative terms. Another important check about detection of radio-anomalies was carried out before and during the strong earthquake and tsunami occurred in Japan in 2011. The radio-anomalies that take over in this event and the energy released by the seaquake are linked and proportional between them.

  15. The surface latent heat flux anomalies related to major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Feng; Shen, Xuhui; Kang, Chunli; Xiong, Pan; Hong, Shunying

    2011-12-01

    SLHF (Surface Latent Heat Flux) is an atmospheric parameter, which can describe the heat released by phase changes and dependent on meteorological parameters such as surface temperature, relative humidity, wind speed etc. There is a sharp difference between the ocean surface and the land surface. Recently, many studies related to the SLHF anomalies prior to earthquakes have been developed. It has been shown that the energy exchange enhanced between coastal surface and atmosphere prior to earthquakes can increase the rate of the water-heat exchange, which will lead to an obviously increases in SLHF. In this paper, two earthquakes in 2010 (Haiti earthquake and southwest of Sumatra in Indonesia earthquake) have been analyzed using SLHF data by STD (standard deviation) threshold method. It is shows that the SLHF anomaly may occur in interpolate earthquakes or intraplate earthquakes and coastal earthquakes or island earthquakes. And the SLHF anomalies usually appear 5-6 days prior to an earthquake, then disappear quickly after the event. The process of anomaly evolution to a certain extent reflects a dynamic energy change process about earthquake preparation, that is, weak-strong-weak-disappeared.

  16. Kinetic and potential parts of nuclear symmetry energy: the role of Fock terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Bao Yuan; Long, Wen Hui

    2015-09-01

    The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is studied within the covariant density functional (CDF) theory in terms of the kinetic energy, isospin-singlet, and isospin-triplet potential energy parts of the energy density functional. When the Fock diagram is introduced, it is found that both isospin-singlet and isospin-triplet components of the potential energy play an important role in determining the symmetry energy. At high densities, a strong density-dependent behavior is revealed in the isospin-triplet potential part of the symmetry energy. In addition, the inclusion of the Fock terms in the CDF theory reduces the kinetic part of the symmetry energy and may lead to negative values at the supranuclear density region, which is regarded partly as the effect of the nuclear tensor-force components. The results demonstrate the importance of the Fock diagram in the CDF theory on the isospin properties of the in-medium nuclear force at high densities, especially from the isoscalar-meson coupling channels.

  17. Anomalies of a topologically ordered surface

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Deepnarayan; Thakur, Sangeeta; Ali, Khadiza; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2015-01-01

    Bulk insulators with strong spin orbit coupling exhibit metallic surface states possessing topological order protected by the time reversal symmetry. However, experiments show vulnerability of topological states to aging and impurities. Different studies show contrasting behavior of the Dirac states along with plethora of anomalies, which has become an outstanding problem in material science. Here, we probe the electronic structure of Bi2Se3 employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy and discover the dependence of the behavior of Dirac particles on surface terminations. The Dirac cone apex appears at different binding energies and exhibits contrasting shift on Bi and Se terminated surfaces with complex time dependence emerging from subtle adsorbed oxygen-surface atom interactions. These results uncover the surface states behavior of real systems and the dichotomy of topological and normal surface states important for device fabrication as well as realization of novel physics such as Majorana Fermions, magnetic monopole, etc. PMID:26041405

  18. Feet on the potential energy surface, head in the pi clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Quentin

    2012-07-12

    This work presents explorations of the potential energy surface of clusters of atoms and of the interactions between molecules. First, structures of small aluminum clusters are examined and classified as ground states, transition states, or higher-order saddle points. Subsequently, the focus shifts to dispersion-dominated ?-? interactions when the potential energy surfaces of benzene, substituted benzene, and pyridine dimers are explored. Because DNA nucleotide bases can be thought of as substituted heterocycles, a natural extension of the substituted benzene and pyridine investigations is to model paired nucleotide bases. Finally, the success of the dispersion studies inspires the development of an extension to the computational method used, which will enable the dispersion energy to be modeled – and the potential energy surface explored – in additional chemical systems. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is described, as well as various quantum mechanical methods. An ab inito quantum mechanical study of 13-atom aluminum clusters is described. EFP studies of aromatic dimers are reported in which dispersion energy makes a significant contribution to the attraction between monomers. Theory and code development toward a means of computing dispersion energy in mixed ab inito-EFP systems are described.

  19. High-level ab initio potential energy surfaces and vibrational energies of H2CS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Ribeyre, Tristan; Thiel, Walter

    2011-08-01

    Six-dimensional (6D) potential energy surfaces (PESs) of H2CS have been generated ab initio using the recently proposed explicitly correlated (F12) singles and doubles coupled cluster method including a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12b [T. B. Adler, G. Knizia, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] in conjunction with F12-optimized correlation consistent basis sets. Core-electron correlation, high-order correlation, scalar relativistic, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer terms were included as additive high-level (HL) corrections. The resulting 6D PESs were represented by analytical functions which were used in variational calculations of the vibrational term values below 5000 cm-1. The best PESs obtained with and without the HL corrections, VQZ-F12* HL and VQZ-F12*, reproduce the fundamental vibrational wavenumbers with mean absolute deviations of 1.13 and 1.22 cm-1, respectively. A detailed analysis of the effects of the HL corrections shows how the VQZ-F12 results benefit from error cancellation. The present purely ab initio PESs will be useful as starting points for empirical refinements towards an accurate "spectroscopic" PES of H2CS.

  20. High-potential geothermal energy resource areas of Nigeria and their geologic and geophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.O.

    1984-04-01

    The widespread occurrence of geothermal manifestations in Nigeria is significant because the wide applicability and relative ease of exploitation of geothermal energy is of vital importance to an industrializing nation like Nigeria. There are two known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in Nigeria: the Ikogosi Warm Springs of Ondo State and the Wikki Warm Springs of Bauchi State. These surficial effusions result from the circulation of water to great depths through faults in the basement complex rocks of the area. Within sedimentary areas, high geothermal gradient trends are identified in the Lagos subbasin, the Okitipupa ridge, the Auchi-Agbede are of the Benin flank/hinge line, and the Abakaliki anticlinorium. The deeper Cretaceous and Tertiary sequences of the Niger delta are geopressured geothermal horizons. In the Benue foldbelt, extending from the Abalaliki anticlinorium to the Keana anticline and the Zambuk ridge, several magmatic intrusions emplaced during the Late Cretaceous line the axis of the Benue trough. Positive Bouguer gravity anomalies also parallel this trough and are interpreted to indicate shallow mantle. Parts of this belt and the Ikom, the Jos plateau, Bauchi plateau, and the Adamawa areas, experienced Cenozoic volcanism and magmatism.