Science.gov

Sample records for potential energy anomaly

  1. Understanding Anomalies to Extract Vacuum Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, P.A

    2004-02-04

    Recent Russian literature contains some interesting speculations of potentially wide applicability regarding the physical vacuum. These investigations examined and applied a theory to various anomalies to try and understand what these events may represent. Data were collected by Dmitriev to quantify these events and identify commonalties that indicate the anomalies might have a natural origin. Dyatlov created theories on the Polarized Inhomogeneous Physical Vacuum where he claimed that each anomaly possessed a distinct boundary separate from its surroundings. Within this inhomogeneous boundary, the theory suggests that the magnetic, electric, gravitic, and spin fields would be different from its surroundings. From these findings, he developed equations that resemble the London equations for a superconductor and are somewhat similar to those developed later by Puthoff. The importance of these events is that with additional understanding, they may offer a means for extracting energy from the physical vacuum. Moreover, one may speculate that these anomalies may represent a gravitational vortex or even a portal or a wormhole to look into potential travel within other dimensions.

  2. Thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalies for shoulderlike potentials.

    PubMed

    Barraz, Ney M; Salcedo, Evy; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2009-09-01

    Using molecular dynamic simulations we study a family of continuous core-softened potentials consisting of a hard core, a shoulder at closest distances, and an attractive well at further distance. The repulsive shoulder and the well distances represent two length scales. We show that if the first scale, the shoulder, is repulsive or has a small well, the potential has a region in the pressure-temperature phase diagram with density, diffusion, and structural anomalies. However, if the closest scale becomes a deep well, the regions in the pressure-temperature phase diagram where the three anomalies are present shrink and disappear. This result helps in defining two length scales potentials that exhibit anomalies. PMID:19739858

  3. Supersymmetric Casimir energy and the anomaly polynomial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobev, Nikolay; Bullimore, Mathew; Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    We conjecture that for superconformal field theories in even dimensions, the supersymmetric Casimir energy on a space with topology S 1 S D-1 is equal to an equivariant integral of the anomaly polynomial. The equivariant integration is defined with respect to the Cartan subalgebra of the global symmetry algebra that commutes with a given supercharge. We test our proposal extensively by computing the supersymmetric Casimir energy for large classes of superconformal field theories, with and without known Lagrangian descriptions, in two, four and six dimensions.

  4. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  5. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,

  6. Singularity analysis of potential fields to enhance weak anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Cheng, Q.; Liu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geoanomalies generally are nonlinear, non-stationary and weak, especially in the land cover areas, however, the traditional methods of geoanomaly identification are usually based on linear theory. In past two decades, many power-law function models have been developed based on fractal concept in mineral exploration and mineral resource assessment, such that the density-area (C-A) model and spectrum-area model (S-A) suggested by Qiuming Cheng have played important roles in extracting geophysical and geochemical anomalies. Several power-law relationships are evident in geophysical potential fields, such as field value-distance, power spectrum-wave number as well as density-area models. The singularity index based on density-area model involves the first derivative transformation of the measure. Hence, we introduce the singularity analysis to develop a novel high-pass filter for extracting gravity and magnetic anomalies with the advantage of scale invariance. Furthermore, we suggest that the statistics of singularity indices can provide a new edge detection scheme for the gravity or magnetic source bodies. Meanwhile, theoretical magnetic anomalies are established to verify these assertions. In the case study from Nanling mineral district in south China and Qikou Depression in east China, compared with traditional geophysical filtering methods including multiscale wavelet analysis and total horizontal gradient methods, the singularity method enhances and extracts the weak anomalies caused by buried magmatic rocks more effectively, and provides more distinct boundary information of rocks. Moreover, the singularity mapping results have good correspondence relationship with both the outcropping rocks and known mineral deposits to support future mineral resource exploration. The singularity method based on fractal analysis has potential to be a new useful theory and technique for processing gravity and magnetic anomaly data.

  7. Remote energetic neutral atom imaging of electric potential over a lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Lue, C.; Wurz, P.; Vorburger, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract<p label="1">The formation of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> over lunar magnetized regions is essential for understanding fundamental lunar science, for understanding the lunar environment, and for planning human exploration on the Moon. A large positive electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> was predicted and detected from single point measurements. Here, we demonstrate a remote imaging technique of electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> mapping at the lunar surface, making use of a new concept involving hydrogen neutral atoms derived from solar wind. We apply the technique to a lunar magnetized region using an existing dataset of the neutral atom <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrometer SARA/CENA on Chandrayaan-1. Electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> larger than +135 V inside the Gerasimovic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confirmed. This structure is found spreading all over the magnetized region. The widely spread electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> can influence the local plasma and dust environment near the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4280H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4280H"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory investigation of lunar surface electric <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Howes, C. T.; Wang, X.; Deca, J.; Hornyi, M.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>To gain insight into lunar surface charging in the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions, we present the results of laboratory experiments with a flowing plasma engulfing a magnetic dipole field above an insulating surface. When the dipole moment is perpendicular to the surface, large positive <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (close to ion flow <span class="hlt">energies</span> in eV) are measured on the surface in the dipole lobe regions, charged by the unmagnetized ions while the electrons are magnetically excluded. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> decreases exponentially with distance from the surface on the ion (flow) Debye length scale. The surface <span class="hlt">potentials</span> become much smaller when the dipole moment is parallel to the surface, likely due to collisionality. We discuss the implications of our laboratory results for the lunar surface charging in the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions, suggesting that the surface <span class="hlt">potential</span> may be much higher than the generally expected several volts positive due to photoemission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9253V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9253V"><span id="translatedtitle">Organized convection ahead of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vaughan, Geraint; Antonescu, Bogdan; Schultz, David; Dearden, Chris</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>We present a case study of a convective band that intensified ahead of an upper level trough on September 16 2011, distinguishing the role of the upper-level <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from that of low-level forcing. The event occurred during an Intensive Observing Period of two field campaigns, providing the study with detailed measurements from the UK's FAAM research aircraft together with intensive ground-based observations. The WRF model, initialized with ECMWF analyses, was able to simulate the observed structure of the band very well, allowing its development to be analyzed in detail. The band intensified as the result of the merger of two convergence lines which originated in a frontal structure over the Atlantic the previous day, with its morphology influenced by two upper-level features: the remnants of a tropopause fold which capped convection over the south of the band, and a reduction in upper tropospheric static stability over the north of the band which enabled the convection to reach the tropopause. The cause of the band was therefore the low-level forcing (lift) which was manifest as a sharp line of veering wind below 2 km. Accurate forecasting of events such as this require such small-scale boundary-layer features to be accurately captured in the model analyses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1022533','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1022533"><span id="translatedtitle">Insights on the Cuprate High <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Observed in ARPES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moritz, Brian</p> <p>2011-08-16</p> <p>Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> in cuprate superconductors: the high <span class="hlt">energy</span> 'waterfall' or high <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (HEA). The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is present for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates as well as the half-filled parent insulators with different <span class="hlt">energy</span> scales arising on either side of the phase diagram. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. creating a 'waterfall'-like appearance, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA <span class="hlt">energy</span> scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram. We find that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> demarcates a transition, or cross-over, from a quasiparticle band at low binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding <span class="hlt">energy</span>, assumed to be of strong oxygen character.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005CG.....31..661R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005CG.....31..661R"><span id="translatedtitle">A new method of interpreting self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of two-dimensional inclined sheets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Radhakrishna Murthy, I. V.; Sudhakar, K. S.; Rama Rao, P.</p> <p>2005-06-01</p> <p>A new method of interpreting self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of inclined sheet-like bodies of infinite strike length is presented in this study. In contrast to conventional schemes, the method does not explicitly make use of the magnitudes of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values during inversion. But, positions of a pair of points, at which the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> values differ from each other by a constant magnitude, are selected to construct some linear equations. The coefficients of these equations are functions of the model parameters, and hence the latter are solved from these coefficients. The method can be extended to gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of various models of simple geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26426477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26426477"><span id="translatedtitle">Water-like <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Phase Behavior of a Pair <span class="hlt">Potential</span> that Stabilizes Diamond.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bertolazzo, Andressa A; Kumar, Abhinaw; Chakravarty, Charusita; Molinero, Valeria</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Water, silicon, silica, and other liquids that favor tetrahedral order display thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the pressure range in which they form tetrahedrally coordinated crystals. The tetrahedral order in these liquids is induced by anisotropic hydrogen bonding or covalent interactions, or, in ionic melts, by an appropriate size ratio of the ions. Simple isotropic two-length scale models have been extensively used to understand the origin of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in complex liquids. However, single-component isotropic liquids characterized to date generally do not stabilize tetrahedral crystals, and in the few cases that they do, it was found that the liquids do not display <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the region of the tetrahedral crystal. This poses the question of whether it is possible for isotropic pair <span class="hlt">potentials</span> to display water-like phase behavior and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the phase behavior and the existence and loci of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a single-component purely repulsive isotropic pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> that stabilizes diamond in the ground state over a wide range of pressures. We demonstrate that, akin to water, silica, and silicon, the isotropic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Marcotte, Stillinger, and Torquato (MST) presents structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the region of stability of the tetrahedral crystal. The regions of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of MST are nested in the T-p plane following the same hierarchy as in silica: the region of diffusional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> encloses the region of structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which in turn contains the region of thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. To our knowledge, MST is the first example of pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> for which water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are associated with the formation of tetrahedral order. PMID:26426477</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=olympics&pg=7&id=EJ1049826','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=olympics&pg=7&id=EJ1049826"><span id="translatedtitle">Sensitivity of the International Skating Union's Mathematical Criteria to Flag <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Scoring <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Looney, Marilyn A.; Howell, Steven M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article describes the "mathematical criteria" employed by the International Skating Union (ISU) to identify <span class="hlt">potential</span> judging <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within competitive figure skating. The mathematical criteria have greater sensitivity to identify scoring <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for technical element scores than for the program component scores. This article</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/989833','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/989833"><span id="translatedtitle">The trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and dynamical vacuum <span class="hlt">energy</span> in cosmology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mottola, Emil</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of conformal matter implies the existence of massless scalar poles in physical amplitudes involving the stress-<span class="hlt">energy</span> tensor. These poles may be described by a local effective action with massless scalar fields, which couple to classical sources, contribute to gravitational scattering processes, and can have long range gravitational effects at macroscopic scales. In an effective field theory approach, the effective action of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is an infrared relevant term that should be added to the Einstein-Hilbert action of classical General Relativity to take account of macroscopic quantum effects. The additional scalar degrees of freedom contained in this effective action may be understood as responsible for both the Casimir effect in flat spacetime and large quantum backreaction effects at the horizon scale of cosmological spacetimes. These effects of the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> imply that the cosmological vacuum <span class="hlt">energy</span> is dynamical, and its value depends on macroscopic boundary conditions at the cosmological horizon scale, rather than sensitivity to the extreme ultraviolet Planck scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4105S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4105S"><span id="translatedtitle">EVAREST - Evaluation of geological models by joint interpretation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Skiba, Peter; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Structural geological models are often based on the integration of different geophysical datasets. During the last years an increasing interest in the <span class="hlt">potential</span> field methods, i.e. gravimetry and magnetic, can be observed, even though data acquisition can cause considerable costs and logistic effort. Therefore, the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different methods were analyzed. In a case study, which was conducted in cooperation with RWE Dea and which is located in northern Germany, it was studied to which level of detail gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be interpreted jointly by 3D forward modelling. Special attention was paid to the individual residuals, i.e. those parts of the gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which could not be interpreted satisfactorily by the joint structural / physical model. In a subsequent stage of the workflow this information was analyzed individually for each dataset to improve the geological interpretation and to identify and localize the sources of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in more detail. For the discussed study several <span class="hlt">potential</span> field datasets of different resolution were available, which were first analyzed by means of field transformation. While the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are mainly related to the occurrence of salt structures, the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> seem to be controlled by deep structures, most probably by the magnetic basement. Some local magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with amplitudes of less than 10 nT can be related to the rim synclines of the salt structures as well as to buried Pleistocene subglacial valleys. 3D forward models, constrained by existing structural information and rock physical data, have shown that, e.g., a common fitting of both <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields is not possible if homogenous densities and magnetizations are assigned to the different lithological units and while considering the geometry of the source bodies to be the same for both <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. To explain the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> a more detailed differentiation of the source bodies in terms of thin layers is required, while for the interpretation of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> vertical density gradients must be considered for specific lithologies. Furthermore, from the magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ideas about the maximum depth of source bodies can be derived.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21336101','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21336101"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonrelativistic inverse square <span class="hlt">potential</span>, scale <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and complex extension</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moroz, Sergej Schmidt, Richard</p> <p>2010-02-15</p> <p>The old problem of a singular, inverse square <span class="hlt">potential</span> in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is treated employing a field-theoretic, functional renormalization method. An emergent contact coupling flows to a fixed point or develops a limit cycle depending on the discriminant of its quadratic beta function. We analyze the fixed points in both conformal and nonconformal phases and perform a natural extension of the renormalization group analysis to complex values of the contact coupling. Physical interpretation and motivation for this extension is the presence of an inelastic scattering channel in two-body collisions. We present a geometric description of the complex generalization by considering renormalization group flows on the Riemann sphere. Finally, using bosonization, we find an analytical solution of the extended renormalization group flow equations, constituting the main result of our work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870009504','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870009504"><span id="translatedtitle">Spherical harmonic expansions of the Earth's gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> to degree 360 using 30' mean <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rapp, Richard H.; Cruz, Jaime Y.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient fields that are complete to degree and order 360 have been computed. One field (OSU86E) excludes geophysically predicted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> while the other (OSU86F) includes such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These fields were computed using a set of 30' mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derived from satellite altimetry in the ocean areas and from land measurements in North America, Europe, Australia, Japan and a few other areas. Where no 30' data existed, 1 deg x 1 deg mean <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> estimates were used if available. No rigorous combination of satellite and terrestrial data was carried out. Instead advantage was taken of the adjusted <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients from a rigorous combination of the GEML2' <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient set and 1 deg x 1 deg mean gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The two new fields were computed using a quadrature procedure with de-smoothing factors. The spectra of the new fields agree well with the spectra of the fields with 1 deg x 1 deg data out to degree 180. Above degree 180 the new fields have more power. The fields have been tested through comparison of Doppler station geoid undulations with undulations from various geopotential models. The agreement between the two types of undulations is approximately + or - 1.6 m. The use of a 360 field over a 180 field does not significantly improve the comparison. Instead it allows the comparison to be done at some stations where high frequency effects are important. In addition maps made in areas of high frequency information (such as trench areas) clearly reveal the signal in the new fields from degree 181 to 360.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22253163','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22253163"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of attractive interactions on the water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a core-softened model <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pant, Shashank; Gera, Tarun; Choudhury, Niharendu E-mail: niharc2002@yahoo.com</p> <p>2013-12-28</p> <p>It is now well established that water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be reproduced by a spherically symmetric <span class="hlt">potential</span> with two length scales, popularly known as core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In the present study we aim to investigate the effect of attractive interactions among the particles in a model fluid interacting with core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the existence and location of various water-like <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the temperature-pressure plane. We employ extensive molecular dynamic simulations to study anomalous nature of various order parameters and properties under isothermal compression. Order map analyses have also been done for all the <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. We observe that all the systems with varying depth of attractive wells show structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As many of the previous studies involving model water and a class of core softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have concluded that the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region encloses the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, which in turn, encloses the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, the same pattern has also been observed in the present study for the systems with less depth of attractive well. For the systems with deeper attractive well, we observe that the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region shifts toward higher densities and is not always enclosed by the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region. Also, density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region is not completely enclosed by diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region in this case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17014187','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17014187"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for a three dimensional isotropic core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Oliveira, Alan Barros; Netz, Paulo A; Colla, Thiago; Barbosa, Marcia C</p> <p>2006-09-28</p> <p>Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the structure of a system of particles interacting through a continuous core-softened interparticle <span class="hlt">potential</span>. We found for the translational order parameter t a local maximum at a density rho(t-max) and a local minimum at rho(t-min)>rho(t-max). Between rho(t-max) and rho(t-min), the t parameter anomalously decreases upon increasing pressure. For the orientational order parameter Q(6) a maximum was observed at a density rho(t-max)<rho(Qmax)<rho(t-min). For densities between rho(Qmax) and rho(t-min), both the translational (t) and orientational (Q(6)) order parameters have anomalous behavior. We know that this system also exhibits density and diffusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We found that the region in the pressure-temperature phase diagram of the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> englobes the region of the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is larger than the region limited by the temperature of maximum density. This cascade of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic) for our model has the same hierarchy as that observed for the simple point charge/extended water. PMID:17014187</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P43F..06W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P43F..06W"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory studies of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> effects on electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> distributions near the lunar surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, X.; Robertson, S. H.; Horanyi, M.; NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The Moon does not have a global magnetic field, unlike the Earth, rather it has strong crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Data from Lunar Prospector and SELENE (Kaguya) observed strong interactions between the solar wind and these localized magnetic fields. In the laboratory, a configuration of a horseshoe permanent magnet below an insulating surface is used as an analogue of lunar crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Plasmas are created above the surface by a hot filament discharge. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> distributions are measured with an emissive probe and show complex spatial structures. In our experiments, electrons are magnetized with gyro-radii r smaller than the distance from the surface d (r < d) and ions are un-magnetized with r > d. Unlike negative charging on surfaces with no magnetic fields, the surface <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the center of the magnetic dipole is found close to the plasma bulk <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The surface charging is dominated by the cold unmagnetized ions, while the electrons are shielded away. A <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum is formed between the center of the surface and the bulk plasma, most likely caused by the trapped electrons between the two magnetic mirrors at the cusps. The value of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> minimum with respect to the bulk plasma <span class="hlt">potential</span> decreases with increasing plasma density and neutral pressure, indicating that the mirror-trapped electrons are scattered by electron-electron and electron-neutral collisions. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> at the two cusps are found to be more negative due to the electrons following the magnetic field lines onto the surface.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2783H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V31B2783H"><span id="translatedtitle">Magmatic reservoir modeling of the Azufral Volcano from interpreted <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, Nario, Colombia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, O.; Gomez, D.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Azufral Volcano is an active volcano located at 1 5 'N, 77 43'W, at 565 km from Bogot, in the Southern Colombian Andes. The volcano has a semicircular crater that involves a lake and four generations of rhyodacitic domes. The crater lake has a width of 300 m and a length of 1 km approximately. Azufral is considered one of the most explosive volcanoes of Colombia, apparently with a valuable geothermal <span class="hlt">potential</span> . A gravity and magnetic survey was carried out in an area of approximately 600 km2, in the Volcano influence zone. Data reduction, data filtering and spectral analysis were applied in order to highlight details on the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that allowed correlation analysis with the general geological setting of the area including the volcano. The Complete Bouguer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> map shows in general, two large blocks NE-SW trend coincident with the general direction of the faults in the region, showing between these two sites a total absolute change of about 118 mGal. Spectral analysis, Euler Deconvolution showed that the region trend is that the bodies that generate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located in predominantly shallow crustal levels, less than 5 km above the volcano summit. Profile modeling in the WE direction and passing through the volcano, shows stratified deposits, typical for volcanic regions with vertical density variations from the basement, modeled at about 3 km over the summit, to shallow levels where are modeled ignimbrites, Lavas, moraines and lava domes located in the vicinity of the crater lake. In the crater lake area it is possible to outline the probable existence of an elongated zone, with a top at around 2 km deep, extending in depth about 2 km, that can be associated with an abnormal structure that is the causative body of a clear negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on this particular zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ExG....46..320R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ExG....46..320R"><span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory modelling of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to spherical bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roudsari, Mohamad Sadegh; Beitollahi, Ali</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The relationship between the self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) produced by a polarised sphere and its depth was studied in a laboratory experiment. This was carried out by using a sphere made up of two hemispheres of different materials: one copper and the other zinc. Self-<span class="hlt">potentials</span> were measured by placing the sphere at a given depth in a rectangular glass tank filled with water. The surface of the water was covered by a sheet with 684 brass electrodes. A sensitive, high impedance digital voltmeter was used to measure <span class="hlt">potentials</span> from each electrode to a `base'. We have measured the SP response of the metallic body and our work shows that SP signals of several millivolts are generated due to the sphere placed within water. The gridded SP data show a clear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the sphere at shallow depths, and as the depth of the sphere increases, the measured SP signal due to the sphere decreases. An analytical formula is given to determine the maximum depth of the sphere at which the presence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> can be detected. Responses from other geometries are examined as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882035','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882035"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Using Constitutive Relationships for Electrochemical and Thermoelectric Coupling Coefficients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Knapp, R. B.; Kasameyer, P. W.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Constitutive relationships for electrochemical and thermoelectric cross-coupling coefficients are derived using ionic mobilities, applying a general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> and employing the zero net current condition. The general derivative of chemical <span class="hlt">potential</span> permits thermal variations which give rise to the thermoelectric effect. It also accounts for nonideal solution behavior. An equation describing electric field strength is similarly derived with the additional assumption of electrical neutrality in the fluid Planck approximation. The Planck approximation implies that self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) is caused only by local sources and also that the electric field strength has only first order spatial variations. The derived relationships are applied to the NaCl-KCl concentration cell with predicted and measured voltages agreeing within 0.4 mV. The relationships are also applied to the Long Valley and Yellowstone geothermal systems. There is a high degree of correlation between predicted and measured SP response for both systems, giving supporting evidence for the validity of the approach. Predicted SP amplitude exceeds measured in both cases; this is a possible consequence of the Planck approximation. Electrochemical sources account for more than 90% of the predicted response in both cases while thermoelectric mechanisms account for the remaining 10%; electrokinetic effects are not considered. Predicted electrochemical and thermoelectric voltage coupling coefficients are comparable to values measured in the laboratory. The derived relationships are also applied to arbitrary distributions of temperature and fluid composition to investigate the geometric diversity of observed SP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Amplitudes predicted for hypothetical saline spring and hot spring environments are less than 40 mV. In contrast, hypothetical near surface steam zones generate very large amplitudes, over 2 V in one case. These results should be viewed with some caution due to the uncertain validity of the Planck approximation for these conditions. All amplitudes are controlled by electrochemical mechanisms. Polarities are controlled by the curvature of the concentration or thermal profile. Concave upward thermal profiles produce positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, for constant fluid concentrations, whereas concave upward concentration profiles produce negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Concave downward concentration profiles are characterized by small negative closures bounding a larger, positive SP <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Higbie&id=EJ123194','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Higbie&id=EJ123194"><span id="translatedtitle">Inertia of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Higbie, J.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Demonstrates that when a system of attracting or repelling bodies is bound, its rest mass will generally be different than the sum of the rest masses of the individual bodies. The mass excess or defect is simply related to the stored <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the system. (Author/MLH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1779293','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1779293"><span id="translatedtitle">Developing global climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> suggest <span class="hlt">potential</span> disease risks for 2006 2007</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anyamba, Assaf; Chretien, Jean-Paul; Small, Jennifer; Tucker, Compton J; Linthicum, Kenneth J</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Background El Nio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been shown to have an impact on infectious disease outbreaks. The Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/CPC) has recently issued an unscheduled El Nio advisory, indicating that warmer than normal sea surface temperatures across the equatorial eastern Pacific may have pronounced impacts on global tropical precipitation patterns extending into the northern hemisphere particularly over North America. Building evidence of the links between ENSO driven climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and infectious diseases, particularly those transmitted by insects, can allow us to provide improved long range forecasts of an epidemic or epizootic. We describe developing climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that suggest <span class="hlt">potential</span> disease risks using satellite generated data. Results Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the equatorial east Pacific ocean have anomalously increased significantly during July October 2006 indicating the typical development of El Nio conditions. The persistence of these conditions will lead to extremes in global-scale climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as has been observed during similar conditions in the past. Positive Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, indicative of severe drought conditions, have been observed across all of Indonesia, Malaysia and most of the Philippines, which are usually the first areas to experience ENSO-related impacts. This dryness can be expected to continue, on average, for the remainder of 2006 continuing into the early part of 2007. During the period November 2006 January 2007 climate forecasts indicate that there is a high probability for above normal rainfall in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Islands, the Korean Peninsula, the U.S. Gulf Coast and Florida, northern South America and equatorial east Africa. Taking into consideration current observations and climate forecast information, indications are that the following regions are at increased risk for disease outbreaks: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and most of the southeast Asia Islands for increased dengue fever transmission and increased respiratory illness; Coastal Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Colombia for increased risk of malaria; Bangladesh and coastal India for elevated risk of cholera; East Africa for increased risk of a Rift Valley fever outbreak and elevated malaria; southwest USA for increased risk for hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and plague; southern California for increased West Nile virus transmission; and northeast Brazil for increased dengue fever and respiratory illness. Conclusion The current development of El Nio conditions has significant implications for global public health. Extremes in climate events with above normal rainfall and flooding in some regions and extended drought periods in other regions will occur. Forecasting disease is critical for timely and efficient planning of operational control programs. In this paper we describe developing global climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that suggest <span class="hlt">potential</span> disease risks that will give decision makers additional tools to make rational judgments concerning implementation of disease prevention and mitigation strategies. PMID:17194307</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323421','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323421"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Climate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Infectious Disease Risks: 2014-2015</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chretien, Jean-Paul; Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer; Britch, Seth; Sanchez, Jose L.; Halbach, Alaina C.; Tucker, Compton; Linthicum, Kenneth J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: The El Nio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global climate phenomenon that impacts human infectious disease risk worldwide through droughts, floods, and other climate extremes. Throughout summer and fall 2014 and winter 2015, El Nio Watch, issued by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, assessed likely El Nio development during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter, persisting into spring 2015. Methods: We identified geographic regions where environmental conditions may increase infectious disease transmission if the predicted El Nio occurs using El Nio indicators (Sea Surface Temperature [SST], Outgoing Longwave Radiation [OLR], and rainfall <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) and literature review of El Nio-infectious disease associations. Results: SSTs in the equatorial Pacific and western Indian Oceans were anomalously elevated during August-October 2014, consistent with a developing weak El Nio event. Teleconnections with local climate is evident in global precipitation patterns, with positive OLR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (drier than average conditions) across Indonesia and coastal southeast Asia, and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across northern China, the western Indian Ocean, central Asia, north-central and northeast Africa, Mexico/Central America, the southwestern United States, and the northeastern and southwestern tropical Pacific. Persistence of these conditions could produce environmental settings conducive to increased transmission of cholera, dengue, malaria, Rift Valley fever, and other infectious diseases in regional hotspots as during previous El Nio events. Discussion and Conclusions: The current development of weak El Nio conditions may have significant <span class="hlt">potential</span> implications for global public health in winter 2014-spring 2015. Enhanced surveillance and other preparedness measures in predicted infectious disease hotspots could mitigate health impacts. PMID:25685635</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyA..343..424D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyA..343..424D"><span id="translatedtitle">Specific heat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of non-interacting fermions with multifractal <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Oliveira, I. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>In this work, we compute the specific heat of a system of non-interacting fermions whose <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum presents a self-similar character. The critical attractor of the logistic map is used to generate a multifractal <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum. We study the temperature dependence of the specific heat for distinct band fillings. At low temperatures the specific heat presents <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which evolve from log-periodic oscillations at low band fillings to more complex patterns which strongly depends on the actual position of the Fermi <span class="hlt">energy</span>. We relate the character of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with some scaling exponents which characterize the discrete scale invariance of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MarGR..35....1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MarGR..35....1M"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating Cenozoic equatorial sediment deposition <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for <span class="hlt">potential</span> paleoceanographic and Pacific plate motion applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mitchell, Neil C.; Dubois, Nathalie</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>If equatorial sediments form characteristic deposits around the equator, they may help to resolve the amount of northwards drift of the Pacific tectonic plate. Relevant to this issue, it has been shown that 230Th has been accumulating on the equatorial seabed faster than its production from radioactive decay in the overlying water column during the Holocene (Marcantonio et al. in Paleoceanography 16:260-267, 2001). Some researchers have argued that this reflects the deposition of particles with adsorbed 230Th carried by bottom currents towards the equator ("focusing"). If correct, this effect may combine with high pelagic productivity, which is also centered on the equator, to yield a characteristic signature of high accumulation rates marking the paleoequator in older deposits. Here we evaluate <span class="hlt">potential</span> evidence that such an equatorial feature existed in the geological past. Seismic reflection data from seven meridional transects suggest that a band of equatorially enhanced accumulation of restricted latitude was variably developed, both spatially and temporally. It is absent in the interval 14.25-20.1 Ma but is well developed for the interval 8.55-14.25 Ma. We also examined eolian dust accumulation rate histories generated from scientific drilling data. A dust accumulation rate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near the modern equator, which is not obviously related to the inter-tropical convergence zone, is interpreted as caused by focusing. Accumulation rates of Ba and P2O5 (proxies of export production) reveal a static equatorial signature, which suggests that the movement of the Pacific plate over the period 10-25 Ma was modest. The general transition from missing to well-developed focusing signatures around 14.25 Ma in the seismic data coincides with the mid-Miocene development of the western boundary current off New Zealand. This current supplies the Pacific with deep water from Antarctica, and could therefore imply a <span class="hlt">potential</span> paleoceanographic or paleoclimatic origin. At 10.05-14.25 Ma, the latitudes of the seismic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are up to ~2 different from the paleoequator predicted by Pacific plate-hotspot models, suggesting <span class="hlt">potentially</span> a small change in the hotspot latitudes relative to the present day (although this inference depends on the precise form of the deposition around the equator). The Ba and P2O5 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, on the other hand, are broadly compatible with plate models predicting slow northward plate movement over 10-25 Ma.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1156912','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1156912"><span id="translatedtitle">Mining Building <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Management System Data Using Fuzzy <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection and Linguistic Descriptions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dumidu Wijayasekara; Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Building <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Management Systems (BEMSs) are essential components of modern buildings that utilize digital control technologies to minimize <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption while maintaining high levels of occupant comfort. However, BEMSs can only achieve these <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings when properly tuned and controlled. Since indoor environment is dependent on uncertain criteria such as weather, occupancy, and thermal state, performance of BEMS can be sub-optimal at times. Unfortunately, the complexity of BEMS control mechanism, the large amount of data available and inter-relations between the data can make identifying these sub-optimal behaviors difficult. This paper proposes a novel Fuzzy <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection and Linguistic Description (Fuzzy-ADLD) based method for improving the understandability of BEMS behavior for improved state-awareness. The presented method is composed of two main parts: 1) detection of anomalous BEMS behavior and 2) linguistic representation of BEMS behavior. The first part utilizes modified nearest neighbor clustering algorithm and fuzzy logic rule extraction technique to build a model of normal BEMS behavior. The second part of the presented method computes the most relevant linguistic description of the identified <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The presented Fuzzy-ADLD method was applied to real-world BEMS system and compared against a traditional alarm based BEMS. In six different scenarios, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified anomalous behavior either as fast as or faster (an hour or more), that the alarm based BEMS. In addition, the Fuzzy-ADLD method identified cases that were missed by the alarm based system, demonstrating <span class="hlt">potential</span> for increased state-awareness of abnormal building behavior.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1059713','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1059713"><span id="translatedtitle">Addressing the Challenges of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection for Cyber Physical <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Grid Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A; Melin, Alexander M; Czejdo, Bogdan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The consolidation of cyber communications networks and physical control systems within the <span class="hlt">energy</span> smart grid introduces a number of new risks. Unfortunately, these risks are largely unknown and poorly understood, yet include very high impact losses from attack and component failures. One important aspect of risk management is the detection of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and changes. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection within cyber security remains a difficult, open problem, with special challenges in dealing with false alert rates and heterogeneous data. Furthermore, the integration of cyber and physical dynamics is often intractable. And, because of their broad scope, <span class="hlt">energy</span> grid cyber-physical systems must be analyzed at multiple scales, from individual components, up to network level dynamics. We describe an improved approach to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection that combines three important aspects. First, system dynamics are modeled using a reduced order model for greater computational tractability. Second, a probabilistic and principled approach to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is adopted that allows for regulation of false alerts and comparison of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> across heterogeneous data sources. Third, a hierarchy of aggregations are constructed to support interactive and automated analyses of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at multiple scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21198001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21198001"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of the attractive interactions in the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a two length scale <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>da Silva, Jonathas Nunes; Salcedo, Evy; de Oliveira, Alan Barros; Barbosa, Marcia C</p> <p>2010-12-28</p> <p>Using molecular dynamic simulations, we study a system of particles interacting through a continuous core-softened <span class="hlt">potentials</span> consisting of a hard core, a shoulder at closest distances, and an attractive well at further distance. We obtain the pressure-temperature phase diagram of this system for various depths of the tunable attractive well. Since this is a two length scale <span class="hlt">potential</span>, density, diffusion, and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are expected. We show that the effect of increasing the attractive interaction between the molecules is to shrink the region in pressure in which the density and the diffusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present. If the attractive forces are too strong, particle will be predominantly in one of the two length scales and no density of diffusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is observed. The structural anomalous region is present for all the cases. PMID:21198001</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PApGe.133..117S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PApGe.133..117S"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of the Hilbert transform to interpret self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to two-dimensional inclined sheets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sundararajan, N.; Kumar, I. Arun; Mohan, N. L.; Seshagiri Rao, S. V.</p> <p>1990-03-01</p> <p>Self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to two-dimensional inclined sheet of finite depth extent are analysed from their horizontal and vertical derivatives via the Hilbert transform. The depths to the top and bottom of the sheet and the inclination are obtained by means of simple mathematical expressions. The method is applied to a theoretical example and to a field S.P. <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over a sulphide deposit in the Kalava fault zone of Cuddapah basin, India. The presence of random noise is analysed for various levels and its effect is discussed. This interpretation process can be automated for all practical purposes by simple programming.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610087T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610087T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> vorticity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as precursors of extreme precipitation events in the Mediterranean region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Toreti, Andrea; Martius, Olivia; Giannakaki, Paraskevi</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The achievement of a better understanding and characterisation of precipitation extremes is upmost for exposed and vulnerable areas such as the Mediterranean region, where these events can cause huge damages, losses and fatalities. The spatial complexity of the Mediterranean region as well as of the physical processes acting on the area led to numerous studies focused on specific events and/or specific sites. Here, a set of 108 daily time series (from 1961 to 2007) mostly covering the northern coastal areas of the Basin are used to identify common upper-level atmospheric factors that have contributed to precipitation extremes. An advanced statistical approach, developed in the frame of the Extreme Value Theory and able to deal with non-stationarities, is applied to get a classification of the stations into homogeneous areas and to characterise precipitation extremes. The upper-level atmospheric dynamics of extremes is investigated by analysing <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity derived from ERA-40 reanalysis. In terms of precipitation extremes, stations can be classified into six homogeneous areas, although higher spatial variability affects estimated return levels in the western part of the region. For almost all areas, significant <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the PV composites (one, two and even three days before the events) are estimated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983661','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983661"><span id="translatedtitle">Alaska's renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources and which renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technology investment efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.322a2008G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.322a2008G"><span id="translatedtitle">Woods-Saxon and So Paulo optical model calculations of the threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the 6,7Li+28Si systems near Coulomb barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gmez Camacho, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Two types of optical model interactions, namely the double-folding density dependent So Paulo <span class="hlt">potential</span> (SPP) and the Woods-Saxon <span class="hlt">potential</span> (WSP) are used to study the appearance of the Theshold <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (TA) or the Breakup Threshold <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (BTA) for the nuclear systems 6,7Li+28Si for <span class="hlt">energies</span> around the Coulomb barrier. In the first case, the presence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is determined from the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the normalization parameters NR and NI as found from fittings to elastic scattering angular distributions. In the second case, the presence of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is investigated by the <span class="hlt">energy</span> variation of the fusion and direct reaction parts of the Woods-Saxon <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In this case, the parameters of the fusion and direct reaction <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are calculated by a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering, fusion and total reaction cross sections. It is found in both cases that the BTA appears for the 6Li+28Si reaction. As for 7Li+28Si, the calculation with the SPP shows that the usual TA appears but the dispersion relation is not satisfied, however the WSP indicates that indeed the BTA shows up.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..91w5402S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvB..91w5402S"><span id="translatedtitle">Dependence of the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier in quantum wires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Hamilton, A. R.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Ninety-eight one-dimensional channels defined using split gates fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure are measured during one cooldown at 1.4 K. The devices are arranged in an array on a single chip and are individually addressed using a multiplexing technique. The anomalous conductance feature known as the "0.7 structure" is studied using statistical techniques. The ensemble of data shows that the 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> becomes more pronounced and occurs at lower values as the curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier in the transport direction decreases. This corresponds to an increase in the effective length of the device. The 0.7 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is not strongly influenced by other properties of the conductance related to density. The curvature of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier appears to be the primary factor governing the shape of the 0.7 structure at a given T and B .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAESc.114..327C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAESc.114..327C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> relationships between seismo-deformation and seismo-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Chieh-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Wang, Chung-Ho; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Yeh, Ta-Kang; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Lin, Tzu-Wei</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>This study examines the relationships between seismo-deformation and seismo-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> during two M6 earthquakes that occurred on March 27th and June 2nd, 2013 in Taiwan. The Hilbert-Huang Transform is applied on surface displacement data to remove the effects of noise, semi-annual and annual cycles, and the long-term plate movements. The residual displacements have similar orientations when earthquake-related stress accumulates in the crust. Once the accumulated stress approaches the threshold for fault rupture, the orientations of the residual displacements generally become random, except in a small region near the epicenter. Interestingly, high-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which can be detected from the 3-component magnetic data via the magnetic transfer function, exist in places very close to this small region near the epicenter. Spatial and temporal correlations between the high-conductivity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the small region of seismo-deformation <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> suggest that electric charges may migrate and become trapped in the region during seismogenic processes due to differential stress accumulation. These electric charges form a high-conductivity material that affects the Parkinson vector of the geomagnetic field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=72355&keyword=your+AND+brain+AND+necessary&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55652486&CFTOKEN=83527673','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=72355&keyword=your+AND+brain+AND+necessary&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55652486&CFTOKEN=83527673"><span id="translatedtitle">PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> ROLE OF HORMONAL ALTERATIONS IN INITIATING ADULT REPRODUCTIVE <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The primary hypothesis to be tested in this series of studies is whether or not exposure to environmental agents, during certain key periods of development, will increase the risk of specific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the reproductive system. Embedded in this hypothesis is the assumption that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995wein.conf..599P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995wein.conf..599P"><span id="translatedtitle">The San Onofre reactor neutrino experiment: a low <span class="hlt">energy</span> test of the atmospheric neutrino <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piepke, A.; Boehm, F.; Chen, M.; Cook, B.; Henrikson, H.; Hertenberger, R.; Lou, K.; Mascarenhas, N.; Michael, D.; Novikov, V. M.; Vogel, P.</p> <p></p> <p>The long-standing solar neutrino deficit and the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the ratio of electron to muon neutrinos, found for neutrinos generated in the atmosphere, are intriguing hints at the existence of finite neutrino masses and flavor mixing. The authors are preparing a low <span class="hlt">energy</span> long baseline ?-oscillation experiment, to test the latter phenomenon. A 12 ton segmented, Gd loaded liquid scintillation detector will be installed at 740 m distance from the San Onofre nuclear power station in California, in an underground vault.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SGeo..tmp...50A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SGeo..tmp...50A"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Gravity and Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> for the Deep Structure and Possibility of Hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of the Region Surrounding Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia, Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aydemir, Attila; Ates, Abdullah; Bilim, Funda; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Bektas, Ozcan</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is not observed on the surface beyond 40 km southeast of Karliova town toward the western shoreline of Lake Van. Various amplitudes of gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are observed around the lake and surrounding region. In the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map, contour intensity is observed from the north of Mus city center toward Lake Van. There is a possibility that the NAF extends from here to the lake. Because there is no gravity data within the lake, the extension of the NAF is unknown and uncertain in the lake and to the east. Meanwhile, it is observed from the aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that there are several positive and negative amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> aligned around a slightly curved line in the east-west direction. The same curvature becomes much clearer in the analytic signal transformation map. The volcanic mountains of Nemrut and Suphan, and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the east of the Lake Van are all lined up and extended with this slightly curved line, provoking thoughts that a fault zone that was not previously mapped may exist. The epicenter of the major earthquake event that occurred on October 23, 2011 is located on this fault zone. The fault plane solution of this earthquake indicates a thrust fault in the east-west direction, consistent with the results of this study. Volcanic mountains in this zone are accepted as still being active because of gas seepages from their calderas, and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by buried causative bodies, probably magmatic intrusions. Because of its magmatic nature, this zone could be a good prospect for geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> exploration. In this study, the basement of the Van Basin was also modelled three-dimensionally (3D) in order to investigate its hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">potential</span>, because the first oil production in Anatolia was recorded around the Kurzot village in this basin. According to the 3D modelling results, the basin is composed of three different depressions aligned in the N-S direction and many prospective structures were observed between and around these depressions where the depocenter depths may reach down to 10 km.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790020473','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790020473"><span id="translatedtitle">Global accuracy estimates of point and mean undulation differences obtained from gravity disturbances, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jekeli, C.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Through the method of truncation functions, the oceanic geoid undulation is divided into two constituents: an inner zone contribution expressed as an integral of surface gravity disturbances over a spherical cap; and an outer zone contribution derived from a finite set of <span class="hlt">potential</span> harmonic coefficients. Global, average error estimates are formulated for undulation differences, thereby providing accuracies for a relative geoid. The error analysis focuses on the outer zone contribution for which the <span class="hlt">potential</span> coefficient errors are modeled. The method of computing undulations based on gravity disturbance data for the inner zone is compared to the similar, conventional method which presupposes gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data within this zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp...96L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp...96L"><span id="translatedtitle">Two key parameters for the El Nio continuum: zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and Western Pacific subsurface <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lai, Andy Wang-Chun; Herzog, Michael; Graf, Hans-F.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Different types of El Nio (EN) events have recently been discussed. Based on NCEP-NOAA reanalysis data this analysis explores a number of key parameters that cause a range of EN types over the period 1980-2013. EN events are divided into three types depending on the spatial and temporal evolution of the sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (SSTA): Central Pacific (CPEN), Eastern Pacific (EPEN), and Hybrid (HBEN). We find that EN is a continuous spectrum of events with CPEN and EPEN as the end members. This spectrum mainly depends on two key parameters: the 130E-160E Western Pacific 5-250 m subsurface oceanic <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> about 1 year before the EN peak (typically January and February), and the 140E-160W cumulative zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (ZWA) between onset and peak of the EN event. Using these two parameters, about 70 % of the total variance of the maximum SSTA realised in different Nio regions can already be explained up to 6 months before the maximum SSTA occurs. This offers a rather simple <span class="hlt">potential</span> for ENSO prediction. A necessary condition for the evolution of an EPEN, the Western Pacific is in the recharged state. Strong and sustained westerly wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Western Pacific can then trigger a Kelvin wave propagating to the eastern Pacific. Both parameters, <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature and zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, constructively interfere. For a CPEN, these parameters are much less important. Kelvin wave propagation is not involved in the evolution of the event. Instead, the Central Pacific warming is caused locally by a zonal advection feedback and local air-sea interaction as already demonstrated in previous studies. The HBEN occurs when both parameters interfere in different ways: (1) Western Pacific is weakly charged, but strong westerly ZWA are observed that reduce the equatorial upwelling in the Central Pacific while the triggered Kelvin wave is too weak to have a significant effect; (2) Western Pacific is strongly charged but only weak westerly ZWA develop, so that the resulting Kelvin wave cannot fully extend into the eastern-most Pacific.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45.3461L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45.3461L"><span id="translatedtitle">Two key parameters for the El Nio continuum: zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and Western Pacific subsurface <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lai, Andy Wang-Chun; Herzog, Michael; Graf, Hans-F.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Different types of El Nio (EN) events have recently been discussed. Based on NCEP-NOAA reanalysis data this analysis explores a number of key parameters that cause a range of EN types over the period 1980-2013. EN events are divided into three types depending on the spatial and temporal evolution of the sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (SSTA): Central Pacific (CPEN), Eastern Pacific (EPEN), and Hybrid (HBEN). We find that EN is a continuous spectrum of events with CPEN and EPEN as the end members. This spectrum mainly depends on two key parameters: the 130E-160E Western Pacific 5-250 m subsurface oceanic <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> about 1 year before the EN peak (typically January and February), and the 140E-160W cumulative zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (ZWA) between onset and peak of the EN event. Using these two parameters, about 70 % of the total variance of the maximum SSTA realised in different Nio regions can already be explained up to 6 months before the maximum SSTA occurs. This offers a rather simple <span class="hlt">potential</span> for ENSO prediction. A necessary condition for the evolution of an EPEN, the Western Pacific is in the recharged state. Strong and sustained westerly wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Western Pacific can then trigger a Kelvin wave propagating to the eastern Pacific. Both parameters, <span class="hlt">potential</span> temperature and zonal wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, constructively interfere. For a CPEN, these parameters are much less important. Kelvin wave propagation is not involved in the evolution of the event. Instead, the Central Pacific warming is caused locally by a zonal advection feedback and local air-sea interaction as already demonstrated in previous studies. The HBEN occurs when both parameters interfere in different ways: (1) Western Pacific is weakly charged, but strong westerly ZWA are observed that reduce the equatorial upwelling in the Central Pacific while the triggered Kelvin wave is too weak to have a significant effect; (2) Western Pacific is strongly charged but only weak westerly ZWA develop, so that the resulting Kelvin wave cannot fully extend into the eastern-most Pacific.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020087569&hterms=solar+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Benergy','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020087569&hterms=solar+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Benergy"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Surface Solar <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Including El Nino and La Nina Years</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Whitlock, C. H.; Brown, D. E.; Chandler, W. S.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Stackhouse, Paul W.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This paper synthesizes past events in an attempt to define the general magnitude, duration, and location of large surface solar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the globe. Surface solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> values are mostly a function of solar zenith angle, cloud conditions, column atmospheric water vapor, aerosols, and surface albedo. For this study, solar and meteorological parameters for the 10-yr period July 1983 through June 1993 are used. These data were generated as part of the Release 3 Surface meteorology and Solar <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (SSE) activity under the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) effort. Release 3 SSE uses upgraded input data and methods relative to previous releases. Cloud conditions are based on recent NASA Version-D International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) global satellite radiation and cloud data. Meteorological inputs are from Version-I Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) reanalysis data that uses both weather station and satellite information. Aerosol transmission for different regions and seasons are for an 'average' year based on historic solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> data from over 1000 ground sites courtesy of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These data are input to a new Langley Parameterized Shortwave Algorithm (LPSA) that calculates surface albedo and surface solar <span class="hlt">energy</span>. That algorithm is an upgraded version of the 'Staylor' algorithm. Calculations are performed for a 280X280 km equal-area grid system over the globe based on 3-hourly input data. A bi-linear interpolation process is used to estimate data output values on a 1 X 1 degree grid system over the globe. Maximum <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are examined relative to El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Maximum year-to-year <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the globe are provided for a 10-year period. The data may assist in the design of systems with increased reliability. It may also allow for better planning for emergency assistance during some atypical events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhB...47l4034K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhB...47l4034K"><span id="translatedtitle">Temperature-resolution <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the reconstruction of time dynamics from <span class="hlt">energy</span>-loss experiments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kogar, Anshul; Vig, Sean; Gan, Yu; Abbamonte, Peter</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Inelastic scattering techniques provide a powerful approach to studying electron and nuclear dynamics, via reconstruction of a propagator that quantifies the time evolution of a system. There is now growing interest in applying such methods to very low <span class="hlt">energy</span> excitations, such as lattice vibrations, but in this limit the cross section is no longer proportional to a propagator. Significant deviations occur due to the finite temperature Bose statistics of the excitations. Here we consider this issue in the context of high-resolution electron <span class="hlt">energy</span>-loss experiments on the copper-oxide superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8. We find that simple division of a Bose factor yields an accurate propagator on <span class="hlt">energy</span> scales greater than the resolution width. However, at low <span class="hlt">energy</span> scales, the effects of resolution and finite temperature conspire to create <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the dynamics at long times. We compare two practical ways for dealing with such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and discuss the range of validity of the technique in light of this comparison.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963444','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963444"><span id="translatedtitle">LHC Physics <span class="hlt">Potential</span> versus <span class="hlt">Energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the <span class="hlt">energy</span> range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9593E..0SM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9593E..0SM"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms for field-acquired gamma <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ron; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing a tactical, networked radiation detection system that will be agile, reconfigurable, and capable of rapid threat assessment with high degree of fidelity and certainty. Our design is driven by the needs of users such as law enforcement personnel who must make decisions by evaluating threat signatures in urban settings. The most efficient tool available to identify the nature of the threat object is real-time gamma spectroscopic analysis, as it is fast and has a very low probability of producing false positive alarm conditions. Urban radiological searches are inherently challenged by the rapid and large spatial variation of background gamma radiation, the presence of benign radioactive materials in terms of the normally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and shielded and/or masked threat sources. Multiple spectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms have been developed by national laboratories and commercial vendors. For example, the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) a one-dimensional deterministic radiation transport software capable of calculating gamma ray spectra using physics-based detector response functions was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm (or NSCRAD), developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses spectral comparison ratios to detect deviation from benign medical and NORM radiation source and can work in spite of strong presence of NORM and or medical sources. RSL has developed its own wavelet-based gamma <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm called WAVRAD. Test results and relative merits of these different algorithms will be discussed and demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..131R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..131R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> transform methods based on total <span class="hlt">energy</span> and ocean heat content norms for generating ocean dynamic disturbances for ensemble climate forecasts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Romanova, Vanya; Hense, Andreas</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In our study we use the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> transform, a special case of ensemble transform method, in which a selected set of initial oceanic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in space, time and variables are defined and orthogonalized. The resulting orthogonal perturbation patterns are designed such that they pick up typical balanced <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structures in space and time and between variables. The metric used to set up the eigen problem is taken either as the weighted total <span class="hlt">energy</span> with its zonal, meridional kinetic and available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> terms having equal contributions, or the weighted ocean heat content in which a disturbance is applied only to the initial temperature fields. The choices of a reference state for defining the initial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are such that either perturbations on seasonal timescales and or on interannual timescales are constructed. These project a-priori only the slow modes of the ocean physical processes, such that the disturbances grow mainly in the Western Boundary Currents, in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the El Nino Southern Oscillation regions. An additional set of initial conditions is designed to fit in a least square sense data from global ocean reanalysis. Applying the AT produced sets of disturbances to oceanic initial conditions initialized by observations of the MPIOM-ESM coupled model on T63L47/GR15 resolution, four ensemble and one hind-cast experiments were performed. The weighted total <span class="hlt">energy</span> norm is used to monitor the amplitudes and rates of the fastest growing error modes. The results showed minor dependence of the instabilities or error growth on the selected metric but considerable change due to the magnitude of the scaling amplitudes of the perturbation patterns. In contrast to similar atmospheric applications, we find an <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion from kinetic to available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, which suggests a different source of uncertainty generation in the ocean than in the atmosphere mainly associated with changes in the density field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723691"><span id="translatedtitle">A new parameter-free soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> for silica and its application to simulation of silica <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M</p> <p>2015-12-28</p> <p>A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body <span class="hlt">potential</span> term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26723691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.143x4506I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.143x4506I"><span id="translatedtitle">A new parameter-free soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> for silica and its application to simulation of silica <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body <span class="hlt">potential</span> term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482292"><span id="translatedtitle">Cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease: a radiologic finding <span class="hlt">potentially</span> confused with child abuse</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hill, Suvimol C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport caused by mutations in ATP7A, a copper-transporting ATPase. Certain radiologic findings reported in this condition overlap with those caused by child abuse. However, cervical spine defects simulating cervical spine fracture, a known result of nonaccidental pediatric trauma, have not been reported previously in this illness. Objective To assess the frequency of cervical spine <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Menkes disease after discovery of an apparent C2 posterior arch defect in a child participating in a clinical trial. Materials and methods We examined cervical spine radiographs obtained in 35 children with Menkes disease enrolled in a clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Results Four of the 35 children with Menkes disease had apparent C2 posterior arch defects consistent with spondylolysis or incomplete/delayed ossification. Conclusion Defects in C2 were found in 11% of infants and young children with Menkes disease. Discovery of cervical spine defects expands the spectrum of radiologic findings associated with this condition. As with other skeletal abnormalities, this feature simulates nonaccidental trauma. In the context of Menkes disease, suspicions of child abuse should be considered cautiously and tempered by these findings to avoid unwarranted accusations. PMID:22825777</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coulomb&pg=2&id=EJ215006','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Coulomb&pg=2&id=EJ215006"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energies</span> of Screened Coulomb <span class="hlt">Potentials</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lai, C. S.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>This article shows that, by applying the Hellman-Feynman theorem alone to screened Coulomb <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, the first four coefficients in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> series in powers of the perturbation parameter can be obtained from the unperturbed Coulomb system. (Author/HM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/893003','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/893003"><span id="translatedtitle">Examining the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>This outreach document goes to <span class="hlt">potential</span> partners for NREL's Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Initiative, which will explore the long-term <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> to meet a substantial share of U.S. <span class="hlt">energy</span> needs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4208775','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4208775"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Detection Based on Undecimated Discrete Wavelet Transform and Its Application in Magnetic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nie, Xinhua; Pan, Zhongming; Zhang, Dasha; Zhou, Han; Chen, Min; Zhang, Wenna</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection (MAD) is a passive approach for detection of a ferromagnetic target, and its performance is often limited by external noises. In consideration of one major noise source is the fractal noise (or called 1/f noise) with a power spectral density of 1/fa (0<a<2), which is non-stationary, self-similarity and long-range correlation. Meanwhile the orthonormal wavelet decomposition can play the role of a Karhunen-Love-type expansion to the 1/f-type signal by its decorrelation abilities, an effective <span class="hlt">energy</span> detection method based on undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the foundations of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and UDWT are introduced in brief, while a possible detection system based on giant magneto-impedance (GMI) magnetic sensor is also given out. Then our proposed <span class="hlt">energy</span> detection based on UDWT is described in detail, and the probabilities of false alarm and detection for given the detection threshold in theory are presented. It is noticeable that no a priori assumptions regarding the ferromagnetic target or the magnetic noise probability are necessary for our method, and different from the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the UDWT is shift invariant. Finally, some simulations are performed and the results show that the detection performance of our proposed detector is better than that of the conventional <span class="hlt">energy</span> detector even utilized in the Gaussian white noise, especially when the spectral parameter ? is less than 1.0. In addition, a real-world experiment was done to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:25343484</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/919494','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/919494"><span id="translatedtitle">California Industrial <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike</p> <p>2005-06-01</p> <p>This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic <span class="hlt">potential</span>, the study examines achievable program <span class="hlt">potential</span> undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, the<span class="hlt">Energy</span> Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing <span class="hlt">Energy</span> ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable <span class="hlt">potential</span> over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of <span class="hlt">energy</span> savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable <span class="hlt">potential</span> estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16512727','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16512727"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic and dynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for a three-dimensional isotropic core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Oliveira, Alan Barros; Netz, Paulo A; Colla, Thiago; Barbosa, Marcia C</p> <p>2006-02-28</p> <p>Using molecular-dynamics simulations and integral equations (Rogers-Young, Percus-Yevick, and hypernetted chain closures) we investigate the thermodynamics of particles interacting with continuous core-softened intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Dynamic properties are also analyzed by the simulations. We show that, for a chosen shape of the <span class="hlt">potential</span>, the density, at constant pressure, has a maximum for a certain temperature. The line of temperatures of maximum density (TMD) was determined in the pressure-temperature phase diagram. Similarly the diffusion constant at a constant temperature, D, has a maximum at a density rho(max) and a minimum at a density rho(min) < rho(max). In the pressure-temperature phase diagram the line of extrema in diffusivity is outside of the TMD line. Although this interparticle <span class="hlt">potential</span> lacks directionality, this is the same behavior observed in simple point charge/extended water. PMID:16512727</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Epoch&pg=3&id=EJ881806','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Epoch&pg=3&id=EJ881806"><span id="translatedtitle">Do U Txt? Event-Related <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> to Semantic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Standard and Texted English</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berger, Natalie I.; Coch, Donna</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Texted English is a hybrid, technology-based language derived from standard English modified to facilitate ease of communication via instant and text messaging. We compared semantic processing of texted and standard English sentences by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in a classic semantic incongruity paradigm designed to elicit an N400 effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7037830','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7037830"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1990-03-01</p> <p>On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies contribute to diversifying sources of <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> use and what is the <span class="hlt">potential</span> timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21305088','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21305088"><span id="translatedtitle">FERMI CONSTRAINS DARK-MATTER ORIGIN OF HIGH-<span class="hlt">ENERGY</span> POSITRON <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pohl, Martin; Eichler, David E-mail: eichler@bgumail.bgu.ac.il</p> <p>2010-03-20</p> <p>Fermi measurements of the high-latitude {gamma}-ray background strongly constrain a decaying-dark-matter origin for the 1-100 GeV Galactic positron <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> measured with PAMELA. Inverse Compton scattering of the microwave background by the emergent positrons produces a bump in the diffuse 100-200 MeV {gamma}-ray background that would protrude from the observed background at these <span class="hlt">energies</span>. The positrons are thus constrained to emerge from the decay process at a typical <span class="hlt">energy</span> between {approx}100 GeV and {approx}250 GeV. By considering only {gamma}-ray emission of the excess positrons and electrons, we derive a minimum diffuse {gamma}-ray flux that, apart from the positron spectrum assumed, is independent of the actual decay modes. Any {gamma}-rays produced directly by the dark-matter decay leads to an additional signal that makes the observational limits more severe. A similar constraint on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of emergent positrons from annihilation in dark-matter substructures is argued to exist, according to recent estimates of enhancement in low-mass dark-matter substructures, and improved simulations of such substructure will further sharpen this constraint.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DokES.464..983G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DokES.464..983G"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface and internal <span class="hlt">energy</span> of hydrocarbon gas bubbles as a factor of formation of gas deposits and related heat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Golubev, V. A.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>It is shown that, during coalescence of bubbles, the mechanical <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the surface tension transits to the heat <span class="hlt">energy</span> sufficient to increase the temperature of the bed-reservoir by several tens of degrees. The positive heat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and anomalously high formation pressure in the petroleum regions may be caused by <span class="hlt">energy</span> released during the amalgamation of a small-disperse gas phase into economic deposits.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PApGe.170..895T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PApGe.170..895T"><span id="translatedtitle">An Approach for Interpretation of Self-<span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> due to Simple Geometrical Structures Using Fair Function Minimization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tlas, M.; Asfahani, J.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>A quantitative interpretation method of self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has been proposed. The method is designed and implemented for the estimation of center depth, electric dipole moment or magnitude of polarization, polarization angle, and geometric shape factor of a buried body from SP field data, related to simple geometric structures such as cylinders, spheres and sheet-like bodies. The proposed method is based on Fair function minimization and also on stochastic optimization modeling. This new technique was first tested on theoretical synthetic data randomly generated by a chosen statistical distribution from a known model with different random noise components. Such mathematical simulation shows a very close agreement between assumed and estimated model parameters. Being theoretically proven, it has been applied and tested on self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> field data taken from the United States, Germany, India and Turkey. The agreement between results obtained by the suggested method and those obtained by other previous methods is good and comparable. Moreover, the depth obtained by this method is found to be in high accordance with that obtained from drilling information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20307904','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20307904"><span id="translatedtitle">Do u txt? Event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> to semantic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in standard and texted English.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berger, Natalie I; Coch, Donna</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Texted English is a hybrid, technology-based language derived from standard English modified to facilitate ease of communication via instant and text messaging. We compared semantic processing of texted and standard English sentences by recording event-related <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in a classic semantic incongruity paradigm designed to elicit an N400 effect. In participants fluent in both text and standard English, an N400 effect was elicited in both the texted and standard English conditions. The amplitude and distribution of the N400 effect (300-500ms) in the texted and standard English conditions were similar, but the text semantic incongruity effect was characterized by a delayed peak latency and an extended duration into the 500-700ms epoch. This pattern of results replicates previous findings regarding differences in the N400 effect in native and non-native language processing, but for the first time extends the bilingual ERP literature to include the technological phenomenon of texted English. PMID:20307904</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JChPh..92..340N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JChPh..92..340N"><span id="translatedtitle">Walking on <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nichols, Jeff; Taylor, Hugh; Schmidt, Peter; Simons, Jack</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>An algorithm for locating stationary points corresponding to local minima and transition states on <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces is developed and analyzed. This method, which represents a substantial extension of an earlier algorithm, utilizes local gradient and Hessian (i.e., first and second <span class="hlt">energy</span> derivative) information to generate a series of ``steps'' that are followed to the desired stationary point. By designing the step sequence to move energetically downhill in all coordinates, local minima can be found. By stepping uphill along one local eigenmode of the Hessian while minimizing the <span class="hlt">energy</span> along all other modes, one locates transition states. A key element of this development is a more efficient parametrization of the step vector in terms of quantities that permit the direction (i.e., uphill or downhill) and length of the step to be carefully controlled. This, in turn, allows ``walks'' that trace streambeds connecting local minima to transition states and to neighboring local minima more closely than has been found using the earlier methods. Such streambed walks provide information that can be used in subsequent reaction-path dynamics simulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.8605W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.8605W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> impacts of wintertime soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from agricultural irrigation at low latitudes on regional and global climates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wey, Hao-Wei; Lo, Min-Hui; Lee, Shih-Yu; Yu, Jin-Yi; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Anthropogenic water management can change surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> budgets and the water cycle. In this study, we focused on impacts of Asian low-latitude irrigation on regional and global climates during boreal wintertime. A state-of-the-art Earth system model is used to simulate the land-air interaction processes affected by irrigation and the consequent responses in atmospheric circulation. Perturbed experiments show that wet soil moisture <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at low latitudes can reduce the surface temperature on a continental scale through atmospheric feedback. The intensity of prevailing monsoon circulation becomes stronger because of larger land-sea thermal contrast. Furthermore, anomalous upper level convergence over South Asia and midlatitude climatic changes indicate tropical-extratropical teleconnections. The wintertime Aleutian low is deepened and an anomalous warm surface temperature is found in North America. Previous studies have noted this warming but left it unexplained, and we provide plausible mechanisms for these remote impacts coming from the irrigation over Asian low-latitude regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5513432','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5513432"><span id="translatedtitle">Holonomy <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.</p> <p>1985-05-01</p> <p>A new type of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989PApGe.129..535F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989PApGe.129..535F"><span id="translatedtitle">Induced gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and seismic <span class="hlt">energy</span> as a basis for prediction of mining tremors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fajklewicz, Zbigniew; Jakiel, Krzysztof</p> <p>1989-09-01</p> <p>The results of prediction of occurrence of mining tremors and bursts in the course of the exploitation of the remaining part of the hard coal in seam 510 of the mine Pstrowski, Upper Silesia, have been presented in the paper. The exploitation has taken place under extremely difficult conditions hazardous for the mining crew. To predict the occurrence of mining tremors, bursts and direction of migration of increased elastic strain in the rock mass, the microgravity method has been applied. The microgravity observations were carried out in the measurement points located at mutual distances equal 20 m in three profiles of the lengths 700 m, 760 m and 260 m respectively. The profiles were located in mining workings in the vicinity of the exploited part of the bed. In the course of exploitation, lasting 25 months, 29 series of measurements including 3600 individual microgravity observations were carried out. Microgravity observations were made with a Worden-Master gravimeter. The observed time changes of gravity microanomalies were essential for prediction. Local negative changes of gravity microanomalies signalled the approaching mining tremor. The tremor would cover an area of the radius 60 m to 100 m. The regional time changes of the gravity microanomalies appearing as linear trends of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> signalled the development of the fields of elastic strain in the whole investigated area and the approaching violent release of elastic strain <span class="hlt">energy</span> from the rock mass. The values of the amplitudes AMP of the above-mentioned trend were the measure of this hazard. In the course of the investigations each shock was preceded by considerably increased values of AMP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040081281','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040081281"><span id="translatedtitle">Bangui <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Taylor, Patrick T.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (figure 2). This elliptically shaped <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is composed of three segments; there are two positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695837','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695837"><span id="translatedtitle">Baryon junction loops and the baryon-meson <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at high <span class="hlt">energies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pop, V. Topor; Barrette, J.; Gale, C.; Gyulassy, M.; Wang, X.N.; Xu, N.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>A new version, v2.0, of the HIJING/BB Monte Carlo nuclear collision event generator is introduced in order to explore further the possible role of baryon junctions loops in the baryon-meson <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (2<p{sub T}<5 GeV/c) observed in 200A GeV Au+Au reactions at RHIC. We show that junction loops with an enhanced intrinsic k{sub T}{approx_equal}1 GeV/c transverse momentum kick may provide a partial explanation of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> as well as other important baryon stopping observables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ938805.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ938805.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Geothermal <span class="hlt">Energy</span>: Tapping the <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Bill</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Ground source geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building <span class="hlt">energy</span> utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26ES...27a2068K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26ES...27a2068K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> of renewable and alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The article deals with application <span class="hlt">potential</span> of clean alternative renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> in Tomsk Oblast as well as main <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources of existing <span class="hlt">energy</span> system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering <span class="hlt">potential</span> of renewable and alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high <span class="hlt">potential</span> of alternative and renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13.1077A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13.1077A"><span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Akhoondzadeh, M.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), have been proposed to quantify <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4). The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST) night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT) data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i) ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii) A multilayer perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii) Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. (iv) ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and <span class="hlt">potentialities</span> of the four integrated methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..91d4610G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..91d4610G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> dependence of the optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for the 9Be +208Pb and 9Be +209Bi systems at near-Coulomb-barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gmez Camacho, A.; Yu, N.; Zhang, H. Q.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Jia, H. M.; Lubian, J.; Lin, C. J.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>We analyze the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the interacting optical <span class="hlt">potential</span>, at near barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span>, for two systems involving the weakly bound projectile 9Be and the heavy 208Pb and 209Bi targets, by the simultaneous fit of elastic scattering angular distributions and fusion excitation functions. The approach used consists of dividing the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> into two parts. A short-range <span class="hlt">potential</span> VF+i WF that is responsible for fusion, and a superficial <span class="hlt">potential</span> VDR+i WDR for direct reactions. It is found, for both systems studied, that the fusion imaginary <span class="hlt">potential</span> WF presents the usual threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (TA) observed in tightly bound systems, whereas the direct reaction imaginary <span class="hlt">potential</span> WDR shows a breakup threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (BTA) behavior. Both <span class="hlt">potentials</span> satisfy the dispersion relation. The direct reaction polarization <span class="hlt">potential</span> predominates over the fusion <span class="hlt">potential</span> and so a net overall behavior is found to follow the BTA phenomenon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/862083','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/862083"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> Water and <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Savings from Showerheads</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Biermayer, Peter J.</p> <p>2005-09-28</p> <p>This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize <span class="hlt">potential</span> water and <span class="hlt">energy</span> saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their <span class="hlt">potential</span> water and <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D"><span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dorman, Lev; Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.</p> <p></p> <p>Results of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment, are presented. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the "Kosmos" series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are com-bined in one database, together with similar information on other spacecrafts. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of the space weather: geo-magnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different <span class="hlt">energies</span>, high <span class="hlt">energy</span> cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high ( 5000 events) and low (about 800 events) altitude orbit satellites. No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satel-lite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (∼1500 km) and low (¡1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in a behavior. Satellites were divided on several groups according to the orbital char-acteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits that should be taken into account under developing of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented. Keywords: Space weather; Satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Energetic particles; Magnetic storms</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC51D0444M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMGC51D0444M"><span id="translatedtitle">Spatio-Temporal Sensitivity of MODIS Land Surface Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Indicates High <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Large-Scale Land Cover Change Detection in Permafrost Landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muster, S.; Langer, M.; Abnizova, A.; Young, K. L.; Boike, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The accelerated warming Arctic climate may alter the surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> balance locally and regionally of which a changing land surface temperature (LST) is a key indicator. Modelling current and anticipated changes of the surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> balance requires an understanding of the spatio-temporal interactions between LST and land cover. This paper investigated the accuracy of MODIS LST V5 1 km level 3 product and its spatio-temporal sensitivity to land cover properties in a Canadian High Arctic permafrost landscape. Land cover ranged from fully vegetated moss/segde grass tundra to sparsely vegetated bare soil and barren areas. Daily mean MODIS LST were compared to in-situ radiometer measurements over wet tundra for three summers and two winters in 2008, 2009, and 2010. MODIS LST showed an accuracy of 1.8°C and a RMSE of 3.8°C in the total observation period including both summer and winter. Agreement was lowest during summer 2009 and freeze-back periods which were associated with prevailing overcast conditions. A multi-year <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis revealed robust spatio-temporal patterns taking into account the found uncertainty and different atmospheric conditions. Summer periods with regional mean LST larger than 5°C showed highest spatial diversity with four distinct <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> classes. Dry ridge areas heated up most whereas wetland areas and dry barren surfaces with high albedo were coolest. Mean inter-annual differences of LST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for different land cover classes were less than 1°C. However, spatial pattern showed fewer positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in 2010 suggesting differences in surface moisture due to inter­annual differences in the amount of end-of-winter snow. Presented summer LST <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> might serve as a baseline against which to evaluate past and future changes in land surface properties with regard to the surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> balance. Sub-temporal heterogeneity due to snow or ice on/off as well as the effect of subpixel water bodies has to be taken into account. A multi-sensor approach combining thermal satellite measurements with high-resolution optical and radar imagery therefore promises to be an effective tool for a dynamic, process-based ecosystem monitoring scheme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=corrosion&pg=4&id=EJ166697','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=corrosion&pg=4&id=EJ166697"><span id="translatedtitle">Geothermal <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in Western United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pryde, Philip R.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Reviews types of geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> is a major <span class="hlt">potential</span> use of geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span>, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...564A.113A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...564A.113A"><span id="translatedtitle">Cosmic microwave background <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from imperfect dark <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Confrontation with the data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Axelsson, Magnus; Hansen, Frode; Koivisto, Tomi; Mota, David F.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>We test anisotropic dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> models with the 7-year WMAP temperature observation data. In the presence of imperfect sources, large-scale gradients or anisotropies in the dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> mean that the CMB sky will be distorted anisotropically on its way to us by the ISW effect. The signal covariance matrix then becomes non-diagonal for small multipoles, but at ? ? 20 the anisotropy is negligible for any reasonably probable values of the already constrained dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> fluid parameters. As a consequence, only possible large-scale anisotropies are studied in this paper. We parametrize possible violations of rotational invariance in the late universe by the magnitude of a post-Friedmannian deviation from isotropy and its scale dependence, where the deviation from isotropy is modeled through a mismatch between the ? and ? <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that arise due to anisotropic stresses caused by some (unknown) mechanism. In this sense, our model is general. In this paper we explore the possibility that the stresses are caused by an imperfect dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> component in the form of a vector field aligned with some axis. This way we may obtain hints of the possible imperfect nature of dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> and the large-angle anomalous features in the CMB. A robust statistical analysis, subjected to various tests and consistency checks, is performed to compare the predicted correlations with those obtained from the satellite-measured CMB full sky maps. The preferred axis points toward (l,b) = (168, -31) and the amplitude of the anisotropy is ?0 = (0.51 0.94) (1? deviation quoted). The best fit model has a steep blue anisotropic spectrum (nde = 3.1 1.5). In light of recent studies, the model provides an interesting extension of the standard model of cosmology, since it is able to account for the apparent deficit in large-scale power in the spectrum through a physically motivated late time ISW effect. Further studies of this class of models are justified by the results of the analysis, which suggest that it cannot be ruled out at present.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hematology&pg=2&id=ED018056','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hematology&pg=2&id=ED018056"><span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p></p> <p>BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CYTOLOGY&id=ED018056','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CYTOLOGY&id=ED018056"><span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p></p> <p>BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/95413','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/95413"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical studies of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harding, L.B.</p> <p>1995-07-01</p> <p>MRCI (configuration interaction) calculations were used to examine possible pathways for the O{sub 2} + CCH reaction. The H{sub 2} + CN <span class="hlt">potential</span> surface was examined. An initial survey was made of the HCl + CN <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface at a low level of theory.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902146','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/902146"><span id="translatedtitle">A universal high <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in angle resolved photoemissionspectra of high temperature superconductors -- possible evidence ofspinon and holon branches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Graf, J.; Gweon, G.-H.; McElroy, K.; Zhou, S.Y.; Jozwiak, C.; Rotenberg, E.; Bill, A.; Sasagawa, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Takagi,H.; Lee, D.-H.; Lanzara A.</p> <p>2006-12-19</p> <p>A universal high <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the single particlespectral function is reported in three different families of hightemperature superconductors by using angle-resolved photoemissionspectroscopy. As we follow the dispersing peak of the spectral functionfrom the Fermi <span class="hlt">energy</span> to the valence band complex, we find dispersionanomalies marked by two distinctive high <span class="hlt">energy</span> scales, E_1 approx 0.38eV and E_2 approx 0.8 eV. E_1 marks the <span class="hlt">energy</span> above which the dispersionsplits into two branches. One is a continuation of the near parabolicdispersion, albeit with reduced spectral weight, and reaches the bottomof the band at the Gamma point at approx 0.5 eV. The other is given by apeak in the momentum space, nearly independent of <span class="hlt">energy</span> between E_1 andE_2. Above E_2, a band-like dispersion re-emerges. We conjecture thatthese two <span class="hlt">energies</span> mark the disintegration of the low energyquasiparticles into a spinon and holon branch in the high T_c cuprates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972260','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972260"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Strong Correlations on the High <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Moritz, B.; Schmitt, F.; Meevasana, W.; Johnston, S.; Motoyama, E.M.; Greven, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kim, C.; Scalettar, R.T.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES</p> <p>2010-02-15</p> <p>Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> in cuprate superconductors: the high <span class="hlt">energy</span> 'waterfall' or high <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding <span class="hlt">energy</span>, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA <span class="hlt">energy</span> scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17001017','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17001017"><span id="translatedtitle">A theory for the atmospheric <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum: depth-limited temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the tropopause.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tulloch, R; Smith, K S</p> <p>2006-10-01</p> <p>The horizontal spectra of atmospheric wind and temperature at the tropopause have a steep -3 slope at synoptic scales, but transition to -5/3 at wavelengths of the order of 500-1,000 km [Nastrom, G. D. & Gage, K. S. (1985) J. Atmos. Sci. 42, 950-960]. Here we demonstrate that a model that assumes zero <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity and constant stratification N over a finite-depth H in the troposphere exhibits the same type of spectra. In this model, temperature perturbations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cascade of <span class="hlt">energy</span> with a slope of -3 at large scales, -5/3 at small scales, and a transition near horizontal wavenumber k(t) = f/NH, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Ballpark atmospheric estimates for N, f, and H give a transition wavenumber near that observed, and numerical simulations of the previously undescribed model verify the expected behavior. Despite its simplicity, the model is consistent with a number of perplexing features in the observations and demonstrates that a complete theory for mesoscale dynamics must take temperature advection at boundaries into account. PMID:17001017</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1595413','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1595413"><span id="translatedtitle">A theory for the atmospheric <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum: Depth-limited temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the tropopause</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tulloch, R.; Smith, K. S.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The horizontal spectra of atmospheric wind and temperature at the tropopause have a steep ?3 slope at synoptic scales, but transition to ?5/3 at wavelengths of the order of 5001,000 km [Nastrom, G. D. & Gage, K. S. (1985) J. Atmos. Sci. 42, 950960]. Here we demonstrate that a model that assumes zero <span class="hlt">potential</span> vorticity and constant stratification N over a finite-depth H in the troposphere exhibits the same type of spectra. In this model, temperature perturbations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cascade of <span class="hlt">energy</span> with a slope of ?3 at large scales, ?5/3 at small scales, and a transition near horizontal wavenumber kt = f/NH, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Ballpark atmospheric estimates for N, f, and H give a transition wavenumber near that observed, and numerical simulations of the previously undescribed model verify the expected behavior. Despite its simplicity, the model is consistent with a number of perplexing features in the observations and demonstrates that a complete theory for mesoscale dynamics must take temperature advection at boundaries into account. PMID:17001017</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981aes.....4.1727W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981aes.....4.1727W"><span id="translatedtitle">Sources and <span class="hlt">potential</span> uses of wave <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Woodbridge, D. D.</p> <p></p> <p>An analysis of ocean wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> and its uses is presented. The ocean <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion systems surveyed include the ocean valve, the spherical vane, the hinged raft and the oscillating water column systems. The configuration of the Ocean Swell and Wave <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Converter (OSWEC) is detailed, and its <span class="hlt">potential</span> power output is discussed. It is noted that the utilization of a single OSWEC system of 20 MW would result in a savings of nearly 25,000 barrels of oil a month.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965189','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965189"><span id="translatedtitle">Economic <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Savings <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in Federal Buildings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.</p> <p>2000-09-04</p> <p>The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, <span class="hlt">energy</span> prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224234','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224234"><span id="translatedtitle">Applying supersymmetry to <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.</p> <p>2013-11-15</p> <p>We investigate the supersymmetry properties of <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the <span class="hlt">potential</span> depends linearly on the <span class="hlt">energy</span>, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6239045','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6239045"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation in Kenya: progress, <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, problems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schipper, L.; Hollander, J.M.; Milukas, M.; Alcamo, J.; Meyers, S.; Noll, S.</p> <p>1981-09-01</p> <p>A study was carried out of the flows of commercial <span class="hlt">energy</span> in the economy of Kenya. Indications were sought of the extent to which <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation, (i.e., increase in efficiency of <span class="hlt">energy</span> use) has reduced the ratio of <span class="hlt">energy</span> inputs to economic outputs, in the post-1973 years. An assessment was made of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation to reduce the growth of Kenyan <span class="hlt">energy</span> use in the future and of significant barriers to increasing <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency. Consideration was given to the role of government policy and of international assistance in fostering <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation in Kenya and other developing countries. The study was performed by analyzing available <span class="hlt">energy</span> data and statistics from the largest oil companies, the Kenyan electric utility, and the government. These sources were supplemented by conducting personal interviews with personnel of nearly 50 commercial firms in Kenya. Direct consumption of fuel accounts for 94% of the commercial <span class="hlt">energy</span> use in Kenya, while electricity accounts for 6%. The sectoral division of fuel use is: transportation 53%, industry 21%, <span class="hlt">energy</span> production 11%, agriculture 9%, buildings and residences 5%, and construction 1%. For electricity the division is: buildings and residences 48%, industry 45%, <span class="hlt">energy</span> production 4%, agriculture 2%, and construction 1%. Recent progress in conservation is reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/990773','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/990773"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric solar system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>There are at least four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations, or that one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6772833','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6772833"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> function for the hydroperoxyl radical</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lemon, W.J.; Hase, W.L.</p> <p>1987-03-12</p> <p>A switching function formalism is used to derive an analytic <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for the O + OH in equilibrium HO/sub 2/ in equilibrium H + O/sub 2/ reactive system. Both experimental and ab initio data are used to derive parameters for the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface. Trajectory calculations for highly excited HO/sub 2/ are performed on this surface. From these trajectories quasi-periodic eigentrajectories are found for vibrational levels near the HO/sub 2/ dissociation threshold with small amounts of quanta in the OH stretch mode and large amounts of quanta in the OO stretch mode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PTEP.2015i3E01M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PTEP.2015i3E01M"><span id="translatedtitle">Search for dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in quintessence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Muromachi, Yusuke; Okabayashi, Akira; Okada, Daiki; Hara, Tetsuya; Itoh, Yutaka</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The time evolution of the equation of state w for quintessence models with a scalar field as dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> is studied up to the third derivative big (d^3w/da^3big ) with respect to the scale factor a, in order to predict future observations and specify the scalar <span class="hlt">potential</span> parameters with the observables. The third derivative of w for general <span class="hlt">potential</span> V is derived and applied to several types of <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. They are the inverse power law big (V=M^{4+? }/Q^{? }big ), the exponential big (V=M^4exp {? M/Q}big ), the mixed big (V=M^{4+? }exp {? M/Q}/Q^{? }big ), the cosine big (V=M^4[cos (Q/f)+1]big ), and the Gaussian types big (V=M^4exp big {-Q^2/? ^2big }big ), which are prototypical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for the freezing and thawing models. If the parameter number for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> form is n, it is necessary to find at least n+2 independent observations to identify the <span class="hlt">potential</span> form and the evolution of the scalar field (Q and dot {Q}). Such observations would be the values of ? _Q, w, dw/da,ldots , dw^n/da^n. From these specific <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, we can predict the n+1 and higher derivatives of w: dw^{n+1}/da^{n+1},ldots . Since four of the abovementioned <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have two parameters, it is necessary to calculate the third derivative of w for them to estimate the predicted values. If they are tested observationally, it will be understood whether the dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> can be described by a scalar field with this <span class="hlt">potential</span>. At least it will satisfy the necessary conditions. Numerical analysis for d^3w/da^3 is performed with some specified parameters in the investigated <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, except for the mixed one. It becomes possible to distinguish the <span class="hlt">potentials</span> by accurately observing dw/da and d^2w/da^2 for some parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10187872','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10187872"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass resource <span class="hlt">potential</span> using <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>Biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of <span class="hlt">energy</span> products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> for very rapid growth rates. New wood <span class="hlt">energy</span> crop systems developed by the Department of <span class="hlt">Energy`s</span> Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/883823','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/883823"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> sputtering of EUVL materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pomeroy, J M; Ratliff, L P; Gillaspy, J D; Bajt, S</p> <p>2004-07-02</p> <p>Of the many candidates employed for understanding the erosion of critical Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) components, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> damage remains relatively uninvestigated. Unlike the familiar kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> sputtering, which is a consequence of the momentum transferred by an ion to atoms in the target, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> sputtering occurs when an ion rapidly collects charge from the target as it neutralizes. Since the neutralization <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a singly charged ion is typically on the order of 10 eV, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> effects are generally neglected for low charge state ions, and hence the bulk of the sputtering literature. As an ion's charge state is increased, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> (PE) increases rapidly, e.g. PE(Xe{sup 1+})= 11 eV, PE(Xe{sup 10+}) = 810 eV, PE(Xe{sup 20+}) = 4.6 keV, etc. By comparison, the binding <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a single atom on a surface is typically about 5 eV, so even relatively inefficient <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer mechanisms can lead to large quantities of material being removed, e.g. 25% efficiency for Xe{sup 10+} corresponds to {approx} 40 atoms/ion. By comparison, singly charged xenon ions with {approx} 20 keV of kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> sputter only about 5 atoms/ion at normal incidence, and less than 1 atom/ion at typical EUV source <span class="hlt">energies</span>. EUV light sources are optimized for producing approximately 10{sup 16} xenon ions per shot with an average charge state of q=10 in the core plasma. At operational rates of {approx}10 kHz, the number of ions produced per second becomes a whopping 10{sup 20}. Even if only one in a billion ions reaches the collector, erosion rates could reach {approx}10{sup 12} atoms per second, severely reducing the collector lifetime (for an average yield of 10 atoms/ion). In addition, efforts to reduce contamination effects may contribute to reduced neutralization and even larger <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> damages rates (discussed further below). In order to provide accurate estimates for collector lifetimes and to develop mitigation schemes, NIST is working to understand and quantify <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> damage mechanisms on materials relevant to EUVL. Accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> damage rates can then be used for projecting component lifetimes as source plasma conditions are modified and characterized. This chapter will serve to provide an introduction and some background to the physics of highly charged ions and some of the relevant experimental work in the literature. This chapter will first provide a brief background and an overview of the interaction of highly charged ions (HCIs) with solids as it is currently understood. Secondly, it will present current data from screen test measurements performed to isolate and evaluate the effects of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> damage on critical EUVL materials. We will then speculate on the implications of work to date and the outlook for EUVL development and, finally, summarize.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820017234&hterms=reduction+Cost&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dreduction%2BCost','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820017234&hterms=reduction+Cost&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dreduction%2BCost"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> reduction of DSN uplink <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dolinsky, S.; Degroot, N. F.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>DSN Earth stations typically transmit more power than that required to meet minimum specifications for uplink performance. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> and cost savings that could result from matching the uplink power to the amount required for specified performance are studied. The Galileo mission was selected as a case study. Although substantial reduction in transmitted <span class="hlt">energy</span> is possible, <span class="hlt">potential</span> savings in source <span class="hlt">energy</span> (oil or electricity) savings are much less. This is because of the rising inefficiency in power conversion and radio frequency power generation that accompanies reduced power output.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3527321','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3527321"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kunisaki, Shaun M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Over the past decade, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel, experimental approach for the treatment of a wide variety of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> diagnosed either in utero or postnatally. There are a number of unique properties of amniotic fluid stem cells that have allowed it to become a major research focus. These include the relative ease of accessing amniotic fluid cells in a minimally invasive fashion by amniocentesis as well as the relatively rich population of progenitor cells obtained from a small aliquot of fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells, c-kit positive stem cells, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells have all been derived from human amniotic fluid in recent years. This article gives a pediatric surgeons perspective on amniotic fluid stem cell therapy for the management of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The current status in the use of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells, particularly as they relate as substrates in tissue engineering-based applications, is described in various animal models. A roadmap for further study and eventual clinical application is also proposed. PMID:22986340</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015FrP.....3....8Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015FrP.....3....8Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic mechanism of density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of liquid water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yasutomi, Makoto</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Although density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of liquid water has long been studied by many different authors up to now, it is not still cleared what thermodynamic mechanism induces the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The thermodynamic properties of substances are determined by interparticle interactions. We analyze what characteristics of pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> cause the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the basis of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics using a thermodynamically self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation (SCOZA). We consider a fluid of spherical particles with a pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> given by a hard-core repulsion plus a soft-repulsion and an attraction. We show that the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs when the value of the soft-repulsive <span class="hlt">potential</span> at hard-core contact is in some proper range, and the range depends on the attraction. Further, we show that the behavior of the excess internal <span class="hlt">energy</span> plays an essential role in the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the behavior is mainly determined by the values of the soft-repulsive <span class="hlt">potential</span>, especially near the hard core contact. Our results show that most of ideas put forward up to now are not the direct causes of the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of liquid water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26437925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26437925"><span id="translatedtitle">Resolving <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Predicting Electrokinetic <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4593964','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4593964"><span id="translatedtitle">Resolving <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Predicting Electrokinetic <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6531749','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6531749"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings from aquifer thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> storage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Anderson, M.R.; Weijo, R.O.</p> <p>1988-07-01</p> <p>Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers developed an aggregate-level model to estimate the short- and long-term <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings from using aquifer thermal storage (ATES) in the United States. The objectives of this effort were to (1) develop a basis from which to recommend whether heat or chill ATES should receive future research focus and (2) determine which market sector (residential, commercial, or industrial) offers the largest <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings from ATES. Information was collected on the proportion of US land area suitable for ATES applications. The economic feasibility of ATES applications was then evaluated. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings from ATES applications was calculated. Characteristic <span class="hlt">energy</span> use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors was examined, as was the relationship between waste heat production and consumption by industrial end-users. These analyses provided the basis for two main conclusions: heat ATES applications offer higher <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings than do chill ATES applications; and the industrial sector can achieve the highest <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings for the large consumption markets. Based on these findings, it is recommended that future ATES research and development efforts be directed toward heat ATES applications in the industrial sector. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPD..2430015I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJMPD..2430015I"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the solar system?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iorio, Lorenzo</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known matter-<span class="hlt">energy</span> distributions have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark <span class="hlt">Energy</span>. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> could anyhow lead to advancements in either cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century, and technology itself. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: (a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia. (b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab). (c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon. (d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox. (e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun. (f) The Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. (g) The Pioneer <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>. (h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..90b4101S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..90b4101S"><span id="translatedtitle">Sparse representation for a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Seko, Atsuto; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Isao</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>We propose a simple scheme to estimate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) for which the accuracy can be easily controlled and improved. It is based on model selection within the framework of linear regression using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique. Basis functions are selected from a systematic large set of candidate functions. The sparsity of the PES significantly reduces the computational cost of evaluating the <span class="hlt">energy</span> and force in molecular dynamics simulations without losing accuracy. The usefulness of the scheme for describing the elemental metals Na and Mg is clearly demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JMoSt.291..255K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JMoSt.291..255K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> hypersurface and molecular flexibility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ko?a, Jaroslav</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, <span class="hlt">energy</span> level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910004193','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910004193"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for chemical reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The objective was to obtain accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940028530','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940028530"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for chemical reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1234791','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1234791"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Savings <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Radiative Cooling Technologies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas</p> <p>2015-11-30</p> <p>Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> cooling <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150018447','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150018447"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.</p> <p>1960-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31C1749S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS31C1749S"><span id="translatedtitle">Convective Available <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> of World Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important <span class="hlt">energy</span> source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open-ocean convection may arise through strong surface buoyancy fluxes (Schott et al. 1996), or by thermobaric instability (Akitomo 1999a, b). Ingersoll (2005) demonstrated that thermobaric-induced deep convection is due to the abrupt release of ocean <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> into kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span>. In atmospheric dynamics, Convective Available <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (CAPE) has long been an important thermodynamic variable (Arakawa and Schubert 1974) that has been used to forecast moist convection (Doswell and Rasmussen 1994) and to test the performance of GCMs (Ye et al. 1998). However, the development of a similar diagnostic in the ocean has received little attention.; World Ocean Convective Available <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> distribution in North-Hemisphere Autumn (J/kg)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997PhDT.......100T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997PhDT.......100T"><span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and dynamical electroweak-symmetry breaking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tandean, Jusak</p> <p></p> <p>We explore some of the phenomenological consequences of dynamical electro-weak-symmetry breaking, where fermionic bound-states, instead of elementary scalar fields, induce the breaking. In particular, we consider processes generated by chiral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with global- symmetry currents in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free gauge theories, as experimental studies of such processes have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for revealing some of the details of the mechanism responsible for the symmetry breaking. Two investigations are conducted employing simple technicolor models. The first one deals with the way that the equivalence theorem, which relates observable longitudinal gauge- bosons to the corresponding unphysical Goldstone-bosons, is satisfied in cases where the latter bosons have <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-generated couplings. In the second investigation, we study the production and detection of the techni- ?sp/prime, which decays via the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to two photons much as the ordinary ?sp/prime does, at a high-<span class="hlt">energy</span> photon collider.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMNS43A..02S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMNS43A..02S"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating the Detectability of Streaming <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Caused by Structural Defects in the Core of an Embankment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sheffer, M.; Oldenburg, D.; Beckie, R.</p> <p>2006-05-01</p> <p>Internal erosion, defined as the loss of fine-grained material due to seepage forces, can compromise the stability of an earthfill dam and cause its ultimate failure. Monitoring of dam performance has become of critical importance, particularly as the structures age and design methods evolve. Conventional monitoring of the hydraulic regime using piezometers and weirs provides sparse sampling, and these methods may not be sufficient to detect the onset of internal erosion. Consequently, a comprehensive investigation tool is needed to complement these methods. The self-<span class="hlt">potential</span> (SP) method has been used to delineate anomalous zones that correspond with areas of preferential seepage flow in embankment dams. Observed responses have been attributed to the electrokinetic phenomenon of streaming <span class="hlt">potential</span>, where electrical current flow is generated by fluid flow through porous media. We have developed a rigorous 3-D finite volume algorithm that calculates the SP field induced by a simulated hydraulic regime, based on the principles of coupled flow. In the current study, we apply the algorithm to investigate the anomalous SP response resulting from seepage through pervious defects in the core of an embankment. While the SP signal due to seepage through the intact embankment is large (in the range of tens of milliVolts), the anomalous responses caused by the presence of pervious defects are close to noise levels for typical measurements made at surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1933N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.1933N"><span id="translatedtitle">The Wind <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Iceland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nawri, Nikolai; Nna Petersen, Gurn; Bjornsson, Halldr; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jnasson, Kristjn; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>While Iceland has an abundant wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road infrastructure and the power grid, as well as due to the harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions, wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. Based on these results, 14 test sites were selected for more detailed analyses using the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). These calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more <span class="hlt">energy</span> throughout the year than a small hydro power plant, making wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> a viable additional option.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyS...90k4010N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyS...90k4010N"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces of Polonium isotopes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, C.; Bartel, J.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The evolution of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape is analysed in detail for ten eveneven polonium isotopes in the mass range 188\\lt A\\lt 220 as obtained within the macroscopicmicroscopic approach, relying on the LublinStrasbourg drop model and the Yukawa-folded single-particle <span class="hlt">energies</span> for calculating the microscopic shell and pairing corrections. A variant of the modified FunnyHills nuclear shape parametrization is used to efficiently map possible fission paths. The approach explains the main features of the fragment partition as measured in low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> fission along the polonium chain. The latter lies in a transitional region of the nuclear chart, and will be essential to consistently understand the evolution of fission properties from neutron-deficient mercury to heavy actinides. The ability of our method to predict fission observables over such an extended region looks promising.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10173313','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10173313"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> flux and hydrogeology of thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Gulf of Mexico basin. Progress report, June 1992--August 1993</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sharp, J.M. Jr.</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>Specific project objectives are to: determine whether or not the observed thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin can be accounted for by heat conduction only; determine whether or not the present-day groundwater flow system is amenable with the heat advection hypothesis; and determine fluid and heat flux histories that are consistent with the observed data. In support of these objectives, we have collected over 25,000 data points, reflecting pressures and temperatures at depths of up to 16,000 feet in the Texas portion of the Gulf of Mexico basin. These data have been collated into a computerized data base system. In addition, we have begun collection of thermophysical data. This research provides fundamental knowledge and understanding to the geosciences and contributes to the sciences and technology base required for current and future <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies. Quantifying the evolution of the hydrodynamic and thermal regimes in sedimentary basins is important for predicting timing of hydrocarbon maturation and migration. The evolving subsurface temperature and hydrodynamic system also have a first-order control on sediment diagenesis, brine evolution, and the formation of ore deposits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvD..82b3503C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvD..82b3503C"><span id="translatedtitle">Can multistate dark matter annihilation explain the high-<span class="hlt">energy</span> cosmic ray lepton <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cirelli, Marco; Cline, James M.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>Multistate dark matter (DM) models with small mass splittings and couplings to light hidden sector bosons have been proposed as an explanation for the PAMELA/Fermi/H.E.S.S. high-<span class="hlt">energy</span> lepton excesses. We investigate this proposal over a wide range of DM density profiles, in the framework of concrete models with doublet or triplet dark matter and a hidden SU(2) gauge sector that mixes with standard model hypercharge. The gauge coupling is bounded from below by the DM relic density, and the Sommerfeld enhancement factor is explicitly computable for given values of the DM and gauge boson masses M, ? and the (largest) dark matter mass splitting ?M12. Sommerfeld enhancement is stronger at the galactic center than near the Sun because of the radial dependence of the DM velocity profile, which strengthens the inverse Compton (IC) gamma ray constraints relative to usual assumptions. We find that the PAMELA/Fermi/H.E.S.S. lepton excesses are marginally compatible with the model predictions, and with CMB and Fermi gamma ray constraints, for M?800GeV, ??200MeV, and a dark matter profile with noncuspy Einasto parameters ??0.20, rs30kpc. We also find that the annihilating DM must provide only a subdominant (?0.4) component of the total DM mass density, since otherwise the boost factor due to Sommerfeld enhancement is too large.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6749F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6749F"><span id="translatedtitle">IRETHERM: The geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Irish radiothermal granites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Farrell, Thomas; Jones, Alan; Muller, Mark; Feely, Martin; Brock, Andrew; Long, Mike; Waters, Tim</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The IRETHERM project is developing a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), surface heat-flow (SHF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is important to assessing the geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Galway granite in western Ireland, and the Leinster and the buried Kentstown granites in eastern Ireland. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of a 1980's geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 ?Wm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite, to the SW of Dublin. In the Galway granite batholith, on the west coast of Ireland, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 ?Wm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Rossaveal borehole. The buried Kentstown granite, 35 km NW of Dublin, has an associated negative Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 490 m. Heat production is measured at 2.4 ?Wm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30 m of the granite. The core of this study consists of a program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite (40 km SW of Dublin) extend to depths of 2-5 km. Preliminary results from the southern profile suggest a greater thickness of granite to a depth of 6-9 km beneath the Tullow pluton, 75 km SW of Dublin. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total of 75 sites (33 consist of only AMT data acquisition, with both MT and AMT recorded at the remaining 42). Preliminary results show a deep resistor extending to depths of 15-20 km beneath the central block, with the resistive upper layer extending to depths of 3.5-7 km west of the Shannawona fault, a major structure that cuts the batholith. MT and AMT data acquired along a profile at 22 locations over the Kentstown granite suggests that this buried granite is at a depth of 400 m beneath the centre of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The MT and AMT data will be integrated with gravity and seismic refraction data (in the case of the Leinster granite) to identify deeply penetrating faults, which may provide conduits for hydrothermal fluids, and to produce a robust estimation of the volumetric extent of the granites, which is crucial in defining their geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Thermal conductivity and geochemical data will be incorporated to constrain the heat contribution of granites to the Irish crust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940015696','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940015696"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for chemical reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A new global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global <span class="hlt">potential</span> for reaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013968','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013968"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical studies of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harding, L. B.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this program is to calculate accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schroedinger equation must be solved. Our approach starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wave functions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Dynamical electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. With this approach, we are able to provide chemically useful predictions of the energetics for many systems. A second aspect of this program is the development of techniques to fit multi-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> surfaces to convenient, global, analytic functions that can then be used in dynamics calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139885','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139885"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical studies of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harding, L.B.</p> <p>1993-12-01</p> <p>The goal of this program is to calculate accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5264947','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5264947"><span id="translatedtitle">California's biomass and its <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lucarelli, F.B. Jr.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for using California's biomass for <span class="hlt">energy</span> have been assessed. The study relies on the recent work of Amory Lovins and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Distributed <span class="hlt">Energy</span> System's Project to specify an <span class="hlt">energy</span> future for Californians. These works identify transportation fuels as the most valuable <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion for biomass. Within this context, the extent of five categories of terrestial biomass is estimated, in addition to the environmental impacts and monetary cost of collecting and transporting each biomass category. Estimates of the costs of transforming biomass into different fuels as well as a survey of government's role in a biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> program are presented. The major findings are summarized below. (1) California's existing biomass resources are sufficient to provide only 20 percent of its future liquid fuel requirements. (2) Meeting the full transportation demand with biomass derived fuels will require the development of exotic biomass sources such as kelp farms and significant reductions in automobile travel in the State. (3) Under assumptions of moderate increases in gasoline prices and without major new government incentives, the cost of transforming biomass into transport fuels will be competitive with the price of gasoline on a Btu basis by the year 1990. (4) The environmental impacts of collecting most forms of biomass are beneficial and should reduce air pollution from agricultural burning and water pollution from feedlot and dairy farm runoff. Moreover, the collection of logging residues should improve timber stand productivity and the harvest of chaparral should reduce the risk of wildfire in the State. (5) The institutional context for implementing biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> projects is complex and fragmented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/678756','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/678756"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces of superheavy nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Reinhard, P.-G. Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.</p> <p>1998-10-01</p> <p>We investigate the structure of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces of the superheavy nuclei {sub 158}{sup 258}Fm{sub 100}, {sub 156}{sup 264}Hs{sub 108}, {sub 166}{sup 278}112, {sub 184}{sup 298}114, and {sub 172}{sup 292}120 within the framework of self-consistent nuclear models, i.e., the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach and the relativistic mean-field model. We compare results obtained with one representative parametrization of each model which is successful in describing superheavy nuclei. We find systematic changes as compared to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces of heavy nuclei in the uranium region: there is no sufficiently stable fission isomer any more, the importance of triaxial configurations to lower the first barrier fades away, and asymmetric fission paths compete down to rather small deformation. Comparing the two models, it turns out that the relativistic mean-field model gives generally smaller fission barriers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGeod..89..141S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGeod..89..141S"><span id="translatedtitle">Integral formulas for computing a third-order gravitational tensor from volumetric mass density, disturbing gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span>, gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and gravity disturbance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>A new mathematical model for evaluation of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor is formulated in this article. Firstly, we construct corresponding differential operators for the components of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor in a spherical local north-oriented frame. We show that the differential operators may efficiently be decomposed into an azimuthal and an isotropic part. The differential operators are even more simplified for a certain class of isotropic kernels. Secondly, the differential operators are applied to the well-known integrals of Newton, Abel-Poisson, Pizzetti and Hotine. In this way, 40 new integral formulas are derived. The new integral formulas allow for evaluation of the components of the third-order (disturbing) gravitational tensor from density distribution, disturbing gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span>, gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and gravity disturbances. Thirdly, we investigate the behaviour of the corresponding integral kernels in the spatial domain. The new mathematical formulas extend the theoretical apparatus of geodesy, i.e. the well-known Meissl scheme, and reveal important properties of the third-order gravitational tensor. They may be exploited in geophysical studies, continuation of gravitational field quantities and analysing the gradiometric-geodynamic boundary value problem.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V41B2077W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.V41B2077W"><span id="translatedtitle">High-Resolution Distribution of Temperature, Particle and Oxidation/Reduction <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> From a Submarine Hydrothermal System: Brothers Volcano, Kermadec Arc</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; de Ronde, C. E.; Yoerger, D.; Embley, R. W.; Davy, B.; Merle, S. G.; Resing, J. A.; Nakamura, K.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The complex relationships between geological setting and hydrothermal venting have, to date, largely been explored with ship-based surveys that effectively examine regional relationships, or with remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and manned submersibles which allow close examination of individual vent fields. Higher- resolution surveys than are possible with ship-based techniques and broader surveys than are practical with ROVs and manned submersibles are necessary for more thoroughly understanding hydrothermal systems and their impact on ocean ecosystems. Autonomous vehicles (AUVs), such as the WHOI Autonomous Benthic Explorer (ABE) can be programmed to conduct high-resolution surveys that systematically cover a broad area of seafloor. Brothers volcano, a hydrothermally active submarine caldera volcano located on the Kermadec arc northwest of New Zealand, was surveyed in July-August 2007 using ABE. Brothers caldera is ~3 km in diameter with a floor depth of 1850 m and walls that rise 290-530 m above the caldera floor. A dacite cone with a summit depth of ~1200 m sits within the caldera, partially merging with the southern caldera wall. Prior to the survey, active hydrothermal vents were known to be perched along the NW caldera wall and located at three sites on the cone. The enclosed caldera, presence of known vent fields with differing geochemical characteristics, and existence of at least one currently inactive site made Brothers volcano an ideal site for a high-resolution survey to explore in greater detail the mass, thermal and geochemical exchanges of hydrothermal systems. During our expedition, the caldera walls and dacite cone (~7 km2) were completely surveyed by ABE with 50-60 m trackline spacing at an altitude of 50 m above the seafloor. Hydrothermal plumes were mapped with ABE's integrated CTD (conductivity- temperature-depth) and sensors measuring optical backscatter (particle concentrations) and oxidation- reduction <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ORP; indicating the presence of reduced chemical species). This survey resulted in the first high-resolution map of temperature, particle and ORP <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within a hydrothermally active submarine caldera. New details about the extent and structure of the known active vent fields were revealed, and a new area of active venting was discovered along the west caldera wall. Additionally, relationships between source vents, buoyant plumes, and neutrally buoyant regional plumes mapped using standard surface ship methods can be compared. Simultaneously acquired bathymetry and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data show correlations between the geomorphology of the caldera, magnetic alterations and patterns of past and present hydrothermal venting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6818152','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6818152"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of sugarcane and sweet sorghum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elawad, S.H.; Gascho, G.J.; Shih, S.F.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of sugarcane and sweet sorghum as raw materials for the production of ethanol and petrochemical substitutes is discussed. Both crops belong to the grass family and are classified as C/sub 4/ malateformers which have the highest rate of photosynthesis among terrestrial plants. Large amounts of biomass are required to supply a significant fraction of US <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption. Biomass production could be substantially increased by including tops and leaves, adopting narrow row spacing and improving cultural practices. This presents challenges for cultivating, harvesting, and hauling the biomass to processing centers. Large plants and heavy capital investment are essential for <span class="hlt">energy</span> production. Ethanol and ammonia are the most promising candidates of a biomass program. If sugarcane were to be used for biomass production, breeding programs should be directed for more fermentable sugars and fiber. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> research on sweet sorghum should be done with syrup varieties. Sweet sorghum needs to be incorporated with other crops because of its short growing season. The disposal of stillage from an extensive ethanol industry may pose environmental problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860012497','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860012497"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on lithospheric structure from satellite <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data: Africa and Asia. Analysis and interpretation of MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over North Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Phillips, R. J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Crustal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection with MAGSAT data is frustrated by the inherent resolving power of the data and by contamination from the external and core fields. The quality of the data might be tested by modeling specific tectonic features which produce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that fall within the proposed resolution and crustal amplitude capabilities of the MAGSAT fields. To test this hypothesis, the north African hotspots associated with Ahaggar, Tibestia and Darfur have been modeled as magnetic induction <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due solely to shallower depth to the Curie isotherm surface beneath these features. The MAGSAT data were reduced by subtracting the external and core fields to isolate the scalar and vertical component crustal signals. The predicted model magnetic signal arising from the surface topography of the uplift and the Curie isotherm surface was calculated at MAGSAT altitudes by the Fourier transform technique modified to allow for variable magnetization. In summary it is suggested that the region beneath Ahaggar is associated with a strong thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the predicted <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> best fits the associated MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> if the African plate is moving in a northeasterly direction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22420085','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22420085"><span id="translatedtitle">Certification and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mehta, Dhagash; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Wales, David J.</p> <p>2014-06-14</p> <p>Typically, there is no guarantee that a numerical approximation obtained using standard nonlinear equation solvers is indeed an actual solution, meaning that it lies in the quadratic convergence basin. Instead, it may lie only in the linear convergence basin, or even in a chaotic region, and hence not converge to the corresponding stationary point when further optimization is attempted. In some cases, these non-solutions could be misleading. Proving that a numerical approximation will quadratically converge to a stationary point is termed certification. In this report, we provide details of how Smale's α-theory can be used to certify numerically obtained stationary points of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape, providing a mathematical proof that the numerical approximation does indeed correspond to an actual stationary point, independent of the precision employed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21293372','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21293372"><span id="translatedtitle">Field Theory Model of the Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lewis, R. A</p> <p>2009-03-16</p> <p>Precision tracking of spacecraft on interplanetary missions has turned up several anomalous deviations from predictions of general relativity. The Flyby <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, wherein spacecraft gain or lose <span class="hlt">energy</span> in an earth-centric frame after an encounter with earth, is clearly associated with the rotation of the earth. The possibility that the missing ingredient is a new type of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field surrounding the earth is assessed in this write-up. A scalar field with the kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution of the earth as a source is evaluated numerically, with an amplitude parameter adjusted to match the data of Anderson et al.(2008). The new field can be interpreted as a coupling between kinetic <span class="hlt">energies</span> of objects, a field analogous to fluid mechanics, or a field coupled to acceleration. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> field violates various aspects of standard physics, such as <span class="hlt">energy</span> non-conservation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..APR.C9003B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..APR.C9003B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Functionals from Low-Momentum <span class="hlt">Potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bogner, S. K.</p> <p>2006-04-01</p> <p>The nonperturbative nature of conventional inter-nucleon interactions is strongly scale or resolution dependent, and can be radically modified by using the renormalization group to lower the momentum cutoff of the two-nucleon <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Recent calculations demonstrate that using low-momentum <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (``Vlow k'') with consistent three-body forces leads to saturating nuclear matter at the Hartree-Fock level, with rapidly converging perturbative corrections in the particle-particle channel ^a. With these interactions, the density matrix expansion (DME) becomes a natural tool for the microscopic construction of a universal <span class="hlt">energy</span> functional for nuclei ^b. By varying the cutoff, the resolution dependence of the functional can be studied. The use of sharp momentum cutoffs in Vlow k complicates the application of the DME in coordinate space. This problem is resolved with the recent generalization of Vlow k to smooth cutoff regulators. ^aS. K. Bogner, A. Schwenk, R. J. Furnstahl and A. Nogga, Nucl. Phys. A 763, 59 (2005). ^bJ. W. Negele and D. Vautherin, Phys. Rev. C 5, 1472 (1972).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://dx.doi.org/10.1306/?61EEDDD2-173E-11D7-8645000102C1865D','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1306/?61EEDDD2-173E-11D7-8645000102C1865D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> resource <span class="hlt">potential</span> of natural gas hydrates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Collett, T.S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource. However, significant to <span class="hlt">potentially</span> insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource <span class="hlt">potential</span> of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26562223','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26562223"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Multipole <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Functions for Water.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tan, Ming-Liang; Tran, Kelly N; Pickard, Frank C; Simmonett, Andrew C; Brooks, Bernard R; Ichiye, Toshiko</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Water is the most common liquid on this planet, with many unique properties that make it essential for life as we know it. These properties must arise from features in the charge distribution of a water molecule, so it is essential to capture these features in <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> functions for water to reproduce its liquid state properties in computer simulations. Recently, models that utilize a multipole expansion located on a single site in the water molecule, or "molecular multipole models", have been shown to rival and even surpass site models with up to five sites in reproducing both the electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> around a molecule and a variety of liquid state properties in simulations. However, despite decades of work using multipoles, confusion still remains about how to truncate the multipole expansions efficiently and accurately. This is particularly important when using molecular multipole expansions to describe water molecules in the liquid state, where the short-range interactions must be accurate, because the higher order multipoles of a water molecule are large. Here, truncation schemes designed for a recent efficient algorithm for multipoles in molecular dynamics simulations are assessed for how well they reproduce results for a simple three-site model of water when the multipole moments and Lennard-Jones parameters of that model are used. In addition, the multipole analysis indicates that site models that do not account for out-of-plane electron density overestimate the stability of a non-hydrogen-bonded conformation, leading to serious consequences for the simulated liquid. PMID:26562223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880020509','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880020509"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for chemical reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The minimum <span class="hlt">energy</span> path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962310','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962310"><span id="translatedtitle">An ab initio method for locating <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> minima</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bock, Nicolas; Peery, Travis; Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric; Wallace, Duane; Lizarraga, Raquel; Holmstrom, Erik</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We study the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape underlying the motion of monatomic liquids by quenching from random initial configurations (stochastic configurations) to the nearest local minimum of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. We show that this procedure reveals the underlying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface directly. This is in contrast to the common technique of quenching from a molecular dynamics trajectory which does not allow a direct view of the underlying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface, but needs to be corrected for thermodynamic weighting factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43208&keyword=turbine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55653651&CFTOKEN=27009085','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43208&keyword=turbine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55653651&CFTOKEN=27009085"><span id="translatedtitle">ASSESSMENT OF <span class="hlt">ENERGY</span> RECOVERY <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> OF INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EQUIPMENT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>An assessment was conducted to evaluate the waste heat content and <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery <span class="hlt">potential</span> of flue gases from 30 industrial combustion devices. Pollution controls on nine of the devices were evaluated to estimate <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements and particulate reduction; <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirement...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1793L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1793L"><span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lev, Dorman</p> <p></p> <p>Results are presented of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different <span class="hlt">energies</span>, high <span class="hlt">energy</span> cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=energy+AND+definition&pg=5&id=EJ088334','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=energy+AND+definition&pg=5&id=EJ088334"><span id="translatedtitle">Transportation <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Use and Conservation <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hirst, Eric</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Analyzes transportation <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption and <span class="hlt">energy</span> intensiveness for inter-city freight and passenger traffic and urban passenger traffic with the definition of <span class="hlt">energy</span> intensiveness as Btu per ton-mile or per passenger-mile. Indicates that public education is one of three ways to achieve the goals of <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation. (CC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93c5434Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93c5434Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploring stereographic surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> maps of cubic metals via an effective pair-<span class="hlt">potential</span> approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yoo, Su-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Jung, Young-Kwang; Soon, Aloysius</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A fast and efficient way to calculate and generate an accurate surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> database (of more than several million surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> data points) for all bcc and fcc metals is proposed based on an effective pair-wise-<span class="hlt">potential</span> model. The accuracy of this model is rigorously tested and verified by employing density functional theory calculations, which shows good agreement within a mean absolute error of 0.03 eV/atom. The surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> database generated by this model is then visualized and mapped in various ways; namely, the surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> as a function of relative orientation, a orientation-dependent stereographic projection (the so-called Wulff net), and Gibbs-Wulff construction of the equilibrium crystal shape, for comparison and analysis. The Wulff nets (drawn with several million surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> data points) provide us with characteristic surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> maps of these cubic metals. In an attempt to explain the surface <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in bcc Li, we demonstrate how our effective-pair-<span class="hlt">potential</span>-derived Wulff net can clearly discriminate the strong influence of the second- and third-nearest-neighbor bonds on the high-Miller-index surface energetics of bcc Li.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02399527','CLINICALTRIALS'); return false;" href="https://ClinicalTrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02399527"><span id="translatedtitle">Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Registry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/screen/SimpleSearch">ClinicalTrials.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-11-04</p> <p>Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2894498','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2894498"><span id="translatedtitle">Peters' <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Anaesthetic Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>M, Senthilkumar; V, Darlong; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravinder</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Summary Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality, in association with other systemic abnormality or one component of a number of well-defined syndromes. We review our experience of anaesthetic management and systemic association of peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. To the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature of Peters' <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with relevant to anaesthesia. PMID:20640218</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.P43B1929R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.P43B1929R"><span id="translatedtitle">Lunar Orbit <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Riofrio, L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Independent experiments show a large <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been suggested to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark <span class="hlt">energy</span>'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015183','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760015183"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/755051','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/755051"><span id="translatedtitle">HIGH <span class="hlt">ENERGY</span> PHYSICS <span class="hlt">POTENTIAL</span> AT MUON COLLIDERS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>PARSA,Z.</p> <p>2000-04-07</p> <p>In this paper, high <span class="hlt">energy</span> physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5164676','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5164676"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of surface modification technologies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.</p> <p>1985-09-01</p> <p>This report assesses the <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuclear+AND+fuel&pg=5&id=ED212481','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuclear+AND+fuel&pg=5&id=ED212481"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> in America: Progress and <span class="hlt">Potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>An overview of America's <span class="hlt">energy</span> situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the <span class="hlt">energy</span> problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gas+AND+coal&pg=7&id=ED212481','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gas+AND+coal&pg=7&id=ED212481"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> in America: Progress and <span class="hlt">Potential</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>An overview of America's <span class="hlt">energy</span> situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the <span class="hlt">energy</span> problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IAUS..261..189A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IAUS..261..189A"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric solar-system <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, John D.; Nieto, Michael Martin</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>There are at least four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> per unit mass. Next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is reportedly increasing by about 15 cm yr-1. The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists, including us, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is prudent to suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations, or that one or more <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..078A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JHEP...02..078A"><span id="translatedtitle">Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>We analyse scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to Lifshitz scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a dynamical exponent equal to one.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70140581','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70140581"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploratory and spatial data analysis (EDA-SDA) for determining regional background levels and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of <span class="hlt">potentially</span> toxic elements in soils from Catorce-Matehuala, Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Chiprés, J.A.; Castro-Larragoitia, J.; Monroy, M.G.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The threshold between geochemical background and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be influenced by the methodology selected for its estimation. Environmental evaluations, particularly those conducted in mineralized areas, must consider this when trying to determinate the natural geochemical status of a study area, quantifying human impacts, or establishing soil restoration values for contaminated sites. Some methods in environmental geochemistry incorporate the premise that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (natural or anthropogenic) and background data are characterized by their own probabilistic distributions. One of these methods uses exploratory data analysis (EDA) on regional geochemical data sets coupled with a geographic information system (GIS) to spatially understand the processes that influence the geochemical landscape in a technique that can be called a spatial data analysis (SDA). This EDA-SDA methodology was used to establish the regional background range from the area of Catorce-Matehuala in north-central Mexico. Probability plots of the data, particularly for those areas affected by human activities, show that the regional geochemical background population is composed of smaller subpopulations associated with factors such as soil type and parent material. This paper demonstrates that the EDA-SDA method offers more certainty in defining thresholds between geochemical background and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> than a numeric technique, making it a useful tool for regional geochemical landscape analysis and environmental geochemistry studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSMGP54A..03P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSMGP54A..03P"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated <span class="hlt">Potential</span>-field Studies in Support of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Resource Assessment in Frontier Areas of Alaska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Phillips, J. D.; Saltus, R. W.; Potter, C. J.; Stanley, R. G.; Till, A. B.</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>In frontier areas of Alaska, <span class="hlt">potential</span>-field studies play an important role in characterizing the geologic structure of sedimentary basins having <span class="hlt">potential</span> for undiscovered oil and gas resources. Two such areas are the Yukon Flats basin in the east-central interior of Alaska, and the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Yukon Flats basin is a <span class="hlt">potential</span> source of hydrocarbon resources for local consumption and possible export. Knowledge of the subsurface configuration of the basin is restricted to a few seismic reflection profiles covering a limited area and one well. The seismic profiles were reprocessed and reinterpreted in preparation for an assessment of the oil and gas resources of the basin. The assessment effort required knowledge of the basin configuration away from the seismic profiles, as well as an understanding of the nature of the underlying basement. To extend the interpretation of the basin thickness across the entire area of the basin, an iterative Jachens-Moring gravity inversion was performed on gridded quasi-isostatic residual gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. The inversion was constrained to agree with the interpreted basement surface along the seismic profiles. In addition to the main sedimentary depocenter interpreted from the seismic data as having over 8 km of fill, the gravity inversion indicated a depocenter with over 7 km of fill in the Crooked Creek sub-basin. Results for the Crooked Creek sub-basin are consistent with magnetic and magnetotelluric modeling, but they await confirmation by drilling or seismic profiling. Whether hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the pre-Cenozoic basement beneath Yukon Flats is difficult to determine because extensive surficial deposits obscure the bedrock geology, and no deep boreholes penetrate basement. The color and texture patterns in a red-green-blue composite image consisting of reduced-to-the-pole aeromagnetic data (red), magnetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> (blue), and basement gravity (green) highlight domains with common geophysical characteristics and, by inference, lithology. The observed patterns suggest that much of the basin is underlain by Devonian to Jurassic oceanic rocks that probably have little or no <span class="hlt">potential</span> for hydrocarbon generation. The coastal plain surficial deposits in the northern part of ANWR conceal another frontier basin with hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Proprietary aeromagnetic and gravity data were used, along with seismic reflection profiles, to construct a structural and stratigraphic model of this highly deformed sedimentary basin for use in an <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource assessment. Matched-filtering techniques were used to separate short-wavelength magnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> attributed to sources near the top of the sedimentary section from longer-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> attributed to deeper basin and basement sources. Models along the seismic reflection lines indicate that the primary sources of the short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are folded and faulted sedimentary beds truncated at the Pleistocene erosion surface. In map view, the aeromagnetic and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> produced by the sedimentary units were used to identify possible structural trapping features and geometries, but they also indicated that these features may be significantly disrupted by faulting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5641382','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5641382"><span id="translatedtitle">The threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for heavy-ion scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Satchler, G.R.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The real parts of optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> deduced from heavy-ion scattering measurements become rapidly more attractive as the bombarding <span class="hlt">energy</span> is reduced close to the top of the Coulomb barrier. This behavior is explained as a coupled-channels effect, and is related to the corresponding reduction in the absorptive <span class="hlt">potential</span> through a dispersion relation which expresses the consequences of causality. Another manifestation of this ''<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'' is the striking enhancement observed for the near- and sub-barrier fusion of two heavy ions. The barrier penetration model of fusion is examined critically in this context. It is also stressed that similar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> could appear in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of nonelastic scattering. 21 refs., 4 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20795747','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20795747"><span id="translatedtitle">Zeta-function approach to Casimir <span class="hlt">energy</span> with singular <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Khusnutdinov, Nail R.</p> <p>2006-01-15</p> <p>In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir <span class="hlt">energy</span> for three simple model system: single delta <span class="hlt">potential</span>, step function <span class="hlt">potential</span> and three delta <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are analyzed. It is shown that the <span class="hlt">energy</span> contains contributions which are peculiar to the <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. It is suggested to renormalize the <span class="hlt">energy</span> using the condition that the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of infinitely separated <span class="hlt">potentials</span> is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The <span class="hlt">energy</span> obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit, and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The effective action is calculated, and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988NuPhA.483...50S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988NuPhA.483...50S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> dependence of the optical model <span class="hlt">potential</span> for fast neutron scattering from cobalt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Smith, A. B.; Guenther, P. T.; Lawson, R. D.</p> <p>1988-06-01</p> <p>Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured from 1.5 to 10.0 MeV over the scattering-angle range 18 to 160, with sufficient detail to define the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-averaged behavior. Inelastic neutron groups were observed corresponding to measured excitation <span class="hlt">energies</span> of: 1115 29, 1212 24, 1307 24, 1503 33, 1778 40, 2112 40, 2224 35, 2423 39, 2593 41 and 2810 67 keV. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of spherical-optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. A successful description of the differential elastic scattering below 10 MeV and the total cross section in the range 0-20 MeV was achieved using the spherical optical model with <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent strengths and geometries. These <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependencies are large below approximately 7.0 MeV, but become smaller and similar to those reported for "global" <span class="hlt">potentials</span> at higher <span class="hlt">energies</span>. This change in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the parameters, which occurs about 19 MeV above the Fermi <span class="hlt">energy</span>, was also seen in the analysis of the 209Bi data and probably marks the onset of the Fermi surface <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Inelastic scattering to the levels below 1.8 MeV displays a forward peaked behavior. This non-statistical component is interpreted using the weak coupling model in which the f{7}/{2} proton hole is coupled to the 2 + state in 60Ni. This vibrational characteristic provides an explanation of the unusual <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence and relatively small radius found for the imaginary optical model <span class="hlt">potential</span>. In conjunction with the fact that cobalt is four neutrons away from the N = 28 closed shell, the coupling also provides an explanation for the large value of this <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The real spherical optical-model <span class="hlt">potential</span> derived from the neutron-scattering results was extrapolated to bound <span class="hlt">energies</span> using the dispersion relationship and the method of moments. The resulting real-<span class="hlt">potential</span> strength and radius peak at -10.0 MeV, whereas the real diffuseness is at a minimum at this <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The extrapolated <span class="hlt">potential</span> is 8% larger than that implied by reported particle-state <span class="hlt">energies</span>, and 13% smaller than indicated by hole-state <span class="hlt">energies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mining+AND+engineering&pg=6&id=EJ096886','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mining+AND+engineering&pg=6&id=EJ096886"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Sources Pose Mining Problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chemical and Engineering News, 1974</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as <span class="hlt">potential</span> sources of fuel. (CC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219982','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219982"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Savings <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Research & Development Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>none,</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>This study documents the <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> of various technologies and <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment. The study provided an overview of CRE applications, assessed the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> of CRE in the U.S., outline key barriers to adoption of <span class="hlt">energy</span>-savings technologies, and recommended opportunities for advanced <span class="hlt">energy</span> saving technology research. The study was modeled after an earlier 1996 report by Arthur D. Little, Inc., and updated key information, examined more equipment types, and outlined long-term research and development opportunities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=solar+AND+energy+AND+law&id=EJ142450','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=solar+AND+energy+AND+law&id=EJ142450"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">Energy</span>: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Powerhouse for Jobs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCallion, Tom</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Components of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> systems are described, the development of the solar industry discussed, and implications are drawn for employment opportunities in industries (which may expand into new, solar-related areas) and in the professions, from law to sales, upon the advent of solar heating. (AJ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvA..73b3202M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvA..73b3202M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>We describe the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of elemental S8 , Se8 , and Te8 clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se8 . We also map the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of heterogeneous Sen(S,Te)8-n clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5793302','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5793302"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> production of <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane for fuel in the Caribbean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Samuels, G.</p> <p>1984-12-01</p> <p>Sugarcane presents a tremendous <span class="hlt">potential</span> as a renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> source for the non-oil producing countries of the Caribbean. The <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane concept is sugarcane managed for maximum dry matter (total fermentable solids for alcohol fuel and combustible solids for electricity) rather than sucrose. The use of sugarcane as a renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> source can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the Caribbean <span class="hlt">energy</span> problem. Sugar cane production and the use of this crop as a renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> source are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6663818','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6663818"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> from <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving irrigation systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wilfert, G.L.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.</p> <p>1982-11-01</p> <p>This report systematically compares, within a consistent framework, the technical and economic characteristics of <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving irrigation systems with those of conventional irrigation systems and to determine total <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings. Levelized annual costs of owning and operating both <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving and conventional irrigation systems have been developed and compared for all 17 states to account for the differences in <span class="hlt">energy</span> costs and irrigation conditions in each state. Market penetration of <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving systems is assessed for those systems having lower levelized annual costs than conventional systems performing the same function. Annual <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings were computed by matching the <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings per system with an assumed maximum market penetration of 100 percent in those markets where the levelized annual costs of <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving systems are lower than the levelized annual costs of conventional systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010868','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010868"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>To facilitate processing large data arrays, elements of spherical Earth analysis programs NVERTSM, SMFLD, NVERTG and GLFD were implemented and tested on the LARS IBM 4341 computer. Currently, the problem of inverting 2 deg MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region (80 W, 60 E) longitude and (40 S, 70 N) latitude is being implemented on the LARS-computer for quantitative comparison with free air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, geothermal and tectonic data. Gravity and MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from a subset of this region (30 W, 60 E), (40 S, 70 N) were already processed for a paper on satellite magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of Africa and Europe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2801930','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2801930"><span id="translatedtitle">Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Konstantinov, Igor E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, management of the Taussig-Bing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> remains challenging. A history of the original description of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5249448','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5249448"><span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary evaluation of wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>: Cook Inlet area, Alaska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hiester, T.R.</p> <p>1980-06-01</p> <p>This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7035221','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7035221"><span id="translatedtitle">Equivalent local <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent nonlocal interactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fiedeldey, H. ); Lipperheide, R. ); Rawitscher, G.H. ); Sofianos, S.A. )</p> <p>1992-06-01</p> <p>Various equivalent local <span class="hlt">potentials</span> and their Perey factors are discussed. The Wronskian and inversion-type equivalent local <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent nonlocal interaction induced by the coupling of the elastic to the nonelastic channels are investigated numerically. Their Perey factors are found to be closer to unity than those associated with exchange-type nonlocal <span class="hlt">potentials</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5139350','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5139350"><span id="translatedtitle">Geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the San Luis Valley, Colorado</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Coe, B.A.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The background of the area itself is investigated considering the geography, population, economy, attitudes of residents, and <span class="hlt">energy</span> demands of the area. The requirements for geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> development are considered, including socio-economic, institutional, and environmental conditions as well as some technical aspects. The current, proposed, and <span class="hlt">potential</span> geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> developments are described. The summary, conclusions, and methodology are included. (MHR)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6433837','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6433837"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Energy</span> cost of postextrasystolic <span class="hlt">potentiation</span> in man].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Geschwind, H; Huet, Y; Laine, J F; Teisseire, B; Dhainaut, J F; Laurent, D</p> <p>1984-07-01</p> <p>The energetic costs of post-extrasystolic <span class="hlt">potentiation</span> (PEP) were assessed by evaluating left ventricular function and coronary blood flow in 16 patients with different forms of cardiac disease during cardiac catheterisation under basal conditions and sustained coupled right ventricular pacing. The coronary blood flow was measured by thermodilution techniques with sampling in the aorta and coronary sinus to measure O2 concentration, glucose, and plasma lactate and catecholamine levels. Parameters of LV function were calculated from data obtained from biplane left cineventriculography. During PEP, the ejection fraction increased from 0.48 +/- 0.8 to 0.62 +/- 0.22, the mean velocity of circumferential fibre shortening from 0.79 +/- 0.37 to 1.12 +/- 0.45 circ/s (p less than 0.001) and systolic work from 97 +/- 46 to 139 +/- 67 g/m2 (p less than 0.05). Coronary blood flow increased from 176 +/- 60 to 305 +/- 155 ml/min; myocardial oxygen consumption per <span class="hlt">potentialized</span> beat rose from 0.15 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.33 ml/beat (p less than 0.001) whilst cardiac efficiency fell from 19.1 +/- 8 to 9.2 +/- 4% (p less than 0.001). PEP was associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline secretion (-3.1 +/- 31.5 ng/min under basal conditions to 30.2 +/- 42.8 ng/min, p less than 0.05). Therefore, the inotropic effect of PEP imposes a high metabolic demand and is associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline secretion. PMID:6433837</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1093253','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1093253"><span id="translatedtitle">Radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> discrimination from spectral ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements</p> <p>2013-08-20</p> <p>A method for discriminating a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having <span class="hlt">energies</span> in a first range of <span class="hlt">energy</span> values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having <span class="hlt">energies</span> in a second range of <span class="hlt">energy</span> values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having <span class="hlt">energies</span> in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having <span class="hlt">energies</span> in the second range, and determining that a radioactive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20713765','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20713765"><span id="translatedtitle">Observational manifestations of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> inflow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Boyarsky, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail</p> <p>2005-10-15</p> <p>In theories with chiral couplings, one of the important consistency requirements is that of the cancellation of a gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In particular, this is one of the conditions imposed on the hypercharges in the standard model. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation condition of the standard model looks unnatural from the perspective of a theory with extra dimensions. Indeed, if our world were embedded into an odd-dimensional space, then the full theory would be automatically <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-free. In this paper we discuss the physical consequences of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> noncancellation for effective 4-dimensional field theory. We demonstrate that in such a theory parallel electric and magnetic fields get modified. In particular, this happens for any particle possessing both electric charge and magnetic moment. This effect, if observed, can serve as a low <span class="hlt">energy</span> signature of extra dimensions. On the other hand, if such an effect is absent or is very small, then from the point of view of any theory with extra dimensions it is just another fine-tuning and should acquire theoretical explanation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613849C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613849C"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Horizontal Irradiance <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Series Over India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1761C"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Solar Irradiation <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Long Term Over India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>India has a high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20598795','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20598795"><span id="translatedtitle">[Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: information documents].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Philandrianos, C; Degardin, N; Casanova, D; Bardot, J; Petit, P; Bartoli, J-M; Magalon, G</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are a complex pathological group. They are composed of hemangiomas and other vascular tumors and congenital vascular malformations: venous, lymphatic, arteriovenous and capillary malformations. The management of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is difficult and must involve an interdisciplinary approach. To help patients to understand their pathology, we have made some information documents. PMID:20598795</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoRL..3520819J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoRL..3520819J"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploring wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> off the California coast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Qingfang; Doyle, James D.; Haack, Tracy; Dvorak, Michael J.; Archer, Cristina L.; Jacobson, Mark Z.</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>Wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> represents the nearest term cost-effective renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> source. While efforts have been made to assess wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> over land around the world, offshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources are largely unexplored, in part because these regions have relatively sparse wind observations. In this study, the wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> offshore of the California coast is evaluated using a well-tested high-resolution numerical model dataset. We found that along the coastline, the low-level winds exhibit strong spatial variation and are characterized by alternating windspeed maxima and minima near coastal promontories associated with the interaction between the marine boundary layer and coastal topography. Further analysis highlights the enormous and reliable wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> development <span class="hlt">potential</span> in these persistent offshore windspeed maxima.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.633a2045C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.633a2045C"><span id="translatedtitle">A Frontier orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> approach to redox <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Conradie, Jeanet</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The prediction of the oxidation and reduction <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of molecules is important in many research areas. A review of relationships obtained between frontier orbital <span class="hlt">energies</span> (eV), the calculated ionization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> (IP in eV), or adiabatic electron affinities (EA in eV) with the experimental oxidation and reduction <span class="hlt">potentials</span> is presented, for selected series of ?- diketones, rhodium-?-diketonato complexes, as well as metal-tris-?-diketonato complexes, with the metal Fe or Mn. The good linear relationships obtained for related series of complexes show that the oxidation and reduction <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of these complexes can be predicted by their DFT-calculated <span class="hlt">energies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15003722','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15003722"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> on Public Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2003-02-01</p> <p>This report represents an initial activity of the Bureau of Land Managements (BLM) proposed National <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Policy Implementation Plan: identify and evaluate renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources on federal lands and any limitations on accessing them. Ultimately, BLM will prioritize land-use planning activities to increase industrys development of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources. These resources include solar, biomass, geothermal, water, and wind <span class="hlt">energy</span>. To accomplish this, BLM and the Department of <span class="hlt">Energys</span> National Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources on BLM lands in the western United States. The objective of this collaboration was to identify BLM planning units in the western states with the highest <span class="hlt">potential</span> for private-sector development of renewable resources. The assessment resulted in the following findings: (1) 63 BLM planning units in nine western states have high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for one or more renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies; and (2) 20 BLM planning units in seven western states have high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for power production from three or more renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources. This assessment report provides BLM with information needed to prioritize land-use planning activities on the basis of <span class="hlt">potential</span> for the development of <span class="hlt">energy</span> from renewable resources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314749','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22314749"><span id="translatedtitle">New approach to calculating the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of colliding nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.</p> <p>2014-12-15</p> <p>The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> at least by two orders of magnitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhG...43a5107C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhG...43a5107C"><span id="translatedtitle">Reinterpreting the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chamon, L. C.; Gasques, L. R.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In earlier works, we proposed a model for the nuclear <span class="hlt">potential</span> of ?-nucleus systems which is <span class="hlt">energy</span> independent and has no adjustable parameters. This interaction has been successfully applied in the description of fusion, elastic and inelastic scattering data for many of those systems in regions of low <span class="hlt">energy</span>. In the present work, we assume the same interaction as the bare <span class="hlt">potential</span> to study the elastic scattering for ? + 208Pb in a wide <span class="hlt">energy</span> range. We demonstrate that the corresponding data set can be described if couplings to inelastic states with high excitation <span class="hlt">energy</span> are explicitly considered through coupled-channel calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.eia.gov/renewable/archive/neaf0001.pdf','EIAPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.eia.gov/renewable/archive/neaf0001.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Consumption and Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Development <span class="hlt">Potential</span> on Indian Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eia.doe.gov/reports/">EIA Publications</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable resources development of Indian lands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20941736','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20941736"><span id="translatedtitle">Intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for CS2 dimer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L</p> <p>2011-04-15</p> <p>A new four-dimensional intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction <span class="hlt">energies</span> for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated <span class="hlt">energy</span> points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface, overestimating the total <span class="hlt">energy</span> by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface. The MP2 extrapolated <span class="hlt">energy</span> points were fitted to well-known analytical <span class="hlt">potential</span> functions using two different methods to represent the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface. PMID:20941736</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18215439','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18215439"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span>: the scale of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> resource.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Field, Christopher B; Campbell, J Elliott; Lobell, David B</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>Increased production of biomass for <span class="hlt">energy</span> has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to offset substantial use of fossil fuels, but it also has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to threaten conservation areas, pollute water resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> agriculture on climate could be either cooling or warming, depending on the crop, the technology for converting biomass into useable <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and the difference in carbon stocks and reflectance of solar radiation between the biomass crop and the pre-existing vegetation. The area with the greatest <span class="hlt">potential</span> for yielding biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> that reduces net warming and avoids competition with food production is land that was previously used for agriculture or pasture but that has been abandoned and not converted to forest or urban areas. At the global scale, <span class="hlt">potential</span> above-ground plant growth on these abandoned lands has an <span class="hlt">energy</span> content representing approximately 5% of world primary <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption in 2006. The global <span class="hlt">potential</span> for biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> production is large in absolute terms, but it is not enough to replace more than a few percent of current fossil fuel usage. Increasing biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> production beyond this level would probably reduce food security and exacerbate forcing of climate change. PMID:18215439</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EOSTr..84Q.214S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EOSTr..84Q.214S"><span id="translatedtitle">Re-examining <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Geothermal <span class="hlt">Energy</span> in United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Showstack, Randy</p> <p></p> <p>New technological initiatives, along with <span class="hlt">potential</span> policy and economic incentives, could help to bring about a resurgence in geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> development in the United States, said several experts at a 22 May forum in Washington, D.C. The forum was sponsored by the House and Senate Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> and <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency Caucuses, the Sustainable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Coalition, and the Environmental and <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Study Institute. Among these initiatives is an ambitious program of the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> to expand existing geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> fields and <span class="hlt">potentially</span> create new fields through ``enhanced geothermal systems.'' In addition, a program of the Bush administration encourages geothermal development on some public lands, and current legislation would provide tax credits and other incentives for geothermal development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970015323&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970015323&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen"><span id="translatedtitle">Ab initio <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface for H-H2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged <span class="hlt">potential</span> determined from the calculated <span class="hlt">energies</span> agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20979297','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20979297"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.</p> <p>2006-02-15</p> <p>We describe the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21392310','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21392310"><span id="translatedtitle">IDENTIFYING <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Congdon, Arthur B.; Keeton, Charles R.; Nordgren, C. Erik E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>We examine the ability of gravitational lens time delays to reveal complex structure in lens <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. In a previous paper, we predicted how the time delay between the bright pair of images in a 'fold' lens scales with the image separation, for smooth lens <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Here we show that the proportionality constant increases with the quadrupole moment of the lens <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and depends only weakly on the position of the source along the caustic. We use Monte Carlo simulations to determine the range of time delays that can be produced by realistic smooth lens models consisting of isothermal ellipsoid galaxies with tidal shear. We can then identify outliers as 'time delay <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>'. We find evidence for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in close image pairs in the cusp lenses RX J1131 - 1231 and B1422+231. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in RX J1131 - 1231 provide strong evidence for substructure in the lens <span class="hlt">potential</span>, while at this point the apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in B1422+231 mainly indicate that the time delay measurements need to be improved. We also find evidence for time delay <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in larger-separation image pairs in the fold lenses, B1608+656 and WFI 2033 - 4723, and the cusp lens RX J0911+0551. We suggest that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by some combination of substructure and a complex lens environment. Finally, to assist future monitoring campaigns we use our smooth models with shear to predict the time delays for all known four-image lenses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21289458','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21289458"><span id="translatedtitle">Fusion at deep subbarrier <span class="hlt">energies</span>: <span class="hlt">potential</span> inversion revisited</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hagino, K.; Rowley, N.</p> <p>2009-03-04</p> <p>For a single <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier, the barrier penetrability can be inverted based on the WKB approximation to yield the barrier thickness. We apply this method to heavy-ion fusion reactions at <span class="hlt">energies</span> well below the Coulomb barrier and directly determine the inter-nucleus <span class="hlt">potential</span> between the colliding nuclei. To this end, we assume that fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier <span class="hlt">energies</span> are governed by the lowest barrier in the barrier distribution. The inverted inter-nucleus <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for the {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb reactions show that they are much thicker than phenomenological <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. We discuss a consequence of such thick <span class="hlt">potential</span> by fitting the inverted <span class="hlt">potentials</span> with the Bass function.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981STIN...8222783A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981STIN...8222783A"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications for Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Austin, J. C.</p> <p>1981-11-01</p> <p>Several <span class="hlt">potential</span> applications of geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> for the Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital are outlined. A brief background on the resource and distribution system, is provided; which hospital heating systems should be considered for <span class="hlt">potential</span> geothermal retrofit is discussed; and technical and economic feasibility are addressed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/860768','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/860768"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on orbifolds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard</p> <p>2001-03-16</p> <p>We discuss the form of the chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1350146','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1350146"><span id="translatedtitle">Behavioral economics without <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rachlin, H</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Behavioral economics is often conceived as the study of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> superimposed on a rational system. As research has progressed, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have multiplied until little is left of rationality. Another conception of behavioral economics is based on the axiom that value is always maximized. It incorporates so-called <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> either as conflicts between temporal patterns of behavior and the individual acts comprising those patterns or as outcomes of nonexponential time discounting. This second conception of behavioral economics is both empirically based and internally consistent. PMID:8551195</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5856699','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5856699"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> production of <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane for fuel in the Caribbean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Samuels, G.</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>Sugarcane grown as <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane presents a new <span class="hlt">potential</span> to the Caribbean countries to provide their own <span class="hlt">energy</span> needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving <span class="hlt">energy</span> feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the <span class="hlt">energy</span> cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for <span class="hlt">energy</span>-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1067906','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1067906"><span id="translatedtitle">Geospatial Analysis of Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Technical <span class="hlt">Potential</span> on Tribal Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012003','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012003"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> as a source of earthquake <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Barrows, L.; Langer, C.J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Some degree of tectonic stress within the earth originates from gravity acting upon density structures. The work performed by this "gravitational tectonics stress" must have formerly existed as gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> contained in the stress-causing density structure. According to the elastic rebound theory (Reid, 1910), the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of earthquakes comes from an elastic strain field built up by fairly continuous elastic deformation in the period between events. For earthquakes resulting from gravitational tectonic stress, the elastic rebound theory requires the transfer of <span class="hlt">energy</span> from the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the density structures into an elastic strain field prior to the event. An alternate theory involves partial gravitational collapse of the stress-causing density structures. The earthquake <span class="hlt">energy</span> comes directly from a net decrease in gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> released at the time of the earthquake is split between the <span class="hlt">energy</span> released by the earthquake, including work done in the fault zone and an increase in stored elastic strain <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The stress associated with this elastic strain field should oppose further fault slip. ?? 1981.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24561405','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24561405"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potentials</span> in the cloud.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Da-Sheng</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Collecting webpage messages can serve as a sensor for investigating the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potential</span> of buildings. Focusing on stores, a cloud sensor system is developed to collect data and determine their <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The owner of a store under investigation must register online, report the store address, area, and the customer ID number on the electric meter. The cloud sensor system automatically surveys the <span class="hlt">energy</span> usage records by connecting to the power company website and calculating the <span class="hlt">energy</span> use index (EUI) of the store. Other data includes the chain store check, company capital, location price, and the influence of weather conditions on the store; even the exposure frequency of store under investigation may impact the <span class="hlt">energy</span> usage collected online. After collecting data from numerous stores, a multi-dimensional data array is constructed to determine <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potential</span> by identifying stores with similarity conditions. Similarity conditions refer to analyzed results that indicate that two stores have similar capital, business scale, weather conditions, and exposure frequency on web. Calculating the EUI difference or pure technical efficiency of stores, the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potential</span> is determined. In this study, a real case study is performed. An 8-dimensional (8D) data array is constructed by surveying web data related to 67 stores. Then, this study investigated the savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the 33 stores, using a site visit, and employed the cloud sensor system to determine the saving <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The case study results show good agreement between the data obtained by the site visit and the cloud investigation, with errors within 4.17%. Among 33 the samples, eight stores have low saving <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of less than 5%. The developed sensor on the cloud successfully identifies them as having low saving <span class="hlt">potential</span> and avoids wasting money on the site visit. PMID:24561405</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..022G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...03..022G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, conformal manifolds, and spheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space {M} is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail {N}=(2,2) and {N}=(0,2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is Kähler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing Kähler class. For {N}=(2,2) theories in d = 2 and {N}=2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the Kähler <span class="hlt">potential</span> of {M} follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Along the way we find several examples of <span class="hlt">potential</span> trace <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRA..120..880L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRA..120..880L"><span id="translatedtitle">Kappa distribution in the presence of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Livadiotis, George</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> of particles but not of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial <span class="hlt">potentials</span> is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent <span class="hlt">potential</span>. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational <span class="hlt">potentials</span>; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law <span class="hlt">potentials</span>; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARJ33013H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARJ33013H"><span id="translatedtitle">Testing excited-state <span class="hlt">energy</span>-density functionals and <span class="hlt">potentials</span> with the ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> theorem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The modified local spin density functional and the related local <span class="hlt">potential</span> for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding <span class="hlt">potential</span> is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> ?max accurately, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> ?max thus obtained is then compared with the ?SCF ionization <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.P1260Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MAR.P1260Z"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Calculations for Water Adsorption on Poly (methyl methacrylate)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zuba, Mateusz J.; Howard, Patrick; Familo, Brian; Kane, Thorin; Netusil, Ross L.; Ilie, Carolina C.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The generosity of the NOYCE Research Grant enabled me to focus on the study of various polymers. The main goal was to study the molecular orbitals of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and calculate the <span class="hlt">energy</span> band gap. We also performed the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations for our system: two polymer chains and water molecules. We obtained the activation <span class="hlt">energy</span> from thermal desorption spectra of water on poly (methyl methacrylate) by employing Arrhenius analysis. NSF - Noyce Scholarship Program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22308764','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22308764"><span id="translatedtitle">Communication: Separable <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces from multiplicative artificial neural networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Koch, Werner Zhang, Dong H.</p> <p>2014-07-14</p> <p>We present a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface fitting scheme based on multiplicative artificial neural networks. It has the sum of products form required for efficient computation of the dynamics of multidimensional quantum systems with the multi configuration time dependent Hartree method. Moreover, it results in analytic <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> matrix elements when combined with quantum dynamics methods using Gaussian basis functions, eliminating the need for a local harmonic approximation. Scaling behavior with respect to the complexity of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> as well as the requested accuracy is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/971097','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/971097"><span id="translatedtitle">Framework for State-Level Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Market <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> market <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market <span class="hlt">potential</span> study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5490648','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5490648"><span id="translatedtitle">Saint Paul <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Park: the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for district heating</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.</p> <p>1980-03-01</p> <p>The results of ANL's study of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Park are summarized. The <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and <span class="hlt">energy</span> use characteristics of six possible <span class="hlt">energy</span> system options for supplying <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6818069','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6818069"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farms in the Dominican Republic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Newman, L.C.; Park, W.R.; Trehan, R.K.</p> <p>1980-12-01</p> <p>This report assesses the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> farms to supply feedstock for electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> needs in the Dominican Republic. That part of the dry forest area not used for agriculture production (1.3 million acres) is found to have a production <span class="hlt">potential</span> of 200 MW to 1400 MW, depending upon the level of management and choice of species. A biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> farm design and conversion facility is described and the economics of operating a wood fired facility of 50 MW, 20 MW, 5 MW, and 2 MW is compared to 50 MW and 20 MW.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvC..93c4601H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvC..93c4601H"><span id="translatedtitle">Separable representation of <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent representation of complex, <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, <span class="hlt">energy</span>-independent representation of global optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for <span class="hlt">energies</span> from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent separable representation of complex, <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent phenomenological optical <span class="hlt">potentials</span> fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/453497','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/453497"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> and cost savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> at DOD facilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L.</p> <p>1996-06-01</p> <p>The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption patterns and <span class="hlt">energy</span> and financial savings <span class="hlt">potential</span>. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> (ECP) and cost savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual <span class="hlt">energy</span> costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1629..414G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1629..414G"><span id="translatedtitle">Renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in Bulgaria - Some computer simulations results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ganev, K.; Jordanov, G.; Gadzhev, G.; Miloshev, N.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The paper presents a work, which aims at numerical study of the wind and solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the country. The wind/solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> fields simulations were performed applying the 5th generation PSU/NCAR Meso-Meteorological Model MM5 for years 2000-2007 with a spatial resolution of 3 km over Bulgaria. The computer simulated data base is large and rather comprehensive. In this sense it can be considered as statistically significant ensemble. This allows statistical treatment in order various wind and solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> evaluations to be retrieved from the data base. Some evaluations of the country wind and solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>, based on the simulation output are demonstrated in the paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19884.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19884.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (image)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Ebstein's <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a congenital heart condition which results in an abnormality of the tricuspid valve. In this condition the ... and displaced downward towards the right ventricle. The abnormality causes the tricuspid valve to leak blood backwards ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711135H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1711135H"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Dyke Propagation using the Minimum <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Principle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heimisson, Elas; Hooper, Andrew; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>An important aspect of eruption forecasting is the prediction and monitoring of dyke propagation. Eruptions occur where dykes propagate to the surface, with lava flows causing a major threat. When such eruption occur under ice, as is common in Iceland, they become explosive and often cause hazardous and destructive floods. Dykes have also been known to trigger explosive eruption when hot basaltic magma comes in contact with more developed volatile saturated magma. Such explosive eruptions pose a danger to both lives and property. At divergent plate boundaries new crust is formed primarily by dyke injections. These injections usually grow laterally away from a central volcano. Lateral growth of a dyke is expected to follow the minimum <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> principle. Assuming a closed system, a dyke will tend to be emplaced such that it minimizes the total <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, ?T, given by: ?T = ?s + ?g (1) where ?s is the strain <span class="hlt">potential</span> and ?g the gravitational <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Assuming that the elastic medium behaves linearly the strain <span class="hlt">potential</span> can be calculated by numerically integrating the strain <span class="hlt">energy</span> density over a large volume. If the dyke is assumed to be propagating at a constant depth with respect to sea level the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> can be turned into a two dimensional integral. We do this by integrating the predicted vertical displacements multiplied by the local topographic load above a reference surface and the acceleration of gravity. We approximate strain and stress due to plate movements and then consider strain changes induced by the dyke formation. Opening of a dyke is energetically favourable when it releases strain <span class="hlt">energy</span> built up at a divergent plate boundary, but once deviatoric stress in the crust adjacent to a segment is released it becomes favourable to propagate laterally. Dyke formation is associated with uplift on their flanks; the lower the topographic load over the flanks, the less <span class="hlt">energy</span> it costs. For any given location on a volcano, the strike of a new dyke segment will influence the strain and gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> change in a different way. This type of model was applied to the more than 45 km long dyke formed in the Brarbunga volcanic system in Iceland in a rifting event in August 2014. Large observed changes in strike can be explained mostly by interplay of gravitational effects of topography and plate boundary strain. The model minimizing the total <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> explains this propagation path. Our results suggest that by applying the total minimum <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> principle we can forecast dyke propagation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790031865&hterms=MID-ATLANTIC+REGION&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DMID-ATLANTIC%2BREGION','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790031865&hterms=MID-ATLANTIC+REGION&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DMID-ATLANTIC%2BREGION"><span id="translatedtitle">On isostatic geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haxby, W. F.; Turcotte, D. L.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>In regions of slowly varying lateral density changes, the gravity and geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be expressed as power series expansions in topography. Geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in isostatically compensated regions can be directly related to the local dipole moment of the density-depth distribution. This relationship is used to obtain theoretical geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for different models of isostatic compensation. The classical Pratt and Airy models give geoid height-elevation relationships differing in functional form but predicting geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of comparable magnitude. The thermal cooling model explaining ocean floor subsidence away from mid-ocean ridges predicts a linear age-geoid height relationship of 0.16 m/m.y. Geos 3 altimetry profiles were examined to test these theoretical relationships. A profile over the mid-Atlantic ridge is closely matched by the geoid curve derived from the thermal cooling model. The observed geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the Atlantic margin of North America can be explained by Airy compensation. The relation between geoid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and bathymetry across the Bermuda Swell is consistent with Pratt compensation with a 100-km depth of compensation.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5576823','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5576823"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation in the glass industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.</p> <p>1986-06-01</p> <p>While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific <span class="hlt">energy</span> use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant <span class="hlt">potential</span> for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry <span class="hlt">energy</span> productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that <span class="hlt">energy</span> costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in <span class="hlt">energy</span> costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this <span class="hlt">energy</span>-saving <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790050006&hterms=energy+consumption&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Denergy%2Bconsumption','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790050006&hterms=energy+consumption&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Denergy%2Bconsumption"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> in California industry - Applications, characteristics and <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Results of a survey to determine the <span class="hlt">potential</span> applicability of solar thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar <span class="hlt">energy</span>, total state <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996JChPh.105.6490P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996JChPh.105.6490P"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of H2 16O</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Polyansky, Oleg L.; Jensen, Per; Tennyson, Jonathan</p> <p>1996-10-01</p> <p>We report here a new determination of the H216O <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface from experimental data. The calculations have been carried out by means of the very accurate and highly efficient method proposed and applied to H216O in a previous paper [Polyansky, Jensen, and Tennyson, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7651 (1994)]. This previous work has been significantly improved by inclusion of additional terms in the analytical expression used to represent the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface. Previously, 1600 rotation-vibration term values for H216O were fitted with a standard deviation of 0.36 cm-1. With the extended model of the present work, this standard deviation could be improved to 0.25 cm-1. With the extended model and the new fitted <span class="hlt">potential</span> function we have calculated a data set comprising 3200 term values, all of which can be compared with experimentally derived values. The standard deviation for this data set is 0.6 cm-1. The data set contains rotationally excited <span class="hlt">energy</span> levels for all the 63 vibrational states which have been characterized by high resolution spectroscopy. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> function obtained in the present work improves drastically the agreement with experiment for the highly excited local mode stretching states above 20 000 cm-1. For the vibrational band origins of these states, the highest of which is measured at 25 118 cm-1, our previous fitted <span class="hlt">potential</span> produced discrepancies of more than 100 cm-1. These deviations are reduced to less than 1 cm-1 by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> function of the present work. We show that no significant improvement of the fit can be obtained by extending the analytical expression for the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> by further high-order terms. An analysis of the residuals shows that at the level of accuracy achieved, the major contribution to the error originates in the neglect of nonadiabatic correction terms in the Born-Oppenheimer kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> operator. We conclude that any further improvement of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface requires that such correction terms be included in the Hamiltonian. With the present <span class="hlt">potential</span>, reliable extrapolations towards higher rotational and vibrational <span class="hlt">energies</span> can be carried out, and we expect that such calculations can be very helpful in the assignment of experimental spectra involving highly excited states.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970013359&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970013359&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen"><span id="translatedtitle">Ab Initio <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface for H-H2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Patridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged <span class="hlt">potential</span> determined from the calculated <span class="hlt">energies</span> agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- 3 micro E(h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (25-70 kcal/mol above the H-H2 asymptote) at small interatomic separations; the Boothroyd, Keogh, Martin, and Peterson (BKMP) <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface is found to agree with results of the present calculations within the expected uncertainty (+/- 1 kcal/mol) of the fit. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(0)) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..MARN29001C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..MARN29001C"><span id="translatedtitle">The metabolic <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost of action <span class="hlt">potential</span> velocity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Crotty, Patrick; Sangrey, Thomas; Levy, William</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>Voltage changes in neurons and other active cells are caused by the passage of ions across the cell membrane. These ionic currents depend on the transmembrane ion concentration gradients, which in unmyelinated axons are maintained during rest and restored after electrical activity by an ATPase sodium-potassium exchanger in the membrane. The amount of ATP consumed by this exchanger can be taken as the metabolic <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost of any electrical activity in the axon. We use this measure, along with biophysical models of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels, to quantify the <span class="hlt">energy</span> cost of action <span class="hlt">potentials</span> propagating in squid giant axons. We find that the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of an action <span class="hlt">potential</span> can be naturally divided into three separate components associated with different aspects of the action <span class="hlt">potential</span>. We calculate these <span class="hlt">energy</span> components as functions of the ion channel densities and axon diameters and find that the component associated with the rising phase and velocity of the action <span class="hlt">potential</span> achieves a minimum near the biological values of these parameters. This result, which is robust with respect to other parameters such as temperature, suggests that evolution has optimized the axon for the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the action <span class="hlt">potential</span> wavefront.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22157036','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22157036"><span id="translatedtitle">Split kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> method for quantum systems with competing <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mineo, H.; Chao, Sheng D.</p> <p>2012-09-15</p> <p>For quantum systems with competing <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such a kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new <span class="hlt">energy</span> dissection idea. Instead of dividing the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> into 'unperturbed' and 'perturbed' terms, a partition of the kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> is performed. By distributing the kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> term in part into each individual <span class="hlt">potential</span>, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double {delta}-function <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new basis set expansion method is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Split kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> method is proposed to solve quantum eigenvalue problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement has been obtained in converging to exact results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of such methods is promising and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21028097','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21028097"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimizing <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> functions for maximal intrinsic hyperpolarizability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhou Juefei; Szafruga, Urszula B.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Watkins, David S.</p> <p>2007-11-15</p> <p>We use numerical optimization to study the properties of (1) the class of one-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> functions and (2) systems of point nuclei in two dimensions that yield the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizabilities, which we find to be within 30% of the fundamental limit. In all cases, we use a one-electron model. It is found that a broad range of optimized <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, each of very different character, yield the same intrinsic hyperpolarizability ceiling of 0.709. Furthermore, all optimized <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> functions share common features such as (1) the value of the normalized transition dipole moment to the dominant state, which forces the hyperpolarizability to be dominated by only two excited states and (2) the <span class="hlt">energy</span> ratio between the two dominant states. All optimized <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are found to obey the three-level ansatz to within about 1%. Many of these <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> functions may be implementable in multiple quantum well structures. The subset of <span class="hlt">potentials</span> with undulations reaffirm that modulation of conjugation may be an approach for making better organic molecules, though there appear to be many others. Additionally, our results suggest that one-dimensional molecules may have larger diagonal intrinsic hyperpolarizability {beta}{sub xxx}{sup int} than higher-dimensional systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGC41D0861Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGC41D0861Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Onshore Wind <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Its Uncertainties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Y.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.; Smith, S.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Wind power, a clean and renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource, can play an important role in providing <span class="hlt">energy</span> and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Yet there are substantial and important uncertainties about the <span class="hlt">potential</span> costs and supplies of wind that influence our ability to understand today the strategic role of wind power in the future. A detailed global assessment of onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> and its uncertainties will help decision-makers develop policies and strategies to meet <span class="hlt">energy</span> and environmental goals. In this study, we assess the technical and economic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> and its spatial distribution using reanalysis wind speed data from the National Centers for Environmental Modeling (Figure 1). The study focuses in particular in exploring a range of uncertainties that impact the economic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of wind power by constructing quantitative scenarios for eight key physical and economic parameters. We present quantification of the impact of uncertainties in these parameters, focusing on areas relevant to geoscience research (Figure 2). The amount of economic <span class="hlt">potential</span> of wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> depends strongly on several uncertain parameters such as wind speed, turbine cost, and land-suitability. The distribution of wind speed at fine temporal and spatial scales is a key parameter, but is not well quantified in many regions of the world. Reanalysis datasets with more accurate wind fields are a first step, along with computationally tractable downscaling methodologies. Another key assumption is land-suitability, which is the fraction of a particular land-cover type assumed to be available for wind farm development. There is currently little scientific basis for land-suitability assumptions. While some of the data needed for progress in these areas is readily available, such as high-resolution land-cover and terrain data, further advances are likely to require new methodologies and inter-disciplinary collaboration. We outline a number of areas where further research is needed to construct improved estimates of global wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990064232&hterms=plasma+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dplasma%2Benergy','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990064232&hterms=plasma+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dplasma%2Benergy"><span id="translatedtitle">Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned <span class="hlt">potential</span> as well as formulas for density, temperature and <span class="hlt">energy</span> flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019353','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019353"><span id="translatedtitle">Saturation wind power <span class="hlt">potential</span> and its implications for wind <span class="hlt">energy</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jacobson, Mark Z; Archer, Cristina L</p> <p>2012-09-25</p> <p>Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span>, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some <span class="hlt">potential</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span>. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation <span class="hlt">potential</span> not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world's all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-<span class="hlt">energy</span> economy. PMID:23019353</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3465402','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3465402"><span id="translatedtitle">Saturation wind power <span class="hlt">potential</span> and its implications for wind <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jacobson, Mark Z.; Archer, Cristina L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span>, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some <span class="hlt">potential</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span>. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation <span class="hlt">potential</span> not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation <span class="hlt">potentials</span> are >250terawatts (TW) at 100m globally, approximately 80TW at 100m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380TW at 10km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75TW) or several times the worlds all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-<span class="hlt">energy</span> economy. PMID:23019353</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IAU...261.0702A"><span id="translatedtitle">Astrometric Solar-System <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, John D.</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>There are four unexplained <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5 mm/s for the NEAR spacecraft at a closest approach of 539 km, 3.9 mm/s for the Galileo spacecraft at 960 km, and 1.8 mm/s for the Rosetta spacecraft at 1956 km. Next, I suggest the change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm/yr (Krasinsky and Brumberg, Celes. Mech. & Dynam. Astron. 90, 267). The other two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. D 65, 082004). Some, including me, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported increase that is about three times larger than expected (J. G. Williams, DDA/AAS Brouwer Award Lecture, Halifax, Nova Scotia 2006). We suspect that all four <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have mundane explanations. However, the possibility that they will be explained by a new theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation of the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21294208','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21294208"><span id="translatedtitle">Low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> scattering in two and three dimensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Khuri, N. N.; Martin, Andre; Richard, J.-M.; Wu, T. T.</p> <p>2009-07-15</p> <p>Conditions are established for the existence of a scattering length and an effective range in the low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> expansion of the S-wave phase shift of a central <span class="hlt">potential</span> in two and three dimensions. The behavior of the phase shift as a function of the momentum is also derived for longer-range power-law <span class="hlt">potentials</span> which do not fulfill these conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850045155&hterms=Apes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DApes','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850045155&hterms=Apes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DApes"><span id="translatedtitle">Reference pressure changes and available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> in isobaric coordinates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Robertson, F. R.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A formulation of the available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of <span class="hlt">energy</span> via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770050537&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770050537&hterms=potential+hydrogen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dpotential%2Bhydrogen"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> structural material problems in a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Potential</span> structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750018428','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750018428"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> structural material problems in a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Potential</span> structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> system are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002CoPhC.147..803H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002CoPhC.147..803H"><span id="translatedtitle">Extraction of analytical <span class="hlt">potential</span> function parameters from ab initio <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces and analytical forces*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hayes, J. M.; Greer, J. C.</p> <p>2002-09-01</p> <p>The program PAROPT has been written to extract forcefield parameters from ab initio calculations of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PES) and ab initio analytical forces. The ability to use either <span class="hlt">energies</span> or forces, or a combination of the two to determine forcefield parameters is a novel feature of the program. Simulated annealing is used within the program to minimise the difference between a set of forces and <span class="hlt">energies</span> calculated using ab initio techniques and the same quantities calculated using an empirical forcefield. Details of the program and methods used to extract forcefield parametrizations are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6388K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.6388K"><span id="translatedtitle">Renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, barriers and solutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable <span class="hlt">energies</span> from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technology sector in Kazakhstan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1009188','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1009188"><span id="translatedtitle">LHC Physics <span class="hlt">Potential</span> vs. <span class="hlt">Energy</span>: Considerations for the 2011 Run</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam <span class="hlt">energy</span> from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the <span class="hlt">energy</span> range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21386616','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21386616"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> dependence of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S.</p> <p>2010-02-15</p> <p>Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding <span class="hlt">energies</span> from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> observed in the behavior of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..DPPCP1032S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..DPPCP1032S"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Role of Fusion <span class="hlt">Energy</span> in China and India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sheffield, John</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>It is projected that both China and India will install many 100's of megawatts electric (MWe) of additional electrical capacity by 2050 with more additions later. All <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources will be required to meet such a demand. Fortunately, while world <span class="hlt">energy</span> demand will be increasing, the world is well endowed with a variety of <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources. However, their distribution does not match well the areas of demand and there are many environmental issues. Such geopolitical issues affect China and India and make it important for them to be able to deploy improved technologies. International collaborations in developing these technologies, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), may be important in all <span class="hlt">energy</span> areas. In this regard, Korea is an interesting example of a country that has worked with other countries to develop its own capability to do advanced technologies - such as nuclear fission plants - in a relatively short time. Fusion <span class="hlt">energy</span> is viewed as interesting <span class="hlt">potential</span> option in these three countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Capacitors&pg=6&id=ED190755','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Capacitors&pg=6&id=ED190755"><span id="translatedtitle">Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Kinetic <span class="hlt">Energy</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.</p> <p></p> <p>This concept module on <span class="hlt">potential</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gravity+AND+field&pg=4&id=EJ346097','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gravity+AND+field&pg=4&id=EJ346097"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching Field Concept and <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> at A-Level.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Poon, C. H.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JChPh.132k4301P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JChPh.132k4301P"><span id="translatedtitle">A highly accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curve for the mercury dimer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pahl, Elke; Figgen, Detlev; Thierfelder, Christian; Peterson, Kirk A.; Calvo, Florent; Schwerdtfeger, Peter</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curve of the electronic ground state of the mercury dimer based on CCSD(T) calculations at the complete basis set (CBS) limit, including corrections for the full triples ?T and explicit spin-orbit (SO) interactions at the CCSD(T) level of theory, is presented. In the far long-range part, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curve is complemented by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> curves of an analytically simple, extended Lennard-Jones form are obtained from very accurate fits to the CBS/CCSD(T)+SO and CBS/CCSD(T)+SO+?T data. The Hg2 <span class="hlt">potential</span> curves yield dissociation <span class="hlt">energies</span> of De=424/392 cm-1 and equilibrium distances of re=3.650/3.679 at the CBS/CCSD(T)+SO and CBS/CCSD(T)+SO+?T levels of theory, respectively. By including perturbative quadruple corrections in our coupled-cluster calculations and corrections from correlating the 4f-core, we arrive at a final dissociation <span class="hlt">energy</span> of De=405 cm-1, in excellent agreement with the experimentally estimated value of 407 cm-1 by Greif and Hensel. In addition, the rotational and vibrational spectroscopic constants as well as the second virial coefficient B(T ) in dependence of the temperature T are calculated and validated against available experimental and theoretical data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=conversion+AND+electrical+AND+energy+AND+thermal&id=ED190755','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=conversion+AND+electrical+AND+energy+AND+thermal&id=ED190755"><span id="translatedtitle">Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Kinetic <span class="hlt">Energy</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.</p> <p></p> <p>This concept module on <span class="hlt">potential</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842870','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842870"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potentials</span> and policy implications of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and material efficiency improvement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient <span class="hlt">energy</span> to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for <span class="hlt">energy</span> and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing <span class="hlt">energy</span> and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply. A large <span class="hlt">potential</span> exists for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings through <span class="hlt">energy</span> and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large <span class="hlt">potential</span> for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/935754','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/935754"><span id="translatedtitle">Global <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane</p> <p>2008-06-15</p> <p>This report estimates the global <span class="hlt">potential</span> reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around <span class="hlt">energy</span>, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the <span class="hlt">potential</span> impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for <span class="hlt">energy</span>-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory <span class="hlt">energy</span> performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the <span class="hlt">energy</span>-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under consideration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410076B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410076B"><span id="translatedtitle">Turkey's High Temperature Geothermal <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Resources and Electricity Production <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bilgin, .</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Turkey is in the first 7 countries in the world in terms of <span class="hlt">potential</span> and applications. Geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> which is an alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource has advantages such as low-cost, clean, safe and natural resource. Geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> is defined as hot water and steam which is formed by heat that accumulated in various depths of the Earth's crust; with more than 20oC temperature and which contain more than fused minerals, various salts and gases than normal underground and ground water. It is divided into three groups as low, medium and high temperature. High-temperature fluid is used in electricity generation, low and medium temperature fluids are used in greenhouses, houses, airport runways, animal farms and places such as swimming pools heating. In this study high temperature geothermal fields in Turkey which is suitable for electricity production, properties and electricity production <span class="hlt">potential</span> was investigated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..87g5317S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..87g5317S"><span id="translatedtitle">Heterobarrier for converting hot-phonon <span class="hlt">energy</span> to electric <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shin, Seungha; Melnick, Corey; Kaviany, Massoud</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>We show that hot phonons emitted in <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion or resistive processes can be converted to electric <span class="hlt">potential</span> in heterobarrier structures. Using phonon and electron interaction kinetics and self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo, we find the favorable conditions for unassisted absorption of hot phonons and design graded heterobarriers for their direct conversion into electric <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Tandem barriers with nearly optical-phonon height allow for substantial <span class="hlt">potential</span> gain without current loss. We find that 19% of hot phonons can be harvested with an optimized GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier structure over a range of current and electron densities, thus enhancing the overall <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion efficiency and reducing waste heat.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNH32A..07S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNH32A..07S"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Climate Variability Impacts on the Offshore <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stear, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Climate variability may have important implications for the offshore <span class="hlt">energy</span> industry. Scenarios of increased storm activity and changes in sea level could require the retrofit of existing offshore platforms and coastal infrastructure, the decommissioning of facilities for which upgrade or relocation is not economically viable, and the development of new methods and equipment which are removed from or less sensitive to environmental loads. Over the past years the <span class="hlt">energy</span> industry has been actively involved in collaborative research efforts with government and academia to identify the <span class="hlt">potential</span> changes in the offshore operating environment, and corresponding risk implications. This presentation will review several of these efforts, and for several of the hypothetical climate variation scenarios, review the <span class="hlt">potential</span> impacts on and possible mitigations for offshore and coastal <span class="hlt">energy</span> infrastructure and operations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22415838','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22415838"><span id="translatedtitle">Three-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of Ar–CO</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki</p> <p>2015-01-14</p> <p>A three-dimensional intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of the Ar–CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation <span class="hlt">energies</span>. A three-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/941430','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/941430"><span id="translatedtitle">U.S. Building-Sector <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter</p> <p>2008-09-30</p> <p>This paper presents an estimate of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency <span class="hlt">potential</span> studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span>'s Scenarios for a Clean <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved <span class="hlt">energy</span> of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual <span class="hlt">energy</span> bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991gcai.rept.....G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991gcai.rept.....G"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Goodwin, R. Christopher; Athens, William P.; Saltus, Allen R., Jr.</p> <p>1991-07-01</p> <p>This report presents results of testing and assessment of eleven previously recorded magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Maintenance dredging of Lower Bayou Teche may impact several of the eight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> evaluated in this study. Objectives of the study were to conduct detailed surveys and assessments of eight previously located <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These were <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> 8, 13, 24a, 29, 30, 31, 33, and 58. Three orther <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 23, 24b, and 55 were also briefly examined. Methods used during survey included relocation of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a magnetometer; informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and its vicinity, physical search of the river bottom at each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> location; use of a metal detector to assess the depth of the magnetic source of each <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>; probing of the river bottom to locate buried structures; and limited excavation with a jet probe to document the source, nature, and research <span class="hlt">potential</span> of each of the eight <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Two of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 30 and 58 could not be relocated. Four of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> apparently are associated with modern debris: <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> nos. 8, 13, 29, and 31. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> no. 33 appears to be an isolated object. Evidence of structure was observed 14 to 15 ft below water surface, however, it occurs below the project impact zone. One archeological site, the <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> no. 23/24 Complex (Site 16SMY76) was defined. It consists of two wooden barges and some twentieth century bridge remains.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvB..83l5431A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvB..83l5431A"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> gap in graphene nanoribbons with structured external electric <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Apel, W.; Pal, G.; Schweitzer, L.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>The electronic properties of graphene zigzag nanoribbons with electrostatic <span class="hlt">potentials</span> along the edges are investigated. Using the Dirac-fermion approach, we calculate the <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrum of an infinitely long nanoribbon of finite width w, terminated by Dirichlet boundary conditions in the transverse direction. We show that a structured external <span class="hlt">potential</span> that acts within the edge regions of the ribbon can induce a spectral gap and thus switch the nanoribbon from metallic to insulating behavior. The basic mechanism of this effect is the selective influence of the external <span class="hlt">potentials</span> on the spinorial wave functions that are topological in nature and localized along the boundary of the graphene nanoribbon. Within this single-particle description, the maximal obtainable <span class="hlt">energy</span> gap is Emax???vF/w, i.e., ?0.12 eV for w=15 nm. The stability of the spectral gap against edge disorder and the effect of disorder on the two-terminal conductance is studied numerically within a tight-binding lattice model. We find that the <span class="hlt">energy</span> gap persists as long as the applied external effective <span class="hlt">potential</span> is larger than ?0.55W, where W is a measure of the disorder strength. We argue that there is a transport gap due to localization effects even in the absence of a spectral gap.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22311295','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22311295"><span id="translatedtitle">An exploration of the ozone dimer <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve</p> <p>2014-06-28</p> <p>The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic <span class="hlt">energy</span>, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O?O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup ?1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1035715','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1035715"><span id="translatedtitle">Technical <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Solar <span class="hlt">Energy</span> to Address <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This analysis explores the technical <span class="hlt">potential</span> of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address <span class="hlt">energy</span> poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span>'s National Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Laboratory (NREL).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/419866','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/419866"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of the clean <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings and air pollution control in Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kaygusuz, K.; Kargi, H.; Kaygusuz, A.</p> <p>1996-12-01</p> <p>This article begins with a brief review of the technical <span class="hlt">potential</span>, the regional distribution, and the air pollution effects of all fossil <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources as well as of all clean and renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources that could be used in Turkey. Air pollution levels due to fossil fuel consumption are examined. In this context, the role of clean <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources is indicated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JChPh.137x4101I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JChPh.137x4101I"><span id="translatedtitle">NVU dynamics. III. Simulating molecules at constant <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Dyre, Jeppe C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>This is the final paper in a series that introduces geodesic molecular dynamics at constant <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. This dynamics is entitled NVU dynamics in analogy to standard <span class="hlt">energy</span>-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics. In the first two papers [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 104101 (2011), 10.1063/1.3623585; T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 104102 (2011), 10.1063/1.3623586], a numerical algorithm for simulating geodesic motion of atomic systems was developed and tested against standard algorithms. The conclusion was that the NVU algorithm has the same desirable properties as the Verlet algorithm for Newtonian NVE dynamics, i.e., it is time-reversible and symplectic. Additionally, it was concluded that NVU dynamics becomes equivalent to NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, the NVU algorithm for atomic systems is extended to be able to simulate the geodesic motion of molecules at constant <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. We derive an algorithm for simulating rigid bonds and test this algorithm on three different systems: an asymmetric dumbbell model, Lewis-Wahnström o-terphenyl (OTP) and rigid SPC/E water. The rigid bonds introduce additional constraints beyond that of constant <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> for atomic systems. The rigid-bond NVU algorithm conserves <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, bond lengths, and step length for indefinitely long runs. The quantities probed in simulations give results identical to those of Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics. Since Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics is known to give results equivalent to those of NVE dynamics, the latter results show that NVU dynamics becomes equivalent to NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit also for molecular systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001DPS....33.4801V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001DPS....33.4801V"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemical <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potentially</span> available to organisms in martian hydrothermal systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Varnes, E. S.; Jakosky, B. M.; McCollom, T. M.</p> <p>2001-11-01</p> <p>Although a global average of <span class="hlt">energy</span> available to <span class="hlt">potentially</span> support life from chemosynthesis on Mars has been estimated, issues of how the <span class="hlt">energy</span> is distributed and which environments have the greatest <span class="hlt">potential</span> to support life remain unresolved. We have begun to address these questions by developing numerical geochemical models of martian hydrothermal systems using the software package EQ3/6. In order to model hydrothermal systems, the elemental composition of the initial fluid (the groundwater) and the initial host rock with which it interacts must be defined. The host rock was defined using the composition of LEW 88516, which is similar to the martian mantle. This host rock was reacted at high temperature (350 deg C) with a series of groundwaters. Groundwaters are either pure water in equilibrium with present martian atmosphere or in equilibrium with Pathfinder-composition soils and the atmosphere. The hot fluid resulting from the rock/groundwater reaction was then reacted with increments of fresh groundwater, simulating the mixing that occurs in hydrothermal systems. During mixing, oxidation and reduction reactions are kinetically inhibited; organisms may exploit this inhibition to derive metabolic <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The maximum amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> an organism can obtain from a given reaction is determined from the Gibbs free <span class="hlt">energy</span> of that reaction. For each model run, we have calculated the Gibbs free <span class="hlt">energy</span> of reactions that are important for terrestrial chemosynthetic organisms and likely representative for putative martians. Our results indicate that substantial amounts of <span class="hlt">energy</span> may be derived from these reactions, but they depend sensitively on the oxidation state of the groundwater and whether saturated species precipitate to equilibrium. Thus, it is unknown whether sufficient <span class="hlt">energy</span> is available to support martian life, although it is likely that suitable environments exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22715929','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22715929"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of global onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> and generation costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon</p> <p>2012-07-17</p> <p>In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to supply a significant portion of the world <span class="hlt">energy</span> needs, although this <span class="hlt">potential</span> varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind <span class="hlt">potential</span> under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind <span class="hlt">potential</span> is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power. PMID:22715929</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS21B1120I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS21B1120I"><span id="translatedtitle">The Growth and Decay of Hydrate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Marine Sediments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Irizarry, J. T.; Rempel, A. W.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Natural gas hydrates, stored in huge quantities beneath permafrost, and in submarine sediments on the continental shelf, have the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to become a vital clean-burning <span class="hlt">energy</span> source. However, clear evidence is recorded in coastal sediments worldwide that past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. Arctic permafrost is thawing, and environmental changes can alter ocean circulation to warm the seafloor, causing hydrates to dissociate or dissolve in the sediments beneath. Decades of focused research provide a firm understanding of laboratory conditions under which hydrates become unstable and dissociate, and how hydrate reserves form when microbes convert organic material into methane, which can also dissolve and be carried by pore waters into the hydrate stability zone. Despite these advances, many key questions that concern both the resource <span class="hlt">potential</span> of hydrates and their role in causing environmental geohazards, are intimately tied to the more poorly understood behavior of hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which tend to be concentrated in the large pores of sand layers and form segregated lenses and nodules in muds. We present simple models designed to unravel the importance of the diverse physical interactions (i.e. flow focusing, free-gas infiltration, and pore-scale solubility effects) that help control how hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> form. Predicted hydrate distributions are qualitatively different when accumulation in <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is supplied primarily by: 1. aqueous flow through sediments with enhanced permeability, 2. free-gas transport high above the three-phase stability boundary, or 3. diffusive transport along solubility gradients associated with pore-scale effects. We discuss examples that illustrate each of these distinct generation modes, in hopes of providing a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their geomechanical properties in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AIPC..135...92R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AIPC..135...92R"><span id="translatedtitle">Residential <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency: Progress since 1973 and future <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rosenfeld, Arthur H.</p> <p>1985-11-01</p> <p>Today's 85 million U.S. homes use 100 billion of fuel and electricity (1150/home). If their <span class="hlt">energy</span> intensity (resource <span class="hlt">energy</span>/ft2) were still frozen at 1973 levels, they would use 18% more. With well-insulated houses, need for space heat is vanishing. Superinsulated Saskatchewan homes spend annually only 270 for space heat, 150 for water heat, and 400 for appliances, yet they cost only 20001000 more than conventional new homes. The concept of Cost of Conserved <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (CCE) is used to rank conservation technologies for existing and new homes and appliances, and to develop supply curves of conserved <span class="hlt">energy</span> and a least cost scenario. Calculations are calibrated with the BECA and other data bases. By limiting investments in efficiency to those whose CCE is less than current fuel and electricity prices, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> residential plus commercial <span class="hlt">energy</span> use in 2000 AD drops to half of that estimated by DOE, and the number of power plants needed drops by 200. For the whole buildings sector, <span class="hlt">potential</span> savings by 2000 are 8 Mbod (worth 50B/year), at an average CCE of 10/barrel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21259971','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21259971"><span id="translatedtitle">Quintom dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> models with nearly flat <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Setare, M. R.; Saridakis, E. N.</p> <p>2009-02-15</p> <p>We examine quintom dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> models, produced by the combined consideration of a canonical and a phantom field, with nearly flat <span class="hlt">potentials</span> and dark <span class="hlt">energy</span> equation-of-state parameter w{sub DE} close to -1. We find that all such models converge to a single expression for w{sub DE}(z), depending only on the initial field values and their derivatives. We show that this quintom paradigm allows for a description of the transition through -1 in the near cosmological past. In addition, we provide the necessary conditions for the determination of the direction of the -1 crossing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/572698','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/572698"><span id="translatedtitle">Parallel unconstrained minimization of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> in LAMMPS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Plantenga, T.</p> <p>1997-10-13</p> <p>This report describes a new minimization capability added to LAMMPS V4.0. Minimization of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> is used to find molecular conformations that are close to structures found in nature. The new minimization algorithm uses LAMMPS subroutines for calculating <span class="hlt">energy</span> and force vectors, and follows the LAMMPS partitioning scheme for distributing large data objects on multiprocessor machines. Since gradient-based algorithms cannot tolerate nonsmoothness, a new Coulomb style that smoothly cuts off to zero at a finite distance is provided. This report explains the minimization algorithm and its parallel implementation within LAMMPS. Guidelines are given for invoking the algorithm and interpreting results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/431139','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/431139"><span id="translatedtitle">No strings attached <span class="hlt">potential</span> vs. interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> in QCD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Goldman, T.</p> <p>1996-10-20</p> <p>In infrared-stable fixed-point field theories, the interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a test particle is proportional to the non-relativistic (heavy source) coordinate-space <span class="hlt">potential</span> derived from the field strength produced by that source. This is no longer true in ultraviolet-stable fixed-point field theories (UVSFPFT) as they may not have a finite infrared fixed point. This leads to the possibility that UVSFPFTs may have quite conventional field strength distributions despite the unusual spatial dependence expected for the interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2790825','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2790825"><span id="translatedtitle">Bifurcations on <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces of Organic Reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ess, Daniel H.; Wheeler, Steven E.; Iafe, Robert G.; Xu, Lai; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Houk, K. N.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>A single transition state may lead to multiple intermediates or products if there is a post-transition state reaction path bifurcation. These bifurcations arise when there are sequential transition states with no intervening <span class="hlt">energy</span> minimum. For such systems, the shape of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface and dynamic effects control selectivity rather than transition state energetics. This minireview covers recent investigations of organic reactions exhibiting reaction pathway bifurcations. Such phenomena are surprisingly general and affect experimental observables such as kinetic isotope effects and product distributions. PMID:18767086</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20771540','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20771540"><span id="translatedtitle">Absence of the threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the elastic scattering of the weakly bound projectile {sup 7}Li on {sup 27}Al</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Figueira, J.M.; Abriola, D.; Niello, J.O. Fernandez; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O.A.; Barbara, E. de; Marti, G.V.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Lubian, J.</p> <p>2006-05-15</p> <p>To study the conditions leading to the appearance of the threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in systems involving weakly bound projectiles we measured elastic scattering cross sections for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al system at ten different bombarding <span class="hlt">energies</span>. The results were exhaustively analyzed using different optical model <span class="hlt">potentials</span>. The similar behavior observed in all these analyses allows us to conclude that no threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is found for the present system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/814468','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/814468"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> For <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency In The State of Iowa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hadley, SW</p> <p>2001-12-05</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to do an initial estimate of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings in the state of Iowa. Several methods for determining savings were examined, including existing programs, surveys, savings calculators, and economic simulation. Each method has advantages and disadvantages, trading off between detail of information, accuracy of results, and scope. This paper concentrated on using economic simulation (the NEMS model (EIA 2000a)) to determine market <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings for the residential and commercial sectors. The results of surveys were used to calculate the economic <span class="hlt">potential</span> for savings in the industrial sector. The NEMS model is used by the <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Information Administration to calculate twenty-year projections of <span class="hlt">energy</span> use for every region of the country. The results of the Annual <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Outlook 2000 were used as the Base case (EIA 1999a). Two alternative cases were created to simulate <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings policies. Voluntary, market-related programs were simulated by lowering the effective discount rates that end-users use when making decisions on equipment purchases. Standards programs in the residential sector were simulated by eliminating the availability of low efficiency equipment in future years. The parameters for these programs were based on the Moderate scenario from the DOE Clean <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Futures study (Interlaboratory Working Group 2000), which assumed increased concern by society on <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency but not to the point of fiscal policies such as taxes or direct subsidies. The study only considered a subset of the various programs, policies, and technologies that could reduce <span class="hlt">energy</span> use. The major end-uses in the residential sector affected by the policies were space cooling (20% savings by 2020) and water heating (14% savings by 2020.) Figure S-1 shows the space cooling savings when voluntary programs and minimum efficiency standards were implemented. Refrigerators, freezers, and clothes dryers saw slight improvements. The study did not involve changes to the building shell (e.g., increased insulation) or residential lighting improvements. Nevertheless, the residential sector's market <span class="hlt">potential</span> for electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings was calculated to be 5.3% of expected electrical use, representing 850 GWh by 2020. Natural gas savings could be 2.4% of expected gas use, representing 2.1 trillion Btus. Using expected prices for <span class="hlt">energy</span> in that year, these represent savings of $47 million and $12 million per year. In the commercial sector, the study only considered voluntary market-based policies for some of the technologies. The most notable savings were in ventilation (12% savings by 2020), lighting (12% savings), refrigeration (7% savings), water heating (6% savings), and space heating (5% savings by 2020). The commercial sector's market <span class="hlt">potential</span> for electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings based on the programs modeled was calculated to be 5.1% of its total expected electrical use, representing 605 GWh of power by 2020. Natural gas savings were 2.3 trillion Btu, 3.7% of use. Using the same prices as the residential sector (5.5{cents}/kWh and $5.74/MBtu), the savings represent $33 million and $13 million per year, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760053811&hterms=formaldehyde&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dformaldehyde','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760053811&hterms=formaldehyde&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dformaldehyde"><span id="translatedtitle">MCSCF <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for photodissociation of formaldehyde</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jaffe, R. L.; Morokuma, K.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for the dissociation of formaldehyde (H2CO to H2 and CO) is calculated with the ab initio MCSCF method with an extended (4-31G) basis set. The location, barrier height, and force constants of the transition state are determined, and the normal coordinate analysis is carried out. The calculated barrier height is 4.5 eV. Based on the calculated quantities, the detailed mechanism of the photochemical dissociation is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139925','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139925"><span id="translatedtitle">Electronic structure, molecular bonding and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ruedenberg, K.</p> <p>1993-12-01</p> <p>By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7261V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7261V"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> impact of hydrogen <span class="hlt">energy</span> use on the atmosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Energy</span> models show very different trajectories for future <span class="hlt">energy</span> systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based <span class="hlt">energy</span> system. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of hydrogen in the global <span class="hlt">energy</span> system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global <span class="hlt">energy</span> system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an <span class="hlt">energy</span> system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T., Hess, P. G., Collins, W. D., Emmons, L. K., Ginoux, P., Luo, C. and Tie, X. X. (2005). "Response of a coupled chemistry-climate model to changes in aerosol emissions: Global impact on the hydrological cycle and the tropospheric burdens of OH, ozone and NOx." Geophysical Research Letters 32(16). Lamarque, J.-F., Kinnison, D. E., Hess, P. G. and Vitt, F. (2008). "Simulated lower stratospheric trends between 1970 and 2005: identifying the role of climate and composition changes." Journal of Geophysical Research 113(D12301). Price, H., Jaegle, L., Rice, A., Quay, P., Novelli, P. C. and Gammon, R. (2007). "Global budget of molecular hydrogen and its deuterium content: constraints from ground station, cruise, and aircraft observations." Journal of Geophysical Research 112(D22108). Sanderson, M. G., Collins, W. J., Derwent, R. G. and Johnson, C. E. (2003). "Simulation of Global Hydrogen Levels Using a Lagrangian Three-Dimensional Model." Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 46(1): 15-28. Schultz, M. G., Diehl, T., Brasseur, G. P. and Zittel, W. (2003). "Air Pollution and Climate-Forcing Impacts of a Global Hydrogen Economy." Science 302(5645): 624-627. Tromp, T. K., Shia, R. L., Allen, M., Eiler, J. M. and Yung, Y. L. (2003). "<span class="hlt">Potential</span> environmental impact of a hydrogen economy on the stratosphere." Science 300(5626): 1740-1742. van Ruijven, B., Hari, L., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2008). "The <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of hydrogen in India and Western Europe." <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Policy 36(5): 1649-1665. van Ruijven, B., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2007). "The <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of hydrogen in <span class="hlt">energy</span> systems with and without climate policy." International Journal of Hydrogen <span class="hlt">Energy</span> 32(12): 1655-1672. van Vuuren, D. P. (2007). <span class="hlt">Energy</span> systems and climate policy. Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Faculty of Science. Utrecht, Utrecht University: 326.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JASTP.138...32W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JASTP.138...32W"><span id="translatedtitle">Derivation of gravity wave <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> density from NDMC measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wüst, Sabine; Wendt, Verena; Schmidt, Carsten; Lichtenstern, Sabrina; Bittner, Michael; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Within the Network for the Detection of Mesospheric Change, NDMC, We present an algorithm for the estimation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> density using measurements of five GRIPS instruments from 2011 to 2014 at three stations in central and one in Northern Europe. Nightly temperature variations are retrieved for periods shorter and longer than ca. 60 min applying an iterative approach of sliding means. Based on these results, monthly mean <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> density is estimated for the short and the long periods. The Brunt-Väisälä frequency, which is necessary for its calculation, is taken from TIMED-SABER and CIRA-86 data. In order to justify the combination of TIMED-SABER and GRIPS data sets, temperature time series at the different stations are compared. Depending on the periods, an annual and/or semi-annual variation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> density can be observed in most cases which agree quite well with other publications addressing the mesopause at mid-latitudes but relying on different techniques. The influence of the vertical extension of the OH*-layer and of the size of the field-of-view on the results is discussed. Finally, we show for the first time that GRIPS measurements, which take place at the same station but which are characterized through differing sizes of the fields of view, can provide additional information about the dominating horizontal wavelengths at mesopause heights.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MARL41006L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MARL41006L"><span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear momentum distribution and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface in hexagonal ice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the <span class="hlt">potential</span> acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/986540','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/986540"><span id="translatedtitle">Data Network Equipment <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Use and Savings <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in Buildings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.</p> <p>2010-06-09</p> <p>Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the <span class="hlt">energy</span> use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment <span class="hlt">energy</span> use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total <span class="hlt">energy</span> use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of <span class="hlt">energy</span> use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and <span class="hlt">energy</span> use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6414E..0DB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6414E..0DB"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> system efficiencies for MEMS vibration <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Behrens, S.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Reliable power sources are needed for portable micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices such as wireless automobile tire pressure sensors. Vibration is an ubiquitous <span class="hlt">energy</span> source that maybe 'harvested' as electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> at the site of the MEMS device. Existing vibration <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting systems use either a piezoelectric or an electromagnetic transducer to convert vibrations into electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span>. This electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> is then conditioned using a passive rectifier dc-dc converter circuit. Such vibration harvesting techniques have focused on optimising circuit efficiency and, hence, have ignored the system efficiency i.e. mechanical-to-electrical efficiency. Results obtained in the laboratory can be extrapolated to predict <span class="hlt">potential</span> system efficiencies for MEMS vibration <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting systems. Results to date, using a standard speaker as the electromagnetic transducer, have demonstrated system efficiencies of greater than 14%. Initial estimates suggest a MEMS system efficiency of more than 80% could be achieved with a high performance transducer. Research is continuing to demonstrate these higher system efficiencies with the experimental apparatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6616562','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6616562"><span id="translatedtitle">Mashreq Arab interconnected power system <span class="hlt">potential</span> for economic <span class="hlt">energy</span> trading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Al-Shehri, A.M.; El-Amin, I.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.</p> <p>1994-12-01</p> <p>The Mashreq Arab countries covered in this study are Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. A feasibility study for the interconnection of the electrical networks of the Mashreq Arab countries, sponsored by the Arab Fund, was completed in June 1992. Each country is served by one utility except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The Mashreq Arab region has a considerable mix of <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources. Egypt and Syria have some limited amounts of hydropower resources, and the Arabian Gulf region is abundant in fossil fuel reserves. Owing to the differences in <span class="hlt">energy</span> production costs, a <span class="hlt">potential</span> exists for substantial <span class="hlt">energy</span> trading between electric utilities in the region. The major objective of this project is to study the feasibility of electric <span class="hlt">energy</span> trading between the Mashreq Arab countries. The basis, assumptions, and methodologies on which this <span class="hlt">energy</span> trading study is based relate to the results and conclusions arising out of the previous study, power plant characteristics and costs, assumptions on economic parameters, rules for economy <span class="hlt">energy</span> exchange, etc. This paper presents the basis, methodology, and major findings of the study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21250328','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21250328"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the cosmological constant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Koksma, Jurjen F.; Prokopec, Tomislav</p> <p>2008-07-15</p> <p>It has been argued that the quantum (conformal) trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> could <span class="hlt">potentially</span> provide us with a dynamical explanation of the cosmological constant problem. In this paper, however, we show by means of a semiclassical analysis that the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not affect the cosmological constant. We construct the effective action of the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes consisting of local quadratic geometric curvature invariants. Counterterms are thus expected to influence the numerical value of the coefficients in the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and we must therefore allow these parameters to vary. We calculate the evolution of the Hubble parameter in quasi-de Sitter spacetime, where we restrict our Hubble parameter to vary slowly in time, and in Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes. We show dynamically that a universe consisting of matter with a constant equation of state, a cosmological constant, and the quantum trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> evolves either to the classical de Sitter attractor or to a quantum trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> driven one. When considering the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> truncated to quasi-de Sitter spacetime, we find a region in parameter space where the quantum attractor destabilizes. When considering the exact expression of the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, a stability analysis shows that whenever the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> driven attractor is stable, the classical de Sitter attractor is unstable, and vice versa. Semiclassically, the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not affect the classical late time de Sitter attractor, and hence it does not solve the cosmological constant problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70122682','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70122682"><span id="translatedtitle">Antler <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in tule elk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Gogan, Peter J.P.; Jessup, David A.; Barrett, Reginald H.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Antler <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were evident in tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) within 1 yr of reintroduction to Point Reyes, California (USA). These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are consistent with previously described mineral deficiency-induced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cervids. The elk were judged deficient in copper. Low levels of copper in soils and vegetation at the release site, exacerbated by possible protein deficiency due to poor range conditions, are postulated as likely causes of the antler <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1051195','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1051195"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Generation Costs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.</p> <p>2012-06-20</p> <p>In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to supply a significant portion of world <span class="hlt">energy</span> needs, although this <span class="hlt">potential</span> varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind <span class="hlt">potential</span> under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind <span class="hlt">potential</span> is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the <span class="hlt">potential</span> at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26772574','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26772574"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of triplet N2O2.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Varga, Zoltan; Meana-Paeda, Rubn; Song, Guoliang; Paukku, Yuliya; Truhlar, Donald G</p> <p>2016-01-14</p> <p>We present a global ground-state triplet <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for the N2O2 system that is suitable for treating high-<span class="hlt">energy</span> vibrational-rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer and collision-induced dissociation. The surface is based on multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/minimally augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta electronic structure calculations plus dynamically scaled external correlation. In the multireference calculations, the active space has 14 electrons in 12 orbitals. The calculations cover nine arrangements corresponding to dissociative diatom-diatom collisions of N2, O2, and nitric oxide (NO), the interaction of a triatomic molecule (N2O and NO2) with the fourth atom, and the interaction of a diatomic molecule with a single atom (i.e., the triatomic subsystems). The global ground-state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface was obtained by fitting the many-body interaction to 54?889 electronic structure data points with a fitting function that is a permutationally invariant polynomial in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances. PMID:26772574</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144b4310V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144b4310V"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of triplet N2O2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Varga, Zoltan; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Song, Guoliang; Paukku, Yuliya; Truhlar, Donald G.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We present a global ground-state triplet <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for the N2O2 system that is suitable for treating high-<span class="hlt">energy</span> vibrational-rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer and collision-induced dissociation. The surface is based on multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/minimally augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta electronic structure calculations plus dynamically scaled external correlation. In the multireference calculations, the active space has 14 electrons in 12 orbitals. The calculations cover nine arrangements corresponding to dissociative diatom-diatom collisions of N2, O2, and nitric oxide (NO), the interaction of a triatomic molecule (N2O and NO2) with the fourth atom, and the interaction of a diatomic molecule with a single atom (i.e., the triatomic subsystems). The global ground-state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface was obtained by fitting the many-body interaction to 54 889 electronic structure data points with a fitting function that is a permutationally invariant polynomial in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6619E..03B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6619E..03B"><span id="translatedtitle">Market <span class="hlt">potential</span> for optical fiber sensors in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> sector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bosselmann, T.</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>For a long time electric power was taken as a natural unlimited resource. With globalisation the demand for <span class="hlt">energy</span> has risen. This has brought rising prices for fossil fuels, as well as a diversification of power generation. Besides conventional fossil, nuclear plants are coming up again. Renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources are gaining importance resulting in recent boom of wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> plants. In the past reliability and availability and an extremely long lifetime were of paramount importance. Today this has been added by cost, due to the global competition and the high fuel costs. New designs of power components have increased efficiency using lesser material. Higher efficiency causes inevitably higher stress on the materials, of which the machines are built. As a reduction of lifetime is not acceptable and maintenance costs are expected to be at a minimum, condition monitoring systems are going to being used now. This offers <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for fibre optic sensor application.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17677447','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17677447"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape of an antiplasticized polymer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Riggleman, Robert A; Douglas, Jack F; de Pablo, Juan J</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>The nature of the individual transitions on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape (PEL) associated with particle motion are directly examined for model fragile glass-forming polymer melts, and the results are compared to those of an antiplasticized polymer system. In previous work, we established that the addition of antiplasticizer reduces the fragility of glass formation so that the antiplasticized material is a stronger glass former. In the present work, we find that the antiplasticizing molecules reduce the <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers for relaxation compared to the pure polymer, implying that the antiplasticized system has smaller barriers to overcome in order to explore its configuration space. We examine the cooperativity of segmental motion in these bulk fluids and find that more extensive stringlike collective motion enables the system to overcome larger <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers, in qualitative agreement with both the Stillinger-Weber and Adam-Gibbs views of glass formation. Notably, the stringlike collective motion identified by our PEL analysis corresponds to incremental displacements that occur within larger-scale stringlike particle displacement processes associated with PEL metabasin transitions that mediate structural relaxation. These "substrings" nonetheless seem to exhibit changes in relative size with antiplasticization similar to those observed in "superstrings" that arise at elevated temperatures. We also study the effects of confinement on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers in each system. Film confinement makes the <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers substantially smaller in the pure polymer, while it has little effect on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers in the antiplasticized system. This observation is qualitatively consistent with our previous studies of stringlike motion in these fluids at higher temperatures and with recent experimental measurements by Torkelson and co-workers. PMID:17677447</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NuPhA.933..272G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NuPhA.933..272G"><span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic dependence of fusion enhancement of various heavy ion systems using <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent Woods-Saxon <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gautam, Manjeet Singh</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In the present work, the fusion of symmetric and asymmetric projectile-target combinations are deeply analyzed within the framework of <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependent Woods-Saxon <span class="hlt">potential</span> model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with one dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel code CCFULL. The neutron transfer channels and the inelastic surface excitations of collision partners are dominating mode of couplings and the coupling of relative motion of colliding nuclei to such relevant internal degrees of freedom produces a significant fusion enhancement at sub-barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span>. It is quite interesting that the effects of dominant intrinsic degrees of freedom such as multi-phonon vibrational states, neutron transfer channels and proton transfer channels can be simulated by introducing the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence in the nucleus-nucleus <span class="hlt">potential</span> (EDWSP model). In the EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm, which is much larger than a value (a = 0.65 fm) extracted from the elastic scattering data, is needed to reproduce sub-barrier fusion data. However, such diffuseness <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which might be an artifact of some dynamical effects, has been resolved by trajectory fluctuation dissipation (TFD) model wherein the resulting nucleus-nucleus <span class="hlt">potential</span> possesses normal diffuseness parameter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023285&hterms=oceanic+crust&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doceanic%2Bcrust','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850023285&hterms=oceanic+crust&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doceanic%2Bcrust"><span id="translatedtitle">Continental and oceanic magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: Enhancement through GRM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>In contrast to the POGO and MAGSAT satellites, the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) satellite system will orbit at a minimum elevation to provide significantly better resolved lithospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for more detailed and improved geologic analysis. In addition, GRM will measure corresponding gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to enhance our understanding of the gravity field for vast regions of the Earth which are largely inaccessible to more conventional surface mapping. Crustal studies will greatly benefit from the dual data sets as modeling has shown that lithospheric sources of long-wavelength magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> frequently involve density variations which may produce detectable gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at satellite elevations. Furthermore, GRM will provide an important replication of lithospheric magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as an aid to identifying and extracting these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from satellite magnetic measurements. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> benefits to the study of the origin and characterization of the continents and oceans, that may result from the increased GRM resolution are examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3031181','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3031181"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathogenesis of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patients age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudsons double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.8957R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.8957R"><span id="translatedtitle">Onshore wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> over Iberia: present and future projections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the <span class="hlt">potential</span> power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that <span class="hlt">potential</span> wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power <span class="hlt">potential</span> are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSMGC43A..17S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUSMGC43A..17S"><span id="translatedtitle">GIS Assessment of Wind <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> in California and Florida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Snow, R. K.; Snow, M. M.</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Energy</span> efficiency coupled with renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies can provide most of the U.S. carbon emissions reductions needed to contain atmospheric carbon concentrations at 450-500 parts per million, considered by many to be a tipping point in mitigating climate change. Among the leaders in the alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> sector is wind power, which is now one of the largest sources of new power generation in the U.S. creating jobs and revenue for rural communities while powering our economy with an emissions-free source of <span class="hlt">energy</span>. In 2006, wind turbines capable of generating more than 2,400 megawatts of electricity were installed in the U.S. and by 2007 this number had risen to 3,000 megawatts. The U.S. generated 31 billion kilowatt-hours of wind power in 2007, which is enough electricity to power the equivalent of nearly 3 million average homes. It is estimated that generating the same amount of electricity would require burning 16 million tons of coal or 50 million barrels of oil. This study examines the wind power <span class="hlt">potential</span> of sites near populated areas in Florida and California to determine the practicability of installing wind turbines at these locations. A GIS was developed in order to conduct a spatial analysis of these sites based on mean annual wind speed measured in meters per second and wind power density ratings measured in watts per square meter. The analysis indicates that coastal areas of Cocoa Beach, Key West, Hollywood, and West Palm Beach, respectively, possess the greatest <span class="hlt">potential</span> for wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> in Florida with mean annual wind speeds of 4.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 171 w/m2 peaking at Cocoa Beach followed by wind speeds of 4.64 m/s and wind power ratings of 115 w/m2 at Key West. California wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> is even greater than that of Florida with Fairfield exhibiting mean annual wind speeds of 5.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 327 w/m2 followed by the Mojave and Palmdale areas with mean annual wind speeds of 5.0 m/s and 4.6 m/s, respectively. Wind power density ratings for Mojave are 240 w/m2 and 153 w/m2 at Palmdale. These results help confirm that wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> continues to offer a clean, cost-effective, inexhaustible, and readily available means of helping to curb global warming while answering the increasing demand for electricity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078216','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4078216"><span id="translatedtitle">A Review of Vascular <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: Genetics and Common Syndromes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may pave the way for <span class="hlt">potential</span> development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip..book..101S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009cip..book..101S"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling And Detecting <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Scada Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Svendsen, Nils; Wolthusen, Stephen</p> <p></p> <p>The detection of attacks and intrusions based on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is hampered by the limits of specificity underlying the detection techniques. However, in the case of many critical infrastructure systems, domain-specific knowledge and models can impose constraints that <span class="hlt">potentially</span> reduce error rates. At the same time, attackers can use their knowledge of system behavior to mask their manipulations, causing adverse effects to observed only after a significant period of time. This paper describes elementary statistical techniques that can be applied to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in critical infrastructure networks. A SCADA system employed in liquefied natural gas (LNG) production is used as a case study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695748','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695748"><span id="translatedtitle">Threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with weakly bound projectiles: Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Be+{sup 27}Al</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Muri, C.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.; Chamon, L.C.; Neto, R. Liguori; Added, N.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Marti, G.V.; Capurro, O.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Abriola, D.</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>Elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 9}Be on {sup 27}Al was measured at near barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span>. The optical model data analysis with the real and imaginary parts of a global double-folding <span class="hlt">potential</span> does not show strong evidence of the usual threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The same result was obtained by using a Woods-Saxon shape optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> and calculating the <span class="hlt">potential</span> strengths at the strong absorption radius. The reason for this behavior may be explained by the presence of break-up and/or transfer channels at low <span class="hlt">energies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800026193&hterms=geothermal+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528geothermal%2Benergy%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800026193&hterms=geothermal+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528geothermal%2Benergy%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the earth - A spherical harmonic approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rubincam, D. P.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic expansion agrees with the usual expression for the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic <span class="hlt">energy</span> in the crust and mantle of -2.77 x 10 to the 29th ergs, an order of magnitude below McKenzie's (1966) estimate. McKenzie's result stems from mathematical error. Our figure is almost identical with Kaula's (1963) estimate of the minimum shear strain <span class="hlt">energy</span> in the mantle, a not unexpected result on the basis of the virial theorem. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the 20th P is found by assuming that the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation of <span class="hlt">energy</span>. This number is almost six orders of magnitude below MacDonald's (1966) estimate of the viscosity and removes his objection to convection. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at 1% efficiency, then the viscosity is 10 to the 22nd P, a number preferred by Cathles (1975) and Peltier and Andrew (1976) as the viscosity of the mantle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGP23A0998F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGP23A0998F"><span id="translatedtitle">IRETHERM: Magnetotelluric studies of Irish radiothermal granites and their geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Farrell, T. F.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Feely, M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The IRETHERM project seeks to develop a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> through integrated modeling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), heat-flow (HF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is of key importance in assessing the geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Leinster granite, the Galway granite and the buried Kentstown granite. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of an early 1980's EU-funded geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 ?Wm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite. In the Galway granite batholith, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 ?Wm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Ros a Mhil borehole. The lower heat-flow encountered at the Ros a Mhil borehole suggests that the associated high heat production does not extend to great depth. The buried Kentstown granite has associated with it a significant negative Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 485 m. Heat production has been measured at 2.4 ?Wm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30m of the granite. The core of this study consists of an ambitious program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, extending over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite extend to depths of 2-5 km. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total of 29 sites, with a further 46 sites to be collected in August 2013 (of these 75 sites, 33 will consist of AMT-only data acquisition, with both MT and AMT recorded at the remaining 42). Preliminary results derived from the 29 sites recorded in 2012 show a deep resistor extending to depths of 15-20 km beneath the central block of the batholith, with the resistive body extending to depths of 3.5-7.0 km west of the Shannawona fault. MT and AMT data acquired along a profile at 22 locations over the Kentstown granite suggests that the top of this buried granite is at a depth of 380m beneath the center of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The MT and AMT data will be integrated with gravity data and seismic refraction data (in the case of the Leinster granite) to identify deeply penetrating faults, which may provide pathways for hydrothermal fluids, and to produce a robust estimation of the volumetric extent of the granites. Geochemical data will also be incorporated to ultimately constrain the local and regional thermal contribution and geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the granites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013964','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013964"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical studies of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces and computational methods.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shepard, R.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PES) involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. Most of our work focuses on general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of molecular geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5419505','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5419505"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> environmental effects of <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation measures in northwest industries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their <span class="hlt">potential</span> environmental impacts. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different <span class="hlt">energy</span> and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe <span class="hlt">potential</span> conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss <span class="hlt">potential</span> primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/924389','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/924389"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> impacts of nanotechnology on <span class="hlt">energy</span> transmission applications and needs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division</p> <p>2007-11-30</p> <p>The application of nanotechnologies to <span class="hlt">energy</span> transmission has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce <span class="hlt">potential</span> ROW impacts. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139929','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/139929"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical studies of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces and computational methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shepard, R.</p> <p>1993-12-01</p> <p>This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231863"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection and localization in crowded scenes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Weixin; Mahadevan, Vijay; Vasconcelos, Nuno</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The detection and localization of anomalous behaviors in crowded scenes is considered, and a joint detector of temporal and spatial <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is proposed. The proposed detector is based on a video representation that accounts for both appearance and dynamics, using a set of mixture of dynamic textures models. These models are used to implement 1) a center-surround discriminant saliency detector that produces spatial saliency scores, and 2) a model of normal behavior that is learned from training data and produces temporal saliency scores. Spatial and temporal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps are then defined at multiple spatial scales, by considering the scores of these operators at progressively larger regions of support. The multiscale scores act as <span class="hlt">potentials</span> of a conditional random field that guarantees global consistency of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> judgments. A data set of densely crowded pedestrian walkways is introduced and used to evaluate the proposed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector. Experiments on this and other data sets show that the latter achieves state-of-the-art <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection results. PMID:24231863</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26969232"><span id="translatedtitle">Gynecologic concerns in patients with cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Breech, Lesley</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Children with anorectal malformations (ARM) constitute a significant group within a pediatric surgery practice. It is important with female cases of anorectal malformations to consider the association of gynecologic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, especially at the time of the definitive repair. However, it is critical to consider the association of such gynecologic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> when caring for patients with a cloacal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. If not recognized, an opportunity to diagnose and treat such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be missed with the possibility of negative implications for future reproductive capacity. With the knowledge of the associated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and long-term sequelae, surgeons can provide better care for girls and important counseling for parents. Knowledge of reproductive related issues in females with cloaca allows the pediatric surgeon an opportunity both, to provide optimal surgical management in infancy, childhood, and into young adulthood and to collaborate medically and surgically with an experienced gynecologist in patients with more complex anatomic variations. Appropriate counseling for patients and families about <span class="hlt">potential</span> reproductive concerns that may develop many years after the definitive surgical repair allows preparation and planning to preserve future fertility. PMID:26969232</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19517383','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19517383"><span id="translatedtitle">Multidetector CT urography of renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trkvatan, Aysel; Oler, Tlay; Cumhur, Turhan</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in which both kidneys are fused togeher in early embyronic life, are rarely encountered. Once a fused kidney is diagnosed or suspected, further laboratory and imaging evaluation should be performed to assess the status of the kidneys and to look for treatable causes of renal pathology. The early dignosis of <span class="hlt">potential</span> complications that can accompany this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> must be made in order to prevent permanent renal damage. The advantage of multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) urography is its ability to depict the normal urinary tract anatomy, including both the renal parenchyma, and collecting structures and ureters. MDCT urography is helpful to screen for the presence of stones, hydronephrosis or masses. Additionally, it provides information about the vascular supply of the fused kidneys. Therefore, MDCT urography enables a comprehensive evaluation of patients with renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a single examination. Especially three-dimensional reformatted images can provide good delineation of congenital fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the kidney. In this study we report our experience with MDCT urography for the anatomic demonstration of renal fusion <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:19517383</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22311333','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22311333"><span id="translatedtitle">Intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard</p> <p>2014-10-28</p> <p>A six-dimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction <span class="hlt">energies</span> for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site <span class="hlt">potential</span> function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction <span class="hlt">energies</span> and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..91a4612B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..91a4612B"><span id="translatedtitle">Microscopic positive-<span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> based on the Gogny interaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and <span class="hlt">energy</span>-dependent optical <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrdinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident <span class="hlt">energies</span> up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher <span class="hlt">energies</span> are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real <span class="hlt">potential</span> for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6111358','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6111358"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation in the cement industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Garrett-Price, B.A.</p> <p>1985-02-01</p> <p>This report assesses the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation in the cement industry. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest <span class="hlt">potential</span> for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10124759','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10124759"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chang, Yan-Tyng</p> <p>1991-11-01</p> <p>A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous <span class="hlt">potential</span> surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/501526','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/501526"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessing geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in upstate New York. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hodge, D.S.</p> <p>1996-08-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best <span class="hlt">potential</span> for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/255611','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/255611"><span id="translatedtitle">NN inversion <span class="hlt">potentials</span> intermediate <span class="hlt">energy</span> proton-nucleus elastic scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Love, W.G.; Geramb, H.V. von</p> <p>1995-10-01</p> <p>Recently developed nucleon-nucleon interactions using the quantum inverse scattering method shed new fight on the off-shell properties of the internucleon effective force for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Calculations of proton elastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the 500 MeV region show that variations in off-shell contributions are determined to a great extent by the accuracy with which the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts are reproduced. The study is based on the full-folding approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> which allows a deep understanding of the interplay between on- and off-shell effects in nucleon scattering. Results and the promising extension offered by the inversion <span class="hlt">potentials</span> beyond the range of validity of the low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> internucleon forces will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JEner...7..549B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JEner...7..549B"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of market <span class="hlt">potential</span> of compressed air <span class="hlt">energy</span> storage systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boyd, D. W.; Buckley, O. E.; Clark, C. E., Jr.</p> <p>1983-12-01</p> <p>This report describes an assessment of <span class="hlt">potential</span> roles that EPRI might take to facilitate the commercial acceptance of compressed air <span class="hlt">energy</span> storage (CAES) systems. The assessment is based on (1) detailed analyses of the market <span class="hlt">potential</span> of utility storage technologies, (2) interviews with representatives of key participants in the CAES market, and (3) a decision analysis synthesizing much of the information about market and technology status. The results indicate a large <span class="hlt">potential</span> market for CAES systems if the overall business environment for utilities improves. In addition, it appears that EPRI can have a valuable incremental impact in ensuring that utilities realize the <span class="hlt">potential</span> of CAES by (1) continuing an aggressive information dissemination and technology transfer program, (2) working to ensure the success of the first United States CAES installation at Soyland Power Cooperative, (3) developing planning methods to allow utilities to evaluate CAES and other storage options more effectively and more realistically, and (4) supporting R and D to resolve residual uncertainties in first-generation CAES cost and performance characteristics. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25121</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020050253&hterms=new+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Benergy','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020050253&hterms=new+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dnew%2Benergy"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10187192','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10187192"><span id="translatedtitle">Domestic refrigeration appliances in Poland: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for improving <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Meyers, S.; Schipper, L.; Lebot, B.</p> <p>1993-08-01</p> <p>This report is based on information collected from the main Polish manufacturer of refrigeration appliances. We describe their production facilities, and show that the <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption of their models for domestic sale is substantially higher than the average for similar models made in W. Europe. Lack of data and uncertainty about future production costs in Poland limits our evaluation of the cost-effective <span class="hlt">potential</span> to increase <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency, but it appears likely that considerable improvement would be economic from a societal perspective. Many design options are likely to have a simple payback of less than five years. We found that the production facilities are in need of substantial modernization in order to produce higher quality and more efficient appliances. We discuss policy options that could help to build a market for more efficient appliances in Poland and thereby encourage investment to produce such equipment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AIPC..135..368R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AIPC..135..368R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings in old and new auto engines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reitz, John R.</p> <p>1985-11-01</p> <p>This paper disucsses the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings in the transportation sector through the use of both improved and entirely new automotive engines. Although spark-ignition and diesel internal combustion engines will remain the dominant choices for passenger-car use throughout the rest of this century, improved versions of these engines (lean-burn, low-friction spark-ignition and adiabatic, low-friction diesel engines) could, in the long term, provide a 20-30 percent improvement in fuel economy over what is currently available. The use of new materials, and modifications to both vehicle structure and vehicle transmissions may yield further improvements. Over a longer time frame, the introduction of the high-temperature gas-turbine engine and the use of new synfuels may provide further opportunities for <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22416002','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22416002"><span id="translatedtitle">Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu</p> <p>2015-01-21</p> <p>Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and <span class="hlt">energies</span> is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JEMat..41.1115A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JEMat..41.1115A"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Permeable Segmented Thermoelements in Cooling Mode</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anatychuk, L. I.; Cherkez, R. G.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we study a thermoelement used to cool liquid or gas fluxes that pass through legs consisting of permeable segments of thermoelectric materials connected in series. Methods for theoretical calculations and optimization of the thermoelement's <span class="hlt">energy</span> characteristics are presented based on mathematical optimal control theory and computer design techniques. Computer design results are presented for the case when segmented materials based on Bi2Te3 are employed in the legs. The effect of the number of segments, contact resistance, and structural and thermophysical parameters on the thermoelement's <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> is studied under optimal conditions of electric current and air pumping velocity. The results demonstrate the existence of optimal operating conditions for which the coefficient of performance is increased by 10% to 30% and the specific cooling capacity by 10% to 20%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.345....1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.345....1M"><span id="translatedtitle">Tsunami earthquake generation by the release of gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McKenzie, Dan; Jackson, James</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Earthquakes that generate large tsunamis share a number of unusual features. They commonly have long source-time functions, involve large displacements, of 10 m or more, of the prisms of poorly consolidated sediment that form the accretionary wedge, and have many aftershocks with normal faulting mechanisms on the landward side of the trench. These features are not easily understood if the only source of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> involved is the stored elastic strain. The observations, especially those from the Tohoku, Japan, 2011 earthquake, instead suggest that the observed behaviour results from the release of gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, as well as elastic strain. A simple model of this process can account for these and other observations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhRvE..64c6703C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhRvE..64c6703C"><span id="translatedtitle">Taboo search by successive confinement: Surveying a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chekmarev, Sergei F.</p> <p>2001-09-01</p> <p>A taboo search for minima on a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcSpA.153..741C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcSpA.153..741C"><span id="translatedtitle">Terahertz absorption spectra and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution of liquid crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CMaPh.tmp...26B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CMaPh.tmp...26B"><span id="translatedtitle">Freezing of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> of a Soliton in an External <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bambusi, D.; Maspero, A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this paper we study the dynamics of a soliton in the generalized NLS with a small external <span class="hlt">potential</span> ɛV of Schwartz class. We prove that there exists an effective mechanical system describing the dynamics of the soliton and that, for any positive integer r, the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of such a mechanical system is almost conserved up to times of order ɛ -r . In the rotational invariant case we deduce that the true orbit of the soliton remains close to the mechanical one up to times of order ɛ -r .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26476072','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26476072"><span id="translatedtitle">Terahertz absorption spectra and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution of liquid crystals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng</p> <p>2016-01-15</p> <p>In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26588954','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26588954"><span id="translatedtitle">Constrained Broyden Dimer Method with Bias <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Exploring <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface of Multistep Reaction Process.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan</p> <p>2012-07-10</p> <p>To predict the chemical activity of new matter is an ultimate goal in chemistry. The identification of reaction pathways using modern quantum mechanics calculations, however, often requires a high demand in computational power and good chemical intuition on the reaction. Here, a new reaction path searching method is developed by combining our recently developed transition state (TS) location method, namely, the constrained Broyden dimer method, with a basin-filling method via bias <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, which allows the system to walk out from the <span class="hlt">energy</span> traps at a given reaction direction. In the new method, the reaction path searching starts from an initial state without the need for preguessing the TS-like or final state structure and can proceed iteratively to the final state by locating all related TSs and intermediates. In each elementary reaction step, a reaction direction, such as a bond breaking, needs to be specified, the information of which is refined and preserved as a normal mode through biased dimer rotation. The method is tested successfully on the Baker reaction system (50 elementary reactions) with good efficiency and stability and is also applied to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface exploration of multistep reaction processes in the gas phase and on the surface. The new method can be applied for the computational screening of new catalytic materials with a minimum requirement of chemical intuition. PMID:26588954</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5557810','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5557810"><span id="translatedtitle">Physicochemical isotope <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Esat, T.M.</p> <p>1988-06-01</p> <p>Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/885869','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/885869"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency and Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> in North Carolina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hadley, SW</p> <p>2003-08-06</p> <p>As many states have restructured their electric power industry, they have established a ''systems benefit charge'' to help fund those activities that will no longer be funded by utilities in the new structure. Examples include weatherization of low-income housing, efficiency programs, and renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> development. Varying amounts have been collected and allocated depending on state needs and abilities. One question that arises is what are the <span class="hlt">potential</span> results of funding the different types of programs. What is the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency or for renewable power, and what would be accomplished given the amount of funding that the system benefit charge may provide? The purpose of this project is to provide an initial estimate of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency and renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> in North Carolina. This <span class="hlt">potential</span> could be funded by a public benefits fund resulting from a green power program being considered in the state. It concentrates on electric <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings and production. Savings in buildings can include improvements to space conditioning as well as improvements to lighting or other appliances. Distributed power <span class="hlt">potential</span>, through use of combined heat and power and renewables such as photovoltaic, wind, and biomass were examined. The goal is to provide information to decision makers who are developing a green power program in North Carolina. It will not be a complete and detailed study of all efficiency <span class="hlt">potentials</span> but is more of a scoping exercise to determine the relative impacts and begin the process for a more definitive study at a later date. Statewide <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> cannot be directly measured but must be calculated. First, the word ''<span class="hlt">potential</span>'' means that the savings have not occurred yet. Second, the savings are often only indirectly measured by estimating what <span class="hlt">energy</span> use there would have been without the changes in technology or behavior. Calculations through sampling and statistical analysis or by simulation are a necessary part of any mechanism to determine <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span>. There are currently several methods for calculating savings. Extrapolation of savings achieved from specific programs, surveys of existing building stock or <span class="hlt">energy</span>-using activities, computer calculations of representative building types, and economic simulations all provide insight into the amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> that could be saved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18517937','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18517937"><span id="translatedtitle">Hypercharged <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dermsek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio alpha between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or = |alpha| < or = 0.25 and m(3/2) > or = 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario. PMID:18517937</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhRvL.100m1804D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhRvL.100m1804D"><span id="translatedtitle">Hypercharged <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Mediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dermek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio ? between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05?|?|?0.25 and m3/2?35TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........70Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........70Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Shockwave <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zaide, Daniel Wei-Ming</p> <p></p> <p>The reliable simulation of shockwaves is critical in the prediction and study of many phenomena, where abrupt changes in material properties due to shockwaves can greatly affect regions of interest and activate physical mechanisms. When a physical shockwave is formed, it moves through the flow with a certain speed, having some finite width determined by physical dissipation until it encounters some event in its path. For numerical shockwaves, however, a numerical width is enforced, often much greater than the physical width. With this numerical width comes the formation of intermediate states having no direct physical interpretation. Even as the mesh is refined, these intermediate states do not go away; they simply occupy less space. The existence of intermediate states does raise some doubt, however, about how closely a captured shockwave may emulate an ideal discontinuous shockwave, or a real physical one. There are in fact several types of error associated with intermediate shock states such as errors in shock position, spurious waves, or unstable shock behavior. These errors can be classified as numerical shockwave <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; they are numerical artifacts formed due to the presence of captured shockwaves within the flow solution. Each numerical shockwave <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is directly related to the nonlinearity of the jump conditions and to a resulting ambiguity in sub-cell shock position in a stationary shock. Two new flux functions are developed that do not have this ambiguity. On all of the shock <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in one-dimension, both flux functions show improvement on existing methods without smearing or diffusing the shock. They are also shown to perform adequately within a second-order framework and on two-dimensional problems, important for the practicality of the method. While they are still susceptible to many of the problems that occur in Roe's Riemann solver and several other known issues, these methods serve to validate the philosophy and approach taken in this thesis: by enforcing a linear shock structure and unambiguous sub-cell shock position, numerical shockwave <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are dramatically reduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Sci...255..690L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Sci...255..690L"><span id="translatedtitle">When do <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> begin?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lightman, Alan; Gingerich, Owen</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>The present historical and methodological consideration of scientific <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> notes that some of these are recognized as such, after long neglect, only after the emergence of compelling explanations for their presence in the given theory in view of an alternative conceptual framework. These cases of 'retrorecognition' are indicative not merely of a significant characteristic of the process of conceptual development and scientific discovery, but of the bases for such process in human psychology. Attention is given to the illustrative cases of the 'flatness problem' in big bang theory, the perigee-opposition problem in Ptolemaic astronomy, the continental-fit problem in geology, and the equality of inertial and gravitational mass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020035539&hterms=water+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dwater%2Benergy','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020035539&hterms=water+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dwater%2Benergy"><span id="translatedtitle">An Ab Initio Based <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface for Water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Partridge, Harry; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>We report a new determination of the water <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface. A high quality ab initio <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) and dipole moment function of water have been computed. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base. The adjustment is small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Of the 27,245 assigned transitions in the HITRAN 92 data base for H2(O-16), the overall root mean square (rms) deviation between the computed and observed line positions is 0.125/cm. However the deviations do not correspond to a normal distribution: 69% of the lines have errors less than 0.05/cm. Overall, the agreement between the line intensities computed in the present work and those contained in the data base is quite good, however there are a significant number of line strengths which differ greatly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27C3201R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27C3201R"><span id="translatedtitle">Computer simulations of glasses: the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Raza, Zamaan; Alling, Bjrn; Abrikosov, Igor A.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>We review the current state of research on glasses, discussing the theoretical background and computational models employed to describe them. This article focuses on the use of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape (PEL) paradigm to account for the phenomenology of glassy systems, and the way in which it can be applied in simulations and the interpretation of their results. This article provides a broad overview of the rich phenomenology of glasses, followed by a summary of the theoretical frameworks developed to describe this phenomonology. We discuss the background of the PEL in detail, the onerous task of how to generate computer models of glasses, various methods of analysing numerical simulations, and the literature on the most commonly used model systems. Finally, we tackle the problem of how to distinguish a good glass former from a good crystal former from an analysis of the PEL. In summarising the state of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape picture, we develop the foundations for new theoretical methods that allow the ab initio prediction of the glass-forming ability of new materials by analysis of the PEL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..93a2608J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..93a2608J"><span id="translatedtitle">Colloidal particles driven across periodic optical-<span class="hlt">potential-energy</span> landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Juniper, Michael P. N.; Straube, Arthur V.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Dullens, Roel P. A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We study the motion of colloidal particles driven by a constant force over a periodic optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape. First, the average particle velocity is found as a function of the driving velocity and the wavelength of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape. The relationship between average particle velocity and driving velocity is found to be well described by a theoretical model treating the landscape as sinusoidal, but only at small trap spacings. At larger trap spacings, a nonsinusoidal model for the landscape must be used. Subsequently, the critical velocity required for a particle to move across the landscape is determined as a function of the wavelength of the landscape. Finally, the velocity of a particle driven at a velocity far exceeding the critical driving velocity is examined. Both of these results are again well described by the two theoretical routes for small and large trap spacings, respectively. Brownian motion is found to have a significant effect on the critical driving velocity but a negligible effect when the driving velocity is high.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9064E..1ED','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9064E..1ED"><span id="translatedtitle">Reliable prediction of micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from macro-observables</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Das, Sonjoy; Chakravarty, Sourish</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A stochastic multi-scale based approach is presented in this work to detect signatures of micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from macrolevel response variables. By micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we primarily refer to micro-cracks of size 10-100 ?m (depending on the material), while macro-level response variables imply, e.g., strains, strain <span class="hlt">energy</span> density of macro-level structures (typical size often varying in the order of 10-100 m). The micro-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span> referred above are not discernible to the naked eyes. Nevertheless, they can cause catastrophic failures of structural systems due to fatigue cyclic loading that results in initiation of fatigue cracks. Analysis of such precursory state of internal damage evolution, before amacro-crack visibly appears (say, size of a few cms), is beyond the scope of the conventional crack propagation analysis, e.g., classical fracture mechanics. The present work addresses this issue in a certain sense by incorporating the effects of micro-cracks into the macro-scale constitutive material properties (e.g., constitutive elasticity tensors) within a probabilistic formalism based on random matrix theory, maximum entropy principle, and principles of minimum complementary <span class="hlt">energy</span> and minimum <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Distinct differences are observed in the macro-level response characteristics depending on the presence or absence of micro-cracks. This particular feature can now be used to reliably detect micro-cracks from experimental measurements of macro-observables. The present work, therefore, further proposes an efficient and robust optimization scheme: (1) to identify locations of micro-cracks in macroscopic structural systems, say, in an aircraft wing which is of the size of 10- 100 m, and (2) to determine the weakened (due to the presence of micro-cracks) macroscopic material properties which will be useful in predicting the remaining useful life of structural systems. The proposed optimization scheme achieves better convergence rate and accuracy by exploiting positive-definite structure of the macroscopic constitutive matrices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987JGR....92.8401Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987JGR....92.8401Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Relationships between available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and extratropical cyclone activity within East Coast cyclogenetic regions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zapotocny, John V.</p> <p>1987-07-01</p> <p>Interrelationships between the available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> associated with extratropical cyclones are examined for portions of the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) year. The study is confined to the cyclogenetically active regions encompassing the eastern coasts of Asia and North America. Calculations of vertically integrated available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> (APE) and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> (KE) are done for an active winter storm period (February 14-28, 1979) and a relatively inactive summer period (July 1-15, 1979) using gridded isentropic data produced from the FGGE Level IIIa set of global analyses. During both the winter and summer study periods, good agreement is indicated between cyclone tracks and the spatial distributions of time mean and standard deviations of vertically integrated APE and KE. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> distributions composited for rapidly strengthening and weakening storms show the patterns of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> and kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> which are associated with cyclones in these stages of development. The rapidly intensifying storms are accompanied by strong gradients in APE equatorward of the surface cyclone with maximum KE to the south and southwest of the storm center. Smaller values of kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> and weaker gradients of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> accompany the rapidly decaying storms. An examination of twice daily distributions of APE and KE for 29 individual cyclones reveals that a similar temporal evolution of vertically integrated <span class="hlt">energy</span> patterns accompanies storms in these east coast regions. An example of this evolution is presented in conjunction with a case analysis of the February 1979 Presidents' Day cyclone along the east coast of North America.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997CP....215...77L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997CP....215...77L"><span id="translatedtitle">Structures and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of faujasitic zeolite/water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Limtrakul, Jumras; Treesukol, Piti; Ebner, Christoph; Sansone, Roland; Probst, Michael</p> <p>1997-02-01</p> <p>The structures and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of the system faujasitic zeolite/water have been investigated by Hartree-Fock, second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) and by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations, using five basis sets 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(d,p). The DFT calculations employ the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functional, and, for comparisons, the local density approximation with the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair (VWN) functional. The B3LYP approach is found to yield better agreement with the corresponding experimental results than the VWM and BLYP functionals. The B3LYP amd MP2 levels of theory yield basically the same results. Results of B3LYP with a 6-311 + G(3df,2p) basis set are also very close to those of the very accurate coupled pair functional (CPF) method. Also proton affinities (PA) computed by B3LYP reproduce the corresponding CPF and G1 results very well. The predicted PA of faujasitic catalyst is estimated to be 294 3 kcal/mol, which is in the range of the experimentally determined value of 291-300 kcal/mol. The interaction of faujasite catalyst with water has revealed that the structures can be stabilized by the formation of two hydrogen bonds with water molecules adsorbed at the bridging hydroxyl groups which can act either as a proton acceptor or as a proton donor. Comparison of the faujasite complexes with silanol and hydrogen halides has demonstrated that the faujasitic zeolite is a strong acid. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces of faujasite zeolite/water has been investigated and analytical interaction <span class="hlt">potentials</span> have been derived.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227956','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227956"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Development to Benefit Restoration of the Salton Sea. Analysis of Technical and Market <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gagne, Douglas; Haase, Scott; Oakleaf, Brett; Hurlbut, David; Akar, Sertac; Wall, Anna; Turchi, Craig; Pienkos, Philip; Melius, Jennifer; Melaina, Marc</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This report summarizes the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> development in the Salton Sea region, as well as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for revenues from this development to contribute financially to Salton Sea restoration costs. It considers solar, geothermal, biofuels or nutraceutical production from algae pond cultivation, desalination using renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids. <br/> <br/> <br/></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26929876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26929876"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> without Hydrocephalus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>VACTERL (vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) is an association of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-in the absence of hydrocephalus. PMID:26929876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4737631','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4737631"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonate with VACTERL Association and a Branchial Arch <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> without Hydrocephalus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Velazquez, Danitza; Pereira, Elaine; Havranek, Thomas</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>VACTERL (vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, anal atresia, cardiac defect, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, limb <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>) is an association of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a wide spectrum of phenotypic expression. While the majority of cases are sporadic, there is evidence of an inherited component in a small number of patients as well as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> influence of nongenetic risk factors (maternal diabetes mellitus). Presence of hydrocephalus has been reported in VACTERL patients (VACTERL-H) in the past, with some displaying branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We report the unique case of an infant of diabetic mother with VACTERL association and a branchial arch <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>in the absence of hydrocephalus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4716..128K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4716..128K"><span id="translatedtitle">Automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection processor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kraiman, James B.; Arouh, Scott L.; Webb, Michael L.</p> <p>2002-07-01</p> <p>Robust exploitation of tracking and surveillance data will provide an early warning and cueing capability for military and civilian Law Enforcement Agency operations. This will improve dynamic tasking of limited resources and hence operational efficiency. The challenge is to rapidly identify threat activity within a huge background of noncombatant traffic. We discuss development of an Automated <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Processor (AADP) that exploits multi-INT, multi-sensor tracking and surveillance data to rapidly identify and characterize events and/or objects of military interest, without requiring operators to specify threat behaviors or templates. The AADP has successfully detected an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in traffic patterns in Los Angeles, analyzed ship track data collected during a Fleet Battle Experiment to detect simulated mine laying behavior amongst maritime noncombatants, and is currently under development for surface vessel tracking within the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service to support port security, ship inspection, and harbor traffic control missions, and to monitor medical surveillance databases for early alert of a bioterrorist attack. The AADP can also be integrated into combat simulations to enhance model fidelity of multi-sensor fusion effects in military operations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..861.1147S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..861.1147S"><span id="translatedtitle">Einstein, Entropy and <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric</p> <p>2006-11-01</p> <p>This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19393309','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19393309"><span id="translatedtitle">Cadmium tolerance and accumulation in eight <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shi, Gangrong; Cai, Qingsheng</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The production of <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops that can be used for biodiesel production is a sustainable approach for the removal of metal pollutants by phytoremediation. This study investigated the cadmium (Cd) accumulation and tolerance of eight <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops. After growth for 28 days in substrates containing 0, 50, 100 or 200 mg Cd x kg(-1), seedlings were evaluated for growth parameters, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and Cd accumulation. All eight crops were moderately tolerant to Cd toxicity, with four [i.e., hemp (Cannabis sativa), flax (Linum usitatissimum), castor (Ricinus communis) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea)] being more tolerant than the others. Three of these crops (hemp, flax and peanut) had higher Cd accumulation capacities. The roots of peanut and hemp had high bioconcentration factors (BCF>1000), while flax shoots accumulated a higher concentration of Cd (>100 mg/kg). These results demonstrate that it is possible to grow <span class="hlt">energy</span> crops on Cd-contaminated soil. Hemp, flax and peanut are excellent candidates for phytoremediation. PMID:19393309</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014isms.confERD03P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014isms.confERD03P"><span id="translatedtitle">Calculating <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Curves with Quantum Monte Carlo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Powell, Andrew D.; Dawes, Richard</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is a computational technique that can be applied to the electronic Schrdinger equation for molecules. QMC methods such as Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) have demonstrated the capability of capturing large fractions of the correlation <span class="hlt">energy</span>, thus suggesting their possible use for high-accuracy quantum chemistry calculations. QMC methods scale particularly well with respect to parallelization making them an attractive consideration in anticipation of next-generation computing architectures which will involve massive parallelization with millions of cores. Due to the statistical nature of the approach, in contrast to standard quantum chemistry methods, uncertainties (error-bars) are associated with each calculated <span class="hlt">energy</span>. This study focuses on the cost, feasibility and practical application of calculating <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curves for small molecules with QMC methods. Trial wave functions were constructed with the multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method from GAMESS-US.[1] The CASINO Monte Carlo quantum chemistry package [2] was used for all of the DMC calculations. An overview of our progress in this direction will be given. References: M. W. Schmidt et al. J. Comput. Chem. 14, 1347 (1993). R. J. Needs et al. J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 22, 023201 (2010).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770020703','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770020703"><span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the earth: A spherical harmonic approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rubincam, D. P.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic equation agrees with the usual expression for the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic <span class="hlt">energy</span> in the mantle and crust of -2.77 x 10 to the twenty-ninth power ergs, an order of magnitude. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the twentieth power poises is found by assuming the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at one per cent efficiency, then the viscosity is ten to the twenty second power poises, a number preferred by some as the viscosity of the mantle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatCC...4..684B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatCC...4..684B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> contribution of wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> to climate change mitigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>It is still possible to limit greenhouse gas emissions to avoid the 2 C warming threshold for dangerous climate change. Here we explore the <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of expanded wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> deployment in climate change mitigation efforts. At present, most turbines are located in extra-tropical Asia, Europe and North America, where climate projections indicate continuity of the abundant wind resource during this century. Scenarios from international agencies indicate that this virtually carbon-free source could supply 10-31% of electricity worldwide by 2050 (refs , ). Using these projections within Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) climate forcing scenarios, we show that dependent on the precise RCP followed, pursuing a moderate wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> deployment plan by 2050 delays crossing the 2 C warming threshold by 1-6 years. Using more aggressive wind turbine deployment strategies delays 2 C warming by 3-10 years, or in the case of RCP4.5 avoids passing this threshold altogether. To maximize these climate benefits, deployment of non-fossil electricity generation must be coupled with reduced <span class="hlt">energy</span> use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/789187','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/789187"><span id="translatedtitle">Steam systems in industry: <span class="hlt">Energy</span> use and <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency improvement <span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Einstein, Dan; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta</p> <p>2001-07-22</p> <p>Steam systems are a part of almost every major industrial process today. Thirty-seven percent of the fossil fuel burned in US industry is burned to produce steam. In this paper we will establish baseline <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption for steam systems. Based on a detailed analysis of boiler <span class="hlt">energy</span> use we estimate current <span class="hlt">energy</span> use in boilers in U.S. industry at 6.1 Quads (6.4 EJ), emitting almost 66 MtC in CO{sub 2} emissions. We will discuss fuels used and boiler size distribution. We also describe <span class="hlt">potential</span> savings measures, and estimate the economic <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings <span class="hlt">potential</span> in U.S. industry (i.e. having payback period of 3 years or less). We estimate the nationwide economic <span class="hlt">potential</span>, based on the evaluation of 16 individual measures in steam generation and distribution. The analysis excludes the efficient use of steam and increased heat recovery. Based on the analysis we estimate the economic <span class="hlt">potential</span> at 18-20% of total boiler <span class="hlt">energy</span> use, resulting in <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings approximately 1120-1190 TBtu ( 1180-1260 PJ). This results in a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions equivalent to 12-13 MtC.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820028335&hterms=1095&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231095','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820028335&hterms=1095&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231095"><span id="translatedtitle">A satellite investigation of <span class="hlt">energy</span> flux and inferred <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop in auroral electron <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The relationship between auroral electron <span class="hlt">energy</span> flux and the inferred accelerating <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop for accelerated Maxwellian distributions is investigated on the basis of Atmospheric Explorer D spectral measurements. An analytical approximation for the total downward <span class="hlt">energy</span> flux carried by an isotropic Maxwellian electron population accelerated by a field-aligned electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop is derived which is valid for values of the electron <span class="hlt">energy</span>/characteristic accelerated Maxwellian distribution <span class="hlt">energy</span> which are less than the difference between the ratio of the magnetic field strengths at the altitude of observation and the altitude of <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop, and unity. Data from the Low <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Electron Experiment on board AE D obtained on both the dayside and the nightside during periods of significant inverted-V type electron precipitation shows that the 455 <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectra considered, 160 of them, obtained between 60 and 85 deg invariant latitude, could be fit to accelerated Maxwellian distributions. The 160 Maxwellian spectra are then shown to be in agreement with the predictions of the accelerated Maxwellian model. Finally, analysis of individual spectra suggests that the altitude of the inferred <span class="hlt">potential</span> drop is at a maximum near the center of the inverted-V structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1123477','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1123477"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (<span class="hlt">Energy</span>-SMARRT): Surface/Near Surface Indication - Characterization of Surface <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> from Magnetic Particle and Liquid Penetrant Indications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Griffin, John</p> <p>2014-02-20</p> <p>The systematic study and characterization of surface indications has never been conducted. Producers and users of castings do not have any data on which they can reliably communicate the nature of these indications or their effect on the performance of parts. Clearly, the ultimate intent of any work in this area is to eliminate indications that do in fact degrade properties. However, it may be impractical physically and/or financially to eliminate all surface imperfections. This project focused on the ones that actually degrade properties. The initial work was to identify those that degrade properties. Accurate numerical simulations of casting service performance allow designers to use the geometric flexibility of castings and the superior properties of steel to produce lighter weight and more <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficient components for transportation systems (cars and trucks), construction, and mining. Accurate simulations increase the net melting <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency by improving casting yield and reducing rework and scrap. Conservatively assuming a 10% improvement in yield, approximately 1.33 x 1012 BTU/year can be saved with this technology. In addition, CO2 emissions will be reduced by approximately 117,050 tons per year.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21507625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21507625"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> life cycle assessment of rice straw bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> derived from <span class="hlt">potential</span> gasification technologies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shie, Je-Lueng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Ci-Syuan; Shaw, Dai-Gee; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Ma, Hsiao-Kan</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net <span class="hlt">energy</span> gain and be capable of being produced in large quantities without reducing food supplies. Amounts of agricultural waste are produced and require treatment, with rice straw contributing the greatest source of such <span class="hlt">potential</span> bio-fuel in Taiwan. Through life-cycle accounting, several <span class="hlt">energy</span> indicators and four <span class="hlt">potential</span> gasification technologies (PGT) were evaluated. The input <span class="hlt">energy</span> steps for the <span class="hlt">energy</span> life cycle assessment (ELCA) include collection, generator, torrefaction, crushing, briquetting, transportation, <span class="hlt">energy</span> production, condensation, air pollution control and distribution of biofuels to the point of end use. Every PGT has a positive <span class="hlt">energy</span> benefit. The input of <span class="hlt">energy</span> required for the transportation and pre-treatment are major steps in the ELCA. On-site briquetting of refused-derived fuel (RDF) provides an alternative means of reducing transportation <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements. Bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> sources, such as waste rice straw, provide an ideal material for the bio-fuel plant. PMID:21507625</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10121034','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10121034"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of the US Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> interim commercial building standards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.</p> <p>1993-12-01</p> <p>This report describes a project conducted to demonstrate the whole-building <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> achievable from full implementation of the US Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (DOE) Interim <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Conservation Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings. DOE`s development and implementation of <span class="hlt">energy</span> performance standards for commercial buildings were established by the <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Conservation Standards for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, Public Law (PL) 94-385, 42 USC 6831 et seq., hereinafter referred to as the Act. In accordance with the Act, DOE was to establish performance standards for both federal and private sector buildings ``to achieve the maximum practicable improvements in <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency and use of non-depletable resources for all new buildings``.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...619...54J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CPL...619...54J"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular spinless <span class="hlt">energies</span> of the modified Rosen-Morse <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> model in higher spatial dimensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jia, Chun-Sheng; Dai, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Guang-Dong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We solve the Klein-Gordon equation with the modified Rosen-Morse <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> model in D spatial dimensions. The bound state <span class="hlt">energy</span> equation has been obtained by using the supersymmetric WKB approximation approach. We find that the inter-dimensional degeneracy symmetry exists for the molecular system represented by the modified Rosen-Morse <span class="hlt">potential</span>. For fixed vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, the relativistic <span class="hlt">energies</span> for the 61?u state of the 7Li2 molecule and the X3? state of the SiC radical increase as D increases. We observe that the behavior of the relativistic vibrational <span class="hlt">energies</span> in higher dimensions remains similar to that of the three-dimensional system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21068019','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21068019"><span id="translatedtitle">Threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Garcia, A. R.; Padron, I.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lacerda, T.; Garcia, V. N.</p> <p>2007-12-15</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> for the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi at near and subbarrier <span class="hlt">energies</span> is studied. Elastic angular distributions and the reaction cross section were simultaneously fitted by performing some modifications in the ECIS code. A phenomenological optical model <span class="hlt">potential</span> with the Woods-Saxon form was used. There are signatures that the so-called breakup threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (BTA) is present in this system having a halo projectile {sup 6}He, as it had been found earlier for systems involving stable weakly bound nuclei.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26722874','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26722874"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved DFT <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces via Improved Densities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Min-Cheol; Park, Hansol; Son, Suyeon; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Density-corrected DFT is a method that cures several failures of self-consistent semilocal DFT calculations by using a more accurate density instead. A novel procedure employs the Hartree-Fock density to bonds that are more severely stretched than ever before. This substantially increases the range of accurate <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces obtainable from semilocal DFT for many heteronuclear molecules. We show that this works for both neutral and charged molecules. We explain why and explore more difficult cases, for example, CH(+), where density-corrected DFT results are even better than sophisticated methods like CCSD. We give a simple criterion for when DC-DFT should be more accurate than self-consistent DFT that can be applied for most cases. PMID:26722874</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/925348','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/925348"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment</p> <p>2007-04-20</p> <p>This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23896436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23896436"><span id="translatedtitle">French Brittany macroalgae screening: composition and methane <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">potential</span> alternative sources of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jard, G; Marfaing, H; Carrère, H; Delgenes, J P; Steyer, J P; Dumas, C</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Macroalgae are biomass resources that represent a valuable feedstock to be used entirely for human consumption or for food additives after some extractions (mainly colloids) and/or for <span class="hlt">energy</span> production. In order to better develop the algal sector, it is important to determine the capacity of macroalgae to produce these added-values molecules for food and/or for <span class="hlt">energy</span> industries on the basis of their biochemical characteristics. In this study, ten macroalgae obtained from French Brittany coasts (France) were selected. The global biochemical composition (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, fibers), the presence and characteristics of added-values molecules (alginates, polyphenols) and the biochemical methane <span class="hlt">potential</span> of these algae were determined. Regarding its biochemical composition, Palmaria palmata is interesting for food (rich in nutrients) and for anaerobic digestion (0.279 LCH4/gVS). Saccharina latissima could be used for alginate extraction (242 g/kgTS, ratio between mannuronic and guluronic acid M/G=1.4) and Sargassum muticum for polyphenol extraction (19.8 g/kgTS). PMID:23896436</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGeo....4....3C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGeo....4....3C"><span id="translatedtitle">Heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and their interpretation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chapman, David S.; Rybach, Ladislaus</p> <p>1985-12-01</p> <p>More than 10,000 heat flow determinations exist for the earth and the data set is growing steadily at about 450 observations per year. If heat flow is considered as a surface expression of geothermal processes at depth, the analysis of the data set should reveal properties of those thermal processes. They do, but on a variety of scales. For this review heat flow maps are classified by 4 different horizontal scales of 10 n km (n = 1, 2, 3 and 4) and attention is focussed on the interpretation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which appear with characteristic dimensions of 10 (n - 1) km in the respective representations. The largest scale of 10 4 km encompasses heat flow on a global scale. Global heat loss is 4 10 13 W and the process of sea floor spreading is the principal agent in delivering much of this heat to the surface. Correspondingly, active ocean ridge systems produce the most prominent heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at this scale with characteristic widths of 10 3 km. Shields, with similar dimensions, exhibit negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The scale of 10 3 km includes continent wide displays. Heat flow patterns at this scale mimic tectonic units which have dimensions of a few times 10 2 km, although the thermal boundaries between these units are sometimes sharp. Heat flow <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at this scale also result from plate tectonic processes, and are associated with arc volcanism, back arc basins, hot spot traces, and continental rifting. There are major controversies about the extent to which these surface thermal provinces reflect upper mantle thermal conditions, and also about the origin and evolution of the thermal state of continental lithosphere. Beginning with map dimensions of 10 2 km thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of scale 10 1 km, which have a definite crustal origin, become apparent. The origin may be tectonic, geologic, or hydrologic. Ten kilometers is a common wavelength of topographic relief which drives many groundwater flow systems producing thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The largest recognized continental geothermal systems have thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 10 1 km wide and are capable of producing hundreds of megawatts of thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The smallest scale addressed in this paper is 10 1 km. Worldwide interest in exploiting geothermal systems has been responsible for a recent accumulation of heat flow data on the smallest of scales considered here. The exploration nature of the surveys involve 10's of drillholes and reveal thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> having widths of 10 0 km. These are almost certainly connected to surface and subsurface fluid discharge systems which, in spite of their restricted size, are typically delivering 10 MW of heat to the near surface environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590274"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26277452','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26277452"><span id="translatedtitle">Rare Upper Airway <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938256','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938256"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics of lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Lymphatic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM13A2332S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSM13A2332S"><span id="translatedtitle">Structure of Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Hot Flow <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> (HFAs) were first discovered in 1980s. These are active processes of hot plasma bulks formation that usually occur at planetary bow shocks. Though HFA were studied for long time it is still not clear if they are reforming structures and what defines particular internal structure of HFA. Our study is based on the Interball Tail Probe data. We used 10-sec measurements of complex plasma analyzer SCA-1 and 1-second magnetic field measurements, and ELECTRON spectrometer 2-dimensional measurements with 3,75-sec temporal resolution. Five <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that were observed on the basis of well resolved structure for which we obtained displacement velocity along bow shock, flow velocities within HFA, and estimated the size. We checked if main criteria of HFA formation were fulfilled for each case. The following criteria were satisfied: motional electric field direction was directed toward current sheet at least at one side of it, bow shock was quasi-perpendicular at least at one side of HFA, and angle between current sheet normal and solar wind velocity was large. Convection velocities of plasma within HFA were calculated by subtracting average velocity from measured ion convection velocities along spacecraft trajectory through <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These convection velocities viewed in coordinate system of shock normal and calculated IMF current sheet normal clearly show separation of HFA region in 3 parts: leading part, narrow central part, and trailing part. Ion velocity distributions confirm this triple structure of HFA. Thomsen et al. [1986] identified the region within HFA that they called "internal recovery". It looks like central region that we call narrow central part. Vaisberg et al. [1999] discussed separation of HFA into 2 distinct parts that correspond to leading and trailing parts. Judging from plasma convection pattern within HFAs we assumed that "internal recovery" region is the source of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and momentum around interplanetary current sheet crossing. HFA formation mechanisms presume that HFA is formed when particles are reflected on bow shock, get swept by motional electric field and are injected back into the area. We tried to calculate the balance of <span class="hlt">energy</span> in solar wind and within HFA to estimate what amount of reflected particles is needed for "internal recovery" area to be the real <span class="hlt">energy</span> source. These estimations suggest that this <span class="hlt">energy</span> balance is nearly fulfilled in 4 of 5 analyzed HFAs, and does not hold for one HFA. This <span class="hlt">energy</span> balance may be in favor of quasi-stationary nature of HFA structure. References Thomsen, M. F., J. T. Gosling, S. A. Fuselier, S. J. Bame, and C. T. Russell (1986), Hot, diamagnetic cavities upstream from the Earth's bow shock, J. Geophys. Res., 91(A3), 2961-2973, doi:10.1029/JA091iA03p02961. Vaisberg, O.L., J.H.Waite, L.Avanov, V.N.Smirnov, D.Dempsey J.L.Burch and A.A.Skalsky, HFA-like signatures observed with Interball-Tail spacecraft, in: Solar Wind Nine, ed. By S.R.Habbal, R.Esser, J.V.Hollweg, and P.A.Isenberg, AIP 1-56396-865-7, 1999, pp. 551-554.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5275761','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5275761"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> for supplying solar thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> to industrial unit operations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>May, E.K.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this <span class="hlt">potential</span>, considered in terms of the end-use of <span class="hlt">energy</span> delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020051079&hterms=rotational+kinetic+energy&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Drotational%2Bkinetic%2Benergy','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020051079&hterms=rotational+kinetic+energy&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Drotational%2Bkinetic%2Benergy"><span id="translatedtitle">An Accurate <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface for H2O</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>We have carried out extensive high quality ab initio electronic structure calculations of the ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) and dipole moment function (DMF) for H2O. A small adjustment is made to the PES to improve the agreement of line positions from theory and experiment. The theoretical line positions are obtained from variational ro-vibrational calculations using the exact kinetic <span class="hlt">energy</span> operator. For the lines being fitted, the root-mean-square error was reduced from 6.9 to 0.08 /cm. We were then able to match 30,092 of the 30,117 lines from the HITRAN 96 data base to theoretical lines, and 80% of the line positions differed less than 0.1 /cm. About 3% of the line positions in the experimental data base appear to be incorrect. Theory predicts the existence of many additional weak lines with intensities above the cutoff used in the data base. To obtain results of similar accuracy for HDO, a mass dependent correction to the PH is introduced and is parameterized by simultaneously fitting line positions for HDO and D2O. The mass dependent PH has good predictive value for T2O and HTO. Nonadiabatic effects are not explicitly included. Line strengths for vibrational bands summed over rotational levels usually agree well between theory and experiment, but individual line strengths can differ greatly. A high temperature line list containing about 380 million lines has been generated using the present PES and DMF</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.2858G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoRL..41.2858G"><span id="translatedtitle">Aquarius surface salinity and the Madden-Julian Oscillation: The role of salinity in surface layer density and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guan, Bin; Lee, Tong; Halkides, Daria J.; Waliser, Duane E.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Sea surface salinity (SSS) data from the Aquarius satellite are analyzed along with auxiliary data to investigate the SSS signature of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian and Pacific Oceans, the effect of evaporation-minus-precipitation (E-P), the implication for the role of ocean dynamics, and the SSS influence on surface density and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>. MJO-related SSS changes are consistent with E-P forcing in the western Indian Ocean throughout the MJO cycle and in the central Indian Ocean during the wet phase of the MJO cycle. However, SSS changes cannot be explained by E-P in the central Indian Ocean during the dry phase and in the eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans throughout the MJO cycle, implying the importance of ocean dynamics. SSS has an overall larger contribution to MJO-related surface density and <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> than SST. It partially offsets the SST effect in the western-to-central Indian Ocean and reinforces the SST effect in the eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Ocean modeling and assimilation need to properly account for salinity effects in order to correctly represent mixed layer variability associated with the MJO. Our results also clarify some discrepancy in previous studies about the E-P effect on MJO-related SSS variations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5685614','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5685614"><span id="translatedtitle">Maternal water consumption during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shaw, G.M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Malcoe, L.H. )</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>This case-control study, conducted in a California county that had a local incident of water contamination in 1981, investigated the relation between a mother's reported consumption of tap water during pregnancy and congenital cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in their offspring born during 1981-1983. Data were obtained from telephone interviews with 145 mothers of children born with a severe cardiac <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and 176 mothers of children born without such an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. A positive association between a mother's consumption of home tap water during the first trimester of pregnancy and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in her infant was unrelated to the incident of water contamination, the mother's race, or her educational level. A negative relation was found between a mother's use of bottled water and cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> among the infants. These findings corresponded primarily to births in 1981. These data could not fully distinguish between a <span class="hlt">potential</span> causal agent in the water and differential reporting of exposure by study subjects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20990988','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20990988"><span id="translatedtitle">Breakup threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the elastic scattering of {sup 6}Li on {sup 27}Al</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Figueira, J. M.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Correa, T.; Paes, B.</p> <p>2007-01-15</p> <p>Elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6}Li on {sup 27}Al was measured at near-barrier <span class="hlt">energies</span>. The data analysis was performed using a Woods-Saxon shape optical <span class="hlt">potential</span> and also using the double-folding Sao Paulo <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The results show the presence of the breakup threshold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (BTA), an anomalous behavior when compared with the scattering of tightly bound nuclei. This behavior is attributed to a repulsive polarization <span class="hlt">potential</span> produced by the coupling to the continuum breakup states.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..88k5307R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..88k5307R"><span id="translatedtitle">Z2 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and boundaries of topological insulators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ringel, Zohar; Stern, Ady</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>We study the edge and surface theories of topological insulators from the perspective of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and identify a Z2 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with charge conservation. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is manifested through a two-point correlation function involving creation and annihilation operators on two decoupled boundaries. Although charge conservation on each boundary requires this quantity to vanish, we find that it diverges. A corollary result is that under an insertion of a flux quantum, the ground state evolves to an exactly orthogonal state independent of the rate at which the flux is inserted. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> persists in the presence of disorder and imposes sharp restrictions on possible low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> theories. Being formulated in a many-body, field-theoretical language, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> allows one to test the robustness of topological insulators to interactions in a concise way.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6495196','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6495196"><span id="translatedtitle">Global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> hypersurface for dynamical studies of <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer in HF--HF collisions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Redmon, M.J.; Binkley, J.S.</p> <p>1987-07-15</p> <p>The interaction <span class="hlt">energy</span> of two HF molecules at 1332 individual points has been calculated with Moeller--Plesset (many--body) perturbation theory at the MP4-SDTQ level using a 6-311G** basis set. 293 of the points correspond to stretching of one HF molecule from its equilibrium geometry. No attempt was made to use a sufficiently fine grid to accurately describe the well region corresponding to hydrogen bonding. However, the location and minimum <span class="hlt">energy</span> are consistent with experiment and other accurate theoretical results. An extensive global fit (rms error of 1 kcal/mol) is reported of 1319 points (below 10 eV of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>) using a modified London <span class="hlt">potential</span> with corrections obtained using polynomials through four-body interactions. A model electrostatic <span class="hlt">potential</span> represents the long-range interaction. In addition, the use of an expansion in products of three Legendre functions is discussed. It is shown that the latter approach, although accurately fitting the ab initio data, has difficulties interpolating in regions of the surface exhibiting diverse magnitudes of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, and therefore must be used with caution. This surface should be useful for studies of T--V--R processes in this system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MS%26E...59a2004O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MS%26E...59a2004O"><span id="translatedtitle">Wind and Solar <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Assessment for Development of Renewables <span class="hlt">Energies</span> Applications in Bucaramanga, Colombia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ordóñez, G.; Osma, G.; Vergara, P.; Rey, J.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Currently, the trend of micro-grids and small-scale renewable generation systems implementation in urban environments requires to have historical and detailed information about the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> resource in site. In Colombia, this information is limited and do not favor the design of these applications; for this reason, must be made detailed studies of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in their cities. In this paper is presented the wind and solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource assessment for the city of Bucaramanga, based on the monitoring on four strategic points during the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. According to the analysis, is evidenced a significant solar resource throughout the year ascending on average to 1 734 kWh/m2, equivalent to 4.8 kWh/m2/day. Also, from a wind statistical study based on the Weibull probability distribution and Wind Power Density (WPD) was established the wind <span class="hlt">potential</span> as Class 1 according to the scale of the Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> of the United States (DOE), since the average speed is near 1.4 m/s. Due this, it is technically unfeasible the using of micro-turbines in the city, even so their <span class="hlt">potential</span> for natural ventilation of building was analyzed. Finally, is presented a methodology to analyze solar harvesting by sectors in the city, according to the solar motion and shadowing caused by existing structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20640916','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20640916"><span id="translatedtitle">Probing <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curves of C{sub 2}{sup -} by translational <span class="hlt">energy</span> spectrometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gupta, A.K.; Aravind, G.; Krishnamurthy, M.</p> <p>2004-03-01</p> <p>We present studies on collision induced dissociation of C{sub 2}{sup -} with Ar at an impact <span class="hlt">energy</span> of 15 keV. The C{sup -} fragment ion kinetic-<span class="hlt">energy</span> release (KER) distribution is measured and is used to compute the KER in the center of mass (c.m.) frame (KER{sub c.m.}). We employ the reflection method to deduce an effective repulsive <span class="hlt">potential-energy</span> curve for the molecular anion that is otherwise difficult to evaluate from quantum computational methods. The nuclear wave packet of the molecular ion in the initial ground state is computed by the semiclassical WKB method using the <span class="hlt">potential-energy</span> curve of the {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} ground electronic state calculated by an ab initio quantum computation method. The ground-state nuclear wave packet is reflected on a parametrized repulsive <span class="hlt">potential-energy</span> curve where the parameters are determined by fitting the measured KER{sub c.m.} with the calculated KER distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9089E..0LH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9089E..0LH"><span id="translatedtitle">Seismic data fusion <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Detecting <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..161C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...02..161C"><span id="translatedtitle">Hessian geometry and the holomorphic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardoso, G. L.; Mohaupt, T.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We present a geometrical framework which incorporates higher derivative corrections to the action of N = 2 vector multiplets in terms of an enlarged scalar manifold which includes a complex deformation parameter. This enlarged space carries a deformed version of special Kähler geometry which we characterise. The holomorphic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation arises in this framework from the integrability condition for the existence of a Hesse <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21689919','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21689919"><span id="translatedtitle">Material and <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery in integrated waste management systems: the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Consonni, Stefano; Vigan, Federico</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on "Material and <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)". An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and <span class="hlt">energy</span> balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the <span class="hlt">energy</span> content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-<span class="hlt">Energy</span> (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and <span class="hlt">energy</span> balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its <span class="hlt">energy</span> and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa). PMID:21689919</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23995681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23995681"><span id="translatedtitle">Microscopic origin of the '0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>' in quantum point contacts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bauer, Florian; Heyder, Jan; Schubert, Enrico; Borowsky, David; Taubert, Daniela; Bruognolo, Benedikt; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; von Delft, Jan; Ludwig, Stefan</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Quantum point contacts are narrow, one-dimensional constrictions usually patterned in a two-dimensional electron system, for example by applying voltages to local gates. The linear conductance of a point contact, when measured as function of its channel width, is quantized in units of GQ = 2e(2)/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant. However, the conductance also has an unexpected shoulder at ?0.7GQ, known as the '0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>', whose origin is still subject to debate. Proposed theoretical explanations have invoked spontaneous spin polarization, ferromagnetic spin coupling, the formation of a quasi-bound state leading to the Kondo effect, Wigner crystallization and various treatments of inelastic scattering. However, explicit calculations that fully reproduce the various experimental observations in the regime of the 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, including the zero-bias peak that typically accompanies it, are still lacking. Here we offer a detailed microscopic explanation for both the 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the zero-bias peak: their common origin is a smeared van Hove singularity in the local density of states at the bottom of the lowest one-dimensional subband of the point contact, which causes an anomalous enhancement in the Hartree <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier, the magnetic spin susceptibility and the inelastic scattering rate. We find good qualitative agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results on the dependence of the conductance on gate voltage, magnetic field, temperature, source-drain voltage (including the zero-bias peak) and interaction strength. We also clarify how the low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> scale governing the 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> depends on gate voltage and interactions. For low <span class="hlt">energies</span>, we predict and observe Fermi-liquid behaviour similar to that associated with the Kondo effect in quantum dots. At high <span class="hlt">energies</span>, however, the similarities between the 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the Kondo effect end. PMID:23995681</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1163755','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1163755"><span id="translatedtitle">System for closure of a physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S</p> <p>2014-11-11</p> <p>Systems for closure of a physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and closes the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980cec..rept.....L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980cec..rept.....L"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farming in the southeastern California desert</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lew, V.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">energy</span> forms to provide future sources of <span class="hlt">energy</span> for California is considered. Marginal desert lands in southeastern California are proposed for the siting of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farms using acacia, eucalyptus, euphorbia, guayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/677096','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/677096"><span id="translatedtitle">`t Hooft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matching for discrete symmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Csaki, C.; Murayama, Hitoshi |</p> <p>1998-05-01</p> <p>The authors show how to extend the `t Hooft <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> matching conditions to discrete symmetries. They check these discrete anomally matching conditions on several proposed low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> spectra of certain strongly interacting gauge theories. The excluded examples include the proposed chirally symmetric vacuum of pure N = 1 supersymmetric yang-Mills theories, certain non-supersymmetric confining theories and some self-dual N = 1 supersymmetric theories based on exceptional groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21578469','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21578469"><span id="translatedtitle">Material and <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery in integrated waste management systems: The <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Consonni, Stefano; Vigano, Federico</p> <p>2011-09-15</p> <p>Highlights: > The amount of waste available for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW). > Its <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). > Increasing SSL has marginal effects on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery. > Variations in the composition of the waste fed to WtE plants affect only marginally their performances. > A large WtE plant with a treatment capacity some times higher than a small plant achieves electric efficiency appreciably higher. - Abstract: This article is part of a set of six coordinated papers reporting the main findings of a research project carried out by five Italian universities on 'Material and <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery in Integrated Waste Management Systems (IWMS)'. An overview of the project and a summary of the most relevant results can be found in the introductory article of the series. This paper describes the work related to the evaluation of mass and <span class="hlt">energy</span> balances, which has consisted of three major efforts (i) development of a model for quantifying the <span class="hlt">energy</span> content and the elemental compositions of the waste streams appearing in a IWMS; (ii) upgrade of an earlier model to predict the performances of Waste-to-<span class="hlt">Energy</span> (WtE) plants; (iii) evaluation of mass and <span class="hlt">energy</span> balances of all the scenarios and the recovery paths considered in the project. Results show that not only the amount of material available for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery is significantly higher than the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW) left after Separate Collection (SC), because selection and recycling generate significant amounts of residues, but its heating value is higher than that of the original, gross waste. Therefore, the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of what is left after recycling is always higher than the complement to 100% of the Source Separation Level (SSL). Also, increasing SSL has marginal effects on the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery: nearly doubling SSL (from 35% to 65%) reduces the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> only by one fourth. Consequently, even at high SSL <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery is a fundamental step of a sustainable waste management system. Variations of SSL do bring about variations of the composition, heating value and moisture content of the material fed to WtE plants, but these variations (i) are smaller than one can expect; (ii) have marginal effects on the performances of the WtE plant. These considerations suggest that the mere value of SSL is not a good indicator of the quality of the waste management system, nor of its <span class="hlt">energy</span> and environmental outcome. Given the well-known dependence of the efficiency of steam power plants with their power output, the efficiency of <span class="hlt">energy</span> recovery crucially depends on the size of the IWMS served by the WtE plant. A fivefold increase of the amount of gross waste handled in the IWMS (from 150,000 to 750,000 tons per year of gross waste) allows increasing the electric efficiencies of the WtE plant by about 6-7 percentage points (from 21-23% to 28.5% circa).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150019407','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150019407"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> of Cohesion, Compressibility, and the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Functions of the Graphite System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Girifalco, L. A.; Lad, R. A.</p> <p>1956-01-01</p> <p>The lattice summations of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of importance in the graphite system have been computed by direct summation assuming a Lennard-Jones 6-12 <span class="hlt">potential</span> between carbon atoms. From these summations, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> curves were constructed for interactions between a carbon atom and a graphite monolayer, between a carbon atom and a graphite surface, between a graphite monolayer and a semi-infinite graphite crystal and between two graphite semi-infinite crystals. Using these curves, the equilibrium distance between two isolated physically interacting carbon atoms was found to be 2.70 a, where a is the carbon-carbon distance in a graphite sheet. The distance between a surface plane and the rest of the crystal was found to be 1.7% greater than the interlayer spacing. Theoretical values of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> of cohesion and the compressibility were calculated from the <span class="hlt">potential</span> curve for the interaction between two semi-infinite crystals. They were (delta)E(sub c) = -330 ergs/sq cm and beta =3.18x10(exp -12)sq cm/dyne, respectively. These compared favorably with the experimental values of (delta)E(sub c) = -260 ergs/sq cm and beta = 2.97 X 10(exp -2) sq cm/dyne.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26771032','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26771032"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of fluoroxene: experiment and theory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Uriarte, Iciar; cija, Patricia; Spada, Lorenzo; Zabalza, Eneko; Lesarri, Alberto; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Fernndez, Jos A; Caminati, Walther; Cocinero, Emilio J</p> <p>2016-01-27</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) of the general anesthetic fluoroxene (2,2,2-trifluoroethyl vinyl ether) was probed in a supersonic jet expansion using broadband chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The PES is dominated by a single conformation, as other stable minima are shown to kinetically relax in the expansion to the global minimum. Consistently, the rotational spectrum reveals a single conformation. Fluoroxene adopts a CS heavy-atom planar skeleton structure in the gas phase, with a cis-trans conformation (cis for the CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]CH-O-CH2- and trans for the [double bond, length as m-dash]CH-O-CH2-CF3 part). The sensitivity of a recently-built CP-FTMW spectrometer at the UPV/EHU is demonstrated by the detection of five isotopologues of fluoroxene in natural abundance, corresponding to the (13)C and (18)O monosubstituted species. The rS and r0 structures were determined and are in good agreement with theoretical predictions using the MP2, B3LYP and M06-2X methods. PMID:26771032</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6899512','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6899512"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>Our objective, has been to elucidate on a molecular level, at atomic resolution, the structures of DNAs modified by 2-aminofluorene and its N-acetyl derivative, 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). The underlying hypothesis is that DNA replicates with reduced fidelity when its normal right-handed B-structure is altered, and one result is a higher mutation rate. This change in structure may occur normally at a low incidence, for example by the formation of hairpin loops in appropriate sequences, but it may be enhanced greatly after covalent modification by a mutagenic substance. We use computational methods and have been able to incorporate the first data from NMR studies in our calculations. Computational approaches are important because x-ray and spectroscopic studies have not succeeded in producing atomic resolution views of mutagen and carcinogen-oligonucleotide adducts. The specific methods that we employ are minimized <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations using the torsion angle space molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations, with full solvent and salt, of the important static structures are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a medium that mimics the natural aqueous environment of the cell as well as can be done with current available computing resources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6308328','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6308328"><span id="translatedtitle">(Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> methods)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Broyde, S.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The objective of our work has been, for many year, to elucidate on a molecular level at atomic resolution the structures of DNAs modified by highly mutagenic polycyclic aromatic amines and hydrocarbons, and their less mutagenic chemically related analogs and unmodified DNAs, as controls. The ultimate purpose of this undertaking is to obtain an understanding of the relationship DNA structures and mutagenicity. Our methods for elucidating structures are computational, but we keep in close contact with experimental developments, and have, very recently, been able to incorporate the first experimental information from NMR studies by other workers in our calculations. The specific computational methods we employ are minimized <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations using the torsion angle space program DUPLEX, developed and written by Dr. Brain Hingerty to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations of the important static structures with full solvation and salt are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a milieu that best mimics the natural environment of the cell. In addition, we have been developing new strategies for searching conformation space and building DNA duplexes from favored subunit structures. 30 refs., 12 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930006168','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930006168"><span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical characterization of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for NH + NO</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) for NH + NO was characterized using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) gradient calculations to determine the stationary point geometries and frequencies followed by CASSCF/internally contracted configuration interaction (CCI) calculations to refine the energetics. The present results are in qualitative accord with the BAC-MP4 calculations, but there are differences as large as 8 kcal/mol in the detailed energetics. Addition of NH to NO on a (2)A' surface, which correlated with N2 + OH or H + N2O products, involves barriers of 3.2 kcal/mol (trans) and 6.3 kcal/mol (cis). Experimental evidence for these barriers is found in earlier works. The (2)A' surface has no barrier to addition, but does not correlate with products. Surface crossings between the barrierless (2)A' surface and the (2)A' surface may be important. Production of N2 + OH products is predicted to occur via a planar saddle point of (2)A' symmetry. This is in accord with the preferential formation of II(A') lambda doublet levels of OH in earlier experiments. Addition of NH (1)delta to NO is found to occur on an excited state surface and is predicted to lead to N2O product as observed in earlier works.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020011015&hterms=chemical+reactions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dchemical%2Breactions','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020011015&hterms=chemical+reactions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dchemical%2Breactions"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces and Minimum <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Pathways for Chemical Reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the <span class="hlt">energy</span> at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1069178','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1069178"><span id="translatedtitle">Transportation <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Futures Series: <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Considerable research has focused on <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement <span class="hlt">potential</span> to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Futures (TEF) project, a Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span>-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219927','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219927"><span id="translatedtitle">Transportation <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Futures Series. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Considerable research has focused on <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future <span class="hlt">energy</span> efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement <span class="hlt">potential</span> to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Futures (TEF) project, a Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span>-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..MAR.C1123A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..MAR.C1123A"><span id="translatedtitle">Free <span class="hlt">energy</span> versus <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes of drug-like molecules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abraham, Yonas; Harris, Rebecca; Hammond, Philip S.; Schmitt, Jeffrey D.</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>To gain information about molecular shape tendencies, the life science community has traditionally focused primarily on conformational search methodologies that explore the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface (PES). The output of these methods is a collation of so-called minimum <span class="hlt">energy</span> conformers. In our effort to gain more insight into molecular shape and overall behavior, we have used both PES conformational search techniques and ab initio molecular dynamics to study a set of neuronal nicotinic receptor (NNR) ligands that possess a non-trivial structure-affinity relationship. This latter method, properly executed, provides the free <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape. In this poster we show the sometimes dramatic difference in predicted behavior between these two methods. Significantly, conformers predicted to be highly populated in one method are disallowed in the other method. This work constitutes our first exploration into the use of an ab initio derived free <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape to better understand small molecules of biological interest.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ888131.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ888131.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> Ambient <span class="hlt">Energy</span>-Harvesting Sources and Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yildiz, Faruk</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Ambient <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting is also known as <span class="hlt">energy</span> scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where <span class="hlt">energy</span> is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for <span class="hlt">energy</span> scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/991258','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/991258"><span id="translatedtitle">Earth flyby <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>In the planet-centric system, a spacecraft should have the same initial and final <span class="hlt">energies</span>, even though its <span class="hlt">energy</span> and angular momentum will change in the barycenter of the solar system. However, without explanation, a number of earth flybys have yielded small <span class="hlt">energy</span> changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040034236"><span id="translatedtitle">Reliability of CHAMP <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Continuations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> errors. Indeed, our numerical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> details are to be exploited most fully. Given current <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling suggests that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25719956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25719956"><span id="translatedtitle">Networks of triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting water wave <span class="hlt">energy</span>: a <span class="hlt">potential</span> approach toward blue <span class="hlt">energy</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Jun; Yang, Jin; Li, Zhaoling; Fan, Xing; Zi, Yunlong; Jing, Qingshen; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Pradel, Ken C; Niu, Simiao; Wang, Zhong Lin</p> <p>2015-03-24</p> <p>With 70% of the earth's surface covered with water, wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> is abundant and has the <span class="hlt">potential</span> to be one of the most environmentally benign forms of electric <span class="hlt">energy</span>. However, owing to lack of effective technology, water wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting is almost unexplored as an <span class="hlt">energy</span> source. Here, we report a network design made of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) for large-scale harvesting of kinetic water <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Relying on surface charging effect between the conventional polymers and very thin layer of metal as electrodes for each TENG, the TENG networks (TENG-NW) that naturally float on the water surface convert the slow, random, and high-force oscillatory wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> into electricity. On the basis of the measured output of a single TENG, the TENG-NW is expected to give an average power output of 1.15 MW from 1 km(2) surface area. Given the compelling features, such as being lightweight, extremely cost-effective, environmentally friendly, easily implemented, and capable of floating on the water surface, the TENG-NW renders an innovative and effective approach toward large-scale blue <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting from the ocean. PMID:25719956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17678079','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17678079"><span id="translatedtitle">Algebraic classification of Weyl <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in arbitrary dimensions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boulanger, Nicolas</p> <p>2007-06-29</p> <p>Conformally invariant systems involving only dimensionless parameters are known to describe particle physics at very high <span class="hlt">energy</span>. In the presence of an external gravitational field, the conformal symmetry may generalize to the Weyl invariance of classical massless field systems in interaction with gravity. In the quantum theory, the latter symmetry no longer survives: A Weyl <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appears. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> are a cornerstone of quantum field theory, and, for the first time, a general, purely algebraic understanding of the universal structure of the Weyl <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is obtained, in arbitrary dimensions and independently of any regularization scheme. PMID:17678079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhDT.......102H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhDT.......102H"><span id="translatedtitle">Short-Term Climatic Fluctuations Forced by Thermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hanna, Adel Fahim</p> <p></p> <p>A two-level, global, spectral model using pressure as a vertical coordinate has been developed. The system of equations describing the model is nonlinear and quasi -geostrophic (linear balance). Static stability is variable in the model. A moisture budget is calculated in the lower layer only. Convective adjustment is used to avoid supercritical temperature lapse rates. The mechanical forcing of topography is introduced as a vertical velocity at the lower boundary. Solar forcing is specified assuming a daily mean zenith angle. The differential diabatic heating between land and sea is parameterized. On land- and sea-ice surfaces, a steady state thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> equation is solved to calculate the surface temperature. On the oceans, the sea surface temperature is specified as the climatological average for January, February and March circulations. Experiments are designed to study the response of the atmosphere to thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the lower boundary or in the midtroposphere. The "memory" in the atmosphere of such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, after they have decayed, is also studied. Three patterns of sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are tested. The first pattern represents a cold <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the North Pacific, the second a warm <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the equatorial Pacific and the third pattern contains both of the two <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns acting together. The results suggest that the coupled pattern is the only one that produces the type of geopotential <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with the negative phase of the Southern Oscillation. In contrast to the results of linear models, warm sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the equatorial Pacific cannot produce such geopotential response on their own. The mid-tropospheric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is introduced as an easterly propagating wave over the equatorial Pacific and over the Gulf of Bengal. The amplitude and memory of the response is larger than for the sea surface temperature case. The mid-tropospheric thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show continuous large areas of long memory in the subtropical and middle latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..92e4619G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..92e4619G"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of ? <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the ?-/?+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate <span class="hlt">energies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guo, Wen-Mei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Zuo, Wei</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, effects of the ? resonance <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the free n /p and ?-/?+ ratios in the central collision of 197Au+197Au at beam <span class="hlt">energies</span> of 200 and 400 MeV/nucleon are studied. It is found that the effect of the ? <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the ratio of pre-equilibrium free n /p is invisible. The effect of ? isovector <span class="hlt">potential</span> on the kinetic-<span class="hlt">energy</span>-integrating ratio of ?-/?+ may be observable only at lower incident beam <span class="hlt">energies</span> and with stiffer symmetry <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The strength of the ? isoscalar <span class="hlt">potential</span> affects the height of the ?-/?+ ratio around the Coulomb peak but does not affect the kinetic-<span class="hlt">energy</span>-integrating ratio ?-/?+ . In heavy-ion collisions at intermediate <span class="hlt">energies</span>, relating to the question of nonconservation of <span class="hlt">energy</span> on ? or ? productions, one can replace the ? <span class="hlt">potential</span> by the nucleon isoscalar <span class="hlt">potential</span> especially when a soft symmetry <span class="hlt">energy</span> is employed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23179513','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23179513"><span id="translatedtitle">By-products: oil sorbents as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> source.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karakasi, Olga K; Moutsatsou, Angeliki</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The present study investigated the utilization of an industrial by-product, lignite fly ash, in oil pollution treatment, with the further <span class="hlt">potential</span> profit of <span class="hlt">energy</span> production. The properties of lignite fly ash, such as fine particle size, porosity, hydrophobic character, combined with the properties, such as high porosity and low specific gravity, of an agricultural by-product, namely sawdust, resulted in an effective oil-sorbent material. The materials were mixed either in the dry state or in aqueous solution. The oil sorption behaviour of the fly ash-sawdust mixtures was investigated in both marine and dry environments. Mixtures containing fly ash and 15-25% w/w sawdust performed better than each material alone when added to oil spills in a marine environment, as they formed a cohesive semi-solid phase, adsorbing almost no water, floating on the water surface and allowing total oil removal. For the clean-up of an oil spill 0.5 mm thick with surface area 1000 m(2), 225-255 kg of lignite fly ash can be utilized with the addition of 15-25% w/w sawdust. Fly ash-sawdust mixtures have also proved efficient for oil spill clean-up on land, since their oil sorption capacity in dry conditions was at least 0.6-1.4 g oil g(-1) mixture. The higher calorific value of the resultant oil-fly ash-sawdust mixtures increased up to that of bituminous coal and oil and exceeded that of lignite, thereby encouraging their utilization as alternative fuels especially in the cement industry, suggesting that the remaining ash can contribute in clinker production. PMID:23179513</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375825','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22375825"><span id="translatedtitle">Relic vector field and CMB large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can <span class="hlt">potentially</span> explain two CMB large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050190','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1050190"><span id="translatedtitle">Holographic models and the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jose L. Goity, Roberto C. Trinchero</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Five dimensional dilaton models are considered as possible holographic duals of the pure gauge QCD vacuum. In the framework of these models, the QCD trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> equation is considered. Each quantity appearing in that equation is computed by holographic means. Two exact solutions for different dilaton <span class="hlt">potentials</span> corresponding to perturbative and non-perturbative {beta}-functions are studied. It is shown that in the perturbative case, where the {beta}-function is the QCD one at leading order, the resulting space is not asymptotically AdS. In the non-perturbative case, the model considered presents confinement of static quarks and leads to a non-vanishing gluon condensate, although it does not correspond to an asymptotically free theory. In both cases analyses based on the trace <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and on Wilson loops are carried out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1160097','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1160097"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection in Dynamic Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Turcotte, Melissa</p> <p>2014-10-14</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as <span class="hlt">potentially</span> anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dba/documents/factsheet_cogenitalanomalies.pdf','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dba/documents/factsheet_cogenitalanomalies.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) CS217857 National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Blood Disorders Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED219254.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED219254.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> and Education: Planning for Higher Prices and <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Shortages.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Petrock, Edith M.; Bauman, Paul C.</p> <p></p> <p>This document provides information and suggestions to enable education officials to better control rising <span class="hlt">energy</span> costs and to plan appropriate reactions to <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply disruptions. Information is also provided on major changes in federal policies addressing <span class="hlt">energy</span> shortages and the implications of these policies for state and local</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750039971&hterms=world+map&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dworld%2Bmap','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750039971&hterms=world+map&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dworld%2Bmap"><span id="translatedtitle">A global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>A subset of Pogo satellite magnetometer data has been formed that is suitable for analysis of crustal magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Through the use of a thirteenth-order field model fit to these data, magnetic residuals have been calculated over the world to latitude limits of plus or minus 50 deg. These residuals, averaged over 1-degree latitude-longitude blocks, represent a detailed global magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map derived solely from satellite data. The occurrence of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on all individual satellite passes independent of local time and their decay as altitude increases imply a definite internal origin. Their wavelength structure and their correlation with known tectonic features further suggest that these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are primarily of geologic origin and have their sources in the lithosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/525996','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/525996"><span id="translatedtitle">Classifying sex biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lubinsky, M.S.</p> <p>1997-03-31</p> <p>The reasons for sex biases in congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. 42 refs., 7 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/peters-anomaly','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/peters-anomaly"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetics Home Reference: Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... 000. What genes are related to Peters <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>? Mutations in the FOXC1 , PAX6 , PITX2 , or CYP1B1 gene ... involved in the development of the anterior segment. Mutations in any of these four genes disrupt development ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23396831','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23396831"><span id="translatedtitle">Projection <span class="hlt">potentials</span> and angular momentum convergence of total <span class="hlt">energies</span> in the full-<span class="hlt">potential</span> Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zeller, Rudolf</p> <p>2013-03-13</p> <p>Although the full-<span class="hlt">potential</span> Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method yields accurate results for many physical properties, the convergence of calculated total <span class="hlt">energies</span> with respect to the angular momentum cutoff is usually considered to be less satisfactory. This is surprising because accurate single-particle <span class="hlt">energies</span> are expected if they are calculated by Lloyd's formula and because accurate densities and hence accurate double-counting <span class="hlt">energies</span> should result from the total <span class="hlt">energy</span> variational principle. It is shown how the concept of projection <span class="hlt">potentials</span> can be used as a tool to analyse the convergence behaviour. The key factor blocking fast convergence is identified and it is illustrated how total <span class="hlt">energies</span> can be improved with only a modest increase of computing time. PMID:23396831</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010869','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830010869"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite elevation magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The problem of inverting 2 deg average MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the region 80 W, 60 E longitude and 40 S, 70 N latitude was attempted on the LARS computer; however, the effort was aborted due to insufficient allocation of CPU-time. This problem is currently being resubmitted and should be implemented shortly for quantitative comparison with free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, geothermal, and tectonic data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MeScT..25l7002V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MeScT..25l7002V"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection on cup anemometers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vega, Enrique; Pindado, Santiago; Martínez, Alejandro; Meseguer, Encarnación; García, Luis</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The performances of two rotor-damaged commercial anemometers (Vector Instruments A100 LK) were studied. The calibration results (i.e. the transfer function) were very linear, the aerodynamic behavior being more efficient than the one shown by both anemometers equipped with undamaged rotors. No detection of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (the rotors’ damage) was possible based on the calibration results. However, the Fourier analysis clearly revealed this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvD..65h5028B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvD..65h5028B"><span id="translatedtitle">Dimensional reduction in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boyda, Ed; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron</p> <p>2002-04-01</p> <p>We offer a guide to dimensional reduction in theories with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Evanescent operators proportional to ? arise in the bare Lagrangian when it is reduced from d=4 to d=4-2? dimensions. In the course of a detailed diagrammatic calculation, we show that inclusion of these operators is crucial. The evanescent operators conspire to drive the supersymmetry-breaking parameters along <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediation trajectories across heavy particle thresholds, guaranteeing the ultraviolet insensitivity.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141l4501V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141l4501V"><span id="translatedtitle">Nesting of thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in liquid silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vasisht, Vishwas V.; Mathew, John; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Anomalous behaviour in density, diffusivity, and structural order is investigated for silicon modeled by the Stillinger-Weber <span class="hlt">potential</span> by performing molecular dynamics simulations. As previously reported in the case of water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature (London) 409, 318 (2001)] and silica [M. S. Shell, P. G. Debenedetti, and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011202 (2002)], a cascading of thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalous regions is also observed in liquid silicon. The region of structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> includes the region of diffusivity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which in turn encompasses the region of density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (which is unlike water but similar to silica). In the region of structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, a tight correlation between the translational and tetrahedrality order parameter is found, but the correlation is weaker when a local orientational order parameter (q3) is used as a measure of tetrahedrality. The total excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy are computed across the phase diagram and the correlation between the excess entropy and the regions of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the phase diagram of liquid silicon is examined. Scaling relations associating the excess entropy with the diffusion coefficient show considerable deviation from the quasi-universal behaviour observed in hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones liquids and some liquid metals. Excess entropy based criteria for diffusivity and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> fail to capture the observed regions of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...01..069G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...01..069G"><span id="translatedtitle">An explicit Z '-boson explanation of the B ? K ? ? + ? - <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gauld, Rhorry; Goertz, Florian; Haisch, Ulrich</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A global fit to the recent B ? K ? ? + ? - data shows indications for a large new-physics contribution to the Wilson coefficient of the semi-leptonic vector operator. In this article we consider a simple Z '-boson model of 3-3-1 type that can accommodate such an effect without violating any other constraint from quark-flavour physics. Implications for yet unobserved decay modes such as B ? X s ? and longstanding puzzles like B ? ?K are also discussed. The Z '-boson masses required to address the observed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lie in the range of 7 TeV. Such heavy Z ' bosons evade the existing bounds from precision data and direct searches, and will remain difficult to discover even at a high-luminosity LHC. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of an ILC as well as the next generation of low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> parity-violation experiments in constraining the Z '-boson parameter space is also examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7029645','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7029645"><span id="translatedtitle">Reexamination of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in near-threshold pair production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>De Braeckeleer, L.; Adelberger, E.G.; Garcia, A. )</p> <p>1992-11-01</p> <p>We investigated a reported <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in near-threshold pair production, using radioactive sources to measure the {gamma}+Ge{r arrow}{ital e}{sup +}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}+Ge cross-section at {ital E}{sub {gamma}}=1063, 1086, 1112, 1173, 1213, 1299, 1332, and 1408 keV. Although the data agree with the theory (numerical calculations based on an exact partial-wave formulation for a screened central <span class="hlt">potential</span>) at the higher <span class="hlt">energies</span>, the data lie above the theory at 1063, 1082, and 1112 keV. The discrepancy is reduced by including the final-state Coulomb interaction between the {ital e}{sup +} and {ital e}{sup {minus}}.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5210790','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5210790"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farming in the southeastern California desert</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lew, V.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>The California <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Commission is currently analyzing the use of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farms to provide future sources of <span class="hlt">energy</span> for California. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> farms can be defined as growing plants and converting them to various forms of <span class="hlt">energy</span>. The use of marginal desert lands in southeastern California for the siting of <span class="hlt">energy</span> farms using acacia, Eucalyptus, euphorbia, quayule, jojoba, mesquite, or tamarisk is considered. Two hypothetical scenarios using either rainfall, or rainfall and groundwater as water sources were described to determine the maximum amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> produced from estimated amounts of suitable land in this area. Considering both scenarios, the maximum range of <span class="hlt">energy</span> produced is .03 to 0.4 Quads. It is recommended that (1) genetic research be continued to increase biomass yields of these and other candidate plants grown in the desert; and (2) small test plots be established at varying desert locations to collect yield growth, and survival data. Once this information is known, the identification of the best plant(s) to use for <span class="hlt">energy</span> farming in the California desert area will be known, as well as the cost and quantity of <span class="hlt">energy</span> produced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7243E..0BH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7243E..0BH"><span id="translatedtitle">Visual analytics of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in large data streams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Keim, Daniel A.; Sharma, Ratnesh K.; Mehta, Abhay</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Most data streams usually are multi-dimensional, high-speed, and contain massive volumes of continuous information. They are seen in daily applications, such as telephone calls, retail sales, data center performance, and oil production operations. Many analysts want insight into the behavior of this data. They want to catch the exceptions in flight to reveal the causes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and to take immediate action. To guide the user in finding the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the large data stream quickly, we derive a new automated neighborhood threshold marking technique, called <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>Marker. This technique is built on cell-based data streams and user-defined thresholds. We extend the scope of the data points around the threshold to include the surrounding areas. The idea is to define a focus area (marked area) which enables users to (1) visually group the interesting data points related to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (i.e., problems that occur persistently or occasionally) for observing their behavior; (2) discover the factors related to the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by visualizing the correlations between the problem attribute with the attributes of the nearby data items from the entire multi-dimensional data stream. Mining results are quickly presented in graphical representations (i.e., tooltip) for the user to zoom into the problem regions. Different algorithms are introduced which try to optimize the size and extent of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> markers. We have successfully applied this technique to detect data stream <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in large real-world enterprise server performance and data center <span class="hlt">energy</span> management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JNuM..191....7P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JNuM..191....7P"><span id="translatedtitle">Global <span class="hlt">energy</span> scenarios and the <span class="hlt">potential</span> role of fusion <span class="hlt">energy</span> in the 21st century</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pease, R. S.</p> <p>1992-09-01</p> <p>Global <span class="hlt">energy</span> usage is increasing at about 2% p.a. The expansion is related to population growth and to demand for economic growth and higher standards of living, despite some economies in <span class="hlt">energy</span> use per unit GNP. A severalfold increase in global electricity demand by the middle of the 21st century seems inevitable, with the largest increment from large-population developing countries such as China and India. Currently, most electricity is provided by carbon-based fossil fuels, by hydroelectricity and by nuclear fission. Fusion, with its <span class="hlt">potential</span> to provide electricity from large central power stations could help meet a significant part of this expanding demand. It will have to be broadly competitive with established generating methods. Current advances in fusion research indicate good prospects for technical demonstration of fusion electricity generation. Research and development of materials for fusion <span class="hlt">energy</span> is needed now not only for demonstration plant, but also to enhance the estimates of the competitivity of fusion and to maximise its economic and environmental <span class="hlt">potential</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhB...47k5005H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhB...47k5005H"><span id="translatedtitle">Testing an excited-state <span class="hlt">energy</span> density functional and the associated <span class="hlt">potential</span> with the ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> theorem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hemanadhan, M.; Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The modified local spin density (MLSD) functional and the related local <span class="hlt">potential</span> for excited states is tested by employing the ionization <span class="hlt">potential</span> theorem. The exchange functional for an excited state is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding exchange <span class="hlt">potential</span> is given by an analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital <span class="hlt">energy</span> ?max accurately, the <span class="hlt">potential</span> is corrected for its asymptotic behaviour by employing the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) correction to it. ?max so obtained is then compared with the ?SCF ionization <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculated using the MLSD functional with self-interaction correction for the orbitals involved in the transition. It is shown that the two match quite accurately. The match becomes even better by tuning the LB correction with respect to a parameter in it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=theories+AND+chemical+AND+changes&pg=6&id=EJ015031','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=theories+AND+chemical+AND+changes&pg=6&id=EJ015031"><span id="translatedtitle">Computing Ligand Field <span class="hlt">Potentials</span> and Relative <span class="hlt">Energies</span> of d Orbitals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Krishnamurthy, R.; Schaap, Ward B.</p> <p>1969-01-01</p> <p>Presents a method for calculating the relative <span class="hlt">energies</span> of d orbitals in various geometric configurations having coordination numbers 1 to 12. Discusses the changes in orbital degeneracies and <span class="hlt">energies</span> due to symmetry differences. Shows that the addivity principle of Dq values gives results identical to the complete perturbation treatment. Also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810042058&hterms=shallow+water&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dshallow%2Bwater','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810042058&hterms=shallow+water&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dshallow%2Bwater"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy and <span class="hlt">energy</span> conserving scheme for the shallow water equations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arakawa, A.; Lamb, V. R.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>To improve the simulation of nonlinear aspects of the flow over steep topography, a <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy and <span class="hlt">energy</span> conserving scheme for the shallow water equations is derived. It is pointed out that a family of schemes can conserve total <span class="hlt">energy</span> for general flow and <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy for flow with no mass flux divergence. The newly derived scheme is a unique member of this family, that conserves both <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy and <span class="hlt">energy</span> for general flow. Comparison by means of numerical experiment with a scheme that conserves (<span class="hlt">potential</span>) enstrophy for purely horizontal nondivergent flow demonstrated the considerable superiority of the newly derived <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy and <span class="hlt">energy</span> conserving scheme, not only in suppressing a spurious <span class="hlt">energy</span> cascade but also in determining the overall flow regime. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> enstrophy and <span class="hlt">energy</span> conserving scheme for a spherical grid is also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483788','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483788"><span id="translatedtitle">Large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the microwave background: causation and correlation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aslanyan, Grigor; Easther, Richard</p> <p>2013-12-27</p> <p>Most treatments of large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the microwave sky are aposteriori, with unquantified look-elsewhere effects. We contrast these with physical models of specific inhomogeneities in the early Universe which can generate these apparent <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Physical models predict correlations between candidate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the corresponding signals in polarization and large scale structure, reducing the impact of cosmic variance. We compute the apparent spatial curvature associated with large-scale inhomogeneities and show that it is typically small, allowing for a self-consistent analysis. As an illustrative example we show that a single large plane wave inhomogeneity can contribute to low-l mode alignment and odd-even asymmetry in the power spectra and the best-fit model accounts for a significant part of the claimed odd-even asymmetry. We argue that this approach can be generalized to provide a more quantitative assessment of <span class="hlt">potential</span> large scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Universe. PMID:24483788</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRB..112.6411V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRB..112.6411V"><span id="translatedtitle">Secondary indirect effects in gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data inversion or interpretation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vajda, P.; Van?Ek, P.; NovK, P.; Tenzer, R.; Ellmann, A.</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>The application of topographic corrections to gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and disturbances, and their use in formulating and solving the gravimetric inverse problem are reinvestigated. The gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, whose definition is based on the disturbing <span class="hlt">potential</span> by means of the fundamental gravimetric equation, rather than by the vertical derivative of the disturbing <span class="hlt">potential</span>, differs from the gravity disturbance, which also has implications to the application of the topographic correction. We demonstrate that the application of the topographic correction to the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gives origin to the secondary indirect topographic effect (SITE) and that the formulation of a rigorous relation between the attraction of anomalous subsurface mass density distribution and the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gives rise to a secondary indirect effect of the anomalous mass density distribution (SIEAM). The SITE is shown to be numerically significant in mountainous areas, where it can reach 100 mGal. Because of secondary indirect effects, the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in its rigorous sense is not well suited for the gravimetric inversion. Instead, the topo-corrected gravity disturbance best fits the needs of gravity data inversion or interpretation, as it exactly matches the attraction of the Earth's subsurface anomalous density distribution. It is pointed out that, in geophysics, the gravity data used for inversion or interpretation, although called the "Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>," even if preceded by the adjective "ellipsoidal" as by the newly proposed standards for the North American database, are by the standards of rigor the "topographically corrected gravity disturbance."</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541643','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541643"><span id="translatedtitle">Flavorful hybrid <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-gravity mediation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gross, Christian; Hiller, Gudrun</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>We consider supersymmetric models where <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and gravity mediation give comparable contributions to the soft terms and discuss how this can be realized in a five-dimensional brane world. The gaugino mass pattern of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation is preserved in such a hybrid setup. The flavorful gravity-mediated contribution cures the tachyonic slepton problem of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mediation. The supersymmetric flavor puzzle is solved by alignment. We explicitly show how a working flavor-tachyon link can be realized with Abelian flavor symmetries and give the characteristic signatures of the framework, including O(1) slepton mass splittings between different generations and between doublets and singlets. This provides opportunities for same flavor dilepton edge measurements with missing <span class="hlt">energy</span> at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Rare lepton decay rates could be close to their current experimental limit. Compared to pure gravity mediation, the hybrid model is advantageous because it features a heavy gravitino which can avoid the cosmological gravitino problem of gravity-mediated models combined with leptogenesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27k3201B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPCM...27k3201B"><span id="translatedtitle">Chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and transport in Weyl metals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burkov, A. A.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present an overview of our recent work on transport phenomena in Weyl metals, which may be connected to their nontrivial topological properties, particularly to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We argue that there are two basic phenomena, which are related to chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Weyl metals: anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and chiral magnetic effect (CME). While AHE is in principle present in any ferromagnetic metal, we demonstrate that a magnetic Weyl metal is distinguished from an ordinary ferromagnetic metal by the absence of the extrinsic and the Fermi surface part of the intrinsic contributions to the AHE, as long as the Fermi <span class="hlt">energy</span> is sufficiently close to the Weyl nodes. The AHE in a Weyl metal is thus shown to be a purely intrinsic, universal property, fully determined by the location of the Weyl nodes in the first Brillouin zone. In other words, a ferromagnetic Weyl metal may be thought of as the only example of a ferromagnetic metal with a purely intrinsic AHE. We further develop a fully microscopic theory of diffusive magnetotransport in Weyl metals. We derive coupled diffusion equations for the total and axial (i.e. node-antisymmetric) charge densities and show that chiral <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> manifests as a magnetic-field-induced coupling between them. We demonstrate that an experimentally-observable consequence of CME in magnetotransport in Weyl metals is a quadratic negative magnetoresistance, which will dominate all other contributions to magnetoresistance under certain conditions and may be regarded as a smoking-gun transport characteristic, unique to Weyl metals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26574398','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26574398"><span id="translatedtitle">Probing <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface Exploration Strategies for Complex Systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>N'Tsouaglo, Gawonou Kokou; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand; Pochet, Pascal</p> <p>2015-04-14</p> <p>The efficiency of minimum-<span class="hlt">energy</span> configuration searching algorithms is closely linked to the <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape structure of complex systems, yet these algorithms often include a number of steps of which the effect is not always clear. Decoupling these steps and their impacts can allow us to better understand both their role and the nature of complex <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscape. Here, we consider a family of minimum-<span class="hlt">energy</span> algorithms based, directly or indirectly, on the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) principle. Comparing trajectories generated with BEP-based algorithms to kinetically correct off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo schemes allow us to confirm that the BEP principle does not hold for complex systems since forward and reverse <span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers are completely uncorrelated. As would be expected, following the lowest available <span class="hlt">energy</span> barrier leads to rapid trapping. This is why BEP-based methods require also a direct handling of visited basins or barriers. Comparing the efficiency of these methods with a thermodynamical handling of low-<span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers, we show that most of the efficiency of the BEP-like methods lie first and foremost in the basin management rather than in the BEP-like step. PMID:26574398</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150005540&hterms=anomalies&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Danomalies','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150005540&hterms=anomalies&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Danomalies"><span id="translatedtitle">Toward Baseline Software <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in NASA Missions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Layman, Lucas; Zelkowitz, Marvin; Basili, Victor; Nikora, Allen P.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In this fast abstract, we provide preliminary findings an analysis of 14,500 spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from unmanned NASA missions. We provide some baselines for the distributions of software vs. non-software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in spaceflight systems, the risk ratings of software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the corrective actions associated with software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020042316&hterms=quantum+correlation+second+virial+coefficient&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dquantum%2Bcorrelation%2Bsecond%2Bvirial%2Bcoefficient','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020042316&hterms=quantum+correlation+second+virial+coefficient&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dquantum%2Bcorrelation%2Bsecond%2Bvirial%2Bcoefficient"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer is studied using the new <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850024259','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850024259"><span id="translatedtitle">Generation of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> and the <span class="hlt">energy</span> cycle during the global weather experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Salstein, D. A.; Rosen, R. D.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Two parallel sets of analyses, which in one case included and in the other omitted data observed by satellite based and other FGGE special observing systems are examined. The results of our previous work is extended in two separate, but not unrelated, ways. First, from these two parallel analyses, which are labeled FGGE (full FGGE system) and NOSAT (satellite omitted), it was discovered that the two sets of fields were quite close over much of the globe. Locally the influence of satellite based systems led to some differences, particularly over the Southern Hemisphere Oceans. The diabatic heating fields generated by the GLA FGGE analysis was also examined. From these fields, one can ascertain the role of total diabatic heating and of the various diabatic heating components in the atmospheric <span class="hlt">energy</span> cycle, in particular in the generation of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020010153&hterms=chemical+reactions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dchemical%2Breactions','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020010153&hterms=chemical+reactions&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dchemical%2Breactions"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces and Minimum <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Pathway for Chemical Reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Computed <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22245856','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22245856"><span id="translatedtitle">Airports offer unrealized <span class="hlt">potential</span> for alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>DeVault, Travis L; Belant, Jerrold L; Blackwell, Bradley F; Martin, James A; Schmidt, Jason A; Wes Burger, L; Patterson, James W</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Scaling up for alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> such as solar, wind, and biofuel raises a number of environmental issues, notably changes in land use and adverse effects on wildlife. Airports offer one of the few land uses where reductions in wildlife abundance and habitat quality are necessary and socially acceptable, due to risk of wildlife collisions with aircraft. There are several uncertainties and limitations to establishing alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> production at airports, such as ensuring these facilities do not create wildlife attractants or other hazards. However, with careful planning, locating alternative <span class="hlt">energy</span> projects at airports could help mitigate many of the challenges currently facing policy makers, developers, and conservationists. PMID:22245856</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219367','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1219367"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Production <span class="hlt">Potential</span> from Tidal Streams in the United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent</p> <p>2011-06-29</p> <p>The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal <span class="hlt">energy</span> conversion technology.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016723','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820016723"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGSAT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map and continental drift</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It is also shown that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8032959D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8032959D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> displacement of petroleum imports by solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deleon, P.; Jackson, B. L.; McNown, R. F.; Mahrenholz, G. J.</p> <p>1980-05-01</p> <p>The United States currently imports close to half of its petroleum requirements. The economic, social, and political costs of a foreign oil dependency are discussed. Development of alternative, domestic <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources, such as solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies, which can displace foreign petroleum is discussed. It is estimated that by the year 2000, solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies can displace 3.6 quads of petroleum. This figure includes solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications in utilities, industrial and agricultural process heat, and transportation. The estimate can be treated as a lower bound; if the United States were to achieve the proposed goal of 20 quads by 2000, the amount of displaced oil probably would be greater. Although all the displaced oil would not be imported, the reduction in imported petroleum would relieve many of the conditions that increase the present cost of foreign oil to the American consumer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5043502','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5043502"><span id="translatedtitle">Conservation of <span class="hlt">energy</span>: the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for more efficient use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1985-07-11</p> <p>The US discards more than 50% of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> it consumes as waste heat, but more efficient technologies and more rational use of <span class="hlt">energy</span> could save significant amounts of that <span class="hlt">energy</span>. Despite skepticism about the feasibility of wholesale changes in consumer habits and preferences, significant economies appear to be possible. The largest and possibly the easiest savings to accomplish could come in homes and commercial buildings by revising Federal Housing Administration insulation standards. The combination of structural improvements to improve thermal performance with more efficient heating and air-conditioning equipment is technically possible and would not interfere with living patterns. Although transportation constitutes the largest single end use of <span class="hlt">energy</span>, opportunities for significant saving involve life-style changes that will be more difficult to achieve. 2 figures, 2 tables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047449','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047449"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Portland cement particle size distribution control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particles size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements for cement manufacturing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8032911M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980STIN...8032911M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> for supplying solar thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> to industrial unit operations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>May, E. K.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>Adoption of solar thermal technology, considered in terms of the end use of <span class="hlt">energy</span> delivered to industrial unit operations was studied. The use of low temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology were studied. The adoption of solar technology is favored by the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation measures. High temperature hot water systems are more compatible with solar technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARL35006G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARL35006G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> expressions for model exchange <span class="hlt">potentials</span>: Beyond the Levy--Perdew virial relation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gaiduk, Alex P.; Staroverov, Viktor N.</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>The common way to assign <span class="hlt">energies</span> to Kohn--Sham exchange <span class="hlt">potentials</span> is by using the Levy--Perdew virial relation. However, for model <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that are not functional derivatives, this approach leads to <span class="hlt">energy</span> expressions that lack translational invariance. We point out that there is a more general procedure for constructing density functionals from model <span class="hlt">potentials</span>, of which the Levy--Perdew relation is just a special case. Using this generalization we propose a method for converting model <span class="hlt">potentials</span> into density functionals that ensures translational invariance of the <span class="hlt">energy</span>. To illustrate our approach we construct a competitively accurate exchange functional from the model <span class="hlt">potential</span> of van Leeuwen and Baerends.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1451275','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1451275"><span id="translatedtitle">Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Surveillance System.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention. PMID:2819634</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..APR.R2002P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..APR.R2002P"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Neutrino Physics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Palamara, Ornella</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>In recent years, experimental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> ranging in significance (2.8-3.8 σ) have been reported from a variety of experiments studying neutrinos over baselines less than 1 km. Results from the LSND and MiniBooNE short-baseline νe /νe appearance experiments show <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which cannot be described by oscillations between the three standard model neutrinos (the ``LSND <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). In addition, a re-analysis of the anti-neutrino flux produced by nuclear power reactors has led to an apparent deficit in νe event rates in a number of reactor experiments (the ``reactor <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). Similarly, calibration runs using 51Cr and 37Ar radioactive sources in the Gallium solar neutrino experiments GALLEX and SAGE have shown an unexplained deficit in the electron neutrino event rate over very short distances (the ``Gallium <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>''). The puzzling results from these experiments, which together may suggest the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model and hint at exciting new physics, including the possibility of additional low-mass sterile neutrino states, have raised the interest in the community for new experimental efforts that could eventually solve this puzzle. Definitive evidence for sterile neutrinos would be a revolutionary discovery, with implications for particle physics as well as cosmology. Proposals to address these signals by employing accelerator, reactor and radioactive source experiments are in the planning stages or underway worldwide. In this talk some of these will be reviewed, with emphasis on the accelerator programs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1224159','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1224159"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Clusters to Support Federal Clean <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Goals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal <span class="hlt">energy</span> demand across the contiguous US. Several federal <span class="hlt">energy</span> clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal <span class="hlt">energy</span> clusters. The analysis shows that there are <span class="hlt">potential</span> sites in various federal <span class="hlt">energy</span> clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean <span class="hlt">energy</span> goals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22163695','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22163695"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">potential</span> for harvesting <span class="hlt">energy</span> from the movement of trees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McGarry, Scott; Knight, Chris</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Over the last decade, wireless devices have decreased in size and power requirements. These devices generally use batteries as a power source but can employ additional means of power, such as solar, thermal or wind <span class="hlt">energy</span>. However, sensor networks are often deployed in conditions of minimal lighting and thermal gradient such as densely wooded environments, where even normal wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting is limited. In these cases a possible source of <span class="hlt">energy</span> is from the motion of the trees themselves. We investigated the amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and power available from the motion of a tree in a sheltered position, during Beaufort 4 winds. We measured the work performed by the tree to lift a mass, we measured horizontal acceleration of free movement, and we determined the angular deflection of the movement of the tree trunk, to determine the <span class="hlt">energy</span> and power available to various types of harvesting devices. We found that the amount of power available from the tree, as demonstrated by lifting a mass, compares favourably with the power required to run a wireless sensor node. PMID:22163695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3231266','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3231266"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Harvesting <span class="hlt">Energy</span> from the Movement of Trees</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McGarry, Scott; Knight, Chris</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Over the last decade, wireless devices have decreased in size and power requirements. These devices generally use batteries as a power source but can employ additional means of power, such as solar, thermal or wind <span class="hlt">energy</span>. However, sensor networks are often deployed in conditions of minimal lighting and thermal gradient such as densely wooded environments, where even normal wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting is limited. In these cases a possible source of <span class="hlt">energy</span> is from the motion of the trees themselves. We investigated the amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and power available from the motion of a tree in a sheltered position, during Beaufort 4 winds. We measured the work performed by the tree to lift a mass, we measured horizontal acceleration of free movement, and we determined the angular deflection of the movement of the tree trunk, to determine the <span class="hlt">energy</span> and power available to various types of harvesting devices. We found that the amount of power available from the tree, as demonstrated by lifting a mass, compares favourably with the power required to run a wireless sensor node. PMID:22163695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3599422','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3599422"><span id="translatedtitle">Erosive <span class="hlt">potential</span> of <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks on the dentine surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Considering the current high consumption of <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks in removing the smear layer and exposing dentinal tubules on root surface. Methods Dentine root surfaces were exposed using a diamond bur. Forty movements of scaling were performed in the area prepared in order to create a smear layer. One hundred and thirty specimens were obtained from 35 teeth. Specimens were randomly distributed into 12 groups (n?=?10) and divided into subgroups according to the application: topical (n?=?5) and friction (n?=?5). Twelve <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks were evaluated: RedBull, Burn, TNT, Flash Power, Flying Horse, Sports Drink, Ionic, Hot Power, Army Power, Gladiator and Bug. Distilled water was used as a control group. The specimens were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Results Topical application: a significant influence of <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks on smear layer removal was found for FlyingHorse and Bug when compared with the control group. Friction application: significant smear layer removal was found for Burn, FlyingHorse, Gladiator, SportsDrinks, when compared with the control group. Comparing the different application forms, a statistically significant difference was found for Army Power. Conclusion Considering the significant smear layer removal, <span class="hlt">energy</span> drinks can be an important etiological factor for cervical dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:23422044</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25874229','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25874229"><span id="translatedtitle">Current status and future <span class="hlt">potential</span> of <span class="hlt">energy</span> derived from Chinese agricultural land: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhai, Ningning; Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Energy</span> crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources to optimize the <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply structure has become an important measure to prevent <span class="hlt">energy</span> shortage as well as achieving <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of <span class="hlt">energy</span> agriculture and constructed an <span class="hlt">energy</span> agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry <span class="hlt">energy</span>, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future <span class="hlt">potential</span> of China's marginal land resources, <span class="hlt">energy</span> crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste <span class="hlt">energy</span>-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve <span class="hlt">energy</span> saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4385592','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4385592"><span id="translatedtitle">Current Status and Future <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Derived from Chinese Agricultural Land: A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mao, Chunlan; Feng, Yongzhong; Zhang, Tong; Xing, Zhenjie; Wang, Yanhong; Zou, Shuzhen; Yin, Dongxue; Han, Xinhui; Ren, Guangxin; Yang, Gaihe</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Energy</span> crisis is receiving attention with regard to the global economy and environmental sustainable development. Developing new <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources to optimize the <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply structure has become an important measure to prevent <span class="hlt">energy</span> shortage as well as achieving <span class="hlt">energy</span> conservation and emission reduction in China. This study proposed the concept of <span class="hlt">energy</span> agriculture and constructed an <span class="hlt">energy</span> agricultural technical support system based on the analysis of <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply and demand and China's foreign dependence on <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources, combined with the function of agriculture in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> field. Manufacturing technology equipment and agricultural and forestry <span class="hlt">energy</span>, including crop or forestry plants and animal feces, were used in the system. The current status and future <span class="hlt">potential</span> of China's marginal land resources, <span class="hlt">energy</span> crop germplasm resources, and agricultural and forestry waste <span class="hlt">energy</span>-oriented resources were analyzed. Developing the function of traditional agriculture in food production may promote China's social, economic, and environmental sustainable development and achieve <span class="hlt">energy</span> saving and emission reduction. PMID:25874229</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21486862','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21486862"><span id="translatedtitle">FOLD LENS FLUX <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span>: A GEOMETRIC APPROACH</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Goldberg, David M.; Chessey, Mary K.; Harris, Wendy B.; Richards, Gordon T.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>We develop a new approach for studying flux <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in quadruply imaged fold lens systems. We show that in the absence of substructure, microlensing, or differential absorption, the expected flux ratios of a fold pair can be tightly constrained using only geometric arguments. We apply this technique to 11 known quadruple lens systems in the radio and infrared and compare our estimates to the Monte Carlo based results of Keeton et al. We show that a robust estimate for a flux ratio from a smoothly varying <span class="hlt">potential</span> can be found, and at long wavelengths those lenses deviating from this ratio almost certainly contain significant substructure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001SPIE.4383...43C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001SPIE.4383...43C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection in hyperspectral imagery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Chein-I.; Chiang, Shao-Shan; Ginsberg, Irving W.</p> <p>2001-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection presented in this paper does not need any kind of target information. In other words, target information plays no role in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection. The purpose of our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection is to locate and search for targets which are generally unknown, but relatively small with low probabilities in an image scene. These anomalous targets cannot be identified by prior knowledge. Two approaches are considered in this paper, the RX algorithm developed by Reed and Yu and a uniform target detector (UTD) derived from the low probability detection in Harsanyi's dissertation, both of which operate a matched filter form with different matched signals used in the individual approaches. The matched signal used in the RX algorithm is the pixel vector r while the UTD using the unity vector 1 the matched signal. In addition, they both can be implemented in real-time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046548','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046548"><span id="translatedtitle">Graph <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in cyber communications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael</p> <p>2011-01-11</p> <p>Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..752..131S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..752..131S"><span id="translatedtitle">Boundary terms of conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Solodukhin, Sergey N.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons-Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006236','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006236"><span id="translatedtitle">Spacecraft environmental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> expert system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koons, H. C.; Gorney, D. J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A microcomputer-based expert system is being developed at the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory to assist in the diagnosis of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to address <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by surface charging, bulk charging, single event effects and total radiation dose. These effects depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local environment (which is highly variable), the satellite exposure time and the hardness of the circuits and components of the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instruments Personal Consultant Plus expert system shell. The completed expert system knowledge base will include 150 to 200 rules, as well as a spacecraft attributes database, an historical spacecraft <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> database, and a space environment database which is updated in near real-time. Currently, the expert system is undergoing development and testing within the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED204171.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED204171.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Rivers of <span class="hlt">Energy</span>: The Hydropower <span class="hlt">Potential</span>. Worldwatch Paper No. 44.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Deudney, Daniel</p> <p></p> <p>Described are the history, current status and future <span class="hlt">potential</span> of hydroelectric power in the world. Issues discussed include the environmental and social impacts of dam construction, and the use of small-scale hydroelectric installations in developing nations. Also considered are hydroelectric development of the world's remote regions, the need to…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.107n3904C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.107n3904C"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear time-varying <span class="hlt">potential</span> bistable <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting from human motion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Junyi; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Shengxi; Inman, Daniel J.; Lin, Jing</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>A theoretical and experimental investigation into nonlinear bistable <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting with time-varying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> is presented. The motivation for examining time-varying <span class="hlt">potentials</span> comes from the desire to harvest <span class="hlt">energy</span> from human motion. Time-varying <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> function of bistable oscillator with respect to the swing angle are established to derive the governing electromechanical model for harvesting vibration <span class="hlt">energy</span> from the swaying motion during human walking or running. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> function under different swing angles. Various motion speed treadmill tests are performed to demonstrate the advantage of time-varying bistable harvesters over linear and monostable ones in harvesting <span class="hlt">energy</span> from human motion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017284','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017284"><span id="translatedtitle">Generation of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> and the <span class="hlt">energy</span> cycle during the global weather experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Salstein, D. A.; Rosen, R. D.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Two major themes were pursued during this research period. The first of these involved examining the impacts of satellite-based data and the forecast model used by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) on general circulation statistics. For the other major topic, the diabatic heating fields produced by GLA were examined for one month during the FGGE First Special Observing Period. As part of that effort, the three-dimensional distribution of the four component heating fields were studied, namely those due to shortwave radiation, Q sub SW, longwave radiation, Q sub LW, sensible heating, Q sub S, and latent heating, Q sub L. These components were calculated as part of the GLA analysis/forecast system and archived every quarter day; from these archives cross products with temperature were computed to enable the direct calculation of certain terms of the large-scale atmospheric <span class="hlt">energy</span> cycle, namely those involving the generation of available <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> (APE). The decision to archive the diabatic heating components separately has enabled researchers to study the role of the various processes that drive the <span class="hlt">energy</span> cycle of the atmosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=33428','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=33428"><span id="translatedtitle">Top-down free-<span class="hlt">energy</span> minimization on protein <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Church, Bruce W.; Shalloway, David</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>The hierarchical properties of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> landscapes have been used to gain insight into thermodynamic and kinetic properties of protein ensembles. It also may be possible to use them to direct computational searches for thermodynamically stable macroscopic states, i.e., computational protein folding. To this end, we have developed a top-down search procedure in which conformation space is recursively dissected according to the intrinsic hierarchical structure of a landscape's effective-<span class="hlt">energy</span> barriers. This procedure generates an inverted tree similar to the disconnectivity graphs generated by local minima-clustering methods, but it fundamentally differs in the manner in which the portion of the tree that is to be computationally explored is selected. A key ingredient is a branch-selection algorithm that takes advantage of statistically predictive properties of the landscape to guide searches down the tree branches that are most likely to lead to the physically relevant macroscopic states. Using the computational folding of a ?-hairpin-forming peptide as an example, we show that such predictive properties indeed exist and can be used for structure prediction by free-<span class="hlt">energy</span> global minimization. PMID:11344256</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJMPE..2550001S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJMPE..2550001S"><span id="translatedtitle">Phenomenological calculation of nuclear binding <span class="hlt">energy</span> and density with Yukawa-<span class="hlt">potentials</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scheid, W.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, we study a phenomenological collective model for the calculation of the nuclear density and ground state binding <span class="hlt">energy</span> of nuclei. The proton density is assumed proportional to the nuclear density. The total binding <span class="hlt">energy</span> of the nuclear matter consists of the binding <span class="hlt">energy</span> of infinite nuclear matter, of two Yukawa-<span class="hlt">potentials</span>, of the Coulomb-<span class="hlt">energy</span> and of the symmetry-<span class="hlt">energy</span>. The parameters of the Yukawa-<span class="hlt">potential</span> are fitted with the Bethe-Weizsäcker (BW) mass formula. The resulting binding <span class="hlt">energies</span> and nuclear densities agree quite satisfying with known nuclear values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5315928','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5315928"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> displacement of petroleum imports by solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>DeLeon, P.; Jackson, B.L.; McNown, R.F.; Mahrenholz, G.J.</p> <p>1980-05-01</p> <p>The United States currently imports close to half of its petroleum requirements. This report delineates the economic, social, and political costs of such a foreign oil dependency. These costs are often intangible, but combined they clearly constitute a greater price for imported petroleum than the strictly economic cost. If we can assume that imported oil imposes significant socioeconomic costs upon the American economy and society, one way to reduce these costs is to develop alternative, domestic <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources - such as solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies - which can displace foreign petroleum. The second half of this report estimates that by the year 2000, solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> technologies can displace 3.6 quads of petroleum. This figure includes solar <span class="hlt">energy</span> applications in utilities, industrial and agricultural process heat, and transportation. The estimate can be treated as a lower bound; if the United States were to achieve the proposed goal of 20 quads by 2000, the amount of displaced oil probably would be greater. Although all the displaced oil would not be imported, the reduction in imported petroleum would relieve many of the conditions that increase the present cost of foreign oil to the American consumer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047458','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047458"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Portland cement particle size distribution control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements for cement manufacturing. Because of its scope, the work of Phase 3 will be carried out in 10 main tasks, which will be discussed in this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6260545','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6260545"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Portland Cement particle size distribution control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using exiting or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements for cement manufacturing. Because of its scope, the work of Phase 3 will be carried out in 10 main tasks, which will be discussed in this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371550','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21371550"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking Demysitified</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jung, Dong-Won; Lee, Jae Yong</p> <p>2010-02-10</p> <p>We reinterpret <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-mediated supersymmetry breaking from a field-theoretic perspective in which superconformal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> couple to either the chiral compensator or the U(1){sub R} vector su-perfield. As supersymmetry in the hidden sector is spontaneously broken by non-vanishing vacuum expectation values of the chiral compensator F-term and/or the U(1){sub R} vector superfield D-term, the soft breakdown of supersymmetry emerges in the visible sector. This approach is physically more understandable compared with the conventional approach where the chiral compensator is treated on the same footing as a spurion in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810015994','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810015994"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of DSN software <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21550298','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21550298"><span id="translatedtitle">Proton Size <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barger, Vernon; Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Keung, Wai-Yee; Marfatia, Danny</p> <p>2011-04-15</p> <p>A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low <span class="hlt">energy</span> data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1704c0009A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1704c0009A"><span id="translatedtitle">The use of Compton scattering in detecting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in soil-possible use in pyromaterial detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abedin, Ahmad Firdaus Zainal; Ibrahim, Noorddin; Zabidi, Noriza Ahmad; Demon, Siti Zulaikha Ngah</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The Compton scattering is able to determine the signature of land mine detection based on dependency of density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and <span class="hlt">energy</span> change of scattered photons. In this study, 4.43 MeV gamma of the Am-Be source was used to perform Compton scattering. Two detectors were placed between source with distance of 8 cm and radius of 1.9 cm. Detectors of thallium-doped sodium iodide NaI(TI) was used for detecting gamma ray. There are 9 <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> used in this simulation. The physical of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is in cylinder form with radius of 10 cm and 8.9 cm height. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is buried 5 cm deep in the bed soil measured 80 cm radius and 53.5 cm height. Monte Carlo methods indicated the scattering of photons is directly proportional to density of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The difference between detector response with <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and without <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> namely contrast ratio values are in a linear relationship with density of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of air, wood and water give positive contrast ratio values whereas explosive, sand, concrete, graphite, limestone and polyethylene give negative contrast ratio values. Overall, the contrast ratio values are greater than 2 % for all <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The strong contrast ratios result a good detection capability and distinction between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23577208','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23577208"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of biomass from conservation grasslands in Minnesota, USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jungers, Jacob M; Fargione, Joseph E; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Lehman, Clarence</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Perennial biomass from grasslands managed for conservation of soil and biodiversity can be harvested for bioenergy. Until now, the quantity and quality of harvestable biomass from conservation grasslands in Minnesota, USA, was not known, and the factors that affect bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span> from these systems have not been identified. We measured biomass yield, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency, and plant tissue nitrogen (N) as metrics of bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span> from mixed-species conservation grasslands harvested with commercial-scale equipment. With three years of data, we used mixed-effects models to determine factors that influence bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Sixty conservation grassland plots, each about 8 ha in size, were distributed among three locations in Minnesota. Harvest treatments were applied annually in autumn as a completely randomized block design. Biomass yield ranged from 0.5 to 5.7 Mg ha(-1). May precipitation increased biomass yield while precipitation in all other growing season months showed no affect. Averaged across all locations and years, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency was 450 l Mg(-1) and the concentration of plant N was 7.1 g kg(-1), both similar to dedicated herbaceous bioenergy crops such as switchgrass. Biomass yield did not decline in the second or third year of harvest. Across years, biomass yields fluctuated 23% around the average. Surprisingly, forb cover was a better predictor of biomass yield than warm-season grass with a positive correlation with biomass yield in the south and a negative correlation at other locations. Variation in land ethanol yield was almost exclusively due to variation in biomass yield rather than biomass quality; therefore, efforts to increase biomass yield might be more economical than altering biomass composition when managing conservation grasslands for ethanol production. Our measurements of bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and the factors that control it, can serve as parameters for assessing the economic viability of harvesting conservation grasslands for bioenergy. PMID:23577208</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3618185','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3618185"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> of Biomass from Conservation Grasslands in Minnesota, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jungers, Jacob M.; Fargione, Joseph E.; Sheaffer, Craig C.; Wyse, Donald L.; Lehman, Clarence</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Perennial biomass from grasslands managed for conservation of soil and biodiversity can be harvested for bioenergy. Until now, the quantity and quality of harvestable biomass from conservation grasslands in Minnesota, USA, was not known, and the factors that affect bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span> from these systems have not been identified. We measured biomass yield, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency, and plant tissue nitrogen (N) as metrics of bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span> from mixed-species conservation grasslands harvested with commercial-scale equipment. With three years of data, we used mixed-effects models to determine factors that influence bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Sixty conservation grassland plots, each about 8 ha in size, were distributed among three locations in Minnesota. Harvest treatments were applied annually in autumn as a completely randomized block design. Biomass yield ranged from 0.5 to 5.7 Mg ha−1. May precipitation increased biomass yield while precipitation in all other growing season months showed no affect. Averaged across all locations and years, theoretical ethanol conversion efficiency was 450 l Mg−1 and the concentration of plant N was 7.1 g kg−1, both similar to dedicated herbaceous bioenergy crops such as switchgrass. Biomass yield did not decline in the second or third year of harvest. Across years, biomass yields fluctuated 23% around the average. Surprisingly, forb cover was a better predictor of biomass yield than warm-season grass with a positive correlation with biomass yield in the south and a negative correlation at other locations. Variation in land ethanol yield was almost exclusively due to variation in biomass yield rather than biomass quality; therefore, efforts to increase biomass yield might be more economical than altering biomass composition when managing conservation grasslands for ethanol production. Our measurements of bioenergy <span class="hlt">potential</span>, and the factors that control it, can serve as parameters for assessing the economic viability of harvesting conservation grasslands for bioenergy. PMID:23577208</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5796888','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5796888"><span id="translatedtitle">Methane recovery from coalbeds: a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> source</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mroz, T.H.; Ryan, J.G.; Byrer, C.W.</p> <p>1983-10-01</p> <p>This document integrates all of the available geologic and coal resource data that have been acquired in the Coalbed Methane Project over the past 5 years to determine the stratigraphic units and geographical areas wherein the methane production <span class="hlt">potential</span> is classified as favorable. Sixteen basins were included in this compilation. Each basin is a chapter in this report. The chapter write-ups feature sections on geology, coal resource, <span class="hlt">potential</span> methane resource and recommendations for development of the technology base needed to estimate recovery <span class="hlt">potential</span>. Information used in the sections is supported by a list of references. The integration of these data has removed much of the uncertainty about what production <span class="hlt">potential</span> exists and where the favorable trends are located in the basin. This will aid the producers who are considering well-drilling ventures for coalbed methane recovery. Estimates of production performance from any new wells can only be developed once fundamental reservoir property measurements are acquired. This is the next field activity required. Preliminary results of the coalbed methane resource effort show that many of the coal regions in the US have significant volumes of coalbed methane. The evaluation of the core desorption data from over 50 cooperative wells has helped DOE to refine the in-place methane estimates of the various coal regions. The summary of the methane resource estimates for 16 basins is shown in the Summary of Results Table. Based upon these initial results, the basins showing a high resource estimate of coalbed methane include the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861207','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/861207"><span id="translatedtitle">A New Methodology for Early <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection of BWR Instabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ivanov, K. N.</p> <p>2005-11-27</p> <p>The objective of the performed research is to develop an early <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of <span class="hlt">potential</span> power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810043638&hterms=cutler&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dcutler%252C%2Br','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810043638&hterms=cutler&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAuthor-Name%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dcutler%252C%2Br"><span id="translatedtitle">Determining the electron <span class="hlt">energy</span> distribution near the plasma <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the earth's ionosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.; Cutler, J. R.; Dobbs, M. E.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A determination of the plasma <span class="hlt">potential</span> using an electrostatic analyzer is described in which the <span class="hlt">potential</span> difference between the instrument slit system and surrounding plasma is minimized. Data obtained from rocket-borne instrumentation demonstrate the viability of this technique for electron fluxes between thermal <span class="hlt">energies</span> (about 0.5 V) and suprathermal <span class="hlt">energies</span> (many volts).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hydrogen&pg=7&id=EJ1084321','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hydrogen&pg=7&id=EJ1084321"><span id="translatedtitle">3D Printed <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Free <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> and free <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=energy&pg=4&id=EJ1084321','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=energy&pg=4&id=EJ1084321"><span id="translatedtitle">3D Printed <span class="hlt">Potential</span> and Free <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> and free <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26980401','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26980401"><span id="translatedtitle">Density and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in soft-repulsive dimeric fluids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Munaó, Gianmarco; Saija, Franz</p> <p>2016-04-14</p> <p>We report Monte Carlo results for the fluid structure of a system of dimeric particles interacting via a core-softened <span class="hlt">potential</span>. More specifically, dimers interact through a repulsive pair <span class="hlt">potential</span> of an inverse-power form, modified in such a way that the repulsion strength is softened for a given range of distances. The aim of such a study is to investigate how both the elongation of the dimers and the softness of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> affect some features of the model. Our results show that the dimeric fluid exhibits both density and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, even if the interaction is not characterized by two length scales. Upon increasing the aspect ratio of the dimers, such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are progressively hindered, with the structural <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> surviving even after the disappearance of the density <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These results shed light on the peculiar behaviour of molecular systems of non-spherical shape, showing how geometrical and interaction parameters play a fundamental role in determining the presence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. PMID:26980401</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..985C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..985C"><span id="translatedtitle">ENSO cycle and climate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Yongli; Zhao, Yongping; Feng, Junqiao; Wang, Fan</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The inter-annual variability of the tropical Pacific Subsurface Ocean Temperature <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (SOTA) and the associated anomalous atmospheric circulation over the Asian North Pacific during the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) were investigated using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) atmospheric reanalysis data and simple ocean data simulation (SODA). The relationship between the ENSO and the climate of China was revealed. The main results indicated the following: 1) there are two ENSO modes acting on the subsurface tropical Pacific. The first mode is related to the mature phase of ENSO, which mainly appears during winter. The second mode is associated with a transition stage of the ENSO developing or decaying, which mainly occurs during summer; 2) during the mature phase of El Nio, the meridionality of the atmosphere in the mid-high latitude increases, the Aleutian low and high pressure ridge over Lake Baikal strengthens, northerly winds prevail in northern China, and precipitation in northern China decreases significantly. The ridge of the Ural High strengthens during the decaying phase of El Nio, as atmospheric circulation is sustained during winter, and the northerly wind <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appears in northern China during summer. Due to the ascending branch of the Walker circulation over the western Pacific, the western Pacific Subtropical High becomes weaker, and south-southeasterly winds prevail over southern China. As a result, less rainfall occurs over northern China and more rainfall over the Changjiang River basin and the southwestern and eastern region of Inner Mongolia. The flood disaster that occurred south of Changjiang River can be attributed to this. The La Nia event causes an opposite, but weaker effect; 3) the ENSO cycle can influence climate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within China via zonal and meridional heat transport. This is known as the "atmospheric-bridge", where the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> within the tropical Pacific transfers to the mid-high latitude in the northern Pacific through Hadley cells and Rossby waves, and to the western Pacific-eastern Indian Ocean through Walker circulation. This research also discusses the special air-sea boundary processes during the ENSO events in the tropical Pacific, and indicates that the influence of the subsurface water of the tropical Pacific on the atmospheric circulation may be realized through the sea surface temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the mixed water, which contact the atmosphere and transfer the anomalous heat and moisture to the atmosphere directly. Moreover, the reason for the heavy flood within the Changjiang River during the summer of 1998 is reviewed in this paper.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6814840','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6814840"><span id="translatedtitle">Geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span>: a proven resource with costly <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1980-08-01</p> <p>The commercial use of geothermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> to generate electricity has been spreading across the country since the California Geyser site was developed in 1960. Petroleum companies see geothermal power generation as a way to broaden their own base. The binary-cycle technology to use hydrothermal resources will be ready by 1985. Power generation from geothermal heat will be costly even though the resource itself is free and renewable; but the economics will improve as fossil-fuel prices increase. (DCK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047465','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6047465"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> conservation <span class="hlt">potential</span> of Portland Cement particle size distribution control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tresouthick, S.W.; Weiss, S.J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The main objective of Phase 3 is to develop practical economic methods of controlling the particle size distribution of portland cements using existing or modified mill circuits with the principal aim of reducing electrical <span class="hlt">energy</span> requirements for cement manufacturing. The work of Phase 3, because of its scope, will be carried out in 10 main tasks, some of which will be handled simultaneously. Progress on each of these tasks is discussed in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/443905','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/443905"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces for CH bond cleavage reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harding, L.B.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Ab initio, multi-reference, configuration interaction calculations are reported for CH{sub 4}{leftrightarrow}CH{sub 3}+H, CH{sub 3}F{leftrightarrow}CH{sub 2}F+H, CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}{leftrightarrow}CHF{sub 2}+H, and CHF{sub 3}{leftrightarrow}CF{sub 3}+H. Two equivalent, barrier-less paths are found for the CH{sub 3}+H recombination, two inequivalent, barrier-less paths are found for the CH{sub 2}F+H and CHF{sub 2}+H recombinations (depending on which side of the radical the H atom approaches), and only one barrier-less path is found for the CF{sub 3}+H recombination. Minimum <span class="hlt">energy</span> path for H atom approaching CF{sub 3} from the concave side is predicted to have a barrier of 27 kcal/mole. Both minimum <span class="hlt">energy</span> path <span class="hlt">energies</span> and transitional frequencies as function of R{sub CH} for all 4 reactions are predicted to be similar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NuPhA.941..179L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NuPhA.941..179L"><span id="translatedtitle">An in-medium heavy-quark <span class="hlt">potential</span> from the Q Q bar free <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Shuai Y. F.; Rapp, Ralf</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>We investigate the problem of extracting a static <span class="hlt">potential</span> between a quark and its antiquark in a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) from lattice-QCD computations of the singlet free <span class="hlt">energy</span>, FQQbar (r). We utilize the thermodynamic T-matrix formalism to calculate the free <span class="hlt">energy</span> from an underlying <span class="hlt">potential</span> ansatz resummed in ladder approximation. Imaginary parts of both Q Q bar <span class="hlt">potential</span>-type and single-quark self-<span class="hlt">energies</span> are included as estimated from earlier results of the T-matrix approach. We find that the imaginary parts, and in particular their (low-)<span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence, induce marked deviations of the (real part of the) <span class="hlt">potential</span> from the calculated free <span class="hlt">energy</span>. When fitting lattice results of the latter, the extracted <span class="hlt">potential</span> is characterized by significant long-range contributions from remnants of the confining force. We briefly discuss consequences of this feature for the heavy-quark transport coefficient in the QGP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhyD..165..213K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhyD..165..213K"><span id="translatedtitle">Are the <span class="hlt">energy</span> and magnetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> cascades direct or inverse in 2D MHD turbulence?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Eun-jin; Dubrulle, Breng`ere</p> <p>2002-05-01</p> <p>Transfer of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and magnetic <span class="hlt">potential</span> is studied in 2D MHD turbulence in the presence of a background shear flow and magnetic field. The <span class="hlt">energy</span> is injected into both fluid and magnetic field by external forcing. By using a two-scale analysis and the Gabor transform, the direction of the cascade of <span class="hlt">energy</span> and magnetic vector <span class="hlt">potential</span> is found to depend on the properties of forcings. In particular, in the case of a magnetic forcing that is isotropic, the magnetic vector <span class="hlt">potential</span> cascades from small to large-scales whereas the <span class="hlt">energy</span> from large to small-scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMSA51B4094S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMSA51B4094S"><span id="translatedtitle">Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Preliminary results suggest that such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=233766&keyword=faster+AND+light&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58537587&CFTOKEN=30223264','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=233766&keyword=faster+AND+light&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58537587&CFTOKEN=30223264"><span id="translatedtitle">Coral can have growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Coral growth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApPhL..96r4103E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApPhL..96r4103E"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting <span class="hlt">potential</span> of piezoaeroelastic systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Erturk, A.; Vieira, W. G. R.; De Marqui, C.; Inman, D. J.</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the concept of piezoaeroelasticity for <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting. The focus is placed on mathematical modeling and experimental validations of the problem of generating electricity at the flutter boundary of a piezoaeroelastic airfoil. An electrical power output of 10.7 mW is delivered to a 100 k? load at the linear flutter speed of 9.30 m/s (which is 5.1% larger than the short-circuit flutter speed). The effect of piezoelectric power generation on the linear flutter speed is also discussed and a useful consequence of having nonlinearities in the system is addressed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5236752','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5236752"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> use reduction <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the beet sugar industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barron, T.S.; Cleary, M.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Process <span class="hlt">energy</span> use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7152400','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7152400"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> use reduction <span class="hlt">potential</span> in the beet sugar industry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Process <span class="hlt">energy</span> use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JSV...329.1215M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JSV...329.1215M"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigations of a nonlinear <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvester with a bistable <span class="hlt">potential</span> well</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mann, B. P.; Owens, B. A.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>This paper investigates a nonlinear <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvester that uses magnetic interactions to create an inertial generator with a bistable <span class="hlt">potential</span> well. The motivating hypothesis for this work was that nonlinear behavior could be used to improve the performance of an <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvester by broadening its frequency response. Theoretical investigations study the harvester's response when directly powering an electrical load. Both theoretical and experimental tests show that the <span class="hlt">potential</span> well escape phenomenon can be used to broaden the frequency response of an <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvester.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NewA...34..250W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NewA...34..250W"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> in a gravitationally bound two-body system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> problem in a gravitationally bound two-body system is studied in the framework of a recently proposed impact model of gravity (Wilhelm et al., 2013). The concept of a closed system has been modified, before the physical processes resulting in the liberation of the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> can be described. The <span class="hlt">energy</span> is extracted from the background flux of hypothetical interaction entities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6935419','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6935419"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> from biomass in Louisiana. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brown, W.H.; Ristroph, D.L.; Dionigi, C.P.; Nghiem, N.P.</p> <p>1983-12-01</p> <p>The objective of this project is to identify feasible Louisiana-grown biomass crops and residues, to combine these with technically and economically feasible conversion processes, and to provide integrated biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> production systems in Louisiana. Among the recommended integrated systems are: cotton gin trash and rice hull processing residues used for either direct combustion or methane or ethanol production. Steam generation via direct combustion is recommended. Hardwood chips are economically feasible despite considerable price and supply instability, while high sugar or starch content crops are easily converted to ethanol but limited by price. Possible breakthroughs in biomass production or in the hydrolysis of starch or cellulose substrates may decrease processing costs. Recommended areas for future study dealing with production include: (1) increase biomass availability and density; (2) increase harvesting, transportation and storage technologies; (3) inexpensive, efficient small scale conversion; and (4) better knowledge of the effects of removal of residues on soil fertility and erosion and other ecosociological impacts. Recommendations that concern conversion are: (5) increased understanding of optimal separation and use of molecular fractions of lignocellulose; (6) more efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulose; (7) better microorganisms for conversion to <span class="hlt">energy</span>; and (8) more efficient technology specific to biomass. Twenty-two research topics that would enhance the above recommendations are proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25a5010H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SMaS...25a5010H"><span id="translatedtitle">Non-resonant <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesting via an adaptive bistable <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Narrow bandwidth and easy detuning, inefficiency in broadband and non-stationary excitations, and difficulties in matching a linear harvester’s resonance frequency to low-frequency excitations at small scales, have convinced researchers to investigate nonlinear, and in particular bistable, <span class="hlt">energy</span> harvesters in recent years. However, bistable harvesters suffer from co-existing low and high <span class="hlt">energy</span> orbits, and sensitivity to initial conditions, and have recently been proven inefficient when subjected to many real-world random and non-stationary excitations. Here, we propose a novel non-resonant buy-low-sell-high strategy that can significantly improve the harvester’s effectiveness at low frequencies in a much more robust fashion. This strategy could be realized by a passive adaptive bistable system. Simulation results confirm the high effectiveness of the adaptive bistable system following a buy-low-sell-high logic when subjected to harmonic and random non-stationary walking excitations compared to its conventional bistable and linear counterparts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24018749','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24018749"><span id="translatedtitle">Transiting the molecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface along low <span class="hlt">energy</span> pathways: the TRREAT algorithm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Campa, Carlos; Miller, Ronald E</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>The Transition Rapidly exploring Random Eigenvector Assisted Tree (TRREAT) algorithm is introduced to perform searches along low curvature pathways on a <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES). The method combines local curvature information about the PES with an iterative Rapidly exploring Random Tree algorithm (LaValle, Computer Science Department, Iowa State University, 1998, TR98-11) that quickly searches high-dimensional spaces for feasible pathways between local minima. Herein, the method is applied to identifying conformational changes of molecular systems using Cartesian coordinates while avoiding a priori definition of collective variables. We analyze the pathway identification problem for alanine dipeptide, cyclohexane and glycine using nonreactive and reactive forcefields. We show how TRREAT-identified pathways can be used as valuable input guesses for double-ended methods such as the Nudged Elastic Band when ascertaining transition state <span class="hlt">energies</span>. This method can be utilized to improve/extend the reaction databases that lie at the core of automatic chemical reaction mechanism generator software currently developed to build kinetic models of chemical reactions. PMID:24018749</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6271271','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6271271"><span id="translatedtitle">US Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Revolving Loan Fund: analysis of <span class="hlt">potential</span> applications supporting integrated community <span class="hlt">energy</span> systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bertram, K.M.</p> <p>1985-06-01</p> <p>This study identifies and evaluates several <span class="hlt">potential</span> applications for a US Department of <span class="hlt">Energy</span> (DOE) Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) to promote district heating and cooling (DHC) and grid-connected integrated community <span class="hlt">energy</span> systems (GC-ICES). Project loans from the $10-million RLF now under consideration would tentatively have a maximum size of $300,000 and would be repayable over three to five years on a monthly ''mortgage payment'' basis at below-market interest rates. Monthly payments on outstanding loans would generate constant inflows of cash, which, under effective cash-management practices, could keep government costs of the RLF to a minimum. Public-sector and nonprofit organizations would be eligible to use the RLF. Also eligible would be private-sector firms developing projects in conjunction with public or nonprofit organizations, as well as corporate users of DHC systems and GC-ICES. On the basis of this research, it is concluded that several effective uses would be immediately available for the revolving loan fund, if and when it is implemented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997APS..APR.J1590H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997APS..APR.J1590H"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotational <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>A new N_2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive ab initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational <span class="hlt">energy</span> transfer is studied using the new <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm-1 and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation(W. M. Huo and S. Green, J. Chem. Phys. 104), 7572 (1996). based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,(A. van der Avoird, P. E. S. Wormer, and A. P. J. Jansen, J. Chem. Phys. 84), 1629 (1986). it is found that the the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large ΔJ transitions, but for small ΔJ transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014isms.confEMH12N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014isms.confEMH12N"><span id="translatedtitle">Vibrational Levels and Resonances on a New <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Surface for the Ground Electronic State of Ozone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ndengue, Steve Alexandre; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The isotopic ratios for ozone observed in laboratory and atmospheric measurements, known as the ozone isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>,[1,2] have been an open question in physical and atmospheric chemistry for the past 30 years. The biggest limitation in achieving agreement between theory and experiment has been the availability of a satisfactory[3-5] ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface (PES). The presence of a spurious reef feature in the asymptotic region of most PESs has been associated with large discrepancies between calculated and observed rates of formation especially at low temperature. We recently proposed a new global <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface for ozone[6,7] possessing 4 features that make it suitable for kinetics and dynamics studies: excellent equilibrium parameters, good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, accurate dissociation <span class="hlt">energy</span> and a transition region with accurate topography (without the reef artifact). This PES has been used recently to simulate the temperature dependent exchange reaction (16O+16O2) with a quantum statistical model[6,7], and, for the first time, a negative temperature dependence which agrees with experiments was obtained, indicating the good quality of this global surface. A quantum description of the ozone exchange and recombination reaction requires knowledge of the resonances but also the rovibrational levels just below the dissociation. We present results of global 3-well vibrational-state calculations up to the dissociation threshold and (J = 0) resonances up to 1000 wn beyond. The calculations were done using a large DVR basis ( 24 million functions) with a symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm as well as MCTDH. Results indicate the presence of localized bound states at <span class="hlt">energies</span> close to the dissociation threshold beyond which some long-lived resonances follow, contrasted with a few delocalized bound states with density at large values of the stretching coordinates. References: 1- K. Mauersberger et al., Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 50, 1 (2005) 2- R. Schinke et al., Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 57, 625 (2006) 3- R. Siebert et al., J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9749 (2002) 4- M. Ayouz and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164311 (2013) 5- V.G. Tyuterev et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134307 (2013) 6- R. Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011) 7- R. Dawes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 201103 (2013)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714283Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714283Z"><span id="translatedtitle">The sea surface currents as a <span class="hlt">potential</span> factor in the estimation and monitoring of wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianoy, Stavros; Liakatas, Aristotelis</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The use of wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> as an alternative renewable is receiving attention the last years under the shadow of the economic crisis in Europe and in the light of the promising corresponding <span class="hlt">potential</span> especially for countries with extended coastline. Monitoring and studying the corresponding resources is further supported by a number of critical advantages of wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> compared to other renewable forms, like the reduced variability and the easier adaptation to the general grid, especially when is jointly approached with wind power. Within the framework, a number of countries worldwide have launched research and development projects and a significant number of corresponding studies have been presented the last decades. However, in most of them the impact of wave-sea surface currents interaction on the wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> has not been taken into account neglecting in this way a factor of <span class="hlt">potential</span> importance. The present work aims at filling this gap for a sea area with increased scientific and economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Based on a combination of high resolution numerical modeling approach with advanced statistical tools, a detailed analysis is proposed for the quantification of the impact of sea surface currents, which produced from downscaling the MyOcean-FO regional data, to wave <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The results although spatially sensitive, as expected, prove beyond any doubt that the wave- sea surface currents interaction should be taken into account for similar resource analysis and site selection approaches since the percentage of impact to the available wave power may reach or even exceed 20% at selected areas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012788','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012788"><span id="translatedtitle">An Extreme-Value Approach to <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Vulnerability Identification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Everett, Chris; Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this paper is to present a method for importance analysis in parametric probabilistic modeling where the result of interest is the identification of <span class="hlt">potential</span> engineering vulnerabilities associated with postulated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in system behavior. In the context of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), under which this method has been developed, these vulnerabilities, designated as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, are conditions that produce high risk in the presence of anomalous system behavior. The method defines a parameter-specific Parameter Vulnerability Importance measure (PVI), which identifies <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> risk-model parameter values that indicate the <span class="hlt">potential</span> presence of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vulnerabilities, and allows them to be prioritized for further investigation. This entails analyzing each uncertain risk-model parameter over its credible range of values to determine where it produces the maximum risk. A parameter that produces high system risk for a particular range of values suggests that the system is vulnerable to the modeled anomalous conditions, if indeed the true parameter value lies in that range. Thus, PVI analysis provides a means of identifying and prioritizing <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>-related engineering issues that at the very least warrant improved understanding to reduce uncertainty, such that true vulnerabilities may be identified and proper corrective actions taken.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17677857','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17677857"><span id="translatedtitle">Channels of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> dissipation during multiply charged argon-ion bombardment of copper.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kost, D; Facsko, S; Mller, W; Hellhammer, R; Stolterfoht, N</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>The dissipation of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> of multiply charged Ar ions incident on Cu has been studied by complementary electron spectroscopy and calorimetry at charge states between 2 and 10 and kinetic <span class="hlt">energies</span> between 100 eV and 1 keV. The emitted and deposited fractions of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> increase at increasing charge state, showing a significant jump for charge states q>8 due to the presence of L-shell vacancies in the ion. Both fractions balance the total <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span>, thus rendering former hypotheses of a significant deficit of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> obsolete. The experimental data are reproduced by computer simulations based on the extended dynamic classical-over-the-barrier model. PMID:17677857</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...720054S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...720054S"><span id="translatedtitle">Ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4731820','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4731820"><span id="translatedtitle">Ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26821751','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26821751"><span id="translatedtitle">Ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the <span class="hlt">potentials</span> that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state <span class="hlt">potential</span> around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/883388','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/883388"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of Geothermal <span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Sulphurdale Geothermal Field, Sulphurdale, Utah</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-10-01</p> <p>The Sulphurdale Geothermal Field is located in Beaver County Utah, within the boundaries of the Cove Fort--Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). During the past year, three wells drilled in Section 7, T-26-S, R-6-W, have produced dry steam from a fractured volcanic formation located at a depth of about 1100 feet. Two of these three wells are currently prepared to supply steam to a power plant, and one well has been plugged and abandoned. ThermaSource, Inc. was retained by Mother Earth Industries, the operator of the field, to conduct well tests and render an opinion as to the nature of the geothermal reserves and assess the commercial <span class="hlt">potential</span> of these reserves. Because of the limited area that has been explored to date, there can be no assurance that the reserves estimate will prove accurate. Project economics are based on parameters believed to be accurate, but there is no assurance that such cash flow projections will be realized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820034092&hterms=wind+energy+wind+turbines&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dwind%2Benergy%2Bwind%2Bturbines','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820034092&hterms=wind+energy+wind+turbines&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dwind%2Benergy%2Bwind%2Bturbines"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> and early operational experience for large wind turbines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Projections for the total <span class="hlt">potential</span> output of large wind turbines in the U.S. are reviewed. NASA has developed nine large windpowered generators, of 100 kW, 200 kW, 2 MW, and 2.5 MW capacities, with rotors 100-300 ft in diameter, and all with horizontal axes. Approximately 214,000 sq miles of the U.S. have been determined as having substantial wind regimes and terrain suitable for large wind turbine siting. This translates into 340,000 Mod 2 (2.5 MW) wind turbines producing 4.9 quads of electricity annually, equivalent to saving 2.5 billion barrels of oil/yr. The cost of electricity is seen as the critical factor in utility acceptance of large wind turbines, and the Mod 2 machines are noted to achieve the 2-4 cents/kWh (1977 dollars) COE which is necessary. Problems such as pollution, including visual, auditory, EM, and land use difficulties are considered, and solutions are indicated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6003321','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6003321"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> from livestock and poultry wastes in the South. Agricultural Economic Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jones, H.B.; Ogden, E.A.</p> <p>1984-11-01</p> <p>Livestock and poultry wastes could produce significant amounts of biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> if conventional <span class="hlt">energy</span> prices continue to rise. This study estimates the economically recoverable <span class="hlt">energy</span> available through anaerobic digestion or direct burning of animal wastes in the South for the base year 1980 with projections for 1985 and 1990. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> thermal <span class="hlt">energy</span> from livestock and poultry wastes in 1990 could total more than 79.5 trillion Btu, or about 30 percent of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> from such sources nationwide. The total <span class="hlt">potential</span> farm value of biomass <span class="hlt">energy</span> from livestock and poultry enterprises in the South could range from $344 million to $1.08 billion in 1990 depending upon the types of conventional <span class="hlt">energy</span> displaced. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> products from these wastes attained their highest value when substituted for LP gas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/446406','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/446406"><span id="translatedtitle">Yield stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in B2 FeAl</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yoshimi, K.; Hanada, S.; Yoo, M.H.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>The studies on yield stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of B2 FeAl single crystals are reviewed in this paper. A positive temperature dependence of yield stress, so-called yield stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, is observed in B2 FeAl in which excess vacancies are fully annealed out. Associated with the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, characteristic asymmetry is found between tension and compression. While the strain-rate sensitivity is almost zero in the temperature range of the yield stress <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the stress relaxation becomes significant with increasing temperature, indicating that a recovery process is thermally activated. It is ascertained by the two-surface trace analysis that slip transition from <111> direction at intermediate temperature to <100> at high temperature occurs around the peak temperature. Even at the peak temperature, in addition, operative slip vector for yielding is confirmed to be predominantly <111> by TEM. Also, it is observed that <111>-type superdislocations are frequently climb-dissociated in the temperature range of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. APB formation on {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane is energetically favorable, which is in agreement with the Flinn`s calculation for the B2 superlattice that APB <span class="hlt">energy</span> on {l_brace}111{r_brace} plane is lower than that on {l_brace}110{r_brace} plane. Such an anisotropy of APB <span class="hlt">energy</span> would offer specific driving force for the climb dissociation on <111> superdislocations. On the basis of the observed results, the anomalous strengthening behavior of B2 FeAl single crystals is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.U43C1413D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.U43C1413D"><span id="translatedtitle">Development <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for California's Offshore Wind <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Resource</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dvorak, M. J.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Archer, C. L.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>An initial analysis was performed for areas suitable for offshore wind farm development near the California coast. The siting of an offshore wind farm is limited by water depth, with shallow water being the most preferable economically. Acceptable depths for offshore wind farms were broken up into three categories, based on current and future wind turbine tower support technology; ?20 meters depth for monopile towers, ?50 meters for water jacket tripods/quadrapods, and ? 200 meters depth for deep water floating tower technology which is likely to be developed in the next 15 years. Using the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model version 5 (MM5) to predict winds aloft at high resolution (1.67 and 5 km) near the locations of interest, annual 80 meter wind speeds were found for each area. Annual 80 meter wind speeds were based on the average of January, April, July, and Octobers' 2005/2006 MM5 model data. The interannual variation is also examined. Floating buoys were used to validate the surface level winds off the California coast. Using the REpower 5M 5.0 MW, 126 meter diameter offshore wind turbine, a preliminary overall resource assessment was made for coastal California. Initial estimates show that 2-10 TWh, 9-27 TWh, and 67-293 TWh of <span class="hlt">energy</span> could be harnessed annually using monopile, state of the art, and future turbine support technology in Northern California, the Bay Area, and Southern California respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3973395','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3973395"><span id="translatedtitle">Brittle fracture in a periodic structure with internal <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mishuris, Gennady S.; Slepyan, Leonid I.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We consider a brittle fracture taking account of self-equilibrated distributed stresses existing at microlevel in the absence of external forces. To determine how the latter can affect the crack equilibrium and growth, a model of a structured linearly elastic body is introduced, consisting of two equal symmetrically arranged layers (or half-planes) connected by an interface as a prospective crack path. The interface comprises a discrete set of elastic bonds. In the initial state, the bonds are assumed to be stressed in such a way that tensile and compressive forces of the same value alternate. In the general considerations, the layers are assumed to be of an unspecified periodic structure, where such self-equilibrated stresses may also exist. A two-line chain and a lattice are examined as the specified structure. We consider the states of the body-with-a-crack under such microlevel stresses (MS) and under a combined action of the remote forces and MS. Analytical solutions to the considered problems are presented based on the introduction of a selective discrete transform. We demonstrate that MS can increase as well as decrease the crack resistance depending on the internal <span class="hlt">energy</span> level. We also discuss different scenarios of the crack growth. PMID:24808756</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......255A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.......255A"><span id="translatedtitle">Calibrated <span class="hlt">energy</span> simulations of <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings in actual retail buildings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alhafi, Zuhaira</p> <p></p> <p>Retail stores are commercial buildings with high <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption due to their typically large volumes and long hours of operation. This dissertation assesses heating, ventilating and air conditioning saving strategies based on <span class="hlt">energy</span> simulations with input parameters from actual retail buildings. The dissertation hypothesis is that "Retail store buildings will save a significant amount of <span class="hlt">energy</span> by (1) modifying ventilation rates, and/or (2) resetting set point temperatures. These strategies have shown to be beneficial in previous studies. As presented in the literature review, <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings ranged from 0.5% to 30% without compromising indoor thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The retail store buildings can be ventilated at rates significantly lower than rates called for in the ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2010 while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Therefore, two dissertation objectives are addressed: (1) Investigate opportunities to reduce ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality in retail stores located in Central Pennsylvania, (2) Investigate opportunities to increase (in summer) and decrease (in winter) set point temperatures that do not compromise thermal comfort. This study conducted experimental measurements of ventilation rates required to maintain acceptable air quality and indoor environmental conditions requirements for two retail stores using ASHRAE Standard 62.1_2012. More specifically, among other parameters, occupancy density, indoor and outdoor pollutant concentrations, and indoor temperatures were measured continuously for one week interval. One of these retail stores were tested four times for a yearlong time period. Pollutants monitored were formaldehyde, carbon dioxide, particle size distributions and concentrations, as well as total volatile organic compounds. As a part of the base protocol, the number of occupants in each store was hourly counted during the test, and the results reveal that the occupant densities were approximately 20% to 30% of that called by ASHRAE 62.1. Formaldehyde was the most important contaminant of concern in retail stores investigated. Both stores exceeded the most conservative health guideline for formaldehyde (OEHHA TWA REL = 7.3 ppb). This study found that source removal and reducing the emission rate, as demonstrated in retail stores sampled in this study, is a viable strategy to meet the health guideline. Total volatile compound were present in retail stores at low concentrations well below health guidelines suggested by Molhave (1700microg /m 2) and Bridges (1000 microg /m2). Based on these results and through mass--balance modeling, different ventilation rate reduction scenarios were proposed, and for these scenarios the differences in <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption were estimated. Findings of all phases of this desertion have contributed to understanding (a) the trade-off between <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings and ventilation rates that do not compromise indoor air quality, and (b) the trade-off between <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings and resets of indoor air temperature that do not compromise thermal comfort. Two models for retail stores were built and calibrated and validated against actual utility bills. <span class="hlt">Energy</span> simulation results indicated that by lowering the ventilation rates from measured and minimum references would reduce natural gas <span class="hlt">energy</span> use by estimated values of 6% to 19%. Also, this study found that the electrical cooling <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption was not significantly sensitive to different ventilation rates. However, increasing indoor air temperature by 3°C in summer had a significant effect on the <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings. In winter, both <span class="hlt">energy</span> savings strategies, ventilation reduction and decrease in set points, had a significant effect on natural gas consumption. Specially, when the indoor air temperature 21°C was decreased to 19.4°C with the same amount of ventilation rate of Molhaves guideline for both cases. Interestingly, the temperature of 23.8°C (75°F), which is the lowest value of ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort for sedentary people (cashiers) and the highest value for thermal comfort adjustments due to activity level (customers and workers) that are calculated by using empirical equation, was the optimum temperature for sedentary and active people in Retail store buildings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20979737','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20979737"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Potential</span> Applications for Nuclear <span class="hlt">Energy</span> besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Market</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Energy</span> supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778854','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778854"><span id="translatedtitle">The global technical <span class="hlt">potential</span> of bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> in 2050 considering sustainability constraints</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Haberl, Helmut; Beringer, Tim; Bhattacharya, Sribas C; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Hoogwijk, Monique</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span>, that is, <span class="hlt">energy</span> produced from organic non-fossil material of biological origin, is promoted as a substitute for non-renewable (e.g., fossil) <span class="hlt">energy</span> to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and dependency on <span class="hlt">energy</span> imports. At present, global bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> use amounts to approximately 50 EJ/yr, about 10% of humanity's primary <span class="hlt">energy</span> supply. We here review recent literature on the amount of bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> that could be supplied globally in 2050, given current expectations on technology, food demand and environmental targets (‘technical potential’). Recent studies span a large range of global bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potentials</span> from ≈30 to over 1000 EJ/yr. In our opinion, the high end of the range is implausible because of (1) overestimation of the area available for bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> crops due to insufficient consideration of constraints (e.g., area for food, feed or nature conservation) and (2) too high yield expectations resulting from extrapolation of plot-based studies to large, less productive areas. According to this review, the global technical primary bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> in 2050 is in the range of 160–270 EJ/yr if sustainability criteria are considered. The <span class="hlt">potential</span> of bio-<span class="hlt">energy</span> crops is at the lower end of previously published ranges, while residues from food production and forestry could provide significant amounts of <span class="hlt">energy</span> based on an integrated optimization (‘cascade utilization’) of biomass flows. PMID:24069093</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARN18011V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARN18011V"><span id="translatedtitle">Microscopic Origin of the 0.7-<span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> in Quantum Point Contacts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>von Delft, J.; Bauer, F.; Heyder, J.; Schubert, E.; Borowski, D.; Taubert, D.; Bruognolo, B.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Ludwig, S.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Despite the simple structure of quantum point contacts, their conductance properties exhibit anomalous features, collectively known as the ``0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span>'', whose origin is still subject to controversial discussions. We offer a detailed microscopic explanation for the 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the zero-bias peak that typically accompanies it: the common origin of both is a smeared van Hove singularity in the local density of states at the bottom of the lowest one-dimensional subband of the point contact, which causes an anomalous enhancement in the Hartree <span class="hlt">potential</span> barrier, magnetic spin susceptibility and inelastic scattering rate. We present theoretical calculations and experimental results that show good qualitative agreement for the dependence of the conductance on gate voltage, magnetic field, temperature, bias voltage (including the zero-bias peak) and interaction strength. For low field and temperature we predict and observe Fermi-liquid behavior analogous to that known for the Kondo effect in quantum dots. At high <span class="hlt">energies</span>, however, the analogy between 0.7-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and Kondo effect ceases to be applicable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMNS31A..10A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMNS31A..10A"><span id="translatedtitle">Geoelectrical Characterization of the Punta Banda System: A Possible Structural Control for the Geothermal <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arango-Galvan, C.; Flores-Marquez, E.; Prol-Ledesma, R.; Working Group, I.</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>The lack of sufficient drinking water in Mxico has become a very serious problem, especially in the northern desert regions of the country. In order to give a real solution to this phenomenon the IMPULSA research program has been created to develope novel technologies based on desalination of sea and brackish water using renewable sources of <span class="hlt">energy</span> to face the problem. The Punta Banda geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is located towards the northern part of Baja California Peninsula (Mexico). High water temperatures in some wells along the coast depicted a geothermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. An audiomagnetotelluric survey was carried out in the area as a preliminary study, both to understand the process generating these anomalous temperatures and to assess its <span class="hlt">potential</span> exploitation to supply hot water to desalination plants. Among the electromagnetic methods, the audiomagnetotellurics (AMT) method is appropriated for deep groundwater and geothermal studies. The survey consisted of 27 AMT stations covering a 5 km profile along the Agua Blanca Fault. The employed array allowed us to characterize the geoelectrical properties of the main structures up to 500 m depth. Two main geoelectrical zones were identified: 1) a shallow low resistivity media located at the central portion of the profile, coinciding with the Maneadero valley and 2) two high resitivity structures bordering the conductive zone possibly related to NS faulting, already identified by previous geophysical studies. These results suggest that the main geothermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are controlled by the dominant structural regime in the zone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511805W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511805W"><span id="translatedtitle">Change in the periodicity of the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> of watershed runoff from climate, land use and <span class="hlt">energy</span> policy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wrman, Anders; Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea; Lindstrm, Gran</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Recent investigations show that landuse changes and hydropower regulation has caused significant changes in the runoff statistics in Swedish rivers during the 20th century. These changes are found to be more pronounced than the corresponding change that has occurred due to climatic changes and have implications to frequency of floods as well as the effectiveness of hydropower regulation. Because of the change towards a sustainable <span class="hlt">energy</span> system with more intermittent <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources, like windpower, the stress on the water availability will come from several climatic, technical and management factors. Here we use the coherence spectrum in river discharge to derive information on the variability in the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> over different periods (annually and monthly) and estimate the <span class="hlt">energy</span> <span class="hlt">potential</span> associated with the different terrestrial part of the hydrological cycle, such as land <span class="hlt">potential</span>, stream flow <span class="hlt">potential</span> and groundwater circulation <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The overall stream flow <span class="hlt">potential</span> in Sweden is estimated to be 145 TWh per year, but there is a significant variation in this <span class="hlt">potential</span> over the land surface as well as temporally. The coherence spectrum between northern and southern rivers in Sweden approaches asymptotically about 20 - 25 % for long-term variations. This means that the coefficient of variation of the in annual discharge for the entire country is enhanced in comparison the coefficient of variation of the annual discharge from individual rivers. Tentative analyses of feasible hydropower <span class="hlt">potential</span> indicate that the coherence of discharge is a significant factor for coordination and utilization of the water availability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1441..420B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1441..420B"><span id="translatedtitle">Resolving the axial mass <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in ?? scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bodek, A.; Budd, H. S.; Christy, M. E.</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>We present a parametrization of the observed enhancement in the transverse electron quasielastic (QE) response function for nucleons bound in carbon as a function of the square of the four momentum transfer (Q2) in terms of a correction to the magnetic form factors of bound nucleons. The parametrization should also be applicable to the transverse cross section in neutrino scattering. If the transverse enhancement originates from meson exchange currents (MEC), then it is theoretically expected that any enhancement in the longitudinal or axial contributions is small. We present the predictions of the "Transverse Enhancement" model (which is based on electron scattering data only) for the ??, ?? differential and total QE cross sections for nucleons bound in carbon. The Q2 dependence of the transverse enhancement is observed to resolve much of the long standing discrepancy ("Axial Mass <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>") in the QE total cross sections and differential distributions between low <span class="hlt">energy</span> and high <span class="hlt">energy</span> neutrino experiments on nuclear targets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9875E..25B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9875E..25B"><span id="translatedtitle">Model selection for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Burnaev, E.; Erofeev, P.; Smolyakov, D.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> detection based on one-class classification algorithms is broadly used in many applied domains like image processing (e.g. detection of whether a patient is "cancerous" or "healthy" from mammography image), network intrusion detection, etc. Performance of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithm crucially depends on a kernel, used to measure similarity in a feature space. The standard approaches (e.g. cross-validation) for kernel selection, used in two-class classification problems, can not be used directly due to the specific nature of a data (absence of a second, abnormal, class data). In this paper we generalize several kernel selection methods from binary-class case to the case of one-class classification and perform extensive comparison of these approaches using both synthetic and real-world data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984GeCoA..48.1401N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984GeCoA..48.1401N"><span id="translatedtitle">Titanium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in meteorites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neimeyer, S.; Lugmair, G. W.</p> <p>1984-07-01</p> <p>Studies of Ti isotopic compositions have shown that virtually every Ca-Al-rich Allende inclusion contains anomalous Ti. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a study of Ti isotopic compositions in meteorites. One objective of the study is to evaluate the possibility of a relation between oxygen and Ti <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, while another objective is to explore questions regarding the origin of the Ti <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A summary of the major experimental findings of the study of Ti isotopic compositions is also presented. It is noted that an assessment of the implications of the Ti results favors a chemical memory type of model in which products from various nucleosynthetic sources survive in mineral grains. Isotopic heterogeneities are then preserved due to incomplete mixing and/or equilibriation with the bulk of solar system matter. Strong arguments are found to exist against a pure late supernova injection model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010wfpc.rept....2D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010wfpc.rept....2D"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved WF4 <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Corrections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dixon, V.; Biretta, J.</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>The WF4 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a temperature-dependent reduction in the gain of the WF4 CCD. Software added to calwp2 corrects stellar photometry to ~ 0.01 magnitude, but undercorrects the CCD bias level by several DN. While tracking down this discrepancy, we discovered three other complications that motivated us to construct a new set of reference files: a discontinuity in the WF4 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> between pixels in the image and the overscan region, unexpected structure in the overscan region for low-bias images, and an error in the application of the reference file by calwp2. New reference files that correct for these effects have been created and used to reprocess all low-bias images in the WFPC2 static archive.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11541324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11541324"><span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in extraterrestrial grains.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ireland, T R</p> <p>1996-03-01</p> <p>Isotopic compositions are referred to as anomalous if the isotopic ratios measured cannot be related to the terrestrial (solar) composition of a given element. While small effects close to the resolution of mass spectrometric techniques can have ambiguous origins, the discovery of large isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in inclusions and grains from primitive meteorites suggests that material from distinct sites of stellar nucleosynthesis has been preserved. Refractory inclusions, which are predominantly composed of the refractory oxides of Al, Ca, Ti, and Mg, in chondritic meteorites commonly have excesses in the heaviest isotopes of Ca, Ti, and Cr which are inferred to have been produced in a supernova. Refractory inclusions also contain excess 26Mg from short lived 26Al decay. However, despite the isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicating the preservation of distinct nucleosynthetic sites, refractory inclusions have been processed in the solar system and are not interstellar grains. Carbon (graphite and diamond) and silicon carbide grains from the same meteorites also have large isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> but these phases are not stable in the oxidized solar nebula which suggests that they are presolar and formed in the circumstellar atmospheres of carbon-rich stars. Diamond has a characteristic signature enriched in the lightest and heaviest isotopes of Xe, and graphite shows a wide range in C isotopic compositions. SiC commonly has C and N isotopic signatures which are characteristic of H-burning in the C-N-O cycle in low-mass stars. Heavier elements such as Si, Ti, Xe, Ba, and Nd, carry an isotopic signature of the s-process. A minor population of SiC (known as Grains X, ca. 1%) are distinct in having decay products of short lived isotopes 26Al (now 26Mg), 44Ti (now 44Ca), and 49V (now 49Ti), as well as 28Si excesses which are characteristic of supernova nucleosynthesis. The preservation of these isotopic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> allows the examination of detailed nucleosynthetic pathways in stars. PMID:11541324</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/979362"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Discrete Chiral Symmetries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Creutz, M.</p> <p>2009-09-07</p> <p>The quantum <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047271&hterms=earth+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dearth%2Bgravity','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810047271&hterms=earth+gravity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dearth%2Bgravity"><span id="translatedtitle">Spherical earth gravity and magnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis by equivalent point source inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation <span class="hlt">potential</span> field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of <span class="hlt">potential</span> field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates <span class="hlt">potential</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, pseudo-<span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, vector <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMIN11C1312V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMIN11C1312V"><span id="translatedtitle">Applications of TOPS <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Detection Framework to Amazon Drought Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Ganguly, S.; Michaelis, A.; Hashimoto, H.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include capability for automated <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. While there are large numbers of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms for multivariate datasets, we are extending this capability beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection itself and towards an automated analysis that would discover the possible causes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. We have integrated this knowledge base with a framework for deploying an ensemble of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection algorithms on large volumes of Earth science datasets and applied it to specific scientific applications that support research conducted by our group. In one early application, we were able to process large number of MODIS, TRMM, CERES data along with ground-based weather and river flow observations to detect the evolution of 2010 drought in the Amazon, identify the affected area, and publish the results in three weeks. A similar analysis of the 2005 drought using the same data sets took nearly 2 years, highlighting the <span class="hlt">potential</span> contribution of our <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> framework in accelerating scientific discoveries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011710','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011710"><span id="translatedtitle">Columbus Payloads Flow Rate <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> confirmation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JChPh.135g4302Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JChPh.135g4302Y"><span id="translatedtitle">High-level ab initio <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces and vibrational <span class="hlt">energies</span> of H2CS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Ribeyre, Tristan; Thiel, Walter</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Six-dimensional (6D) <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> surfaces (PESs) of H2CS have been generated ab initio using the recently proposed explicitly correlated (F12) singles and doubles coupled cluster method including a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T)-F12b [T. B. Adler, G. Knizia, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] in conjunction with F12-optimized correlation consistent basis sets. Core-electron correlation, high-order correlation, scalar relativistic, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer terms were included as additive high-level (HL) corrections. The resulting 6D PESs were represented by analytical functions which were used in variational calculations of the vibrational term values below 5000 cm-1. The best PESs obtained with and without the HL corrections, VQZ-F12* HL and VQZ-F12*, reproduce the fundamental vibrational wavenumbers with mean absolute deviations of 1.13 and 1.22 cm-1, respectively. A detailed analysis of the effects of the HL corrections shows how the VQZ-F12 results benefit from error cancellation. The present purely ab initio PESs will be useful as starting points for empirical refinements towards an accurate "spectroscopic" PES of H2CS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4691663','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4691663"><span id="translatedtitle">Langer's arch: a rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> affects axillary lymphadenectomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al Maksoud, Ahmed M.; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Langer's arch is the best-known anatomic variant of definite surgical implication in the region of the axilla. This rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a muscular slip extending from the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle to the tendons, muscles or fasciae around the superior part of the humerus. In this report, we present a rare case of left axillary arch. During modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, we encountered an abnormal muscle slip crossing the axilla from the LD muscle to the posterior surface of the pectoralis major muscle anterior to the neurovascular structures. Preoperative knowledge is essential to identify such unusual <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and avoid <span class="hlt">potential</span> complications both intra- and postoperatively. PMID:26712801</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26712801','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26712801"><span id="translatedtitle">Langer's arch: a rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> affects axillary lymphadenectomy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al Maksoud, Ahmed M; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed M</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Langer's arch is the best-known anatomic variant of definite surgical implication in the region of the axilla. This rare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a muscular slip extending from the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle to the tendons, muscles or fasciae around the superior part of the humerus. In this report, we present a rare case of left axillary arch. During modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, we encountered an abnormal muscle slip crossing the axilla from the LD muscle to the posterior surface of the pectoralis major muscle anterior to the neurovascular structures. Preoperative knowledge is essential to identify such unusual <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and avoid <span class="hlt">potential</span> complications both intra- and postoperatively. PMID:26712801</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=viscosity&pg=5&id=EJ147160','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=viscosity&pg=5&id=EJ147160"><span id="translatedtitle">Determining the Intermolecular <span class="hlt">Potential</span> <span class="hlt">Energy</span> in a Gas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Olbregts, J.; Walgraeve, J. P.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Describes an experiment in which gas viscosity coefficients over a large temperature range are used to determine the parameters of the intermolecular <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> and other properties such as virial coefficients. (MLH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20824181','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20824181"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of U.S. Electric End-Use <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Efficiency <span class="hlt">Potential</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gellings, Clark W.; Wikler, Greg; Ghosh, Debyani</p> <p>2006-11-15</p> <p>Demand-side management holds significant <span class="hlt">potential</span> to reduce growth in U.S. <span class="hlt">energy</span> consumption and peak demand, and in a cost-effective manner. But significant policy interventions will be required to achieve these benefits. (author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695567','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695567"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic polarization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for the halo nucleus {sup 6}He in medium-<span class="hlt">energy</span> elastic scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Suzuki, Y.</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>We study dynamic polarization <span class="hlt">potentials</span> for a halo nucleus {sup 6}He scattered by a {sup 12}C target in the eikonal approximation. We use a realistic, six-nucleon wave function of {sup 6}He to include both the halo-neutron and the core-nucleon excitations on an equal footing. We discuss the <span class="hlt">energy</span> dependence of the polarization <span class="hlt">potential</span> in relation to that of the nucleon-target optical <span class="hlt">potential</span>. The imaginary part of the polarization <span class="hlt">potential</span> changes a sign (negative to positive with increasing <span class="hlt">energy</span>) around the incident <span class="hlt">energy</span> of 200 MeV/nucleon, which gives different contributions, depending on the <span class="hlt">energy</span>, to the elastic differential cross section as well as the reaction cross section.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15014827','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15014827"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the <span class="hlt">Potential</span> for Renewable <span class="hlt">Energy</span> on National Forest System Lands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This technical report and CD for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), evaluates the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for renewable <span class="hlt">energy</span> resource development on National Forest System (NFS) lands. USFS can use the report findings to consider <span class="hlt">potential</span> for development of solar and wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> resources on NFS lands, in land management decisions. The Geographical Information System (GIS) based analysis resulted in the following findings: (1) Ninety-nine National Forest Units have high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for power production from one or more of these solar and wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources; and (2) Twenty National Forest Units in nine states have high <span class="hlt">potential</span> for power production from two or more of these solar and wind <span class="hlt">energy</span> sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10165731','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10165731"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Energy</span> flux and hydrogeology of thermal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Gulf of Mexico Basin -- South Texas example. Progress report, [1 September 1993--28 February 1994</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sharp, J.M. Jr.</p> <p>1994-03-01</p> <p>This report covers the period from 1 September 1993 through 28 February 1994. The last Technical Progress Report was submitted in September 1993. In this period, we have focused our efforts on the following activities (a more detailed description of each effort is (1) Finalizing collection of radiogenic heat production data; (2) Evaluating petrographic controls on thermal conductivity; (3) Modeling one-dimensional heat conduction with sources; (4) Completing base geologic cross-section; (5) Acquiring pressure data to augment data base; (6).Putting map and well data into digital format for analysis; (7) Analyzing salinity, temperate and fluid <span class="hlt">potential</span> data for propensity of free convection; (8) Finalizing preliminary investigation into depressurization of reservoirs; (9) Preparing presentations for AAPG meeting in Denver; (10) Presenting results at the Geological Society of America Meeting in Boston (October 1993); (11) Collaborating with project members of the DOE funded Global Basins Research Network who are working on a project in the Eugene Island Block, offshore Louisiana; and (12) Collaborating with others working on research in the Gulf of Mexico Basin in our Department and with CSIRO scientists in Adelaide, Australia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730010662','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730010662"><span id="translatedtitle">Theory of the phase <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the thermosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Volland, H.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The temperature-density phase <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is discussed on the basis of a quasi-three-dimensional model in which the thermosphere dynamics (including <span class="hlt">energy</span> advection and diffusion associated with wind circulation) is considered in a self consistent form. Included in this analysis are the first three harmonics with nonlinear coupling between diurnal and semi-diurnal tides.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991PhLA..152...83W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991PhLA..152...83W"><span id="translatedtitle">Conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of some 2-d Z (n) models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>William, Peter</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>We describe a numerical calculation of the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the case of some two-dimensional statistical models undergoing a second-order phase transition, utilizing a recently developed method to compute the partition function exactly. This computation is carried out on a massively parallel CM2 machine, using the finite size scaling behaviour of the free <span class="hlt">energy</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26588970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26588970"><span id="translatedtitle">New Soft-Core <span class="hlt">Potential</span> Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free <span class="hlt">Energy</span> Calculations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gapsys, Vytautas; Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L</p> <p>2012-07-10</p> <p>The fields of rational drug design and protein engineering benefit from accurate free <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic integration scheme is often used to calculate changes in the free <span class="hlt">energy</span> of a system by integrating the change of the system's Hamiltonian with respect to a coupling parameter. These methods exploit nonphysical pathways over thermodynamic cycles involving particle introduction and annihilation. Such alchemical transitions require the modification of the classical nonbonded <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> terms by applying soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> functions to avoid singularity points. In this work, we propose a novel formulation for a soft-core <span class="hlt">potential</span> to be applied in nonequilibrium free <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations that alleviates singularities, numerical instabilities, and additional minima in the <span class="hlt">potential</span> <span class="hlt">energy</span> for all combinations of nonbonded interactions at all intermediate alchemical states. The method was validated by application to (a) the free <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations of a closed thermodynamic cycle, (b) the mutation influence on protein thermostability, (c) calculations of small ligand solvation free <span class="hlt">energies</span>, and (d) the estimation of binding free <span class="hlt">energies</span> of trypsin inhibitors. The results show that the novel soft-core function provides a robust and accurate general purpose solution to alchemical free <span class="hlt">energy</span> calculations. PMID:26588970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047251&hterms=cratons&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcratons','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820047251&hterms=cratons&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dcratons"><span id="translatedtitle">Magsat scalar <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distribution - The global perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Frey, H.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>It is established that geographic coincidences exist between high-altitude Magsat scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and major geologic and tectonic structures, with oceanic abyssal plains overlain by negative <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> agreeing well in spatial extent and position and submarine platforms lying beneath positive scalar <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. In addition, geographic coincidence is found in the continents between many high-latitude positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and shields and cratons in North America, Eurasia and Australia. While these correlations are qualitative, they serve to identify regions for detailed study. The global distribution of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provides a basis for comparative study which will be enhanced when reduced-to-pole versions of the Magsat data become available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4801N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42.4801N"><span id="translatedtitle">Interpreting fluid pressure <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in shallow intraplate argillaceous formations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neuzil, C. E.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Investigations have revealed several instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid <span class="hlt">potential</span> in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. Formations with the pressure <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This is consistent with transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10-17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 annum or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide constraints on formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 annum and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10-19-10-22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017263','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950017263"><span id="translatedtitle">Attention focusing and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection in systems monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Doyle, Richard J.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the <span class="hlt">potential</span> for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/445629"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of cerium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with indicators of paleoenvironment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>MacLeod, K.G.; Irving, A.J.</p> <p>1996-09-01</p> <p>Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. <span class="hlt">Potential</span> interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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