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Sample records for potential estrogenic effects

  1. Multiple sclerosis at menopause: Potential neuroprotective effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Mindy S; Mensah, Virginia A; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating and neurodegenerative condition of the central nervous system that preferentially afflicts women more than men. Low estrogen states such as menopause and the postpartum period favor exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in women with the disease. Existing and emerging evidence suggests a role for estrogen in the alleviation of symptoms and reversal of pathology associated with MS. While clinical evidence is sparse regarding the benefit of estrogen therapy for women at risk for MS exacerbations, scientific data demonstrates that estrogen potentiates numerous neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogens play a wide range of roles involved in MS disease pathophysiology, including increasing antiinflammatory cytokines, decreasing demyelination, and enhancing oxidative and energy producing processes in CNS cells. PMID:25544310

  2. Examining triclosan-induced potentiation of the estrogen uterotrophic effect

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (TCS), a widely used antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in rats orally administered 3 μg/kg EE and TCS (2 to 18 mg/kg) in the utero...

  3. Potential estrogenic effects of phosphorus-containing flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Lu, Meiya; Dong, Xiaowu; Wang, Cui; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping; Zhao, Meirong

    2014-06-17

    As the substitute of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), further assessments about the potential ecological safety and health risks of phosphorus-containing flame retardants (PFRs) are required because the worldwide demand for PFRs has been increasing every year. In this study, we examined the agonistic/antagonistic activity of a group of PFRs by three in vitro models (luciferase reporter gene assay, yeast two-hybrid assay, and E-screen assay). Molecule docking was used to further explain the interactions between ERα and PFRs. Data from luciferase reporter gene analysis showed three members of the nine tested PFRs significantly induced estrogenic effects, with the order of TPP > TCP > TDCPP, while TCEP and TEHP have remarkable antiestrogenic properties with calculated REC20 and RIC20 values of 10(-6) M or lower. Results from the luciferase reporter gene method are generally consistent with results obtained from the yeast two-hybrid assay and E-screen, except for the positive estrogenic activity of TBP in E-screen testing. Docking results showed that binding between ligands and ERα was stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. As a proposed alternative for brominated flame retardant, PFRs may have anti/estrogenic activity via ERα at the low dose typical of residue in environmental matrix or animals. PFRs with a short chain, halogen, and benzene ring in the substituent group tend to be estrogenic. Our research suggests that comprehensive evaluations, including health and ecological assessments, are required in determining whether PFRs are preferable as an emerging industrial substitute. PMID:24844797

  4. Biosensor Zebrafish Provide New Insights into Potential Health Effects of Environmental Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Okhyun; Takesono, Aya; Tada, Masazumi; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental estrogens alter hormone signaling in the body that can induce reproductive abnormalities in both humans and wildlife. Available testing systems for estrogens are focused on specific systems such as reproduction. Crucially, however, the potential for significant health impacts of environmental estrogen exposures on a variety of body systems may have been overlooked. Objective: Our aim was to develop and apply a sensitive transgenic zebrafish model to assess real-time effects of environmental estrogens on signaling mechanisms in a whole body system for use in integrated health assessments. Methods: We created a novel transgenic biosensor zebrafish containing an estrogen-inducible promoter derived with multiple tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) and a Gal4ff-UAS system for enhanced response sensitivity. Results: Using our novel estrogen-responsive transgenic (TG) zebrafish, we identified target tissues for environmental estrogens; these tissues have very high sensitivity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Exposure of the TG fish to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) induced specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a wide variety of tissues including the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, otic vesicle, forebrain, lateral line, and ganglions, most of which have not been established previously as targets for estrogens in fish. Furthermore, we found that different EDCs induced GFP expression with different tissue response patterns and time trajectories, suggesting different potential health effects. Conclusion: We have developed a powerful new model for understanding toxicological effects, mechanisms, and health impacts of environmental estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:22510978

  5. Bridging the Gap From Screening Assays to Estrogenic Effects in Fish: Potential Roles of Multiple Estrogen Receptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to delineate the ligand interactions that drive biomarker induction in fish exposed to estrogenic pollutants and provide a case study on the capacity of human (h) estrogen receptor (ER)-based in vitro screening assays to predict estrogenic effects in aquatic species. Adult male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to solutions of singular steroidal estrogens or to the estrogenic extract of an anaerobic swine waste lagoon. All exposure concentrations were calibrated to be equipotent based on the yeast estrogen screen (YES), which reports activation of hERα. These exposures elicited significantly different magnitudes of hepatic vitellogenin and choriogenin gene induction in the male medaka. Effects of the same YES-calibrated solutions in the T47D-KBluc assay, which reports activation of hERα and hERβ, generally recapitulated observations in medaka. Using competitive ligand binding assays, it was found that the magnitude of vitellogenin/choriogenin induction by different estrogenic ligands correlated positively with preferential binding affinity for medaka ERβ subtypes, which are highly expressed in male medaka liver prior to estrogen exposure. Results support emerging evidence that ERβ subtypes are critically involved in the teleost estrogenic response, with the ERα:ERβ ratio being of particular importance. Accordingly, incorporation of multiple ER subtypes into estrogen screening protocols may increase predictive value for the risk assessment of aquatic systems, including complex estrogenic mixtures. PMID:24422420

  6. Synergistic Action of Flavonoids, Baicalein, and Daidzein in Estrogenic and Neuroprotective Effects: A Development of Potential Health Products and Therapeutic Drugs against Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Roy C. Y.; Zhu, Judy T. T.; Yung, Amanda W. Y.; Lee, Pinky S. C.; Xu, Sherry L.; Guo, Ava J. Y.; Zhu, Kevin Y.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the classical hormonal effect, estrogen has been reported to mediate neuroprotection in the brain, which leads to the searching of estrogen-like substances for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Flavonoids, a group of natural compounds, are well known to possess estrogenic effects and used to substitute estrogen, that is, phytoestrogen. Flavonoid serves as one of the potential targets for the development of natural supplements and therapeutic drugs against different diseases. The neuroprotection activity of flavonoids was chosen for a possible development of anti-Alzheimer's drugs or food supplements. The estrogenic activity of two flavonoids, baicalein and daidzein, were demonstrated by their strong abilities in stimulating estrogen receptor phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of estrogen responsive element in MCF-7 breast cells. The neuroprotection effects of flavonoids against β-amyloid (Aβ) were revealed by their inhibition effects on in vitro Aβ aggregation and Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 neuronal cells. More importantly, the estrogenic and neuroprotective activities of individual flavonoid could be further enhanced by the cotreatment in the cultures. Taken together, this synergistic effect of baicalein and daidzein might serve as a method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of different flavonoids against Aβ, which might be crucial in developing those flavonoidsin treating Alzheimer's disease in the future. PMID:24058373

  7. Effects of pinostrobin on estrogen metabolism and estrogen receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Le Bail, J C; Aubourg, L; Habrioux, G

    2000-08-01

    The interaction between the estrogen receptor and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (pinostrobin) was studied in the presence or absence of estradiol or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, using a stably transfected human breast cancer cell line (MVLN). We also evaluated its action on the proliferation in estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) human breast cancer cells in the same conditions than the estrogen receptor assay. On the other hand pinostrobin was evaluated for their effects on the human placental aromatase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Delta(4)/Delta(5) isomerase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities. Pinostrobin did not possess antiestrogenic activity but presented anti-aromatase activity and decreased the growth of MCF-7 cells induced by DHEAS and E(2). This study provides particularly evidence of the potential biological interest of pinostrobin among the flavonoids. PMID:10840157

  8. Estrogen effects in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Rana S.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma prevalence and severity are greater in women than in men, and mounting evidence suggests this is in part related to female steroid sex hormones. Of these, estrogen has been the subject of much study. This review highlights recent research exploring the effects of estrogen in allergic disease. Recent findings Estrogen receptors are found on numerous immunoregulatory cells and estrogen’s actions skew immune responses toward allergy. It may act directly to create deleterious effects in asthma, or indirectly via modulation of various pathways including secretory leukoprotease inhibitor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel and nitric oxide production to exert effects on lung mechanics and inflammation. Not only do endogenous estrogens appear to play a role, but environmental estrogens have also been implicated. Environmental estrogens (xenoestrogens) including bisphenol A and phthalates enhance allergic sensitization in animal models and may enhance development of atopic disorders like asthma in humans. Summary Estrogen’s role in allergic disease remains complex. As allergic diseases continue to increase in prevalence and affect women disproportionately, gaining a fuller understanding of its effects in these disorders will be essential. Of particular importance may be effects of xenoestrogens on allergic disease. PMID:23090385

  9. The estrogenic and androgenic potential of pyrethroids in vitro. Review.

    PubMed

    Saillenfait, Anne-Marie; Ndiaye, Dieynaba; Sabaté, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are used worldwide as insecticides. Their metabolites are regularly detected in the urine of adults and children from the general population. There is increasing concern that they may induce sex-hormone disrupting effects. The present work reviews available published information on the (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic activity of pyrethroids in in vitro screening tests. In recent years, a large number of pyrethroids have been evaluated using various common testing methods. In tests using recombinant yeast or mammalian cells, the pyrethroids were found to be essentially negative or weakly estrogenic. More inconsistent results were found regarding their estrogenic action in proliferation tests. Conflicting findings were also reported across studies and/or assays which evaluated their anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic potential. Some studies have suggested that certain pyrethroids may have potential antagonist activity. However, no strong interaction with the estrogenic or androgenic pathway was reported. The present review confirms the interest in performing a screening battery and in adopting an integrative approach for identifying the potential of different compounds from a chemical family to interfere with the endocrine system. PMID:26921664

  10. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  11. Effects of Estrogens and Estrogenic Disrupting Compounds on Fish Mineralized Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Patricia I. S.; Estêvão, Maria D.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play well-recognized roles in reproduction across vertebrates, but also intervene in a wide range of other physiological processes, including mineral homeostasis. Classical actions are triggered when estrogens bind and activate intracellular estrogen receptors (ERs), regulating the transcription of responsive genes, but rapid non-genomic actions initiated by binding to plasma membrane receptors were recently described. A wide range of structurally diverse compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources have been shown to interact with and disrupt the normal functions of the estrogen system, and fish are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these compounds are frequently discharged or run-off into waterways. The effect of estrogen disruptors in fish has mainly been assessed in relation to reproductive endpoints, and relatively little attention has been given to other disruptive actions. This review will overview the actions of estrogens in fish, including ER isoforms, their expression, structure and mechanisms of action. The estrogen functions will be considered in relation to mineral homeostasis and actions on mineralized tissues. The impact of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds on fish mineralized tissues will be reviewed, and the potential adverse outcomes of exposure to such compounds will be discussed. Current lacunae in knowledge are highlighted along with future research priorities. PMID:25196834

  12. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  13. Potential estrogenic effects of wastewaters on gene expression in Pimephales promelas and fish assemblages in streams of southeastern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; George, Scott D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Hemming, Joceyln D. C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct linkages between endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from municipal and industrial wastewaters and impacts on wild fish assemblages are rare. The levels of plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) and Vtg messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to wastewater effluents and dilutions of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estrogen activity, and fish assemblages in 10 receiving streams were assessed to improve understanding of important interrelations. Results from 4-d laboratory assays indicate that EE2, plasma Vtg concentration, and Vtg gene expression in fathead minnows, and 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq values) were highly related to each other (R2 = 0.98–1.00). Concentrations of E2Eq in most effluents did not exceed 2.0 ng/L, which was possibly a short-term exposure threshold for Vtg gene expression in male fathead minnows. Plasma Vtg in fathead minnows only increased significantly (up to 1136 μg/mL) in 2 wastewater effluents. Fish assemblages were generally unaffected at 8 of 10 study sites, yet the density and biomass of 79% to 89% of species populations were reduced (63–68% were reduced significantly) in the downstream reach of 1 receiving stream. These results, and moderate to high E2Eq concentrations (up to 16.1 ng/L) observed in effluents during a companion study, suggest that estrogenic wastewaters can potentially affect individual fish, their populations, and entire fish communities in comparable systems across New York, USA. 

  14. Estrogenic activity and identification of potential xenoestrogens in a coking wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Yan, Bo; Wei, Chaohai; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the estrogenic activities in influent and effluents of coking wastewater from different treatment stages were studied using Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) bioassays. Raw extracts were further fractioned to identify the potential xenoestrogens combined with YES bioassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Influent, primary effluent, and anaerobic effluent showed high estrogenic activities, with potencies of 1136±269, 1417±320, and 959±69 ng/L of 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent (EEQ), respectively. The potency of estrogenic activity was gradually removed through the treatment processes. In the final effluent, the estrogenic activity was reduced to 0.87 ng EEQ/L with a total removal efficiency of more than 99%, suggesting that the estrogenic activity was almost completely removed in the coking wastewater. For the fractions of raw extracts, bioassay results showed that the estrogenic activities were mostly present in the polar fractions. Correlation analysis between estrogenic activities and responses of identified chemicals indicated that potential xenoestrogens were the derivatives of indenol, naphthalenol, indol, acridinone, fluorenone, and carbazole. The estrogenic activity in the final effluent was higher than the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) for E2, implying that the discharged effluent would probably exert estrogenic activity risk to the aquatic ecosystem in "the worst-case scenario." PMID:25463876

  15. Manure-borne estrogens as potential environmental contaminants: a review.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C

    2003-12-15

    Livestock wastes are potential sources of endocrine disrupting compounds to the environment. Steroidal estrogen hormones such as estradiol, estrone, and estriol are a particular concern because there is evidence that low nanogram per liter concentrations of estrogens in water can adversely affect the reproductive biology of fish and other aquatic vertebrate species. We performed a literature review to assess the current state of science regarding estrogen physicochemical properties, livestock excretion, and the fate of manure-borne estrogens in the environment. Unconjugated steroidal estrogens have low solubility in water (0.8-13.3 mg L(-1)) and are moderately hydrophobic (log Kow 2.6-4.0). Cattle excrete mostly 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts, whereas swine and poultry excrete mostly 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and respective sulfated and glucuronidated counterparts. The environmental fate of estrogens is not clearly known. Laboratory-based studies have found that the biological activity of these compounds is greatly reduced or eliminated within several hours to days due to degradation and sorption. On the other hand, field studies have demonstrated that estrogens are sufficiently mobile and persistent to impact surface and groundwater quality. Future research should use standardized methods for the analysis of manure, soil, and water. More information is needed about the types and amounts of estrogens that exist in livestock wastes and the fate of manure-borne estrogens applied to agricultural lands. Field and laboratory studies should work toward revealing the mechanisms of estrogen degradation, sorption, and transport so that the risk of estrogen contamination of waterways can be minimized. PMID:14717153

  16. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women (Post-MW) than premenopausal women (Pre-MW). Despite recent advances in preventive measures, the incidence of CVD in women has shown a rise that matched the increase in the Post-MW population. The increased incidence of CVD in Post-MW has been related to the decline in estrogen levels, and hence suggested vascular benefits of endogenous estrogen. Experimental studies have identified estrogen receptor ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30 (GPER) in blood vessels of humans and experimental animals. The interaction of estrogen with vascular ERs mediates both genomic and non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by increasing nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor. Estrogen also inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the vascular cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, lipid profile and the vascular inflammatory response have been reported. In addition to the experimental evidence in animal models and vascular cells, initial observational studies in women using menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) have suggested that estrogen may protect against CVD. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) such as the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), which examined the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in older women with established CVD (HERS) or without overt CVD (WHI), failed to demonstrate protective vascular effects of estrogen treatment. Despite the initial set-back from the results of MHT RCTs, growing evidence now supports the ‘timing hypothesis’, which suggests that MHT could increase the risk of CVD if started late after menopause, but may produce beneficial cardiovascular effects in younger women during the perimenopausal period. The choice of

  17. Effectiveness of estrogen replacement in restoration of cognitive function after long-term estrogen withdrawal in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Alicja L; Savonenko, Alena V

    2002-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that some aspects of learning and memory may be altered by a midlife loss of estrogen, indicating a potential causal relationship between the deficiency of ovarian hormones and cognitive aging. In this study, the effects of estrogen withdrawal and replacement were tested in middle-aged Fischer-344 rats using different memory tasks. Estrogen withdrawal accelerated the rate of cognitive aging. A deficit first occurred 4 months after ovariectomy in working memory, which was tested in a delayed-nonmatching-to-position task, and progressed from long-delay to short-delay trials. Reference memory, which was tested in a place discrimination task and a split-stem T-maze, was not affected by aging or ovariectomy. The efficacy of estrogen in ameliorating the cognitive deficit in old rats depended on the type of treatment (acute vs chronic) and whether the aging-related decline in a particular cognitive process was aggravated by estrogen withdrawal. Chronic estrogen treatment (implants) was effective in improving working memory only when primed with repeated injections of estrogen, indicating that simulating the estrogen fluctuations of the estrous cycle may be more effective than the widely used mode of chronic pharmacological treatment. A challenge with scopolamine revealed that ovariectomy-induced cognitive deterioration coincided with a compromised cholinergic system. Importantly, the estrogen treatment that had restored effectively the cognitive abilities of old ovariectomized rats did not reduce their sensitivity to scopolamine. Taking into consideration that estrogen was highly effective against the amnestic action of scopolamine when tested in young-adult rats, these data emphasize that mechanisms of the protective effect of estrogen differ in young and old rats. PMID:12486194

  18. The pesticides endosulfan, toxaphene, and dieldrin have estrogenic effects on human estrogen-sensitive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Chung, K L; Sonnenschein, C

    1994-01-01

    Estrogenic pesticides such as DDT and chlordecone generate deleterious reproductive effects. An "in culture" bioassay was used to assess the estrogenicity of several pesticides. The E-screen test uses human breast estrogen-sensitive MCF7 cells and compares the cell yield achieved after 6 days of culture in medium supplemented with 5% charcoal-dextran stripped human serum in the presence (positive control) or absence (negative control) of estradiol and with diverse concentrations of xenobiotics suspected of being estrogenic. Among the organochlorine pesticides tested, toxaphene, dieldrin, and endosulfan had estrogenic properties comparable to those of DDT and chlordecone; the latter are known to be estrogenic in rodent models. The E-screen test also revealed that estrogenic chemicals may act cumulatively; when mixed together they induce estrogenic responses at concentrations lower than those required when each compound is administered alone. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7925178

  19. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  20. Distinct Effects of Estrogen on Mouse Maternal Behavior: The Contribution of Estrogen Synthesis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen surge following progesterone withdrawal at parturition plays an important role in initiating maternal behavior in various rodent species. Systemic estrogen treatment shortens the latency to onset of maternal behavior in nulliparous female rats that have not experienced parturition. In contrast, nulliparous laboratory mice show rapid onset of maternal behavior without estrogen treatment, and the role of estrogen still remains unclear. Here the effect of systemic estrogen treatment (for 2 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) after progesterone withdrawal was examined on maternal behavior of C57BL/6 mice. This estrogen regimen led to different effects on nursing, pup retrieval, and nest building behaviors. Latency to nursing was shortened by estrogen treatment within 2 h. Moreover, pup retrieval and nest building were decreased. mRNA expression was also investigated for estrogen receptor α (ERα) and for genes involved in regulating maternal behavior, specifically, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Estrogen treatment led to decreased ERα mRNA in both regions. Although OTR mRNA was increased in the MeA, OTR and vasopressin receptor mRNA were reduced in the MPOA, showing region-dependent transcription regulation. To determine the mechanisms for the actions of estrogen treatment, the contribution of estrogen synthesis in the brain was examined. Blockade of estrogen synthesis in the brain by systemic letrozole treatment in ovariectomized mice interfered with pup retrieval and nest building but not nursing behavior, indicating different contributions of estrogen synthesis to maternal behavior. Furthermore, letrozole treatment led to an increase in ERα mRNA in the MeA but not in the MPOA, suggesting that involvement of estrogen synthesis is brain region dependent. Altogether, these results suggest that region-dependent estrogen synthesis leads to differential transcriptional activation due

  1. The Immune System Is a Natural Target for Estrogen Action: Opposing Effects of Estrogen in Two Prototypical Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Deena; Ansar Ahmed, S.

    2016-01-01

    Analogous to other physiological systems, the immune system also demonstrates remarkable sex differences. Although the reasons for sex differences in immune responses are not precisely understood, it potentially involves differences in sex hormones (estrogens, androgens, and differential sex hormone receptor-mediated events), X-chromosomes, microbiome, epigenetics among others. Overall, females tend to have more responsive and robust immune system compared to their male counterparts. It is therefore not surprising that females respond more aggressively to self-antigens and are more susceptible to autoimmune diseases. Female hormone (estrogen or 17β-estradiol) can potentially act on all cellular subsets of the immune system through estrogen receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms. This minireview highlights differential expression of estrogen receptors on immune cells, major estrogen-mediated signaling pathways, and their effect on immune cells. Since estrogen has varied effects in female-predominant autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, we will mechanistically postulate the potential differential role of estrogen in these chronic debilitating diseases. PMID:26779182

  2. Potential role of estrogen in maintaining the imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanchun; Yao, Shuzhong

    2016-03-15

    Endometriosis, one of the most common benign gynecological diseases, affects millions of women of childbearing age. Endometriosis-associated pain is a major cause of disability and compromised quality of life in women. Neuropathic mechanisms are believed to play an important role. An imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation (reduced sympathetic innervation, with unchanged or increased sensory innervation in endometriotic lesions) has been demonstrated in endometriosis in recent studies. And it is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis-associated pain. It is primarily considered to be a natural adaptive program to endometriosis-associated inflammation. However, it is important to further clarify whether other potential modulating factors are involved in this dysregulation. It is generally accepted that endometriosis is an estrogen dependent disease. Higher estrogen biosynthesis and lower estrogen inactivation in endometriosis can lead to an excess of local estrogen in endometriotic lesions. In addition to its proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions, local estrogen in endometriosis also exerts potential neuromodulatory effects on the innervation in endometriosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of estrogen in mediating this imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis, through direct and indirect mechanisms on sympathetic and sensory nerves. Theoretical elaboration of the underlying mechanisms provides new insights in supporting the therapeutic role of estrogen in endometriosis-associated pain. PMID:26777300

  3. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  4. Aromatase inhibiting and combined estrogenic effects of parabens and estrogenic effects of other additives in cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Son, O. van; Piersma, A.H.; Jong, P.C. de; Berg, M. van den

    2008-08-01

    There is concern widely on the increase in human exposure to exogenous (anti)estrogenic compounds. Typical are certain ingredients in cosmetic consumer products such as musks, phthalates and parabens. Monitoring a variety of human samples revealed that these ingredients, including the ones that generally are considered to undergo rapid metabolism, are present at low levels. In this in vitro research individual compounds and combinations of parabens and endogenous estradiol (E{sub 2}) were investigated in the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay. The experimental design applied a concentration addition model (CA). Data were analyzed with the estrogen equivalency (EEQ) and method of isoboles approach. In addition, the catalytic inhibitory properties of parabens on an enzyme involved in a rate limiting step in steroid genesis (aromatase) were studied in human placental microsomes. Our results point to an additive estrogenic effect in a CA model for parabens. In addition, it was found that parabens inhibit aromatase. Noticeably, the effective levels in both our in vitro systems were far higher than the levels detected in human samples. However, estrogenic compounds may contribute in a cumulative way to the circulating estrogen burden. Our calculation for the extra estrogen burden due to exposure to parabens, phthalates and polycyclic musks indicates an insignificant estrogenic load relative to the endogenous or therapeutic estrogen burden.

  5. Breast-related effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators and tissue-selective estrogen complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A number of available treatments provide relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, as breast safety is a major concern, new options are needed, particularly agents with an improved mammary safety profile. Results from several large randomized and observational studies have shown an association between hormone therapy, particularly combined estrogen-progestin therapy, and a small increased risk of breast cancer and breast pain or tenderness. In addition, progestin-containing hormone therapy has been shown to increase mammographic breast density, which is an important risk factor for breast cancer. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) provide bone protection, are generally well tolerated, and have demonstrated reductions in breast cancer risk, but do not relieve menopausal symptoms (that is, vasomotor symptoms). Tissue-selective estrogen complexes (TSECs) pair a SERM with one or more estrogens and aim to blend the positive effects of the components to provide relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis without stimulating the breast or endometrium. One TSEC combination pairing conjugated estrogens (CEs) with the SERM bazedoxifene (BZA) has completed clinical development and is now available as an alternative option for menopausal therapy. Preclinical evidence suggests that CE/BZA induces inhibitory effects on breast tissue, and phase 3 clinical studies suggest breast neutrality, with no increases seen in breast tenderness, breast density, or cancer. In non-hysterectomized postmenopausal women, CE/BZA was associated with increased bone mineral density and relief of menopausal symptoms, along with endometrial safety. Taken together, these results support the potential of CE/BZA for the relief of menopausal symptoms and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis combined with breast and endometrial safety. PMID:25928299

  6. EFFECTS OF EXTROGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection of house finches. Clark, J., Fairbrother, A*. Parametrix, Inc., Corvallis, OR; Brewer, L., EBA, Inc., Sisters, OR; Bennett, R.S., USEPA, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN.

    Concern about the potential for endocrine...

  7. EFFECTS OF EXOGENOUS ESTROGEN ON MATE SELECTION OF HOUSE FINCHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about the potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife has prompted this study of effects of exogenous estrogen on mate selection in songbirds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as a model as it is ...

  8. DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION OF A POTENTIAL NON-STEROIDAL ESTROGEN: TRICLOSAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan is an antibacterial agent commonly used in industry and often detected in wastewater effluent. The potential of triclosan to act as an endocrine disruptor was examined because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidal estrogens (e.g. DES, bis-phenol A...

  9. Histopathologic Effects of Estrogens on Marine Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as estrogens estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) have been reported to affect fish reproduction. This study histologically compared and evaluated effects of EDCs in two species of treated fish. Juvenile male summer flounder (Paral...

  10. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  11. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  12. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen is used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) in ... and cause problems with the skin or nervous system), very high or very low levels of calcium ...

  13. Estrogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen tablets. If you will be taking Estrace® brand tablets, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to aspirin or tartrazine (a food color additive). Ask your pharmacist or check the manufacturer's ...

  14. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17..cap alpha..- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE/sub 2/, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the (p,n) reaction with /sup 80/Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE/sub 2/ showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE/sub 2/ were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of (/sup 80m/Br)BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones. PMID:23161396

  16. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of dietary perinatal Trifolium pratense

    PubMed Central

    Daglioglu, Suzan

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential estrogenic effects of perinatal dietary phytoestrogens on the rat uterus. Pregnant rats were divided to three groups provided the following diets: (1) rat chow, (2) rat chow with 7.5% Trifolium (T.) pratense, or (3) rat chow supplemented with 17β-estradiol (0.5 mg/kg). The dams in each group were kept on the same diet during pregnancy and lactation. Female offspring were euthanized on day 21 at which time body and organ weights were recorded and tissue samples were taken for histology. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) levels. Our results revealed estrogen-like biological effects of perinatal T. pratense exposure. Relative uterus and ovary weights in the experimental groups were increased compared to control. The number of uterine glands and luminal epithelium heights were also increased. However, there were no statistically significant changes detected in the immunostaining intensity of ERα and PR between the groups. PMID:21586870

  17. Estrogenic Environmental Chemicals and Drugs: Mechanisms for Effects on the Developing Male Urogenital System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; Richter, Catherine A.; Ruhlen, Rachel L.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2011-01-01

    Development and differentiation of the prostate from the fetal urogenital sinus (UGS) is dependent on androgen action via androgen receptors (AR) in the UGS mesenchyme. Estrogens are not required for prostate differentiation but do act to modulate androgen action. In mice exposure to exogenous estrogen during development results in permanent effects on adult prostate size and function, which is mediated through mesenchymal estrogen receptor (ER) alpha. For many years estrogens were thought to inhibit prostate growth because estrogenic drugs studied were administered at very high concentrations that interfered with normal prostate development. There is now extensive evidence that exposure to estrogen at very low concentrations during the early stages of prostate differentiation can stimulate fetal/neonatal prostate growth and lead to prostate disease in adulthood. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical that binds to both ER receptor subtypes as well as to AR. Interest in BPA has increased because of its prevalence in the environment and its detection in over 90% of people in the USA. In tissue culture of fetal mouse UGS mesenchymal cells, BPA and estradiol stimulated changes in the expression of several genes. We discuss here the potential involvement of estrogen in regulating signaling pathways affecting cellular functions relevant to steroid hormone signaling and metabolism and to inter- and intra-cellular communications that promote cell growth. The findings presented here provide additional evidence that BPA and the estrogenic drug ethinylestradiol disrupt prostate development in male mice at administered doses relevant to human exposures. PMID:21827855

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemicals as potential risk factor for estrogen-dependent cancers.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Z; Szybiak, Aleksandra; Serkies, Krystyna; Rachoń, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Civilization, industrialization, and urbanization create an environment where humans are continuously exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Some of breast cancers and endometrial cancer, which are the most common female malignant neoplasms, are estrogen-dependent tumors. Prolonged exposure to estrogens or substances with estrogenic properties may be a risk factor for their development. This paper aimed to discuss the potential adverse effect of EDCs on human health, including the role of EDCs in hormone-dependent carcinogenesis. A review of literature regarding the sources of environmental exposure to EDCs and molecular mechanisms of their action was performed. We analyzed the possible mechanisms of how these substances alter the function of the endocrine system, resulting in adverse health effects. Hundreds of substances with endocrine disrupting potential have been identified in our environment. There is accumulating evidence linking exposure to EDCs with the development of mammary and endometrial cancer. By interacting with steroid receptors, EDCs can impact the cellular processes potentially leading to carcinogenesis. There are also data showing the effect of EDCs on immune dysfunction. During lifespan, people are usually exposed to a mixture of various EDCs, which complicates the assessment of individual substances or compounds implicated in cancer development. As the prevalence of hormone-dependent tumors among women continues to increase, their successful prevention is of human benefit. Institutions representing medicine, science, industry, and governments should develop joint strategies to decrease exposure to EDC, and thus to reduce the risk of hormonedependent tumors in women. PMID:27509913

  19. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  20. Estrogen Effects on Cognitive and Synaptic Health Over the Lifecourse

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuko; Waters, Elizabeth M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen facilitates higher cognitive functions by exerting effects on brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Estrogen induces spinogenesis and synaptogenesis in these two brain regions and also initiates a complex set of signal transduction pathways via estrogen receptors (ERs). Along with the classical genomic effects mediated by activation of ER α and ER β, there are membrane-bound ER α, ER β, and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) that can mediate rapid nongenomic effects. All key ERs present throughout the body are also present in synapses of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. This review summarizes estrogen actions in the brain from the standpoint of their effects on synapse structure and function, noting also the synergistic role of progesterone. We first begin with a review of ER subtypes in the brain and how their abundance and distributions are altered with aging and estrogen loss (e.g., ovariectomy or menopause) in the rodent, monkey, and human brain. As there is much evidence that estrogen loss induced by menopause can exacerbate the effects of aging on cognitive functions, we then review the clinical trials of hormone replacement therapies and their effectiveness on cognitive symptoms experienced by women. Finally, we summarize studies carried out in nonhuman primate models of age- and menopause-related cognitive decline that are highly relevant for developing effective interventions for menopausal women. Together, we highlight a new understanding of how estrogen affects higher cognitive functions and synaptic health that go well beyond its effects on reproduction. PMID:26109339

  1. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Deficiency Results in Amplification of the Liver Fat-Lowering Effect of Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Rui, Wenjuan; Zou, Yuhong; Lee, Joonyong; Nambiar, Shashank Manohar; Lin, Jingmei; Zhang, Linjie; Yang, Yan; Dai, Guoli

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates multiple biologic processes, including hepatic lipid metabolism. Estrogen exerts actions affecting energy homeostasis, including a liver fat-lowering effect. Increasing evidence indicates the crosstalk between these two molecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Nrf2 modulates estrogen signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was induced in wild-type and Nrf2-null mice fed a high-fat diet and the liver fat-lowering effect of exogenous estrogen was subsequently assessed. We found that exogenous estrogen eliminated 49% and 90% of hepatic triglycerides in wild-type and Nrf2-null mice with NAFLD, respectively. This observation demonstrates that Nrf2 signaling is antagonistic to estrogen signaling in hepatic fat metabolism; thus, Nrf2 absence results in striking amplification of the liver fat-lowering effect of estrogen. In addition, we found the association of trefoil factor 3 and fatty acid binding protein 5 with the liver fat-lowering effect of estrogen. In summary, we identified Nrf2 as a novel and potent inhibitor of estrogen signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism. Our finding may provide a potential strategy to treat NAFLD by dually targeting Nrf2 and estrogen signaling. PMID:27189962

  2. Long-term effects of early life exposure to environmental estrogens on ovarian function: Role of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gonzalo; Foster, Warren; Paredes, Alfonso; Yi, Kun Don; Uzumcu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens play an important role in development and function of the brain and reproductive tract. Accordingly, it is thought that developmental exposure to environmental estrogens can disrupt neural and reproductive tract development potentially resulting in long-term alterations in neurobehavior and reproductive function. Many chemicals have been shown to have estrogenic activity whereas others affect estrogen production and turnover resulting in disruption of estrogen signaling pathways. However, these mechanisms and the concentrations required to induce these effects cannot account for the myriad adverse effects of environmental toxicants on estrogen sensitive target tissues. Hence, alternative mechanisms are thought to underlie the adverse effects documented in experimental animal models and thus could be important to human health. In this review, the epigenetic regulation of gene expression is explored as a potential target of environmental toxicants including estrogenic chemicals. We suggest that toxicant-induced changes in epigenetic signatures are important mechanisms underlying disruption of ovarian follicular development. In addition, we discuss how exposure to environmental estrogens during early life can alter gene expression through effects on epigenetic control potentially leading to permanent changes in ovarian physiology. PMID:25040227

  3. Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Pesticides at the Human Estrogen Receptor α and β.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Bettina; Klawonn, Frank; Nguema Bekale, Boris; Steinberg, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consumers of fruits and vegetables are frequently exposed to small amounts of hormonally active pesticides, some of them sharing a common mode of action such as the activation of the human estrogen receptor α (hERα) or β (hERβ). Therefore, it is of particular importance to evaluate risks emanating from chemical mixtures, in which the individual pesticides are present at human-relevant concentrations, below their corresponding maximum residue levels. Binary and ternary iso-effective mixtures of estrogenic pesticides at effect concentrations eliciting a 1 or 10% effect in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol were tested experimentally at the hERα in the yeast-based estrogen screen (YES) assay as well as in the human U2-OS cell-based ERα chemical-activated luciferase gene expression (ERα CALUX) assay and at the hERβ in the ERβ CALUX assay. The outcome was then compared to predictions calculated by means of concentration addition. In most cases, additive effects were observed with the tested combinations in all three test systems, an observation that supports the need to expand the risk assessment of pesticides and consider cumulative risk assessment. An additional testing of mixture effects at the hERβ showed that most test substances being active at the hERα could also elicit additive effects at the hERβ, but the hERβ was less sensitive. In conclusion, effects of the same ligands at the hERα and the hERβ could influence the estrogenic outcome under physiological conditions. PMID:26812056

  4. A potential role for estrogen in cigarette smoke-induced microRNA alterations and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Amit; Smith, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is associated with oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this review we aim to suggest that elevated levels of estrogens and their metabolites inside the lungs as a result of cigarette smoke exposure can cause widespread repression of miRNA and contribute to lung tumor development. Anti-estrogenic compounds, such as the components of cruciferous vegetables, can attenuate this effect and potentially reduce the risk of lung cancer (LC) among smokers. PMID:27413713

  5. A potential role for estrogen in cigarette smoke-induced microRNA alterations and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Amit; Burgos-Aceves, Mario Alberto; Smith, Yoav

    2016-06-01

    Alteration in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is associated with oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this review we aim to suggest that elevated levels of estrogens and their metabolites inside the lungs as a result of cigarette smoke exposure can cause widespread repression of miRNA and contribute to lung tumor development. Anti-estrogenic compounds, such as the components of cruciferous vegetables, can attenuate this effect and potentially reduce the risk of lung cancer (LC) among smokers. PMID:27413713

  6. An integrated assessment of estrogenic contamination and biological effects in the aquatic environment of The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Vethaak, A Dick; Lahr, Joost; Schrap, S Marca; Belfroid, Angélique C; Rijs, Gerard B J; Gerritsen, Anton; de Boer, Jacob; Bulder, Astrid S; Grinwis, Guy C M; Kuiper, Raoul V; Legler, Juliette; Murk, Tinka A J; Peijnenburg, Willie; Verhaar, Henk J M; de Voogt, Pim

    2005-04-01

    An extensive study was carried out in the Netherlands on the occurrence of a number of estrogenic compounds in surface water, sediment, biota, wastewater, rainwater and on the associated effects in fish. Compounds investigated included natural and synthetic hormones, phthalates, alkylphenol(ethoxylate)s and bisphenol-A. The results showed that almost all selected (xeno-)estrogens were present at low concentrations in the aquatic environment. Locally, they were found at higher levels. Hormones and nonylphenol(ethoxylate)s were present in concentrations that are reportedly high enough to cause estrogenic effects in fish. Field surveys did not disclose significant estrogenic effects in male flounder (Platichthys flesus) in the open sea and in Dutch estuaries. Minor to moderate estrogenic effects were observed in bream (Abramis brama) in major inland surface waters such as lowland rivers and a harbor area. The prevalence of feminizing effects in male fish is largest in small regional surface waters that are strongly influenced by sources of potential hormone-disrupting compounds. High concentrations of plasma vitellogenin and an increased prevalence of ovotestes occurred in wild male bream in a small river receiving a considerable load of effluent from a large sewage treatment plant. After employing in vitro and in vivo bioassays, both in situ and in the laboratory, we conclude that in this case hormones (especially 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol) and possibly also nonylphenol(ethoxylate)s are primarily responsible for these effects. PMID:15788174

  7. Effects of plasticizers and their mixtures on estrogen receptor and thyroid hormone functions.

    PubMed

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2009-08-25

    Plasticizers are additives used to increase the flexibility or plasticity of the material to which they are added, normally rigid plastic and as additives in paint and adhesives. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the estrogen and the thyroid hormone (TH) systems. We investigated in vitro the thyroid hormone-like and estrogenic activities of a range of widely used plasticizers and phenols including benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA), 4-tert-octylphenol (tOP), 4-chloro-3-methylphenol (CMP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2-phenylphenol (2-PP) and resorcinol. The TH disrupting potential was determined by the effect on the TH-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cell proliferation (T-screen). The estrogenic activities of the compounds were assessed in MVLN cells, stably transfected with an estrogen receptor (ER) luciferase reporter vector. Furthermore, the combined effect of a multi-components mixture of six plasticizers was evaluated for its estrogenic and TH-like activities. All the tested compounds, but 2-PP, significantly affected the GH3 cell proliferation. tOP, BBP and DBP activated ER transactivity, whereas DEHP antagonized the 17beta-estradiol induced ER function. The mixture significantly induced ER transactivity in an additive manner, whereas in the T-screen, the observed mixture effect was lower than predicted, suggesting a potential antagonizing effect of the mixture. In conclusion, the tested plasticizers and phenols elicited endocrine-disrupting potential that can be mediated via interference with the estrogen and TH systems. Moreover, the observed mixture effect stresses the importance of considering the combined effect of the compounds for risk assessment of human health. PMID:19463926

  8. Bisphenol A in dental sealants and its estrogen like effect

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Malik, Poonam; Singh, Jyotirmay

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A or BPA-based epoxy resins are widely used in the manufacture of commercial products, including dental resins, polycarbonate plastics, and the inner coating of food cans. BPA is a precursor to the resin monomer Bis-GMA. During the manufacturing process of Bis-GMA dental sealants, Bisphenol A (BPA) might be present as an impurity or as a degradation product of Bis-DMA through esterases present in saliva. Leaching of these monomers from resins can occur during the initial setting period and in conjunction with fluid sorption and desorption over time and this chemical leach from dental sealants may be bioactive. Researchers found an estrogenic effect with BPA, Bis-DMA, and Bis-GMA because BPA lacks structural specificity as a natural ligand to the estrogen receptor. It generated considerable concern regarding the safety of dental resin materials. This review focuses on the BPA in dental sealants and its estrogen-like effect. PMID:22629496

  9. Examining triclosan-induced estrogenic and androgenic effects on the rat reproductive system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Triclosan (TCS), a widely used antibacterial, has been shown to be an endocrine disruptor. We reported previously that TCS potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth in female rats co-administered EE (3 μg/kg) and TCS (2 to 18 m...

  10. Combined effects of estrogenic chemicals with the same mode of action using an estrogen receptor binding bioassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2014-11-01

    The increasing amounts of various estrogenic chemicals coexisting in the aquatic environment may pose environmental risks. While the concept of estradiol equivalent (EEQ) has been frequently applied in studying estrogenic mixtures, few experiments have been done to prove its reliability. In this study, the reliability of EEQ and the related model concentration addition (CA) was verified based on the two-hybrid recombinant yeast bioassay when all mixture components had the same mode of action and target of action. Our results showed that the measured estrogenic effects could be well predicted by CA and EEQ for all laboratory-made mixtures using two designs, despite the varying estrogenic activity, concentration levels and ratios of the test chemicals. This suggests that when an appropriate endpoint and its relevant bioassay are chosen, CA should be valid and the application of EEQ in predicting the effect of non-equi-effect mixtures is feasible. PMID:25461542

  11. Effects of triclocarban on the transcription of estrogen, androgen and aryl hydrocarbon receptor responsive genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Hunecke, Danele; Luch, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent that is used in detergents, soaps and other personal hygiene products. Similarly to triclosan the widespread use of TCC has raised concerns about its endocrine potential. In luciferase-based reporter assays TCC has been shown to enhance estrogenic and androgenic activities following cellular coexposure with estrogen or dihydrotestosterone, respectively. The present study demonstrates that although coexposure with TCC enhances the estrogenic and androgenic readout of luciferase-based reporter cell lines such as HeLa9908 and MDA-kb2, it fails to act as a xenoandrogen on transcriptional level, nor does it induce cell proliferation in the estrogen sensitive E-screen. In addition TCC did not alter the expression of estrogen responsive genes in human mammary carcinoma MCF-7 cells exposed to 17β-estradiol, bisphenol A, butylparaben or genistein. However, TCC was shown to interfere with the regulon of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) as TCC showed a costimulatory effect on transcription of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, effectively lowering the transcriptional threshold for both genes in the presence of estrogens. It thus seems, that while the induction of the respective luciferase reporter assays by TCC is an unspecific false positive signal caused by luciferase stabilisation, TCC has the potential to interfere with the regulatory crosstalk of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the AhR regulon. PMID:23524099

  12. Corncob bedding alters the effects of estrogens on aggressive behavior and reduces estrogen receptor-α expression in the brain.

    PubMed

    Villalon Landeros, Rosalina; Morisseau, Christophe; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Fu, Samuel H; Hammock, Bruce D; Trainor, Brian C

    2012-02-01

    There is growing appreciation that estrogen signaling pathways can be modulated by naturally occurring environmental compounds such as phytoestrogens and the more recently discovered xenoestrogens. Many researchers studying the effects of estrogens on brain function or behavior in animal models choose to use phytoestrogen-free food for this reason. Corncob bedding is commonly used in animal facilities across the United States and has been shown to inhibit estrogen-dependent reproductive behavior in rats. The mechanism for this effect was unclear, because the components of corncob bedding mediating this effect did not bind estrogen receptors. Here, we show in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) that estrogens decrease aggression when cardboard-based bedding is used but that this effect is absent when corncob bedding is used. California mice housed on corncob bedding also had fewer estrogen receptor-α-positive cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and ventromedial hypothalamus compared with mice housed on cardboard-based bedding. In addition, corncob bedding suppressed the expression of phosphorylated ERK in these brain regions as well as in the medial amygdala and medial preoptic area. Previous reports of the effects of corncob bedding on reproductive behavior are not widely appreciated. Our observations on the effects of corncob bedding on behavior and brain function should draw attention to the importance that cage bedding can exert on neuroendocrine research. PMID:22186416

  13. Effects of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on uterine estrogen receptor. II. Inhibition of estrogen . receptor transformation.

    PubMed

    Traish, A; Müller, R E; Wotiz, H H

    1980-05-10

    Previous observations suggested that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was capable of inhibiting estrogen . receptor (R . E2) activation, or translocation to the nucleus, or both. The present study attempts to define more specifically the locus of this action. To this end we have examined the physicochemical alteration produced by interaction of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with estrogen . receptor complex, using sucrose density gradient analysis and dissociation kinetics. Receptor transformation was inhibited when activation was performed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. This effect was protein- and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentration-dependent. When pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was introduced postactivation it did not have any effect on the activated receptor, but when similar treatment was followed by NABH4 reduction, the complex reverted to the monomeric entity. The dissociation behavior obtained with cytosol R . E2, warmed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, showed a biphasic curve suggesting that a significant portion of receptors remained nonactivated as demonstrated by the fast dissociating component. Due to the fact that Tris buffers cannot be used for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate experiments, we have used a borate buffer which resulted in a displacement of the sedimentation values from a 4S to 4.6 S for the unactivated receptor and 5S to 6 S for the activated form. The observations reported suggest that at least the initial effect of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate results in the inhibition of cytosolic receptor transformation from the nonactivated to the activated form. PMID:7372667

  14. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoidsmore » that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. We find diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.« less

  15. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  16. An NO Donor Approach to Neuroprotective and Procognitive Estrogen Therapy Overcomes Loss of NO Synthase Function and Potentially Thrombotic Risk

    PubMed Central

    VandeVrede, Lawren; Abdelhamid, Ramy; Qin, Zhihui; Choi, Jaewoo; Piyankarage, Sujeewa; Luo, Jia; Larson, John; Bennett, Brian M.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are effective therapeutics that preserve favorable actions of estrogens on bone and act as antiestrogens in breast tissue, decreasing the risk of vertebral fractures and breast cancer, but their potential in neuroprotective and procognitive therapy is limited by: 1) an increased lifetime risk of thrombotic events; and 2) an attenuated response to estrogens with age, sometimes linked to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. Herein, three 3rd generation SERMs with similar high affinity for estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) were studied: desmethylarzoxifene (DMA), FDMA, and a novel NO-donating SERM (NO-DMA). Neuroprotection was studied in primary rat neurons exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation; reversal of cholinergic cognitive deficit was studied in mice in a behavioral model of memory; long term potentiation (LTP), underlying cognition, was measured in hippocampal slices from older 3×Tg Alzheimer's transgenic mice; vasodilation was measured in rat aortic strips; and anticoagulant activity was compared. Pharmacologic blockade of GPR30 and NOS; denudation of endothelium; measurement of NO; and genetic knockout of eNOS were used to probe mechanism. Comparison of the three chemical probes indicates key roles for GPR30 and eNOS in mediating therapeutic activity. Procognitive, vasodilator and anticoagulant activities of DMA were found to be eNOS dependent, while neuroprotection and restoration of LTP were both shown to be dependent upon GPR30, a G-protein coupled receptor mediating estrogenic function. Finally, the observation that an NO-SERM shows enhanced vasodilation and anticoagulant activity, while retaining the positive attributes of SERMs even in the presence of NOS dysfunction, indicates a potential therapeutic approach without the increased risk of thrombotic events. PMID:23976955

  17. [Effects and side effects of estrogens and gestagens in pediatric and adolescent gynecology].

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, C

    1990-10-01

    An overview is given on the indications and possibilities of estrogen-progestagen medication in girls during childhood and adolescence. The physiological effects of estrogen and progestagen treatment are described, and practical advice is given for the management with estrogens-progestagens of labial adhesions, lichen sclerosus, vulvovaginitis, breast anomalies, the different forms of amenorrhoeas, pubertas tarda, anorexia-bulimia, bleeding anomalies and high stature. PMID:2079940

  18. Effects of treadmill exercise training on cerebellar estrogen and estrogen receptors, serum estrogen, and motor coordination performance of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Saidah; Soejono, Sri Kadarsih; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The present study aims at examining the motor coordination performance, serum and cerebellar estrogen, as well as ERβ levels, of ovariectomized rats (as menopausal model) following regular exercise. Materials and Methods: Ten female Sprague Dawley rats aged 12 weeks old were randomly divided into two groups; all of which underwent ovariectomy. The first group was treated with regular exercise of moderate intensity, in which the rats were trained to run on a treadmill for 60 min per day for 12 weeks. The second group served as control. Rotarod test was carried out before and after exercise treatment. All rats were euthanized thereafter, and blood and cerebellums of the rats were collected. The serum and cerebellar estrogen as well as cerebellar ERβ levels were measured using ELISA assays. Results: The number of falls in the rotarod task of the exercise group was significantly lower than that of control group. The cerebellar estrogen level of the exercise group was significantly higher than that of control group. Accordingly, there was a significantly negative correlation between the number of falls and cerebellar estrogen level in the exercise group. Conclusion: The present study shows that a lengthy period of regular exercise improves the cerebellar estrogen level and motor coordination performance in ovariectomized rats. PMID:26221482

  19. Tissue-Specific Effects of Loss of Estrogen during Menopause and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wend, Korinna; Wend, Peter; Krum, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of estrogens have been best studied in the breast, breast cancers, and in the female reproductive tract. However, estrogens have important functions in almost every tissue in the body. Recent clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative have highlighted both the importance of estrogens and how little we know about the molecular mechanism of estrogens in these other tissues. In this review, we illustrate the diverse functions of estrogens in the bone, adipose tissue, skin, hair, brain, skeletal muscle and cardiovascular system, and how the loss of estrogens during aging affects these tissues. Early transcriptional targets of estrogen are reviewed in each tissue. We also describe the tissue-specific effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) used for the treatment of breast cancers and postmenopausal symptoms. PMID:22654856

  20. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Davídková, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERα, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with γ rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATION OF A POTENTIAL NON-STEROIDAL ESTROGEN: TRICLOSAN. (R827098)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Triclosan is an antibacterial agent commonly used in industry and often detected in wastewater effluent. The potential of triclosan to act as an endocrine disruptor was examined because its chemical structure closely resembles known non-steroidal estrogens (e....

  2. Additive Mixture Effects of Estrogenic Chemicals in Human Cell-Based Assays Can Be Influenced by Inclusion of Chemicals with Differing Effect Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Richard Mark; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA) concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX) and cell proliferation (ESCREEN) endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1) a ‘balanced’ design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC10) and 2) a ‘non-balanced’ design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity) to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate) the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential modulators

  3. A stable epoxide as a potential endogenous estrogen metabolite: Possible significance in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I

    2016-06-01

    Epoxides as reactive intermediates of estrogen metabolism have been considered to be potential precursors of the 2- and 4-hydroxy, catechol estrogens and even to be mutagenic/carcinogenic agents themselves. The labile nature of the intermediates has made proof of their existence difficult in natural biological conditions. In our studies on estrogen metabolism in vitro, in various tissues from several laboratory and domestic species, there was chromatographic evidence of formation of a stable estrogen metabolite that could be seen after incubation with radiolabeled estrone, but not with unlabeled substrate. Investigation with acid treatment of the metabolite yielded material detected as 6-hydroxy-estrone-suggesting the presence of an additional oxygen atom in the molecule. An identification of the "unknown compound" has not yet been made but, with this evidence, the properties revealed so far can best be met by assuming the presence of 5,6-epoxy-estrone. The recent favorable reports on the role of 5α,6α-epoxy-cholesterol in breast cancer has led to the hypothesis that the formation of a similar, stable epoxide of an estrogen could potentially be a compound of interest. If a metabolic pathway from estrone to 6-hydroxy-estrone through a stable epoxide has indeed been observed, it would suggest that identifying and screening for the enzymes responsible for its production, as opposed to those generating the catecholestrogens, could provide valuable information in relation to breast cancer. The balance in production of estrogen epoxides could be a key factor in determining normal health or risk of tumor development. PMID:27142140

  4. In vivo and in silico analyses of estrogenic potential of bisphenol analogs in medaka (Oryzias latipes) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2015-10-01

    Various studies have demonstrated the estrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA), a member of bisphenol analogs (BPs), in in vitro and in vivo assays. However, limited data are available on the estrogenic potentials and risks of other BPs in aquatic organisms. In addition, the estrogenic effect of chemicals is known to have species-specific responses in teleost fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of BPs on the medaka (Oryzias latipes) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) using in vivo and in silico assays. Our quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of several hepatic estrogen-responsive biomarker genes in male medaka responded to various types and concentrations of BPs in a dose-response manner. The order of in vivo estrogenic potencies of BPs was as follows: BPC≈BPAF>BPB>BPA⋙BPP. To further investigate the interaction potential of BPs with medaka estrogen receptor α (ERα) in silico, a three-dimensional model of the ERα ligand-binding domain (LBD) was built and docking simulations were performed. The docking simulation analysis revealed that BPC interaction potential for medaka ERα LBD was the most potent, followed by BPAF and BPA. Comparing this with carp ERα LBD revealed that the interaction potentials of these BPs to medaka ERα LBD were more stable than to carp ERα LBD. Furthermore, we identified key amino acid residues in medaka ERα LBD that interacted with BPC (Glu356, Arg397, and Cys533), BPAF (Thr350 and Glu356), and BPA (Glu356 and Met424), and found some differences in these key amino acid residues between medaka and carp ERα LBDs. These results of in vivo and in silico analyses showed potential estrogenic effects of BPs in teleost fish, and they also indicated that the differences in interaction potentials and key amino acid residues between medaka and carp ERα LBDs may be due to the differences between the species and estrogenic potencies of the selected BPs. PMID

  5. VASCULAR ACTIONS OF ESTROGENS: FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Duckles, Sue P.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of estrogen exposure in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease is controversial. But it is clear that estrogen has important effects on vascular physiology and pathophysiology, with potential therapeutic implications. Therefore, it is the goal of this review to summarize, using an integrated approach, current knowledge of the vascular effects of estrogen, both in humans and in experimental animals. Aspects of estrogen synthesis and receptors, as well as general mechanisms of estrogenic action are reviewed with an emphasis on issues particularly relevant to the vascular system. Recent understanding of the impact of estrogen on mitochondrial function suggests that the longer lifespan of women compared to men may depend in part on the ability of estrogen to decrease production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Mechanisms by which estrogen increases endothelial vasodilator function, promotes angiogenesis and modulates autonomic function are summarized. Key aspects of the relevant pathophysiology of inflammation, atherosclerosis, stroke, migraine and thrombosis are reviewed concerning current knowledge of estrogenic effects. A number of emerging concepts are addressed throughout. These include the importance of estrogenic formulation and route of administration and the impact of genetic polymorphisms, either in estrogen receptors or in enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism, on responsiveness to hormone treatment. The importance of local metabolism of estrogenic precursors and the impact of timing for initiation of treatment and its duration are also considered. While consensus opinions are emphasized, controversial views are presented in order to stimulate future research. PMID:18579753

  6. Neurodifferentiating potential of 8-prenylnaringenin and related compounds in neural precursor cells and correlation with estrogen-like activity.

    PubMed

    Urmann, Corinna; Oberbauer, Eleni; Couillard-Després, Sébastien; Aigner, Ludwig; Riepl, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are an increasing burden for our ageing societies; there is an as yet unmet need for the development of effective therapies. Neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons in the adult brain from neural stem cells, has received increasing attention since it offers the potential for endogenous brain repair and functional regeneration. Adult neurogenesis is partially under the control of sex hormones such as estradiol, and boosting neurogenesis with estradiol in animals correlates with cognitive improvement. 8-Prenylnaringenin imitates as highly potent phytoestrogen the effects of estradiol. Here, we studied the potential of 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and related compounds on differentiation induction in vitro using neural precursor cells transiently transfected with a doublecortin promoter luciferase construct, which was recently shown to indicate neuronal fate and differentiation. The flavanones 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin showed slight activity in this assay but significant activity by immunostaining. Although the estrogen-like activities of 8-prenylnaringenin and 6-prenylnaringenin are very different, the activity in differentiation induction is similar. Interestingly, also some prenylflavonoids with extended prenyl groups, e.g., a geranyl group, showed increased differentiation activity, while estrogen-like activity is decreased. This allows the conclusion that estrogen-like activity of prenylflavanones does not correlate directly with the activity of differentiation induction in neural precursor cells. PMID:25714726

  7. Anti-Estrogen Withdrawal Effect With Raloxifene? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lemmo, Walter

    2016-09-01

    A 66-year-old patient presented with acute recurrent metastatic estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, Her-2/neu-negative breast cancer, bone lesions (lumbar spine, pelvis), pulmonary nodules, hepatic metastasis, elevated cancer antigen 15 and liver enzymes, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. The patient had been taking raloxifene for approximately 8 years. After discontinuation, clinical parameters and symptoms improved rapidly without oncological therapy or other forms of treatment. Three months after raloxifene discontinuation, capecitabine was initiated by the treating oncologist who deemed an anti-estrogen withdrawal effect (AEWE) implausible. However, the lasting regression was more indicative of a raloxifene rebound effect than chemotherapy or other interventions. Today, the patient is asymptomatic with a good performance status. Hepatic metastatic regression has been confirmed, without any oncological treatment administered in the past 16 months and approximately 23 months following the withdrawal of raloxifene. This case highlights the need to screen breast cancer patients for the possibility of an AEWE if they are using raloxifene and possibly similar selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) which includes tamoxifen, when diagnosed with advanced breast cancer, especially in the recurrent disease setting. PMID:27411856

  8. Effects of estroprogestins containing natural estrogen on vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    De Seta, Francesco; Restaino, Stefano; Banco, Rubina; Conversano, Ester; De Leo, Rossella; Tonon, Maddalena; Maso, Gianpaolo; Barbati, Giulia; Lello, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Estroprogestins with "natural oestrogen" has represented a new option in terms of combined hormonal contraception. So, the aim of this study is to investigate how estroprogestins with natural estrogen may modify the vaginal niche. In literature, very few studies focused on the interaction between hormonal contraception and vaginal milieu. This is a prospective comparative study. We enrolled 60 women from January 2013 to September 2013, 30 of them were administered estradiol valerate dienogest (E2V+DNG - Klaira®) in a quadriphasic regimen, while the other 30 women were administered 17-β estradiol with nomestrol acetate (EV+NOMAC - Zoely®) in a monophasic regimen. After a baseline study of vaginal milieu at recruitment of patients (Gram stain with Nugent score, vaginal pH, vaginal wet mount for the quantification of leukocytes, Lactobacilli and/or presence of Candida), we performed the same follow-up after six months of estroprogestin therapy. Our results showed that the women treated with E2V+DNG had a trend of an improvement of vaginal health in terms of increase of lactobacillar flora and reduction of vaginal pH in place of women treated with EV+NOMAC that showed a reduction of cervical mucus. Finally, our data about the effects on vaginal flora exerted by two estroprogestin pills (EPs) containing a natural estrogen suggest slight, but interesting differences in terms of vaginal ecology. These differences could be related to the type of estrogen, type of progestin, regimen of administration and, after all, to the net balance between estrogenic and progestin component of the EPs. PMID:24993504

  9. Extranuclear Estrogen Receptors Mediate the Neuroprotective Effects of Estrogen in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yi-dong; Wang, Rui-min; Brann, Darrell W.

    2010-01-01

    Background 17β-estradiol (E2) has been implicated to exert neuroprotective effects in the brain following cerebral ischemia. Classically, E2 is thought to exert its effects via genomic signaling mediated by interaction with nuclear estrogen receptors. However, the role and contribution of extranuclear estrogen receptors (ER) is unclear and was the subject of the current study. Methodology/Principal Findings To accomplish this goal, we employed two E2 conjugates (E2 dendrimer, EDC, and E2-BSA) that can interact with extranuclear ER and exert rapid nongenomic signaling, but lack the ability to interact with nuclear ER due to their inability to enter the nucleus. EDC or E2-BSA (10 µM) was injected icv 60 min prior to global cerebral ischemia (GCI). FITC-tagged EDC or E2-BSA revealed high uptake in the hippocampal CA1 region after icv injection, with a membrane (extranuclear) localization pattern in cells. Both EDC and E2-BSA exerted robust neuroprotection in the CA1 against GCI, and the effect was blocked by the ER antagonist, ICI182,780. EDC and E2-BSA both rapidly enhanced activation of the prosurvival kinases, ERK and Akt, while attenuating activation of the proapoptotic kinase, JNK following GCI, effects that were blocked by ICI182,780. Administration of an MEK or PI3K inhibitor blocked the neuroprotective effects of EDC and E2-BSA. Further studies showed that EDC increased p-CREB and BDNF in the CA1 region in an ERK- and Akt-dependent manner, and that cognitive outcome after GCI was preserved by EDC in an ER-dependent manner. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that activation of extranuclear ER results in induction of ERK-Akt-CREB-BDNF signaling in the hippocampal CA1 region, which significantly reduces ischemic neuronal injury and preserves cognitive function following GCI. The study adds to a growing literature that suggests that extranuclear ER can have important actions in the brain. PMID:20479872

  10. Effects of sex and estrogen on chicken ductus arteriosus reactivity.

    PubMed

    Flinsenberg, Thijs W H; van der Sterren, Saskia; van Cleef, Anne N H; Schuurman, Marijn J; Agren, Pia; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Sex hormones have an important influence on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology and sex differences in vascular reactivity have been widely demonstrated. In the present study we hypothesized 1) the presence of sexual dimorphism in chicken ductus arteriosus (DA) responsiveness to contractile and relaxant stimuli and 2) that estrogens are vasoactive in the chicken DA. In vitro contractions (assessed with a wire myograph) induced by normoxia, KCl, 4-aminopyridine, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, U46619, or endothelin-1, as well as relaxations induced by ACh, sodium nitroprusside, BAY 41-2272, PGE(2), isoproterenol, forskolin,Y-27632, and hydroxyfasudil were not significantly different between males and females. The estrogen 17beta-estradiol elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of KCl-, phenylephrine-, and oxygen-induced active tone in male and female chicken DA. The stereoisomer 17alpha-estradiol showed lesser relaxant effects, and the selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-[(1)H]pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)tris-phenol (ERalpha) and 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERbeta) did not show any effect. There were no sex differences in the responses to estrogen. Endothelium removal or the presence of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ, the K(+) channel blockers tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, and charybdotoxin, or the ER antagonist fulvestrant did not modify 17beta-estradiol-induced relaxation. CaCl(2) (30 muM-10 mM) induced concentration-dependent contraction in DA rings depolarized by 62.5 mM KCl or stimulated with 21% O(2) in Ca(2+)-free medium. Preincubation with 17beta-estradiol or the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine produced an inhibition of CaCl(2)-induced contractions. In conclusion, there are no sex-related differences in chicken DA reactivity. The estrogen 17beta-estradiol induces an endothelium-independent relaxation of chicken DA that is not mediated by ER activation. This relaxant effect is, at least

  11. Extending an In Vitro Panel for Estrogenicity Testing: The Added Value of Bioassays for Measuring Antiandrogenic Activities and Effects on Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Besselink, Harrie T.; Houtman, René; Peijnenburg,  Ad A.C.M.; Brouwer, Abraham; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Bovee,  Toine F.H.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a previously established integrated testing strategy (ITS) for in vitro estrogenicity testing was extended with additional in vitro assays in order to broaden its sensitivity to different modes of action resulting in apparent estrogenicity, i.e., other than estrogen receptor (ER) binding. To this end, an extra set of 10 estrogenic compounds with modes of action in part different from ER binding, were tested in the previously defined ITS, consisting of a yeast estrogen reporter gene assay, an U2OS ERα CALUX reporter gene assay and a cell-free coregulator binding assay. Two androgen reporter gene assays and the enhanced H295R steroidogenesis assay were added to that previous defined ITS. These assays had added value, as several estrogenic model compounds also elicited clear and potent antiandrogenic properties and in addition also showed effects on steroidogenesis that might potentiate their apparent estrogenic effects in vivo. Adding these assays, examining mechanisms of action for estrogenicity apart from ERα binding, gives a more complete and comprehensive assessment of the ability of test compounds to interfere with endocrine signaling. It was concluded that the extended ITS will go beyond in vivo estrogenicity testing by the uterotrophic assay, thereby contributing to the 3R-principles. PMID:24928889

  12. Waste crankcase oil: an environmental contaminant with potential to modulate estrogenic responses.

    PubMed

    Ssempebwa, John; Carpenter, David; Yilmaz, Bayram; DeCaprio, Anthony; O'Hehir, David; Arcaro, Kathleen

    2004-07-23

    Used engine, or crankcase, oil is frequently discarded into the environment resulting in significant pollution of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The chemical composition of crankcase oils changes with use, and in general, used, or waste, crankcase oil is considered more toxic than the original oil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major constituents of crankcase oil and may exhibit both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. In the present study, the estrogenic activity and antiestrogenic activity of both new (unused) and waste crankcase oils were examined in a human breast cancer cell culture assay. Concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 25 ppm of new oil or waste oil did not alter either the preconfluent or postconfluent cell growth when tested in control medium. In contrast, waste crankcase oil significantly reduced the postconfluent growth of cells grown in medium containing 0.1 nM 17 beta-estradiol. Results from mechanistic assays using [3H]-17 beta-estradiol demonstrated that waste crankcase oil both increased the metabolism of 17 beta-estradiol, and displaced 17 beta-estradiol from the estrogen receptor in MCF-7 cells. The observed antiestrogenic activity of the waste crankcase oil suggests that this pollutant has the potential to alter estrogenic responses, and therefore its presence in the environment may be of concern for reproductive health. PMID:15205025

  13. Estrogen Exhibits a Biphasic Effect on Prostate Tumor Growth through the Estrogen Receptor β-KLF5 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Asami; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Akaogi, Kensuke; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Inoue, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are effective in the treatment of prostate cancer; however, the effects of estrogens on prostate cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17β-estradiol [E2]) has biphasic effects on prostate tumor growth. A lower dose of E2 increased tumor growth in mouse xenograft models using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whereas a higher dose significantly decreased tumor growth. We found that anchorage-independent apoptosis in these cells was inhibited by E2 treatment. Similarly, in vivo angiogenesis was suppressed by E2. Interestingly, these effects of E2 were abolished by knockdown of either estrogen receptor β (ERβ) or Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF5). Ιn addition, E2 suppressed KLF5-mediated transcription through ERβ, which inhibits proapoptotic FOXO1 and proangiogenic PDGFA expression. Furthermore, we revealed that a nonagonistic ER ligand GS-1405 inhibited FOXO1 and PDGFA expression through the ERβ-KLF5 pathway and regulated prostate tumor growth without ERβ transactivation. Therefore, these results suggest that E2 biphasically modulates prostate tumor formation by regulating KLF5-dependent transcription through ERβ and provide a new strategy for designing ER modulators, which will be able to regulate prostate cancer progression with minimal adverse effects due to ER transactivation. PMID:26483416

  14. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: Effect of soil type and macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii.

  15. Fate and transport of selected estrogen compounds in Hawaii soils: effect of soil type and macropores.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Matteo; Vasudevan, Dharni; Lichwa, Joseph; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    The fate and transport of estrogen compounds in the environment is of increasing concern due to their potential impact on freshwater organisms, ecosystems and human health. The behavior of these compounds in batch experiments suggests low mobility, while field studies indicate the persistence of estrogen compounds in the soil with the possibility of migration to surface water as well as groundwater. To better understand the movement of these chemicals through soils, we examined their transport in three different Hawaiian soils and two aqueous matrices. The three different soils used were an Oxisol, a Mollisol and a cinder, characterized by different mineralogical properties and collected at depths of 60-90 cm and 210-240 cm. Two liquid matrices were used; deionized (DI) water containing calcium chloride (CaCl2), and recycled water collected from a wastewater treatment facility. The experiments were conducted in packed and structured columns. Non-equilibrium conditions were observed during the study, especially in the structured soil. This is believed to be primarily related to the presence of macropores in the soil. The presence of macropores resulted in reduced contact time between soil and estrogens, which facilitated their transport. We found that the organic carbon content and mineralogical composition of the soils had a profound effect on the transport of the estrogens. The mobility of estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) was greater in cinder than in the other soils. In column experiments with recycled water, earlier breakthrough peaks and longer tails of estrogens were produced compared to those observed using DI water. The use of recycled water for agricultural purposes and the siting of septic tanks and cesspools should be critically reviewed in light of these findings, especially in areas where groundwater is the primary source of potable water, such as Hawaii. PMID:25118588

  16. Endocrine disruptors and estrogenic effects on male reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Sikka, Suresh C; Wang, Run

    2008-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin, and some pesticides) are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones, inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inflammation, Sertoli-cell-only pattern, hypospadias, altered pituitary and thyroid gland functions are also observed, the available data are insufficient to deduce worldwide conclusions. The development of intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is beyond doubt the most important recent breakthrough in the treatment of male infertility, but it does not necessarily treat the cause and may inadvertently pass on adverse genetic consequences. Many well-controlled clinical studies and basic scientific discoveries in the physiology, biochemistry, and molecular and cellular biology of the male reproductive system have helped in the identification of greater numbers of men with male factor problems. Newer tools for the detection of Y-chromosome deletions have further strengthened the hypothesis that the decline in male reproductive health and fertility may be related to the presence of certain toxic chemicals in the environment. Thus the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of male factor infertility remain a real challenge. Clinicians should always attempt to identify the etiology of a possible testicular toxicity, assess the degree of risk to the patient being evaluated for infertility, and initiate a plan to control and prevent exposure to others once an association between occupation/toxicant and infertility has been established. PMID:18087652

  17. Prenylation has a compound specific effect on the estrogenicity of naringenin and genistein.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Georg; Zierau, Oliver; Wober, Jannette; Tischer, Sandra; Metz, Peter; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-01-01

    A variety of plant derived substances, so-called phytoestrogens (PEs), although structurally not related to steroids, produce effects similar to the mammalian estradiol. However, little is known so far about the structural requirements which determine PE activities. Taking into consideration that prenylation reactions are relatively common in plant secondary metabolism, the activity of a set of three PE derivatives of genistein and naringenin, namely genistein, 8-prenylgenistein (8PG), 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)genistein (6DMAG), naringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6DMAN) was compared regarding structure-estrogenicity relationships in three functionally different estrogen receptor assays. Strong estrogenic activities were recorded for 6DMAN and 8PN in all assays used, while the parent compound naringenin showed only very weak estrogenicity. In contrast, in the case of genistein derivatives, only genistein itself exhibited estrogenic activity in a yeast based assay. In MVLN breast cancer cells, a bioluminescent MCF-7-derived cell line, the estrogenic activity of all three genistein derivatives was similar. Studying alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells as an estrogenic response marker revealed a similar pattern of estrogenicity of the genistein derivatives compared to the yeast based assay although a slight estrogenic effect of 6DMAG and 8PG was apparent. In summary, this study demonstrates that prenylation often found in plant secondary metabolism differentially modifies estrogenic properties of PEs depending on the basic structure of the respective PE. PMID:19733663

  18. Potentiation of estrogen receptor activation function 1 (AF-1) by Src/JNK through a serine 118-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, W; Webb, P; Nguyen, P; Liu, X; Li, J; Karin, M; Kushner, P J

    2001-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is activated either by ligand or by signals from tyrosine kinase-linked cell surface receptors. We investigated whether the nonreceptor Src tyrosine kinase could affect ER activity. Expression of constitutively active Src or stimulation of the endogenous Src/JNK pathway enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen-ER complex and strongly stimulates the otherwise weak activation by the unliganded ER and the tamoxifen-ER complex. Src affects ER activation function 1 (AF-1), and not ER AF-2, and does so through its tyrosine kinase activity. This effect of Src is mediated partly through a Raf/mitogen-activated ERK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Raf/MEK/ERK) signaling cascade and partly through a MEKK/JNKK/JNK cascade. Although, as previously shown, Src action through activated ERK stimulates AF-1 by phosphorylation at S118, Src action through activated JNK neither leads to phosphorylation of S118 nor requires S118 for its action. We therefore suggest that the Src/JNK pathway enhances AF-1 activity by modification of ER AF-1-associated proteins. Src potentiates activation functions in CREB-binding protein (CBP) and glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1), and we discuss the possibility that the Src/JNK pathway enhances the activity of these coactivators, which are known to mediate AF-1 action. PMID:11145737

  19. Chemopreventive effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in estrogen-negative human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Joo; Kim, Mi Jie; Kim, Ha Ryong; Yi, Min Sun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Oh, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Excessive level of estrogen is considered as a main cause of breast cancer, therefore, many studies have focused on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, even though ER-negative cancer has a poor prognosis than ER-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the anti-cancer effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) in estrogen-independent breast cancer. GBE has been traditionally used as a platelet activating factor, a circulatory stimulant, a tonic, and anti-asthmatic drug, and anti-cancer agent. However, anti-cancer effects of GBE on ER-negative breast cancer have not been proved yet. In this study, we tested chemotherapeutic potential of GBE in the MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) human breast cancer cell line. Our results showed that cytotoxicity effects of GBE in MDA-MB-231 lead to DNA fragmentation at high concentrations (500 and 1,000 μg/ml). Caspase-3 was significantly activated and mRNA levels of apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2 and Bax) were altered. These results indicate that GBE induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. It is presumed that GBE has chemopreventive effects in ER-independent breast cancer through anti-proliferation and apoptosis-inducing activities. PMID:23335025

  20. Assessing the Effects of Estrogen on the Dynamics of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mufudza, Chipo; Sorofa, Walter; Chiyaka, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer has become the second most common cancer in women. The disease has currently been named the most deadly cancer in women but little is known on what causes the disease. We present the effects of estrogen as a risk factor on the dynamics of breast cancer. We develop a deterministic mathematical model showing general dynamics of breast cancer with immune response. This is a four-population model that includes tumor cells, host cells, immune cells, and estrogen. The effects of estrogen are then incorporated in the model. The results show that the presence of extra estrogen increases the risk of developing breast cancer. PMID:23365616

  1. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. PMID:26686064

  2. Estrogen has opposing effects on vascular reactivity in obese, insulin-resistant male Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks-Asplund, Esther M.; Shoukas, Artin A.; Kim, Soon-Yul; Burke, Sean A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that estradiol treatment would improve vascular dysfunction commonly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. A sham operation or 17beta-estradiol pellet implantation was performed in male lean and obese Zucker rats. Maximal vasoconstriction (VC) to phenylephrine (PE) and potassium chloride was exaggerated in control obese rats compared with lean rats, but estradiol significantly attenuated VC in the obese rats. Estradiol reduced the PE EC50 in all groups. This effect was cyclooxygenase independent, because preincubation with indomethacin reduced VC response to PE similarly in a subset of control and estrogen-treated lean rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation (VD) to sodium nitroprusside was similar among groups, but endothelium-dependent VD to ACh was significantly impaired in obese compared with lean rats. Estradiol improved VD in lean and obese rats by decreasing EC50 but impaired function by decreasing maximal VD. The shift in EC50 corresponded to an upregulation in nitric oxide synthase III protein expression in the aorta of the estrogen-treated obese rats. In summary, estrogen treatment improves vascular function in male insulin-resistant, obese rats, partially via an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase III protein expression. These effects are counteracted by adverse factors, such as hyperlipidemia and, potentially, a release of an endothelium-derived contractile agent.

  3. The Use of a Whole Animal Biophotonic Model as a Screen for the Angiogenic Potential of Estrogenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Ramey C; McGee, Marcus; Feugang, Jean M; Willard, Scott T; Ryan, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor) have estrogenic potential that can initiate inappropriate physiological responses in estrogenic-sensitive tissues following exposure in vivo. Thus, the current study was designed to determine whether the VEGFR-2-Luciferase (Luc) reporter transgenic mouse is a useful model for evaluating estrogenic tendencies of methoxychlor by monitoring wound healing via VEGFR-2-mediated gene expression using bioluminescence and real-time imaging technology. Results: VEGFR-2-Luc gene activity peaked by d 7 (P<0.001) in all groups but was not different (P>0.05) between control and estrogen/methoxychlor exposed mice. Conclusions: Changes in VEGFR-2-Luc gene activity associated with the dermal wound healing process were able to be measured via photonic emission. The increase in vasculature recruitment and formation is paralleled by the increase of VEGFR-2-Luc activity with a peak on day 7. However, estrogen/methoxychlor did not significantly alter wound healing mediated VEGFR-2-Luc gene expression patterns compared to controls. This suggests that the VEGFR-2-Luc transgenic mouse wound model tested in this study may not be optimal for use as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds. PMID:24782643

  4. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Voshell, J Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO(4)-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000 μg/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R(2) = 0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R(2) = 0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO(4)-P were weaker, but were also significant (R(2) = 0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO(4)-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO(4)-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. PMID:22088420

  5. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Voshell, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO 4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17??-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000??g/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R 2=0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R 2=0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO 4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R 2=0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO 4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO 4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Voshell, J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations > 1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (> 1000 μg/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R2 = 0.56–0.81) and E2Eq (R2 = 0.39–0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R2 = 0.27–0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms.

  7. Determination of estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of antifertility substances using rat uterine peroxidase assay.

    PubMed

    Johri, R K; Pahwa, G S; Sharma, S C; Zutshi, U

    1991-11-01

    The effect of three compounds (clomiphene citrate, centchroman, embelin) and plant-derived methanolic extracts (Abutilon indicum and Butea monosperma) was studied on uterotropic and uterine peroxidase activities in ovariectomized rats. It was observed that these two parameters were highly correlated in response to treatment with these test materials and also to estradiol. It was suggested that the uterine peroxidase assay could be utilized as a biochemical parameter in the screening of new antifertility agents for their estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties. PMID:1665776

  8. Effects of Estrogen on Platelet Reactivity After Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T.; Gaines, Jessica M.; Callahan, Kevin P.; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Hurn, Patricia D.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen’s prothrombotic effects are of increasing concern, particularly in stroke risk and recovery. Using an ischemic rodent model, the authors sought to determine (a) if estrogen replacement increases post-ischemic platelet reactivity, (b) if changes in estrogen status alter intraplatelet endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) synthesis, and (c) if estrogen-mediated effects on platelets alter cerebral blood flow during reperfusion. Intact (I), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX + 17β-estradiol (E50) rats were subjected to 30 min of forebrain ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion. Using the platelet activation marker P-selectin, postischemic platelet reactivity was quantified by flow cytometry. In a separate cohort (I, OVX, E50), the authors quantified platelet eNOS by Western blot. Another cohort (OVX, E50) was subjected to ischemia/reperfusion, and cerebral blood flow was determined using the iodoantipyrine technique. Collagen-stimulated platelet P-selectin expression was increased in the OVX rats at 60 min of reperfusion, and this effect was reversed by estrogen treatment. No differences in platelet eNOS expression were detected among groups. Cerebral blood flow at 60 min reperfusion was comparable between the OVX and the E50 rats. The authors conclude that during reperfusion, estrogen deficiency increases postischemic platelet sensitivity to stimuli in estrogen-deficient rats. Estrogen treatment mitigates effects of estrogen loss on platelets, but this early effect is apparently not caused by intraplatelet eNOS depression. Neither estrogen deficiency nor estrogen treatment changes early postischemic regional brain blood flow. In this rodent global cerebral ischemic model, physiologic doses of estrogen are not deleterious to platelet reactivity and may initially reduce postischemic platelet reactivity. PMID:16267375

  9. The estrogenic potential of salicylate esters and their possible risks in foods and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Jia, Chengxia; Hu, Ying; Sun, Libei; Jiao, Jian; Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Desheng; Li, Jun; Tian, Yonglu; Bai, Huicheng; Li, Ruobao; Hu, Jianying

    2012-03-01

    Salicylate esters (SEs), a class of chemicals extensively used as flavor and fragrance additives in foods, beverages and a wide variety of consumer products, are suspected to have estrogenic activity based on chemical analysis of in silica molecular docking. We evaluated the estrogenic potentials of phenyl salicylate (PhS), benzyl salicylate (BzS), phenethyl salicylate (PES), ethyl salicylate (ES) and methyl salicylate (MS) using an in vitro human estrogen receptor α (hERα)-coactivator recruiting assay and in vivo immature rodent uterotrophic bioassays. We found that PhS, BzS and PES showed obvious in vitro hERα agonistic activities; BzS in particular exhibited a higher estrogenic activity compared to bisphenol A (BPA). The uterine weights were significantly increased in mice treated with 11.1, 33.3, 100 and 300 mg/kg/day BzS and 33.3mg/kg/day PES and rats treated with 3.7, 11.1, 33.3 and 100mg/kg/day BzS for 3 days (P<0.05). Finally, we transformed the daily intakes and the dermal exposures of SEs in the real world into estradiol equivalent concentrations (EEQs). We found that the EEQ of BzS daily intake in consumers in the U.S. and the EEQs of dermal BzS and PES exposure among high-volume users worldwide were higher than the maximum secure daily estradiol intake recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In particular, the EEQ for dermal BzS exposure was up to 162 ng EEQ/kg, which is 3.3 times higher than the maximal acceptable daily E(2) intake recommended by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). PMID:22197706

  10. Estrogen has anti-amyloidogenic effects on Alzheimer's {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morinaga, Akiyoshi; Hirohata, Mie; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Inhibition of the assembly of amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) as well as the destabilization of preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}) in the central nervous system could be valuable therapeutics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have indicated that estrogen therapy reduced the risk of developing AD in women. Here, we examined the effects of estrogen (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) and related sexual steroids (androstenedione (AND) and testosterone (TES)) on the polymerization, extension and destabilization of fA{beta}(1-42) and fA{beta}(1-40) at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro, using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies. E1, E2, and E3 dose-dependently inhibited the formation, as well as destabilization of fA{beta}s. The overall anti-amyloidogenic activity of these molecules was in the order of: E3 > E2 = E1 >>AND = TES. Estrogen could be a potential therapeutic agent to prevent or delay AD progression.

  11. Distinct hypothalamic neurons mediate estrogenic effects on energy homeostasis and reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens regulate body weight and reproduction primarily through actions on estrogen receptor-a(ERa). However, ERalpha-expressing cells mediating these effects are not identified. We demonstrate that brain-specific deletion of ERalapha in female mice causes abdominal obesity stemming from both hype...

  12. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Landeros, Rosalina Villalon; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions. PMID:24685383

  13. Estrogenic effects of herbal medicines from Costa Rica used for the management of menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Brian J.; Frasor, Jonna; Bellows, Lauren E.; Locklear, Tracie D.; Perez, Alice; Gomez- Laurito, Jorge; Mahady, Gail. B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcomes from the Women's Health Initiative have demonstrated adverse effects associated with hormone therapy (HT), and have prioritized the need to develop new alternative treatments for the management of menopause and osteoporosis. To this end, we have been investigating natural herbal medicines used by Costa Rican women to manage menopausal symptoms. Design Seventeen plant species were collected and extracted in Costa Rica. To establish possible mechanisms of action, and determine their potential future use for menopause or osteoporosis, the estrogenic activities of the herbal extracts were investigated in an estrogen reporter gene ERβ-CALUX® assay in U2-OS cells, and in reporter and endogenous gene assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Six of the plant extracts bound to the estrogen receptors. Four of the six extracts stimulated reporter gene expression in the ERβ-CALUX® assay. All six extracts modulated expression of endogenous genes in MCF-7 cells, with four extracts acting as estrogen agonists and two extracts, Pimenta dioica and Smilax domingensis, acting as partial agonist/antagonists by enhancing E2-stimulated pS2 mRNA expression, but reducing E2-stimulated PR and PTGES mRNA expression. Both P. dioica and S. domingensis induced a 2ERE-luciferase reporter gene in transient transfected MCF-7 cells, which was inhibited by the ER antagonist ICI 182780. Conclusions This work presents a plausible mechanism of action for many of the herbal medicines used by Costa Rican women to treat menopausal symptoms. However, it further suggests that studies of safety and efficacy are needed before these herbs should be used as alternative therapies to HT. PMID:19424091

  14. Pigment epithelium-derived factor: clinical significance in estrogen-dependent tissues and its potential in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Chuaire, María Liliana; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra; Chuaire-Noack, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the family of non-inhibitory serpins. The broad spectrum of PEDF biological activity is evident when considering its effects in promoting cell survival and proliferation, as well as its antiangiogenic, antitumor, and anti-metastatic properties. Although the structural domains of the PEDF gene that mediate such diverse effects and their mechanisms of action have not been completely elucidated, there is a large body of evidence describing their diverse range of activities; this evidence combined with the regulation of PEDF expression by sex steroids and their receptors have led to the idea that PEDF is not only a diagnostic and prognostic marker for certain diseases such as cancer, but is also a potential therapeutic target. In this manner, this paper aims to generally review the regulation of PEDF expression and PEDF interactions, as well as the findings that relate PEDF to the role of estrogens and estrogen receptors. In addition, this manuscript will review major advances toward potential therapeutic applications of PEDF. PMID:26523216

  15. Effects of Estrogens on Adipokines and Glucose Homeostasis in Female Aromatase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Sinderen, Michelle L.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Jørgensen, Sebastian B.; Honeyman, Jane; Chow, Jenny D.; Herridge, Kerrie A.; Winship, Amy L.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia; Jones, Margaret E. E.; Simpson, Evan R.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of glucose homeostasis within the body is crucial for constant and precise performance of energy balance and is sustained by a number of peripheral organs. Estrogens are known to play a role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice are estrogen-deficient and display symptoms of dysregulated glucose metabolism. We aim to investigate the effects of estrogen ablation and exogenous estrogen administration on glucose homeostasis regulation. Six month-old female wildtype, ArKO, and 17β-estradiol (E2) treated ArKO mice were subjected to whole body tolerance tests, serum examination of estrogen, glucose and insulin, ex-vivo muscle glucose uptake, and insulin signaling pathway analyses. Female ArKO mice display increased body weight, gonadal (omental) adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, and liver triglycerides, which were ameliorated upon estrogen treatment. Tolerance tests revealed that estrogen-deficient ArKO mice were pyruvate intolerant hence reflecting dysregulated hepatic gluconeogenesis. Analyses of skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissues supported a hepatic-based glucose dysregulation, with a down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation (a key insulin signaling pathway molecule) in the ArKO liver, which was improved with E2 treatment. Concurrently, estrogen treatment lowered ArKO serum leptin and adiponectin levels and increased inflammatory adipokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL6). Furthermore, estrogen deficiency resulted in the infiltration of CD45 macrophages into gonadal adipose tissues, which cannot be reversed by E2 treatment. This study describes the effects of estrogens on glucose homeostasis in female ArKO mice and highlights a primary phenotype of hepatic glucose dysregulation and a parallel estrogen modified adipokine profile. PMID:26317527

  16. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  17. The effects of soil and Trifolium repens (white clover) on the fate of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fujikawa, Yoko; Kakumoto, Masumi; Sugahara, Masataka; Hamasaki, Tatsuhide; Umeda, Mikio; Fukui, Masami

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the behavior of estrogens in the rhizosphere of white clover (Trifolium repens, clover hereafter) with two different pot tests, using soil and agar as growth media. In a pot test using agar spiked with estrogen, the estrogen concentration in the agar with clover decreased to non-detectable levels within one month, while in the agar without clover, 60% of initially added estrogen remained after one month. The half-lives of estrone (E1) and 17beta -estradiol (E2) in the agar with clover were 2.4-3.8 and 13.2 d, respectively. The dissipation of E1 followed first-order rate law, while that of E2 fitted a zero-order reaction, indicating that they had different mechanisms of dissipation from agar. In the soil pot test, the behavior of E1 and E2 was not influenced by clover. An initial rapid decrease in the amount of estrogen extracted by methanol/acetic acid was followed by persistence for 1-3 months, regardless of presence of clover. Moreover, in three weeks E1 and E2 were only partly degraded by microbes extracted from the soil used in the pot test. In this study, abiotic degradation of estrogens and sorption of estrogen to soil, rather than the effects of soil microbes and clover, contributed to the initial rapid dissipation of estrogens in the soil. However, the results of the agar pot test suggested that vegetation such as clover may significantly contribute to removal of estrogens when estrogens in aqueous phase are discharged with surface runoff and preferential flow after heavy rain in agricultural fields, or when present in soils with low estrogen sorptivity. PMID:19280482

  18. Most Plastic Products Release Estrogenic Chemicals: A Potential Health Problem That Can Be Solved

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun Z.; Yaniger, Stuart I.; Jordan, V. Craig; Klein, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chemicals having estrogenic activity (EA) reportedly cause many adverse health effects, especially at low (picomolar to nanomolar) doses in fetal and juvenile mammals. Objectives: We sought to determine whether commercially available plastic resins and products, including baby bottles and other products advertised as bisphenol A (BPA) free, release chemicals having EA. Methods: We used a roboticized MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, which is very sensitive, accurate, and repeatable, to quantify the EA of chemicals leached into saline or ethanol extracts of many types of commercially available plastic materials, some exposed to common-use stresses (microwaving, ultraviolet radiation, and/or autoclaving). Results: Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products. Conclusions: Many plastic products are mischaracterized as being EA free if extracted with only one solvent and not exposed to common-use stresses. However, we can identify existing compounds, or have developed, monomers, additives, or processing agents that have no detectable EA and have similar costs. Hence, our data suggest that EA-free plastic products exposed to common-use stresses and extracted by saline and ethanol solvents could be cost-effectively made on a commercial scale and thereby eliminate a potential health risk posed by most currently available plastic products that leach chemicals having EA into food products. PMID:21367689

  19. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-Shang; Kang, Wen-Bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  20. G-1 exerts neuroprotective effects through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 following spinal cord injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qiang; Meng, Jia; Wang, Xin-shang; Kang, Wen-bo; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) always occurs accidently and leads to motor dysfunction because of biochemical and pathological events. Estrogen has been shown to be neuroprotective against SCI through estrogen receptors (ERs), but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of a newly found membrane ER, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPR30 or GPER1), and discussed the feasibility of a GPR30 agonist as an estrogen replacement. Forty adult female C57BL/6J mice (10–12 weeks old) were divided randomly into vehicle, G-1, E2, G-1 + G-15 and E2 + G-15 groups. All mice were subjected to SCI using a crushing injury approach. The specific GPR30 agonist, G-1, mimicked the effects of E2 treatment by preventing SCI-induced apoptotic cell death and enhancing motor functional recovery after injury. GPR30 activation regulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways, increased GPR30 and anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but decreased the pro-apoptosis factor Bax and cleaved caspase-3. However, the neuroprotective effects of G-1 and E2 were blocked by the specific GPR30 antagonist, G-15. Thus, GPR30 rather than classic ERs is required to induce estrogenic neuroprotective effects. Given that estrogen replacement therapy may cause unexpected side effects, especially on the reproductive system, GPR30 agonists may represent a potential therapeutic approach for treating SCI. PMID:27407175

  1. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  2. Estrogen effects on osmotic regulation of AVP and fluid balance.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S; Keefe, David L

    2002-10-01

    To determine estrogen effects on osmotic regulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and body fluids, we suppressed endogenous estrogen and progesterone using the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog leuprolide acetate (GnRHa). Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: 1) GnRHa alone, then GnRHa + estrogen (E, n = 9, 25 +/- 1 yr); 2) GnRHa alone, then GnRHa + estrogen with progesterone (E/P, n = 6, 26 +/- 3). During GnRHa alone and with hormone treatment, we compared AVP and body fluid regulatory responses to 3% NaCl infusion (HSI, 120 min, 0.1 ml. min(-1). kg body wt(-1)), drinking (30 min, 15 ml/kg body wt), and recovery (60 min of seated rest). Plasma [E(2)] increased from 23.9 to 275.3 pg/ml with hormone treatments. Plasma [P(4)] increased from 0.6 to 5.7 ng/ml during E/P and was unchanged (0.4 to 0.6 ng/ml) during E. Compared with GnRHa alone, E reduced osmotic AVP release threshold (275 +/- 4 to 271 +/- 4 mosmol/kg, P < 0.05), and E/P reduced the AVP increase in response during HSI (6.0 +/- 1.3 to 4.2 +/- 0.6 pg/ml at the end of HSI), but free water clearance was unaffected in either group. Relative to GnRHa, pre-HSI plasma renin activity (PRA) was greater during E (0.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1)) but not after HSI or recovery. PRA was greater than GnRHa during E/P at baseline (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6) and after HSI (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.1 +/- 1.1) and recovery (0.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.2 ng ANG I. ml(-1). h(-1)). Baseline fractional excretion of sodium was unaffected by E or E/P but was attenuated by the end of recovery for both E (3.3 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.4%) and E/P (2.8 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.4%, GnRHa alone and with hormone treatment, respectively). Fluid retention increased with both hormone treatments. Renal sensitivity to AVP may be lower during E due to intrarenal effects on water and sodium excretion. E/P increased sodium retention and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone stimulation. PMID:12217888

  3. Effect of vaginal or systemic estrogen on dynamics of collagen assembly in the rat vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Montoya, T Ignacio; Maldonado, P Antonio; Acevedo, Jesus F; Word, R Ann

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of systemic and local estrogen treatment on collagen assembly and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall. Ovariectomized nulliparous rats were treated with estradiol or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) either systemically, vaginal CEE, or vaginal placebo cream for 4 wk. Low-dose local CEE treatment resulted in increased vaginal epithelial thickness and significant vaginal growth without uterine hyperplasia. Furthermore, vaginal wall distensibility increased without compromise of maximal force at failure. Systemic estradiol resulted in modest increases in collagen type I with no change in collagen type III mRNA. Low-dose vaginal treatment, however, resulted in dramatic increases in both collagen subtypes whereas moderate and high dose local therapies were less effective. Consistent with the mRNA results, low-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in increased total and cross-linked collagen content. The inverse relationship between vaginal dose and collagen expression may be explained in part by progressive downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA with increasing estrogen dose. We conclude that, in this menopausal rat model, local estrogen treatment increased total and cross-linked collagen content and markedly stimulated collagen mRNA expression in an inverse dose-effect relationship. High-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha and loss of estrogen-induced increases in vaginal collagen. These results may have important clinical implications regarding the use of local vaginal estrogen therapy and its role as an adjunctive treatment in women with loss of vaginal support. PMID:25537371

  4. Estrogen provokes the depressant effect of chronic nicotine on vagally mediated reflex chronotropism in female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; Fouda, Mohamed A; Helmy, Mai M

    2012-08-01

    We recently reported that acute nicotine impairs reflex tachycardic activity in estrogen-depleted, but not estrogen-repleted, female rats, suggesting a restraining influence for estrogen against the nicotine effect. In this study, we tested whether the baroreflex-protective effect of estrogen can be replicated when nicotine was administered chronically. We also report on the dose dependence and autonomic modulation of the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. The effects of nicotine (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg/day for 14 days) on baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate to increases [phenylephrine (PE)] or decreases [sodium nitroprusside (SNP)] in blood pressure were evaluated in sham-operated (SO), ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen-replaced OVX (OVXE(2)) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS(PE) and BRS(SNP)). In SO rats, both reflex bradycardic and tachycardic responses were attenuated by nicotine in a dose-related fashion. In nicotine-treated rats, blockade of β-adrenergic (propranolol), but not muscarinic (atropine), receptors caused additional reductions in reflex chronotropic responses, implying that nicotine selectively impairs reflex vagal activity. OVX selectively decreased BRS(PE) but not BRS(SNP) and abolished the nicotine-induced impairment of either response. These effects of OVX were reversed after treatment with estrogen or the estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene. In atropine-treated rats, comparable BRS values were demonstrated in all rat preparations regardless of the estrogen or nicotine milieu. Collectively, the inhibition of vagal activity accounts for the depressant effect of chronic nicotine on baroreflex activity. Furthermore, contrary to nicotine's acute effects, the baroreflex-attenuating effect of chronic nicotine is exacerbated by estrogen. PMID:22619254

  5. Effects of postnatal estrogen manipulations on juvenile alloparental behavior.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adam N; Sue Carter, C; Cushing, Bruce S

    2015-09-01

    Sex- and species-specific patterns of estrogen receptor (ER)-α expression are established early in development, which may contribute to sexual differentiation of behavior and determine male social organization. The current study investigated the effects of ERα and ERβ activation during the second postnatal week on subsequent alloparental behavior and ERα expression in juvenile prairie voles. Male and female pups were treated daily with 17β-estradiol (E2, ERα/ERβ agonist), PPT (selective ERα agonist), DPN (selective ERβ agonist), or the oil vehicle on postnatal days (PD) 8-14. Alloparental behavior and ERα expression were examined at PD21. PPT treatment inhibited prosocial motivation in males and increased pup-directed aggression in both sexes. E2 and DPN had no apparent effect on behavior in either sex. PPT-treated males had increased ERα expression in the medial preoptic area (MPN), medial amygdala (MEApd) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTpr). DPN treatment also increased ERα expression in males, but only in the BSTpr. Female ERα expression was unaffected by treatment. These results support the hypothesis that ERα activation in early life is associated with less prosocial patterns of central ERα expression and alloparental behavior in males. The lack of an effect of E2 on behavior suggests that ERβ may antagonize the effects of ERα on alloparental behavior. The results in DPN-treated males suggest that ERα in the MEApd, and not the BSTpr, may be a primary determinant of alloparental behavior in males. PMID:26222494

  6. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis onset in postmenopausal women: Does the ACPA seropositive subset result from genetic effects, estrogen deficiency, skewed profile of CD4(+) T-cells, and their interactions?

    PubMed

    Sapir-Koren, Rony; Livshits, Gregory

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) incidence displays a differentiated age-dependent female-to-male ratio in which women outnumber men. Evidence that the peak incidence of RA in women coincides with menopause age, suggests a potential estrogenic role to disease etiology. Estrogens exert physiologically both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on the immune system. Epidemiologic and animal model studies with estrogen deprivation or supplementation suggested estrogens as to play, mainly, a protective role in RA immunopathology. In this review, we propose that some yet unidentified disturbances associated with estrogen circulating levels, differentiated by the menopausal status, play a major role in women's RA susceptibility. We focus on the interaction between estrogen deprivation and genetic risk alleles for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) seropositive RA, as a major driving force for increased immune reactivity and RA susceptibility, in postmenopausal women. This opens up new fields for research concerning the association among different irregular estrogenic conditions, the cytokine milieu, and age/menopausal status bias in RA. PMID:27178986

  8. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-01

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity. PMID:12670155

  9. Effects of the estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on F344 rat prolactinoma models.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Gao, Hua; Gui, Songbai; Bai, Giwei; Lu, Runchun; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between estrogen and prolactinoma is well documented. But the anti-tumor effects of a pure estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on prolactinomas, especially in vivo, and the possible mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fulvestrant and the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway on rat prolactinoma models. Forty female F344 rat prolactinoma models were established by subcutaneous administration of 10 mg 17β-estradiol for 6 weeks. Rats were intramuscularly injected with fulvestrant (0, 0.5, 3, 20, 40 mg/kg), and tumor size, weight and serum prolactin (PRL) levels were evaluated before and after fulvestrant treatment at 3, 7 and 14 days. Expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα), β-catenin and Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) in prolactinomas was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting, and methylation of the WIF-1 promoter was investigated using pyrosequencing. Tumor size, weight and serum PRL levels were inhibited in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners after fulvestrant treatments. β-catenin expression was downregulated but WIF-1 expression was upregulated following fulvestrant treatment. The methylation of the CpG site of the WIF-1 promoter was negatively correlated to the expression of WIF-1. In addition, the anti-cell proliferation of fulvestrant on GH3 cells was partly disrupted by Wnt signaling pathway agonist SB 216763. In conclusion, fulvestrant inhibited tumor proliferation and PRL secretion of prolactinomas via ERα, and the Wnt signaling pathway was involved in this anti-tumor effect. Therefore, fulvestrant may be a potential new drug for prolactinomas. PMID:24407733

  10. Effect of benzophenone-1 and octylphenol on the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway in estrogen receptor expressing ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sam; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Hwang, Kyung-A; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process in embryonic development and cancer progression and metastasis. EMT is influenced by 17β-estradiol (E2), an endogenous estrogen. Benzophenone-1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, BP-1) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) are suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) because they can exhibit estrogenic properties. In this study, we examined whether BP-1 and OP can lead to EMT of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). A wound healing assay and western blot assay were conducted to show the effect of BP-1 and OP on the migration of BG-1 cells and protein expression of EMT-related genes. BP-1 (10(-6) M) and OP (10(-6) M) significantly enhanced the migration capability of BG-1 cells by reducing the wounded area in the cell monolayer relative to the control, similar to E2 (10(-9) M). However, when BG-1 cells were co-treated with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, the uncovered area was maintained at the level of the control. N-cadherin, snail, and slug were increased by BP-1 and OP while E-cadherin was reduced compared to the control. However, this effect was also restored by co-treatment with ICI 182,780. Taken together, these results indicate that BP-1 and OP, the potential EDCs, may have the ability to induce ovarian cancer metastasis via regulation of the expression of EMT markers and migration of ER-expressing BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. PMID:27145024

  11. Effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function: age-dependent shifts from beneficial to detrimental in small cerebral arteries of the rat.

    PubMed

    Deer, Rachel R; Stallone, John N

    2016-05-15

    In the present study, interactions of age and estrogen in the modulation of cerebrovascular function were examined in small arteries <150 μM. The hypothesis tested was that age enhances deleterious effects of exogenous estrogen by augmenting constrictor prostanoid (CP)-potentiated reactivity of the female (F) cerebrovasculature. F Sprague-Dawley rats approximating key stages of "hormonal aging" in humans were studied: perimenopausal (mature multi-gravid, MA, cyclic, 5-6 mo of age) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic 10-12 mo of age). Rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy and were given estrogen replacement therapy (E) or placebo (O) for 14-21 days. Vasopressin reactivity (VP, 10(-12)-10(-7) M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments, alone or in the presence of COX-1- (SC560, 1 μM) or COX-2- (NS398, 10 μM) selective inhibitors. VP-stimulated release of prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane (TXA2) were assessed by radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites). VP-induced vasoconstriction was attenuated in ovariectomized + estrogen-replaced, multigravid adult rats (5-6 mo; MAE) but potentiated in older ovariectomized + estrogen-replaced, reproductively senescent rats (12-14 mo; RSE). SC560 and NS398 reduced reactivity similarly in ovariectomized multigravid adult rats (5-6 mo; MAO) and ovariectomized reproductively senescent rat (12-14 mo; RSO). In MAE, reactivity to VP was reduced to a greater extent by SC560 than by NS398; however, in RSE, this effect was reversed. VP-stimulated PGI2 was increased by estrogen, yet reduced by age. VP-stimulated TXA2 was increased by estrogen and age in RSE but did not differ in MAO and RSO. Taken together, these data reveal that the vascular effects of estrogen are distinctly age-dependent in F rats. In younger MA, beneficial and protective effects of estrogen are evident (decreased vasoconstriction, increased dilator prostanoid function). Conversely, in older RS

  12. Effect of Topical Estrogen in the Mangement of Traumatic Facial Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Seyed Amirhosein; Barati, Behrooz; Mohammadi, Hosein; Saeidi, Masumeh; Bahreini, Abbas; Kiani, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute skin wound healing is a complicated process comprising various phases. Recent animal studies have shown that steroid sex hormones such as estrogen maybe helpful in the regulation of several pathophysiologic stages that are involved in wound healing. In this study we examined the effects of topical estrogen in the treatment of traumatic facial wounds. Materials and Methods: Patients referred to Luqman Hospital, Tehran with traumatic wounds were enrolled in this case-control study into two groups of equal size. From the second week of the study, topical estrogen (0.625 mg conjugated topical estrogen ointment) was administered in the case group, while the control group received a Eucerin dressing only. The two groups were then compared in terms of wound healing rate on Day 7,14, and 30. Results: Thirty patients with mean age of 16.02+36.23 years were compared in the control and estrogen-treated groups. After treatment, no scars or keloids were observed in either group. The wound area in the estrogen group was lower than that in the control group on Day 14 and 30, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Healing rates in the control group on Day 14 (7.1+42.3 vs.50.3+4.9 mm2) and Day 30 (1.9+93.5 vs. + 97.3+0.6 mm2) (were lower than those in the estrogen group, but the differences were not significant (P>0.05). Findings show that the required time for wound healing in the estrogen-treated group was lower than that in the control group, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Based on this study, topical estrogen has no effect on the rate of wound healing or the rate of wound area. PMID:26878003

  13. Effects of estrogen and testosterone treatment on serotonin transporter binding in the brain of surgically postmenopausal women--a PET study.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Hristina; Kocoska-Maras, Ljiljana; Rådestad, Angelique Flöter; Halldin, Christer; Borg, Jacqueline; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Nordström, Anna-Lena

    2015-02-01

    Sex hormones and the serotonergic system interact in the regulation of mood, learning, memory and sexual behaviour. However, the mechanisms have not been fully explored. The serotonin transporter protein (5-HTT) regulates synaptic concentrations of serotonin and is a primary target for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The aim of this study was to explore how estrogen treatment alone or in combination with testosterone affects 5-HTT binding potentials measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in specific brain regions of postmenopausal women. Ten healthy surgically postmenopausal women (years since oophorectomy 7.5 ± 4.0, mean ± SD) underwent PET examinations at baseline, after three months of estrogen treatment (transdermal estradiol 100 μg/24 hours) and after another three months of combined estrogen and testosterone (testosterone undecanoate 40 mg daily) treatment using the radioligand [(11)C] MADAM developed for examination of the serotonin transporter. The 5-HTT binding potentials decreased significantly in several cortical regions, as well as in limbic and striatal regions after both estrogen treatment alone and combined estrogen/testosterone treatment in comparison to baseline. The observed decrease in 5-HTT could either be due to direct effects on serotonin transporter expression or be the result of indirect adaptation to estrogen and /or testosterone effects on synaptic serotonin levels. Although the mechanism still needs further exploration, the study supports the view that gonadal hormones play a role in serotonin regulated mood disorders. PMID:25462800

  14. In vitro toxicological effects of estrogenic mycotoxins on human placental cells: Structure activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Prouillac, Caroline; Lecoeur, Sylvaine

    2012-03-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroid estrogen mycotoxin produced by numerous strains of Fusarium which commonly contaminate cereals. After oral administration, ZEN is reduced via intestinal and hepatic metabolism to α- and β-zearalenol (αZEL and βZEL). These reduced metabolites possess estrogenic properties, αZEL showing the highest affinity for ERs. ZEN and reduced metabolites cause hormonal effects in animals, such as abnormalities in the development of the reproductive tract and mammary gland in female offspring, suggesting a fetal exposure to these contaminants. In our previous work, we have suggested the potential impact of ZEN on placental cells considering this organ as a potential target of xenobiotics. In this work, we first compared the in vitro effects of αZEL and βΖΕL on cell differentiation to their parental molecule on human trophoblast (BeWo cells). Secondly, we investigated their molecular mechanisms of action by investigating the expression of main differentiation biomarkers and the implication of nuclear receptor by docking prediction. Conversely to ZEN, reduced metabolites did not induce trophoblast differentiation. They also induced significant changes in ABC transporter expression by potential interaction with nuclear receptors (LXR, PXR, PR) that could modify the transport function of placental cells. Finally, the mechanism of ZEN differentiation induction seemed not to involve nuclear receptor commonly involved in the differentiation process (PPARγ). Our results demonstrated that in spite of structure similarities between ZEN, αZEL and βZEL, toxicological effects and toxicity mechanisms were significantly different for the three molecules. -- Highlights: ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on trophoblast differentiation. ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on ABC transporter expression. ► ZEN and metabolites effects involved nuclear receptors interaction.

  15. Is there evidence that estrogen therapy promotes weight maintenance via effects on leptin?

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Alyse M.; Foster-Schubert, Karen; Morton, Gregory J.; Schur, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, plays a crucial role in regulating energy balance. Estrogen, like leptin, reduces food intake and adiposity while increasing energy expenditure in animals and humans of both sexes through its actions in the central nervous system. We reviewed the literature for studies of the effect of exogenously administered estrogen on serum leptin concentrations and adiposity in women. Methods Using PubMed/MEDLINE, we searched for studies of hormone therapy that enrolled healthy postmenopausal women. Studies were further evaluated to determine if leptin and adiposity were monitored both at baseline and throughout a treatment period of at least two months. Results Twenty articles met inclusion criteria. We found no consistent effect of exogenous estrogen on serum leptin concentrations, adiposity, or weight gain. Conclusion Despite suggestive data from animal studies, current literature does not provide compelling evidence that estrogen therapy attenuates weight gain, alters circulating leptin levels, or improves leptin action in postmenopausal women. PMID:24149922

  16. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: II. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Minarik, Thomas A; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Curran, Erin M; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    Urban aquatic ecosystems are often overlooked in toxicological studies even though they serve many ecosystem functions and sustain fish populations despite large-scale habitat alterations. However, urban fish populations are likely exposed to a broad range of stressors, including environmental estrogens (EEs) that may affect anatomy, physiology and reproduction of exposed fish. Although significant progress has been made in establishing ecological consequences of EE exposure, these studies have focused largely on hydrologically simple systems that lack the complexity of urban aquatic environments. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the occurrence and biological effects of EEs across a large urbanized aquatic ecosystem. A multi-pronged study design was employed relying on quantitative determination of select EEs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and repeated biological monitoring of wild-caught and caged fish for indications of endocrine disruption. Over three years, EEs were measured in aqueous samples (n=42 samples) and biological effects assessed in >1200 male fish across the 2000km(2) aquatic ecosystems of the Greater Metropolitan Area of Chicago, IL. Our study demonstrated that in addition to water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents, non-WRP sources contribute significant EE loads to the aquatic ecosystem. While resident and caged male fish responded with the induction of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin, an indicator of EE exposure, neither resident nor caged sunfish exhibited prevalent histopathological changes to their reproductive organs (i.e., intersex) that have been reported in other studies. Vitellogenin induction was greater in spring than the fall and was not correlated with body condition factor, gonadosomatic index or hepatosomatic index. Exposure effects were not correlated with sites downstream of treated effluent discharge further affirming the complexity of sources and effects of EEs in urban aquatic ecosystems

  17. Testosterone attenuates and the selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene, potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotion in male rats.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Boerrigter, Danny; Allen, Katherine; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Karl, Tim; Djunaidi, Vanezha; Double, Kay L; Desai, Reena; Handelsman, David J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2015-04-01

    Although sex steroids are known to modulate brain dopamine, it is still unclear how testosterone modifies locomotor behaviour controlled, at least in part, by striatal dopamine in adolescent males. Our previous work suggests that increasing testosterone during adolescence may bias midbrain neurons to synthesise more dopamine. We hypothesised that baseline and amphetamine-induced locomotion would differ in adult males depending on testosterone exposure during adolescence. We hypothesised that concomitant stimulation of estrogen receptor signaling, through a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), raloxifene, can counter testosterone effects on locomotion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal day 45 were gonadectomised (G) or sham-operated (S) prior to the typical adolescent testosterone increase. Gonadectomised rats were either given testosterone replacement (T) or blank implants (B) for six weeks and sham-operated (i.e. intact or endogenous testosterone group) were given blank implants. Subgroups of sham-operated, gonadectomised and gonadectomised/testosterone-replaced rats were treated with raloxifene (R, 5mg/kg) or vehicle (V), daily for the final four weeks. There were six groups (SBV, GBV, GTV, SBR, GBR, GTR). Saline and amphetamine-induced (1.25mg/kg) locomotion in the open field was measured at PND85. Gonadectomy increased amphetamine-induced locomotion compared to rats with endogenous or with exogenous testosterone. Raloxifene increased amphetamine-induced locomotion in rats with either endogenous or exogenous testosterone. Amphetamine-induced locomotion was negatively correlated with testosterone and this relationship was abolished by raloxifene. Lack of testosterone during adolescence potentiates and testosterone exposure during adolescence attenuates amphetamine-induced locomotion. Treatment with raloxifene appears to potentiate amphetamine-induced locomotion and to have an opposite effect to that of testosterone in male rats. PMID:25747465

  18. Effects of advanced treatments of wastewater effluents on estrogenic and reproductive health impacts in fish.

    PubMed

    Filby, Amy L; Shears, Janice A; Drage, Briane E; Churchley, John H; Tyler, Charles R

    2010-06-01

    Whether the implementation of additional treatments for the removal of estrogens from wastewater treatment works (WwTWs) effluents will eliminate their feminizing effects in exposed wildlife has yet to be established, and this information is crucial for future decisions on investment into WwTWs. Here, granular activated carbon (GAC), ozone (O(3)), and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated for their effectiveness in reducing steroidal estrogen levels in a WwTW effluent and assessments made on the associated estrogenic and reproductive responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed for 21 days. All treatments reduced the estrogenicity of the standard-treated (STD) effluent, but with different efficacies; ranging between 70-100% for total estrogenicity and 53-100% for individual steroid estrogens. In fish exposed to the GAC- and ClO(2)- (but not O(3)-) treated effluents, there was no induction of plasma vitellogenin (VTG) or reduction in the weight of the fatpad, a secondary sex character in males, as occurred for fish exposed to STD effluent. This finding suggests likely benefits of employing these treatment processes for the reproductive health in wild fish populations living in rivers receiving WwTW discharges. Exposure of pair-breeding minnows to the GAC-treated effluent, however, resulted in a similar inhibition of egg production to that occurring for exposure to the STD effluent (34-40%). These data, together with a lack of effect on egg production of the estrogen, ethinylestradiol (10 ng/L), alone, suggest that chemical/physical properties of the effluents rather than their estrogenicity were responsible for the reproductive effect and that these factor(s) were not remediated for through GAC treatment. Collectively, our findings illustrate the importance of assessing integrative biological responses, rather than biomarkers alone, in the assessment and improvement of WwTW technologies for the protection of wild fish populations. PMID:20443592

  19. G-Protein–Coupled Receptor 30 and Estrogen Receptor-α Are Involved in the Proliferative Effects Induced by Atrazine in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albanito, Lidia; Lappano, Rosamaria; Madeo, Antonio; Chimento, Adele; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Dolce, Vincenza; Abonante, Sergio; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2008-01-01

    Background Atrazine, one of the most common pesticide contaminants, has been shown to up-regulate aromatase activity in certain estrogen-sensitive tumors without binding or activating the estrogen receptor (ER). Recent investigations have demonstrated that the orphan G-protein–coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), which is structurally unrelated to the ER, mediates rapid actions of 17β-estradiol and environmental estrogens. Objectives Given the ability of atrazine to exert estrogen-like activity in cancer cells, we evaluated the potential of atrazine to signal through GPR30 in stimulating biological responses in cancer cells. Methods and results Atrazine did not transactivate the endogenous ERα in different cancer cell contexts or chimeric proteins encoding the ERα and ERβ hormone-binding domain in gene reporter assays. Moreover, atrazine neither regulated the expression of ERα nor stimulated aromatase activity. Interestingly, atrazine induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and the expression of estrogen target genes. Using specific signaling inhibitors and gene silencing, we demonstrated that atrazine stimulated the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells through the GPR30–epidermal growth factor receptor transduction pathway and the involvement of ERα. Conclusions Our results indicate a novel mechanism through which atrazine may exert relevant biological effects in cancer cells. On the basis of the present data, atrazine should be included among the environmental contaminants potentially able to signal via GPR30 in eliciting estrogenic action. PMID:19079715

  20. No effect of different estrogen receptor ligands on cognition in adult female monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Wilson, Mark E; Herndon, James G

    2009-03-01

    Many studies in women and animal models suggest that estrogens affect cognitive function. Yet, the mechanisms by which estrogens may impact cognition remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of different estrogen receptor (ER) ligands on cognitive function in adult ovariectomized female rhesus monkeys. The monkeys were tested for 6 weeks on a battery of memory and attentional tasks administered on a touchscreen: the object, face, and spatial versions of the Delayed Recognition Span Test (DRST) and a Visual Search task. Following a 2-week baseline period with oil vehicle treatment, monkeys were randomly assigned to one of 3 treatment groups: estradiol benzoate (EB), selective ERbeta agonist (diarylpropionitrile DPN) or selective ER modulator tamoxifen (TAM). In each treatment group, monkeys received oil vehicle for 2 weeks and the drug for 2 weeks, in a cross-over design. After a 4-week washout, a subset of monkeys was re-tested on the battery when treated with a selective ERalpha agonist (propyl-pyrazole-triol, PPT) or oil vehicle. Overall, drug treatments had no or negligible effects on cognitive performance. These results support the contention that exogenous estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) do not significantly affect cognition in young adult female macaques. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the cognitive effects of estrogens in monkeys of more advanced age are mediated by ERbeta, ERalpha or complex interactions between the two receptors. PMID:19101578

  1. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  2. Src Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer Exhibiting Low Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation.

    PubMed

    Guest, Stephanie K; Ribas, Ricardo; Pancholi, Sunil; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapies in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, approximately 40% of patients relapse. Previously, we identified the Focal-adhesion kinase canonical pathway as a major contributor of resistance to estrogen deprivation and cellular-sarcoma kinase (c-src) as a dominant gene in this pathway. Dasatinib, a pan-src inhibitor, has recently been used in clinical trials to treat ER+ patients but has shown mixed success. In the following study, using isogenic cell line models, we provide a potential explanation for these findings and suggest a sub-group that may benefit. A panel of isogenic cell lines modelling resistance to aromatase inhibitors (LTED) and tamoxifen (TAMR) were assessed for response to dasatinib ± endocrine therapy. Dasatinib caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation in MCF7-TAMR cells and resensitized them to tamoxifen and fulvestrant but not in HCC1428-TAMR. In contrast, in estrogen-deprived conditions, dasatinib increased the proliferation rate of parental-MCF7 cells and had no effect on MCF7-LTED or HCC1428-LTED. Treatment with dasatinib caused a decrease in src-phosphorylation and inhibition of downstream pathways, including AKT and ERK1/2 in all cell lines tested, but only the MCF7-TAMR showed a concomitant decrease in markers of cell cycle progression. Inhibition of src also caused a significant decrease in cell migration in both MCF7-LTED and MCF7-TAMR cells. Finally, we showed that, in MCF7-TAMR cells, in contrast to tamoxifen sensitive cell lines, ER is expressed throughout the cell rather than being restricted to the nucleus and that treatment with dasatinib resulted in nuclear shuttling of ER, which was associated with an increase in ER-mediated transcription. These data suggest that src has differential effects in endocrine-resistant cell lines, particularly in tamoxifen resistant models, with low ER genomic activity, providing further evidence of the importance of patient selection

  3. Src Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer Exhibiting Low Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pancholi, Sunil; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R.; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapies in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, approximately 40% of patients relapse. Previously, we identified the Focal-adhesion kinase canonical pathway as a major contributor of resistance to estrogen deprivation and cellular-sarcoma kinase (c-src) as a dominant gene in this pathway. Dasatinib, a pan-src inhibitor, has recently been used in clinical trials to treat ER+ patients but has shown mixed success. In the following study, using isogenic cell line models, we provide a potential explanation for these findings and suggest a sub-group that may benefit. A panel of isogenic cell lines modelling resistance to aromatase inhibitors (LTED) and tamoxifen (TAMR) were assessed for response to dasatinib ± endocrine therapy. Dasatinib caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation in MCF7-TAMR cells and resensitized them to tamoxifen and fulvestrant but not in HCC1428-TAMR. In contrast, in estrogen-deprived conditions, dasatinib increased the proliferation rate of parental-MCF7 cells and had no effect on MCF7-LTED or HCC1428-LTED. Treatment with dasatinib caused a decrease in src-phosphorylation and inhibition of downstream pathways, including AKT and ERK1/2 in all cell lines tested, but only the MCF7-TAMR showed a concomitant decrease in markers of cell cycle progression. Inhibition of src also caused a significant decrease in cell migration in both MCF7-LTED and MCF7-TAMR cells. Finally, we showed that, in MCF7-TAMR cells, in contrast to tamoxifen sensitive cell lines, ER is expressed throughout the cell rather than being restricted to the nucleus and that treatment with dasatinib resulted in nuclear shuttling of ER, which was associated with an increase in ER-mediated transcription. These data suggest that src has differential effects in endocrine-resistant cell lines, particularly in tamoxifen resistant models, with low ER genomic activity, providing further evidence of the importance of patient selection

  4. Excretion of manure-borne estrogens and androgens and their potential risk estimation in the Yangtze River Basin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxia; Gao, Shiying; Liu, Shufang; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Xuelian; Gao, Min; Cheng, Linjie; Hu, Boyang

    2015-11-01

    The Yangtze River is the longest river in China, and the river basin spans one fifth of the area of the whole country. Based on statistical data, the excretion of manure-borne steroid hormones, including steroid estrogens (SEs) and steroid androgens (SAs), in 10 provinces of China within the region has been estimated. The potential environmental and ecological risk of manure-borne steroid estrogens to the surface water in this region was also assessed. The manure-borne SE and SA excretions in the 10 provinces and municipalities vary in the order: Sichuan>Hunan>Hubei>Yunnan>Jiangsu>Anhui>Jiangxi>Chongqing>Qinghai>Shanghai. The highest increase of manure-borne SEs (1434.3kg) and SAs (408.5kg) was found in Hunan and Hubei provinces, respectively, and the total excretion in 2013 was 65% more than 15years earlier in these two provinces. However, the emissions in Anhui and Shanghai decreased in this 15year period of time. Swine urine, chicken feces, cattle urine, and laying hen feces were considered the dominant sources of manure-borne E1, βE2, αE2, and SAs, respectively. Although Jiangsu province did not have the largest excretion of manure-borne SEs, it had the highest level of predicted 17β-estradiol equivalency (EEQs) value of 16.65ng/L in surface water because of the limited surface water resources. According to the lowest observable effect level of 10ng/L for 17β-estradiol, the manure-borne SEs in Jiangsu province might potentially pose ecological risk to its wild aquatic organisms. PMID:26574094

  5. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  6. Potentially estrogenic polychlorinated biphenyls congeners serum levels and its relation with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Mendez-Henandez, Alejandra; Gabriel, Antonio Padua Y; Jacobo-Avila, Antonio; Portales-Castanedo, Arnulfo; Hernandez-Gonzalez, Sandra; Gallegos-Arreola, Martha Patricia; Ocampo-Gomez, Guadalupe

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world. The main cause of lung cancer is cigarette smoke; however, other important genetic and environmental risk factors play a significant role in the development of lung cancer. Among these factors, occupational and accidental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been associated with an increased risk in lung cancer, suggesting that PCBs could be potent carcinogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between PCB exposure levels, CYP1A1 polymorphisms and the risk of lung cancer. This study enrolled newly diagnosed lung cancer patients. Environmental and occupational information related to the patients studied was collected. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of serum levels of 20 PCB congeners and for CYP1A1 polymorphism analysis. The serum levels of two PCB congeners with potential estrogenic activity were higher in lung cancer patients. The risk of lung cancer was found to correlate with age, gender, smoking history and with agricultural workers, as well as with congener 18. No differences were found in the frequency of CYP1A1 polymorphisms. Furthermore, we did not find a correlation between CYP1A1 polymorphisms and PCB serum levels. The high levels of PCB with estrogenic activity found in our cases, could promote lung cancer inducing cell proliferation in non-neoplastic and neoplastic lung cells via ERβ; inducing the formation of DNA adducts, producing oxidative stress with the subsequent DNA damage and increasing the endogenous catechol levels by catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibition. PMID:22729568

  7. E-Screen - potential tool for assessment of relative serum estrogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The E-Screen bioassay, used to measure estrogenic activity of environmental water samples, feedstuffs, and pure chemicals, was evaluated for its usefulness in estrogenicity assessment of porcine, ovine, bovine, and piscine serum. High concentrations of swine, cattle, and fish serum were toxic to th...

  8. Identification of estrogenic compounds in oil sands process waters by effect directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Siqing; Ramsay, Bruce A; Brown, R Stephen; Wang, Jiaxi; Ramsay, Juliana A

    2015-01-01

    Using effect directed analysis, the presence of estrogenic components in untreated and biologically treated oil sands process water (OSPW) was detected with the yeast estrogenic screening assay after fractionation with solid phase extraction followed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Comparison of the composition, as determined by electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution linear trap quadropole (LTQ)-Orbitrap Velos Pro hybrid mass spectrometry (negative ion) of selected estrogenic and nonestrogenic fractions identified compounds that were uniquely present in the estrogenic samples, biologically treated and untreated. Of the 30 most abundant compounds, there were 14 possible nonaromatic structures and 16 possible aromatic structures. Based on the published literature, the latter are the most likely to cause estrogenicity and were O2, O3 and O4 C17 to C20 compounds with double bond equivalents between 6 and 10 and chemical formulas similar to estrone- and estradiol-like compounds. This study shows exact formulas and masses of possible estrogenic compounds in OSPW. These findings will help to focus study on the most environmentally significant components in OSPW. PMID:25521156

  9. Distinct effects of 4-nonylphenol and estrogen-17β on expression of estrogen receptor α gene in smolting sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Qiong; Ban, Massatoshi; Ando, Hironori; Kitahashi, Takashi; Bhandari, Ramji K.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Urano, Akihisa

    2005-01-01

    Xenoestrogens such as 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) have been shown to affect the parr–smolt transformation, but their mechanisms of action are not known. We therefore examined effects of 4-NP and estradiol-17β (E2) on expression of estrogen receptor (ER) α gene in the liver, gill, pituitary and brain of sockeye salmon to elucidate molecular mechanisms of 4-NP and E2 and developmental differences in response during smolting. Fish were treated twice within a week with 4-NP (15 and 150 mg/kg BW), E2 (2 mg/kg BW) or only vehicle at three stages of smolting, pre-smolting in March, early smolting in April and late smolting in May. The absolute amounts of ERα mRNA were determined by real-time PCR. The basal amounts of ERα mRNA peaked in April in the liver, gill and pituitary. In March, E2 extensively increased the amounts in the liver, while 4-NP had no effects at this stage. In contrast, 4-NP (but not E2) decreased liver ERα mRNA in April. 4-NP also decreased the amount of ERα mRNA in the gill in April. In the pituitary, 4-NP increased ERα mRNA in March but decreased it in May. There were no significant effects in the brain. Changes in basal ERα mRNA observed in this study indicate that estrogen responsiveness of tissues may change during salmon smolting. Furthermore, 4-NP and E2 have different effects on expression of ERα gene in the liver and gill during smolting, and the response is dependent on smolt stage.

  10. Evaluation of Estrogenic Potential of Flavonoids Using a Recombinant Yeast Strain and MCF7/BUS Cell Proliferation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Flávia A.; de Oliveira, Ana Paula S.; de Camargo, Mariana S.; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana A.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, there is a search for compounds with estrogenic activity that can replace estrogen in hormone replacement therapy during menopause, without the undesirable effects of estrogen, such as the elevation of breast cancer occurrence. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to assess the estrogenic activity of flavonoids with different hydroxylation patterns: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone via two different in vitro assays, the recombinant yeast assay (RYA) and the MCF-7 proliferation assay (E-screen), since the most potent phytoestrogens are members of the flavonoid family. In these assays, kaempferol was the only compound that showed ERα-dependent transcriptional activation activity by RYA, showing 6.74±1.7 nM EEQ, besides acting as a full agonist for the stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells. The other compounds did not show detectable levels of interaction with ER under the conditions used in the RYA. However, in the E-screen assay, compounds such as galangin, luteolin and fisetin also stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7/BUS cells, acting as partial agonists. In the evaluation of antiestrogenicity, the compounds quercetin, chrysin and 3-hydroxyflavone significantly inhibited the cell proliferation induced by 17-β-estradiol in the E-screen assay, indicating that these compounds may act as estrogen receptor antagonists. Overall, it became clear in the assay results that the estrogenic activity of flavonoids was affected by small structural differences such as the number of hydroxyl groups, especially those on the B ring of the flavonoid. PMID:24098354

  11. Effects of estrogens on sex differentiation in Japanese quail and chicken.

    PubMed

    Brunström, Björn; Axelsson, Jeanette; Mattsson, Anna; Halldin, Krister

    2009-09-01

    Estrogen production by the female avian embryo induces development of a female phenotype of the reproductive organs whereas the low estrogen concentration in the male embryo results in a male phenotype. Treatment of female embryos with exogenous estrogens disrupts Müllerian duct development resulting in malformations and impaired oviductal function. Exposure of male embryos to estrogens results in ovotestis formation and persisting Müllerian ducts in the embryos and testicular malformations, reduced semen production and partially developed oviducts in the adult bird. Furthermore, studies in Japanese quail show that the male copulatory behavior is impaired by embryonic estrogen treatment. Results from our experiments with selective agonists for ERalpha and ERbeta suggest that the effects of estrogens on the reproductive organs are mediated via activation of ERalpha. Abundant expression of ERalpha mRNA was shown in gonads and Müllerian ducts of early Japanese quail embryos. Both ERalpha and ERbeta transcripts were detected by real-time PCR in early embryo brains of Japanese quail indicating that both receptors may be involved in sex differentiation of the brain. However, in 9-day-old quail embryo brains in situ hybridization showed expression of ERbeta mRNA, but not of ERalpha mRNA, in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), areas implicated in copulatory behavior of adult male quail. Furthermore, embryonic treatment with the selective ERalpha agonist propyl pyrazol triol (PPT) had no effect on the male copulatory behavior. These results suggest that ERbeta may be important for the effects of estrogens on brain differentiation. PMID:19523394

  12. GPR30 is Positioned to Mediate Estrogen Effects on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons and Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, R.; Gibbs, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Beneficial effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance diminish with age and time following the loss of ovarian function. This has led to the ‘Window of Opportunity’ hypothesis, which states that estrogen therapy must be administered within a limited period of time following menopause in order to be effective. Effects of estrogen therapy on cognitive performance are due, at least in part, to effects on cholinergic afferents innervating the hippocampus and cortex, and it has been suggested that the loss of estrogen effect with age and time following menopause is due to a substantial reduction in the function of these projections. The mechanisms that underlie the effects are not clear. GPR30 is a novel G-protein coupled estrogen receptor that is expressed in brain and other tissues. Our recent studies show that GPR30 is expressed in areas of the brain important for spatial learning, memory, and attention. In addition, GPR30 in expressed by the vast majority of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain, and appears to be an important regulator of basal forebrain cholinergic function. We hypothesize that GPR30 plays an important role in mediating direct effects of estradiol on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, with corresponding effects on cognitive performance. Hence, GPR30 may be an important target for developing new therapies that can enhance or restore estrogen effects on cognitive performance in older women. Here we briefly review the cholinergic hypothesis and summarize our findings to date showing effects of a GPR30 agonist and antagonist on basal forebrain cholinergic function and cognitive performance. PMID:21138734

  13. Estrogen-like effects of diet-derived cadmium differ from those of orally administered CdCl(2) in the ERE-luc estrogen reporter mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Balaji; Mäkelä, Sari; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-04-25

    Cadmium (Cd), an environmental and dietary contaminant, has been described to mimic the effects of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in selected model systems when studied as an inorganic salt. However, inorganic Cd salts do not represent the main form of Cd exposure in general human populations. The aims of this study were to compare the estrogen-like effects and the bioavailability of dietary Cd to inorganic CdCl(2). Adult ovariectomized ERE-luc reporter mice were administered two bread based diets containing different concentrations of Cd (17.57 and 49.22μg/kg, corresponding to oral intakes of 1.8 and 5.1μg/kg body weight (bw) per day, respectively), inorganic CdCl(2) (1μg/kg bw per day by gavage) or E(2) (5μg/kg bw per day pellet) for 21 days. The effects on estrogen signaling were investigated by studying the uterine weights, luciferase activation, and expression of endogenous estrogen target genes. The uterine weight was significantly increased by both CdCl(2) and E(2) but not by the Cd containing diets. All treatments modulated the expression of luciferase and the endogenous estrogen target genes; however, there was no consistent overlap between the responses triggered by the bread diets and the responses stimulated by CdCl(2) or E(2). Oral exposure to Cd was calculated and the concentrations in liver and kidneys quantified to estimate the amount of absorbed Cd retained in tissues. The results suggest significantly lower absorption and/or tissue retention of dietary Cd compared to CdCl(2) following oral exposure. Altogether, our results support previous reports on in vivo estrogenicity of CdCl(2) but do not suggest the same activity for diet bound Cd. This study calls for caution when extrapolating results from pure compound studies (e.g. estrogenicity of CdCl(2)) to dietary exposure scenarios (e.g. estrogenicity of diet bound Cd). Further basic research is needed on the mechanisms of interaction between Cd and the estrogen signaling, biologically active species of

  14. Lack of estrogenic or (anti-)androgenic effects of d-phenothrin in the uterotrophic and Hershberger assays.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Ueda, Shinji; Yoshioka, Kaoru; Kawamura, Satoshi; Seki, Takaki; Okuno, Yasuyoshi; Mikami, Nobuyoshi

    2003-04-22

    Synthetic pyrethroids are among the most common insecticides and pesticides currently in use worldwide. Recently, d-phenothrin, a synthetic pyrethroid, is suspected to have endocrine activities through the estrogen and androgen receptors. However, no study has been conducted to evaluate its potential for hormonal activity using an in vivo test specifically focused on estrogenic and androgenic activities. In this study, we evaluated the interaction of d-phenothrin (0, 100, 300 or 1000 mg/kg per day, p.o.) with estrogen- or androgen-mediated mechanisms using in vivo short-term assays. While internationally standardized protocols for the uterotrophic and Hershberger assays have not yet been fully developed, both are widely used and are being considered by the OECD as short-term screening assays for hormonal activity. The highest dose level tested for d-phenothrin was a limit dose (1000 mg/kg per day) designated in the current draft protocol by the OECD, and in fact there was no excessive systemic toxicity in both assays; slightly increased liver weight but no change of serum androgen levels in accessing anti-androgenicity. Potential estrogenic effect of d-phenothrin was evaluated by means of 3-day uterotrophic assay using immature Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats (20 days of age). No increase in uterine weight (wet or blotted) was observed following oral exposure to d-phenothrin. Reference control ethynyl estradiol (0.001 mg/kg per day) showed a significant effect in this assay protocol. A 10-day Hershberger assay using castrated peripubertal male rats measures the androgenic or anti-androgenic effects of the test chemicals on several accessory glands/tissues (the ventral prostate, dorso-lateral prostate, seminal vesicles with coagulating glands, levator ani plus bulbocavernosus muscles, glans penis and Cowper's glands). d-Phenothrin was administered by oral gavage for 10 days to castrated male Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats (7 weeks of age, rats were castrated at 6 weeks of age) with or

  15. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  16. Coexposure to Phytoestrogens and Bisphenol A Mimics Estrogenic Effects in an Additive Manner

    PubMed Central

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER–mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer. PMID:24284790

  17. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer. PMID:24284790

  18. Inhibitory effect of cadmium on estrogen signaling in zebrafish brain and protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chouchene, Lina; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Gueguen, Marie-Madeleine; Hinfray, Nathalie; Brion, François; Piccini, Benjamin; Kah, Olivier; Saïd, Khaled; Messaoudi, Imed; Pakdel, Farzad

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the effects of Cd exposure on estrogen signaling in the zebrafish brain, as well as the potential protective role of Zn against Cd-induced toxicity. For this purpose, the effects on transcriptional activation of the estrogen receptors (ERs), aromatase B (Aro-B) protein expression and molecular expression of related genes were examined in vivo using wild-type and transgenic zebrafish embryos. For in vitro studies, an ER-negative glial cell line (U251MG) transfected with different zebrafish ER subtypes (ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2) was also used. Embryos were exposed either to estradiol (E2 ), Cd, E2 +Cd or E2 +Cd+Zn for 72 h and cells were exposed to the same treatments for 30 h. Our results show that E2 treatment promoted the transcriptional activation of ERs and increased Aro-B expression, at both the protein and mRNA levels. Although exposure to Cd, does not affect the studied parameters when administered alone, it significantly abolished the E2 -stimulated transcriptional response of the reporter gene for the three ER subtypes in U251-MG cells, and clearly inhibited the E2 induction of Aro-B in radial glial cells of zebrafish embryos. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of the expression of esr1, esr2a, esr2b and cyp19a1b genes compared to the E2 -treated group used as a positive control. Zn administration during simultaneous exposure to E2 and Cd strongly stimulated zebrafish ERs transactivation and increased Aro-B protein expression, whereas mRNA levels of the three ERs as well as the cyp19a1b remained unchanged in comparison with Cd-treated embryos. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrate that Cd acts as a potent anti-estrogen in vivo and in vitro, and that Cd-induced E2 antagonism can be reversed, at the protein level, by Zn supplement. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26857037

  19. Effect of surgical menopause and estrogen replacement on cytokine release from human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, R; Brown, C; Puscheck, E; Friedrich, E; Slatopolsky, E; Maggio, D; McCracken, R; Avioli, L V

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether mononuclear cell secretory products contribute to the changes in bone turnover that characterize the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis, we evaluated the effects of oophorectomy and subsequent estrogen replacement on the spontaneous secretion of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and on the phytohemagglutinin A-induced secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In 15 healthy premenopausal women who underwent oophorectomy, increases in GM-CSF activity were observed as early as 1 week after surgery, whereas elevations in IL-1 and TNF-alpha and in hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios, two urinary indices of bone resorption, were detectable 2 weeks after the surgical procedure. Six of the oophorectomized women received no estrogen therapy after surgery and in these subjects hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios plateaued 6 weeks postoperatively, and all three cytokines reached the highest levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, when the study ended. In the remaining 9 women, who were started on estrogen replacement therapy 4 weeks after oophorectomy, decreases in the indices of bone resorption paralleled decreases in the secretion of the cytokines, with lower levels detected after 2 weeks of therapy. In the women who did not receive estrogen therapy, circulating osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, increased beyond preoperative levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, whereas in the estrogen-treated subjects osteocalcin remained unchanged in the entire study period. In 9 female controls who underwent simple hysterectomy, cytokine release and biochemical indices of bone turnover did not change after surgery. These data indicate that changes in estrogen status in vivo are associated with the secretion of mononuclear cell immune factors in vitro and suggest that alterations in the local production of bone

  20. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  1. Experimental Procedures for Demonstration of MicroRNA Mediated Enhancement of Functional Neuroprotective Effects of Estrogen Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-01-01

    Protection of motoneurons is an important therapeutic goal in the treatment of neurological disorders. Recent reports have suggested that specific microRNAs (miRs) could modulate the expression of particular proteins for significant alterations in the pathogenesis of different neurological disorders. Thus, combination of overexpression of a specific neuroprotective miR and treatment with a neuroprotective agent could be a novel strategy for functional protection of motoneurons. The protocols described herein demonstrate that miR-7-1, a neuroprotective miR, can enhance the functional neuroprotective effects of estrogen receptor agonists such as 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT), Way 200070 (WAY), and estrogen (E2) in preventing apoptosis in A23187 calcium ionophore (CI) exposed VSC4.1 motoneurons. This article describes the protocols for the cell viability assay, transfection of VSC4.1 motoneurons with miRs, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining for apoptosis, Western blotting, patch-clamp recording of whole-cell membrane potential, and JC-1 staining for detection of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these protocols are used to demonstrate that miR-7-1 caused significant enhancement of the efficacy of estrogen receptor agonists for functional neuroprotection in VSC4.1 motoneurons. PMID:26585150

  2. Estrogenic Activity in Runoff – Effect of Animal Waste-Based Fertilizer Application to Frozen Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for contamination of surface waters with estrogenic activity from agricultural animal waste has been of recent concern. Application of manure to frozen fields is currently permitted in some states, but requires a 100 ft vegetative buffer between application area and any waterway or til...

  3. Exposures to Synthetic Estrogens at Different Times During the Life, and Their Effect on Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Sonia; Warri, Anni

    2013-01-01

    Women are using estrogens for many purposes, such as to prevent pregnancy or miscarriage, or to treat menopausal symptoms. Estrogens also have been used to treat breast cancer which seems puzzling, since there is convincing evidence to support a link between high lifetime estrogen exposure and increased breast cancer risk. In this review, we discuss the findings that maternal exposure to the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy increases breast cancer risk in both exposed mothers and their daughters. In addition, we review data regarding the use of estrogens in oral contraceptives and as postmenopausal hormone therapy and discuss the opposing effects on breast cancer risk based upon timing of exposure. We place particular emphasis on studies investigating how maternal estrogenic exposures during pregnancy increase breast cancer risk among daughters. New data suggest that these exposures induce epigenetic modifications in the mammary gland and germ cells, thereby causing an inheritable increase in breast cancer risk for multiple generations. PMID:23392570

  4. Molecular identification of potential selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) like properties of phytoestrogens in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Olff, S; Schmidt, S; Michna, H

    2001-08-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies revealed that ethnic populations with higher dietary intake of phytoestrogens have the lowest incidence for breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms which may be responsible for this cancer protective action of phytoestrogens are so far only barely characterised. There are some hints that phytoestrogens may act like selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) on the breast. For this reason we have investigated potential SERM-like properties of the phytoestrogens daidzein (Dai), coumestrol (Cou), and genistein (Gen) in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Effects of these substances on progesterone (PR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER) mRNA expression and estrogen receptor alpha protein levels were studied in comparison to estradiol (E2) and the synthetic SERMs raloxifene (Ral) and faslodex (ICI 182 780). PR mRNA expression was up-regulated after administration of Cou, whereas treatment with Dai and Gen induced only a faint increase. ER mRNA expression was down-regulated by Cou but not affected by Dai and Gen. The content of ER protein in the breast cancer cells was strongly decreased by Gen, only a faint reduction could be observed following administration of Cou, whereas administration of Dai slightly increases ER protein levels. In summary and in comparison to the effects observed after administration of E2, Ral, and ICI it turned out that Cou shows molecular properties which are very similar to an estrogen receptor agonist like E2, whereas the molecular properties of Gen are comparable to the SERMs ICI and Ral. These results clearly indicate that phytoestrogens differ significantly in regard to their molecular action on breast cancer cells and can be subdivided into distinct functional categories. PMID:11509969

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) inhibit hepcidin expression through an estrogen-like effect associated with disordered systemic iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; Zhang, Shuping; Guo, Wenli; Ma, Juan; Chen, Yue; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Sijin

    2015-04-20

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with 209 congeners, are a large family of persistent organic pollutants. PCBs elicit a wide range of toxicities, such as neurotoxicity, hepatoxicity, oncogenicity, and endocrine-disrupting effects. However, an understanding of the potential disruption of systematic iron metabolism by PCBs is still limited. To maintain iron homeostasis, the hepcidin-ferroportin (FPN) axis is critically important, and hepcidin is the central governor in guiding dietary iron absorption and iron egress from macrophages. Hepcidin is secreted by hepatocytes and binds to FPN to promote its degradation. Dysregulation of hepcidin gives rise to disordered iron homeostasis, associated with diverse diseases including anemia and β-thalassemia. Our previous study demonstrated that there is an estrogen response element (ERE) within the promoter of hepcidin gene and that its expression is regulated by estrogen. In the current study, we demonstrated that both PCB153 and PCB126 greatly suppress hepcidin expression in HepG2 cells, with a greater repression occurring in cells upon PCB126 treatment. Further studies uncovered that both PCB153 and PCB126 harbor estrogenic activity and that the estrogenic activity of PCB126 was stronger than that of PCB153 in HepG2 cells. Mechanistic investigation revealed that PCBs suppress hepcidin transcription through a functional ERE within the hepcidin promoter, analogous to the action of 17β-estradiol. Moreover, hepatic hepcidin was downregulated in wild-type mice upon PCB126 administration, coupled with elevated serum iron content as well as reduced hepatic and splenic iron mass. These changes were not replicated in hepcidin-deficient mice upon PCB administration. Additionally, hepatocytes were observed with severe accumulation of lipid droplets in the livers of mice challenged with PCB126, irrespective of the presence of hepcidin. To summarize, our results have deciphered a suppressive role of PCBs in restraining the expression

  6. Extracellular Alkaline pH Leads to Increased Metastatic Potential of Estrogen Receptor Silenced Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khajah, Maitham A.; Almohri, Iman; Mathew, Princy M.; Luqmani, Yunus A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine resistance in breast cancer is associated with enhanced metastatic potential and poor clinical outcome, presenting a significant therapeutic challenge. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF-7 cells which all exhibit enhanced expression profile of mesenchymal markers with reduction of epithelial markers, indicating an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this study we describe their behaviour in response to change in extracellular pH, an important factor controlling cell motility and metastasis. Methods Morphological changes associated with cell exposure to extracellular alkaline pH were assessed by live cell microscopy and the effect of various ion pumps on this behavior was investigated by pretreatment with chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules was assessed by western blotting. Cell motility and invasion were examined by scratch and under-agarose assays respectively. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and specifically of MMP2/9 was assessed in conditioned medium in response to brief alkaline pH exposure. Results Exposure of ER –ve but not ER +ve breast cancer cells to extracellular alkaline pH resulted in cell shrinkage and spherical appearance (termed contractolation); this was reversed by returning the pH back to 7.4. Contractolation was blocked by targeting the Na+/K+ and Na+/H+ pumps with specific chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules critical for cell adhesion were modulated by the exposure to alkaline pH. Brief exposure to alkaline pH enhanced MMP2/9 activity and the invasive potential of ER –ve cells in response to serum components and epithelial growth factor stimulation without affecting unhindered motility. Conclusions Endocrine resistant breast cancer cells behave very differently to estrogen responsive cells in

  7. Effects of low dose treatment of tributyltin on the regulation of estrogen receptor functions in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2013-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are the natural/synthetic compounds which mimic or inhibit the actions of endogenous hormones. Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical. The present study evaluates the estrogenic potential of this compound in vitro in ER (+) breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 cell line. Our data showed that tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) had agonistic activities for estrogen receptor-α (ER-α). Its estrogenic potential was checked using cell proliferation assay, aromatase assay, transactivation assay, and protein expression analysis. Low dose treatment of TBTCl had a proliferative effect on MCF-7 cells and resulted in up-regulation of aromatase enzyme activity and enhanced estradiol production in MCF-7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining showed translocation of ER-α from cytoplasm to nucleus and increased expression of ER-α, 3β-HSD and aromatase on treatment with increasing doses of TBTCl. Further, to decipher the probable signaling pathways involved in its action, the MCF-7 cells were transfected with different pathway dependent luciferase reporter plasmids (CRE, SRE, NF-κB and AP1). A significant increase in CRE and SRE and decrease in NF-κB regulated pathway were observed (p < 0.05). Our results thus showed that the activation of SRE by TBTCl may be due to ligand dependent ER-α activation of the MAPK pathway and increased phosphorylation of ERK. In summary, the present data suggests that low dose of tributyltin genomically and non-genomically augmented estrogen dependent signaling by targeting various pathways. - Highlights: • Tributyltin chloride is agonistic to ER-α in MCF-7 cell line at low doses. • Tributyltin chloride up regulated aromatase activity and estradiol production. • Tributyltin chloride also activates MAPK pathway inducing ERK activation.

  8. Effects of estrogen on beta-amyloid-induced cholinergic cell death in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis.

    PubMed

    Szego, Eva M; Csorba, Attila; Janáky, Tamás; Kékesi, Katalin A; Abrahám, István M; Mórotz, Gábor M; Penke, Botond; Palkovits, Miklós; Murvai, Unige; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z; Kardos, József; Juhász, Gábor D

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and cognitive dysfunctions linked to early loss of cholinergic neurons. As estrogen-based hormone replacement therapy has beneficial effects on cognition of demented patients, and it may prevent memory impairments, we investigated the effect of estrogen-pretreatment on Aβ-induced cholinergic neurodegeneration in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM). We tested which Aβ species induces the more pronounced cholinotoxic effect in vivo. We injected different Aβ assemblies in the NBM of mice, and measured cholinergic cell and cortical fiber loss. Spherical Aβ oligomers had the most toxic effect. Pretreatment of ovariectomized mice with estrogen before Aβ injection decreased cholinergic neuron loss and partly prevented fiber degeneration. By using proteomics, we searched for proteins involved in estrogen-mediated protection and in Aβ toxicity 24 h following injection. The change in expression of, e.g., DJ-1, NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase, ATP synthase, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1, protein phosphatase 2A and dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 support our hypothesis that Aβ induces mitochondrial dysfunction, decreases MAPK signaling, and increases NOS activation in NBM. On the other hand, altered expression of, e.g., MAP kinase kinase 1 and 2, protein phosphatase 1 and 2A by Aβ might increase MAPK suppression and NOS signaling in the cortical target area. Estrogen pretreatment reversed most of the changes in the proteome in both areas. Our experiments suggest that regulation of the MAPK pathway, mitochondrial pH and NO production may all contribute to Aβ toxicity, and their regulation can be prevented partly by estrogen pretreatment. PMID:20938166

  9. In vivo dissection of the estrogen receptor alpha: uncoupling of its physiological effects and medical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Gourdy, Pierre; Lenfant, Françoise

    2013-05-01

    Given this widespread role for estrogen in human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen influence the pathophysiology of numerous diseases, including cancer (of the reproductive tract as breast, endometrial but also colorectal, prostate…), as well as neurodegenerative, inflammatory-immune, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and osteoporosis. These actions are mediated by the activation of estrogen receptors (ER) alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), which regulate target gene transcription (genomic action) through two independent activation functions (AF)-1 and AF-2, but can also elicit rapid membrane initiated steroid signals (MISS). Targeted ER gene inactivation has shown that although ERβ plays an important role in the central nervous system and in the heart, ERα appears to play a prominent role in most of the other tissues. Pharmacological activation or inhibition of ERα and/or ERβ provides already the basis for many therapeutic interventions, from contraception or hormone replacement at menopause to prevention of the recurrence of breast cancer. However, the use of these estrogens or selective estrogen receptors modulators (SERMs) have also induced undesired effects. Thus, an important challenge consists now to uncouple the beneficial actions from other deleterious ones. We summarize here an in vivo molecular "dissection" that allows to delineate in mouse the role of the main "subfunctions" of the receptor. This could pave the way to an optimization of the ER modulation. PMID:23566615

  10. Investigation of the effects of estrogen on skeletal gene expression during zebrafish larval head development

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Benjamin S.; Lassiter, Christopher S.; Jónsson, Zophonías O.

    2016-01-01

    The development of craniofacial skeletal structures requires well-orchestrated tissue interactions controlled by distinct molecular signals. Disruptions in normal function of these molecular signals have been associated with a wide range of craniofacial malformations. A pathway mediated by estrogens is one of those molecular signals that plays role in formation of bone and cartilage including craniofacial skeletogenesis. Studies in zebrafish have shown that while higher concentrations of 17-β estradiol (E2) cause severe craniofacial defects, treatment with lower concentrations result in subtle changes in head morphology characterized with shorter snouts and flatter faces. The molecular basis for these morphological changes, particularly the subtle skeletal effects mediated by lower E2 concentrations, remains unexplored. In the present study we address these effects at a molecular level by quantitative expression analysis of sets of candidate genes in developing heads of zebrafish larvae treated with two different E2 concentrations. To this end, we first validated three suitable reference genes, ppia2, rpl8 and tbp, to permit sensitive quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Next, we profiled the expression of 28 skeletogenesis-associated genes that potentially respond to estrogen signals and play role in craniofacial development. We found E2 mediated differential expression of genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling, mmp2/9/13, sparc and timp2a, as well as components of skeletogenic pathways, bmp2a, erf, ptch1/2, rankl, rarab and sfrp1a. Furthermore, we identified a co-expressed network of genes, including cpn1, dnajc3, esr1, lman1, rrbp1a, ssr1 and tram1 with a stronger inductive response to a lower dose of E2 during larval head development. PMID:27069811

  11. Investigation of the effects of estrogen on skeletal gene expression during zebrafish larval head development.

    PubMed

    Pashay Ahi, Ehsan; Walker, Benjamin S; Lassiter, Christopher S; Jónsson, Zophonías O

    2016-01-01

    The development of craniofacial skeletal structures requires well-orchestrated tissue interactions controlled by distinct molecular signals. Disruptions in normal function of these molecular signals have been associated with a wide range of craniofacial malformations. A pathway mediated by estrogens is one of those molecular signals that plays role in formation of bone and cartilage including craniofacial skeletogenesis. Studies in zebrafish have shown that while higher concentrations of 17-β estradiol (E 2) cause severe craniofacial defects, treatment with lower concentrations result in subtle changes in head morphology characterized with shorter snouts and flatter faces. The molecular basis for these morphological changes, particularly the subtle skeletal effects mediated by lower E 2 concentrations, remains unexplored. In the present study we address these effects at a molecular level by quantitative expression analysis of sets of candidate genes in developing heads of zebrafish larvae treated with two different E 2 concentrations. To this end, we first validated three suitable reference genes, ppia2, rpl8 and tbp, to permit sensitive quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Next, we profiled the expression of 28 skeletogenesis-associated genes that potentially respond to estrogen signals and play role in craniofacial development. We found E 2 mediated differential expression of genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling, mmp2/9/13, sparc and timp2a, as well as components of skeletogenic pathways, bmp2a, erf, ptch1/2, rankl, rarab and sfrp1a. Furthermore, we identified a co-expressed network of genes, including cpn1, dnajc3, esr1, lman1, rrbp1a, ssr1 and tram1 with a stronger inductive response to a lower dose of E 2 during larval head development. PMID:27069811

  12. Estrogens, inflammation and cognition.

    PubMed

    Au, April; Feher, Anita; McPhee, Lucy; Jessa, Ailya; Oh, Soojin; Einstein, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The effects of estrogens are pleiotropic, affecting multiple bodily systems. Changes from the body's natural fluctuating levels of estrogens, through surgical removal of the ovaries, natural menopause, or the administration of exogenous estrogens to menopausal women have been independently linked to an altered immune profile, and changes to cognitive processes. Here, we propose that inflammation may mediate the relationship between low levels of estrogens and cognitive decline. In order to determine what is known about this connection, we review the literature on the cognitive effects of decreased estrogens due to oophorectomy or natural menopause, decreased estrogens' role on inflammation - both peripherally and in the brain - and the relationship between inflammation and cognition. While this review demonstrates that much is unknown about the intersection between estrogens, cognition, inflammation, we propose that there is an important interaction between these literatures. PMID:26774208

  13. Estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the placenta mesotherapy has been widely used to treat menopause. Placenta contains amino acids, peptides, minerals, and estrogen. Here, we investigated the estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine (a main ingredient of placenta) in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause. We assessed the effect of glycine on MG-63 osteoblast cell line, MCF-7 estrogen-dependent cell line, and ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Glycine significantly increased the MG-63 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase were increased by glycine in MG-63 cells. Glycine also increased the BrdU-incorporation and Ki-67 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells. Glycine induced the up-regulation of estrogen receptor-β mRNA expression and estrogen-response element-luciferase activity in MG-63 and MCF-7 cells. In OVX mice, glycine was administered orally at a daily dose of 10 mg/kg per day for 8 weeks. Glycine resulted in the greatest decrease in weight gain caused by ovariectomy. Meanwhile, vaginal weight reduced by ovariectomy was increased by glycine. Glycine significantly increased the ALP activity in OVX mice. MicroCT-analysis showed that glycine significantly enhanced bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density in OVX mice. Moreover, glycine significantly increased the serum 17β-estradiol levels reduced by ovariectomy. Glycine has an estrogen-like osteoprotective effect in menopause models. Therefore, we suggest that glycine may be useful for the treatment of menopause. PMID:26563333

  14. Sex-specific effects of androgen and estrogen on proliferation of the embryonic chicken hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ailing; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2007-04-01

    Effects of androgen and estrogen on proliferation of hypothalamic neurons were evaluated by a chicken hypothalamic neuron-glia coculture model. Hypothalamic cells were dispersed from 17-day-old embryos and challenged with testosterone (T) and 17beta-estradiol (E2) alone or combined with androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, or aromatase inhibitor letrozole for 48 h. The neuron number was counted and the proliferating cells were identified by immunocytochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results showed that both E2 and T stimulated proliferation of hypothalamic neurons. E2 showed more intensive effect on females and this promoting effect was abrogated by tamoxifen. T played more intensive effect on males and the effect was inhibited by flutamide, tamoxifen, or letrozole. The above results indicated that E2 stimulated neuron proliferation through estrogenic actions with more sensitive effect on females and T promoted neuron proliferation through both androgenic and estrogenic actions with more intense effect on males. These observations suggested that steroid hormones influence the proliferation of hypothalamic neurons in a sexually dimorphic manner during the development of chicken embryos. PMID:17873328

  15. Raw drone milk of honeybees elicits uterotrophic effect in rats: evidence for estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Seres, Adrienn B; Ducza, Eszter; Báthori, Mária; Hunyadi, Attila; Béni, Zoltán; Dékány, Miklós; Gáspár, Róbert

    2013-05-01

    Numerous honeybee products are used in medicine, but the literature furnishes no information concerning the effects of the drone milk (DM), although drone brood, which is similar to DM, was reported to elicit a hormone-like strengthening effect. In certain countries, DM is traditionally used to treat infertility and to promote vitality in both men and women. The aim of this study was to determine the putative estrogen hormone-like effect of raw DM in rats and to identify the effective compounds. Uterotrophic assays revealed that DM increased the relative weight of the immature rat uterus. This effect was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain-reaction and Western blot methods, in which the mRNA and protein expression of the estrogen-dependent peptide complement component C3 was determined. Column chromatography and uterotrophic assays were used to fractionate and check bioactivity, respectively. The active compound after the last fractionation was identified by the nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques as E-dec-2-enedioic acid, which is very similar to the fatty acids with estrogenic activity that were previously isolated from royal jelly. These results lead us to suppose that E-dec-2-enedioic acid is responsible for the estrogen-like effect of DM. This appears to be the first report on the pharmacological effects of DM and E-dec-2-enedioic acid in mammals. PMID:23631495

  16. Opposite effects of two estrogen receptors on tau phosphorylation through disparate effects on the miR-218/PTPA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan-Si; Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Dan; Huang, He-Zhou; Wei, Na; Tan, Lu; Chen, Jian-Guo; Man, Heng-Ye; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The two estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, mediate the diverse biological functions of estradiol. Opposite effects of ERα and ERβ have been found in estrogen-induced cancer cell proliferation and differentiation as well as in memory-related tasks. However, whether these opposite effects are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. Here, we find that ERα and ERβ play contrasting roles in regulating tau phosphorylation, which is a pathological hallmark of AD. ERα increases the expression of miR-218 to suppress the protein levels of its specific target, protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα). The downregulation of PTPα results in the abnormal tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (resulting in activation) and protein phosphatase 2A (resulting in inactivation), the major tau kinase and phosphatase. Suppressing the increased expression of miR-218 inhibits the ERα-induced tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the PTPα decline. In contrast, ERβ inhibits tau phosphorylation by limiting miR-218 levels and restoring the miR-218 levels antagonized the attenuation of tau phosphorylation by ERβ. These data reveal for the first time opposing roles for ERα and ERβ in AD pathogenesis and suggest potential therapeutic targets for AD. PMID:26111662

  17. Estrogen Effects on Vascular Inflammation are Age-Dependent: Role of Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Akash; Chen, Yiu-Fai; Szalai, Alexander J.; Oparil, Suzanne; Hage, Fadi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective 17β-Estradiol (E2) offers cardiovascular protection in young female animals and postmenopausal women. In contrast, randomized trials of menopausal hormones carried out in older women have shown harm or no cardiovascular benefit. We hypothesize that E2 effects on vascular inflammation are age-dependent. Approach and Results Young (10-wk) and aged (52-wk) female C57BL/6 mice were used as source for primary cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). E2 pre-treatment of cells derived from young mice attenuated C-reactive protein (CRP)-induced expression of inflammatory mediators. In contrast, E2 pre-treatment of cells from aged mice did not alter (BMMs) or paradoxically exaggerated (VSMCs) inflammatory mediator response to CRP. Using E2 receptor (ER)-knockout mice, we demonstrated that E2 regulates inflammatory response to CRP in BMMs via ERα and in VSMCs via ERβ. BMMs derived from aged (vs. young) mice expressed significantly less ERα mRNA and protein. A selective ligand of the novel ER GPR30 reproduced the E2 effects in BMMs and VSMCs. Unlike in young mice, E2 did not reduce neointima formation in ligated carotid arteries of aged CRP transgenic mice. Conclusions E2 attenuates inflammatory response to CRP in BMMs and VSMCs derived from young but not aged mice and reduces neointima formation in injured carotid arteries of young but not aged CRP transgenic mice. ERα expression in BMMs is greatly diminished with aging. These data suggest that vasoprotective effects of E2 are age-dependent and may explain the vasotoxic effects of E2 seen in clinical trials of postmenopausal women. PMID:24876352

  18. Estrogen overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002584.htm Estrogen overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Estrogen is a female hormone. Estrogen overdose occurs when ...

  19. Effects of coumestrol on estrogen receptor function and uterine growth in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Markaverich, B M; Webb, B; Densmore, C L; Gregory, R R

    1995-01-01

    Isoflavonoids and related compounds such as coumestrol have classically been categorized as phytoestrogens because these environmentally derived substances bind to the estrogen receptor (ER) and increase uterine wet weight in immature rats and mice. Assessment of the binding affinities of isoflavonoids for ER and subsequent effects on uterine growth suggest these compounds are less active estrogens than estradiol and therefore may reduce the risk of developing breast or prostate cancer in humans by preventing estradiol binding to ER. With the renewed interest in the relationships between environmental estrogens and cancer cause and prevention, we assessed the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on uterotropic response in the immature, ovariectomized rat. Our studies demonstrated that in this animal model, coumestrol is an atypical estrogen that does not stimulate uterine cellular hyperplasia. Although acute (subcutaneous injection) or chronic (multiple injection or orally via drinking water) administration of coumestrol significantly increased uterine wet and dry weights, the phytoestrogen failed to increase uterine DNA content. The lack of true estrogenic activity was characterized by the inability of this phytoestrogen to cause cytosolic ER depletion, nuclear ER accumulation, or the stimulation of nuclear type II sites which characteristically precede estrogenic stimulation of cellular DNA synthesis and proliferation. In fact, subcutaneous or oral coumestrol treatment caused an atypical threefold induction of cytosolic ER without corresponding cytosolic depletion and nuclear accumulation of this receptor, and this increased the sensitivity of the uterus to subsequent stimulation by estradiol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images p574-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:7556010

  20. Estrogen disruption of neonatal ovine uterine development: effects on gene expression assessed by suppression subtraction hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanako; Spencer, Thomas E

    2005-10-01

    Inappropriate exposure of neonatal sheep to estrogen during critical developmental periods inhibits or retards endometrial gland morphogenesis and reduces uterine growth. Studies were conducted to identify mechanisms mediating estrogen disruption of neonatal ovine uterine development by analysis of candidate growth factor systems and using suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH). In study 1, sheep were exposed either to corn oil as a control or to estradiol valerate (EV) from birth to Postnatal Day (PND) 14, which ablated endometrial gland development. Estradiol valerate decreased uterine FGF7 (fibroblast growth factor 7) and MET (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) expression and increased INHBA (inhibin betaA). The SSH identified a number of genes responsive to EV, which included GSTM3 (glutathione S-transferase), IDH1 (cytosolic NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase), PECI (peroxisomal D(3),D(2)-enoyl-coenzyme A isomerase), OAS1 (2',5'-oligoadenylate 40/46-kDa synthetase), IGFBP3 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3), TEGT (testis-enhanced gene transcript), CXCL10 (interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10), and IGLV (immunoglobulin V). These mRNAs were expressed predominantly in the endometrial epithelia (GSTM3, IDH1, PEC1, OAS1, and TEGT), stroma (IGFBP3), or immune cells (CXCL10 and IGLV). In study 2, effects of estrogen exposure on uterine gene expression were determined during three different critical developmental periods (PNDs 0-14, 14- 28, and 42-56). Estrogen exposure decreased expression of the SSH-identified genes, particularly those from PNDs 0-14. These studies suggest that estrogen disruption of postnatal uterine development involves period-specific effects on expression of genes predominantly in the endometrial epithelium. The SSH-identified, estrogen-disrupted genes represent new candidate regulators of postnatal endometrial adenogenesis. PMID:15972882

  1. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei-Fei; Cao, Yang; Wang, Min; Rong, Fei; Xu, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal. PMID:25114645

  2. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei-Fei; Cao, Yang; Wang, Min; Rong, Fei; Xu, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal.

  3. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal. PMID:25114645

  4. Effects of 7-O substitutions on estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activities of daidzein analogues in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Daidzein (1) is a natural estrogenic isoflavone. We report here that 1 can be transformed into an antiestrogenic ligand by simple alkyl substitutions of the 7-hydroxyl hydrogen. To test the effect of such structural modifications on the hormonal activities of the resulting compounds, a series of dai...

  5. Estrogen enhances the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide)

    PubMed Central

    E, LING-LING; XU, WEN-HUAN; FENG, LIN; LIU, YI; CAI, DONG-QING; WEN, NING; ZHENG, WEN-JIE

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of estrogen on the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on a collagen-based composite scaffold [nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA)]. For this purpose, 48 healthy 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 2 groups as follows: the bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) rats and sham-operated rats. The PDLSCs were isolated at 3 months after surgery (by which time postmenopausal osteoporosis had developed). The effects of estrogen on the characteristics of these cells seeded in a culture plate and of the cells seeded on nHAC/PLA were then investigated. The PDLSC + nHAC/PLA constructs were implanted subcutaneously into the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for 12 weeks in order to examine the role of estrogen in the bone formation ability of PDLSCs derived from osteoporotic rats. The results from methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay revealed that the proliferation of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly higher than that of the cells derived from the rats in the sham-operated group at the stage of logarithmic growth. The staining intensity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the mineralization of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly weaker than that of the cells from the rats in the sham-operated group. When the PDLSCs were seeded on nHAC/PLA, ALP activity, osteocalcin (OCN) secretion, mineral formation and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ in the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group were markedly decreased. Treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) significantly weakened the proliferative ability of the cells derived from the OVX group rats, and enhanced their osteogenic differentiation ability and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, ERα and ERβ. When the constructs were implanted into the backs of SCID

  6. Estrogen enhances the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide).

    PubMed

    E, Ling-Ling; Xu, Wen-Huan; Feng, Lin; Liu, Yi; Cai, Dong-Qing; Wen, Ning; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of estrogen on the bone regeneration potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) derived from osteoporotic rats and seeded on a collagen-based composite scaffold [nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/poly(L-lactide) (nHAC/PLA)]. For this purpose, 48 healthy 3‑month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 2 groups as follows: the bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) rats and sham‑operated rats. The PDLSCs were isolated at 3 months after surgery (by which time postmenopausal osteoporosis had developed). The effects of estrogen on the characteristics of these cells seeded in a culture plate and of the cells seeded on nHAC/PLA were then investigated. The PDLSC + nHAC/PLA constructs were implanted subcutaneously into the backs of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice for 12 weeks in order to examine the role of estrogen in the bone formation ability of PDLSCs derived from osteoporotic rats. The results from methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay revealed that the proliferation of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly higher than that of the cells derived from the rats in the sham-operated group at the stage of logarithmic growth. The staining intensity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the mineralization of the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group was significantly weaker than that of the cells from the rats in the sham-operated group. When the PDLSCs were seeded on nHAC/PLA, ALP activity, osteocalcin (OCN) secretion, mineral formation and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ in the cells derived from the rats in the OVX group were markedly decreased. Treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) significantly weakened the proliferative ability of the cells derived from the OVX group rats, and enhanced their osteogenic differentiation ability and the mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN, ERα and ERβ. When the constructs were implanted

  7. Effects of chronic estrogen treatment on modulating age-related bone loss in female mice.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhan A; Mödder, Ulrike Il; Roforth, Matthew; Hensen, Ira; Fraser, Daniel G; Peterson, James M; Oursler, Merry Jo; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-11-01

    While female mice do not have the equivalent of a menopause, they do undergo reproductive senescence. Thus, to dissociate the effects of aging versus estrogen deficiency on age-related bone loss, we sham-operated, ovariectomized, or ovariectomized and estrogen-replaced female C57/BL6 mice at 6 months of age and followed them to age 18 to 22 months. Lumbar spines and femurs were excised for analysis, and bone marrow hematopoietic lineage negative (lin-) cells (enriched for osteoprogenitor cells) were isolated for gene expression studies. Six-month-old intact control mice were euthanized to define baseline parameters. Compared with young mice, aged/sham-operated mice had a 42% reduction in lumbar spine bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and maintaining constant estrogen levels over life in ovariectomized/estrogen-treated mice did not prevent age-related trabecular bone loss at this site. By contrast, lifelong estrogen treatment of ovariectomized mice completely prevented the age-related reduction in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and thickness at the tibial diaphysis present in the aged/sham-operated mice. As compared with cells from young mice, lin- cells from aged/sham-operated mice expressed significantly higher mRNA levels for osteoblast differentiation and proliferation marker genes. These data thus demonstrate that, in mice, age-related loss of cortical bone in the appendicular skeleton, but not loss of trabecular bone in the spine, can be prevented by maintaining constant estrogen levels over life. The observed increase in osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation marker gene expression in progenitor bone marrow cells from aged versus young mice may represent a compensatory mechanism in response to ongoing bone loss. PMID:20499336

  8. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects mediated through temperature and dietary regimens in male fat head minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plethora of studies has examined the biological effects of environmental estrogens on fathead minnows. However, in many cases results from environmental studies do not match the expectations from prior laboratory exposures, which usually are designed to minimize confounding factors such as temper...

  9. The cognitive effects of conjugated equine estrogens depend on whether menopause etiology is transitional or surgical.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Jazmin I; Mayer, Loretta P; Braden, B Blair; Nonnenmacher, Sean; Mennenga, Sarah E; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2010-08-01

    The question of whether to take hormone therapy (HT) will impact every woman as she enters reproductive senescence. In women, studies suggest that ovarian hormone loss associated with menopause has deleterious cognitive effects. Results from clinical studies evaluating whether estrogen-containing HT mitigates these effects, and benefits cognition, are discrepant. Type of menopause, surgical vs. transitional, impacts cognitive outcome in women. However, whether type of menopause impacts cognitive effects of HT has not been methodically tested in women or an animal model. We used the 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide rodent model of ovarian follicle depletion, which mimics transitional menopause, and the traditional rat model of menopause, ovariectomy, to cognitively test the most commonly prescribed estrogen therapy in the United States, conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin). Here we show conjugated equine estrogens benefited cognition in surgically menopausal rats, but, in contrast, impaired cognition in transitionally menopausal rats. Androstenedione, released from the residual transitional menopausal ovary, was positively associated with impaired performance, replicating our previous findings in 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide animals. The current findings are especially salient given that no clinical study testing cognition has methodically separated these two populations of menopausal women for analysis. That we now show surgical vs. transitional modes of menopause result in disparate cognitive effects of HT has implications for future research and treatments optimizing HT for menopausal women. PMID:20555031

  10. Cadmium-induced effects on cellular signaling pathways in the liver of transgenic estrogen reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Stenius, Ulla; Adamsson, Annika; Mäkelä, Sari I; Åkesson, Agneta; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Halldin, Krister

    2012-05-01

    Estrogen-like effects of cadmium (Cd) have been reported in several animal studies, and recent epidemiological findings suggest increased risk of hormone-dependent cancers after Cd exposure. The mechanisms underlying these effects are still under investigation. Our aim was to study the effects of Cd on cellular signaling pathways in vivo with special focus on estrogen signaling and to perform benchmark dose analysis on the effects. Transgenic adult ERE-luciferase male mice were exposed subcutaneously to 0.5-500 μg CdCl(2) per kg body weight (bw) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for 3 days. These doses had no effects on organ and bw or testicular histology, indicating subtoxic exposure levels. The transgene luciferase, reporting genomic estrogen response, was significantly increased by EE2 but not by Cd. However, Cd significantly affected kinase phosphorylation and endogenous gene expression. Interestingly, gene expression changes displayed a traditional dose-response relationship, with benchmark dose levels for the expression of Mt1, Mt2, p53, c-fos, and Mdm2 being 92.9, 19.9, 7.6, 259, and 25.9 μg/kg bw, respectively, but changes in kinase phosphorylation were only detected at low exposure levels. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2 was significantly increased even in the lowest dose group, 0.5 μg/kg bw, rendering pErk1/2 a more sensitive sensor of exposure than changes in gene expression. Collectively, our data suggest that the effects triggered by Cd in vivo are markedly concentration dependent. Furthermore, we conclude that the estrogen-like effects of Cd are likely to result from a mechanism different from steroidal estrogens. PMID:22314386

  11. Transcriptomic analysis identifies gene networks regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ that control distinct effects of different botanical estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C. Michael; Helferich, William G.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ mediate the actions of endogenous estrogens as well as those of botanical estrogens (BEs) present in plants. BEs are ingested in the diet and also widely consumed by postmenopausal women as dietary supplements, often as a substitute for the loss of endogenous estrogens at menopause. However, their activities and efficacies, and similarities and differences in gene expression programs with respect to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) are not fully understood. Because gene expression patterns underlie and control the broad physiological effects of estrogens, we have investigated and compared the gene networks that are regulated by different BEs and by E2. Our aim was to determine if the soy and licorice BEs control similar or different gene expression programs and to compare their gene regulations with that of E2. Gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells treated with control vehicle, BE or E2. These cells contained three different complements of ERs, ERα only, ERα+ERβ, or ERβ only, reflecting the different ratios of these two receptors in different human breast cancers and in different estrogen target cells. Using principal component, hierarchical clustering, and gene ontology and interactome analyses, we found that BEs regulated many of the same genes as did E2. The genes regulated by each BE, however, were somewhat different from one another, with some genes being regulated uniquely by each compound. The overlap with E2 in regulated genes was greatest for the soy isoflavones genistein and S-equol, while the greatest difference from E2 in gene expression pattern was observed for the licorice root BE liquiritigenin. The gene expression pattern of each ligand depended greatly on the cell background of ERs present. Despite similarities in gene expression pattern with E2, the BEs were generally less stimulatory of genes promoting proliferation and were more pro-apoptotic in their

  12. Transcriptomic analysis identifies gene networks regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ that control distinct effects of different botanical estrogens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C Michael; Helferich, William; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ mediate the actions of endogenous estrogens as well as those of botanical estrogens (BEs) present in plants. BEs are ingested in the diet and also widely consumed by postmenopausal women as dietary supplements, often as a substitute for the loss of endogenous estrogens at menopause. However, their activities and efficacies, and similarities and differences in gene expression programs with respect to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) are not fully understood. Because gene expression patterns underlie and control the broad physiological effects of estrogens, we have investigated and compared the gene networks that are regulated by different BEs and by E2. Our aim was to determine if the soy and licorice BEs control similar or different gene expression programs and to compare their gene regulations with that of E2. Gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells treated with control vehicle, BE or E2. These cells contained three different complements of ERs, ERα only, ERα+ERβ, or ERβ only, reflecting the different ratios of these two receptors in different human breast cancers and in different estrogen target cells. Using principal component, hierarchical clustering, and gene ontology and interactome analyses, we found that BEs regulated many of the same genes as did E2. The genes regulated by each BE, however, were somewhat different from one another, with some genes being regulated uniquely by each compound. The overlap with E2 in regulated genes was greatest for the soy isoflavones genistein and S-equol, while the greatest difference from E2 in gene expression pattern was observed for the licorice root BE liquiritigenin. The gene expression pattern of each ligand depended greatly on the cell background of ERs present. Despite similarities in gene expression pattern with E2, the BEs were generally less stimulatory of genes promoting proliferation and were more pro-apoptotic in their

  13. Perfluorinated chemicals, PFOS and PFOA, enhance the estrogenic effects of 17β-estradiol in T47D human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonthithai, Pacharapan; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are the two most popular surfactants among perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), with a wide range of uses. Growing evidence suggests that PFCs have the potential to interfere with estrogen homeostasis, posing a risk of endocrine-disrupting effects. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the estrogenic effect of these compounds on T47D hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. PFOS and PFOA (10(-12) to 10(-4)  M) were not able to induce estrogen response element (ERE) activation in the ERE luciferase reporter assay. The ERE activation was induced when the cells were co-incubated with PFOS (10(-10) to 10(-7)  M) or PFOA (10(-9) to 10(-7)  M) and 1 nM of 17β-estradiol (E2). PFOS and PFOA did not modulate the expression of estrogen-responsive genes, including progesterone (PR) and trefoil factor (pS2), but these compounds enhanced the effect of E2-induced pS2 gene expression. Neither PFOS nor PFOA affected T47D cell viability at any of the tested concentrations. In contrast, co-exposure with PFOS or PFOA and E2 resulted in an increase of E2-induced cell viability, but no effect was found with 10 ng ml(-1) EGF co-exposure. Both compounds also intensified E2-dependent growth in the proliferation assay. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased by co-exposure with PFOS or PFOA and E2, but not with EGF. Collectively, this study shows that PFOS and PFOA did not possess estrogenic activity, but they enhanced the effects of E2 on estrogen-responsive gene expression, ERK1/2 activation and the growth of the hormone-deprived T47D cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26234195

  14. Insights into Rapid Modulation of Neuroplasticity by Brain Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Penzes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence from cellular, electrophysiological, anatomic, and behavioral studies suggests that the remodeling of synapse structure and function is a critical component of cognition. This modulation of neuroplasticity can be achieved through the actions of numerous extracellular signals. Moreover, it is thought that it is the integration of different extracellular signals regulation of neuroplasticity that greatly influences cognitive function. One group of signals that exerts powerful effects on multiple neurologic processes is estrogens. Classically, estrogens have been described to exert their effects over a period of hours to days. However, there is now increasing evidence that estrogens can rapidly influence multiple behaviors, including those that require forebrain neural circuitry. Moreover, these effects are found in both sexes. Critically, it is now emerging that the modulation of cognition by rapid estrogenic signaling is achieved by activation of specific signaling cascades and regulation of synapse structure and function, cumulating in the rewiring of neural circuits. The importance of understanding the rapid effects of estrogens on forebrain function and circuitry is further emphasized as investigations continue to consider the potential of estrogenic-based therapies for neuropathologies. This review focuses on how estrogens can rapidly influence cognition and the emerging mechanisms that underlie these effects. We discuss the potential sources and the biosynthesis of estrogens within the brain and the consequences of rapid estrogenic-signaling on the remodeling of neural circuits. Furthermore, we argue that estrogens act via distinct signaling pathways to modulate synapse structure and function in a manner that may vary with cell type, developmental stage, and sex. Finally, we present a model in which the coordination of rapid estrogenic-signaling and activity-dependent stimuli can result in long-lasting changes in neural circuits

  15. USE OF IN VITRO ASSAYS TO INTERPRET INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS' POTENTIAL ESTROGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is to study estrogen receptor binding and gene expression in fish through the development of in vitro approaches and QSAR models applicable to untested chemicals on EPA inventories. This will facilitate prioritization of chemicals to undergo Tier 1 screen...

  16. The estrogenic effects of benzylparaben at low doses based on uterotrophic assay in immature SD rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhaobin; Sun, Libei; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Qingchun; Jiao, Jian; Li, Jun; Qi, Mingwen

    2013-03-01

    Benzylparaben (BzP), a type of parabens being used as a preservative agent in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products, may be ingested by humans. In this study, we performed an immature uterotrophic assay using Sprague Dawley (SD) rats by intragastric administration to determine the estrogenic effects of BzP and found significant increases in uterine weight with doses of 0.16 mg/kg body weight and higher (P<0.05). The in vivo estrogenicity of BzP was supported by in vitro results from the human estrogen receptor α (hERα)-coactivator recruiting assay and in silico molecular docking analysis performed in this study. The in vitro estrogenic activity of BzP can be observed at concentrations of 1.0×10(-8) M and higher. Molecular docking analysis showed that BzP fits well into the agonist pocket of hERα. The lowest observed effect dose (LOED) (0.16 mg/kg/day) of BzP is much lower than the documented LOEDs of other parabens. Actual risk may exist for people who consume a diet high in BzP or use BzP-laden cosmetics. In addition, we tested the sensitivity of Wistar rats to 17β-estradiol by immature uterotrophic assay, and no obvious uterotrophic response was observed in the rats given doses up to 100 μg/kg body weight. PMID:23220609

  17. Effect of Vaginal or Systemic Estrogen on Dynamics of Collagen Assembly in the Rat Vaginal Wall1

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, T. Ignacio; Maldonado, P. Antonio; Acevedo, Jesus F.; Word, R. Ann

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to compare the effects of systemic and local estrogen treatment on collagen assembly and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall. Ovariectomized nulliparous rats were treated with estradiol or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) either systemically, vaginal CEE, or vaginal placebo cream for 4 wk. Low-dose local CEE treatment resulted in increased vaginal epithelial thickness and significant vaginal growth without uterine hyperplasia. Furthermore, vaginal wall distensibility increased without compromise of maximal force at failure. Systemic estradiol resulted in modest increases in collagen type I with no change in collagen type III mRNA. Low-dose vaginal treatment, however, resulted in dramatic increases in both collagen subtypes whereas moderate and high dose local therapies were less effective. Consistent with the mRNA results, low-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in increased total and cross-linked collagen content. The inverse relationship between vaginal dose and collagen expression may be explained in part by progressive downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA with increasing estrogen dose. We conclude that, in this menopausal rat model, local estrogen treatment increased total and cross-linked collagen content and markedly stimulated collagen mRNA expression in an inverse dose-effect relationship. High-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha and loss of estrogen-induced increases in vaginal collagen. These results may have important clinical implications regarding the use of local vaginal estrogen therapy and its role as an adjunctive treatment in women with loss of vaginal support. PMID:25537371

  18. Effects of Bazedoxifene Acetate with and without Conjugated Equine Estrogens on the Breast of Postmenopausal Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ethun, Kelly F.; Wood, Charles E.; Register, Thomas C.; Cline, J. Mark; Appt, Susan E.; Clarkson, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Concerns about increased breast cancer risk with estrogen and progestin therapy have led to an increased interest in progestin alternatives. The main objective of this study was to determine if bazedoxifene acetate (BZA), a new selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), would antagonize the proliferative and transcriptional effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) in the breast. Methods As part of a 20 month preclinical trial, ninety-five ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to receive no treatment or treatment with BZA (20 mg/d), CEE (0.45 mg/d), or BZA and CEE in combination (women’s daily equivalent doses). Data presented here include breast effects following 6 months of treatment. Endpoints included histomorphometry, histopathologic evaluations, gene microarray assays, PCR quantification of specific ERα activity markers, and immunohistochemical detection of sex steroid receptors, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Results BZA+CEE and BZA resulted in significantly less total epithelial density, lobular enlargement, and Ki67 immunolabeling in the terminal ducts compared to CEE alone (P < 0.05 for all). The addition of BZA to CEE antagonized the expression of ERα-regulated genes such as GREB1 and TFF1 (P < 0.01 for both), while BZA alone had minimal effects on ERα-mediated transcriptional activity. BZA and BZA+CEE did not significantly up-regulate genes related to cell cycle progression and proliferation. BZA with and without CEE also resulted in less lobular and terminal duct ERα immunolabeling compared to control and CEE (P < 0.0001 for all). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that BZA given at a clinically relevant dose is an estrogen antagonist in the breast, supporting the idea that CEE + BZA may provide a lower breast cancer risk profile compared to traditional estrogen + progestin therapies. PMID:23103754

  19. Estrogen mediated effects in the Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, following field exposures to sewage effluent containing estrogenic compounds and activity.

    PubMed

    Andrew-Priestley, M N; O'Connor, W A; Dunstan, R H; Van Zwieten, L; Tyler, T; Kumar, A; MacFarlane, G R

    2012-09-15

    The Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, has been demonstrated as a useful biomonitor of estrogenic compounds following laboratory exposures, yet its utility in the assessment of estrogenic exposure and effects under field conditions requires investigation. To achieve this aim, S. glomerata were deployed in Newcastle, Australia in the effluent receiving marine waters of Burwood Beach WWTP (Burwood Beach "near", <50 m from outfall and Burwood Beach "far", 100-150 m from outfall) and reference locations (Redhead, Fingal Island 1 and Fingal Island 2) at depths of 4, 8 and 12 m for six weeks. Effluent receiving waters of Burwood Beach WWTP were found to be a suitable impact location, demonstrated via measurement of estrogenic compounds and activity throughout the deployment. Estrogenic compounds were detected (average of combined solids and liquid fractions) at average concentrations of: 1.42 ng/L for estrone, 0.69 ng/L for 17β estradiol, 3.83 ng/L for estriol (E3), 0.56 ng/L for 17α-ethynylestradiol, 64.2 ng/L for bisphenol A, 7.51 ng/L for 4-nonylphenol and 5.93 ng/L for 4-tert-octylphenol. Total estrogenic activity was estimated at 4.48 ng/L EEQ via the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES(®)) assay (average of combined solid and liquid fractions). Female vitellogenin gene expression was highest at Burwood Beach locations, yet no significant differences were detected among locations for either sex. Vitellogenin protein was significantly higher (p<0.05) in S. glomerata at Burwood Beach Near compared to reference locations for the 4 and 12 m depths. Increased proportions of females were found at Burwood Beach Near, at 4m depth (p<0.05). Both Burwood Beach locations had higher proportions of mature female gonadal development stages compared to reference locations (p<0.05). Oocyte area was highest at both Burwood Beach locations, but no significant differences were detected among locations. Findings provided further evidence that female S. glomerata may be a suitable

  20. Effect of subacute exposure to lead and estrogen on immature pre-weaning rat leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Villagra, R.; Tchernitchin, N.N.; Tchernitchin, A.N.

    1997-02-01

    Lead is an environmental pollutant known to cause damage to human health, affecting specially the central nervous system, reproductive organs, the immune system and kidney. From the perspective or reproduction, lead affects both men and women. Reported effects in women include infertility, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy hypertension and premature delivery. In experimental animals, lead affects female reproductive organs through different mechanisms. The heavy metal may interact at the enzyme level. It may interfere with the action of reproductive hormones at the target organ, modifying the activity of estrogen receptors in the pregnant uterus and inhibiting responses where estrogens play a role. Lead may induce imprinting mechanism, causing persistent changes in uterine estrogen receptors and ovary LH receptors following perinatal exposure. Finally, it may interfere at the level of hypothalamus-pituitary, decreasing pituitary response to growth hormone releasing factor, affecting levels of FSH and LH and increasing blood levels of glucocorticoids, which modify the action of estrogens in the uterus. This study examines the mechanisms of lead-induced interference with female reproductive and immune functions. 33 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Effects of estrogen exposure in mussels, Mytilus edulis, at different stages of gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ciocan, Corina M; Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, Alin M; Hill, Elizabeth M; Minier, Christophe; Osada, Makoto; Fenlon, Kate; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2010-09-01

    Mytilus edulis were exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic estrogens ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and estradiol benzoate (EB) for 10 days. Two exposures were performed to determine their effect on vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor 2 (ER2) mRNA expression at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Significant natural variation was not observed in VTG mRNA expression, though ER2 mRNA expression displayed significantly lower values during January, February and July compared with other times of the year. A significant increase in VTG and ER2 mRNA expression was observed in mussels exposed to estrogens at the early stage of gametogenesis. In contrast, mature mussels displayed no statistically significant change in the VTG or ER2 mRNA expression. The data presented suggests that the reproductive physiology of molluscs, in terms of VTG and ER2 mRNA expression, may be susceptible to damage by environmental estrogens at certain points in their gametogenesis process. PMID:20615598

  2. The Effect of Grape Seed Extract on Estrogen Levels of Postmenopausal Women - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Bauer, Brent A.; Loehrer, Laura L.; Cha, Stephen S.; Suman, Vera J.; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Olson, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The roll of estrogens in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is well documented and has lead to the development of Selective Estrogene Receptor Modulators and Aromatase Inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However these agents are associated with significant side effects and are therefore not well accepted by healthy women who are at high risk for breast cancer. There has been some evidence from in vitro and in vivo animal studies that grapes have an aromatase inhibiting effect resulting in a decrease in estrogen synthesis and increase in androstenedione and testosterone. Method We conducted a randomized, double-blind, dose finding early phase trial. Eligible partici-pants were randomly assigned to one of 4 doses of grape seed extract (200, 400, 600, or 800 mg) to be taken daily for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the change of plasma hormone levels (estrogen conjugates from baseline to 12 weeks after treatment with grape seed extract). Results Forty-six women were enrolled, 39 (84.8%) completed the study. In this pilot study grape-seed extract given in daily doses of 200, 400, 600 or 800 mg for 12 weeks to postmenopausal women did not decrease plasma estrogens (estrone, estradiol, estrone sulfate) and did not increase precursors of androgens (testosterone and androstenedione). There were large variations in pre- and posttreatment estrone, estradiol and estrone sulfate and androgen precursors. Conclusion Future research should carefully consider BMI and changes in BMI as well as higher dosing of grape seed extract in their design. PMID:24670122

  3. [Estrogens and pharmacological modulation of estrogen receptors].

    PubMed

    Sanidize, T V; Ratiani, L R; Gabuniia, L Iu; Tortladze, M L; Kuridze, N N

    2009-02-01

    Estrogens belong to more or less frequently prescribed preparations. Main fields of application of these preparations (as in monotherapy as well as in combination) are contraception and hormone replacement therapy during menopause. More uncommon indications of estrogens are growth inhibition and hypogonadism (in this case they are prescribed along with gonadotropic hormones). Synthesis and metabolism of estrogens, as well as their intracellular receptors are well studied these days, which allow us to understand physiology and pharmacology of these hormones. In pharmacology the main stage is detection of estrogen receptors inside of cells of targets. There are two types of estrogen receptors alpha- and beta- coded by different genes. A number of steroid and non-steroid compounds have characteristics of estrogens. Likely in the future their popularity will increase, as by the aging of population number of those women, who receive replacement therapy, will increase. Investigations to find an ideal elective modulator of estrogen receptors, that will possess anti-estrogenic activity in connection with mammal gland and develop indifference in connection with endometrium and at the same time will display ability to reduce hot flushes, bone resorption, atrophy of mucous membranes of vagina and urinary bladder, as well as it will favorably effect on metabolism of lipoproteins are carried out. PMID:19276483

  4. Estrogen Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Stefan M; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-01-01

    Currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis reduce inflammatory lesions on MRI and decrease clinical relapses but have limited effects on disability. Novel treatment options that target both the inflammatory as well as the neurodegenerative component of the disease are therefore needed. A growing body of evidence from basic science and clinical studies supports the therapeutic potential of estrogens in MS. Mechanisms of action include both immunomodulatory and directly neuroprotective pathways. A first pilot trial of oral estriol treatment showed encouraging results. There are now several phase II trials underway to further determine the efficacy of estrogen treatment in MS. PMID:19539954

  5. Structure-based design of eugenol analogs as potential estrogen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Anita, Yulia; Radifar, Muhammad; Kardono, Leonardus Bs; Hanafi, Muhammad; Istyastono, Enade P

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol is an essential oil mainly found in the buds and leaves of clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill and Perry), which has been reported to have activity on inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This biological activity is correlated to its activity as an estrogen receptor antagonist. In this article, we present the construction and validation of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) protocols to identify the potent estrogen receptor α (ER) antagonists. The selected protocol, which gave acceptable enrichment factors as a virtual screening protocol, subsequently used to virtually screen eugenol, its analogs and their dimers. Based on the virtual screening results, dimer eugenol of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(prop-2-en-1- yl)phenyl]-2-(prop-2-en-1-yl)phenol is recommended to be developed further in order to discover novel and potent ER antagonists. PMID:23144548

  6. Interleukin-6 is a potential therapeutic target in interleukin-6 dependent, estrogen receptor-α-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casneuf, Tineke; Axel, Amy E; King, Peter; Alvarez, John D; Werbeck, Jillian L; Verhulst, Tinne; Verstraeten, Karin; Hall, Brett M; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-01-01

    engraftment with siltuximab, fulvestrant, or combination therapy. Siltuximab alone was able to blunt MCF-7 engraftment. Similarly, siltuximab alone induced regressions in 90% (9/10) of tumors, which were established in the presence which were established in the presence of hMSC expressing human IL-6 and estrogen. Conclusion Given the established role for IL-6 in ERα-positive breast cancer, these data demonstrate the potential for anti-IL-6 therapeutics in breast cancer. PMID:26893580

  7. Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Lead on Estrogen Action in the Prepubertal Rat Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Tchernitchin, Andrei N.; Gaete, Leonardo; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Báez, Aracelly

    2011-01-01

    Lead is a widely spread environmental pollutant known to affect both male and female reproductive systems in humans and experimental animals and causes infertility and other adverse effects. The present paper investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to lead on different parameters of estrogen stimulation in the uterus of the prepubertal rat. In prenatally and perinatally exposed rats, estrogen-induced endometrial eosinophilia, endometrial stroma edema, and eosinophil migration towards the endometrium, and uterine luminal epithelial hypertrophy are enhanced while several other responses to estrogen appear unchanged. These effects may contribute to decrease in fertility following prenatal exposure to lead. The striking difference between most of these effects of prenatal exposure and the previously reported effects of chronic exposure to lead suggests that prenatal exposure to lead may neutralize the effects of chronic exposure to lead, providing partial protection of cell function against the adverse effects of chronic exposure to lead. We propose that the mechanism involved, named imprinting or cell programming, persisted through evolution as a nongenetic adaptive mechanism to provide protection against long-term environmental variations that otherwise may cause the extinction of species not displaying this kind of adaptation. PMID:22263113

  8. Effect of prenatal exposure to lead on estrogen action in the prepubertal rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Tchernitchin, Andrei N; Gaete, Leonardo; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Báez, Aracelly

    2011-01-01

    Lead is a widely spread environmental pollutant known to affect both male and female reproductive systems in humans and experimental animals and causes infertility and other adverse effects. The present paper investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to lead on different parameters of estrogen stimulation in the uterus of the prepubertal rat. In prenatally and perinatally exposed rats, estrogen-induced endometrial eosinophilia, endometrial stroma edema, and eosinophil migration towards the endometrium, and uterine luminal epithelial hypertrophy are enhanced while several other responses to estrogen appear unchanged. These effects may contribute to decrease in fertility following prenatal exposure to lead. The striking difference between most of these effects of prenatal exposure and the previously reported effects of chronic exposure to lead suggests that prenatal exposure to lead may neutralize the effects of chronic exposure to lead, providing partial protection of cell function against the adverse effects of chronic exposure to lead. We propose that the mechanism involved, named imprinting or cell programming, persisted through evolution as a nongenetic adaptive mechanism to provide protection against long-term environmental variations that otherwise may cause the extinction of species not displaying this kind of adaptation. PMID:22263113

  9. Effect of the Interaction of Veratrum Nigrum with Panax Ginseng on Estrogenic Activity In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Ding, Jie; An, Jin-na; Qu, Ya-kun; Li, Xin; Ma, Xiao-ping; Zhang, Yi-min; Dai, Guo-jing; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng (GS) and Veratrum nigrum (VN) are representative of incompatible pairs in “eighteen antagonistic medicaments” that have been recorded in the Chinese medicinal literature for over 2,000 years. However, evidence linking interference effects with combination use is scare. Based on the estrogen-like effect of GS described in our previous studies, we undertake a characterization of the interaction on estrogenic activity of GS and VN using in vivo models of immature and ovariectomized (OVX) mice and in vitro studies with MCF-7 cells for further mechanism. VN decreased the estrogenic efficacy of GS on promoting the development of the uterus and vagina in immature mice, and reversing the atrophy of reproductive tissues in OVX mice. VN interfered with the estrogenic efficacy of GS by decreasing the increase of the serum estradiol and the up-regulation of ERα and ERβ expressions by treatment with GS. And VN antagonized the estrogenic efficacy of GS on promoting the viability of MCF-7 cells and up-regulation of protein and gene expressions of ERs. In conclusion, this study provided evidence that GS and VN decreased effects on estrogenic activity, which might be related to regulation of estrogen secretion and ERs. PMID:27229740

  10. Effect of the Interaction of Veratrum Nigrum with Panax Ginseng on Estrogenic Activity In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Ding, Jie; An, Jin-Na; Qu, Ya-Kun; Li, Xin; Ma, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Min; Dai, Guo-Jing; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng (GS) and Veratrum nigrum (VN) are representative of incompatible pairs in "eighteen antagonistic medicaments" that have been recorded in the Chinese medicinal literature for over 2,000 years. However, evidence linking interference effects with combination use is scare. Based on the estrogen-like effect of GS described in our previous studies, we undertake a characterization of the interaction on estrogenic activity of GS and VN using in vivo models of immature and ovariectomized (OVX) mice and in vitro studies with MCF-7 cells for further mechanism. VN decreased the estrogenic efficacy of GS on promoting the development of the uterus and vagina in immature mice, and reversing the atrophy of reproductive tissues in OVX mice. VN interfered with the estrogenic efficacy of GS by decreasing the increase of the serum estradiol and the up-regulation of ERα and ERβ expressions by treatment with GS. And VN antagonized the estrogenic efficacy of GS on promoting the viability of MCF-7 cells and up-regulation of protein and gene expressions of ERs. In conclusion, this study provided evidence that GS and VN decreased effects on estrogenic activity, which might be related to regulation of estrogen secretion and ERs. PMID:27229740

  11. Effect of nomegestrol acetate on estrogen biosynthesis and transformation in MCF-7 and T47-D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shields-Botella, J; Chetrite, G; Meschi, S; Pasqualini, J R

    2005-01-01

    Although ovaries serve as the primary source of estrogen for pre-menopausal women, after menopause estrogen biosynthesis from circulating precursors occurs in peripheral tissues by the action of several enzymes, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (17beta-HSD1), aromatase and estrogen sulfatase. In the breast, both normal and tumoral tissues have been shown to be capable of synthesizing estrogens, and this local estrogen production can be implicated in the development of breast tumors. In these tissues, estradiol (E(2)) can be synthesized by three pathways: (1) estrone sulfatase transforms estrogen sulfates into bioactive estrogens, (2) 17beta-HSD1 converts estrone (E(1)) into E(2), (3) aromatase which converts androgens into estrogens is also present and contributes to the in situ synthesis of active estrogens but to a far lesser extent than estrone sulfatase. Quantitative assessment of E(2) formation in human breast tumors indicates that metabolism of estrone sulfate (E(1)S) via the sulfatase pathway produces 100-500 times more E(2) than androgen aromatization. Breast tissue also possesses the estrogen sulfotransferase involved in the conversion of estrogens into their sulfates that are biologically inactive. In the present review, we summarized the action of the 19-nor-progestin nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) on the sulfatase, 17beta-HSD1 and sulfotransferase activities in the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T47-D human breast cancer cell lines. Using physiological doses of substrates NOMAC blocks very significantly the conversion of E(1)S to E(2). It inhibits the transformation of E(1) to E(2). NOMAC has a stimulatory effect on sulfotransferase activity in both cell lines, with a strong stimulating effect at low doses but only a weak effect at high concentrations. The effects on the three enzymes are always stronger in the progesterone-receptor rich T47-D cell line as compared with the MCF-7 cell line. Besides, no effect is found for NOMAC on the transformation of

  12. Daidzein-estrogen interaction in the rat uterus and its effect on human breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Astorga, Paola

    2012-12-01

    Sex hormone replacement therapy provides several advantages in the quality of life for climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk of cancer development in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women as compared with Western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. We have previously shown that genistein induces an estradiol-like hypertrophy of uterine cells, but does not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. It also inhibits estradiol-induced mitosis in uterine cells and hormone-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. Nevertheless, genistein stimulates growth of human breast cancer cells in culture; therefore, it is not an ideal estrogen for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRD). The present study investigated the effect of another soy isoflavone, daidzein (subcutaneous, 0.066 mg/kg body weight), in the same animal model, and its effect on responses induced by subsequent treatment (1 h later) with estradiol-17β (E(2); subcutaneous, 0.33 mg/kg body weight). In addition, we investigated the effects of daidzein (1 μg/mL) or E(2) on the growth of human breast cancer cells in culture. Results indicate that daidzein stimulates growth of breast cancer cells and potentiates estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus. We suggest caution for the use of daidzein or formulas containing this compound in HRD. Future research strategies should be addressed in the search for new phytoestrogens that selectively inhibit cell proliferation in the uterus and breast. PMID:23216111

  13. Daidzein–Estrogen Interaction in the Rat Uterus and Its Effect on Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Leonardo; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Astorga, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sex hormone replacement therapy provides several advantages in the quality of life for climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk of cancer development in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women as compared with Western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. We have previously shown that genistein induces an estradiol-like hypertrophy of uterine cells, but does not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. It also inhibits estradiol-induced mitosis in uterine cells and hormone-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. Nevertheless, genistein stimulates growth of human breast cancer cells in culture; therefore, it is not an ideal estrogen for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRD). The present study investigated the effect of another soy isoflavone, daidzein (subcutaneous, 0.066 mg/kg body weight), in the same animal model, and its effect on responses induced by subsequent treatment (1 h later) with estradiol-17β (E2; subcutaneous, 0.33 mg/kg body weight). In addition, we investigated the effects of daidzein (1 μg/mL) or E2 on the growth of human breast cancer cells in culture. Results indicate that daidzein stimulates growth of breast cancer cells and potentiates estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus. We suggest caution for the use of daidzein or formulas containing this compound in HRD. Future research strategies should be addressed in the search for new phytoestrogens that selectively inhibit cell proliferation in the uterus and breast. PMID:23216111

  14. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  15. The effect of estrogen synthesis inhibition on hippocampal memory.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Janine; Rune, Gabriele; Schultz, Heidrun; Tobia, Michael J; Mebes, Imke; Katzler, Olaf; Sommer, Tobias

    2015-06-01

    17-Beta-estradiol (E2) facilitates long term-potentiation (LTP) and increases spine synapse density in hippocampal neurons of ovariectomized rodents. Consistent with these beneficial effects on the cellular level, E2 improves hippocampus-dependent memory. A prominent approach to study E2 effects in rodents is the inhibition of its synthesis by letrozole, which reduces LTPs and spine synapse density. In the current longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we translated this approach to humans and compared the impact of E2 synthesis inhibition on memory performance and hippocampal activity in post-menopausal women taking letrozole (n = 21) to controls (n = 24). In particular, we employed various behavioral memory paradigms that allow the disentanglement of hippocampus-dependent and -independent memory. Consistent with the literature on rodents, E2 synthesis inhibition specifically impaired hippocampus-dependent memory, however, this did not apply to the same degree to all of the employed paradigms. On the neuronal level, E2 depletion tended to decrease hippocampal activity during encoding, whereas it increased activity in the anterior cingulate and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We thus infer that the inhibition of E2 synthesis specifically impairs hippocampal functioning in humans, whereas the increased prefrontal activity presumably reflects a compensatory mechanism, which is already known from studies on cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25863445

  16. Toxicity and adverse effects of Tamoxifen and other anti-estrogen drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Geniey; Nowsheen, Somaira; Aziz, Khaled; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease affecting thousands of people every year. Multiple factors are responsible in causing breast cancer while a number of treatment options are also available for the disease. Tamoxifen is the most widely used anti-estrogen for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. The specific drug is used as a hormonal therapy for patients who exhibit estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. The pharmacological activity of Tamoxifen is dependent on its conversion to its active metabolite, endoxifen, by CYP2D6. Tamoxifen reduces the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer when given as adjuvant therapy and provides effective palliation for patients with metastatic breast cancer. In this review we focus on the role of Tamoxifen in breast cancer treatment including mechanisms and side-effects. Finally, we discuss in detail the exciting prospects that lie ahead. PMID:23711794

  17. Effect of acute transdermal estrogen administration on basal, mental stress and cold pressor-induced sympathetic responses in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sofowora, Gbemiga G; Singh, Iqbal; He, Huai B; Wood, Alastair J J; Stein, C Michael

    2005-06-01

    Administration of estrogen has vascular effects through poorly defined mechanisms that may include sympathetic withdrawal. To define the effects of acute estrogen administration on sympathetic responses, nineteen healthy postmenopausal women (age 54+/-2 years) were studied after application of a placebo or estrogen patch for 36 hours, in random order. A p-value, adjusted for multiple comparisons, of <0.017 was used to determine statistical significance. Heart rate, blood pressure, and norepinephrine spillover were measured at rest, during mental stress (Stroop test), and during a cold pressor test. Estrogen did not attenuate basal or stimulated hemodynamic responses significantly. The increase in mean arterial pressure after the Stroop test (5.9+/-1.2mm/ Hg on placebo vs 6.1+/-1.6mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.9) and after the cold pressor test (12.6+/-2.4mm/Hg on placebo vs 13.0+/-2.2 mm/Hg on estrogen, p=0.8) did not differ. Basal, mental stress and cold pressor-stimulated norepinephrine spillover were not significantly affected by short-term estrogen administration. Norepinephrine spillover tended to be higher after estrogen (1296.2+/-238 ng/min) than placebo (832.5+/-129 ng/min) (p=0.02) at baseline and after the Stroop test (1881.1+/-330 ng/min vs 1014.6+/-249 ng/min) (p=0.02). Acute transdermal estrogen administration did not attenuate norepinephrine spillover or sympathetically mediated hemodynamic responses. PMID:15944868

  18. Effects of estrogens and progesterone on the synaptic organization of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sá, S I; Lukoyanova, E; Madeira, M D

    2009-08-18

    The majority of the studies on the actions of estrogens in the ventrolateral part of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMNvl) concern the factors that modulate the receptive component of the feminine sexual behavior and the expression of molecular markers of neuronal activation. To further our understanding of the factors that regulate synaptic plasticity in the female VMNvl, we have examined the effects of estradiol and progesterone, and of estrogen receptor (ER) subtype selective ligands on the number of dendritic and spine synapses established by individual VMNvl neurons and on sexual behavior. In contrast to earlier studies that analyzed synapse densities, our results show that exogenous estradiol increases the number of spine as well as of dendritic synapses, irrespective of the dose and regimen of administration. They also reveal that an effective dose of estradiol administered as one single pulse induces the formation of more synapses than the same dose administered as two pulses on consecutive days. Our results further show that both ER subtypes are involved in the mediation of the synaptogenic effects of estrogens on VMNvl neurons since the administration of the selective ERalpha, propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), and ERbeta, diarylpropionitrile (DPN), agonists induced a significant increase in the number of synapses that, however, was more exuberant for PPT. Despite its relevant role in feminine sexual behavior, progesterone had no synaptogenic effect in the VMNvl as no changes in synapse numbers were noticed in rats treated with progesterone alone, with estradiol followed by progesterone or with the antiprogestin mifepristone (RU486). Except for the sequential administration of estradiol and progesterone, none of the regimens was associated with lordosis response to vaginocervical stimulation. Therefore, from the sex steroids that undergo cyclic variations over the estrous cycle, only estrogens, acting through both ERalpha and ERbeta, play a key role in

  19. The bone-sparing effects of estrogen and WNT16 are independent of each other

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Wu, Jianyao; Henning, Petra; Gustafsson, Karin L.; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H.; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Börjesson, Anna E.; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Lerner, Ulf H.; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Poutanen, Matti; Ohlsson, Claes

    2015-01-01

    Wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT)16 is a key regulator of bone mass with high expression in cortical bone, and Wnt16−/− mice have reduced cortical bone mass. As Wnt16 expression is enhanced by estradiol treatment, we hypothesized that the bone-sparing effect of estrogen in females is WNT16-dependent. This hypothesis was tested in mechanistic studies using two genetically modified mouse models with either constantly high osteoblastic Wnt16 expression or no Wnt16 expression. We developed a mouse model with osteoblast-specific Wnt16 overexpression (Obl-Wnt16). These mice had several-fold elevated Wnt16 expression in both trabecular and cortical bone compared with wild type (WT) mice. Obl-Wnt16 mice displayed increased total body bone mineral density (BMD), surprisingly caused mainly by a substantial increase in trabecular bone mass, resulting in improved bone strength of vertebrae L3. Ovariectomy (ovx) reduced the total body BMD and the trabecular bone mass to the same degree in Obl-Wnt16 mice and WT mice, suggesting that the bone-sparing effect of estrogen is WNT16-independent. However, these bone parameters were similar in ovx Obl-Wnt16 mice and sham operated WT mice. The role of WNT16 for the bone-sparing effect of estrogen was also evaluated in Wnt16−/− mice. Treatment with estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass to a similar extent in both Wnt16−/− and WT mice. In conclusion, the bone-sparing effects of estrogen and WNT16 are independent of each other. Furthermore, loss of endogenous WNT16 results specifically in cortical bone loss, whereas overexpression of WNT16 surprisingly increases mainly trabecular bone mass. WNT16-targeted therapies might be useful for treatment of postmenopausal trabecular bone loss. PMID:26627248

  20. The bone-sparing effects of estrogen and WNT16 are independent of each other.

    PubMed

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Wu, Jianyao; Henning, Petra; Gustafsson, Karin L; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Börjesson, Anna E; Lagerquist, Marie K; Lerner, Ulf H; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Poutanen, Matti; Ohlsson, Claes

    2015-12-01

    Wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT)16 is a key regulator of bone mass with high expression in cortical bone, and Wnt16(-/-) mice have reduced cortical bone mass. As Wnt16 expression is enhanced by estradiol treatment, we hypothesized that the bone-sparing effect of estrogen in females is WNT16-dependent. This hypothesis was tested in mechanistic studies using two genetically modified mouse models with either constantly high osteoblastic Wnt16 expression or no Wnt16 expression. We developed a mouse model with osteoblast-specific Wnt16 overexpression (Obl-Wnt16). These mice had several-fold elevated Wnt16 expression in both trabecular and cortical bone compared with wild type (WT) mice. Obl-Wnt16 mice displayed increased total body bone mineral density (BMD), surprisingly caused mainly by a substantial increase in trabecular bone mass, resulting in improved bone strength of vertebrae L3. Ovariectomy (ovx) reduced the total body BMD and the trabecular bone mass to the same degree in Obl-Wnt16 mice and WT mice, suggesting that the bone-sparing effect of estrogen is WNT16-independent. However, these bone parameters were similar in ovx Obl-Wnt16 mice and sham operated WT mice. The role of WNT16 for the bone-sparing effect of estrogen was also evaluated in Wnt16(-/-) mice. Treatment with estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass to a similar extent in both Wnt16(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, the bone-sparing effects of estrogen and WNT16 are independent of each other. Furthermore, loss of endogenous WNT16 results specifically in cortical bone loss, whereas overexpression of WNT16 surprisingly increases mainly trabecular bone mass. WNT16-targeted therapies might be useful for treatment of postmenopausal trabecular bone loss. PMID:26627248

  1. Effects of Preoperative Local Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women With Prolapse: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Good, Meadow M.; Roshanravan, Shayzreen M.; Shi, Haolin; Schaffer, Joseph I.; Singh, Ravinder J.; Word, R. Ann

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) increases in prevalence with age; recurrence after surgical repair is common. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the effects of local estrogen treatment on connective tissue synthesis and breakdown in the vaginal wall of postmenopausal women planning surgical repair of POP. Design: This was a randomized trial. Setting: The study was conducted at an academic tertiary medical center. Patients or Other Participants: Postmenopausal women with a uterus and symptomatic anterior and/or apical prolapse at stage 2 or greater participated in the study. Intervention: Estrogen (Premarin) or placebo cream for 6 weeks preoperatively was the intervention. Main Outcome Measures: Full-thickness anterior apical vaginal wall biopsies were obtained at the time of hysterectomy and analyzed for mucosa and muscularis thickness, connective tissue synthesis, and degradation. Serum levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol were analyzed at baseline and the day of surgery using highly sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Fifteen women per group (n = 30 total) were randomized; 13 per group underwent surgery. Among drug-adherent participants (n = 8 estrogen, n = 13 placebo), epithelial and muscularis thickness was increased 1.8- and 2.7-fold (P = .002 and P =.088, respectively) by estrogen. Collagen types 1α1 and 1α2 mRNA increased 6.0- and 1.8-fold in the vaginal muscularis (P < .05 for both); collagen type Ia protein increased 9-fold in the muscularis (P = .012), whereas collagen III was not changed significantly. MMP-12 (human macrophage elastase) mRNA was suppressed in the vaginal mucosa from estrogen-treated participants (P = .011), and matrix metalloprotease-9 activity was decreased 6-fold in the mucosa and 4-fold in the muscularis (P = .02). Consistent with menopausal norms, serum estrone and 17β-estradiol were low and did not differ among the two groups. Conclusions: Vaginal estrogen application for 6

  2. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1-mediated effects in the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei A; Dun, Erica C; Tica, Oana S; Gao, Xin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Oprea, Tudor I; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2011-11-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), also named GPR30, has been previously identified in the female reproductive system. In this study, GPER expression was found in the female rat myometrium by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Using GPER-selective ligands, we assessed the effects of the GPER activation on resting membrane potential and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in rat myometrial cells, as well as on contractility of rat uterine strips. G-1, a specific GPER agonist, induced a concentration-dependent depolarization and increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in myometrial cells. The depolarization was abolished in Na(+)-free saline. G-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly decreased by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, by Ca(2+)-free or Na(+)-free saline. Intracellular administration of G-1 produced a faster and transitory increase in [Ca(2+)](i), with a higher amplitude than that induced by extracellular application, supporting an intracellular localization of the functional GPER in myometrial cells. Depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin produced a robust store-activated Ca(2+) entry; the Ca(2+) response to G-1 was similar to the constitutive Ca(2+) entry and did not seem to involve store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In rat uterine strips, administration of G-1 increased the frequency and amplitude of contractions and the area under the contractility curve. The effects of G-1 on membrane potential, [Ca(2+)](i), and uterine contractility were prevented by pretreatment with G-15, a GPER antagonist, further supporting the involvement of GPER in these responses. Taken together, our results indicate that GPER is expressed and functional in rat myometrium. GPER activation produces depolarization, elevates [Ca(2+)](i) and increases contractility in myometrial cells. PMID:21865584

  3. Breast density and parenchymal texture measures as potential risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Accurate assessment of a woman's risk to develop specific subtypes of breast cancer is critical for appropriate utilization of chemopreventative measures, such as with tamoxifen in preventing estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. In this context, we investigate quantitative measures of breast density and parenchymal texture, measures of glandular tissue content and tissue structure, as risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Mediolateral oblique (MLO) view digital mammograms of the contralateral breast from 106 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast density and parenchymal texture were analyzed via fully-automated software. Logistic regression with feature selection and was performed to predict ER+ versus ER- cancer status. A combined model considering all imaging measures extracted was compared to baseline models consisting of density-alone and texture-alone features. Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Delong's test were used to compare the models' discriminatory capacity for receptor status. The density-alone model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.62 AUC (p=0.05). The texture-alone model had a higher discriminatory capacity of 0.70 AUC (p=0.001), which was not significantly different compared to the density-alone model (p=0.37). In contrast the combined density-texture logistic regression model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.82 AUC (p<0.001), which was statistically significantly higher than both the density-alone (p<0.001) and texture-alone regression models (p=0.04). The combination of breast density and texture measures may have the potential to identify women specifically at risk for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer and could be useful in triaging women into appropriate risk-reduction strategies.

  4. The effects of (-)-epicatechin on endothelial cells involve the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Mendez-Luna, David; Beltran-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo, Carmen; Guevara, Gustavo; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Correa-Basurto, José; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    We have provided evidence that the stimulatory effects of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-EPI) on endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production may involve the participation of a cell-surface receptor. Thus far, such entity(ies) has not been fully elucidated. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a cell-surface receptor that has been linked to protective effects on the cardiovascular system and activation of intracellular signaling pathways (including NO production) similar to those reported with (-)-EPI. In bovine coronary artery endothelial cells (BCAEC) by the use of confocal imaging, we evidence the presence of GPER at the cell-surface and on F-actin filaments. Using in silico studies we document the favorable binding mode between (-)-EPI and GPER. Such binding is comparable to that of the GPER agonist, G1. By the use of selective blockers, we demonstrate that the activation of ERK 1/2 and CaMKII by (-)-EPI is dependent on the GPER/c-SRC/EGFR axis mimicking those effects noted with G1. We also evidence by the use of siRNA the role that GPER has on mediating ERK1/2 activation by (-)-EPI. GPER appears to be coupled to a non Gαi/o or Gαs, protein subtype. To extrapolate our findings to an ex vivo model, we employed phenylephrine pre-contracted aortic rings evidencing that (-)-EPI can mediate vasodilation through GPER activation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that suggests the GPER as a potential mediator of (-)-EPI effects and highlights the important role that GPER may have on cardiovascular system protection. PMID:26303816

  5. Neurocognitive effects of estrogens across the adult lifespan in nonhuman primates: State of knowledge and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Mong, Jessica A; Hara, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". This review discusses the unique contribution of nonhuman primate research to our understanding of the neurocognitive effects of estrogens throughout the adult lifespan in females. Mounting evidence indicates that estrogens affect many aspects of hippocampal, prefrontal and cholinergic function in the primate brain and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. In addition, estrogens may also influence cognitive function indirectly, via the modulation of other systems that impact cognition. We will focus on the effects of estrogens on sleep and emphasize the need for primate models to better understand these complex interactions. Continued research with nonhuman primates is essential for the development of therapies that are optimal for the maintenance of women's cognitive health throughout the lifespan. PMID:25762288

  6. (Anti)estrogenic effects of phytochemicals on human primary mammary fibroblasts, MCF-7 cells and their co-culture

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van . E-mail: J.A.vanMeeuwen@iras.uu.nl; Korthagen, N.; Jong, P.C. de; Piersma, A.H.; Berg, M. van den

    2007-06-15

    In the public opinion, phytochemicals (PCs) present in the human diet are often considered beneficial (e.g. by preventing breast cancer). Two possible mechanisms that could modulate tumor growth are via interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER) and inhibition of aromatase (CYP19). Multiple in vitro studies confirmed that these compounds act estrogenic, thus potentially induce tumor growth, as well as aromatase inhibitory, thus potentially reduce tumor growth. It is thought that in the in vivo situation breast epithelial (tumor) cells communicate with surrounding connective tissue by means of cytokines, prostaglandins and estradiol forming a complex feedback mechanism. Recently our laboratory developed an in vitro co-culture model of healthy mammary fibroblasts and MCF-7 cells that (at least partly) simulated this feedback mechanism (M. Heneweer et al., TAAP vol. 202(1): 50-58, 2005). In the present study biochanin A, chrysin, naringenin, apigenin, genistein and quercetin were studied for their estrogenic properties (cell proliferation, pS2 mRNA) and aromatase inhibition in MCF-7 breast tumor cells, healthy mammary fibroblasts and their co-culture. The proliferative potency of these compounds in the MCF-7 cells derived from their EC{sub 50}s decreased in the following order: estadiol (4*10{sup -3} nM) > biochanin A (9 nM) > genistein (32 nM) > testosterone (46 nM) > naringenin (287 nM) > apigenin (440 nM) > chrysin (4 {mu}M). The potency to inhibit aromatase derived from their IC{sub 50}s decreased in the following order: chrysin (1.5 {mu}M) > naringenin (2.2 {mu}M) > genistein (3.6 {mu}M) > apigenin (4.1 {mu}M) > biochanin A (25 {mu}M) > quercetin (30 {mu}M). The results of these studies show that these PCs can induce cell proliferation or inhibit aromatase in the same concentration range (1-10 {mu}M). Results from co-cultures did not elucidate the dominant effect of these compounds. MCF-7 cell proliferation occurs at concentrations that are not uncommon in blood

  7. Effect of estrogen on molecular and functional characteristics of the rodent vaginal muscularis

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Maureen E.; Chang, Shaohua; Burrows, Lara J.; Lassmann, Jenny; Wein, Alan J.; Moreland, Robert S.; Chacko, Samuel K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal atrophy is a consequence of menopause however little is known concerning the effect of a decrease in systemic estrogen on vaginal smooth muscle structure and function. As the incidence of pelvic floor disorders increases with age, it is important to determine if estrogen regulates the molecular composition and contractility of the vaginal muscularis. Aim The goal of this study was to determine the effect of estrogen on molecular and functional characteristics of the vaginal muscularis utilizing a rodent model of surgical menopause. Methods 3–4 month old Sprague Dawley rats underwent sham laparotomy (Sham, n=18) or ovariectomy (Ovx, n=39). Two weeks following surgery, animals received a subcutaneous osmotic pump containing vehicle (Sham, Ovx) or 17- β estradiol (Ovx). Animals were euthanized one week later and the proximal vagina was collected for analysis of contractile protein expression and in vitro studies of contractility. Measurements were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc analysis (α= 0.05). Main Outcome Measures Protein and mRNA transcript expression levels of contractile proteins, in vitro measurements of vaginal contractility Results Ovariectomy decreased the expression of carboxyl-terminal myosin heavy chain isoform SM1 and h-caldesmon and reduced the amplitude of contraction of the vaginal muscularis in response to KCl. Estradiol replacement reversed these changes. No differences were detected in the % vaginal muscularis, mRNA transcript expression of amino terminal MHC isoforms, l-caldesmon expression and maximal velocity of shortening. Conclusion Systemic estrogen replacement restores functional and molecular characteristics of the vaginal muscularis of ovariectomized rats. Our results indicate that menopause is associated with changes in the vaginal muscularis, which may contribute to the increased incidence of pelvic floor disorders with age. PMID:23438289

  8. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  9. Normal breast tissue implanted into athymic nude mice identifies biomarkers of the effects of human pregnancy levels of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blance, Rognvald N; Sims, Andrew H; Anderson, Elizabeth; Howell, Anthony; Clarke, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    We have generated a novel model system for the study of estrogen intervention in normal breast tissue. Nulliparous human breast tissue was implanted into immunocompromised nude mice and treated with high-dose estrogen to simulate the effects of pregnancy. Treatment of mice with human mid-pregnancy levels of 17beta-estradiol for a period of 4 weeks was followed by 4 weeks of withdrawal to mimic involution. Gene expression in the xenograft tissue was then analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR to identify differences between treated and control tissues. Ten genes previously identified as altered by pregnancy in rodent models were found to be differentially expressed in human breast tissue with a > or =1.8-fold up-regulation of CDC42, TGFbeta3, DCN, KRT14, LTF, and AREG and a > or =0.7-fold down-regulation of STAT1, CTGF, IGF1, and VAMP1. Immunohistochemical analysis of archival paraffin-embedded adult premenopausal human breast tissue specimens identified a significantly lower level of expression of STAT1 (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) in parous compared with age-matched nulliparous tissue (median of 24% compared with 42% epithelial cells positive). We conclude that many of the pregnancy-induced breast cancer-protective changes observed in rodent models also occur in human breast tissue following intervention using human pregnancy levels of estrogen and that STAT1 expression is a potential biomarker of parity-induced breast cancer protection in the human breast. PMID:19258541

  10. Parabens: potential impact of low-affinity estrogen receptor binding chemicals on human health.

    PubMed

    Karpuzoglu, Ebru; Holladay, Steven D; Gogal, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Parabens, alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, are widely used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and as food additives to inhibit microbial growth and extend product shelf life. Consumers of these compounds are frequently exposed via the skin, lips, eyes, oral mucosa, nails, and hair. Parabens are estrogenic molecules but exert weaker activity than natural estrogens, which would imply a low risk. Consistent with this idea, a number of recent commission reports from different countries suggested that parabens pose a negligible endocrine-disrupting risk at the recommended doses. However, individuals are not routinely exposed to a single paraben, and most of the available paraben toxicity data, reviewed in these reports, are from single-exposure studies. Further, assessing the additive and cumulative risk of multiple paraben exposure from daily use of multiple cosmetic and/or personal care products is presently not possible based on current studies. In this review, current and recent studies of paraben exposure and public health policies as well as critical gaps in the knowledge are discussed and new research directions regarding multiple exposures and novel target cohorts are recommended. PMID:23909435

  11. Estrogen increases the permeability of the cultured human cervical epithelium by modulating cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Gorodeski, G I

    1998-09-01

    Estrogens increase secretion of cervical mucus in females. The objective of this research was to study the mechanisms of estrogen action. The experimental models were human CaSki (endocervical) and hECE (ectocervical) epithelial cells cultured on filters. Incubation in steroid-free medium increased transepithelial electrical resistance (RTE) and decreased epithelial permeability to the cell-impermeant acid pyranine. Estrogen treatment reversed the effects, indicating estrogen decreases epithelial paracellular resistance. The estrogen effect was time and dose related (EC50 approximately 1 nM) and specific (estradiol = diethylstilbestrol > estrone, estriol; no effect by progesterone, testosterone, or cortisol) and was blocked by progesterone, tamoxifen, and ICI-182780 (an estrogen receptor antagonist). Estrogen treatment did not modulate dilution potential or changes in RTE in response to diC8 or to low extracellular Ca2+ (modulators of tight junctional resistance). In contrast, estrogen augmented decreases in RTE in response to hydrostatic and hypertonic gradients [modulators of resistance of lateral intercellular space (RLIS)], suggesting estrogen decreases RLIS. Estrogen decreased cervical cell size, shortened response time relative to changes in cell size after hypertonic challenge, and augmented the decrease in cell size in response to hypertonic and hydrostatic gradients. Lowering luminal NaCl had no significant effect on RTE, and the Cl- channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylate attenuated the hypertonicity-induced decrease in cell size to the same degree in control and estrogen-treated cells, suggesting estrogen effects on permeability and cell size are not mediated by modulating Na+ or Cl- transport. In contrast, estrogen increased cellular G-actin levels, suggesting estrogens shift actin steady-state toward G-actin and the cervical cell cytoskeleton toward a more flexible structure. We suggest that the mechanism by which estrogens decrease RLIS and

  12. The effect of Momordica charantia intake on the estrogen receptors ESRα/ESRβ gene levels and apoptosis on uterine tissue in ovariectomy rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ozge; Akpinar, Hikmet; Oba, Rabia; Cilingir, Ozlem Tugce; Ozdemir, Zarife Nigar; Cetinel, Sule; Yoldemir, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen or combinational hormone therapy can protect to menopausal symptoms but exogenous estrogen therapy has some potential risks which in turns lead to the appearance of various diseases. In recent years plants with high phytoestrogen content are recommended as therapeutic agents for postmenopausal hormonal treatment. In this research, we investigated the effects of Momordica charantia (MC) on the estrogen production and E2 as well as anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic role on the ovariectomy rat model. The rats were ovariectomized and fed on 2 g/kg of fruit extra of MC for 30 days by gavage. 17-β estradiol (E2) and 8-OHdG levels in serum, markers of oxidative damage of ROS and ESRα, ESRβ and NF-kB gene levels were measured in uterus horn tissue. Caspase-3, caspase-9, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, Bcl-2 and Nf-kB proteins expression were assessed by western blotting. Structural changes in tissue were examined with H&E staining. MC administration also stimulated the E2 production and ESRα/ESRβ gene levels and the inhibited oxidative damage. Furthermore, MC treatment enhanced anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory process and tissue regeneration. Data herein support that MC directly regulates uterine estrogen response and may serve as a new phytoestrogenic substance for the treatment of post-menopausal symptoms. PMID:25253099

  13. Genotoxic effects of environmental estrogen-like compounds in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Sumiko; Nakagawa, Yoshio; Tayama, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Some environmental estrogen-like compounds, such as bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-octylphenol (OP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (P-PHBA), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (B-PHBA), synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), and natural estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were studied for their genotoxicity in CHO-K1 cells using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosome aberration (CA), and DNA strand break (comet) assays. Six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused DNA migration in the comet assay and induced SCEs at one or more of the highest doses. Among the chemicals, OP produced an especially high incidence of SCEs. Structural CA was induced by five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and BPA, E2, and DES also induced aneuploid cells. E2 and DES particularly increased the rate of polyploidy at high doses. The incidence of colchicine-mitosis-like (c-mitotic) figures suggesting spindle disrupting effects was also detected with five of the chemicals, excluding OP and NP, and six of the chemicals, excluding E2, caused endoreduplication (ERD), a form of nuclear polyploidization induced by block of cell cycle at G2 phase, at one or more high doses. Our present results suggest that OP and NP cause repairable DNA damage, including SCEs, and do not result in CA, while the damage caused by DES, BPA, P-PHBA, and B-PHBA results in the induction of CAs together with SCEs probably because of imperfect repair. We are unable to explain the observation that the DNA damage caused by E2 resulted in CA induction but not DNA migration or SCE induction, except for speculating that the DNA damage is different from that caused by DES and the estrogen-like chemicals. Our findings also suggest that E2, DES and BPA have aneuploidogenic properties, and that the former two of chemicals also are polyploidy-inducing agents. PMID:17913570

  14. Changes in plasma volume during bed rest - Effects of menstrual cycle and estrogen administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Beckett, W. S.; Carpenter, A. J.; Davis, J.; Drew, H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of increased blood estrogen concentration, caused either during normal menstrual cycles or by exogenous administration of premarin, on the bed-rest (BR) induced decrease in plasma volume (PV) was investigated. In women who underwent duplicate 11-day BR without estrogen supplementation, the PV was found to decrease significantly, during the first 5 days of BR, to a lower level at which it remained for the rest of the BR period. In women who began BR in the periovulatory stage of the menstrual cycle, the loss of PV was delayed, while women who began BR during other stages of the cycle exhibited the usual trend of the PV decrease during the BR. In women who underwent a single 12-day BR period while taking premarin (1.25 mg/day), PV was found to decrease during the first 4-5 days of BR, but then returned toward the pre-BR level during the remainder of the BR, indicating that estrogens have a role in stabilizing body fluid volume.

  15. Effect of estrogen receptor-subtype-specific ligands on fertility in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Dumasia, Kushaan; Kumar, Anita; Kadam, Leena; Balasinor, N H

    2015-06-01

    Maintenance of normal male fertility relies on the process of spermatogenesis which is under complex endocrine control by mechanisms involving gonadotropin and steroid hormones. Although testosterone is the primary sex steroid in males, estrogen is locally produced in the testis and plays a very crucial role in male fertility. This is evident from presence of both the estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) in the testis and their absence, as in the case of knockout mice models, leads to sterility. The present study was undertaken to understand individual roles of the two ERs in spermatogenesis and their direct contribution towards the maintenance of male fertility using receptor-subtype-specific ligands. Administration of ERα and β agonists to adult male rats for 60 days results in a significant decrease in fertility, mainly due to an increase in pre- and post-implantation loss and a concomitant decrease in litter size and sperm counts. Our results indicate that ERα is mainly involved in negative feedback regulation of gonadotropin hormones, whereas both ERs are involved in regulation of prolactin and testosterone production. Histological examinations of the testis reveal that ERβ could be involved in the process of spermiation since many failed spermatids were observed in stages IX-XI following ERβ agonist treatment. Our results indicate that overactivation of estrogen signaling through either of its receptors can have detrimental effects on the fertility parameters and that the two ERs have both overlapping and distinct roles in maintenance of male fertility. PMID:25869617

  16. Effect of steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, on epithelial mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer development.

    PubMed

    Jeon, So-Ye; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    As the primary female sex steroid hormones, estrogens and progesterone play important roles to regulate growth, differentiation, and function of a broad range of target tissues in the human body and maintain the function of female reproductive tissues. Ovarian cancer is the most cause of cancer death in gynecological malignancy. Despite enormous outcomes in the understanding of ovarian cancer pathology, this disease has resulted in poor survival rates since most patients are asymptomatic until the disease has been metastasized. The exact molecular events leading to metastasis of ovarian tumor cells have not yet been well elucidated, although it is recognized that the acquisition of capacity for migration and invasiveness would be a necessary prerequisite. During metastasis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process, in which epithelial cells lose their intracellular adhesion and cell polarity and acquire increased motility and invasive properties to become mesenchymal like cells. The process of cancer cells to undergo EMT is regulated through the up- and down- regulation of a multiple cellular markers and signaling proteins. In this review, we focused the roles of women sex steroid hormones, estrogen and progesterone, in ovarian cancer, especially the ovarian cancer undergoing EMT and metastatic process. All things considered, we may suggest that progesterone is a potent hormone which inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells and development to metastasis whereas estrogen may act as a risk factor of ovarian cancer progression and that progesterone therapy may be an alternative clinically effective tool for the treatment of human ovarian cancer. PMID:26873134

  17. A 3-D QSAR-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  18. The inhibition of the estrogenic effects of pesticides and environmental chemicals by curcumin and isoflavonoids.

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S P; Goldin, B R; Lin, P S

    1998-01-01

    Many environmental chemicals and pesticides have been found to be estrogenic and have been shown to stimulate the growth of estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) human breast cancer cells. Since it is difficult to avoid human exposure to environmental estrogens, a potentially important area of research is the development of dietary strategies to prevent the stimulated growth of breast tumors by environmental estrogens. In this context, the inhibitory action of curcumin and a combination of curcumin and isoflavonoids were studied in ER-positive human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and T47D) and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells induced by the pesticide o,p'-DDT and the environmental pollutants 4-nonylphenol and 4-octylphenol. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for curcumin in T47D cells was 10 microM when measured at either a 48-hr or a 6-day incubation time. The IC50 value for curcumin was within the 8-10 microM range for inhibiting the growth of T47D cells induced by a 10- microM concentration each of 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, and o, p'-DDT. The IC50 for curcumin in MCF-7 cells induced by 10 microM of either o,p'-DDT, 4-octylphenol, or 4-nonylphenol were 9, 39, and >50 microM, respectively. A combination of curcumin and isoflavonoids was able to inhibit the induced growth of ER-positive cells up to 95%. For MDA-MB-231 cells, the IC50 for curcumin was 17 microM, which was reduced to 11 microM in the presence of 25 microM genistein. Curcumin and genistein induce drastic changes in the morphological shape of both ER-positive and ER-negative cells. Data presented here indicate that a mixture of curcumin and isoflavonoids is the most potent inhibitor against the growth of human breast tumor cells. These data suggest that combinations of natural plant compounds may have preventive and therapeutic applications against the growth of breast tumors induced by environmental estrogens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9831541

  19. Comparison of estrogen mixtures in vitro vs. in vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous sources contribute to widespread contamination of drinking water sources with both natural and synthetic estrogens, which isa concern for potential ecological and human health effects. In vitro screening assays are valuable tools for identifying mechanisms of toxicity bu...

  20. Effects of Pubertal Exposure to Dietary Soy on Estrogen Receptor Activity in the Breast of Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Fitriya N; Wood, Charles E; Willson, Cynthia J; Register, Thomas C; Lees, Cynthia J; Howard, Timothy D; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Tooze, Janet A; Chou, Jeff W; Miller, Lance D; Cline, J Mark

    2016-05-01

    Endogenous estrogens influence mammary gland development during puberty and breast cancer risk during adulthood. Early-life exposure to dietary or environmental estrogens may alter estrogen-mediated processes. Soy foods contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones (IF), which have mixed estrogen agonist/antagonist properties. Here, we evaluated mammary gland responses over time in pubertal female cynomolgus macaques fed diets containing either casein/lactalbumin (n = 12) or soy protein containing a human-equivalent dose of 120 mg IF/day (n = 17) for approximately 4.5 years spanning menarche. We assessed estrogen receptor (ER) expression and activity, promoter methylation of ERs and their downstream targets, and markers of estrogen metabolism. Expression of ERα and classical ERα response genes (TFF1, PGR, and GREB1) decreased with maturity, independent of diet. A significant inverse correlation was observed between TFF1 mRNA and methylation of CpG sites within the TFF1 promoter. Soy effects included lower ERβ expression before menarche and lower mRNA for ERα and GREB1 after menarche. Expression of GATA-3, an epithelial differentiation marker that regulates ERα-mediated transcription, was elevated before menarche and decreased after menarche in soy-fed animals. Soy did not significantly alter expression of other ER activity markers, estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, or promoter methylation for ERs or ER-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate greater ER expression and activity during the pubertal transition, supporting the idea that this life stage is a critical window for phenotypic modulation by estrogenic compounds. Pubertal soy exposure decreases mammary ERα expression after menarche and exerts subtle effects on receptor activity and mammary gland differentiation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 385-95. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27006379

  1. Intratumoral estrogen sulfotransferase induction contributes to the anti-breast cancer effects of the dithiocarbamate derivative TM208

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xi-wei; Chen, Guang-ping; Song, Yan; Hua, Ming; Wang, Li-jie; Li, Liang; Yuan, Yin; Wang, Si-yuan; Zhou, Tian-yan; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfation is the most important pathway for inactivating estrogens. Thus, activation of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) may be an alternative approach for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In this study we investigated the involvement of EST in anti-breast cancer effects of the dithiocarbamate derivative TM208 in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The viability of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells was determined using a SBB assay. Nude mice bearing MCF-7 cells were orally administered TM208 (50 and 150 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 18 days. The xenograft tumors and uteri were collected. The mRNA expression of EST was examined with real-time PCR. EST protein was detected with Western blot, ELISA or immunohistochemical staining assays. A radioactive assay was used to measure the EST activity. Uterotropic bioassay was used to examine the uterine estrogen responses. Results: Treatment with TM208 (10, 15 and 20 μmol/L) concentration-dependently increased EST expression in MCF-7 cells in vitro. Co-treatment with triclosan, an inhibitor of sulfonation, abolished TM208-induced cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. TM208 exhibited an apparent anti-estrogenic property: it exerted more potent cytotoxicity in E2-treated MCF-7 cells. In the nude mice bearing MCF-7 cells, TM208 administration time-dependently increased the expression and activity of EST, and blocked the gradual increase of E2 concentration in the xenograft tumors. Furthermore, TM208 administration blocked the estrogens-stimulated uterine enlargement. Tamoxifen, a positive control drug, produced similar effects on the expression and activity of EST in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: The induction of EST and reduction of estrogen concentration contribute to the anti-breast cancer action of TM208 and tamoxifen. TM208 may be developed as anticancer drug for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. PMID:25937633

  2. Estrogens and Prostate Cancer: Etiology, Mediators, Prevention, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shuk-Mei; Lee, Ming-tsung; Lam, Hung-Ming; Leung, Yuet-Kin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between hormones and the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (PCa) has been studied extensively. All the mainstay targets for hormonal PCa therapies are based on negating androgen action. Recent epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly pinpointed the key roles of estrogens in PCa development and progression. Racial and geographical differences, as well as age-associated changes, in estrogen synthesis and metabolism contribute significantly to the etiology by increasing the ratio of circulating estrogen to androgen, sex hormone binding globulin synthesis, and aromatase activity and reducing androgen glucuronidation and tissue bioactivation. Promotion of aberrant cell growth, evasion of apoptosis, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and gains in adiposity and bioactivation to genotoxic carcinogens during adulthood are probable mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenicity, while “estrogen imprinting” via epigenetics in early-life also determines PCa risk. Although the effects of estrogens are known to be mediated by genomic actions of the two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes (ERα and ERβ), other non-canonical mediators, including the different ERβ isoforms, membrane and mitochondrial ERs, and G protein-coupled receptor 30, may have major actions diverging from classical ER actions. These new discoveries have led to renewed interest among the public and the medicinal field in estrogens and antiestrogens as singular and adjuvant PCa treatment and prevention regimens. This review summarizes current knowledge on how different estrogens/antiestrogens/estrogen mimics contribute to prostate carcinogenesis, the roles of the different mediators of estrogen in the process, and the potentials of new estrogenic/antiestrogenic compounds as targeted therapies for prevention and treatment of PCa. PMID:21889723

  3. Estrogen anti-inflammatory activity on human monocytes is mediated through cross-talk between estrogen receptor ERα36 and GPR30/GPER1.

    PubMed

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Kampa, Marilena; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Deli, Alexandra; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis; Agrogiannis, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Tsapis, Andreas; Castanas, Elias; Notas, George

    2016-02-01

    Estrogens are known modulators of monocyte/macrophage functions; however, the underlying mechanism has not been clearly defined. Recently, a number of estrogen receptor molecules and splice variants were identified that exert different and sometimes opposing actions. We assessed the expression of estrogen receptors and explored their role in mediating estrogenic anti-inflammatory effects on human primary monocytes. We report that the only estrogen receptors expressed are estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant and G-protein coupled receptor 30/G-protein estrogen receptor 1, in a sex-independent manner. 17-β-Estradiol inhibits the LPS-induced IL-6 inflammatory response, resulting in inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity. This is achieved via a direct physical interaction of ligand-activated estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant with the p65 component of NF-κB in the nucleus. G-protein coupled receptor 30/G-protein estrogen receptor 1, which also physically interacts with estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant, acts a coregulator in this process, because its inhibition blocks the effect of estrogens on IL-6 expression. However, its activation does not mimic the effect of estrogens, on neither IL-6 nor NF-κB activity. Finally, we show that the estrogen receptor profile observed in monocytes is not modified during their differentiation to macrophages or dendritic cells in vitro and is shared in vivo by macrophages present in atherosclerotic plaques. These results position estrogen receptor-α 36-kDa splice variant and G-protein coupled receptor 30 as important players and potential therapeutic targets in monocyte/macrophage-dependent inflammatory processes. PMID:26394816

  4. Endocrine-disrupting potentials of equine estrogens equilin, equilenin, and their metabolites, in the medaka Oryzias latipes: in silico and DNA microarray studies.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaya; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ryoko; Koyanagi, Akiko; Kusano, Teruhiko; Tominaga, Nobuaki; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Arizono, Koji

    2015-09-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated the presence of equine estrogens in the aquatic environment, limited data are currently available on the endocrine-disrupting potentials in fish and the risks they pose to aquatic organisms. To investigate the interactions of major equine estrogens equilin (Eq) and equilenin (Eqn), as well as their metabolites 17α-dihydroequilin, 17β-dihydroequilin, 17α-dihydroequilenin and 17β-dihydroequilenin, with the estrogen receptor α (ERα) of medaka (Oryzias latipes), a three-dimensional model of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERα was built in silico, and docking simulations were performed. The docking simulation analysis indicated that the interaction of 17β-dihydroequilenin with the ERα LBD is the most potent, followed by those of 17α-dihydroequilin and 17β-dihydroequilin, whereas those of Eq and Eqn were least potent. We further analyzed gene expression profiles in the livers of male medaka exposed to Eq and Eqn. A DNA microarray representing 6000 genes revealed that 24-h exposure to Eq and Eqn (100 ng/L) upregulated the expression of 6 and 34 genes in the livers of males, respectively. Genes upregulated by Eq included the estrogenic biomarker genes vitellogenins and choriogenins, suggesting the estrogenic potential of Eq. In contrast, Eqn exposure upregulated several cancer-related genes, such as mediator complex subunit 16 and RAS oncogene family members, suggesting a carcinogenic potential for Eqn. These results suggest that equine estrogens may have not only endocrine-disrupting potentials via the ERα signaling pathway but also carcinogenic potency in male medaka. PMID:25611945

  5. Development of in vivo and in vitro assays to evaluate the physiological effects of environmental estrogens in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, L.; Yao, Z.; Kraak, G. Van Der

    1995-12-31

    There are many reports of environmental chemicals that may act as estrogens by binding to the nuclear 17-{beta} estradiol (E{sub 2}) receptor. Experiments were conducted to evaluate whether the plant sterol {beta}-sitosterol and the detergent nonylphenol interact with hepatic estrogen receptors in fish. These compounds are estrogenic in mammals and are found in treated industrial and municipal sewage waters and in pulp and paper mill effluents. Specific high affinity binding sites were characterized in rainbow trout. Nonylphenol and sitosterol were found to have relative affinities of 0.009 and 0.0001 compared to E{sub 2}. To determine if these compounds act as E{sub 2} agonists, their ability to induce estrogen dependent processes was monitored. Induction of estrogen receptors is a common E{sub 2} dependent effect. While other groups have shown in other systems that induction of hepatic E2 receptor levels was estrogen dependent, the authors found that E{sub 2} did not increase E{sub 2} binding in goldfish. However, using isolated goldfish hepatocytes cells, E{sub 2}, sitosterol and nonylphenol induced vitellogenin production. Current studies are aimed at evaluating the structure and activity relationships of these compounds responsible for causing E{sub 2} binding and vitellogenin inductions. Other means to evaluate E{sub 2} binding in goldfish liver are also being investigated.

  6. Estrogenic effect of procymidone through activation of MAPK in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Radice, Sonia; Chiesara, Enzo; Frigerio, Silvia; Fumagalli, Roberta; Parolaro, Daniela; Rubino, Tiziana; Marabini, Laura

    2006-05-01

    Procymidone modifies sexual differentiation in vitro and induces estrogenic activity in primary cultured rainbow trout hepatocytes, as shown by an increase in the contents of vitellogenin and heat shock proteins. Since this dicarboximide fungicide is found in human tissues, it was considered of interest to investigate its ability to induce endocrine damage in the MCF-7 human cell line. The mechanism of this estrogenic action was also evaluated. Procymidone 100 microM stimulated cell growth from day 3 up to day 12 and raised the level of pS2 on day 3. Although procymidone does not bind the estrogen receptor (ER), the antiestrogen ICI 182780 inhibited its effect on cell growth and pS2 content, suggesting that the ER is involved indirectly in these effects. In exploring the mechanism of ER indirect activation we found that the antibody against c-Neu receptor (9G6) did not modify procymidone's effects on cell growth and pS2 expression. Thus, procymidone does not bind the c-Neu membrane receptor, excluding this indirect ER activation pathway. We also found that procymidone induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) at 15 and 30 min, and that PD 98059, a MAPK (Erk1/2) inhibitor, prevented procymidone's effects on cell growth and pS2, indicating that MAPK activation is responsible for procymidone ER activation. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with these times and elimination of the phenomenon by alpha-tocopherol (alpha-T), a ROS scavenger, is proof that oxygen free-radical production is at the basis of the MAPK activation by procymidone. PMID:16310225

  7. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Miao; Zhou, Yuan-Zheng; Wang, Han-Bi; Sun, Zheng-Yi; Zhen, Jing-Ran; Shen, Keng; Deng, Cheng-Yan; Lang, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thin endometrium is associated with poor reproductive outcomes; estrogen treatment can increase endometrial thickness (EMT). The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the factors influencing the effectiveness of estrogen treatment and reproductive outcomes after the treatment in patients with thin endometrium. Methods: Relevant clinical data of 101 patients with thin endometrium who had undergone estrogen treatment were collected. Possible factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment were analyzed retrospectively by logistic regression analysis. Eighty-seven infertile women without thin endometrium who had undergone assisted reproduction served as controls. The cases and controls were matched for age, assisted reproduction method, and number of embryos transferred. Reproductive outcomes of study and control groups were compared using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test. Results: At the end of estrogen treatment, EMT was ≥8 mm in 93/101 patients (92.1%). Effectiveness of treatment was significantly associated with maximal pretreatment EMT (P = 0.017) and treatment duration (P = 0.004). The outcomes of assisted reproduction were similar in patients whose treatment was successful in increasing EMT to ≥8 mm and the control group. The rate of clinical pregnancy in patients was associated with the number of good-quality embryos transferred in both fresh (P = 0.005) and frozen-thawed (P = 0.000) embryo transfer cycles. Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes. The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration. Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm) are similar to those of controls. The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen. PMID:26612292

  8. Effects of Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathways on Bladder Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Guilherme; Gakis, Georgios; Smith, Carolyn L.; Fahmy, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have long demonstrated clear differences in incidence and progression of bladder cancer between genders suggesting that the mechanisms of development and progression in these tumors have a strong association with steroid hormonal pathways. Such observations led to preclinical studies investigating the role of androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as their cognate hormones in bladder cancer initiation and progression. Using various in vitro cell line assays and in vivo mouse models, studies have elucidated different mechanisms and signaling pathways through which these steroid receptors may participate in this disease. More recently, RNA expression data from multiple studies revealed a luminal subtype of bladder cancer that exhibited an estrogen receptor signaling pathway, making it a strong candidate for further consideration of targeted therapies in the future. Despite the promising preclinical data demonstrating potential roles for both antiandrogen and antiestrogen strategies targeting these pathways in different stages of bladder cancer, only two clinical trials are currently active and accruing patients for such clinical studies. Targeted therapies in bladder cancer are a large unmet need and have the potential to change treatment paradigms and improve oncological outcomes of patients with bladder cancer. PMID:27376135

  9. Olive oil exhibits osteoprotection in ovariectomized rats without estrogenic effects

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, XIAOHUA; HUANG, HUIJUAN; ZHENG, XIAOBING; LI, BAOHENG

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of olive oil on bone and uterus in ovariectomized rats. A total of 34 surgically ovariectomized or sham-operated virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: i) Sham-operated control rats (sham group); ii) Ovariectomized rats (OVX group); iii) Olive oil-supplemented ovariectomized rats (olive group); and iv) Diethylstilbestrol-supplemented ovariectomized rats (E2 group). At 12 weeks following left ventricular blood sacrificed to detect plasma estradiol (E2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 levels. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the left femur proximal 1/3 slices were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Uterine wet weight and the uterus index (ratio of uterine wet weight and body weight) were compared, and the uterine endometrium was observed using a light microscope. In the OVX group, serum E2 was significantly lower and IL-1β and IL-6 levels were significantly higher compared with the sham group. By contrast, serum E2 levels increased and IL-1β levels decreased in the olive group, but showed no significant difference compared with the sham group. The lumbar spine BMD in the olive group was increased compared with OVX group. Electron microscopy revealed sparse collagen fibers in the OVX group, with decreased density and multi-cavity, showing pathological features of osteoporosis. By contrast, the situation was improved in the E2 and olive groups, in which organelles such as the rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and Golgi apparatus were visible and active. Compared with the sham group rats, the uterine wet weight and uterine index decreased in the OVX and olive groups; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the E2 group. Furthermore, endometrial hyperplasia was not observed in the olive group, which were apparently different from E2 group. The present results suggest that olive

  10. Regulation of placental low-density lipoprotein uptake in baboons by estrogen: Dose-dependent effects of the anti-estrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25)

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, M.C.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D. )

    1991-07-01

    In the present study, increasing amounts of the anti-estrogen 1-(p-2-diethylaminoethoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-2-p-methoxyphenoletha nol (MER-25) were administered to pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) to block the action of endogenous estrogen and to determine effect on placental low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake. Pregnant baboons were untreated (n = 8) or received MER-25 orally at a dosage of 25 (n = 10), 50 (n = 8), or 75 (n = 4) mg/kg BW daily on Days 140-170 of gestation (term = 184 days). Placentas were removed on Day 170 of gestation and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase. Placental cells were incubated in Medium 199 for 12 h at 37{degrees} C with increasing amounts of 125I-LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean ({plus minus} SEM) placental uptake (ng/micrograms cell protein) of 125I-LDL was 55% (6.4 {plus minus} 1.0), 75% (3.6 {plus minus} 0.7), and 81% (2.7 {plus minus} 0.2) lower (p less than 0.001) in baboons that received MER-25 in doses of 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg BW, respectively, than in untreated baboons (14.2 {plus minus} 1.3 ng/micrograms cell protein). Maximal effect occurred with 50 mg MER-25, because LDL uptake was not further decreased with greater levels of MER-25. Dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as determined by Scatchard analysis, were unaltered by anti-estrogen treatment. The amount of 125I-LDL degradation by placental cells of untreated and MER-25-treated baboons was proportional to LDL uptake.

  11. Dynamic monitoring of GPER-mediated estrogenic effects in breast cancer associated fibroblasts: An alternative role of estrogen in mammary carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haojun; Liu, Manran; Luo, Shujuan; Yu, Tenghua; Wu, Chengyi; Yang, Guanglun; Tu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are crucial contributors to breast cancer development. Estrogen affects mammary stroma in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We show here that estrogen (G-protein coupled) receptor (GPER) could be detected by immunohistochemistry in stromal fibroblasts of primary breast cancers. The presence of GPER expression was further confirmed by immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR in CAFs isolated from primary breast cancers. Based on dynamic monitoring by real time cell analyzer (RTCA) system, 17-β-estradiol (E2) as well as GPER specific agonist G1 were observed to trigger transient cell index increasing within an hour in a dosage-dependent manner in breast CAFs. In addition, E2 and G1 stimulated intracellular calcium modulation and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 within seconds and minutes in CAFs, respectively. Moreover, E2 and G1 promoted cell proliferation of breast CAFs measured by RTCA monitoring, cell viability assay and cell cycle analysis, and this promotion could be blocked by a GPER-selective antagonist G15. Interestingly, dynamic RTCA monitoring indicated that E2 increased adhesion of resuspended cells, and microscopy confirmed that E2 stimulated cell spreading. Both the adhesion and spreading were proposed to be mediated by GPER, since G1 also stimulated these effects similar to E2, and G15 reduced them. Moreover, GPER was found to mediate migration that was increased by E2 and G1 but reduced by G15 in RTCA cell migration assay and transwell assay. Accordingly, GPER mediates not only rapid actions but also slow effects including adhesion/spreading, proliferation and migration in breast CAFs. Estrogen is likely to affect tumor associated stroma and contributes to mammary carcinoma development through CAFs. PMID:27016131

  12. A COMPUTATIONALLY-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS, PART II. AN EVALUATION OF A HUMAN RECEPTOR-BASED MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of an expert system described in the previous paper (Bradbury et al., 2000; Toxicol. Sci.) to identify the potential for chemicals to act as ligands of mammalian estrogen receptors (ERs). The basis of that algorithm was a...

  13. ERα Mediates Estrogen-Induced Expression of the Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor Gene BRMS1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongtao; Gollahon, Lauren S.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, estrogen has been reported as putatively inhibiting cancer cell invasion and motility. This information is in direct contrast to the paradigm of estrogen as a tumor promoter. However, data suggests that the effects of estrogen are modulated by the receptor isoform with which it interacts. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the role of estrogen in potentially suppressing breast cancer metastasis, we investigated the regulation of estrogen and its receptor on the downstream target gene, breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) in MCF-7, SKBR3, TTU-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that estrogen increased the transcription and expression of BRMS1 in the ERα positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Additionally, the ERα specific agonist PPT also induced the transcription and expression of BRMS1. However, the two remaining estrogen receptor (ER) subtype agonists had no effect on BRMS1 expression. In order to further examine the influence of ERα on BRMS1 expression, ERα expression was knocked down using siRNA (siERα). Western blot analysis showed that siERα reduced estrogen-induced and PPT-induced BRMS1 expression. In summary, this study demonstrates estrogen, via its α receptor, positively regulates the expression of BRMS1, providing new insight into a potential inhibitory effect of estrogen on metastasis suppression. PMID:26821020

  14. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Crews, D.; Bergeron, J.M.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ between the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a process termed temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Research on TSD indicates that gonadal sex is not irrevocably set by the genetic composition inherited at fertilization but depends ultimately on which genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes and hormone receptors are activated during the midtrimester of embryonic development by temperature. Incubation temperature modifies the activity as well as the temporal and spatial sequence of enzymes and hormone receptors to determine gonad type. Estrogen is the physiologic equivalent of incubation temperature and the proximate cue that initiates female sex determination. increasing evidence indicates some polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans. Reproductive disorders resulting from exposure to these xenobiotic compounds may include reductions in fertility, hatch rate in fish and birds, and viability of offspring, as well as alterations in hormone levels or adult sexual behaviors. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds may be acting to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, by which the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. In TSD turtles, the estrogenic effect of some PCBs reverses gonadal sex in individuals incubating at an otherwise male-producing temperature. Furthermore, certain PCBs are synergistic in their effect at very low concentrations. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Effect of estrogen on vagal afferent projections to the brainstem in the female.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John; Caverson, Monica M

    2016-04-01

    The effects of 17β-estradiol (E) on the distribution and density of brainstem projections of small or large diameter primary vagal afferents were investigated in Wistar rats using transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin- (WGA; preferentially transported by non-myelinated afferent C-fibers; 2%), or cholera toxin B-subunit- (CTB, 5%; preferentially transported by large myelinated afferent A-fibers) conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in combination with the tetramethylbenzidine method in age matched ovariectomized (OVX) only or OVX and treated with E (OVX+E; 30 pg/ml plasma) females for 12 weeks. Additionally, these projections were compared to aged matched males. Unilateral microinjection of WGA-HRP into the nodose ganglion resulted in dense anterograde labeling bilaterally, with an ipsilateral predominance in several subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in area postrema that was greatest in OVX+E animals compared to OVX only and males. Moderately dense anterograde labeling was also observed in paratrigeminal nucleus (PAT) of the OVX+E animals. CTB-HRP produced less dense anterograde labeling in the NTS complex, but had a wider distribution within the brainstem including the area postrema, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, PAT, the nucleus ambiguus complex and ventrolateral medulla in all groups. The distribution of CTB-HRP anterograde labeling was densest in OVX+E, less dense in OVX only females and least dense in male rats. Little, if any, labeling was found within PAT in males using either WGA-or CTB-HRP. Taken together, these data suggest that small, non-myelinated (WGA-labeled) and large myelinated (CTB-labeled) diameter vagal afferents projecting to brainstem autonomic areas are differentially affected by circulating levels of estrogen. These effects of estrogen on connectivity may contribute to the sex differences observed in central autonomic mechanisms between gender, and in females with and without estrogen. PMID

  16. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  17. Anxiolytic Effects and Neuroanatomical Targets of Estrogen Receptor-β (ERβ) Activation by a Selective ERβ Agonist in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Mario G.; Portillo, Wendy; Reyna, Andrea; Foradori, Chad D.; Kudwa, Andrea; Hinds, Laura; Handa, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The dichotomous anxiogenic and anxiolytic properties of estrogens have been reported to be mediated by two distinct neural estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, respectively. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we confirmed that the anxiolytic actions of estradiol are mediated by ERβ and extended and these observations to demonstrate the neuroanatomical targets involved in ERβ activation in these behavioral responses. We examined the effects of the biologically active S-enantiomer of diarylpropionitrile (S-DPN) on anxiety-related behavioral measures, the corresponding stress hormonal response to hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity, and potential sites of neuronal activation in mutant female mice carrying a null mutation for ERβ gene (βERKO). S-DPN administration significantly reduced anxiety-like behaviors in the open field, light-dark exploration, and the elevated plus maze (EPM) in ovariectomized wild-type (WT) mice, but not in their βERKO littermates. Stress-induced corticosterone (CORT) and ACTH were also attenuated by S-DPN in the WT mice but not in the βERKO mice. Using c-fos induction after elevated plus maze, as a marker of stress-induced neuronal activation, we identified the anterodorsal medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis as the neuronal targets of S-DPN action. Both areas showed elevated c-fos mRNA expression with S-DPN treatment in the WT but not βERKO females. These studies provide compelling evidence for anxiolytic effects mediated by ERβ, and its neuroanatomical targets, that send or receive projections to/from the paraventricular nucleus, providing potential indirect mode of action for the control of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis function and behaviors. PMID:22186418

  18. An ethanolic extract of black cohosh causes hematological changes but not estrogenic effects in female rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Cora, Michelle C.; Witt, Kristine L.; Granville, Courtney A.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Fomby, Laurene; Knostman, Katherine A.; Ryan, Michael J.; Newbold, Retha; Smith, Cynthia; Foster, Paul M.; Vallant, Molly K.; Stout, Matthew D.

    2012-09-01

    Black cohosh rhizome (Actaea racemosa) is used as a remedy for pain and gynecological ailments; modern preparations are commonly sold as ethanolic extracts available as dietary supplements. Black cohosh was nominated to the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for toxicity testing due to its widespread use and lack of safety data. Several commercially available black cohosh extracts (BCE) were characterized by the NTP, and one with chemical composition closest to formulations available to consumers was used for all studies. Female B6C3F1/N mice and Wistar Han rats were given 0, 15 (rats only), 62.5 (mice only), 125, 250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day BCE by gavage for 90 days starting at weaning. BCE induced dose-dependent hematological changes consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia and increased frequencies of peripheral micronucleated red blood cells (RBC) in both species. Effects were more severe in mice, which had decreased RBC counts in all treatment groups and increased micronucleated RBC at doses above 125 mg/kg. Dose-dependent thymus and liver toxicity was observed in rats but not mice. No biologically significant effects were observed in other organs. Puberty was delayed 2.9 days at the highest treatment dose in rats; a similar magnitude delay in mice occurred in the 125 and 250 mg/kg groups but not at the higher doses. An additional uterotrophic assay conducted in mice exposed for 3 days to 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 500 mg/kg found no estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity. These are the first studies to observe adverse effects of BCE in rodents. -- Highlights: ► Mice and rats were dosed with black cohosh extract for 90 days starting at weaning. ► Hematological changes were consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia. ► Peripheral micronucleated red blood cell frequencies increased. ► Puberty was delayed 2.9 days in rats. ► No estrogenic/anti-estrogenic activity was seen in the uterotrophic assay.

  19. Effects of CYP7B1-mediated catalysis on estrogen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Hanna; Lundqvist, Johan; Norlin, Maria

    2010-09-01

    Most of the many biological effects of estrogens are mediated via the estrogen receptors ERalpha and beta. The current study examines the role of CYP7B1-mediated catalysis for activation of ER. Several reports suggest that CYP7B1 may be important for hormonal action but previously published studies are contradictory concerning the manner in which CYP7B1 affects ERbeta-mediated response. In the current study, we examined effects of several CYP7B1-related steroids on ER activation, using an estrogen response element (ERE) reporter system. Our studies showed significant stimulation of ER by 5-androstene-3beta,17beta-diol (Aene-diol) and 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol (3beta-Adiol). In contrast, the CYP7B1-formed metabolites from these steroids did not activate the receptor, indicating that CYP7B1-mediated metabolism abolishes the ER-stimulating effect of these compounds. The mRNA level of HEM45, a gene known to be stimulated by estrogens, was strongly up-regulated by Aene-diol but not by its CYP7B1-formed metabolite, further supporting this concept. We did not observe stimulation by dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or 7alpha-hydroxy-DHEA, previously suggested to affect ERbeta-mediated response. As part of these studies we examined metabolism of Aene-diol in pig liver which is high in CYP7B1 content. These experiments indicate that CYP7B1-mediated metabolism of Aene-diol is of a similar rate as the metabolism of the well-known CYP7B1 substrates DHEA and 3beta-Adiol. CYP7B1-mediated metabolism of 3beta-Adiol has been proposed to influence ERbeta-mediated growth suppression. Our results indicate that Aene-diol also might be important for ER-related pathways. Our data indicate that low concentrations of Aene-diol can trigger ER-mediated response equally well for both ERalpha and beta and that CYP7B1-mediated conversion of Aene-diol into a 7alpha-hydroxymetabolite will result in loss of action. PMID:20553962

  20. Region-Specific Growth Effects in the Developing Rat Prostate Following Fetal Exposure to Estrogenic Ultraviolet Filters

    PubMed Central

    Hofkamp, Luke; Bradley, Sarahann; Tresguerres, Jesus; Lichtensteiger, Walter; Schlumpf, Margret; Timms, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives Exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors is a potential risk factor for humans. Many of these chemicals have been shown to exhibit disruption of normal cellular and developmental processes in animal models. Ultraviolet (UV) filters used as sunscreens in cosmetics have previously been shown to exhibit estrogenic activity in in vitro and in vivo assays. We examined the effects of two UV filters, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) and 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC), in the developing prostate of the fetal rat. Methods Pregnant Long Evans rats were fed diets containing doses of 4-MBC and 3-BC that resulted in average daily intakes of these chemicals corresponding to the lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL) and the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) doses in prior developmental toxicity studies. Using digital photographs of serial sections from postnatal day 1 animals, we identified, contoured, and aligned the epithelial ducts from specific regions of the developing prostate, plus the accessory sex glands and calculated the total volume for each region from three-dimensional, surface-rendered models. Results Fetal exposure to 4-MBC (7.0 mg/kg body weight/day) resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.05) in tissue volume in the prostate and accessory sex glands. Treated males exhibited a 62% increase in the number of ducts in the caudal dorsal prostate. Increased distal branching morphogenesis appears to be a consequence of exposure in the ventral region, resulting in a 106% increase in ductal volume. Conclusions 4-MBC exposure during development of the male reproductive accessory sex glands exhibited classical growth effects associated with estrogenic endocrine disruptors. The different regional responses suggest that the two developmental processes of ductal outgrowth and branching morphogenesis are affected independently by exposure to the environmental chemicals. PMID:18629307

  1. Estrogen receptor modulatory effects of germinated brown rice bioactives in the uterus of rats through the regulation of estrogen-induced genes

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Sani Ismaila; Maznah, Ismail; Mahmud, Rozi Bint; Saeed, Mohammed Ibrahim; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ishaka, Aminu

    2013-01-01

    -β reactivity at the glandular epithelium, while the group treated with EST showed immunoreactivity at the glandular, luminal, and stromal epithelium. Conclusion GBR phenolics moderately regulate the expression of ER-β, HSP70, and IL-4 receptor genes, and gave a positive immunoreaction to ER-β antigen in the uterus. ASG regulates the expression of CaBP9k and IL-4 receptor genes, and ORZ regulates the expression of the CaBP9k gene, while GABA at 100 mg/kg regulates the expression of the HSP70 gene. GBR and its bioactives might have an effect on estrogen-regulated genes in the uterus of rats. PMID:24324328

  2. Dual effects of daidzein on chicken hepatic vitellogenin II expression and estrogen receptor-mediated transactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ying-Dong; Hong, Wen-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Chuan; Grossmann, Roland; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Two in vitro systems were employed to delineate the estrogenic activity of daidzein (Da), alone or in combination with high or low concentrations of estrogen in two cell types possessing different estrogen-receptor (ER) isoforms, ERalpha and/or ERbeta: (1) vitellogenin II (VTG), the egg yolk precursor protein and the endpoint biomarker for estrogenicity, in chicken primary hepatocytes, and (2) CHO-K1 cells transiently co-transfected with ERalpha or ERbeta and estrogen-response elements (ERE) linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Da (100 microM) alone induced VTG mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes, albeit with much less potency compared to estradiol (E(2)). Da exhibited different effects in the presence of 1 microM and 10 microM E(2). At a concentration of 100 microM, Da enhanced 1 microM E(2)-induced VTG transcription by 2.4-fold, but significantly inhibited 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression in a dose-dependent fashion from 1 to 100 microM. Tamoxifen completely blocked the estrogenic effect of daidzein, alone or in combination with 1 microM of E(2), but did not influence its anti-estrogenic effect on 10 microM E(2)-induced VTG mRNA expression. Furthermore, neither E(2) nor daidzein, alone or in combination, affected ERalpha mRNA expression, yet all the treatments significantly up-regulated ERbeta mRNA expression in chicken hepatocytes. E(2) effectively triggered estrogen-response elements (ERE)-driven reporter gene transactivation in CHO-K1 cells expressing ERalpha or ERbeta and showed much greater potency with ERalpha than with ERbeta. In contrast, daidzein was 1000 times more powerful in stimulating ERbeta- over ERalpha-mediated transactivation. Daidzein, in concentrations ranging from 5 nM to 50 microM, did not affect ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 1 nM E(2), but it significantly inhibited ERbeta-mediated transactivation induced by 10 nM E(2) at 500 nM. Despite the tremendous difference in sensitivity between the two in vitro systems

  3. Direct in vitro effects of androgens and estrogens on ob gene expression and leptin secretion in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Machinal-Quélin, Florence; Dieudonné, Marie-Noëlle; Pecquery, René; Leneveu, Marie-Christine; Giudicelli, Yves

    2002-07-01

    In the present study, we have explored, in vitro, the possibility that short exposure to androgens and estrogens for 24 h may directly influence leptin expression (ARNm and secretion) in sc adipose tissue from men and women. In men, only dihydrotestosterone at high concentration (100 nM) induced a reduction in leptin secretion and ob mRNA level. In women, 17beta-estradiol (10-100 nM) increased ob mRNA expression (+180 to +500%) and leptin release (+75%). Moreover, in adipose tissue of women, the estrogen precursors testosterone (100 nM) and dehydroepiandrosterone (1 microM) also induced an increase in leptin secretion (+84 and +96%, respectively), an effect that was prevented by the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. Finally, the stimulatory effect of 17beta-estradiol observed in women was antagonized by the antiestrogen ICI182780. Altogether, these results suggest that the sexual dimorphism of leptinemia in humans is mainly owing to the estrogen receptor-dependent stimulation of leptin expression in adipose tissue by estrogens and estrogen precursors in women. PMID:12374466

  4. Effects of Age and Estrogen on Skeletal Gene Expression in Humans as Assessed by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Nicks, Kristy M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Therneau, Terry M.; McCready, Louise K.; Peterson, James M.; Drake, Matthew T.; Monroe, David G.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    Precise delineation of the specific genes and pathways altered with aging and estrogen (E) therapy may lead to new skeletal biomarkers and the development of novel bone therapeutics. Previous human bone studies, however, have been limited by only examining pre-specified genes and pathways. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq), on the other hand, offers an unbiased approach to examine the entire transcriptome. Here we present an RNAseq analysis of human bone samples, obtained from iliac crest needle biopsies, to yield the first in vivo interrogation of all genes and pathways that may be altered in bone with aging and E therapy in humans. 58 healthy women were studied, including 19 young women (mean age ± SD, 30.3 ± 5.4 years), 19 old women (73.1 ± 6.6 years), and 20 old women treated with 3 weeks of E therapy (70.5 ± 5.2 years). Using generally accepted criteria (false discovery rate [q] < 0.10), aging altered a total of 678 genes and 12 pathways, including a subset known to regulate bone metabolism (e.g., Notch). Interestingly, the LEF1 transcription factor, which is a classical downstream target of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, was significantly downregulated in the bones from the old versus young women; consistent with this, LEF1 binding sites were significantly enriched in the promoter regions of the differentially expressed genes in the old versus young women, suggesting that aging was associated with alterations in Wnt signaling in bone. Further, of the 21 unique genes altered in bone by E therapy, the expression of INHBB (encoding for the inhibin, beta B polypeptide), which decreased with aging (by 0.6-fold), was restored to young adult levels in response to E therapy. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that aging alters a substantial portion of the skeletal transcriptome, whereas E therapy appears to have significant, albeit less wide-ranging effects. These data provide a valuable resource for the potential identification of novel biomarkers

  5. Effects of low-dose tamoxifen on breast cancer biomarkers Ki-67, estrogen and progesterone receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Juarez Antônio; Facina, Gil; da Silva, Benedito Borges; Gebrim, Luiz Henrique

    2006-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy among women and it has a major impact on mortality. Studies of primary chemoprevention with tamoxifen have generated high expectations and considerable success rates. The efficacy of lower doses of tamoxifen is similar to that seen with a standard dose of the drug, and there has been a reduction in healthcare costs and side effects. The immune reaction to monoclonal antibody Ki-67 (MIB-1) and the expression of estrogen receptors (1D5) and progesterone receptors (PgR 636) in breast carcinoma were studied in patients treated with 10 mg of tamoxifen for a period of 14 days. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted with 38 patients divided into two groups: Group A: N = 20 (control group-without medication) and Group B: N = 18 (tamoxifen/10 mg/day for 14 days). All patients signed an informed consent term previously approved by both institutions. Patients underwent incisional biopsy before treatment and 14 days later a tumor tissue sample was obtained during surgical treatment. Positivity was quantitatively assessed, counting at least 1.000 cells per slide. For statistical data analysis, a Wilcoxon non-parametric test was used, and α was set at 5%. Both groups (A and B) were considered homogeneous regarding control variables. In Group A (control), there was no statistically significant reduction in Ki-67 (MIB-1) (p = 0.627), estrogen receptor (1D5) (p = 0.296) and progesterone receptor positivity (PgR 636) (p = 0.381). In Group B (tamoxifen 10 mg/day), the mean percentage of nuclei stained by Ki-67 (MIB-1) was 24.69% before and 10.43% after tamoxifen treatment. Mean percentage of nuclei stained by estrogen receptor (1D5) was 59.53% before and 25.99% after tamoxifen treatment. Mean percentage of nuclei stained by progesterone receptor (PgR 636), was 59.34 before and 29.59% after tamoxifen treatment. A statistically significant reduction was found with the three markers (p < 0.001). Tamoxifen significantly

  6. The cerebellum as a target for estrogen action

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, Valerie L.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Meisel, Robert L.; Mermelstein, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of estrogens upon the cerebellum, a brain region long ignored as a site of estrogen action. Highlighted are the diverse effects of estradiol within the cerebellum, emphasizing the importance of estradiol signaling in cerebellar development, modulation of synaptic neurotransmission in the adult, and the potential influence of estrogens on various health and disease states. We also provide new data, consistent with previous studies, in which locally synthesized estradiol modulates cerebellar glutamatergic neurotransmission, providing one underlying mechanism by which the actions of estradiol can affect this brain region. PMID:22975197

  7. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Modulators on Morphine Induced Sensitization in Mice Memory

    PubMed Central

    Anoush, Mahdieh; Jani, Ali; Sahebgharani, Moosa; Jafari, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the effects of estradiol valerate and raloxifenea selective estrogen receptor modulator; (SERM) on morphine induced sensitization were examined in mice memory, according to the step-down passive avoidance task. Method: The mice received morphine or estradiol and raloxifene for three days alone or in combination with morphine. After a drug free period of 5 days, the subjects received saline or morphine as pre- training treatments followed by a pre-test saline administration. The memory retrieval was evaluated using step-down passive avoidance test both on the training and test day. Results: The results illustrated that the three- day administration of morphine induced sensitization through the enhancement of memory retrieval (morphine induced sensitization in mice memory). Both the three- day administration of estradiol valerate alone and with morphine (5 mg/kg) restored memory. On the other hand, the three- day administration of raloxifene had no effect on memory retrieval alone, but declined morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. Conclusion: The results of the study indicated that there is an interaction between estrogen receptor modulators and morphine induced sensitization in mice memory. PMID:26877753

  8. Binary classification models for endocrine disrupter effects mediated through the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Roncaglioni, A; Piclin, N; Pintore, M; Benfenati, E

    2008-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters (EDs) form an interesting field of application attracting great attention in the recent years. They represent a number of exogenous substances interfering with the function of the endocrine system, including the interfering with developmental processes. In particular EDs are mentioned as substances requiring a more detailed control and specific authorization within REACH, the new European legislation on chemicals, together with other groups of chemicals of particular concern. QSAR represents a challenging method to approach data gap which is foreseen by REACH. The aim of this study was to provide an insight into the use of QSAR models to address ED effects mediated through the estrogen receptor (ER). New predictive models were derived to assess estrogenicity for a very large and heterogeneous dataset of chemical compounds. QSAR binary classifiers were developed based on different data mining techniques such as classification trees, decision forest, fuzzy logic, neural networks and support vector machines. The focus was given to multiple endpoints to better characterize the effects of EDs evaluating both binding (RBA) and transcriptional activity (RA). A possible combination of the models was also explored. A very good accuracy was reached for both RA and RBA models (higher than 80%). PMID:19061085

  9. Adrenocortical effects of oral estrogens and soy isoflavones in female monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wood, Charles E; Cline, J Mark; Anthony, Mary S; Register, Thomas C; Kaplan, Jay R

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term adrenocortical effects of premenopausal oral contraceptives (OC) and postmenopausal conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and soy isoflavones in a female cynomolgus monkey model. Half of the animals received a triphasic OC for a period of 26 months, after which all monkeys were ovariectomized and randomized to one of three diet groups for 36 months: 1). isoflavone-depleted soy protein (control) (n = 54); 2). soy protein with isoflavones (129 mg/d equivalent) (SPI+) (n = 56); or 3). isoflavone-depleted soy protein with CEE (0.625 mg/d equivalent) (n = 59). In the premenopausal phase, OC treatment resulted in significantly higher cortisol (F) and lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, and testosterone relative to intact controls. In the postmenopausal phase, CEE treatment resulted in significantly higher basal F and lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, and testosterone when compared with control and SPI+ diets. Serum F and androgens in the SPI+ group did not differ significantly from the control group. The SPI+ group had significantly lower adrenal weight than either control or CEE groups, and this effect was localized primarily to the zona fasciculata region of the adrenal cortex. These findings suggest that long-term estrogen treatment may contribute to an androgen-deficient and hypercortisolemic state. PMID:15126559

  10. Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seo Yeon; Kang, Purum; Lee, Hui Su; Seol, Geun Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation of the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara (neroli oil) on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to inhale 0.1% or 0.5% neroli oil or almond oil (control) for 5 minutes twice daily for 5 days. Menopause-related symptoms, as determined by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL); sexual desire visual analog scale (VAS); serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations, blood pressure, pulse, and stress VAS, were measured before and after inhalation. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significant improvements in the physical domain score of the MENQOL and in sexual desire. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group inhaling 0.5% neroli oil than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significantly lower diastolic blood pressure and tended to improve pulse rate and serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations. These findings indicate that inhalation of neroli oil helps relieve menopausal symptoms, increase sexual desire, and reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Neroli oil may have potential as an effective intervention to reduce stress and improve the endocrine system. PMID:25024731

  11. Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo Yeon; Kang, Purum; Lee, Hui Su; Seol, Geun Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation of the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara (neroli oil) on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to inhale 0.1% or 0.5% neroli oil or almond oil (control) for 5 minutes twice daily for 5 days. Menopause-related symptoms, as determined by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL); sexual desire visual analog scale (VAS); serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations, blood pressure, pulse, and stress VAS, were measured before and after inhalation. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significant improvements in the physical domain score of the MENQOL and in sexual desire. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group inhaling 0.5% neroli oil than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significantly lower diastolic blood pressure and tended to improve pulse rate and serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations. These findings indicate that inhalation of neroli oil helps relieve menopausal symptoms, increase sexual desire, and reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Neroli oil may have potential as an effective intervention to reduce stress and improve the endocrine system. PMID:25024731

  12. Overcoming the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid extracts in the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) assay.

    PubMed

    Citulski, Joel; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2012-04-01

    For nearly two decades, the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) has been used as a valuable tool for determining the total estrogenic potency of various environmental samples, including influent and effluent streams at municipal wastewater plants. However, applying the YES assay to wastewater sludges and stabilized biosolids has been problematic. This is due to co-extracted compounds from the solids either proving toxic to the yeast or masking the presence of estrogenic substances. The present research describes the development and validation of sample preparation steps that mitigate the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid samples in the YES assay, while allowing for reliable dose-dependent expression of estrogenic activity. A copper work-up for sulfur removal and chromatographic cleanup with silica and alumina were required in addition to solid-phase extraction to adequately remove interfering compounds. Sample stabilization methods such as autoclaving, lyophilization and formaldehyde treatment were found to be detrimental to the assay. Hence, heat-drying is recommended to prevent cytotoxicity and the degradation of estrogenic substances. PMID:22277884

  13. Mixture interactions of xenoestrogens with endogenous estrogens.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. These environmental estrogens originate from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), m...

  14. Genomic variation in the MMP-1 promoter influences estrogen receptor mediated activity in a mechanically activated environment: potential implications for microgravity risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, John; Myers, Ken; Lu, Ting; Hart, David

    examine the potential impact of the 1G/2G SNP on the cellular response to mechanical loading. HIG-82 cells are estrogen receptor (ER) negative and were transiently transfected with SV40 expression vectors for either ER-α or ER-β isoforms. Cells grown on glass slides were also co-transfected with either a 1G or 2G MMP-1 promoter-luciferase construct. Transfected cells were subjected to dynamic shear stress in a Flexcell Streamer Shear Stress Device. The dynamic loading regime was 0.5 Hz, 10 dyn/cm2 shear for 1 minute followed by 14 minutes rest and repeated for 8 hrs. A Promega Dual Luciferase Reporter Assay System was used to assess MMP-1 promoter activity. Results: Shear stress loading increased both 1G and 2G MMP-1 promoter activity compared to unloaded controls, however the 2G promoter had significantly higher rates of expression than the 1G promoter across all loading regimes and ER co-transfections. Transfection with ER-β resulted in higher MMP-1 promoter activity than that in cells expressing ER-α or in ER-neg cells. Conclusions: Specific genomic variations can lead to differences in cellular responses to changes in mechanical loading environments such as are encountered in microgravity environments or earth-based analogs. These genomic differences may predispose individuals to greater risk of bone loss. It is important to understand the combined effects of mechanical loading, genetic variation and sex hormones on bone maintenance so that risks can be identified for microgravity or analog environments, and specific interventions developed to counteract such risk or even exclude some individuals from prolonged space environments due to the extent of the risk.

  15. Effects of ovariectomy on estrogen uptake capacity, mitotic index and morphology of immunocytochemically-identified gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of these studies was to examine the effects of ovariectomy on the pituitary gonadotrope population in the rat. Several parameters were examined including morphology, mitotic index and ability of individual cells to concentrate estrogen. Adult, female rats which had been ovariectomized 3, 14, or 50 previously, were injected with /sup 3/H-estradiol (i.v.) and killed 1 hour later. Pituitaries were excised and immediately hemisected (mid-sagittal cut). Trunk blood was collected for subsequent radioimmunoassay of serum LH levels to assess the activity of the pituitary gonadotropes. Frozen pituitaries were sectioned and processed for dry-mount autoradiography. Estrogen uptake capacity of gonadotropes increased with time after ovariectomy. This increase was not seen in male rats after castration. Hemi-pituitaries were sectioned (1 ..mu..m) and analyzed for the number of mitotic figures per mm/sup 2/ and dividing cells were characterized as to their hormonal content. Ovariectomy induced an increase in the mitotic index of the pituitary gland. Furthermore, a majority of the mitotic futures seen in the ovariectomized rat were found in cells containing LH-immunoreactivity. Electron microscopic examination of dividing gonadotropes revealed that these cells contained large amounts of vesiculated endoplasmic reticumum typical of post-castration gonadotropes.

  16. Effects of in utero exposure to nonsteroidal estrogens on mouse testis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, C; Ferreras-Estrada, M C; García-Iglesias, M J; Bravo-Moral, A M; Espinosa-Alvarez, J; Escudero-Diez, A

    1997-01-01

    Male mice exposed in utero to alpha-zearalanol (zeranol) or diethylstilbestrol (DES) were analyzed postnatally to evaluate the possible changes on their testicular morphology as part of an examination of the effects of transplacental exposure to non-steroidal estrogens on sensitive tissues. Pregnant NMRI mice were injected subcutaneously with ethyl oleate (0.1 mL) alone (negative control) or with 150 micrograms/kg of body weight of zeranol or DES (positive control) on days 9 and 10 of gestation. Experimental and control male offspring were euthanized at days 45 (n = 47), 90 (n = 44), 180 (n = 40) and 365 (n = 26) after birth and their gonads were examined by light and electron microscopy. The results suggested that prenatal zeranol or DES exposure induced more severe and earlier (at 45 d) testicular abnormalities than in negative control (at 6 mo). These age-related alterations were characterized by regressive changes in the germinal epithelium and Sertoli's cells as well as foci of Leydig's cells around atrophied seminiferous tubules and dysplasia of the rete testis epithelium. On the contrary, the presence of Leydig's cells with immature morphology and their arrangement in sheet could be attributable exclusively to estrogen treatment. The presence of no neoplasm was confirmed. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. PMID:9114959

  17. Estrogen effects on cognition and hippocampal transcription in middle-aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Aenlle, Kristina K.; Kumar, Ashok; Cui, Li; Jackson, Travis C.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Young and middle-aged female mice were ovariectomized and given cyclic injections of either estradiol or vehicle treatments. During the fifth week after surgery the Morris water maze was used to assess cognitive function. Age and treatment effects emerged over the course of spatial training such that middle-aged vehicle treated mice exhibited deficits in acquiring a spatial search strategy compared to younger vehicle treated mice and middle-age estradiol treated mice. Following behavioral characterization, mice were maintained on their injection schedule until week seven and hippocampi were collected 24 hr after the last injection. Hippocampal RNA was extracted and genes responsive to age and estrogen were identified using cDNA microarrays. Estradiol treatment in middle-aged mice altered the expression of genes related to transcriptional regulation, biosynthesis, growth, neuroprotection, and elements of cell signaling pathways. Expression profiles for representative genes were confirmed in a separate set of animals using oligonucleotide arrays and RT-PCR. Our results indicate that estrogen treatment in middle-aged animals may promote hippocampal health during the aging process. PMID:17950954

  18. Estrogen receptor mediated effects of Cimicifuga extracts on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonwoo; Shim, Myeongkuk; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Lee, YoungJoo

    2012-11-01

    Cimicifuga racemosa extracts have long been used to treat female reproductive disorders both in Asia and Europe. Here in this study, we examined the possible estrogen receptor (ER)alpha effects of Cimicifuga heracleifolia var. bifida ethanol extract (C-Ex), which has been used traditionally in Asia, in MCF-7 cells. The activity of C-Ex was characterized in a transient transfection system, using ERa and estrogen-responsive luciferase plasmids in HEK 293 cells and endogenous target genes were studied in MCF-7 cells. C-Ex failed to activate ERalpha and at a concentration of 0.005-0.5 mg/ml as examined by reporter activity. In addition, no statistically significant antiestrogenic activity was observed. However, to our interest, C-Ex enhanced expression of VEGF at 0.5 mg/ml concentration and repressed ERalpha both at the mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 cells. These results suggested that C-Ex does not activate or inactivate ERalpha in a direct manner, but the extracts may affect factors in ER signal transduction pathway. PMID:23210246

  19. Effects of estrogens during embryonal development on crowing in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gunther; Jurkevich, Aleksandr; Grossmann, Roland

    2004-09-30

    In the domestic fowl, crowing is typically a male-specific vocal behavior while the females normally do not crow. These sex differences in vocalization may result from organizational actions of estrogens during specific periods of embryonic development. To further investigate the role of estrogens in differentiation of crowing and development of the acoustic characteristics of crow calls, male domestic fowls were treated on Incubation Day 8 with estradiol benzoate (EB) or either oil or saline vehicles. On the same incubation day, the female fowls were treated with an aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, or saline vehicle. An adulthood vocalization of cocks and hens was recorded during corresponding tests of sexual behavior. The exposure to EB or fadrozole had no effect on sexual differentiation of the gonads and all fadrozole-treated hens laid eggs at a rate similar to the control hens that received saline. While the levels of plasma testosterone at adulthood did not differ in treated and untreated cocks, the incidence of crowing rate was significantly lower in cocks that were exposed to estradiol. Acoustic analysis revealed a considerable reduction in duration and acoustic energy of calls while the main frequency characteristics were not changed. Four out of the seven tested fadrozole-treated hens demonstrated regularly crow-like vocalization with shorter duration and lower energy of calls in comparison to crows of the control males. These findings point out to a role for estradiol in organization of crowing behavior and a specific temporal pattern of the crowing call. PMID:15327911

  20. Short-time QiBaoMeiRan Formula Treatment Exerts Estrogenic Activities without Side Effects on Reproductive Tissues in Immature Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Ma, Xiao-ping; An, Jin-na; Zhang, Zi-jia; Ding, Jie; Qu, Ya-kun; Liu, Zhen-li; Lin, Na

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese herbal preparation QiBaoMeiRan formula (QBMR) displayed estrogenic effects in ovariectomized rats after long-term administration in a previous study. The uterus and vagina are negatively influenced by estrogens in hormone therapy. While QBMR is known to be a phytoestrogen, its estrogenic effects and safety on reproductive tissues after short-term administration and its mechanism via estrogen receptor (ER) pathway haven’t been studied. Here, we characterized its estrogenic effects using immature mice together with in vitro studies for further molecular characterization. Immature mice were treated with QBMR at doses of 1.125, 2.25, and 4.5 g/kg for 7 days. 1.125 and 2.25 g/kg QBMR promoted the growth and development of uterus and vagina, and upregulated ERα and ERβ expression in reproductive tissues. QBMR had a stimulatory effect on proliferating cell nuclear antigen in vagina but not in uterus, and was without any influence on ki-67 antigen in uterus and vagina. QBMR significantly induced luciferase expression from the ERα/β-estrogen response element (ERE) luciferase reporter and upregulated ERα and ERβ expressions in MCF-7 cells, which were significantly inhibited by estrogen antagonist ICI182,780. This study demonstrated QBMR exerts estrogenic effects on reproductive tissues without side effects and through ER-ERE-dependent pathway. PMID:26644197

  1. Effects of estradiol benzoate, raloxifen and an ethanolic extract of Cimicifuga racemosa in nonclassical estrogen regulated organs of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    The special extract of Cimicifuga racemosa (CR) BNO 1055 was shown to have bone protective effects without exerting estrogenic effects in the uterus or mammary gland. Whether the effects of CR BNO 1055 would be exerted in other organs that also express estrogen receptors (ERs) but in which the effects of estrogens and of the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifen (Ral) were not thoroughly studied was therefore investigated in the present contribution. Rats were ovariectomized (ovx) and their food immediately substituted with estradiol benzoate (EB), Ral or 2 doses of CR BNO 1055 for 3 months. Expressions of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) and of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) genes were determined in the vagina, liver, thyroid gland, lung, spleen, colon and kidney by means of quantitative RT-PCRs. Body weights in all treatment groups were significantly reduced and uterine weights in the EB treated animals were largely and in the Ral treated animals slightly but significantly increased. CR BNO 1055 was without effects in the uterus. We tested 3 genes: ERalpha gene expression was significantly reduced in the vagina, liver and kidney and remained unaffected in all other organs with the exception of the thyroid gland where ERalpha gene expression was stimulated by EB, Ral had--if any--similar effects in these organs. The CR extract BNO 1055 was devoid of any effect on ERalpha gene expression. ERbeta gene expression was suppressed in the vagina and colon by EB and this effect was shared by Ral in the colon. In the thyroid, EB and Ral stimulated ERbeta gene expression. Expression of IGF-1 gene was stimulated by EB and CR BNO 1055 in the vagina and kidney and inhibited by EB and Ral in the liver. No effects were observed by CR BNO 1055 in these organs. The effects of Ral, if occurring, were similar to those of EB while CR BNO 1055 was ineffective in all organs but the vagina. In the colon, reduced ERbeta gene activity may

  2. Differential Estrogen-Regulation of CXCL12 Chemokine Receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, Contributes to the Growth Effect of Estrogens in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boudot, Antoine; Kerdivel, Gwenneg; Habauzit, Denis; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Le Dily, François; Flouriot, Gilles; Samson, Michel; Pakdel, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    CXCR4 and CXCR7 are the two receptors for the chemokine CXCL12, a key mediator of the growth effect of estrogens (E2) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers. In this study we examined E2-regulation of the CXCL12 axis components and their involvement in the growth of breast cancer cells. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were differentially regulated by E2 which enhanced the expression of both CXCL12 and CXCR4 but repressed the expression of CXCR7. Formaldehyde-associated isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) revealed that E2-mediated transcriptional regulation of these genes is linked to the control of the compaction state of chromatin at their promoters. This effect could be accomplished via several distal ER-binding sites in the regions surrounding these genes, all of which are located 20–250 kb from the transcription start site. Furthermore, individual down-regulation of CXCL12, CXCR4 or CXCR7 expression as well as the inhibition of their activity significantly decreases the rate of basal cell growth. In contrast, E2-induced cell growth was differentially affected. Unlike CXCR7, the inhibition of the expression or activity of either CXCL12 or CXCR4 significantly blunted the E2-mediated stimulation of cellular growth. Besides, CXCR7 over-expression increased the basal MCF-7 cell growth rate and decreased the growth effect of E2. These findings indicate that E2 regulation of the CXCL12 signaling axis is important for the E2-mediated growth effect of breast cancer cells. These data also provide support for distinct biological functions of CXCR4 and CXCR7 and suggest that targeting CXCR4 and/or CXCR7 would have distinct molecular effects on ER-positive breast tumors. PMID:21695171

  3. Effect of source-separated urine storage on estrogenic activity detected using bioluminescent yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Kivistö, Anniina; Palmroth, Marja R T; Karp, Matti

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that a microbial whole cell biosensor, bioluminescent yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (BMAEREluc/ERα) can be applied to detect overall estrogenic activity from fresh and stored human urine. The use of source-separated urine in agriculture removes a human originated estrogen source from wastewater influents, subsequently enabling nutrient recycling. Estrogenic activity in urine should be diminished prior to urine usage in agriculture in order to prevent its migration to soil. A storage period of 6 months is required for hygienic reasons; therefore, estrogenic activity monitoring is of interest. The method measured cumulative female hormone-like activity. Calibration curves were prepared for estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α- ethinylestradiol and estriol. Estrogen concentrations of 0.29-29,640 μg L(-1) were detectable while limit of detection corresponded to 0.28-35 μg L(-1) of estrogens. The yeast sensor responded well to fresh and stored urine and gave high signals corresponding to 0.38-3,804 μg L(-1) of estrogens in different urine samples. Estrogenic activity decreased during storage, but was still higher than in fresh urine implying insufficient storage length. The biosensor was suitable for monitoring hormonal activity in urine and can be used in screening anthropogenic estrogen-like compounds interacting with the receptor. PMID:26804108

  4. Effects of treatment with estrogen and progesterone on the methamphetamine-induced cognitive impairment in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ghazvini, Hamed; Khaksari, Mohammad; Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh; Shabani, Mohammad; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-04-21

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the most powerful psychostimulant that leads to long lasting cognitive impairment. Earlier researches demonstrated that ovarian hormones including estrogen and progesterone ameliorate cognitive function against various central nervous system disorders. Moreover, recent studies demonstrate a neuroprotective role against methamphetamine toxicity. In current study the effects of estrogen and progesterone alone or in combination, on spatial learning and memory in METH-exposed ovariectomized (OVX) rats are investigated. Three weeks after ovariectomy, the animals were treated by estrogen (1mg/kg, i.p.) and progesterone (8mg/kg, i.p.) alone and in combination or vehicle during 14 consecutive days. On the 28th day, rats were exposed to a single-day METH regimens (four injections of 6mg/kg, s.c, at 2h intervals) 30min after the hormones treatment. Finally, spatial learning and memory were examined using the Morris water maze 2days after the last treatment. The findings showed that estrogen and progesterone did not have significant effect on spatial learning and memory in non METH-exposed OVX rats. The treatment with estrogen and progesterone alone in METH-exposed rats, significantly improved spatial learning and memory impairment. On the other hand, the cognitive performance of animals that received combination of estrogen plus progesterone in METH-exposed rats did not significantly differ from that of METH-exposed animals that received vehicle injections. Taken together, the present findings suggest that treatment with ovarian hormones can partially improve spatial learning and memory deficits induced by methamphetamine in OVX rats. PMID:26944454

  5. Renoprotective effects of a selective estrogen receptor modulator, Raloxifene in an animal model of diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Alexis; Corinne, C. Wells; Singh, Sandhya; Babayan, Regina; Maric, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Our previous studies have shown that supplementation with 17-β estradiol (E2) from the onset of diabetes attenuates diabetic nephropathy. But, E2 is accompanied by feminizing effects as well as adverse side effects on other organs. The current study examined the renoprotective effects of a selective estrogen receptor modulator, raloxifene (RAL), in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy. RAL activates estrogen receptors and estrogen receptor-mediated cellular events without the side effects of E2. Methods The study was performed in Sprague-Dawley non-diabetic (ND), streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (D) and STZ-induced diabetic+raloxifene (D+RAL) rats (n=6/group). Results After 12 weeks of treatment, D was associated with increased albumin excretion (UAE; ND, 4.2±0.4; ND, 41.3±9.0 mg/day), glomerulosclerosis (GSI; ND, 0.26±0.04; D, 1.86±0.80 AU), tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIFI; ND, 0.37±0.05; D, 2.12±0.50 AU), increased collagen type I (CI; ND, 1.31±0.07; D, 4.65±0.09 ROD), collagen type IV (CIV; ND, 0.64±0.03; D, 1.37±0.11 ROD) and transforming growth factor beta protein expression (TGF-β; ND, 0.65±0.08; D, 1.25±0.10 ROD), increased density of CD68-positive cells (CD68; ND, 1.37±3.02; D, 29.2±1.74 cells/mm2) and increased plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6; ND, 14.8±5.0; D, 51.3±14.0 pg/ml). Treatment with RAL partially or fully attenuated these processes (UAE, 21.0±5.0 mg/day; GSI, 0.40±0.06 AU; TIFI, 0.20±0.04 AU; CI, 2.55±0.49 ROD; CIV, 0.70±0.09 ROD; TGF-β, 0.91±0.08 ROD; CD68, 6.03±2.38 cells/mm2; IL-6, 31.2±5.0 pg/ml). Conclusions Our data indicate that treatment with RAL attenuates albuminuria and renal structural changes associated with diabetes. PMID:17308373

  6. Differential effect of pure isoflavones and soymilk on estrogen receptor activity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rando, Gianpaolo; Ramachandran, Balaji; Rebecchi, Monica; Ciana, Paolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2009-06-15

    Background: Because of the complexity of estrogen receptor (ER) physiological activity, the interaction of pure isoflavones or soy-based diets on ER needs to be clearly demonstrated. Objectives: To investigate the effects of the administration of isoflavones as a pure compound or as a component of diet on the ER transcriptional activity in adult mice. Methods: Effects of acute (6 h) and chronic (21 days) oral administration of soy milk, pure genistein and a mix of genistein and daidzein was studied in living ERE-Luc mice. In this animal model, the synthesis of luciferase is under the state of ER transcriptional activity. Luciferase activity was measured in living mice by daily bioluminescence imaging sessions and in tissue extracts by enzymatic assay. Results: Acute, oral administration of genistein or soymilk caused a significant increase of ER activity in liver. In a 20 day long treatment, soymilk was more potent than genistein in liver and appeared to extend its influence on ER transcriptional activity in other tissues, such as the digestive tract. A mixture of pure genistein and daidzein at the same concentration as in soymilk failed to induce significant changes during acute and chronic studies suggesting an important, uncharacterized role of the soymilk matrix. Consistent with this observation, synergistic effects of the matrix plus isoflavones were observed in MCF-7 cells stably transfected with the ERE-luc construct. Conclusions: This study underlines the limitations of the analysis of single food components in the evaluation of their effects on estrogen receptor activity and advocates the necessity to use complex organisms for the full comprehension of the effects of compounds altering the endocrine balance.

  7. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Simmler, Charlotte; Yuan, Yang; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M; Pauli, Guido F; van Breemen, Richard B; Bolton, Judy L

    2013-01-01

    The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec.) to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata) in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE)-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of botanical

  8. Evaluation of Estrogenic Activity of Licorice Species in Comparison with Hops Used in Botanicals for Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Simmler, Charlotte; Yuan, Yang; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M.; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus) and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec.) to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata) in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE)-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of botanical

  9. A preliminary risk assessment of potential exposure to naturally occurring estrogens from Beijing (China) market milk products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Mi, Xiaoxia; Yuan, Yuwei; Chen, Gang; Ren, Li; Wang, Kaiqiang; Zhu, Dan; Qian, Yongzhong

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of the natural steroid hormones estrone (E1), 17α-estradiol (αE2), 17β-estradiol (βE2) and estriol (E3) in 38 commercial milk samples obtained from markets in Beijing, China. Liquid Chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed to determine estrogens levels. The concentrations of E1, αE2, βE2 and E3 in different milk products varied from 0-146.12 ng/L, 0-70.12 ng/L, 0-31.85 ng/L to 0-2.18 ng/L, respectively. We compared exposures to estrogens through milk consumption with acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and threshold for toxicological concern (TTC) to determine whether estrogen intakes from milk consumption are larger or smaller than the toxicity-based benchmarks. The combined margin of safety MOS (MOST) for total estrogens are about 72-99, 118-161, 539-1104, for 2-4, 4-7 year-old residential children, and adults, respectively. The lowest MOST for children of 2-4 years old result from comparing total of estrogens with the lowest TTC value (0.15 μg/person/day) (MOS=3.5). The MOS values suggest that the individual and total estrogens that may present in milk are not causing a health risk for the local residents, including young children. PMID:24910459

  10. Effects of estrogen on genioglossal muscle contractile properties and fiber-type distribution in chronic intermittent hypoxia rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hua; Huang, Yan; Shao, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by recurrent sleep-induced collapse of the upper airway. Genioglossus is an important pharyngeal dilator muscle that helps to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The effect of female hormones on pharyngeal dilator muscle activity may be one possible explanation for the differences observed in the prevalence of OSAHS between genders. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of estrogen on genioglossus activity in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Eight-wk-old female rats were ovariectomized or sham-operated, received 5-wk of estrogen replacement therapy, and/or were exposed to CIH. The contractile properties of the genioglossus were measured. ATPase staining was performed to determine the per cent fiber-type distribution and to measure the cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers. Myosin heavy chain phenotypes were determined by gel electrophoresis. Chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the contractile properties of the genioglossus muscle, decreased the CSA of type IIA fibers, and decreased the proportion of myosin heavy chain IIA, and ovariectomy exacerbated this effect. However, estrogen replacement can partially reverse the effect of CIH in ovariectomized rats. It is concluded that a low female hormone level and CIH may increase fatigue and alter genioglossus structure and function, and may compromise the maintenance of upper airway patency, while estrogen may help to reverse this effect. PMID:20121931

  11. An Ethanolic Extract of Black Cohosh Causes Hematological Changes but Not Estrogenic Effects in Female Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Cora, Michelle C.; Witt, Kristine L.; Granville, Courtney A.; Hejtmancik, Milton; Fomby, Laurene; Knostman, Katherine A.; Ryan, Michael J.; Newbold, Retha; Smith, Cynthia; Foster, Paul M.; Vallant, Molly K.; Stout, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Black cohosh rhizome (Actaea racemosa) is used as a remedy for pain and gynecological ailments; modern preparations are commonly sold as ethanolic extracts available as dietary supplements. Black cohosh was nominated to the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for toxicity testing due to its widespread use and lack of safety data. Several commercially available black cohosh extracts (BCE) were characterized by the NTP, and one with chemical composition closest to formulations available to consumers was used for all studies. Female B6C3F1/N mice and Wistar Han rats were given 0, 15 (rats only), 62.5 (mice only), 125, 250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day BCE by gavage for 90 days starting at weaning. BCE induced dose-dependent hematological changes consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia and increased frequencies of peripheral micronucleated red blood cells (RBC) in both species. Effects were more severe in mice, which had decreased RBC counts in all treatment groups and increased micronucleated RBC at doses above 125 mg/kg. Dose-dependent thymus and liver toxicity was observed in rats but not mice. No biologically significant effects were observed in other organs. Puberty was delayed 2.9 days at the highest treatment dose in rats; a similar magnitude delay in mice occurred in the 125 and 250 mg/kg groups but not at the higher doses. An additional uterotrophic assay conducted in mice exposed for 3 days to 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 500 mg/kg found no estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity. These are the first studies to observe adverse effects of BCE in rodents. PMID:22687605

  12. An ethanolic extract of black cohosh causes hematological changes but not estrogenic effects in female rodents.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Feliciano, Minerva; Cora, Michelle C; Witt, Kristine L; Granville, Courtney A; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Fomby, Laurene; Knostman, Katherine A; Ryan, Michael J; Newbold, Retha; Smith, Cynthia; Foster, Paul M; Vallant, Molly K; Stout, Matthew D

    2012-09-01

    Black cohosh rhizome (Actaea racemosa) is used as a remedy for pain and gynecological ailments; modern preparations are commonly sold as ethanolic extracts available as dietary supplements. Black cohosh was nominated to the National Toxicology Program (NTP) for toxicity testing due to its widespread use and lack of safety data. Several commercially available black cohosh extracts (BCE) were characterized by the NTP, and one with chemical composition closest to formulations available to consumers was used for all studies. Female B6C3F1/N mice and Wistar Han rats were given 0, 15 (rats only), 62.5 (mice only), 125, 250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day BCE by gavage for 90 days starting at weaning. BCE induced dose-dependent hematological changes consistent with a non-regenerative macrocytic anemia and increased frequencies of peripheral micronucleated red blood cells (RBC) in both species. Effects were more severe in mice, which had decreased RBC counts in all treatment groups and increased micronucleated RBC at doses above 125 mg/kg. Dose-dependent thymus and liver toxicity was observed in rats but not mice. No biologically significant effects were observed in other organs. Puberty was delayed 2.9 days at the highest treatment dose in rats; a similar magnitude delay in mice occurred in the 125 and 250 mg/kg groups but not at the higher doses. An additional uterotrophic assay conducted in mice exposed for 3 days to 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 500 mg/kg found no estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity. These are the first studies to observe adverse effects of BCE in rodents. PMID:22687605

  13. CrkL is a co-activator of estrogen receptor alpha that enhances tumorigenic potential in cancer.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Renjini Ambika; Nirmala, Lini; Murali, Megha; Laloraya, Malini

    2011-09-01

    Signaling via estrogen receptor (ER) occurs by interacting with many proteins. Nuclear interactome analysis of ERα in an embryo implantation model revealed the association of chicken tumor virus no. 10 regulator of kinase like (CrkL) with ERα, which was further validated by mammalian two-hybrid assay as well as coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Mutation in LPALL motif of CrkL disrupts the ERα-CrkL interaction and its transactivation potential, thereby suggesting that the interaction is mediated via its single ER binding motif, Leu-Pro-Ala-Leu-Leu (LXXLL) motif in the sarcoma homology (SH)2 domain. CrkL deletion constructs of SH2 domain target to the nucleus due to presence of nuclear localization signal. Interestingly, the SH2-SH3 (N terminal) construct shows an increased transactivation potential like CrkI. Weak interaction capability of mutated ERα-Y538F with CrkL validates that CrkL interacts with ERα via its YDLL motif at Tyr 541. In an attempt to understand the physiological relevance of this association, we investigated the impact on cell proliferation using a cancer model, because events associated in the process of pregnancy and cancer are analogous. Also, overexpression of CrkL is frequently associated with tumorigenesis. However, its significance in hormone-regulated cancers still remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate that association of ERα and CrkL directly enhances the tumorigenic potential of CrkL, thus pointing to its role in cell proliferation. In human endometrial cancers, we observed a strong association between ERα and CrkL levels. Thus, the molecular signaling set off by ERα and CrkL association may have a central role in pregnancy and cancer, two events which share parallels in growth, invasion, and immune tolerance. PMID:21700719

  14. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE PARAMETERS IN A MARINE FISH, TAUTOGOLABRUS ADSPERSUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estradiol (E2), ethynylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E4) are steroidal estrogens that are released into the aquatic environment in sewage treatment effluent. To determine whether these estrogens could impact reproductive parameters in a model fish species, actively spawning male ...

  15. [The environmental estrogen bisphenol A and its effects on the human organism].

    PubMed

    Lazúrová, Z; Lazúrová, I

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), i.e. an environmental estrogen, is one of the most common synthetic chemicals which enter the human body from plastic bottles, food packaging and dental materials. As many studies show, a longterm exposure to BPA is connected with a risk of developing various diseases and endocrine disorders. Exposure to BPA, particularly during development, increases the risk of breast carcinoma, obesity, diabetes mellitus type 2 as well as reproductive disorders. It also increases the risk of testes carcinoma and prostate carcinoma. Some isolated studies support also the relation between BPA and the risk of cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases. The effect of other xenoestrogens, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, phthalates, dioxins, as well as others, is similar or perhaps even stronger. For the time being, however, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms of these relations are not quite clear and require further experimental, but especially human, studies. PMID:23808741

  16. Nutritional dependence of the effect of estrogen on fat cell lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Valette, A; Mercier, L; Benoit, V; Meignen, J M; Boyer, J

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynylestradiol (EE) at low dose (1.2 micrograms/day) injected s.c. for 10 days on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in fat cells of female rats fed a standard diet (5% lipid, 49.5% glucid, 23.5% protein) as a function of the nutritional state. EE caused a 150% increase in LPL activity in the fed state, and a 65% decrease in the fasting state, resulting in a large increment in the physiological feeding-fasting difference. Feeding the rats a diet supplemented with 20% lard reversed the estrogen-dependent LPL increase in the fed state. Under all experimental conditions, EE caused a depletion of fat stores and an increase in plasma levels of triacyglycerol. PMID:3669666

  17. Differential Effect of Phosphorylation-Defective Survivin on Radiation Response in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Larson, Richard; Xu, Wei; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a key member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, and is considered a promising therapeutic target due to its universal overexpression in cancers. Survivin is implicated in cellular radiation response through its role in apoptosis, cell division, and DNA damage response. In the present study, analysis of publically available data sets showed that survivin gene expression increased with breast cancer stage (p < 0.00001) and was significantly higher in estrogen receptor-negative cancers as compared to estrogen receptor-positive cancers (p = 9e-46). However, survivin was prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive tumors (p = 0.03) but not in estrogen receptor-negative tumors (p = 0.28). We assessed the effect of a survivin dominant-negative mutant on colony-formation (2D) and mammosphere-formation (3D) efficiency, and radiation response in the estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 and estrogen receptor-negative SUM149 breast cancer cell lines. The colony-formation efficiency was significantly lower in the dominant-negative survivin-transduced cells versus control MCF7 cells (0.42 vs. 0.58, p < 0.01), but it was significantly higher in dominant-negative population versus control-transduced SUM149 cells (0.29 vs. 0.20, p < 0.01). A similar, non-significant, trend in mammosphere-formation efficiency was observed. We compared the radiosensitivity of cells stably expressing dominant-negative survivin with their controls in both cell lines under 2D and 3D culture conditions following exposure to increasing doses of radiation. We found that the dominant-negative populations were radioprotective in MCF7 cells but radiosensitive in SUM149 cells compared to the control-transduced population; further, Taxol was synergistic with the survivin mutant in SUM149 but not MCF7. Our data suggests that survivin modulation influences radiation response differently in estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes, warranting further

  18. Anticancer effect of metformin on estrogen receptor-positive and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyoung; Lee, Jiyun; Jang, Soon Young; Kim, Chungyeul; Choi, Yoojin; Kim, Aeree

    2016-05-01

    Acquisition of tamoxifen resistance (TR) during anti-estrogenic therapy using tamoxifen is a major obstacle in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. As a biguanide derivative, metformin is commonly used to treat type II diabetes. It has recently emerged as a potential anticancer agent. The objective of the present study was to investigate the anticancer activity of metformin in relation to ERα expression and its signaling pathway in ERα-positive MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 breast cancer cells as well as TR MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Metformin inhibited both protein and mRNA levels of ERα in the presence or absence of estrogen (E2) in the MCF-7, TR MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 cells. Metformin repressed E2-inducible estrogen response element (ERE) luciferase activity, protein levels and mRNA levels of E2/ERα-regulated genes [including c-Myc, cyclin D1, progesterone receptor (PR) and pS2] to a greater degree than tamoxifen, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation of MCF-7, TR MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that one of the anticancer mechanisms of metformin could be attributable to the repression of expression and transcriptional activity of ERα. Metformin may be a good therapeutic agent for treating ERα-positive breast cancer by inhibiting the expression and function of ERα. In addition, metformin may be useful to treat tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. PMID:26986571

  19. Exercise training is an effective alternative to estrogen supplementation for improving glucose homeostasis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Tara L; Ritchie, Kerry L; Davies, Sarah; Hamilton, Melissa J; Cervone, Daniel T; Dyck, David J

    2015-01-01

    The irreversible loss of estrogen (specifically 17-β-estradiol; E2) compromises whole-body glucose tolerance in women. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is frequently prescribed to treat estrogen deficiency, but has several deleterious side effects. Exercise has been proposed as an HRT substitute, however, their relative abilities to treat glucose intolerance are unknown. Thirty ovariectomized (OVX) and 20 SHAM (control) rats underwent glucose tolerance tests (GTT) 10 weeks post surgery. Area under the curve (AUC) for OVX rats was 60% greater than SHAM controls (P = 0.0005). Rats were then randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: SHAM sedentary (sed) or exercise (ex; 60 min, 5×/weeks), OVX sed, ex, or E2 (28 μg/kg bw/day) for 4 weeks. OVX ex rats experienced a ∼45% improvement in AUC relative to OVX sed rats, whereas OVX E2 underwent a partial reduction (17%; P = 0.08). Maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in soleus and EDL was not impaired in OVX rats, or augmented with exercise or E2. Akt phosphorylation did not differ in soleus, EDL, or liver of any group. However, OVX ex and OVX E2 experienced greater increases in p-Akt Ser473 in VAT and SQ tissues compared with SHAM and OVX sed groups. Mitochondrial markers CS, COXIV, and core1 were increased in soleus posttraining in OVX ex rats. The content of COXIV was reduced by 52% and 61% in SQ of OVX sed and E2 rats, compared to SHAM controls, but fully restored in OVX ex rats. In summary, exercise restores glucose tolerance in OVX rats more effectively than E2. This is not reflected by alterations in muscle maximal insulin response, but increased insulin signaling in adipose depots may underlie whole-body improvements. PMID:26603453

  20. Joint effects of heterogeneous estrogenic chemicals in the E-screen--exploring the applicability of concentration addition.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elisabete; Rajapakse, Nissanka; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Ermler, Sibylle; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    In the last few years, significant advances have been made toward understanding the joint action of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). A number of studies have demonstrated that the combined effects of different types of EDCs (e.g., estrogenic, antiandrogenic, or thyroid-disrupting agents) can be predicted by the model of concentration addition (CA). However, there is still limited information on the effects of mixtures of large numbers of chemicals with varied structural features, which are more representative of realistic human exposure scenarios. The work presented here aims at filling this gap. Using a breast cancer cell proliferation assay (E-Screen), we assessed the joint effects of five mixtures, containing between 3 and 16 estrogenic agents, including compounds as diverse as steroidal hormones (endogenous and synthetic), pesticides, cosmetic additives, and phytoestrogens. CA was employed to predict mixture effects, which were then compared with experimental outcomes. The effects of two of the mixtures tested were additive, being accurately predicted by CA. However, for the three other mixtures, CA slightly overestimated the experimental observations. In view of these results, we hypothesized that the deviations were due to increased metabolism of steroidal estrogens in the mixture setting. We investigated this by testing the impact of two such mixtures on the activation and expression of steroidal estrogen metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP 1B1, and CYP 3A4. Activation of CYP 1B1 and, consequently, a reduction in the levels of steroidal estrogens in the mixture could contribute to the shortfall from the additivity prediction that we observed. PMID:21561885

  1. The effect of low estrogen state on serotonin transporter function in mouse hippocampus: a behavioral and electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Paul P; Paranavitane, Udeni T; Chavez, Carolina; Gogos, Andrea; Jones, Margaret; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2005-12-01

    Defects in serotonergic transmission, including serotonin transporter (SERT) function, have been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and some aspects of schizophrenia. The sex steroid hormone estrogen is known to modulate functional SERT activity, but whether it is up- or down-regulated is unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a low estrogen state in mice on the behavioral effect of drugs acting through the SERT, serotonin uptake kinetics and SERT density in the hippocampus. We compared control mice, ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice and aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice that are unable to produce estrogen. Fluoxetine treatment, but not fenfluramine treatment, significantly increased prepulse inhibition (PPI), a measure of sensorimotor gating, in C57BL/6J mice. The effect of fluoxetine was greater in OVX compared to sham-operated mice. In ArKO and J129 wild-type mice, fluoxetine increased PPI to the same extent while fenfluramine increased PPI more in ArKO mice compared to controls. Measurement of the time-course for diffusion and reuptake of exogenous serotonin in the CA3 region of the hippocampus showed that, in OVX mice, the fluoxetine-induced slowing of signal decay after application of serotonin was enhanced when compared to sham-operated controls. Similarly, in ArKO mice, the effect of fluoxetine was enhanced, suggesting that SERT function was greater than in J129 wild-type controls. Measurement of SERT density by [3H]-citalopram autoradiography, revealed an 18% decrease in hippocampus of OVX mice compared to intact controls. SERT density was also significantly reduced in nucleus accumbens (26%) but not in other regions, such as the raphe nuclei. Together, these results suggest that a low estrogen state increases SERT activity in the hippocampus despite an apparent reduction in SERT density. The behavioral consequences of these changes depend on the model of estrogen state used. PMID:16298349

  2. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the

  3. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4. PMID:20855884

  4. The effect of estrogen on the early cytotoxic response to IB virus infection in hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Nii, Takahiro; Isobe, Naoki; Yoshimura, Yukinori

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the egg-laying phase and estrogen affect the induction of cytotoxic cells in response to avian infectious bronchitis (IB) virus at early stage of infection in the oviduct. Attenuated IB virus (aIBV group) or its vehicle (control group) was introduced to the oviductal magnum lumen of White Leghorn hens in the laying and molting phase, as well as molting hens injected with estradiol benzoate (M-EB hens) or corn oil (M-oil hens). Oviductal isthmus and uterus were collected 24h after injection. The frequency of CD8(+) and TCRγδ(+) T cells expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, followed by image analysis. The expression of the genes of toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), natural killer cell receptor (BNK), cytotoxic substances (granzyme, perforin), and cytokines (CXCL12, CX3CL1, and IFNγ) were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The frequency of CD8(+) and TCRγδ(+) T cells in the isthmus, and CD8(+) cells in the uterus was significantly higher in the aIBV group compared to the control group of laying and M-EB hens. The expression of all the genes examined in this study in the isthmus, and CX3CL1 and IFNγ expression in the uterus was significantly higher in the aIBV group in the laying and M-EB hens. These results suggested that infection with IB virus causes an immune response involving the influx of cytotoxic cells and upregulation of cytokines in the isthmus and uterus at early stage of infection. This response was stronger during the laying phase compared to the molting phase, probably due to the effect of estrogen. PMID:25593044

  5. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  6. The Estrogenic Content of Rodent Diets, Bedding, Cages, and Water Bottles and Its Effect on Bisphenol A Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thigpen, Julius E; Setchell, Kenneth DR; Kissling, Grace E; Locklear, Jacqueline; Caviness, Gordon F; Whiteside, Tanya; Belcher, Scott M; Brown, Nadine M; Collins, Bradley J; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Camacho, Luísa; Adsit, Floyd G; Grant, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The lowest observed adverse effect level for bisphenol A (BPA) in mice and rats is currently poorly defined due to inconsistent study designs and results in published studies. The objectives of the current study were to (1) compare the estrogenic content of rodent diets, bedding, cages, and water bottles to evaluate their impact on the estrogenic activity of BPA and (2) review the literature on BPA to determine the most frequently reported diets, beddings, cages, and water bottles used in animal studies. Our literature review indicated that low-dose BPA animal studies have inconsistent results and that factors contributing to this inconsistency are the uses of high-phytoestrogen diets and the different routes of exposure. In 44% (76 of 172) of all reports, rodents were exposed to BPA via the subcutaneous route. Our literature review further indicated that the type of diet, bedding, caging, and water bottles used in BPA studies were not always reported. Only 37% (64 of 172) of the reports described the diet used. In light of these findings, we recommend the use of a diet containing low levels of phytoestrogen (less than 20 µg/g diet) and metabolizable energy (approximately 3.1 kcal/g diet) and estrogen-free bedding, cages, and water bottles for studies evaluating the estrogenic activity of endocrine-disrupting compounds such as BPA. The oral route of BPA exposure should be used when results are to be extrapolated to humans. PMID:23562095

  7. Biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level in response to exposure to environmental estrogen-like chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Palangat, M.; Chen, Chiao-Wen

    1997-01-01

    Estrogen-like chemical are unique because the estrogenic property of these compounds allows them to act like sex hormones. Whether weak or strong, the estrogenic response of a chemical, if not overcome, will add extra estrogenic burden to the system. At elevated doses, natural estrogens and environmental estrogen-like chemicals are known to produce adverse effects. The source of extra or elevated concentration of estrogen could be either endogenous or exogenous. The potential of exposure for humans and animals to environmental estrogen-like chemicals is high. Only a limited number of estrogen-like compounds, such as diethylstibestrol (DES), bisphenol A, nonylphenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), have been used to assess the biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level. This article is focused mainly on DES-related observations. In addition to estrogenic effects, environmental estrogen-like chemical produce multiple and multitype genetic and/or nongenetic hits. Exposure of Syrian hamsters to stilbene estrogen (DES) produces several changes in the nuclei of target organ for carcinogenesis (kidney). Exposure of Noble rats to DES also produces several changes in the mammary gland. Some other estrogenic compounds may also follow a similar pattern of effects to DES, because these compounds alter cell cycle kinetics, produce telomeric associations, and produce chromosomal aberrations. It should be noted that a particular or multitype hit(s) will depend upon the nature of the environmental estrogen-like chemical. The role of individual attack leading to a particular change is not clear at this stage. Consequences of these multitypes of attack on the nuclei of cells could be (1) nuclear toxicity/cell death; (2) repair of all the hits and then acting as normal cells; or (3) sustaining most of the hits and acting as unstable cells. 180 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Longitudinal assessment of the effects of estrogen on blood pressure and cardiovascular autonomic activity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2013-01-01

    1. Published data concerning the effect of ovarian hormones on hemodynamic variability is contradictory. This study employed, for the first time, radiotelemetric hemodynamic monitoring to investigate the long-term effects of chronic estrogen depletion and repletion on cardiovascular autonomic control and arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in female rats. 2. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and +dP/dtmax of arterial pressure (an estimate of myocardial contractility) were monitored in sham-operated (SO), ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen-replaced OVX rats (OVXE2) for 16 weeks. Cardiovascular autonomic control and baroreflexes were assessed by frequency domain analysis of interbeat intervals (IBI) and systolic BP (SBP). 3. Compared with SO rats, OVX rats exhibited (i) no changes in BP, (ii) short-lived decreases in HR, and (iii) sustained reductions in dP/dtmax of arterial pressure. The high frequency (HF, 0.75-3 Hz) and low frequency (LF, 0.25-0.75 Hz) components of spectral power of IBI were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, by ovariectomy. An increase in the IBILF/HF ratio in OVX rats suggested a shift in the cardiac sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic dominance. Index α, the spectral index of spontaneous BRS, was reduced by OVX. 4. Estrogen replacement caused significant reductions in BP and HR and reversed OVX-induced changes in +dP/dtmax of arterial pressure and cardiac autonomic activity. The LF oscillations of SBP were reduced in OVX-E2 treated rats, suggesting a reduction in vascular sympathetic tone by estrogen. 5. These findings highlight the importance of long-term estrogen therapy in rectifying the detrimental cardiovascular and baroreflex influences caused by depletion of ovarian hormones. PMID:19413598

  9. Overexpression or knockdown of rat tryptophan hyroxylase-2 has opposing effects on anxiety behavior in an estrogen-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hiroi, Ryoko; McDevitt, Ross A.; Morcos, Paul A.; Clark, Michael S.; Neumaier, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that chronic estrogen treatment increases tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2) mRNA in the caudal dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and this increase was associated with decreased anxiety. The present study explored the interaction of estrogen and targeted, bidirectional manipulation of TpH2 expression in the caudal DRN by knockdown or viral overexpression, to decrease or increase tryptophan hydroxylase expression respectively, on anxiety behavior. Rats were ovariectomized and replaced with empty or estradiol capsules (OVX, OVX/E, respectively). Animals received microinfusions of either antisense TpH2 or control morpholino oligonucleotides into caudal DRN and were later tested in the open field test. A separate group of animals were microinfused with TpH2-GFP or GFP-only herpes simplex viral vectors into caudal DRN and tested in the open field. The bidirectional impact of manipulations on TpH2 expression was confirmed using a combination of quantitative protein and mRNA measurements; TpH2 expression changes were limited to discrete subregions of DRN that were targeted by the manipulations. Estradiol decreased anxiety in all behavioral measures. In the OVX/E group, TpH2 knockdown significantly decreased time spent in the center of the open field, but not in the OVX group, suggesting that TpH2 knockdown reduced the anxiolytic effects of estrogen. Conversely, TpH2 overexpression in the OVX group mimicked the effects of estrogen, as measured by increased time spent in the center of the open field. These results suggest that estrogen and TpH2 in the caudal DRN have a critical interaction in regulating anxiety-like behavior. PMID:21182901

  10. Synthesis and Functional Analysis of Novel Bivalent Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.; Yelton, Sharon M.; Lou, Dingyuan; Watt, David S.; Noonan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The steroid hormone estrogen plays a critical role in female development and homeostasis. Estrogen mediates its effects through binding and activation of specific estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ), members of the steroid/nuclear receptor family of ligand-induced transcription factors. Due to their intimate roles in genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways, these hormones and their receptors have been also implicated in the pathologies of a variety of cancers and metabolic disorders, and have been the target of large therapeutic development efforts. The binding of estrogen to its respective receptors initiates a cascade of events that include receptor dimerization, nuclear localization, DNA binding and recruitment of co-regulatory protein complexes. In this manuscript, we investigate the potential for manipulating steroid receptor gene expression activity through the development of bivalent steroid hormones that are predicted to facilitate hormone receptor dimerization events. Data are presented for the development and testing of novel estrogen dimers, linked through their C-17 moiety, that can activate estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated transcription events with efficacy and potency equal to or greater than that of ERα’s cognate ligand, 17β-estradiol. These bivalent estrogen structures open the door to the development of a variety of steroid therapeutics that could dramatically impact future drug development in this area. PMID:20685325

  11. Sex-Dependent Influence of Endogenous Estrogen in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Kirsty M.; Wright, Audrey F.; Duggan, Nicholas; Rowlands, David J.; Hussey, Martin J.; Roberts, Sonia; Fullerton, Josephine; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Thomas, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension is greater in women, suggesting estrogens may play a role in the disease pathogenesis. Experimentally, in males, exogenously administered estrogen can protect against pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, in models that display female susceptibility, estrogens may play a causative role. Objectives: To clarify the influence of endogenous estrogen and sex in PH and assess the therapeutic potential of a clinically available aromatase inhibitor. Methods: We interrogated the effect of reduced endogenous estrogen in males and females using the aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, in two models of PH: the hypoxic mouse and Sugen 5416/hypoxic rat. We also determined the effects of sex on pulmonary expression of aromatase in these models and in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Measurements and Main Results: Anastrozole attenuated PH in both models studied, but only in females. To verify this effect was caused by reduced estrogenic activity we confirmed that in hypoxic mice inhibition of estrogen receptor α also has a therapeutic effect specifically in females. Female rodent lung displays increased aromatase and decreased bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Id1 expression compared with male. Anastrozole treatment reversed the impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 pathway in females. Increased aromatase expression was also detected in female human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells compared with male. Conclusions: The unique phenotype of female pulmonary arteries facilitates the therapeutic effects of anastrozole in experimental PH confirming a role for endogenous estrogen in the disease pathogenesis in females and suggests aromatase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. PMID:24956156

  12. Paired box gene 2 is associated with estrogen receptor α in ovarian serous tumors: Potential theory basis for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ma, Haifen

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Paired box gene (PAX)2 is activated by estradiol via estrogen receptor (ER)α in breast and endometrial cancer. The expression of PAX2 was restricted to ovarian serous tumors and only one case was positive in borderline mucinous tumor in our previous study. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the expression of ERα in 58 cases of ovarian serous tumors, including 30 serous cystadenomas, 16 borderline serous cystadenomas, 12 serous carcinomas and 67 cases of ovarian mucinous tumors, including 29 mucinous cystadenoma, 23 borderline mucinous cystadenoma and 15 mucinous carcinoma, which were the same specimens with detection of PAX2 expression. The results demonstrated that ERα was expressed in 10% (3/30) of serous cystadenomas, 62.5% (10/16) borderline serous cystadenomas and 66.7% (8/12) serous carcinomas. The expression of ERα in borderline serous cystadenomas and serous carcinomas were significantly higher compared with that in serous cystadenomas (P<0.01). ERα was detected in 3.4% (1/29) mucinous cystadenoma, 26.1% (6/23) borderline mucinous cystadenoma and only 6.7% (1/15) mucinous carcinoma. Furthermore, a scatter plot of the expression of PAX2 and ERα revealed a linear correlation between them in ovarian serous tumors (P<0.0001). With few positive results, no correlation was determined in ovarian mucinous tumors. It was demonstrated that PAX2 is associated with ERα in ovarian serous tumors, and this may become a potential theory basis for targeted therapy for ovarian serous tumors. Further research is required to determine how PAX2 and ERα work together, and the role of targeted therapy in ovarian serous tumors. PMID:27446571

  13. Differential effects of estrogen and medroxyprogesterone on basal and stress-induced growth hormone release, IGF-1 levels, and cellular immunity in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Malarkey, W B; Burleson, M; Cacioppo, J T; Poehlmann, K; Glaser, R; Kiecolt-Glaser, J K

    1997-10-01

    We evaluated the influence of continual estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) as presently practiced by postmenopausal women with conjugated estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF-1) axis and cellular immunity. Thirty-nine postmenopausal women were evaluated (12 on no replacement, 14 on estrogen only, and 13 on estrogen and MPA). In the women receiving only conjugated estrogens, increased GH levels and decreased IGF-1 levels were found, which replicated previous research and probably reflected estrogen inhibition of hepatic IGF-1 production with a secondary increase in GH release because of reduced feedback inhibition. In women taking both MPA and estrogen, GH was increased and the previously observed estrogen induced decrease in IGF-1 levels was inhibited. In order to determine the influence of ERT on psycho-social stress-induced GH release, math (mental stress) and speech (social stress) challenges were utilized, and they produced significant increases in heart rate in all three groups. The heart rate following stress was significantly enhanced by estrogen replacement. These stressors also led to increased GH secretion in the women taking estrogen and MPA, but not in the other two groups. Gonadal steroids and GH can influence cellular immunity. We observed that ERT in both groups was associated with significantly enhanced lymphocyte responsiveness to the T-cell mitogens phytohemaglutinin (PHA) and Conconavalin A (Con A), and basal GH levels were correlated with the PHA response in the estrogen only group. ERT did not influence natural killer (NK) cell activity. We also found significant differences in the steady-state expression of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with increased antibody titers in the women in the estrogen only group and lower antibody titers in the MPA plus estrogen group. GH levels were correlated with EBV antibody titers in the estrogen plus MPA group. This study supports the

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of 17β-Estradiol Rely on Estrogen Receptor Membrane Initiated Signals

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchetti, Marco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Besides its crucial role in many physiological events, 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts protective effects in the central nervous system. The E2 effects are not restricted to the brain areas related with the control of reproductive function, but rather are widespread throughout the developing and the adult brain. E2 actions are mediated through estrogen receptors (i.e., ERα and ERβ) belonging to the nuclear receptor super-family. As members of the ligand-regulated transcription factor family, classically, the actions of ERs in the brain were thought to mediate only the E2 long-term transcriptional effects. However, a growing body of evidence highlighted rapid, membrane initiated E2 effects in the brain that are independent of ER transcriptional activities and are involved in E2-induced neuroprotection. The aim of this review is to focus on the rapid effects of E2 in the brain highlighting the specific role of the signaling pathway(s) of the ERβ subtype in the neuroprotective actions of E2. PMID:22493583

  15. Distribution and seasonal variation of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and N-nitrosodimethylamine formation potential in the Huangpu River, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei; Chen, Ling

    2014-05-01

    Detection of estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in drinking water has led to rising concerns. There are, however, a paucity of studies on the distribution and seasonal variation of NDMA and NDMA formation potential (NDMA-FP) in natural waters, especially in China. For EDCs, limited studies have investigated the distribution and seasonal variation of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), technical-nonylphenols (t-NP), and bisphenol A (BPA) in Shanghai. In this study, water samples were collected from 11 sampling sites along the Huangpu River in 2012. The distribution and seasonal variation of EDCs, NDMA, and NDMA-FP were investigated. The results showed that all of the 11 sampling sites were contaminated by the target compounds. Compared with E2 and EE2, higher E1 and E3 concentrations were usually detected in the Huangpu River. The values of 17β-estradiol equivalents (EEQ) suggest a high possibility of endocrine effects on exposed organisms in the Huangpu River. NDMA-FP and t-NP were the dominant contaminants among the eight target compounds. The detection rates of the target compounds and their concentrations were both higher in dry seasons than in wet seasons. Higher concentrations of target compounds were observed in urban sampling sites near drainage outlets, and also in suburban sampling sites where intensive livestock farming and farmlands were located. PMID:25079632

  16. Combinations of Physiologic Estrogens with Xenoestrogens Alter ERK Phosphorylation Profiles in Rat Pituitary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Watson, Cheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Estrogens are potent nongenomic phospho-activators of extracellular-signal–regulated kinases (ERKs). A major concern about the toxicity of xenoestrogens (XEs) is potential alteration of responses to physiologic estrogens when XEs are present simultaneously. Objectives We examined estrogen-induced ERK activation, comparing the abilities of structurally related XEs (alkylphenols and bisphenol A) to alter ERK responses induced by physiologic concentrations (1 nM) of estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and estriol (E3). Methods We quantified hormone/mimetic-induced ERK phosphorylations in the GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary cell line using a plate immunoassay, comparing effects with those on cell proliferation and by estrogen receptor subtype-selective ligands. Results Alone, these structurally related XEs activate ERKs in an oscillating temporal pattern similar (but not identical) to that with physiologic estrogens. The potency of all estrogens was similar (active between femtomolar and nanomolar concentrations). XEs potently disrupted physiologic estrogen signaling at low, environmentally relevant concentrations. Generally, XEs potentiated (at the lowest, subpicomolar concentrations) and attenuated (at the highest, picomolar to 100 nM concentrations) the actions of the physiologic estrogens. Some XEs showed pronounced nonmonotonic responses/inhibitions. The phosphorylated ERK and proliferative responses to receptor-selective ligands were only partially correlated. Conclusions XEs are both imperfect potent estrogens and endocrine disruptors; the more efficacious an XE, the more it disrupts actions of physiologic estrogens. This ability to disrupt physiologic estrogen signaling suggests that XEs may disturb normal functioning at life stages where actions of particular estrogens are important (e.g., development, reproductive cycling, pregnancy, menopause). PMID:20870566

  17. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future. PMID:26780699

  18. Effect of cadmium on the interaction of 17beta-estradiol with the rainbow trout estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Nesatyy, Victor J; Ammann, Adrian A; Rutishauser, Barbara V; Suter, Marc J F

    2006-02-15

    The widely reported negative effects of xenoestrogens on the endocrine system of aquatic organisms gave raise to public concern and led to a number of screening and testing initiatives on the international level. Recent studies indicated that not only organic chemicals but also certain heavy metals, including cadmium, can mimic the effects of the endogenous estrogen receptor agonist 17beta-estradiol (E2) and lead to estrogen receptor activation. While the effects of cadmium on the endocrine system and its potential to harm living organisms are no longer in doubt, the exact mode of action is still essentially unknown. In the present study we utilized the rainbow trout ER alpha ligand binding domain (rtER-LBD) fused to glutathione-S-transferase, to study noncovalent interactions between cadmium and the rtER-LBD. ICP-MS data showed that the Cd uptake by the rtER-LBD was strongly pH-dependent. Previous results showing that Cd shields Cys residues of the rtER-LBD against chemical modification, and competitive binding experiments reported here provide insights into the specificity of the interaction of cadmium with the ER hormone binding cavity. It could, for instance, be shown that most of the cadmium adsorbed to the protein could be released into solution either under denaturing conditions, or by stripping from the protein surface using EDTA at physiological conditions. Competitive binding experiments using radio-labeled estradiol showed that, in contrast to previously published data, E2 has an affinity an order of magnitude higher for the ER than for Cd. ICP-MS experiments showed that, despite its higher affinity, increasing E2 concentrations were unable to replace Cd from the rtER-LBD that had been preequilibrated with Cd. These findings were independently confirmed by the [3H]-E2 binding assay. At the same time both ICP-MS and the [3H]-E2 binding assay showed that increasing Cd concentrations not only lead to a decrease in the specific estradiol binding, but also to

  19. Tibolone, transdermal estradiol or oral estrogen-progestin therapies: effects on circulating allopregnanolone, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Genazzani, A D; Bernardi, F; Casarosa, E; Pieri, M; Palumbo, M; Picciarelli, G; Gabbanini, M; Luisi, M; Genazzani, A R

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in healthy postmenopausal women, the impact of tibolone (2.5 mg), transdermal estradiol (50 microg) (TE) and different oral estrogen-progestin regimens, conjugated equine estrogens (0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg) (CEE + MPA) and estradiol (2 mg) plus norethisterone acetate (1 mg) (E2 + NETA) on circulating estradiol, progesterone, allopregnanolone, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. Blood samples were collected before and after 1, 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment in 85 postmenopausal women. Estradiol levels increased (p < 0.001) in the TE, CEE + MPA and E2 + NETA groups after 1 month of therapy, but did not change in the tibolone group during the entire follow-up period. Both E2 + NETA and tibolone treatments induced an increase in progesterone levels (p < 0.05) after 1 year of therapy. Allopregnanolone levels showed an increase in all estrogen-based groups, being significant after 3 months of treatment (p < 0.01). Patients receiving tibolone showed a significant increase in allopregnanolone levels at 3 months (p < 0.05), but lower than in the other groups. Cortisol levels decreased significantly in the TE and CEE + MPA groups after 6 months and 12 months of treatment, respectively. Neither tibolone nor E2 + NETA treatments modified circulating cortisol levels. DHEA levels significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after 6 months of TE or estrogen-progestin therapies independently of the presence or the type of progestin used. In contrast, DHEA remained stable throughout the 12 months of treatment with tibolone. The increase of allopregnanolone, a steroid with sedative and anxiolytic properties, in response to these different treatments could underlie, at least in part, the central effects that hormone replacement therapy and tibolone have on anxiety, mood and behavior. Unlike estrogen-based therapy, tibolone treatment did not reduce the DHEA milieu in the menopause, and thus did not enhance the

  20. Estrogen Therapy Has No Long-Term Effect on Cognition in Younger Postmenopausal Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk to cognitive function years after treatment. A randomized clinical trial of estrogen therapy in younger postmenopausal ... 1998 at 40 academic research centers. Participants were randomized to one of two groups: women who had ...

  1. Estrogens stimulate serotonin neurons to inhibit binge-like eating in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuehong; Xu, Pingwen; Oyola, Mario G; Xia, Yan; Yan, Xiaofeng; Saito, Kenji; Zou, Fang; Wang, Chunmei; Yang, Yongjie; Hinton, Antentor; Yan, Chunling; Ding, Hongfang; Zhu, Liangru; Yu, Likai; Yang, Bin; Feng, Yuxin; Clegg, Deborah J; Khan, Sohaib; DiMarchi, Richard; Mani, Shaila K; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    Binge eating afflicts approximately 5% of US adults, though effective treatments are limited. Here, we showed that estrogen replacement substantially suppresses binge-like eating behavior in ovariectomized female mice. Estrogen-dependent inhibition of binge-like eating was blocked in female mice specifically lacking estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Administration of a recently developed glucagon-like peptide-1-estrogen (GLP-1-estrogen) conjugate designed to deliver estrogen to GLP1 receptor-enhanced regions effectively targeted bioactive estrogens to the DRN and substantially suppressed binge-like eating in ovariectomized female mice. Administration of GLP-1 alone reduced binge-like eating, but not to the same extent as the GLP-1-estrogen conjugate. Administration of ERα-selective agonist propylpyrazole triol (PPT) to murine DRN 5-HT neurons activated these neurons in an ERα-dependent manner. PPT also inhibited a small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current; blockade of the SK current prevented PPT-induced activation of DRN 5-HT neurons. Furthermore, local inhibition of the SK current in the DRN markedly suppressed binge-like eating in female mice. Together, our data indicate that estrogens act upon ERα to inhibit the SK current in DRN 5-HT neurons, thereby activating these neurons to suppress binge-like eating behavior and suggest ERα and/or SK current in DRN 5-HT neurons as potential targets for anti-binge therapies. PMID:25157819

  2. New insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of estrogen on cholesterol gallstone formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helen H.; Liu, Min; Clegg, Deborah J.; Portincasa, Piero; Wang, David Q.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have found that at all ages women are twice as likely as men to form cholesterol gallstones, and this gender difference begins since puberty and continues through the childbearing years, which highlight the importance of female sex hormones. Estrogen is a crucial hormone in human physiology and regulates a multitude of biological processes. The actions of estrogen have traditionally been ascribed to two closely related classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) and ESR2. Recent studies have revealed that the increased risk for cholesterol gallstones in women vs. men is related to differences in how the liver metabolizes cholesterol in response to estrogen. A large number of human and animal studies have proposed that estrogen increases the risk of developing cholesterol gallstones by increasing the hepatic secretion of biliary cholesterol, which, in turn, leads to an increase in cholesterol saturation of bile. Furthermore, it has been identified that hepatic ESR1, but not ESR2, plays a major role in cholesterol gallstone formation in mice in response to high doses of 17β-estradiol. The mechanisms mediating estrogen’s action has become more complicated with the recent identification of a novel estrogen receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), a member of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence for the lithogenic actions of estrogen through ESR1 and discuss the cellular and physiological actions of GPR30 in estrogen-dependent processes and the relationship between GPR30 and classical ESR1 on gallstone formation. PMID:19589396

  3. The in vitro estrogenic activities of triclosan and triclocarban.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyu; Du, Guizhen; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jialei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2014-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), as broad spectrum antibacterial agents, are distributed widely in the environment and humans. Most studies have focused on their distribution and biodegradation, but the endocrine-disrupting effects of these chemicals, especially their estrogenic effects, are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the estrogenic effects of TCS and TCC using a series of in vitro assays, including the ER reporter gene assay in the CV-1 cells, E-screen assay and evaluation of estrogen-responsive genes in the MCF-7 cells. The tested concentrations of TCS and TCC were both from 1 × 10(-9) to 1 × 10(-6)  M. Results showed that TCS and TCC exerted estrogenic activities by inducing luciferase activities in an ER reporter gene assay, promoting the proliferation of the MCF-7 cells, up-regulating the expression of pS2 and down-regulating ERα expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the MCF-7 cells. We further found that TCS and TCC could alter the expression of multiple microRNAs (mir-22, mir-206 and mir-193b) in the MCF-7 cells, which would help understand the mechanisms of their estrogenic effects on regulating the expression of ERα. In brief, our results demonstrated the potential estrogenic effects and profiled in vitro data for further risk assessment of TCS and TCC. PMID:24740835

  4. The use of a whole animal biophotonic model as a screen for the angiogenic potential of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential for normal vascular growth and development during wound repair. VEGF is estrogen responsive and capable of regulating its own receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Several agricultural pesticides (e.g., methoxychlor)...

  5. Characterizing the Estrogenic Potential of 1060 Environmental Chemicals by Assessing Growth Kinetics in T47D Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to detect environmental chemicals that pose a risk of endocrine disruption, high-throughput screening (HTS) tests capable of testing thousands of environmental chemicals are needed. Alteration of estrogen signaling has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effec...

  6. Selective estrogen receptor-beta (SERM-beta) compounds modulate raphe nuclei tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1) mRNA expression and cause antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Clark, J A; Alves, S; Gundlah, C; Rocha, B; Birzin, E T; Cai, S-J; Flick, R; Hayes, E; Ho, K; Warrier, S; Pai, L; Yudkovitz, J; Fleischer, R; Colwell, L; Li, S; Wilkinson, H; Schaeffer, J; Wilkening, R; Mattingly, E; Hammond, M; Rohrer, S P

    2012-11-01

    Estrogen acts through two molecularly distinct receptors termed estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) which bind estradiol with similar affinities and mediate the effects of estrogen throughout the body. ERα plays a major role in reproductive physiology and behavior, and mediates classic estrogen signaling in such tissues as the uterus, mammary gland, and skeleton. ERβ, however, modulates estrogen signaling in the ovary, the immune system, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and hypothalamus, and there is some evidence that ERβ can regulate ERα activity. Moreover, ERβ knockout studies and receptor distribution analyses in the CNS suggest that this receptor may play a role in the modulation of mood and cognition. In recent years several ERβ-specific compounds (selective estrogen receptor beta modulators; SERM-beta) have become available, and research suggests potential utility of these compounds in menopausal symptom relief, breast cancer prevention, diseases that have an inflammatory component, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as modulation of mood, and anxiety. Here we demonstrate an antidepressant-like effect obtained using two SERM-beta compounds, SERM-beta1 and SERM-beta2. These compounds exhibit full agonist activity at ERβ in a cell based estrogen response element (ERE) transactivation assay. SERM-beta1 and 2 are non-proliferative with respect to breast as determined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell-based assay and non-proliferative in the uterus as determined by assessing the effects of SERM-beta compounds on immature rat uterine weight and murine uterine weight. In vivo SERM-beta1 and 2 are brain penetrant and display dose dependent efficacy in the murine dorsal raphe assays for induction of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA and progesterone receptor protein. These compounds show activity in the murine forced swim test and promote hippocampal neurogenesis acutely in rats. Taken

  7. Effects of the environmental estrogenic contaminants bisphenol A and 17α-ethinyl estradiol on sexual development and adult behaviors in aquatic wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji K; Deem, Sharon L; Holliday, Dawn K; Jandegian, Caitlin M; Kassotis, Christopher D; Nagel, Susan C; Tillitt, Donald E; Vom Saal, Frederick S; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S

    2015-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including the mass-produced component of plastics, bisphenol A (BPA) are widely prevalent in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Many aquatic species, such as fish, amphibians, aquatic reptiles and mammals, are exposed daily to high concentrations of BPA and ethinyl estradiol (EE2), estrogen in birth control pills. In this review, we will predominantly focus on BPA and EE2, well-described estrogenic EDCs. First, the evidence that BPA and EE2 are detectable in almost all bodies of water will be discussed. We will consider how BPA affects sexual and neural development in these species, as these effects have been the best characterized across taxa. For instance, such chemicals have been in many cases reported to cause sex-reversal of males to females. Even if these chemicals do not overtly alter the gonadal sex, there are indications that several EDCs might demasculinize male-specific behaviors that are essential for attracting a mate. In so doing, these chemicals may reduce the likelihood that these males reproduce. If exposed males do reproduce, the concern is that they will then be passing on compromised genetic fitness to their offspring and transmitting potential transgenerational effects through their sperm epigenome. We will thus consider how diverse epigenetic changes might be a unifying mechanism of how BPA and EE2 disrupt several processes across species. Such changes might also serve as universal species diagnostic biomarkers of BPA and other EDCs exposure. Lastly, the evidence that estrogenic EDCs-induced effects in aquatic species might translate to humans will be considered. PMID:25277515

  8. Effects of the environmental estrogenic contaminants bisphenol A and 17α-ethinyl estradiol on sexual development and adult behaviors in aquatic wildlife species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhandari, Ramji K.; Deem, Sharon L.; Holliday, Dawn K.; Jandegian, Caitlin M.; Kassotis, Christopher D.; Nagel, Susan C.; Tillitt, Donald E.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S.

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including the mass-produced component of plastics, bisphenol A (BPA) are widely prevalent in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Many aquatic species, such as fish, amphibians, aquatic reptiles and mammals, are exposed daily to high concentrations of BPA and ethinyl estradiol (EE2), estrogen in birth control pills. In this review, we will predominantly focus on BPA and EE2, well-described estrogenic EDCs. First, the evidence that BPA and EE2 are detectable in almost all bodies of water will be discussed. We will consider how BPA affects sexual and neural development in these species, as these effects have been the best characterized across taxa. For instance, such chemicals have been in many cases reported to cause sex-reversal of males to females. Even if these chemicals do not overtly alter the gonadal sex, there are indications that several EDCs might demasculinize male-specific behaviors that are essential for attracting a mate. In so doing, these chemicals may reduce the likelihood that these males reproduce. If exposed males do reproduce, the concern is that they will then be passing on compromised genetic fitness to their offspring and transmitting potential transgenerational effects through their sperm epigenome. We will thus consider how diverse epigenetic changes might be a unifying mechanism of how BPA and EE2 disrupt several processes across species. Such changes might also serve as universal species diagnostic biomarkers of BPA and other EDCs exposure. Lastly, the evidence that estrogenic EDCs-induced effects in aquatic species might translate to humans will be considered.

  9. Effects of the chemically synthesized flavanone 7-(O-prenyl)naringenin-4'-acetate on the estrogen signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Georg; Vollmer, Günter; Schwab, Pia; Tischer, Sandra; Metz, Peter; Zierau, Oliver

    2007-10-01

    The flavanone naringenin is known to possess only weak estrogenic properties, but some of its derivatives such as 8-prenylnaringenin are potent phytoestrogens. The aim of this study was to further clarify structure-function relationships of flavanones regarding their estrogenic or antiestrogenic properties by characterizing the new chemically synthesized naringenin derivative 7-(O-prenyl)naringenin-4'-acetate (7-O-PN). A yeast based reporter gene assay and MVLN cells, a MCF-7-derived cell line that possesses a luciferase reporter gene under the control of a vitellogenin estrogen responsive element, were used to investigate estrogenic actions of 7-O-PN in vitro. Estradiol (E2) has been used as a positive control. Subsequently a 3-day rat uterotrophic assay was performed to test for estrogenic effects. In addition, mRNA expression of estrogen sensitive genes in the uteri of these rats was measured using real time rtPCR. While E2 leads to a strong dose dependent signal in the yeast based reporter gene assay and in MVLN cells, 7-O-PN shows mild E2 antagonistic properties at concentrations 10(-8) and 10(-7)M, E2 agonistic properties at 10(-6) and 10(-5)M in MVLN cells and no effects on the yeast based system. In contrast to E2 treatment, 7-O-PN treatment did not increase uterus wet weight compared to the negative control. These findings are supported by mRNA expression studies of proliferation markers. Additionally, mRNA expression studies of estrogen regulated genes revealed very strong antiestrogenic properties of 7-O-PN regarding regulation of complement C3 expression while some estrogenic effects could be observed on the expression of estrogen receptor beta, clusterin and possibly on progesterone receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:17631998

  10. Metabolic Effect of Estrogen Receptor Agonists on Breast Cancer Cells in the Presence or Absence of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Anissa; Čuperlović-Culf, Miroslava; Touaibia, Mohamed; Ouellette, Rodney J.; Surette, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic shift is one of the major hallmarks of cancer development. Estrogen receptor (ER) activity has a profound effect on breast cancer cell growth through a number of metabolic changes driven by its effect on transcription of several enzymes, including carbonic anhydrases, Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, and oncogenes including HER2. Thus, estrogen receptor activators can be expected to lead to the modulation of cell metabolism in estrogen receptor positive cells. In this work we have investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol, an ER activator, and ferulic acid, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, as well as ER activator, in the absence and in the presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide on the metabolism of MCF7 cells and MCF7 cells, stably transfected to express HER2 (MCF7HER2). Metabolic profiles were studied using 1D and 2D metabolomic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments, combined with the identification and quantification of metabolites, and the annotation of the results in the context of biochemical pathways. Overall changes in hydrophilic metabolites were largest following treatment of MCF7 and MC7HER2 cells with 17β-estradiol. However, the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide had the largest effect on the profile of lipophilic metabolites. PMID:27240414

  11. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, D A; Shappell, N W; Billey, L O; Bermudez, D S; Wilson, V S; Kolpin, D W; Perkins, S D; Evans, N; Foreman, W T; Gray, J L; Shipitalo, M J; Meyer, M T

    2013-06-15

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentrations of estrogens in streams from these manures also are of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with livestock operations were sampled by discrete samples (n = 38) or by time-integrated polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS, n = 19). Samples were analyzed for estrogens by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS(2)) and estrogenic activity was assessed by three bioassays: Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), T47D-KBluc Assay, MCF-7 Estrogenicity Screen (E-Screen). Samples were collected from 19 streams within small (≈ 1-30 km(2)) watersheds in 12 U.S. states representing a range of hydrogeologic conditions, dominated by: dairy (3), grazing beef (3), feedlot cattle (1); swine (5); poultry (3); and 4 areas where no livestock were raised or manure was applied. Water samples were consistently below the United Kingdom proposed Lowest Observable Effect Concentration for 17β-estradiol in fish (10 ng/L) in all watersheds, regardless of land use. Estrogenic activity was often higher in samples during runoff conditions following a period of manure application. Estrone was the most commonly detected estrogen (13 of 38 water samples, mean 1.9, maximum 8.3 ng/L). Because of the T47D-KBluc assay's sensitivity towards estrone (1.4 times 17β-estradiol) it was the most sensitive method for detecting estrogens, followed by the E-Screen, GC-MS(2), and YES. POCIS resulted in more frequent detections of estrogens than discrete water samples across all sites, even when applying the less-sensitive YES bioassay to the POCIS extracts. PMID:23623470

  12. Bioassay of estrogenicity and chemical analyses of estrogens in streams across the United States associated with livestock operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.; Shappell, Nancy W.; Billey, L.O.; Bermudez, Dietrich S.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Perkins, Stephanie D.; Evans, Nicola; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; Shipitalo, J.M.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Animal manures, used as a nitrogen source for crop production, are often associated with negative impacts on nutrient levels in surface water. The concentrations of estrogens in streams from these manures also are of concern due to potential endocrine disruption in aquatic species. Streams associated with livestock operations were sampled by discrete samples (n = 38) or by time-integrated polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS,n = 19). Samples were analyzed for estrogens by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSM2) and estrogenic activity was assessed by three bioassays: Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), T47D-KBluc Assay, MCF-7 Estrogenicity Screen (E-Screen). Samples were collected from 19 streams within small (∼1-30 km2) watersheds in 12 U.S. states representing a range of hydrogeologic conditions, dominated by: dairy (3), grazing beef (3), feedlot cattle (1); swine (5); poultry (3); and 4 areas where no livestock were raised or manure was applied. Water samples were consistently below the United Kingdom proposed Lowest Observable Effect Concentration for 17b-estradiol in fish (10 ng/L) in all watersheds, regardless of land use. Estrogenic activity was often higher in samples during runoff conditions following a period of manure application. Estrone was the most commonly detected estrogen (13 of 38 water samples, mean 1.9, maximum 8.3 ng/L). Because of the T47D-KBluc assay’s sensitivity towards estrone (1.4 times 17β-estradiol) it was the most sensitive method for detecting estrogens, followed by the E-Screen, GC-MS2, and YES. POCIS resulted in more frequent detections of estrogens than discrete water samples across all sites, even when applying the less-sensitive YES bioassay to the POCIS extracts.

  13. FIELD DEPLOYABLE TECHNIQUES TO MONITOR EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS THROUGHOUT THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE OF WILD BIRDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern about potential for endocrine disrupting chemicals to interfere with normal breeding behaviors of wildlife prompted this study of effects of exposure to environmental estrogens during the breeding cycle of wild birds. The house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) was selected as...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE ASSAY FOR VITELLOGENIN TO MONITOR ESTROGEN-LIKE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmental contaminants have the potential to disrupt endocrine systems of wildlife and humans resulting in impairment of reproductive and other systems. A subset of these contaminants may initiate these effects by binding to the estrogen receptor. In oviparous vertebrate...

  15. Anabolic effect of the traditional Chinese medicine compound tanshinone IIA on myotube hypertrophy is mediated by estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Piwen; Soukup, Sebastian Tobias; Hegevoss, Jonas; Ngueu, Sandrine; Kulling, Sabine Emma; Diel, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle loss during menopause is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes type II and the general development of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, strategies combining nutritional and training interventions to prevent muscle loss are necessary. Danshen Si Wu is a traditional Chinese medicine used for menopausal complains. One of the main compounds of Danshen Si Wu is tanshinone IIA. Physiological effects of tanshinone IIA have been described as being mediated via the estrogen receptor. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine its tissue specific ERα- and ERβ-mediated estrogenic activity, to investigate its antiestrogenic properties, and, particularly, to study estrogen receptor-mediated biological responses to tanshinone IIA on skeletal muscle cells. The purity of tanshinone IIA was analyzed by LC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. ERα/ERβ-mediated activity was dose-dependently analyzed in HEK 239 cells transfected with ERα or ERβ expression vectors and respective reporter genes. Androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antiestrogenic properties of tanshinone IIA were analyzed in a yeast reporter gene assay. The effects of tanshinone IIA on proliferation and cell cycle distribution were investigated in ERα positive T47D breast cancer cells. The ability of tanshinone IIA to stimulate estrogen receptor-mediated myotube hypertrophy was studied in C2C12 myoblastoma cells. Our data show that tanshinone IIA is quite potent at stimulating ERα and ERβ reporter genes with comparable efficacy. Tanshinone IIA displayed antiestrogenic and also antiandrogenic properties in a yeast reporter gene assay. It inhibited the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by suppressing proliferation and arresting the cells in G0/G1. Tanshinone IIA also stimulated the hypertrophy of C2C12 myotubes via an estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism. Summarizing our results, tanshinone IIA can be characterized as an estrogen receptor partial agonist with antiandrogenic properties. It

  16. Short-Term Effect of Estrogen on Human Bone Marrow Fat.

    PubMed

    Limonard, Eelkje J; Veldhuis-Vlug, Annegreet G; van Dussen, Laura; Runge, Jurgen H; Tanck, Michael W; Endert, Erik; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Fliers, Eric; Hollak, Carla E; Akkerman, Erik M; Bisschop, Peter H

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow fat, an unique component of the bone marrow cavity increases with aging and menopause and is inversely related to bone mass. Sex steroids may be involved in the regulation of bone marrow fat, because men have higher bone marrow fat than women and clinical observations have suggested that the variation in bone marrow fat fraction is greater in premenopausal compared to postmenopausal women and men. We hypothesized that the menstrual cycle and/or estrogen affects the bone marrow fat fraction. First, we measured vertebral bone marrow fat fraction with Dixon Quantitative Chemical Shift MRI (QCSI) twice a week during 1 month in 10 regularly ovulating women. The vertebral bone marrow fat fraction increased 0.02 (95% CI, 0.00 to 0.03) during the follicular phase (p = 0.033), and showed a nonsignificant decrease of 0.02 (95% CI, -0.01 to 0.04) during the luteal phase (p = 0.091). To determine the effect of estrogen on bone marrow fat, we measured vertebral bone marrow fat fraction every week for 6 consecutive weeks in 6 postmenopausal women before, during, and after 2 weeks of oral 17-β estradiol treatment (2 mg/day). Bone marrow fat fraction decreased by 0.05 (95% CI, 0.01 to 0.09) from 0.48 (95% CI, 0.42 to 0.53) to 0.43 (95% CI, 0.34 to 0.51) during 17-β estradiol administration (p < 0.001) and increased again after cessation. During 17-β estradiol administration the bone formation marker procollagen type I N propeptide (P1NP) increased (p = 0.034) and the bone resorption marker C-terminal crosslinking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTx) decreased (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we described the variation in vertebral bone marrow fat fraction among ovulating premenopausal women. And among postmenopausal women, we demonstrated that 17-β estradiol rapidly reduces the marrow fat fraction, suggesting that 17-β estradiol regulates bone marrow fat independent of bone mass. PMID:25982922

  17. Metabonomic profiling in studying anti-osteoporosis effects of strontium fructose 1,6-diphosphate on estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis in rats by GC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Li, Xiaotian; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Di; Wang, Guangji; A, Jiye; Sun, Jianguo; Li, Jing; Liu, Yinhui; Wang, Yonglu; Ying, Hanjie

    2013-10-15

    A novel strontium salt compound strontium fructose 1, 6-diphosphate (FDP-Sr) has been proved to have highly effective for bone loss via dual effects of stimulating bone formation and suppressing bone absorption. In the present study, metabolomic approach was used to identify and study potential biomarkers associated with the effect and safety of FDP-Sr. The metabolomic profiles of bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency in a rat model was described to attain a system-level map of the shift on the metabolic response in plasma using GC/TOF-MS, after FDP-Sr was orally administered at the dose of 110 mg/kg/day for the prevention and 220 mg/kg/day for the treatment. Meanwhile, bone turnover biomarkers and bone mineral density were investigated to identify the specific changes of potential anti-osteoporosis effects of FDP-Sr. The differences in metabolic profiles between osteoporosis rats and FDP-Sr treated rats were well observed by the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to the MS spectra. Some metabolites including homocysteine, arachidonic acid, alanine, and hydroxyproline, which significantly changed during osteoporosis progression could be effectively reversed after FDP-Sr therapy. Of course some metabolites such as uric acid, glyceric acid, octadecadienoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, and hexadecanoic acid were not found to reverse significantly after FDP-Sr administration. These results delineated the FDP-Sr effects-related metabolic alterations in the bone loss rats, suggesting that metabonomic analysis could provide helpful information on the new potential biomarkers relating to the mechanism of anti-osteoporosis action and side effects of FDP-Sr against estrogen deficiency induced bone loss. PMID:23872379

  18. Effects of estrogens, clomiphene and castration in a male transsexual with as compared to those without hypersecretion of gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Goh, H H; Ratnam, S S

    1990-06-01

    A 24-year-old male-to-female transsexual with hypersecretion of gonadotropins was studied with regard to his recovery from sex steroid hormone treatment before his sex change operation and the effects of castration, clomiphene tests and estrogens on the hypersecretion of gonadotropins. Computer-assisted tomography and X-ray results indicated that the possibility that the hypersecretion of gonadotropins was not associated with a pituitary adenoma could not be ruled out. After a period of recovery from previous sex steroid hormone therapy, inappropriately high FSH and LH levels in the presence of normal male levels of testosterone and estradiol were found. The latter normal levels failed to suppress both the FSH and LH levels. From the clomiphene challenge tests carried out before and after the sex reassignment operation, the estradiol infusion studies and treatment with ethinyl estradiol after the sex reassignment operation, it appears that the hypersecretion of gonadotropins was responsive to the negative feedback effect of estrogens. However, the sensitivity, especially that of FSH, was very attenuated. Even after 23 weeks of ethinyl estradiol treatment FSH remained well above the upper limit for normal men. The results showed that before his sex change operation the hypersecretion of gonadotropins in the patient was probably under autonomous control. Testicular factors at normal male concentrations appear to have a minimal negative feedback effect on the hypersecretion of gonadotropins. However, hypersecretion of gonadotropins can be suppressed by prolonged exposure to estrogens. PMID:2118708

  19. Icaritin ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury mainly because of the antioxidative function through estrogen-like effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Jin, Xiang; Lv, Hao; Li, Jing; Xu, Wen; Qian, Hai-hua; Yin, Zhengfeng

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of icaritin, an active ingredient extracted from Epimedium Sagittatum (Sieb. et Zucc.), on CCl4-induced liver injury and its possible mechanisms. Hepatocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley male rats were treated with 3 mmol/L CCl4 for 24 h to induce acute liver cell injury, then icaritin (0.1, 1, 10, 100 μmol/L, respectively) was administrated to the cells, and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182,780 (1 μmol/L) was co-treated with 10 μmol/L icaritin. Biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), malondialdehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and cell apoptosis were detected to evaluate the injury degree. Protein expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by western blot. Icaritin alleviated CCl4-induced liver cell injury in a concentration-dependent manner and 10 μmol/L was the optimal concentration. Icaritin (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced activities of ALT, AST in cell culture medium and MDA level of the impaired liver cells, but increased the intercellular SOD activity. The apoptotic rate of the impaired liver cells was also decreased by icaritin (10 μmol/L) treatment. Icaritin might exert antioxidative and anti-apoptotic functions via estrogen-like effect, as the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was significantly increased, while protein expressions of L-FABP and PPAR-α were markedly increased, and this function was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182,780 efficiently. Icaritin may be a promising drug candidate for acute liver injury benefiting from the antioxidative and anti-apoptotic functions via estrogen-like effect. PMID:25148823

  20. Diabetes impairs the vascular effects of aldosterone mediated by G protein-coupled estrogen receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nathanne S.; Cau, Stêfany B. A.; Silva, Marcondes A. B.; Manzato, Carla P.; Mestriner, Fabíola L. A. C.; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone promotes non-genomic effects in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and G protein-coupled estrogen receptors (GPER). GPER activation is associated with beneficial/protective effects in the vasculature. Considering that vascular dysfunction plays a major role in diabetes-associated complications, we hypothesized that the beneficial effects mediated by vascular GPER activation, in response to aldosterone, are decreased in diabetes. Mesenteric resistance arteries from female, 14–16 weeks-old, control and diabetic (db/db) mice were used. Phenylephrine (PhE)-induced contractions were greater in arteries from db/db vs. control mice. Aldosterone (10 nM) increased maximal contractile responses to PhE in arteries from control mice, an effect elicited via activation of GPER. Although aldosterone did not increase PhE responses in arteries from db/db mice, blockade of GPER, and MR decreased PhE-induced contractile responses in db/db mesenteric arteries. Aldosterone also reduced the potency of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation in arteries from both control and db/db mice via MR-dependent mechanisms. GPER antagonism further decreased ACh-induced relaxation in the control group, but did not affect ACh responses in the diabetic group. Aldosterone increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation in arteries from control and db/db mice by a GPER-dependent mechanism. GPER, but not MR, gene, and protein expression, determined by RT-PCR and immunoblotting/immunofluorescence assays, respectively, were increased in arteries from db/db mice vs. control arteries. These findings indicate that aldosterone activates both vascular MR and GPER and that the beneficial effects of GPER activation are decreased in arteries from diabetic animals. Our results further elucidate the mechanisms by which aldosterone influences vascular function and contributes to vascular dysfunction in diabetes. Financial

  1. Estrogenic Effects of Several BPA Analogs in the Developing Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Vaillant, Colette; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Charlier, Thierry D.; Kah, Olivier; Coumailleau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Important set of studies have demonstrated the endocrine disrupting activity of Bisphenol A (BPA). The present work aimed at defining estrogenic-like activity of several BPA structural analogs, including BPS, BPF, BPAF, and BPAP, on 4- or 7-day post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larva as an in vivo model. We measured the induction level of the estrogen-sensitive marker cyp19a1b gene (Aromatase B), expressed in the brain, using three different in situ/in vivo strategies: (1) Quantification of cyp19a1b transcripts using RT-qPCR in wild type 7-dpf larva brains exposed to bisphenols; (2) Detection and distribution of cyp19a1b transcripts using in situ hybridization on 7-dpf brain sections (hypothalamus); and (3) Quantification of the cyp19a1b promoter activity in live cyp19a1b-GFP transgenic zebrafish (EASZY assay) at 4-dpf larval stage. These three different experimental approaches demonstrated that BPS, BPF, or BPAF exposure, similarly to BPA, significantly activates the expression of the estrogenic marker in the brain of developing zebrafish. In vitro experiments using both reporter gene assay in a glial cell context and competitive ligand binding assays strongly suggested that up-regulation of cyp19a1b is largely mediated by the zebrafish estrogen nuclear receptor alpha (zfERα). Importantly, and in contrast to other tested bisphenol A analogs, the bisphenol AP (BPAP) did not show estrogenic activity in our model. PMID:27047331

  2. Estrogenic Effects of Several BPA Analogs in the Developing Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Cano-Nicolau, Joel; Vaillant, Colette; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Charlier, Thierry D; Kah, Olivier; Coumailleau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Important set of studies have demonstrated the endocrine disrupting activity of Bisphenol A (BPA). The present work aimed at defining estrogenic-like activity of several BPA structural analogs, including BPS, BPF, BPAF, and BPAP, on 4- or 7-day post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larva as an in vivo model. We measured the induction level of the estrogen-sensitive marker cyp19a1b gene (Aromatase B), expressed in the brain, using three different in situ/in vivo strategies: (1) Quantification of cyp19a1b transcripts using RT-qPCR in wild type 7-dpf larva brains exposed to bisphenols; (2) Detection and distribution of cyp19a1b transcripts using in situ hybridization on 7-dpf brain sections (hypothalamus); and (3) Quantification of the cyp19a1b promoter activity in live cyp19a1b-GFP transgenic zebrafish (EASZY assay) at 4-dpf larval stage. These three different experimental approaches demonstrated that BPS, BPF, or BPAF exposure, similarly to BPA, significantly activates the expression of the estrogenic marker in the brain of developing zebrafish. In vitro experiments using both reporter gene assay in a glial cell context and competitive ligand binding assays strongly suggested that up-regulation of cyp19a1b is largely mediated by the zebrafish estrogen nuclear receptor alpha (zfERα). Importantly, and in contrast to other tested bisphenol A analogs, the bisphenol AP (BPAP) did not show estrogenic activity in our model. PMID:27047331

  3. Design of pathway preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L; Carlson, Kathryn E; Mayne, Christopher G; Shaul, Philip W; Korach, Kenneth S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles that support desirable activities for menopausal women, such as metabolic and vascular protection, but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. We report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained "pathway preferential estrogens" (PaPEs), which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear PaPEs, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  4. Morphologic effects of estrogen stimulation on 3D MCF-7 microtissues.

    PubMed

    Vantangoli, Marguerite M; Wilson, Shelby; Madnick, Samantha J; Huse, Susan M; Boekelheide, Kim

    2016-04-25

    In the development of human cell-based assays, 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture models are intriguing as they are able to bridge the gap between animal models and traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. Previous work has demonstrated that MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells cultured in a 3D scaffold-free culture system self-assemble and develop into differentiated microtissues that possess a luminal space. Exposure to estradiol for 7 days decreased lumen formation in MCF-7 microtissues, altered microtissue morphology and altered expression of genes involved in estrogen signaling, cell adhesion and cell cycle regulation. Exposure to receptor-specific agonists for estrogen receptor alpha, estrogen receptor beta and g-protein coupled estrogen receptor resulted in unique, receptor-specific phenotypes and gene expression signatures. The use of a differentiated scaffold-free 3D culture system offers a unique opportunity to study the phenotypic and molecular changes associated with exposure to estrogenic compounds. PMID:26921789

  5. Lack of (anti-) androgenic or estrogenic effects of three pyrethroids (esfenvalerate, fenvalerate, and permethrin) in the Hershberger and uterotrophic assays.

    PubMed

    Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Yamada, Tomoya; Ose, Keiko; Sunami, Osamu; Kamita, Yusuke; Okuno, Yasuyoshi; Seki, Takaki; Nakatsuka, Iwao

    2002-04-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids are among the most common pesticides and insecticides currently in use worldwide. Recently, chemicals classified as synthetic pyrethroids are suspected as being endocrine disrupting chemicals. However, no study has been conducted to assess their potential hormonal activities using in vivo test specifically focused on endocrine disruption. In the present study, we evaluated the interaction of three pyrethroids (esfenvalerate, fenvalerate, and permethrin) with androgen receptor (AR)- and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated mechanisms using in vivo short-term assays. While internationally standardized protocols for the Hershberger and uterotrophic assays have not yet been fully developed, both are widely used and are being considered by OECD as short-term screening assays for hormonal activity. A 5-day Hershberger assay using castrated male rats measures agonistic and androgenic ability of the test chemicals to AR of several accessory glands/tissues (the ventral prostate, dorsolateral prostate, seminal vesicles with coagulating glands, and levator ani plus bulbocavernosus muscles). Esfenvalerate (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg/day), fenvalerate (20, 40, or 80 mg/kg/day), or permethrin (25, 50, or 75 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage for 5 days to castrated male Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats (1 week after the castration, 11 weeks of age) with or without coadministration of 0.25 mg/kg/day testosterone propionate (subcutaneous injection on the dorsal surface). The highest dose levels tested for each chemical were considered the maximum level that could be used without causing excessive systemic toxicity. None of esfenvalerate, fenvalerate, and permethrin showed any androgenic or antiandrogenic effects. Reference control of p,p'-DDE and methyltestosterone (100 mg/kg/day) provided significant effects in this assay protocol. Potential effects of these pyrethroids mediated through the ER were evaluated by means of 3-day uterotrophic assay using ovariectomized Crj

  6. Gene Alterations of Ovarian Cancer Cells Expressing Estrogen Receptors by Estrogen and Bisphenol A Using Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Se-Hyung; Yi, Bo-Rim

    2011-01-01

    Since endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may interfere with the endocrine system(s) of our body and have an estrogenicity, we evaluated the effect(s) of bisphenol A (BPA) on the transcriptional levels of altered genes in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by microarray and real-time polymerase-chain reaction. In this study, treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) or BPA increased mRNA levels of E2-responsive genes related to apoptosis, cancer and cell cycle, signal transduction and nucleic acid binding etc. In parallel with their microarray data, the mRNA levels of some altered genes including RAB31_MEMBER RAS ONCOGENE FAMILY (U59877), CYCLIN D1 (X59798), CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 (U37022), IGF-BINDING PROTEIN 4 (U20982), and ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE (NM_000479) were significantly induced by E2 or BPA in this cell model. These results indicate that BPA in parallel with E2 induced the transcriptional levels of E2-responsive genes in an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BG-1 cells. In conclusion, these microarray and real-time polymerase-chain reaction results indicate that BPA, a potential weak estrogen, may have estrogenic effect by regulating E2-responsive genes in ER-positive BG-1 cells and BG-1 cells would be the best in vitro model to detect these estrogenic EDCs. PMID:21826169

  7. The Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein on Steroidogenesis and Estrogen Receptor Expression in Porcine Granulosa Cells of Large Follicles.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Anna; Sadowska, Agnieszka; Orlowska, Karina; Jablonska, Monika; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2015-01-01

    Genistein is a biologically active isoflavone with estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity which can be found in a variety of soy products. Since in pigs' diet soy is the main source of protein, genistein may affect the reproductive/endocrine systems in these animals. Genistein has been shown to alter porcine ovarian and adrenal steroidogenesis but the mechanism of this action is still not clear. It is known that genistein binds to both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), although it has a higher affinity to ERβ. Moreover, this phytoestrogen was demonstrated to posses the activity of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor. The aim of the study was to examine the in vitro effects of genistein on: (1) progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) secretion by porcine luteinized granulosa cells harvested from large follicles, and (2) the mRNA and protein expression of ERa and ERβ in these cells. In addition, to verify the role of PTK-dependent mechanisms possibly involved in genistein biological action, we tested the effects of lavendustin C, the nonsteroidal PTK inhibitor, on granulosa cell steroidogenesis. Genistein significantly inhibited P4 and did not affect E2 secretion by porcine luteinized granulosa cells isolated from large follicles. Lavendustin C did not affect basal steroids secretion by examined cells. Genistein did not alter ERa but increased ERβ mRNA levels in the cultured porcine granulosa cells. In contrast to medium follicles, the expression of ERβ protein was unaffected by genistein in granulosa cells of large follicles. To conclude, the soy phytoestrogen genistein acts directly on the porcine ovary to decrease progesterone production and to increase the expression of ERβ mRNA. Moreover, genistein-induced changes in follicular steroidogenesis and granulosal sensitivity to estrogens in pigs may depend on maturity of the follicles. PMID:26255463

  8. Neonatal Androgenization Exacerbates Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Adult Rats, an Effect Abrogated by Estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ellefson, Whitney M.; Lakner, Ashley M.; Hamilton, Alicia; McKillop, Iain H.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Steuerwald, Nury M.; Huet, Yvette M.; Schrum, Laura W.

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) affects millions of people worldwide and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. However, fewer than 10% of heavy drinkers progress to later stages of injury, suggesting other factors in ALD development, including environmental exposures and genetics. Females display greater susceptibility to the early damaging effects of ethanol. Estrogen (E2) and ethanol metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, CYP450) are implicated in sex differences of ALD. Sex steroid hormones are developmentally regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which controls sex-specific cycling of gonadal steroid production and expression of hepatic enzymes. The aim of this study was to determine if early postnatal inhibition of adult cyclic E2 alters ethanol metabolizing enzyme expression contributing to the development of ALD in adulthood. An androgenized rat model was used to inhibit cyclic E2 production. Control females (Ctrl), androgenized females (Andro) and Andro females with E2 implants were administered either an ethanol or isocalorically-matched control Lieber-DeCarli diet for four weeks and liver injury and CYP450 expression assessed. Androgenization exacerbated the deleterious effects of ethanol demonstrated by increased steatosis, lipid peroxidation, profibrotic gene expression and decreased antioxidant defenses compared to Ctrl. Additionally, CYP2E1 expression was down-regulated in Andro animals on both diets. No change was observed in CYP1A2 protein expression. Further, continuous exogenous administration of E2 to Andro in adulthood attenuated these effects, suggesting that E2 has protective effects in the androgenized animal. Therefore, early postnatal inhibition of cyclic E2 modulates development and progression of ALD in adulthood. PMID:22206017

  9. Estrogenic Impact on Cardiac Ischemic/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-02-01

    The increase in cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome incidence following the onset of menopause has highlighted the role of estrogen as a cardiometabolic protective agent. Specifically regarding the heart, estrogen induced an improvement in cardiac function, preserved calcium homeostasis, and inhibited the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The beneficial effects of estrogen in relation to cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, such as reduced infarction and ameliorated post-ischemic recovery, have also been shown. Nevertheless, controversial findings exist and estrogen therapy is reported to be related to a higher rate of thromboembolic events and atrial fibrillation in post-menopausal women. Therefore, greater clarification is needed to evaluate the exact potential of estrogen use in cases of cardiac I/R injury. This article reviews the effects of estrogen, in both acute and chronic treatment, and collates the studies with regard to their in vivo, in vitro, or clinical trial settings in cases of cardiac I/R injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:26786980

  10. High fat diet decreases beneficial effects of estrogen on serotonin-related gene expression in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Flowers, Matthew; Shapiro, Robert A; Colman, Ricki J; Abbott, David H; Levine, Jon E

    2015-04-01

    suppressed urocortin 1 (UCN1; stresscopin) expression (p=0.045) but E treatment had no effect. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) was different due to treatment across the groups (p=0.028). MAO-A was increased in the E+HFD group (p<0.01) whereas previous studies showed E suppressed MAO-A in macaques. The serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), the serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1A), estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and progestin receptor (PR) expressions were not different between groups. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) was undetectable. In summary, the data indicate that important actions of hormone therapy in the serotonin system may be lost in the context of a HFD. PMID:25542371

  11. High Fat Diet Decreases Beneficial Effects of Estrogen on Serotonin-Related Gene Expression in Marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Flowers, Matthew; Shapiro, Robert A.; Colman, Ricki J; Abbott, David H; Levine, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    suppressed urocortin 1 (UCN1; stresscopin) expression (p=0.045) but E treatment had no effect. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) was different due to treatment across the groups (p=0.028). MAO-A was increased in the E+HFD group (p<0.01) whereas previous studies showed E suppressed MAO-A in macaques. The serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), the serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1A), estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) and progestin receptor (PR) expressions were not different between groups. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) was undetectable. In summary, the data indicate that important actions of hormone therapy in the serotonin system may be lost in the context of a HFD. PMID:25542371

  12. Estrogen mediation of hormone responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Castracane, V Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The roles of estrogens extend from the regulation of reproduction to other functions involved in control of metabolism, fluid balance, as well as gastrointestinal, lung, and brain function, with a strong effect on other hormones that subsequently alter the physiology of multiple tissues. As such, alteration of endogenous estrogens across the menstrual cycle, or from oral contraception and estrogen replacement therapy, can affect these tissues. Due to the important effects that estrogens have on different tissues, there are many investigations concerning the effects of a human estrogenic environment on endocrine responses to exercise. The following review will describe the consequences of varying estrogen levels on pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and endocrine function, followed by discussion of the outcomes of different estrogen levels on endocrine tissues in response to exercise, problems encountered for interpretation of findings, and recommended direction for future research. PMID:22512823

  13. Nudging oligodendrocyte intrinsic signaling to remyelinate and repair: Estrogen receptor ligand effects.

    PubMed

    Khalaj, Anna J; Hasselmann, Jonathan; Augello, Catherine; Moore, Spencer; Tiwari-Woodruff, Seema K

    2016-06-01

    Demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to significant, progressive axonal and neuronal degeneration. Currently existing immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory therapies alleviate MS symptoms and slow, but fail to prevent or reverse, disease progression. Restoration of damaged myelin sheath by replenishment of mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) should not only restore saltatory axon conduction, but also provide a major boost to axon survival. Our previous work has shown that therapeutic treatment with the modestly selective generic estrogen receptor (ER) β agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) confers functional neuroprotection in a chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS by stimulating endogenous remyelination. Recently, we found that the more potent, selective ERβ agonist indazole-chloride (Ind-Cl) improves clinical disease and motor performance. Importantly, electrophysiological measures revealed improved corpus callosal conduction and reduced axon refractoriness. This Ind-Cl treatment-induced functional remyelination was attributable to increased OL progenitor cell (OPC) and mature OL numbers. At the intracellular signaling level, transition of early to late OPCs requires ERK1/2 signaling, and transition of immature to mature OLs requires mTOR signaling; thus, the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway plays a major role in the late stages of OL differentiation and myelination. Indeed, therapeutic treatment of EAE mice with various ERβ agonists results in increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated (p) Akt and p-mTOR levels. It is notable that while DPN's neuroprotective effects occur in the presence of peripheral and central inflammation, Ind-Cl is directly neuroprotective, as demonstrated by remyelination effects in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model, as well as immunomodulatory. Elucidating the mechanisms by which ER agonists and other directly remyelinating agents modulate endogenous OPC and OL regulatory

  14. Bradycardic effects mediated by activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in rat nucleus ambiguus.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Oprea, Tudor I; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2013-03-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has been identified in several brain regions, including cholinergic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus, which are critical for parasympathetic cardiac regulation. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, microinjection into the nucleus ambiguus and blood pressure measurement, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of GPER activation in nucleus ambiguus neurons. A GPER selective agonist, G-1, produced a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in a concentration-dependent manner in retrogradely labelled cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus. The increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) produced by G-1 was abolished by pretreatment with G36, a GPER antagonist. G-1 depolarized cultured cardiac vagal neurons of the nucleus ambiguus. The excitatory effect of G-1 was also identified by whole-cell visual patch-clamp recordings in nucleus ambiguus neurons, in medullary slices. To validate the physiological relevance of our in vitro studies, we carried out in vivo experiments. Microinjection of G-1 into the nucleus ambiguus elicited a decrease in heart rate; the effect was blocked by prior microinjection of G36. Systemic injection of G-1, in addition to a previously reported decrease in blood pressure, also reduced the heart rate. The G-1-induced bradycardia was prevented by systemic injection of atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, or by bilateral microinjection of G36 into the nucleus ambiguus. Our results indicate that GPER-mediated bradycardia occurs via activation of cardiac parasympathetic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus and support the involvement of the GPER in the modulation of cardiac vagal tone. PMID:23104934

  15. Antiproliferative effect of ASC-J9 delivered by PLGA nanoparticles against estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Verderio, Paolo; Pandolfi, Laura; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Marinozzi, Maria Rosaria; Vanna, Renzo; Gramatica, Furio; Corsi, Fabio; Colombo, Miriam; Morasso, Carlo; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-08-01

    Among polymeric nanoparticles designed for cancer therapy, PLGA nanoparticles have become one of the most popular polymeric devices for chemotherapeutic-based nanoformulations against several kinds of malignant diseases. Promising properties, including long-circulation time, enhanced tumor localization, interference with "multidrug" resistance effects, and environmental biodegradability, often result in an improvement of the drug bioavailability and effectiveness. In the present work, we have synthesized 1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxyhepta-1,4,6-trien-3-one (ASC-J9) and developed uniform ASC-J9-loaded PLGA nanoparticles of about 120 nm, which have been prepared by a single-emulsion process. Structural and morphological features of the nanoformulation were analyzed, followed by an accurate evaluation of the in vitro drug release kinetics, which exhibited Fickian law diffusion over 10 days. The intracellular degradation of ASC-J9-bearing nanoparticles within estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells was correlated to a time- and dose-dependent activity of the released drug. A cellular growth inhibition associated with a specific cell cycle G2/M blocking effect caused by ASC-J9 release inside the cytosol allowed us to put forward a hypothesis on the action mechanism of this nanosystem, which led to the final cell apoptosis. Our study was accomplished using Annexin V-based cell death analysis, MTT assessment of proliferation, radical scavenging activity, and intracellular ROS evaluation. Moreover, the intracellular localization of nanoformulated ASC-J9 was confirmed by a Raman optical imaging experiment designed ad hoc. PLGA nanoparticles and ASC-J9 proved also to be safe for a healthy embryo fibroblast cell line (3T3-L1), suggesting a possible clinical translation of this potential nanochemotherapeutic to expand the inherently poor bioavailability of hydrophobic ASC-J9 that could be proposed for the treatment of malignant breast cancer. PMID:24945469

  16. The Effects of Synthetic Estrogen Exposure on the Sexually Dimorphic Liver Transcriptome of the Sex-Role-Reversed Gulf Pipefish

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Emily; Flanagan, Sarah P.; Jones, Adam G.

    2015-01-01

    Species exhibiting sex-role reversal provide an unusual perspective on the evolution of sex roles and sex differences. However, the proximate effects of sex-role reversal are largely unknown. Endocrine disruptors provide an experimental mechanism to address hormonal regulation of sexually dimorphic gene expression in sex-role-reversed taxa. Here, we investigate gene expression patterns in the liver of the sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish, because the liver is known to be sexually dimorphic and estrogen-regulated in species with conventional sex roles. Using next-generation RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), we detected sexually dimorphic hepatic gene expression patterns, with a total of 482 differentially expressed genes between the sexes in Gulf pipefish. Two-thirds of these genes were over-expressed in females, and the sex-specific transcriptomes of this sex-role-reversed pipefish’s liver were superficially similar to those of fishes with conventional sex-roles. We exposed females, pregnant males, and non-pregnant males to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at ecologically relevant concentrations of 5ng/L and compared gene expression patterns in the livers of exposed fish to control fish. Several genes that were up-regulated in EE2-exposed males relative to control males were also found to be female-biased in control animals. These genes included several of the classic estrogen biomarkers, such as vitellogenin, choriogenin, and zona pellucida. Thus, estrogen exposure induced feminization of the male liver transcriptome in a sex-role-reversed pipefish. These results suggest that the ancestral state of estrogen-regulated female reproductive physiology has been retained in all sex-role-reversed vertebrates thus far studied, despite substantial evolution of the hormonal regulation of ornamentation and mating behavior in these interesting taxa. PMID:26448558

  17. Effects of estrogen deficiency and bisphosphonate therapy on osteocyte viability and microdamage accumulation in an ovine model of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Orlaith; Kennedy, Oran D; Lee, T Clive; Rackard, Susan M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2011-03-01

    It has been proposed that osteocyte viability plays an important role in bone integrity, and that bone loss in osteoporosis may be partially due to osteocyte cell death following estrogen depletion. Osteoporosis treatments such as bisphosphonates can inhibit osteocyte apoptosis which in turn may also reduce remodeling. Consequently, microcracks in bone which are normally repaired by bone remodeling may accumulate. This study used an ovine model of osteoporosis to examine the effects of estrogen depletion and bisphosphonates on osteocyte apoptosis and microdamage accumulation. Skeletally mature ewes were randomly assigned into two equal groups; ovariectomy (OVX) and a non-treatment group (control). Half of these animals were sacrificed 12 months post-OVX. Twenty months post-OVX, a number of OVX animals were randomly selected and each received a supra-pharmacological dose of the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (Zol). This group and all the remaining animals were sacrificed 31 months post-OVX. A compact bone specimen was removed from the left metacarpal of each animal; half was used for osteocyte apoptosis detection and the remainder for microdamage analysis. Estrogen deficiency resulted in significant increases in the levels of osteocyte apoptosis while zoledronic acid significantly reduced the level of apoptosis in osteocytes. Zoledronic acid treatment resulted in the formation of more microcracks. However, these cracks were shorter than in control or OVX groups which may provide one explanation as to why increased damage levels following bisphosphonate treatment have not lead to increased fractures. This study also provides additional evidence of the importance of estrogen in preserving the osteocyte network. PMID:20886644

  18. Effects of Estrogen Fluctuation during the Menstrual Cycle on the Response to Stretch-Shortening Exercise in Females

    PubMed Central

    Sipavičienė, Saulė; Daniusevičiutė, Laura; Klizienė, Irina; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether variation in estrogen levels during the menstrual cycle influences susceptibility to exercise-induced muscle damage after stretch-shortening cycle exercise. Physically active women (n = 18; age = 20.2 ± 1.7 yr) participated in this research. The subjects performed one session of 100 maximal drop jumps on day 1 or 2 of the follicular phase and another identical session on day 1 or 2 of the ovulatory phase; the order of the sessions was randomized. Quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque evoked by electrical stimulation and maximal voluntary contraction, muscle pain, and CK activity were measured before and at various times up to 72 h after exercise. It was found that the high estrogen level during the ovulatory phase might be related to an earlier return to baseline muscle strength after strenuous stretch-shortening cycle exercise in that phase compared with the follicular phase. The estrogen effect appears to be highly specific to the damaged site because the differences in most EIMD markers (CK, soreness, and low-frequency fatigue) between the two menstrual cycle phases were small. PMID:24151587

  19. Effect of lapatinib on the development of estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Tracy E; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Yun; Hill, Jamal L; Li, Yuxin; Wang, Chunyu; Kim, Hee-Tae; Gilmer, Tona M; Sexton, Krystal R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Osborne, C Kent; Brown, Powel H

    2009-01-21

    Lapatinib, a selective orally available inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinases, is a promising agent for the treatment of breast cancer. We examined the effect of lapatinib on the development of mammary tumors in MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice, which express wild-type ErbB2 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and spontaneously develop estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ErbB2-positive mammary tumors by 14 months of age. Mice were treated from age 3 months to age 15 months with vehicle (n = 17) or lapatinib (30 or 75 mg/kg body weight; n = 16 mice per group) by oral gavage twice daily (6 d/wk). All statistical tests were two-sided. By 328 days after the start of treatment, all 17 (100%) of the vehicle-treated mice vs five (31%) of the 16 mice treated with high-dose lapatinib developed mammary tumors (P < .001). Among MMTV-erbB2 mice treated for 5 months (n = 20 mice per group), those treated with lapatinib had fewer premalignant lesions and noninvasive cancers in their mammary glands than those treated with vehicle (P = .02). Lapatinib also effectively blocked epidermal growth factor-induced signaling through the EGFR and ErbB2 receptors, suppressed cyclin D1 and epiregulin mRNA expression, and stimulated p27 mRNA expression in human mammary epithelial cells and in mammary epithelial cells from mice treated for 5 months with high-dose lapatinib. Thus, cyclin D1, epiregulin, and p27 may represent useful biomarkers of lapatinib response in patients. These data suggest that lapatinib is a promising agent for the prevention of ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:19141783

  20. Potentiation of brain mitochondrial function by S-equol and R/S-equol estrogen receptor β-selective phytoSERM treatments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jia; Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Chen, Shuhua; Wong, Karren Carmen; To, Jimmy; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2013-06-13

    Previously we developed an estrogen receptor β-selective phytoestrogenic (phytoSERM) combination, which contains a mixture of genistein, daidzein, and racemic R/S-equol. The phytoSERM combination was found neuroprotective and non-feminizing both in vitro and in vivo. Further, it prevented or alleviated physical and neurological changes associated with human menopause and Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, we conducted translational analyses to compare the effects of racemic R/S-equol-containing with S-equol-containing phytoSERM therapeutic combinations on mitochondrial markers in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and in a female mouse ovariectomy (OVX) model. Data revealed that both the S-equol and R/S-equol phytoSERM treatments regulated mitochondrial function, with S-equol phytoSERM combination eliciting greater response in mitochondrial potentiation. Both phytoSERM combination treatments increased expression of key proteins and enzymes involved in energy production, restored the OVX-induced decrease in activity of key bioenergetic enzymes, and reduced OVX-induced increase in lipid peroxidation. Comparative analyses on gene expression profile revealed similar regulation between S-equol phytoSERM and R/S-equol phytoSERM treatments with minimal differences. Both combinations regulated genes involved in essential bioenergetic pathways, including glucose metabolism and energy sensing, lipid metabolism, cholesterol trafficking, redox homeostasis and β-amyloid production and clearance. Further, no uterotrophic response was induced by either of the phytoSERM combinations. These findings indicate translational validity for development of an ER β selective S-equol phytoSERM combination as a nutraceutical to prevent menopause-associated symptoms and to promote brain metabolic activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Hormone Therapy. PMID:23428542

  1. Neo-synthesis of estrogenic or androgenic neurosteroids determine whether long-term potentiation or depression is induced in hippocampus of male rat

    PubMed Central

    Di Mauro, Michela; Tozzi, Alessandro; Calabresi, Paolo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; Grassi, Silvarosa

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic and androgenic steroids synthesized in the brain may rapidly modulate synaptic plasticity interacting with specific membrane receptors. We explored by electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices of male rat the influence of 17β-estradiol (E2) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) neo-synthesis on the synaptic changes induced in the CA1 region. Induction of long-term depression (LTD) and depotentiation (DP) by low frequency stimulation (LFS, 15 min-1 Hz) and of long-term potentiation (LTP) by high frequency stimulation (HFS, 1 s-100 Hz), medium (MFS, 1 s-50 Hz), or weak (WFS, 1 s-25 Hz) frequency stimulation was assayed under inhibitors of enzymes converting testosterone (T) into DHT (5α-reductase) and T into E2 (P450-aromatase). We found that LFS-LTD depends on DHT synthesis, since it was fully prevented under finasteride, an inhibitor of DHT synthesis, and rescued by exogenous DHT, while the E2 synthesis was not involved. Conversely, the full development of HFS-LTP requires the synthesis of E2, as demonstrated by the LTP reduction observed under letrozole, an inhibitor of E2 synthesis, and its full rescue by exogenous E2. For intermediate stimulation protocols DHT, but not E2 synthesis, was involved in the production of a small LTP induced by WFS, while the E2 synthesis was required for the MFS-dependent LTP. Under the combined block of DHT and E2 synthesis all stimulation frequencies induced partial LTP. Overall, these results indicate that DHT is required for converting the partial LTP into LTD whereas E2 is needed for the full expression of LTP, evidencing a key role of the neo-synthesis of sex neurosteroids in determining the direction of synaptic long-term effects. PMID:26483631

  2. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  3. THE USE OF DNA MACROARRAYS TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS ON WILDLIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the mid-1990s, several investigations in the United States and United Kingdom showed that wild fish of several species collected downstream of sewage treatment plants or industrial discharges presented expression of estrogen-responsive genes, or phenotypic sex reversal. Su...

  4. Ethanolic extract of dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) induces estrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells and immature rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Min; Kim, Ha Ryong; Park, Yong Joo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-11-01

    Plants of the genus Taraxacum, commonly known as dandelions, are used to treat breast cancer in traditional folk medicine. However, their use has mainly been based on empirical findings without sufficient scientific evidence. Therefore, we hypothesized that dandelions would behave as a Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and be effective as hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the postmenopausal women. In the present study, in vitro assay systems, including cell proliferation assay, reporter gene assay, and RT-PCR to evaluate the mRNA expression of estrogen-related genes (pS2 and progesterone receptor, PR), were performed in human breast cancer cells. Dandelion ethanol extract (DEE) significantly increased cell proliferation and estrogen response element (ERE)-driven luciferase activity. DEE significantly induced the expression of estrogen related genes such as pS2 and PR, which was inhibited by tamoxifen at 1 μmol·L(-1). These results indicated that DEE could induce estrogenic activities mediated by a classical estrogen receptor pathway. In addition, immature rat uterotrophic assay was carried out to identify estrogenic activity of DEE in vivo. The lowest concentration of DEE slightly increased the uterine wet weight, but there was no significant effect with the highest concentration of DEE. The results demonstrate the potential estrogenic activities of DEE, providing scientific evidence supporting their use in traditional medicine. PMID:26614455

  5. Effects of melatonin and dexpanthenol on antioxidant parameters when combined with estrogen treatment in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ozan; Ay, Aybala Agac; Turgut, Hulya; Ay, Ahmet; Kafkas, Samet; Dost, Turhan

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether it is possible to reduce the oxidative damage using antioxidant agents combined with hormone replacement therapy after menopause. In this prospective experimental study, 50 mature female Wistar albino rats weighing 270-310 g were used. Rats were divided into the following six groups: (1) Ovx group (n = 7): the animals underwent bilateral ovariectomy. No drug was administered following bilateral ovariectomy. (2) Ovx + E 2 group (n = 7): bilateral ovariectomy + 17β-estradiol (100 μg/kg/day); (3) Ovx + E 2 + MT5 group (n = 7): bilateral ovariectomy + 17β-estradiol (100 μg/kg/day) + melatonin (5 mg/kg/day); (4) Ovx + E 2 + MT20 group (n = 7): bilateral ovariectomy + 17β-estradiol (100 μg/kg/day) + melatonin (20 mg/kg/day); (5) Ovx + E 2 + Dxp250 group (n = 7): bilateral ovariectomy + 17β-estradiol (100 μg/kg/day) + dexpanthenol (250 mg/kg/day); (6) Ovx + E 2 + Dxp500 group (n = 7): bilateral ovariectomy + 17β-estradiol (100 μg/kg/day) + dexpanthenol (500 mg/kg/day), and the activity of these antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products were measured. Enzymatic activity levels of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px), and glutathione reductase and levels of free radicals (malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide) were both analyzed. We observed an increase in the level of GSH activity, but no significant differences in levels of CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px enzymatic activity and in levels of free radical MDA following 17β-estradiol or additional antioxidant treatment (melatonin or dexpanthenol). Despite the present study indicating that the addition of melatonin and dexpanthenol into the hormone replacement therapy regimen may contribute to the antioxidant effect of estrogen, the existence of limited data in this field indicates that further studies are warranted. PMID:23471492

  6. Stress induced hippocampal mineralocorticoid and estrogen receptor β gene expression and long-term potentiation in male adult rats is sensitive to early-life stress experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Meyer, Katrin; Korz, Volker

    2013-02-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones and their receptors have been identified to be involved in emotional and cognitive disorders in early stressed subjects during adulthood. However, the impact of other steroid hormones and receptors has been considered less. Especially, functional roles of estrogen and estrogen receptors in male subjects are largely unknown. Therefore, we measured hippocampal concentrations of 17β-estradiol, corticosterone and testosterone, as well as the gene expression of estrogen receptor α and β (ERα, β), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors after stress in adulthood in maternally separated (MS+; at postnatal days 14-16 for 6h each day) and control (MS-) male rats. In vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) serves as a cellular model of learning and memory formation. Population spike- (PSA) and the fEPSP-LTP within the dentate gyrus (DG) were reinforced by elevated-platform-stress (EP-stress) in MS- but not in MS+ rats. MR- and ERβ-mRNA were upregulated 1h after EP-stress in MS- but not in MS+ rats as compared to non-stressed littermates. Infusion of an MR antagonist before LTP induction blocked early- and late-PSA- and -fEPSP-LTP, whereas blockade of ERβ impaired only the late PSA-LTP. Application of a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor partly restored the LTP-reinforcement in MS+ rats, accompanied by a retrieval of ERβ- but not MR-mRNA upregulation. Basal ERβ gene promoter methylation was similar between groups, whereas MS+ and MS- rats showed different methylation patterns across CpG sites after EP-stress. These findings indicate a key role of ERβ in early-stress mediated emotionality and emotion-induced late-LTP in adult male rats via DNA methylation mechanisms. PMID:22776422

  7. Committee Opinion No. 659: The Use of Vaginal Estrogen in Women With a History of Estrogen-Dependent Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Cancer treatment should address female-specific survivorship issues, including the hypoestrogenic- related adverse effects of cancer therapies or of natural menopause in survivors. Systemic and vaginal estrogen are widely used for symptomatic relief of vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and lower urinary tract infections in the general population. However, given that some types of cancer are hormone sensitive, there are safety concerns about the use of local hormone therapy in women who currently have breast cancer or have a history of breast cancer. Nonhormonal approaches are the first-line choices for managing urogenital symptoms or atrophy-related urinary symptoms experienced by women during or after treatment for breast cancer. Among women with a history of estrogen-dependent breast cancer who are experiencing urogenital symptoms, vaginal estrogen should be reserved for those patients who are unresponsive to nonhormonal remedies. The decision to use vaginal estrogen may be made in coordination with a woman's oncologist. Additionally, it should be preceded by an informed decision-making and consent process in which the woman has the information and resources to consider the benefits and potential risks of low-dose vaginal estrogen. Data do not show an increased risk of cancer recurrence among women currently undergoing treatment for breast cancer or those with a personal history of breast cancer who use vaginal estrogen to relieve urogenital symptoms. PMID:26901334

  8. Estrogen-induced DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells is mediated by ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Felty, Quentin

    2006-01-01

    Background Since estrogen is known to increase vascular endothelial cell growth, elevated estrogen exposure from hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives has the potential to contribute in the development of abnormal proliferative vascular lesions and subsequent thickening of the vasculature. How estrogen may support or promote vascular lesions is not clear. We have examined in this study whether estrogen exposure to vascular endothelial cells increase the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and estrogen-induced ROS is involved in the growth of endothelial cells. Methods The effect of estrogen on the production of intracellular oxidants and the role of estrogen-induced ROS on cell growth was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ROS were measured by monitoring the oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin by spectrofluorometry. Endothelial cell growth was measured by a colorimetric immunoassay based on BrdU incorporation into DNA. Results Physiological concentrations of estrogen (367 fmol and 3.67 pmol) triggered a rapid 2-fold increase in intracellular oxidants in endothelial cells. E2-induced ROS formation was inhibited to basal levels by cotreatment with the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone (2 μM) and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol (50 μM). Inhibitors of NAD(P)H oxidase, apocynin and DPI, did not block E2-induced ROS formation. Furthermore, the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, did not prevent the increase in E2-induced ROS. These findings indicate both mitochondria and xanthine oxidase are the source of ROS in estrogen treated vascular endothelial cells. E2 treated cells showed a 2-fold induction of BrdU incorporation at 18 h which was not observed in cells exposed to vehicle alone. Cotreatment with ebselen (20 μM) and NAC (1 mM) inhibited E2-induced BrdU incorporation without affecting the basal levels of DNA synthesis. The observed inhibitory effect of NAC and ebselen on E2-induced DNA synthesis was also shown to be dose dependent

  9. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  10. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  11. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  12. Effects of exercise dose on endogenous estrogens in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Neilson, Heather K; Wang, Qinggang; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Yasui, Yutaka; Duha, Aalo; MacLaughlin, Sarah; Kallal, Ciara; Forbes, Cynthia C; Courneya, Kerry S

    2015-10-01

    Exercise dose comparison trials with biomarker outcomes can identify the amount of exercise required to reduce breast cancer risk and also strengthen the causal inference between physical activity and breast cancer. The Breast Cancer and Exercise Trial in Alberta (BETA) tested whether or not greater changes in estradiol (E2), estrone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations can be achieved in postmenopausal women randomized to 12 months of HIGH (300 min/week) vs MODERATE (150 min/week) volumes of aerobic exercise. BETA included 400 inactive postmenopausal women aged 50-74 years with BMI of 22-40 kg/m(2). Blood was drawn at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Adiposity, physical fitness, diet, and total physical activity were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed using linear mixed models. At full prescription, women exercised more in the HIGH vs MODERATE group (median min/week (quartiles 1,3): 253 (157 289) vs 137 (111 150); P<0.0001). Twelve-month changes in estrogens and SHBG were <10% on average for both groups. No group differences were found for E2, estrone, SHBG or free E2 changes (treatment effect ratios (95% CI) from linear mixed models: 1.00 (0.96-1.06), 1.02 (0.98-1.05), 0.99 (0.96-1.02), 1.01 (0.95, 1.06), respectively, representing the HIGH:MODERATE ratio of geometric mean biomarker levels over 12 months; n=382). In per-protocol analyses, borderline significantly greater decreases in total and free E2 occurred in the HIGH group. Overall, no dose effect was observed for women randomized to 300 vs 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous intensity exercise who actually performed a median of 253 vs 137 min/week. For total and free E2, the lack of differential effect may be due to modest adherence in the higher dose group. PMID:26338699

  13. Nephroprotective effect of estrogen and progesterone combination on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in ovariectomized female rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, M.; Nematbakhsh, M.; Pezeshki, Z.; Soltani, N.; Moeini, M.; Talebi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that estrogen (Es) has no beneficial effect on cisplatin (CP)-induced nephrotoxicity, but the role of progesterone (Pr) and the combination of Es and Pr are not yet well-defined. In this study, we investigated the protective role of Pr, and co-administration of Es/Pr on CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighty-six ovariectomized female Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups, and the experiments were performed in two phases. In Phase I, Groups 1–4 received 2, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg, IM Pr dissolved in sesame oil every 5 days for four doses. Groups 5–8 had the same treatment regimen as Groups 1–4, but after the third injection the animals also received continuous dose of CP (2.5 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 8 days. Group 9, as the positive control group, received sesame oil instead of Pr plus CP. Group 10, as the negative control group, received sesame oil instead of Pr. After the most effective dose of Pr was determined in Phase I, Groups 11–13 in Phase II received 10 mg/kg Pr plus either 0.25, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg, IM estradiol valerate every 5 days for four doses. After the third injection, they also received a continuous dose of CP for 8 days. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), kidney tissue damage score (KTDS), and kidney weight (KW) increased and body weight (BW) decreased in the positive control group (P < 0.05). Administration of Pr (10 mg/kg) plus CP decreased KTDS and BW loss and KW. Co-administration of ES/Pr at specific doses improved Cr, BUN, and KTDS; and resulted in reduced CP-induced nephrotoxicity. The results obtained suggest that the beneficial effect of Pr on CP-induced nephrotoxicity is dose-dependent. In addition, combination of Es/Pr with a specific dose decreased CP-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27194830

  14. Nephroprotective effect of estrogen and progesterone combination on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, M; Nematbakhsh, M; Pezeshki, Z; Soltani, N; Moeini, M; Talebi, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that estrogen (Es) has no beneficial effect on cisplatin (CP)-induced nephrotoxicity, but the role of progesterone (Pr) and the combination of Es and Pr are not yet well-defined. In this study, we investigated the protective role of Pr, and co-administration of Es/Pr on CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighty-six ovariectomized female Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups, and the experiments were performed in two phases. In Phase I, Groups 1-4 received 2, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg, IM Pr dissolved in sesame oil every 5 days for four doses. Groups 5-8 had the same treatment regimen as Groups 1-4, but after the third injection the animals also received continuous dose of CP (2.5 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 8 days. Group 9, as the positive control group, received sesame oil instead of Pr plus CP. Group 10, as the negative control group, received sesame oil instead of Pr. After the most effective dose of Pr was determined in Phase I, Groups 11-13 in Phase II received 10 mg/kg Pr plus either 0.25, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg, IM estradiol valerate every 5 days for four doses. After the third injection, they also received a continuous dose of CP for 8 days. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), kidney tissue damage score (KTDS), and kidney weight (KW) increased and body weight (BW) decreased in the positive control group (P < 0.05). Administration of Pr (10 mg/kg) plus CP decreased KTDS and BW loss and KW. Co-administration of ES/Pr at specific doses improved Cr, BUN, and KTDS; and resulted in reduced CP-induced nephrotoxicity. The results obtained suggest that the beneficial effect of Pr on CP-induced nephrotoxicity is dose-dependent. In addition, combination of Es/Pr with a specific dose decreased CP-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27194830

  15. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  16. Importance of Estrogenic Signaling and Its Mediated Receptors in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kin-Mang; To, Ka-Fai

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) treatment was first established by Huggins and Hodges in 1941, primarily described as androgen deprivation via interference of testicular androgen production. The disease remains incurable with relapse of hormone-refractory cancer after treatments. Epidemiological and clinical studies disclosed the importance of estrogens in PCa. Discovery of estrogen receptor ERβ prompted direct estrogenic actions, in conjunction with ERα, on PCa cells. Mechanistically, ERs upon ligand binding transactivate target genes at consensus genomic sites via interactions with various transcriptional co-regulators to mold estrogenic signaling. With animal models, Noble revealed estrogen dependencies of PCa, providing insight into potential uses of antiestrogens in the treatment. Subsequently, various clinical trials were conducted and molecular and functional consequences of antiestrogen treatment in PCa were delineated. Besides, estrogens can also trigger rapid non-genomic signaling responses initiated at the plasma membrane, at least partially via an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR30. Activation of GPR30 significantly inhibited in vitro and in vivo PCa cell growth and the underlying mechanism was elucidated. Currently, molecular networks of estrogenic and antiestrogenic signaling via ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in PCa have not been fully deciphered. This crucial information could be beneficial to further developments of effective estrogen- and antiestrogen-based therapy for PCa patients. PMID:27589731

  17. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  18. Identification of Potential Glycoprotein Biomarkers in Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) and Negative (ER-) Human Breast Cancer Tissues by LC-LTQ/FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Suzan M.; Wang, Xu; Marshall, Alan G.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most fatal cancer in American women. To increase the life expectancy of patients with breast cancer new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and drug targets must be identified. A change in the glycosylation on a glycoprotein often causes a change in the function of that glycoprotein; such a phenomenon is correlated with cancerous transformation. Thus, glycoproteins in human breast cancer estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tissues and those in the more advanced stage of breast cancer, estrogen receptor negative (ER-) tissues, were compared. Glycoproteins showing differences in glycosylation were examined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis with double staining (glyco- and total protein staining) and identified by reversed-phase nano-liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap/ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Among the identified glycosylated proteins are alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, calmodulin, and superoxide dismutase mitochondrial precursor that were further verified by Western blotting for both ER+ and ER- human breast tissues. Results show the presence of a possible glycosylation difference in alpha-1-antitrypsin, a potential tumor-derived biomarker for breast cancer progression, which was expressed highest in the ER- samples. PMID:22773931

  19. Gene expression profiling in hearts of diabetic mice uncovers a potential role of estrogen-related receptor γ in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, Jaime; Vilà, Maria; Zamora, Mònica; Riu, Efrén; Pardo, Rosario; Poncelas, Marcos; Cases, Ildefonso; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Hernández, Cristina; Feliu, Juan E; Simó, Rafael; García-Dorado, David; Villena, Josep A

    2016-07-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by an abnormal oxidative metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be defined. To uncover potential mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, we performed a gene expression profiling study in hearts of diabetic db/db mice. Diabetic hearts showed a gene expression pattern characterized by the up-regulation of genes involved in lipid oxidation, together with an abnormal expression of genes related to the cardiac contractile function. A screening for potential regulators of the genes differentially expressed in diabetic mice found that estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) was increased in heart of db/db mice. Overexpression of ERRγ in cultured cardiomyocytes was sufficient to promote the expression of genes involved in lipid oxidation, increase palmitate oxidation and induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings strongly support a role for ERRγ in the metabolic alterations that underlie the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27062900

  20. Effects of steroid hormone on estrogen sulfotransferase and on steroid sulfatase expression in endometriosis tissue and stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Piccinato, Carla A; Neme, Rosa M; Torres, Natália; Sanches, Lívia Renta; Derogis, Priscilla Bento Mattos Cruz; Brudniewski, Heloísa F; Rosa e Silva, Júlio C; Ferriani, Rui A

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease that afflicts about 10% of women in their reproductive age, causing severe pain and infertility. The potential roles of female steroid hormones in modulating key estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, steroid sulfatase (STS) and estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), were investigated. The expression of STS and SULT1E1 mRNA in biopsy samples (n=78) of superficial and deep endometriotic lesions, eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis and endometrium from control patients were compared according to the menstrual cycle phase. Increased STS gene expression was detected in superficial and deep-infiltrating lesions and a reduced SULT1E1 expression was also observed in the eutopic endometrium relative to the superficial lesions. Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was detected between STS and SULT1E1 mRNA expression levels in biopsy specimens collected from the endometriosis patients, and not in control individuals. The actions of female steroid hormones on SULT1E1 and STS expression were evidenced in endometriosis, revealed by increased expression levels in the luteal phase of the cycle. There was an increased STS expression in primary eutopic and ectopic endometrial stromal cells treated with estradiol and progesterone (representative of the luteal phase, n=3). Although an increased STS mRNA expression was observed in hormone-induced endometrial stromal cells in vitro, no difference could be detected between the hormone treatment groups in estradiol formation from estradiol sulfate measured by LC-MS-MS. Interestingly, a greater expression of STS was observed in stromal cells from eutopic endometrium with an agreement in estradiol formation originated from estradiol sulfate. The differential regulation of STS and SULT1E1 could provide insights for novel studies of the therapeutic use of STS inhibitors. PMID:26723541

  1. Paradoxical effects of oxytocin and vasopressin on basal prolactin secretion and the estrogen-induced prolactin surge

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Leemin ); Pan, Jenntser )

    1990-01-01

    The roles of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on both basal and estrogen-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion were examined. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats that were ovariectomized for 3 weeks and received estrogen treatment for 1 week were used. Intravenous administration of hormones and serial blood sampling were accomplished through indwelling intraatrial catheters which were implanted two days before. Plasma PRL levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Oxytocin at a dose of 20 {mu}g/rat stimulated a moderate PRL release in the morning and lower doses were without effect. Vasopressin was most effective at a dose of 5 {mu}g/rat in stimulating PRL release, while consecutive injections of higher doses were less effective. In contrast, TRH, ranging from 1 to 8 {mu}g/rat, induced a dose-dependent increases in PRL secretion. Using the effective dosages determined from the morning studies, repeated injections of either OT, AVP or their specific antagonists MPOMeOVT were given hourly between 1300 to 1800h and blood samples were obtained hourly from 1100 to 1900h. It was found that either OT or AVP significantly reduced the afternoon PRL surge, while their antagonists were not as effective.

  2. Effect of monensin on the estrogen-induced LH surge in prepuberal heifers.

    PubMed

    Randel, R D; Rutter, L M; Rhodes, R D

    1982-04-01

    The effect of dietary monensin on the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge following estradiol-17 beta (E2) injection was investigated in prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers. Ten heifers, weighing approximately 260 kg and approximately 10 mo of age, were equally divided by age and weight into two groups: control (C) heifers each received 1.8 kg/d of a concentrate diet plus Coastal bermudagrass hay ad libitum; monensin (M) heifers each received the same diet plus 200 mg monensin/d. All heifers were maintained in dry lots on their respective diets for 14 d before the E2 challenge. On d 15, all heifers were injected in with 5 mg of E2 in corn oil. Blood samples were collected via tail vessel puncture immediately before E2 injection and at 2-h intervals until 48 h after the E2 injection. The samples were processed for serum and stored at -20 degrees C until LH concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Mean concentrations of LH in serum differed (P less than .005) between C and M heifers and with time after E2 injection. A treatment X sampling period interaction (P less than .10) indicated that maximum serum concentrations of LH (LH surge) were detected earlier (P less than .001) for M (17.2 +/- 1.8 h) than C (27.0 +/- 6.0 h) heifers after the E2 injection. When the data were arrayed relative to the time of the LH surge, treatment (P less than .05) and sampling period (P less than .001) effects were significant, but a treatment X sampling period interaction was not detected. Peak LH concentration was 23.1 +/- 3.0 ng/ml for M heifers and 21.6+/- 4.2 ng/ml for controls (P greater than .10). Duration of the LH surge was 8.0 +/- .9 h in M heifers and 4.8 +/- 1.6 h in C heifers (P less than .001). Area under the LH surge was greater (P less than .001) in M heifers than in control heifers. We conclude that dietary monensin altered the estrogen-induced LH surge in prepuberal heifers. PMID:7085526

  3. The evaluation of the immunomodulating properties of ERA-63 a pharmaceutical with estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Janssen, G B; Penninks, A H; Knippels, L M J; van Zijverden, M; Spanhaak, S

    2008-08-28

    This paper describes studies performed with ERA-63 a low molecular weight pharmaceutical with intended immunomodulatory effects. Since this compound was also known to have estrogenic activity a non-conventional approach was taken in order to differentiate between estrogenic and non-estrogenic-induced immunomodulatory effects. EE was included not only for qualitative comparison (hazard identification) between immunomodulatory effects but also, in case of similar effects, to facilitate the extrapolation of the findings in the rat to anticipated effects in humans. After 28 days of treatment with dosages ranging from pharmacological up to clearly toxic levels for both compounds the immunotoxic potential was assessed by performing a T cell-dependent antibody response and a host resistance assay in rats. Selected ERA-63 dose levels (0.167-0.2, 1.67-2 and 16.7-20mg/kg) were expected to have comparable estrogenic activity to respective EE dose levels (0.05, 0.5 and 5mg/kg). General toxicity parameters reflecting estrogenic activity (i.e. decreased body- and organ weights of thymus and testis, and increased bilirubin and GGT levels) confirmed the comparable estrogenic activity for both compounds at the dose levels tested. Together with the comparable estrogen-related immune suppression (i.e. decreases in specific antibody responses and an increased susceptibility for Listeria monocytogenes infects) for both compounds, this indicates that available clinical data for EE facilitates the human risk assessment of ERA-63. PMID:18602456

  4. Hops (Humulus lupulus) inhibits Oxidative Estrogen Metabolism and Estrogen-Induced Malignant Transformation in Human Mammary Epithelial cells (MCF-10A)

    PubMed Central

    Madhubhani, L.P.; Hemachandra, P.; Esala, R.; Chandrasena, P.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Main, Matthew; Lankin, David C.; Scism, Robert A.; Dietz, Birgit M.; Pauli, Guido F.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term exposure to estrogens including those in traditional hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers. As a result, women are turning to over-the-counter (OTC) botanical dietary supplements such as black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) and hops (Humulus lupulus) as natural alternatives to HRT. The two major mechanisms which likely contribute to estrogen and/or HRT cancer risk are: the estrogen receptor (ER) mediated hormonal pathway; and, the chemical carcinogenesis pathway involving formation of estrogen quinones that damage DNA and proteins, hence initiating and promoting carcinogenesis. Since OTC botanical HRT alternatives are in widespread use they may have the potential for chemopreventive effects on estrogen carcinogenic pathways in vivo. Therefore the effect of OTC botanicals on estrogen-induced malignant transformation of MCF-10A cells was studied. Cytochrome P450 catalyzed hydroxylation of estradiol at the 4-position leads to an o-quinone believed to act as the proximal carcinogen. LC-MS/MS analysis of estradiol metabolites showed that 4-hydroxylation was inhibited by hops, whereas black cohosh was without effect. Estrogen-induced expression of CYP450 1B1 and CYP450 1A1 was attenuated by the hops extract. Two phenolic constituents of hops (xanthohumol, XH; and 8-prenylnaringenin, 8-PN) were tested: 8-PN was a potent inhibitor whereas XH had no effect. Finally, estrogen-induced malignant transformation of MCF-10A cells was observed to be significantly inhibited by hops (5 μg/mL) and 8-PN (50 nM). These data suggest that hops extracts possess cancer chemopreventive activity through attenuation of estrogen metabolism mediated by 8-PN. PMID:21997247

  5. Hops (Humulus lupulus) inhibits oxidative estrogen metabolism and estrogen-induced malignant transformation in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A).

    PubMed

    Hemachandra, L P; Madhubhani, P; Chandrasena, R; Esala, P; Chen, Shao-Nong; Main, Matthew; Lankin, David C; Scism, Robert A; Dietz, Birgit M; Pauli, Guido F; Thatcher, Gregory R J; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-01-01

    Long-term exposure to estrogens including those in traditional hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers. As a result, women are turning to over-the-counter (OTC) botanical dietary supplements, such as black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) and hops (Humulus lupulus), as natural alternatives to HRT. The two major mechanisms which likely contribute to estrogen and/or HRT cancer risk are: the estrogen receptor-mediated hormonal pathway; and the chemical carcinogenesis pathway involving formation of estrogen quinones that damage DNA and proteins, hence initiating and promoting carcinogenesis. Because, OTC botanical HRT alternatives are in widespread use, they may have the potential for chemopreventive effects on estrogen carcinogenic pathways in vivo. Therefore, the effect of OTC botanicals on estrogen-induced malignant transformation of MCF-10A cells was studied. Cytochrome P450 catalyzed hydroxylation of estradiol at the 4-position leads to an o-quinone believed to act as the proximal carcinogen. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis of estradiol metabolites showed that 4-hydroxylation was inhibited by hops, whereas black cohosh was without effect. Estrogen-induced expression of CYP450 1B1 and CYP450 1A1 was attenuated by the hops extract. Two phenolic constituents of hops (xanthohumol, XH; 8-prenylnaringenin, 8-PN) were tested: 8-PN was a potent inhibitor, whereas XH had no effect. Finally, estrogen-induced malignant transformation of MCF-10A cells was observed to be significantly inhibited by hops (5 μg/mL) and 8-PN (50 nmol/L). These data suggest that hops extracts possess cancer chemopreventive activity through attenuation of estrogen metabolism mediated by 8-PN. PMID:21997247

  6. Elucidation of the pharmacokinetics of prednisone and prednisolone: elimination and the effect of estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavson, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Several aspects of the pharmacokinetics of the interconvertible glucocorticoids prednisone and prednisolone have been studied. The pharmacokinetics of prednisolone were examined in postmenopausal women taking conjugated estrogens and age-matched control women. The subjects received iv bolus doses of 0.14 and 0.55 mg/kg prednisolone. Expected increases in clearance and volume of distribution with increasing dose were observed for total prednisolone in all subjects. At both doses, significant decreases in total and unbound prednisolone clearance were observed in the women taking estrogen compared to the controls. Volume of distribution was unchanged. The decreases in clearance are smaller than those observed in young women taking oral contraceptives indicating that factors other than estrogen administration may influence prednisolone clearance in oral contraceptive users. While the protein binding of prednisolone is well characterized, little is known about the protein binding of prednisone. Equilibrium dialysis employing (/sup 3/H)prednisone was used to study the binding of prednisone in human plasma containing endogenous hydrocortisone. Plasma was obtained from volunteers with normal and elevated transcortin binding capacities (CAP/sub T/). Prednisolone binding exhibits marked concentration dependence and sensitivity to CAP/sub T/. In contrast, prednisone binding is independent of concentration and CAP/sub T/.

  7. Hypergravity and estrogen effects on avian anterior pituitary growth hormone and prolactin levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorindo, R. P.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developing female chicks with fractured right radii were maintained for 14 d at either earth gravity (1 g) or a hypergravity state (2 g). The birds at 1 g were divided into groups which received daily injections of (1) saline, (2) 200 micrograms estrone, and (3) 400 micrograms estrone for 14 d. The 2-g birds were divided into three similarly treated groups. All 2-g birds showed significantly lower body weights than did 1-g birds. Anterior pituitary (AP) glands were excised and analyzed for growth hormone and prolactin content by analytical electrophoresis. The 1-g chicks receiving either dose of daily estrogen showed increased AP growth hormone levels, whereas hypergravity alone did not affect growth hormone content. Chicks exposed to daily estrogen and hypergravity displayed reduced growth hormone levels. AP prolactin levels were slightly increased by the lower daily estrogen dose in 1-g birds, but markedly reduced in birds exposed only to hypergravity. Doubly-treated chicks displayed normal prolactin levels. Reduced growth in 2-g birds might be due, in part, to reduced AP levels of prolactin and/or growth hormone.

  8. Chick oviduct differentiation. The effect of estrogen and progesterone on the expression of progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, T K

    1990-06-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) is a marker of estrogen action. Its cellular appearance during estrogen (20 mg/kg i.m.)-induced differentiation of the immature chick oviduct was therefore studied by immunohistochemistry. PR was located in the epithelial, mesothelial, submucosal stromal and smooth muscle cells. Progesterone (20 mg/kg i.m.) caused an obvious decrease in PR immunoreactivity without inducing synthesis of progesterone-dependent avidin. Thus mere receptor occupation by ligand is not sufficient for this induction. This paper reports that the expression of PR in the mucosal stromal cell differs from that in other cell types. In the mucosal stromal cell PR was inducible, i.e., not shown without the action of estrogen. The formation of tubular glands did not commence before mucosal stromal cells expressed PR. It would seem that the mucosal stromal cells have a crucial role in mediating epithelial differentiation. The onset of differentiation was preceded by vascularization and invasion of mononuclear cells in the submucosa. It was conspicuous that the smooth muscle cells of arteries also contained PR. PMID:2207839

  9. Effects of estrogen and gender on cataractogenesis induced by high-LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.A.; Rusek, A.; Valluri, S.; Garrett, J.; Lopez, J.; Caperell-Grant, A.; Mendonca, M.; Bigsby, R.; Dynlacht, J.

    2010-02-01

    Planning for long-duration manned lunar and interplanetary missions requires an understanding of radiation-induced cataractogenesis. Previously, it was demonstrated that low-linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation with 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays resulted in an increased incidence of cataracts in male rats compared to female rats. This gender difference was not due to differences in estrogen, since male rats treated with the major secreted estrogen 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) showed an identical increase compared to untreated males. We now compare the incidence and rate of progression of cataracts induced by high-LET radiation in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received a single dose of 1 Gy of 600 MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. Lens opacification was measured at 2-4 week intervals with a slit lamp. The incidence and rate of progression of radiation-induced cataracts was significantly increased in the animals in which estrogen was available from endogenous or exogenous sources. Male rats with E2 capsules implanted had significantly higher rates of progression compared to male rats with empty capsules implanted (P = 0.025) but not compared to the intact female rats. These results contrast with data obtained after low-LET irradiation and suggest the possibility that the different types of damage caused by high- and low-LET radiation may be influenced differentially by steroid sex hormones.

  10. Effects of biodegradation and sorption by humic acid on the estrogenicity of 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Ho; Zhou, John L; Kim, Sang Don

    2011-11-01

    The removal of 17β-estradiol (E2) by biodegradation and sorption onto humic acid (HA) was examined at various HA concentrations. Subsequently, estrogenicity associated with E2 removal was estimated using E-screen bioassay. Results showed that E2 biodegradation and its subsequent transformation to estrone (E1) were significantly reduced with increasing HA concentration. In addition, the presence of nutrients enhanced the biodegradation of E2. Overall, E2 biodegradation was the dominating contributor to its removal, which demonstrated a significantly negative correlation with E2 sorption at various HA concentrations. The sorption of E2 by HA was significantly enhanced with increasing HA concentration. Estrogenicity associated with residual E2 showed that there existed a significant difference among various HA concentrations, with the lowest value in the absence of HA. The findings suggest that the presence of HA and nutrients in natural waters should be considered in assessing estrogenicity of environmental samples due to complex sorption and biodegradation processes. PMID:21872903

  11. G-protein-coupled receptor 30-mediated antiapoptotic effect of estrogen on spinal motor neurons following injury and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINGYU; HU, RONG; GE, HONGFEI; DUANMU, WANGSHENG; LI, YUHONG; XUE, XINGSENG; HU, SHENGLI; FENG, HUA

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in severe dysfunction of motor neurons. G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) expression in the motor neurons of the ventral horn of the spinal cord mediates neuroprotection through estrogen signaling. The present study explored the antiapoptotic effect of estrogen, mediated by GPR30 following SCI, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. Spinal motor neurons from rats were cultured in vitro in order to establish cell models of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). The effects of estrogen, the estrogen agonist, G1, and the estrogen inhibitor, G15, on motor neurons were observed using MTT assays. The effects of E2, G1 and G15 on spinal motor neuron apoptosis following OGD, were detected using flow cytometry. The role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) inhibitor, LY294002, was also determined using flow cytometry. Rat SCI models were established. E2, G1 and E2+LY294002 were administered in vivo. Motor function was scored at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 d following injury, using Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) standards. Cell activity in the estrogen and G1 groups was higher than that in the solvent group, whereas cell activity in the E2+G15 group was lower than that in the E2 group (P<0.05). Following OGD, the proportion of apoptotic cells significantly increased (P<0.05). The proportion in the estrogen group was significantly lower than that in the solvent group, whereas the proportion of apoptotic cells in the E2+G15 and E2+LY294002 groups was higher than that in the E2 group (P<0.05). Treatment with E2 and G1 led to upregulation of P-Akt expression in normal cells and post-OGD cells. The BBB scores of rats in the E2 and G1 groups were higher than those in the placebo group (P<0.05). The BBB scores of the E2+LY294002 group were lower than those of the E2 group (P<0.05). Estrogen thus appears to exert a protective effect on spinal motor neurons following OGD, via GPR30. The PI3K/Akt pathway may be one of those

  12. In vitro OECD test methods applied to screen the estrogenic effect of chemicals, used in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Eun-Jung; Han, Songyi; Oh, Gyeong-Yong; Kim, Min-Hee; Kang, Hui-Seung; Suh, Jin-Hyang; Oh, Jae-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Moon, Guiim; Hong, Jin-Hwan; Hwang, In-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 27 chemicals found in household products, which became an issue in Korea were screened for the agonistoc and antagonistic effects against human estrogen receptor using official Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in vitro assays, STTA assay using ERα-HeLa-9903 cell line and BG1Luc ER TA assay. In the case of human ER agonist screening by two assays, all tested chemicals did not show agonist effect against ER. In ER antagonist test by BG1Luc ER TA assay, five surfactants α-dodecyl-ω-hydroxypoly(oxyethylene), alcohols C16-18 ethoxylated, nonylphenol, ethoxylated, 3,6,9,12,15,18,21-heptaoxatritriacontan-1-ol, and α-dodecyl-ω-hydroxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl)) were found to exhibit weak antagonistic activities. The agonist/antagonist effects against human estrogen receptor of various chemicals, used in Korea by OECD test guideline are reported in this study. These results indicated that two OECD in vitro assays will can be applied in Korea by screening of agonistic/antagonistic effects against human ER of various chemicals. PMID:27317829

  13. Effects of growth hormone and low dose estrogen on bone growth and turnover in long bones of hypophysectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, L. S.; Schmidt, I. U.; Evans, G. L.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Pituitary hormones are recognized as critical to longitudinal growth, but their role in the radial growth of bone and in maintaining cancellous bone balance are less clear. This investigation examines the histomorphometric effects of hypophysectomy (Hx) and ovariectomy (OVX) and the subsequent replacement of growth hormone (GH) and estrogen (E), in order to determine the effects and possible interactions between these two hormones on cortical and cancellous bone growth and turnover. The replacement of estrogen is of interest since Hx results in both pituitary and gonadal hormone insufficiencies, with the latter being caused by the Hx-associated reduction in follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). All hypophysectomized animals received daily supplements of hydrocortisone (500 microg/kg) and L-thyroxine (10 microg/kg), whereas intact animals received daily saline injections. One week following surgery, hypophysectomized animals received either daily injections of low-dose 17 beta-estradiol (4.8 microg/kg s.c.), 3 X/d recombinant human GH (2 U/kg s.c.), both, or saline for a period of two weeks. Flurochromes were administered at weekly intervals to label bone matrix undergoing mineralization. Whereas Hx resulted in reductions in body weight, uterine weight, and tibial length, OVX significantly increased body weight and tibial length, while reducing uterine weight. The combination of OVX and Hx resulted in values similar to Hx alone. Treatment with GH normalized body weight and bone length, while not affecting uterine weight in hypophysectomized animals. Estrogen increased uterine weight, while not impacting longitudinal bone growth and reduced body weight. Hypophysectomy diminished tibial cortical bone area through reductions in both mineral appositional rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR). While E had no effect, GH increased both MAR and BFR, though not to sham-operated (control) levels. Hypophysectomy reduced proximal tibial trabecular number and cancellous bone

  14. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS) FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which ...

  15. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  16. Analysis of lagoon samples from different concentrated animal feeding operations for estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Stephen R; White, Mark V; Hudson, Felisa M; Fine, Dennis D

    2007-02-01

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which are used for land application. Lagoons associated with swine, poultry, and cattle operations were sampled at three locations each for direct analysis for estrogens by GC/ MS/MS and estrogen conjugates by LC/MS/MS. Estrogen conjugates were also analyzed indirectly by first subjecting the same samples to enzyme hydrolysis. Solids from centrifuged samples were extracted for free estrogens to estimate total estrogen load. Total free estrogen levels (estrone, 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estriol) were generally higher in swine primary (1000-21000 ng/L), followed by poultry primary (1800-4000 ng/L), dairy secondary (370-550 ng/L), and beef secondary (22-24 ng/L) whole lagoon samples. Swine and poultry lagoons contained levels of 17(alpha-estradiol comparable to those of 17beta-estradiol. Confirmed estrogen conjugates included estrone-3-sulfate (2-91 ng/L), 17beta-estradiol-3-sulfate (8-44 ng/L), 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate (141-182 ng/L), and 17beta-estradiol-17-sulfate (72-84 ng/L) in some lagoons. Enzymatic hydrolysis indicated the presence of additional unidentified estrogen conjugates not detected bythe LC/MS/MS method. In most cases estrogen conjugates accounted for at least a third of the total estrogen equivalents. Collectively, these methods can be used to better determine estrogen loads from CAFO operations, and this research shows that estrogen conjugates contribute significantly to the overall estrogen load, even in different types of CAFO lagoons. PMID:17328177

  17. Pomegranate extract demonstrate a selective estrogen receptor modulator profile in human tumor cell lines and in vivo models of estrogen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, Sreekumar; Santhosh Kumar, Thankayyan R; Lakshmi, Baddireddi S; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2012-07-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are estrogen receptor (ER) ligands exhibiting tissue-specific agonistic or antagonistic biocharacter and are used in the hormonal therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancers. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to exert antiproliferative effects on human breast cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME). PME was evaluated for antiproliferative activity at 20-320 μg/ml on human breast (MCF-7, MDA MB-231) endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), ovarian (SKOV3) carcinoma and normal breast fibroblast (MCF-10A) cells. Competitive radioactive binding studies were carried out to ascertain whether PME interacts with ER. The reporter gene assay measured the estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of PME in MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 cells transiently transfected with plasmids coding estrogen response elements with a reporter gene (pG5-ERE-luc) and wild-type ERα (hEG0-ER). PME inhibited the binding of [³H] estradiol to ER and suppressed the growth and proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells. PME binds ER and down-regulated the transcription of estrogen-responsive reporter gene transfected into breast cancer cells. The expressions of selected estrogen-responsive genes were down-regulated by PME. Unlike 17β-estradiol [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] and tamoxifen (10 mg/kg BW), PME (50 and 100 mg/kg BW) did not increase the uterine weight and proliferation in ovariectomized mice and its cardioprotective effects were comparable to that of 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PME displays a SERM profile and may have the potential for prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancers with beneficial effects in other hormone-dependent tissues. PMID:21839626

  18. Differential effects of short term feeding of a soy protein isolate diet and estrogen treatment on bone in the pre-pubertal rat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beneficial effects of a soy diet on bone quality have been assumed to be due to the putative estrogenic actions of isoflavones. We studied the effects of soy protein isolate (SPI) on bone quality and compared these effects to 17 beta-estradiol (E2) in pre-pubertal rats. Female rats were weaned to a ...

  19. The effect of flushing and stimulus of estrogenized does on reproductive performance of anovulatory-range goats.

    PubMed

    De Santiago-Miramontes, María Angeles; Luna-Orozco, Juan Ramon; Meza-Herrera, Cesar A; Rivas-Muñoz, Raymundo; Carrillo, Evaristo; Véliz-Deras, Francisco Gerardo; Mellado, Miguel

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether flushing or the stimulus of estrogenized goats is necessary to achieve a high reproductive response in anestrous goats on rangeland. Does were feed-supplemented on rangeland (flushed, n = 20). Other group was exposed to estrogenized does during the mating period (stimulated, n = 20). A third group was both supplemented and stimulated (stimulated-flushed, n = 20) and other group grazed on rangeland only (control, n = 18). More goats in the stimulated and stimulated-flushed groups showed estrus during the first 5 days of joining (45% and 60%, respectively) than the control and flushed groups (11% and 5%, respectively; P < 0.05). Flushing did not improve prolificacy and reduced (P < 0.05) kidding rates (40% and 35% for the flushed and stimulated-flushed groups, respectively) compared to 67% and 55% for the control and stimulated groups, respectively. This experiment demonstrates potential shortcomings of use of flushing in range goats with inadequate nutrition during gestation. PMID:21479570

  20. Effect of process conditions on the analysis of free and conjugated estrogen hormones by solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPE-GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Suri, Rominder P S; Singh, Tony Sarvinder; Chimchirian, Robert F

    2012-03-01

    Simultaneous analysis of 11 free estrogen hormones and five conjugated estrogens in water and municipal wastewater was studied. The analytical method was developed and tested for different types of solid-phase extraction adsorbents, eluents, sample containers and storage conditions, derivatization, and matrix effects. Varian Bond Elut C-18 solid-phase extraction adsorbent cartridge was selected based on its high recoveries for both free and conjugated estrogens. Sample storage conditions, as well as selection and pretreatment of sample container materials, can affect the trace level analysis of estrogens. Silanization of glassware is observed to provide low relative standard deviation (RSD) in the analysis and less percentage loss due to contacting with sample container materials. Light exposure during the test can significantly impact the results. The derivatized samples stored at -20°C for at least 6 days showed less than 10.5% average RSD in the analysis. The recovery efficiency in clean water varies from 72% to 101% for free estrogens and 78% to 82% for conjugated estrogens. The method detection limits (MDL) for most of the compounds range from 30 to 870 ng/L using a sample volume of 200 mL. With a sample volume of 3 L, the most sensitive compound produces a MDL of 0.03 ng/L. Dilute methanol is used to wash the loaded cartridge as a cleanup step in order to remove interfering species during analysis of wastewater samples. Using the optimized analytical methods, the concentration level of free estrogens in the influent and effluent municipal wastewaters is tested. PMID:21544501

  1. Nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate the dose-related myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by acute ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute ethanol lowers blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output in proestrus and after chronic estrogen (E2) replacement in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. However, whether rapid nongenomic effects of estrogen mediate these hemodynamic effects of ethanol remains unanswered. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of ethanol (0.5 or 1.5 g/kg iv) on left ventricular (LV) function and oxidative markers in OVX rats pretreated 30 min earlier with 1 μg/kg E2 (OVXE2) or vehicle (OVX) and in proestrus sham-operated (SO) rats. In SO rats, ethanol caused significant and dose-related reductions in BP, rate of rise in LV pressure (LV dP/dtmax), and LV developed pressure (LVDP). These effects of ethanol disappeared in OVX rats and were restored in OVXE2 rats, suggesting rapid estrogen receptor signaling mediates the detrimental effects of ethanol on LV function. Ex vivo studies revealed that the estrogen-dependent myocardial dysfunction caused by ethanol was coupled with higher LV 1) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) expression of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, 3) phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and 4) catalase activity. ERK1/2 inhibition by PD-98059 (1 mg/kg iv) abrogated the myocardial dysfunction, hypotension, and the elevation in myocardial ROS generation caused by ethanol. We conclude that rapid estrogen receptor signaling is implicated in cellular events that lead to the generation of aldehyde protein adducts and Akt/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which ultimately mediate the estrogen-dependent LV oxidative stress and dysfunction caused by ethanol in female rats. PMID:24368668

  2. Behaviour of estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals in permeable carbonate sands.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Benjamin O; Erler, Dirk V; Tait, Douglas R; van Zwieten, Lukas; Kimber, Stephen; Eyre, Bradley D

    2015-08-01

    The remediation of four estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estriol (E3), was measured in saturated and unsaturated carbonate sand-filled columns dosed with wastewater from a sewage treatment plant. The estrogen equivalency (EEQ) of inlet wastewater was 1.2 ng L(-1) and was remediated to an EEQ of 0.5 ng L(-1) through the unsaturated carbonate sand-filled columns. The high surface area of carbonate sand and associated high microbial activity may have assisted the degradation of these estrogens. The fully saturated sand columns showed an increase in total estrogenic potency with an EEQ of 2.4 ng L(-1), which was double that of the inlet wastewater. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in total estrogenic potency between aerobic and anaerobic columns. The breakdown of conjugated estrogens to estrogenic EDCs formed under long residence time and reducing conditions may have been responsible for the increase in the fully saturated columns. This may also be explained by the desorption of previously sorbed estrogenic EDCs. The effect of additional filter materials, such as basalt sediment and coconut fibre, on estrogenic EDC reduction was also tested. None of these amendments provided improvements in estrogen remediation relative to the unamended unsaturated carbonate sand columns. Aerobic carbonate sand filters have good potential to be used as on-site wastewater treatment systems for the reduction of estrogenic EDCs. However, the use of fully saturated sand filters, which are used to promote denitrification, and the loss of nitrogen as N2 were shown to cause an increase in EEQ. The potential for the accumulation of estrogenic EDCs under anaerobic conditions needs to be considered when designing on-site sand filtration systems required to reduce nitrogen. Furthermore, the accumulation of estrogens under anaerobic conditions such as under soil absorption systems or leachate fields has the

  3. Activation of Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) Estrogen Receptors by Phytoestrogens: Potential Role in the Reproductive Failure of Captive-Born Females?

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Phillip; Cardon, Mary; Varga, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The captive southern white rhinoceros (SWR; Ceratotherium simum simum) population serves as an important genetic reservoir critical to the conservation of this vulnerable species. Unfortunately, captive populations are declining due to the poor reproductive success of captive-born females. Captive female SWR exhibit reproductive problems suggested to result from continual ovarian follicular activity and prolonged exposure to endogenous estrogen. However, we investigated the potential role of exogenous dietary phytoestrogens in the reproductive failure of SWR by cloning and characterizing in vitro phytoestrogen binding and activation of recombinant SWR estrogen receptors (ESR). We compared those characteristics with recombinant greater one-horned rhinoceros (GOHR; Rhinoceros unicornis) ESR, a species that receives similar captive diets yet reproduces relatively well. Our results indicate that phytoestrogens bind rhino ESR in a manner similar to other vertebrate species, but there are no differences found in phytoestrogen binding affinity of SWR ESR compared with GOHR ESR. However, species-specific differences in ESR activation by phytoestrogens were detected. The phytoestrogen coumestrol stimulated greater maximal activation of SWR ESR1 than GOHR ESR1. SWR ESR2 were also more sensitive to phytoestrogens and were activated to a greater extent by both coumestrol and daidzein. The concentrations in which significant differences in ESR activation occurred (10−7 to 10−5 m) are consistent with circulating concentrations measured in other vertebrate species. Taken together, these findings suggest that phytoestrogens potentially pose a risk to the reproductive health of captive SWR. However, additional studies are needed to further clarify the physiological role of dietary phytoestrogens in the reduced fertility of this species. PMID:22253418

  4. Osteoprotective Effects of Estrogen in the Maxillary Bone Depend on ERα.

    PubMed

    Macari, S; Ajay Sharma, L; Wyatt, A; Knowles, P; Szawka, R E; Garlet, G P; Grattan, D R; Dias, G J; Silva, T A

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency results in disruption of maxillary alveolar bone microarchitecture. Most of the actions of estrogen in long bones occur via estrogen receptor α (ERα). However, the function of ERα in the maxillary bone has not been defined. We aimed to investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of ERα in the physiological and mechanically induced alveolar bone remodeling in female and male mice. Wild-type (WT) and ERα(-/-) (ERKOα) mice were subjected to mechanically stimulated bone remodeling by inducing orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). The maxillary bone was analyzed using histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) from WT and ERKOα mice were tested for their capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Both male and female ERKOα mice exhibited marked reduction of alveolar bone mass and increased OTM. This response was associated with an increased number of osteoclasts and reduced number of apoptotic cells and osteoblasts in the periodontium and alveolar bone. Consistently, ERKOα mice exhibited lower levels of calcium in bone and increased expression of IL-33 (interleukin-33), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α), and IL-1β (interleukin-1β) and decreased expression of dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein and alkaline phosphatase in periodontal tissues. Moreover, the differentiation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts in vitro was significantly higher in BMCs obtained from ERKOα. ERα is required to maintain the microarchitecture of maxillary alveolar bone. This process is linked to bone cell differentiation and apoptosis, as well as local production of inflammatory molecules such as IL-33, TNF-α, and IL-1β. PMID:26917440

  5. [Carcinogenesis theory based on estrogen deficiency].

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2009-06-21

    Earlier, estrogens were considered simply the most important hormones involved in female physiology and reproduction. Nowadays it has become familiar that they have pivotal roles in gene regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. There are many contradictions concerning the associations of female sexual steroids and cancer. Cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs are in the forefront of tumors as they are regarded as hormone associated ones. However, re-evaluation of earlier results supporting the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen exhibited many shortcomings and controversies. Recently, the clinical studies on hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women justified beneficial anticancer effects in several organs even in the female breast. The newly revealed association between estrogen deficiency and oral cancer risk also means a contradiction of the traditional concept of estrogen-induced cancer. Distinction between cancers of moderately and highly estrogen dependent tumors can be based on their different epidemiological features. The vast majority of the so-called smoking associated malignancies of the moderately estrogen dependent organs occur typically in the late postmenopausal life of women when the ovarian estrogen production is fairly decreased. However cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs such as breast, endometrium and ovary exhibit both premenopausal and postmenopausal occurrence. In spite of the different epidemiological data of these two groups of cancers the mechanism of gene regulation disorder in the background of tumor initiation cannot act through quite opposite pathways. This suggests that in moderately estrogen sensitive organs a serious, in the highly estrogen dependent sites even a mild estrogen deficiency is enough to provoke gene regulation disorders. The new findings both on smoking associated and hormone related cancers might lead to the same conversion; not estrogen but rather its deficiency may provoke

  6. Effect of dietary estrogens from bovine milk on blood hormone levels and reproductive organs in mice.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, N; Koracin, J; Majdic, G; Snoj, T

    2016-08-01

    Cows are often milked until 60 d before their next expected calving. Milk from cows in the third trimester of pregnancy contains up to 20 times more estrogens than milk from nonpregnant cows. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether exposure to known doses of estrogens from bovine milk could affect blood hormone levels in mice and influence their reproductive organs. This study was performed with 30 intact male and 30 ovariectomized female mice. Mice of each sex were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups, each with 6 animals of each sex, and a control group with 12 animals of each sex. The first experimental group received 4mL of milk each day from a pregnant cow with natural estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2) in concentrations 0.093 and 0.065ng/mL, respectively. The second experimental group received 4mL of the same milk each day, with an added 10ng/mL of both E1 and E2. The third experimental group received 4mL of the same milk each day, with an added 100ng/mL of both E1 and E2. The control group received no milk. After 8 d of treatment, mice were euthanized, blood was collected, and the uteruses, testes, and seminal vesicles were weighed. The results of our study demonstrated that consumption of native milk from a pregnant cow did not affect plasma E1 and E2 levels in either sex; uterine weight in females; or testosterone levels and testes and seminal vesicle weights in males. Similarly, we found no changes in the group that received the milk with an added 10ng/mL of E1 and E2. We did observe elevated plasma estrogens in both sexes, increased uterus weight in females, and decreased plasma testosterone levels in males from the group that received milk with an added 100ng/mL of E1 and E2. However, concentrations in the third group exceeded the physiological concentration of milk estrogens by 1,000 times, so it would be extremely unlikely to find such concentrations in native cow milk. PMID:27265162

  7. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor knockout mice: what their phenotypes reveal about mechanisms of estrogen action.

    PubMed

    Curtis Hewitt, S; Couse, J F; Korach, K S

    2000-01-01

    Natural, synthetic and environmental estrogens have numerous effects on the development and physiology of mammals. Estrogen is primarily known for its role in the development and functioning of the female reproductive system. However, roles for estrogen in male fertility, bone, the circulatory system and immune system have been established by clinical observations regarding sex differences in pathologies, as well as observations following menopause or castration. The primary mechanism of estrogen action is via binding and modulation of activity of the estrogen receptors (ERs), which are ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factors. ERs are found in highest levels in female tissues critical to reproduction, including the ovaries, uterus, cervix, mammary glands and pituitary gland. Since other affected tissues have extremely low levels of ER, indirect effects of estrogen, for example induction of pituitary hormones that affect the bone, have been proposed. The development of transgenic mouse models that lack either estrogen or ER have proven to be valuable tools in defining the mechanisms by which estrogen exerts its effects in various systems. The aim of this article is to review the mouse models with disrupted estrogen signaling and describe the associated phenotypes. PMID:11250727

  8. Emotional and cognitive functional imaging of estrogen and progesterone effects in the female human brain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Toffoletto, Simone; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Gingnell, Malin; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Comasco, Erika

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian hormones are pivotal for the physiological maintenance of the brain function as well as its response to environmental stimuli. There is mounting evidence attesting the relevance of endogenous ovarian hormones as well as exogenous estradiol and progesterone for emotional and cognitive processing. The present review systematically summarized current knowledge on sex steroid hormonal modulation of neural substrates of emotion and cognition revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-four studies of healthy naturally cycling and combined oral contraceptives (COC) user women, or women undergoing experimental manipulations, during their reproductive age, were included. Furthermore, six studies of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a hormonally based mood disorder, and three of gender dysphoria (GD), which provides an intriguing opportunity to examine the effect of high-dose cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) on brain functioning, were included. Globally, low (early follicular and the entire follicular phase for estrogen and progesterone, respectively) and high (COC, CSHT, late follicular and luteal phase for estrogen; COC, mid- and late-luteal phase for progesterone) hormonal milieu diversely affected the response of several brain regions including the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus, but their functional recruitment across groups and domains was scattered. The constellation of findings provides initial evidence of the influence of sex steroid hormones on cortical and subcortical regions implicated in emotional and cognitive processing. Further well-powered and multimodal neuroimaging studies will be needed to identify the neural mechanism of functional brain alterations induced by sex steroid hormones. PMID:25222701

  9. The effect of estrogen on the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells is mediated by ERRγ through AKT and ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Wang, Cuicui; Yang, Hui; Ma, Xiaoxin

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the effects and underlying mechanism of estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) on the proliferation of endometrial carcinoma cells. Ishikawa cells, human endometrial cancer cells, were treated with estrogen. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the expression of ERRγ. Stable transfection with the plasmid containing ERRγ shRNA was carried out to knock down the expression of ERRγ in Ishikawa cells. MTT assays were performed to analyze the proliferation of Ishikawa cells. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK)1/2 and activated protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathways was identified using specific phosphorylated antibodies against ERK1/2 and AKT. PD98059, a MEK inhibitor, and LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, were used in the inhibition experiments. ERRγ could translocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in Ishikawa cells after exposure to estrogen. Knockdown of ERRγ inhibited estrogen-induced proliferation of Ishikawa cells. More interestingly, knockdown of ERRγ abolished the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT in the Ishikawa cells treated with estrogen. Inhibition of AKT in Ishikawa cells with LY294002 resulted in a significant reduction in the levels of phospho-ERK1/2, whereas inhibition of ERK1/2 with PD98059 exerted no effects on AKT activation. Our data showed that ERRγ mediated the effects of estrogen on the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells through the activation AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, which indicated that ERRγ plays a key role in endometrial cancer. PMID:25068805

  10. Estrogen-Cholinergic Interactions: Implications for Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-01-01

    While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  11. Estrogen-cholinergic interactions: Implications for cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and Cognition". While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  12. GPER1 mediates estrogen-induced neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation in the primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Fei; Hu, Jun; He, Shi-Ming; Ding, Qian; Ma, Lian-Ting

    2016-07-22

    It is well-known that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen have potential in the prevention and amelioration of ischemic and degenerative neurological disorders, while the underlying mechanisms for estrogen actions are undefined. As an important mediator for the non-genomic functions of estrogen, GPER1 (G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor 1) has been suggested to involve in the beneficial roles of estrogen in neural cells. Here our studies on primary hippocampal neurons have focused on GPER1 in an in vitro model of ischemia using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). GPER1 expression in the primary hippocampal neurons was stimulated by the OGD treatments. Both E2 (estradiol) and E2-BSA (membrane impermeable estradiol by covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin) attenuated OGD-induced cell death in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Importantly, this membrane-mediated estrogen function requires GPER1 protein. Knocking down of GPER1 diminished, while overexpression of GPER1 potentiated, the protective roles of E2/E2-BSA following OGD. Additionally, the downstream mechanisms employed by membrane-associated estrogen signaling were found to include PI3K/Akt-dependent Ask1 inhibition in the primary hippocampal neurons. Overall, these research results could enhance our understanding of the neuroprotective actions for estrogen, and provide a new therapeutic target for improving stroke outcome and ameliorating degenerative neurological diseases. PMID:27113328

  13. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J.; Brown, Celeste J.; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV. PMID:27103314

  14. Activation of transgenic estrogen receptor-beta by selected phytoestrogens in a stably transduced rat serotonergic cell line.

    PubMed

    Amer, Dena A M; Kretzschmar, Georg; Müller, Nicole; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-06-01

    Many flavonoids, a major group of phenolic plant-derived secondary metabolites, are known to possess estrogen-like bioactivities. However, little is known about their estrogenic properties in the central nervous system due to the lack of suitable cellular models expressing sufficient amounts of functional estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). To overcome this deficit, we have created a cellular model, which is serotonergic in origin, to study properties of estrogenic substances by stably transducing RN46A-B14 cells derived from raphe nuclei region of the rat brain with a lentiviral vector encoding a human ERbeta. We clearly showed that the transgenic human ERbeta is a spontaneously expressed and a functional receptor. We have further assessed the estrogenicity of three different isoflavones and four different naringenin-type flavanones in this cell line utilizing a luciferase reporter gene assay. Genistein (GEN), Daidzein (DAI), Equol (EQ), Naringenin (NAR) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) showed strong estrogenic activity in a concentration-dependent manner as compared to 7-(O-prenyl)naringenin-4'-acetate (7-O-PN) which was only slightly estrogenic and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6-DMAN) that neither showed estrogenic nor anti-estrogenic activity in our model. All observed effects could be antagonized by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant. Moreover, co-treatment of cells with 17beta-estradiol (E2) and either GEN or DAI showed a slight additive effect as compared to EQ. On the other hand, 8-PN in addition to 7-O-PN, but not NAR and 6-DMAN, were able to slightly antagonize the responses triggered by E2. Our newly established cellular model may prove to be a useful tool in explicating basic physiological properties of ERbeta in the brain and may help unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in serotonergic mood regulation by estrogen or potential plant-derived secondary metabolites. PMID:20433925

  15. Estrogenic and Progestagenic effects of extracts of Justicia pectoralis Jacq., an herbal medicine from Costa Rica used for the treatment of Menopause and PMS

    PubMed Central

    Locklear, Tracie D.; Huang, Yue; Frasor, Jonna; Doyle, Brian J.; Perez, Alice; Gomez-Laurito, Jorge; Mahady, Gail. B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the biological activities of Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae), an herbal medicine used in Costa Rica (CR) for the management of menopausal symptoms and dysmenorrhea. Study design The aerial parts of Justicia pectoralis were collected, dried and extracted in methanol. To establish possible mechanisms of action of JP for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, the estrogenic and progesterone agonist, and antiinflammatory activities were investigated. Main outcome measures The methanol extract (JP-M) was tested in ER and PR binding assays, a COX-2 enzyme inhibition assay, the ERβ-CALUX assay in U2-OS cells, as well as reporter and endogenous gene assays in MCF-7 K1 cells. Results The JP-M extract inhibited COX-2 catalytic activity (IC50 4.8µg/ml); bound to both ERα and ERβ (IC50 50 µg/ml and 23.1µg/ml, respectively); induced estrogen-dependent transcription in the ERβ-CALUX; and bound to the progesterone receptor (IC50 22.8 µg/ml). The extract also modulated the expression of endogenous estrogen responsive genes pS2, PR, and PTGES in MCF-7 cells at a concentration of 20 µg/ml. Activation of a 2 ERE-construct in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells by the extract was inhibited by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780, indicating that the effects were mediated through the estrogen receptor. Finally, the extract weakly enhanced the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, however this was not statistically significant as compared with DMSO controls. Conclusions Extracts of J. pectoralis have estrogenic, progestagenic and anti-inflammatory effects, and thus have a plausible mechanism of action, explaining its traditional use for menopause and PMS. PMID:20452152

  16. Relationship between estrogen receptor-binding and estrogenic activities of environmental estrogens and suppression by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Han, Dal-Ho; Denison, Michael S; Tachibana, Hirofumi; Yamada, Koji

    2002-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the estrogenic activity of environmental estrogens by a competition binding assay using a human recombinant estrogens receptor (hERbeta) and by a proliferation assay using MCF-7 cells and a sulforhodamine-B assay. In the binding assay, pharmaceuticals had a stronger binding activity to hERbeta than that of some phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, luteolin, chrysin, flavone, and naringenin) or industrial chemicals, but phytoestrogens such as coumestrol had a binding activity as strong as pharmaceuticals such as 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE), tamoxifen (Tam), and mestranol. In the proliferation assay, pharmaceuticals such as diethylstilbestrol, EE, Tam, and clomiphene, and industrial chemicals such as 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 4-dihydroxybiphenyl had a proliferation-stimulating activity as strong as 17beta-estradiol (ES). In addition, we found that phytoestrogens such as coumestrol, daidzein, luteolin, and quercetin exerted a proliferation stimulating activity as strong as ES. Furthermore, we examined the suppression of proliferation-stimulating activity, induced by environmental estrogen, by flavonoids, such as daidzein, genistein, quercetin, and luteolin, and found that these flavonoids suppressed the induction of the proliferation-stimulating activity of environmental estrogens. The suppressive effect of flavonoids suggests that these compounds have anti-estrogenic and anti-cancer activities. PMID:12224631

  17. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Subtype Agonists on Serotonergic Function in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Saloua; Adeniji, Opeyemi S; Privratsky, Anthony A; Frazer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Acute estradiol treatment was reported to slow the clearance of serotonin via activation of estrogen receptors (ER)β and/or GPR30 and to block the ability of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to slow serotonin clearance via activation of ERα. In this study, the behavioral consequences of longer-term treatments with estradiol or ER subtype-selective agonists and/or an SSRI were examined in the forced swim test (FST). Ovariectomized rats were administered the following for 2 weeks: estradiol, ERβ agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN), GPR30 agonist (G1), ERα agonist (PPT), and/or the SSRI sertraline. Similar to sertraline, longer-term treatment with estradiol, DPN or G1 induced an antidepressant-like effect. By contrast, PPT did not, even though it blocked the antidepressant-like effect of sertraline. Uterus weights, used as a peripheral measure of estrogenic activity, were increased by estradiol and PPT but not DPN or G1 treatment. A second part of this study investigated, using Western blot analyses in homogenates from hippocampus, whether these behavioral effects are accompanied by changes in the activation of specific signaling pathways and/or TrkB. Estradiol and G1 increased phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and TrkB. These effects were similar to those obtained after treatment with sertraline. Treatment with DPN increased phosphorylation of ERK and TrkB, but it did not alter that of Akt. Treatment with PPT increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK without altering that of TrkB. In conclusion, activation of at least TrkB and possibly ERK may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of estradiol, ERβ and GPR30 agonists whereas Akt activation may not be necessary. PMID:26159182

  18. Effects of flaxseed and Hypericum perforatum on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers in menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfarpour, Masumeh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Khadivzadeh, Talat; khorsand, Imaneh; Afiat, Maliheh; Esmaeilizadeh, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed at evaluation of the efficacy of Hypericum perforatum and flaxseed on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers in menopausal women Materials and Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (RCT) to explore trials that assessed the effectiveness of H. perforatum and flaxseed on hot flash, vaginal atrophy and estrogen-dependent cancers. In this regard, the following terms were used “menopause AND H. perforatum OR flaxseed OR Linum usitatissimum. Only randomized controlled trials were included in the study. Results: Nine RCTs were included in this systematic review. Based on the literature, flaxseed showed beneficial effect on hot flash frequency and intensity, which was not statistically significant. According to two trials, flaxseed showed estrogenic effects; however, no conclusion regarding cancer promoting or protecting effects can be made. The evidence of the efficacy of the flaxseed on alleviating vaginal atrophy was also limited due to inconsistent findings in this regard. One trial declared that Vitex agnus-castus and H. perforatum showed comparable decrease in the frequency of hot flashes. Conclusion: The results of our systematic review suggest beneficial effect on vasomotor symptom with both of flaxseed and H. perforatum. Consistent conclusion regarding estrogen-dependent cancers and maturation value is limited due to small number of trials related to flaxseed. Further trials are still needed to confirm the results of our systematic review. PMID:27462550

  19. Estrogen priming effect on growth hormone (GH) provocative test: a useful tool for the diagnosis of GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A S; Domené, H M; Ropelato, M G; Jasper, H G; Pennisi, P A; Escobar, M E; Heinrich, J J

    2000-11-01

    We have studied the effect of estradiol (E2) on the GH-insulin-like growth factor (GH-IGF) axis in 15 prepubertal GH deficiency (GHD) children and 44 prepubertal or early pubertal children with idiopathic short stature (SS). All of them received a daily dose of micronized E2 (1 or 2 mg) or placebo, for 3 days, before a sequential arginine-clonidine test. In SS children, GH maximal responses were 17.8+/-10.9 on placebo and 27.9+/-14.5 microg/L on estrogen (P < 0.0001). The lower 95% confidence limits for GH maximal response changed from 3.7 microg/L (without E2) to 8.3 microg/L (on E2). In GHD children, no significant stimulatory effect of estrogen on GH levels was observed. After placebo, a cut-off limit of 3.7 microg/L (the lower 95% confidence interval limit) resulted in 73% sensitivity, 95% specificity, and an overall 90% diagnostic efficiency. After E2, a cut-off limit of 8.3 microg/L resulted in a sensitivity of 87%, a specificity of 98%, and a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. After placebo, 68% of SS showed normal IGF-I levels, and the mean did not change on E2 (13.7+/-6.3 vs. 14.3+/-6.8 nmol/L, not significant). In 93% of SS, IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 levels were normal during placebo. On E2, mean IGFBP-3 did not change (2.63+/-0.70 vs. 2.70+/-0.70 mg/L, not significant). In 14 of 15 GHD patients, IGF-I values were below normal on placebo, and the mean of the group did not change after E2. During placebo, 13 of 15 GHD children presented low IGFBP-3 values. During E2, there was a small significant increase in IGFBP-3 values (1.06+/-0.58 vs. 1.20+/-0.69 mg/L, P < 0.02). The highest diagnostic efficiencies for IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were observed during placebo (75% and 91%, respectively). We conclude that GH stimulation tests after E2 priming had the highest diagnostic efficiency. Our findings suggest that the effect of estrogen priming on GH stimulated levels, by reducing the number of false nonresponders, might be useful to better discriminate between normal and

  20. Estrogen Abolishes Latent Inhibition in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nofrey, Barbara S.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat M.; Brake, Wayne G.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is frequently prescribed as a method of birth control and as hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women with varied effects on cognition. Here the effects of estrogen on attention were examined using the latent inhibition (LI) behavioral paradigm. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were given either estrogen benzoate (EB, 10 or…

  1. Opposing Effects of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ) Response to 5α-Reductase Inhibition in Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Teresa T; Grubisha, Melanie J; Frahm, Krystle A; Wendell, Stacy G; Liu, Jiayan; Ricke, William A; Auchus, Richard J; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-07-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an androgen receptor-driven, inflammatory disorder affecting elderly men, include 5α-reductase (5AR) inhibitors (i.e. dutasteride and finasteride) to block the conversion of testosterone to the more potent androgen receptor ligand dihydrotestosterone. Because dihydrotestosterone is the precursor for estrogen receptor β (ERβ) ligands, 5AR inhibitors could potentially limit ERβ activation, which maintains prostate tissue homeostasis. We have uncovered signaling pathways in BPH-derived prostate epithelial cells (BPH-1) that are impacted by 5AR inhibition. The induction of apoptosis and repression of the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin by the 5AR inhibitor dutasteride requires both ERβ and TGFβ. Dutasteride also induces cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2), which functions in a negative feedback loop in TGFβ and ERβ signaling pathways as evidenced by the potentiation of apoptosis induced by dutasteride or finasteride upon pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated ablation of COX-2. Concurrently, COX-2 positively impacts ERβ action through its effect on the expression of a number of steroidogenic enzymes in the ERβ ligand metabolic pathway. Therefore, effective combination pharmacotherapies, which have included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, must take into account biochemical pathways affected by 5AR inhibition and opposing effects of COX-2 on the tissue-protective action of ERβ. PMID:27226548

  2. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  3. The effects of exogenous melatonin and melatonin receptor blockade on aggression and estrogen-dependent gene expression in male California mice (Peromyscus californicus)

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Orr, Veronica; McMackin, Marissa Z.; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Photoperiodic regulation of aggression has been well established in several vertebrate species, with rodents demonstrating increased aggression in short day photoperiods as compared to long day photoperiods. Previous work suggests that estrogens regulate aggression via rapid nongenomic pathways in short days and act more slowly in long days, most likely via genomic pathways. The current study therefore examines the role of melatonin in mediating aggression and estrogen-dependent gene transcription. In Experiment 1, male California mice were housed under long day photoperiods and were treated with either 0.3 ug/g of melatonin, 40 mg/kg of the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, or vehicle for 10 days. We found that melatonin administration significantly increased aggression as compared to mice receiving vehicle, but this phenotype was not completely ameliorated by luzindole. In Experiment 2, male California mice were injected with either 1 mg/kg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole or vehicle, and oxytocin receptor (OTR), estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), and c-fos gene expression was examined in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and medial preoptic area (MPOA). In the BNST, but not MPOA, OTR mRNA was significantly downregulated following letrozole administration, indicating that OTR is an estrogen-dependent gene in the BNST. In contrast, ERα was not estrogen dependent in either brain region. In the MPOA, OTR mRNA was inhibited by melatonin, and luzindole suppressed this effect. C-fos and ERα did not differ between treatments in any brain region examined. These results suggest that it is unlikely that melatonin facilitates aggression via broad spectrum regulation of estrogen-dependent gene expression. Instead melatonin may act via regulation of other transcription factors such as extracellular signal regulated kinase. PMID:24518867

  4. Effects of BMAL1-SIRT1-positive cycle on estrogen synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells: an implicative role of BMAL1 in PCOS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaou; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhu, Kai; Hong, Yan; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yanzhi; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 (BMAL1) is necessary for fertility and has been found to be essential to follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) has been reported to interact with BMAL1 and function in a circadian manner. Evidence has shown that SIRT1 regulates aromatase expression in estrogen-producing cells. We aimed to ascertain if there is a relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and BMAL1, and whether and how BMAL1 takes part in estrogen synthesis in human granulosa cells (hGCs). Twenty-four women diagnosed with PCOS and 24 healthy individuals undergoing assisted reproduction were studied. BMAL1 expression in their granulosa cells (GCs) was observed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The level of expression in the PCOS group was lower than that of the group without PCOS (p < 0.05). We also analyzed estrogen synthesis and aromatase expression in KGN cell lines. Both were downregulated after BMAL1 and SIRT1 knock-down and, conversely, upregulated after overexpression treatments of these two genes in KGN cells. Both BMAL1 and SIRT1 had a mutually positive regulation, as did the phosphorylation of JNK. Furthermore, JNK overexpression increased estrogen synthesis activity and the expression levels of aromatase, BMAL1, and SIRT1. In KGN and hGCs, estrogen synthesis and aromatase expression were downregulated after treatment with JNK and SIRT1 inhibitors. In addition, BMAL1, SIRT1, and JNK expression levels were all downregulated. Our results demonstrate the effects of BMAL1 on estrogen synthesis in hGCs and suggest a BMAL1-SIRT1-JNK positive feedback cycle in this process, which points out an important role of BMAL1 in the development of PCOS. PMID:27117143

  5. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  6. No substantial changes in estrogen receptor and estrogen-related receptor orthologue gene transcription in Marisa cornuarietis exposed to estrogenic chemicals☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Richard; Beresford, Nicola; Granger, David W.; Pounds, Nadine A.; Rand-Weaver, Mariann; White, Roger; Jobling, Susan; Routledge, Edwin J.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor orthologues in molluscs may be targets for endocrine disruptors, although mechanistic evidence is lacking. Molluscs are reported to be highly susceptible to effects caused by very low concentrations of environmental estrogens which, if substantiated, would have a major impact on the risk assessment of many chemicals. The present paper describes the most thorough evaluation to-date of the susceptibility of Marisa cornuarietis ER and ERR gene transcription to modulation by vertebrate estrogens in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the effects of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol exposure on in vivo estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene transcription in the reproductive and neural tissues of the gastropod snail M. cornuarietis over a 12-week period. There was no significant effect (p > 0.05) of treatment on gene transcription levels between exposed and non-exposed snails. Absence of a direct interaction of estradiol-17β and 4-tert-Octylphenol with mollusc ER and ERR protein was also supported by in vitro studies in transfected HEK-293 cells. Additional in vitro studies with a selection of other potential ligands (including methyl-testosterone, 17α-ethinylestradiol, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, diethylstilbestrol, cyproterone acetate and ICI182780) showed no interaction when tested using this assay. In repeated in vitro tests, however, genistein (with mcER-like) and bisphenol-A (with mcERR) increased reporter gene expression at high concentrations only (>10−6 M for Gen and >10−5 M for BPA, respectively). Like vertebrate estrogen receptors, the mollusc ER protein bound to the consensus vertebrate estrogen-response element (ERE). Together, these data provide no substantial evidence that mcER-like and mcERR activation and transcript levels in tissues are modulated by the vertebrate estrogen estradiol-17β or 4-tert-Octylphenol in vivo, or that other ligands of vertebrate ERs and ERRs (with the possible exception of

  7. Estrogenic effects in the influents and effluents of the drinking water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yan-You; Lin, Susana; Que, Danielle E; Tayo, Lemmuel L; Lin, Ding-Yan; Chen, Kuan-Chung; Chen, Fu-An; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Hsu, Yi-Chyuan; Chuang, Kuo Pin; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Chao, How-Ran

    2016-05-01

    Estrogen-like endocrine disrupting compounds (EEDC) such as bisphenol A, nonylphenol, and phthalic acid esters are toxic compounds that may occur in both raw- and drinking water. The aim of this study was to combine chemical- and bioassay to evaluate the risk of EEDCs in the drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). Fifty-six samples were collected from seven DWTPs located in northern-, central-, and southern Taiwan from 2011 to 2012 and subjected to chemical analyses and two bioassay methods for total estrogenic activity (E-Screen and T47D-KBluc assay). Among of the considered EEDCs, only dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were detected in both drinking and raw water samples. DBP levels in drinking water ranged from

  8. Large effects from small exposures. I. Mechanisms for endocrine-disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Welshons, Wade V; Thayer, Kristina A; Judy, Barbara M; Taylor, Julia A; Curran, Edward M; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2003-01-01

    Information concerning the fundamental mechanisms of action of both natural and environmental hormones, combined with information concerning endogenous hormone concentrations, reveals how endocrine-disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity (EEDCs) can be active at concentrations far below those currently being tested in toxicological studies. Using only very high doses in toxicological studies of EEDCs thus can dramatically underestimate bioactivity. Specifically: a) The hormonal action mechanisms and the physiology of delivery of EEDCs predict with accuracy the low-dose ranges of biological activity, which have been missed by traditional toxicological testing. b) Toxicology assumes that it is valid to extrapolate linearly from high doses over a very wide dose range to predict responses at doses within the physiological range of receptor occupancy for an EEDC; however, because receptor-mediated responses saturate, this assumption is invalid. c) Furthermore, receptor-mediated responses can first increase and then decrease as dose increases, contradicting the assumption that dose-response relationships are monotonic. d) Exogenous estrogens modulate a system that is physiologically active and thus is already above threshold, contradicting the traditional toxicological assumption of thresholds for endocrine responses to EEDCs. These four fundamental issues are problematic for risk assessment methods used by regulatory agencies, because they challenge the traditional use of extrapolation from high-dose testing to predict responses at the much lower environmentally relevant doses. These doses are within the range of current exposures to numerous chemicals in wildlife and humans. These problems are exacerbated by the fact that the type of positive and negative controls appropriate to the study of endocrine responses are not part of traditional toxicological testing and are frequently omitted, or when present, have been misinterpreted. PMID:12826473

  9. Estrogens and Cognition: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Korol, Donna L.; Pisani, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are becoming well known for their robust enhancement on cognition particularly for learning and memory that relies upon functioning of the hippocampus and related neural systems. What is also emerging is that estrogen modulation of cognition is not uniform, at times enhancing yet at other times impairing learning. This review explores the bidirectional effects of estrogens on learning from a multiple memory systems view, focusing on the hippocampus and striatum, whereby modulation by estrogens sorts according to task attributes and neural systems engaged during cognition. We highlight our findings that show the ability to solve hippocampus-sensitive tasks typically improves under relatively high estrogen status while the ability to solve striatum-sensitive tasks degrades with estrogen exposures. Though constrained by dose and timing of exposure, these opposing enhancements and impairments of cognition can be observed following treatments with different estrogenic compounds including the hormone estradiol, the isoflavone genistein found in soybeans, and agonists that are selective for specific estrogen receptors, suggesting that activation of a single receptor type is sufficient to produce the observed shifts in learning strategies. Using this multi-dimensional framework will allow us to extend our thinking of the relationship between estrogens and cognition to other brain regions and cognitive functions. PMID:26149525

  10. Comparison of Individual and Combined Effects of Four Endocrine Disruptors on Estrogen Receptor Beta Transcription in Cerebellar Cell Culture: The Modulatory Role of Estradiol and Triiodo-Thyronine

    PubMed Central

    Jocsak, Gergely; Kiss, David Sandor; Toth, Istvan; Goszleth, Greta; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans and animals are continuously exposed to a number of environmental substances that act as endocrine disruptors (EDs). While a growing body of evidence is available to prove their adverse health effects, very little is known about the consequences of simultaneous exposure to a combination of such chemicals; Methods: Here, we used an in vitro model to demonstrate how exposure to bisphenol A, zearalenone, arsenic, and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, alone or in combination, affect estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA expression in primary cerebellar cell cultures. Additionally, we also show the modulatory role of intrinsic biological factors, such as estradiol (E2), triiodo-thyronine (T3), and glial cells, as potential effect modulators; Results: Results show a wide diversity in ED effects on ERβ mRNA expression, and that the magnitude of these ED effects highly depends on the presence or absence of E2, T3, and glial cells; Conclusion: The observed potency of the EDs to influence ERβ mRNA expression, and the modulatory role of E2, T3, and the glia suggests that environmental ED effects may be masked as long as the hormonal milieu is physiological, but may tend to turn additive or superadditive in case of hormone deficiency. PMID:27338438

  11. Estrogen-dependent regulation of Eg5 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Planas-Silva, Maricarmen D; Filatova, Irina S

    2007-08-01

    HsEg5 (Eg5) is a kinesin required for proper execution of mitosis. Several compounds that specifically block Eg5 are in clinical development and have the potential to be used in the treatment of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Eg5 and estrogen receptor signaling. We observed decreased Eg5 expression after treatment of estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with the estrogen receptor downregulator fulvestrant. Downregulation of Eg5 expression in response to fulvestrant was also observed in another estrogen receptor-positive cell line ZR-75, but not in the estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-231. Moreover, in MCF-7 cells previously arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle by fulvestrant, addition of estrogen increased Eg5 expression. This upregulation correlated with progression through S-phase. Nevertheless, the effect of fulvestrant in Eg5 expression could not be explained solely by cell cycle arrest, because treatments that blocked cell cycle progression did not consistently decrease Eg5 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of Eg5 function, with either S-trityl-L-cysteine or monastrol, prevented growth of estrogen-treated MCF-7 cells with an IC50 of 0.46 and 29.71 micromol/l, respectively. Simultaneous inhibition of estrogen receptor function with fulvestrant increased the IC50 for S-trityl-L-cysteine to 2.30 micromol/l and for monastrol to 112.69 micromol/l. Our results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of Eg5 may be an effective treatment for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, even without concomitant hormonal therapy. PMID:17581299

  12. Estrogens stimulate serotonin neurons to inhibit binge-like eating in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuehong; Xu, Pingwen; Oyola, Mario G.; Xia, Yan; Yan, Xiaofeng; Saito, Kenji; Zou, Fang; Wang, Chunmei; Yang, Yongjie; Hinton, Antentor; Yan, Chunling; Ding, Hongfang; Zhu, Liangru; Yu, Likai; Yang, Bin; Feng, Yuxin; Clegg, Deborah J.; Khan, Sohaib; DiMarchi, Richard; Mani, Shaila K.; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating afflicts approximately 5% of US adults, though effective treatments are limited. Here, we showed that estrogen replacement substantially suppresses binge-like eating behavior in ovariectomized female mice. Estrogen-dependent inhibition of binge-like eating was blocked in female mice specifically lacking estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Administration of a recently developed glucagon-like peptide-1–estrogen (GLP-1–estrogen) conjugate designed to deliver estrogen to GLP1 receptor–enhanced regions effectively targeted bioactive estrogens to the DRN and substantially suppressed binge-like eating in ovariectomized female mice. Administration of GLP-1 alone reduced binge-like eating, but not to the same extent as the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate. Administration of ERα-selective agonist propylpyrazole triol (PPT) to murine DRN 5-HT neurons activated these neurons in an ERα-dependent manner. PPT also inhibited a small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current; blockade of the SK current prevented PPT-induced activation of DRN 5-HT neurons. Furthermore, local inhibition of the SK current in the DRN markedly suppressed binge-like eating in female mice. Together, our data indicate that estrogens act upon ERα to inhibit the SK current in DRN 5-HT neurons, thereby activating these neurons to suppress binge-like eating behavior and suggest ERα and/or SK current in DRN 5-HT neurons as potential targets for anti-binge therapies. PMID:25157819

  13. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  14. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects via alterations in salinity and dissolved oxygen in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory exposure data indicate that estrogens and estrogen mimics can cause endocrine disruption in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In the wild, conditions are not static as is often the case in the laboratory. Changes in water quality parameters, such as salinity influx due to road s...

  15. Effect of estrogen/gestagen and 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 therapy on bone formation in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, K.; Riis, B.; Christiansen, C.

    1986-12-01

    The effect of two different estrogen/gestagen regimens and 24R,25-(OH)2-cholecalciferol on bone formation was studied in a randomized trial with 144 healthy postmenopausal women. Urinary excretion (UE) of /sup 99m/technetium-diphosphonate and serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) was determined before and then once a year for 2 years of treatment. Both estimates of bone formation showed highly significant decreases (p less than .001) to normal premenopausal levels in women receiving unopposed 17 beta-estradiol or in a sequential combination with progestagen, whereas unchanged high values were found in the groups receiving 24R,25-(OH)2D3 and placebo. The data show that bone turnover increases in early postmenopausal women concomitantly with the loss of bone mass, and that hormonal substitutional therapy normalizes the total skeletal turnover as well as preventing bone loss.

  16. Estrogen and Xenoestrogens in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S.V.; Russo, J.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing concern that estrogenic environmental compounds that act as endocrine disrupting chemicals might potentially have adverse effects on hormone-sensitive organs such as the breast. This concern is further fueled by evidence indicating that natural estrogens, specifically 17 β-estradiol (E2), are important factors in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. We have developed an in vitro- in vivo model in which we have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of E2 in the human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F. Hypermethylation of NRG1, STXBP6, BMP6, CSS3, SPRY1 and SNIP were found at different progression stages in this model. The utilization of this powerful and unique model has provided a tool for exploring whether bisphenol A (BPA) and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) have relevance in the initiation of breast cancer. These studies provide first hand evidence that the natural estrogen 17 β-estradiol and xenoestrogenic substances like BPA are able to induce neoplastic transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:19933552

  17. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs): In Vitro Mechanism of Estrogenic Activation and Differential Effects on ER Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Luh, Colin J.; Burns, Katherine A.; Arao, Yukitomo; Jiang, Zhongliang; Teng, Christina T.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) influence the activity of estrogen receptors (ERs) and alter the function of the endocrine system. However, the diversity of EDC effects and mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Objectives: We examined the agonistic activity of EDCs through ERα and ERβ. We also investigated the effects of EDCs on ER-mediated target genes. Methods: HepG2 and HeLa cells were used to determine the agonistic activity of EDCs on ERα and ERβ via the luciferase reporter assay. Ishikawa cells stably expressing ERα were used to determine changes in endogenous ER target gene expression by EDCs. Results: Twelve EDCs were categorized into three groups on the basis of product class and similarity of chemical structure. As shown by luciferase reporter analysis, the EDCs act as ER agonists in a cell type– and promoter-specific manner. Bisphenol A, bisphenol AF, and 2-2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (group 1) strongly activated ERα estrogen responsive element (ERE)-mediated responses. Daidzein, genistein, kaempferol, and coumestrol (group 2) activated both ERα and ERβ ERE-mediated activities. Endosulfan and kepone (group 3) weakly activated ERα. Only a few EDCs significantly activated the “tethered” mechanism via ERα or ERβ. Results of real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that bisphenol A and bisphenol AF consistently activated endogenous ER target genes, but the activities of other EDCs on changes of ER target gene expression were compound specific. Conclusion: Although EDCs with similar chemical structures (in the same group) tended to have comparable ERα and ERβ ERE-mediated activities, similar chemical structure did not correlate with previously reported ligand binding affinities of the EDCs. Using ERα-stable cells, we observed that EDCs differentially induced activity of endogenous ER target genes. PMID:23384675

  18. The joint effects of room temperature ionic liquids and ordered media on fluorescence characteristics of estrogens in water and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huili; Duan, Ailian; Dahlgren, Randy A.; Li, Yanyan; Li, Changli; Wang, Wenwei; Zeng, Aibing; Wang, Xuedong

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2) in the presence of ordered media (β-cyclodextrins (β-CD) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)). In addition, we analyzed the effects of four room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) on the fluorescence intensities (FIs) of EE2/β-CD and E2/β-CD inclusion complexes in methanol. Both β-CD and CTAB enhanced the fluorescence of EE2 and E2. The FIs of EE2 and E2 with β-CD or CTAB in methanol were greater than those in water, possibly resulting from decreased oxygen-quenching in H2O molecules. β-CD and CTAB may form inclusion complexes with estrogen in both water and methanol. The inclusion ratio of the complex was 1:1 and the inclusion constant (K) values in water were greater than those in methanol. The fluorescence lifetimes were 2.50 and 4.13 ns for EE2 and 2.58 and 4.03 ns for E2 in aqueous solution and methanol, respectively. The changing trend of fluorescence lifetimes for EE2 and E2 in β-CD or CTAB was similar to the steady-state FIs. The four RTILs had a significant quenching effect on the FIs of EE2/β-CD and E2/β-CD, and the quenching process for EE2/β-CD and E2/β-CD by RTILs was demonstrated to be a dynamic quenching mechanism. Fluorescent data obtained from these complex systems provide a theoretical foundation for understanding the interaction mechanisms between ordered media and RTILs in the analysis of estrogens.

  19. Effects of natural and synthetic polyamines on the conformation of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide with the estrogen response element.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, T; Kulkarni, G D; Gallo, M A; Greenfield, N; Lewis, J S; Shirahata, A; Thomas, T J

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of natural and synthetic polyamines on the conformation of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN1) harboring the estrogen response element (ERE) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Putrescine and spermidine had no marked effect on the CD spectrum of ODN1. In contrast, spermine provoked and stabilized two characteristic changes in the CD spectrum. The first change was indicated by an increase in the intensity of the CD band at 280 nm at 0.5 mM spermine in Tris-HCl buffer containing 50 mM NaCl. This change appears to be related to changes in base tilt and conformational alterations similar to A-DNA. At 1-2 mM spermine, the CD spectrum was characterized by a loss of positive bands at 220 and 270 nm. This change might have contributions from polyamine-induced condensation/aggregation of DNA. Spectral measurements were also conducted in Tris-HCl buffer containing 150 mM NaCl to minimize contributions from condensation and aggregation of ODN1. Under these conditions, CD spectral changes were retained by (ODN1), although the magnitude of the change was diminished. In contrast, a control oligdeoxyribonucleotide (ODN2) having similar base composition did not show any significant change in the CD spectrum in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 2 mM spermine. The changes in the CD spectrum of ODN1 were highly sensitive to polyamine structure, as evidenced by experiments using spermine analogs with altered number of -CH2- groups separating the amino and imino groups. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis further showed ODN1 stabilization by spermine and its analogs. These data demonstrate the ability of an ODN containing ERE to undergo conformational transitions in the presence of polyamines and suggest a possible mechanism for polyamine-mediated alterations in the interaction of estrogen receptor with ERE. PMID:9171091

  20. Estrogenic status modulates the effect of soy on hepatic responses to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Rohit; Badger, Thomas M.; Ronis, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the influence of estradiol (E2) status and soy protein isolate (SPI) intake on the hepatic responses altered by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon [PAH]). Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized (OVX) at PND50 and infused with E2 or vehicle for 14 d and gavaged with 50 mg/kg DMBA or vehicle 24 h before sacrifice at PND64. Rats were fed an AIN-93G diet made with SPI or casein as sole protein source throughout the study. Basal AhR protein levels were reduced (P < 0.05) by SPI feeding irrespective of the E2 status. However, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) AhR-induced CYP1A1 gene expression in OVX, SPI-fed rats, but reduced (P < 0.05) CYP1A1 in OVX + E2, SPI-fed rats. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated lower (P < 0.05) DMBA-mediated recruitment of estrogen receptor alpha to the CYP1A1 promoter by SPI feeding in the presence of E2, suggesting an estrogen-like action of SPI on DMBA-mediated signaling in the absence of E2. Further, microarray analysis (Rat 230-2.0 Affymetrix-GeneChip{sup TM}) revealed 231 genes common to SPI + DMBA and SPI + E2 + DMBA (normalized to E2) treatments. AhR-activated genes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NQO1) were down-regulated by SPI + E2 + DMBA compared to SPI + DMBA. Unique interactions among SPI, DMBA and E2 altered the expression profile of 316 genes, not observed by either treatment alone. Our data suggest that although E2 status does not effect soy-mediated AhR degradation, it modulates the effects of soy on many genes, including CYP1A1.

  1. Estrogen and Bazedoxifene

    MedlinePlus

    Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are used to treat hot flashes (sudden feelings of warmth, especially in the ... women may experience other symptoms and body changes). Estrogen and bazedoxifene tablets are also used to prevent ...

  2. Estrogen and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Shang, Yongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen exhibits a broad spectrum of physiological functions ranging from regulation of the menstrual cycle and reproduction to modulation of bone density, brain function, and cholesterol mobilization. Despite the beneficial actions of endogenous estrogen, sustained exposure to exogenous estrogen is a well-established risk factor for various cancers. We summarize our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signaling in normal and cancer cells and discuss the major challenges to existing antiestrogen therapies. PMID:23043248

  3. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  4. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  5. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  6. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  7. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515... package inserts for estrogens. (a) Requirement for a patient package insert. FDA concludes that the safe and effective use of drug products containing estrogens requires that patients be fully informed...

  8. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C.J.; Burgoon, L.D.; Zacharewski, T.R. . E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu

    2006-08-15

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 {mu}g/kg 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free