Science.gov

Sample records for potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria

  1. UVB Radiation as a Potential Selective Factor Favoring Microcystin Producing Bloom Forming Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Song, Lirong; Sedmak, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the stratospheric ozone depletion, several organisms will become exposed to increased biologically active UVB (280–320 nm) radiation, not only at polar but also at temperate and tropical latitudes. Bloom forming cyanobacteria are exposed to UVB radiation on a mass scale, particularly during the surface bloom and scum formation that can persist for long periods of time. All buoyant species of cyanobacteria are at least periodically exposed to higher irradiation during their vertical migration to the surface that usually occurs several times a day. The aim of this study is to assess the influence on cyanobacteria of UVB radiation at realistic environmental intensities. The effects of two UVB intensities of 0.5 and 0.99 W/m2 in up to 0.5 cm water depth were studied in vitro on Microcystis aeruginosa strains, two microcystin producing and one non-producing. After UVB exposure their ability to proliferate was estimated by cell counting, while cell fitness and integrity were evaluated using light microscopy, autofluorescence and immunofluorescence. Gene damage was assessed by TUNEL assay and SYBR Green staining of the nucleoide area. We conclude that UVB exposure causes damage to the genetic material, cytoskeletal elements, higher sedimentation rates and consequent cell death. In contrast to microcystin producers (PCC7806 and FACHB905), the microcystin non-producing strain PCC7005 is more susceptible to the deleterious effects of radiation, with weak recovery ability. The ecological relevance of the results is discussed using data from eleven years’ continuous UVB radiation measurements within the area of Ljubljana city (Slovenia, Central Europe). Our results suggest that increased solar radiation in temperate latitudes can have its strongest effect during cyanobacterial bloom formation in spring and early summer. UVB radiation in this period may significantly influence strain composition of cyanobacterial blooms in favor of microcystin producers. PMID

  2. Optical detection of microcystin produced by cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ammar, R.; Nabok, A.; Hashim, A.; Smith, T.

    2013-06-01

    Microcystin (MC-LR) produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was detected in direct immunoassay with specific monoclonal antibody MC10E7 using an optical method of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE). The minimal detected concentration of MC-LR of 0.1 ng/ml is a remarkable achievement for direct immunoassay against such low molecular weight analyte molecule. The study of binding kinetics of MC-LR to MC10E7 antibody allowed the evaluation of the association constant KA of about 108 (l/Mol) typical for highly specific immune reactions. Concentration of MC-LR in aqueous solutions was reduced using an absorbent made of polyelectrolyte-coated microparticles functionalized with MC10E7 antibodies.

  3. Occurrence of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in Ugandan freshwater habitats

    PubMed Central

    Okello, William; Portmann, Cyril; Erhard, Marcel; Gademann, Karl; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic heptapeptides that are the most abundant toxins produced by cyanobacteria in freshwater. The phytoplankton of many freshwater lakes in Eastern Africa is dominated by cyanobacteria. Less is known, however, on the occurrence of MC producers and the production of MCs. Twelve Ugandan freshwater habitats ranging from mesotrophic to hypertrophic conditions were sampled in May and June of 2004 and April of 2008 and were analyzed for their physico-chemical parameters, phytoplankton composition, and MC concentrations. Among the group of the potential MC-producing cyanobacteria, Anabaena (0 - 107 cells ml−1) and Microcystis (103 - 107 cells ml−1) occurred most frequently and dominated in eutrophic systems. A significant linear relationship (n = 31, r2 = 0.38, p < 0.001) between the Microcystis cell numbers and MC concentration (1.3-93 fg of MC cell−1) was observed. Beside [MeAsp3, Mdha7]-MC-RR two new microcystins, [Asp3]-MC-RY and [MeAsp3]-MC-RY were isolated and their constitution assigned by LC-MS2. In order to identify the MC-producing organism in the water samples (i), the conserved aminotransferase domain part of the mcyE gene that is indicative of MC production was amplified by general primers and cloned and sequenced, and (ii), genus-specific primers were used to amplify the mcyE gene of the genera Microcystis, Anabaena, and Planktothrix. Only mcyE genotypes that are indicative of Microcystis sp. were obtained via the environmental cloning approach (337 bp, 96.1%-96.7% similarity to the Microcystis aeruginosa strain PCC7806). Accordingly, only the mcyE primers, which are specific for Microcystis, revealed PCR products. We concluded that Microcystis is the major MC-producer in Ugandan freshwater. PMID:19609871

  4. Phylogenies of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes suggest extensive genetic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Timothy W; Watson, Susan B; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J; Ciborowski, Jan J H; McKay, Robert Michael; Bullerjahn, George S

    2014-01-01

    Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1) track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2) conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) during a high biomass event, and 3) compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L(-1)) for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems. PMID:25207941

  5. Phylogenies of Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacteria in the Lower Laurentian Great Lakes Suggest Extensive Genetic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Timothy W.; Watson, Susan B.; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J.; Ciborowski, Jan J. H.; McKay, Robert Michael; Bullerjahn, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1) track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2) conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena) during a high biomass event, and 3) compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L−1) for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems. PMID:25207941

  6. Microcystin-producing and non-producing cyanobacterial blooms collected from the Central India harbor potentially pathogenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Prashant; Kumar Agrawal, Manish; Nath Bagchi, Suvendra

    2015-05-01

    On the basis of relative abundance, frequency and biovolume, the important value index ranks were assigned to individual cyanobacteria in phytoplankton samples collected from fourteen water resources of Central India. The mcyABDE genes were detected in all the blooms with Microcystis (-aeruginosa, -viridis, -panniformis, -botrys) as being the major constituent morphospecies. On the other hand, blooms composed of primarily Oscillatoria (-limosa,-agardhii, -laetevirens) along with Anabaena, Nostoc, Phormidium and Spirulina as sub-dominant forms exhibited quite a patchy distribution of one or the other mcy genes. Fifty percent of Microcystis- but none of the Oscillatoria dominant blooms produced microcystins-RR and desmethyl-RR at 0.03-0.41mgg(-1) bloom dry mass. Traces of dissolved microcystin was detected in lake water, which is well below the WHO guideline. Irrespective of cyanobacterial composition and microcystin production ability, during the study period 43-64% of the cyanobacterial bloom samples exhibited association of viable but nonculturable forms of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, as evident from amplification of the antigen genes. We believe that spread of endemic cholera is the major threat associated with harmful algal blooms. PMID:25682583

  7. Effects of elevated CO2 on dynamics of microcystin-producing and non-microcystin-producing strains during Microcystis blooms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Min; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate the effects of different CO2 concentrations (270, 380, and 750 μL/L) on the competition of microcystin-producing (MC-producing) and non-MC-producing Microcystis strains during dense cyanobacteria blooms, an in situ simulation experiment was conducted in the Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu in the summer of 2012. The abundance of total Microcystis and MC-producing Microcystis genotypes was quantified based on the 16S rDNA and mcyD gene using real-time PCR. The results showed that atmospheric CO2 elevation would significantly decrease the pH value and increase the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Changes in CO2 concentration did not show significant influence on the abundance of total Microcystis population. However, CO2 concentrations may be an important factor in determining the subpopulation structure of Microcystis. The enhancement of CO2 concentrations could largely increase the competitive ability of non-MC-producing over MC-producing Microcystis, resulting in a higher proportion of non-MC-producing subpopulation in treatments using high CO2 concentrations. Concurrently, MC concentration in water declined when CO2 concentrations were elevated. Therefore, we concluded that the increase of CO2 concentrations might decrease potential health risks of MC for human and animals in the future. PMID:25597684

  8. Temporal variations in microcystin-producing cells and microcystin concentrations in two fresh water ponds.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Rai, Pankaj Kumar; Chau, Rocky; Ravi, Alok Kumar; Neilan, Brett A; Asthana, Ravi Kumar

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between microcystin production, microcystin-producing cyanobacteria, including Microcystis spp., and various biological and physicochemical parameters in Sankuldhara and Lakshmikund, situated in the same geographical area was studied over a period of 1.5 years. Seasonal variation in cyanobacterial 16S rRNA, Microcystis spp. 16S rRNA, mcyA and mcyB genes were quantitatively determined by real-time PCR. Microcystis was the dominant microcystin producer in both study sites constituting 67% and 97% of the total microcystin-producing cyanobacteria at Sankuldhara and Lakshmikund, respectively. Microcystin concentrations were 2.19-39.60 μg/L and 15.22-128.14 μg/L at Sankuldhara and Lakshmikund, respectively, as determined by LC-MS. Principal component analysis revealed a strong positive correlation between microcystin concentration and the copy number of mcyA and mcyB, chlorophyll a and cyanobacterial biomass at both sites. The higher microcystin concentrations in Lakshmikund pond were attributed to the high copy number of mcy genes present coupled with the pond's eutrophication status, as indicated by high total algal biomass, high chlorophyll a content, high nutrient load and low DO. Therefore, a significant difference in microcystin concentrations, correlating with these various biological and physicochemical parameters, confirms the importance of local environmental variables in the overall regulation of microcystins production. PMID:25463934

  9. Cyanobacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Syndrome Life Cycle Impacts Human Health Wildlife Ecosystems Socioeconomic Freshwater Regions Distribution - U.S. Distribution - World Maps ... Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Cyanobacteria Medical Community ... cyanobacteria blooms are potential ...

  10. Changes in iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Cladoceran Daphnia magna Exposed to Microcystin-Producing and Microcystin-Free Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Kai; Meng, Qingguo; Zhu, Xuexia; Dai, Daoxin; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Global warming and increased nutrient fluxes cause cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater ecosystems. These phenomena have increased the concern for human health and ecosystem services. The mass occurrences of toxic cyanobacteria strongly affect freshwater zooplankton communities, especially the unselective filter feeder Daphnia. However, the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial toxicity remain poorly understood. This study is the first to combine the established body growth rate (BGR), which is an indicator of life-history fitness, with differential peptide labeling (iTRAQ)-based proteomics in Daphnia magna influenced by microcystin-producing (MP) and microcystin-free (MF) Microcystis aeruginosa. A significant decrease in BGR was detected when D. magna was exposed to MP or MF M. aeruginosa. Conducting iTRAQ proteomic analyses, we successfully identified and quantified 211 proteins with significant changes in expression. A cluster of orthologous groups revealed that M. aeruginosa-affected differential proteins were strongly associated with lipid, carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolism. These parameters could potentially explain the reduced fitness based on the cost of the substance metabolism. PMID:27057760

  11. Acute Exposure to Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Alters Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Swimming Performance Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kist, Luiza Wilges; Piato, Angelo Luis; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Koakoski, Gessi; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil; Yunes, João Sarkis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Bogo, Maurício Reis

    2011-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are toxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), primarily Microcystis aeruginosa, forming water blooms worldwide. When an organism is exposed to environmental perturbations, alterations in normal behavioral patterns occur. Behavioral repertoire represents the consequence of a diversity of physiological and biochemical alterations. In this study, we assessed behavioral patterns and whole-body cortisol levels of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to cell culture of the microcystin-producing cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa (MC-LR, strain RST9501). MC-LR exposure (100 μg/L) decreased by 63% the distance traveled and increased threefold the immobility time when compared to the control group. Interestingly, no significant alterations in the number of line crossings were found at the same MC-LR concentration and time of exposure. When animals were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/L, MC-LR promoted a significant increase (around 93%) in the time spent in the bottom portion of the tank, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. The results also showed that none of the MC-LR concentrations tested promoted significant alterations in absolute turn angle, path efficiency, social behavior, or whole-body cortisol level. These findings indicate that behavior is susceptible to MC-LR exposure and provide evidence for a better understanding of the ecological consequences of toxic algal blooms. PMID:22253623

  12. Target gene approaches: Gene expression in Daphnia magna exposed to predator-borne kairomones or to microcystin-producing and microcystin-free Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Two major biological stressors of freshwater zooplankton of the genus Daphnia are predation and fluctuations in food quality. Here we use kairomones released from a planktivorous fish (Leucaspius delineatus) and from an invertebrate predator (larvae of Chaoborus flavicans) to simulate predation pressure; a microcystin-producing culture of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and a microcystin-deficient mutant are used to investigate effects of low food quality. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) allows quantification of the impact of biotic stressors on differential gene activity. The draft genome sequence for Daphnia pulex facilitates the use of candidate genes by precisely identifying orthologs to functionally characterized genes in other model species. This information is obtained by constructing phylogenetic trees of candidate genes with the knowledge that the Daphnia genome is composed of many expanded gene families. Results We evaluated seven candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna after exposure to kairomones. As a robust approach, a combination normalisation factor (NF) was calculated based on the geometric mean of three of these seven reference genes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, TATA-box binding protein and succinate dehydrogenase. Using this NF, expression of the target genes actin and alpha-tubulin were revealed to be unchanged in the presence of the tested kairomones. The presence of fish kairomone up-regulated one gene (cyclophilin) involved in the folding of proteins, whereas Chaoborus kairomone down-regulated the same gene. We evaluated the same set of candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna after exposure to a microcystin-producing and a microcystin-free strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The NF was calculated based on the reference genes 18S ribosomal RNA, alpha-tubulin and TATA-box binding protein. We found glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and

  13. Identification of toxigenic Cyanobacteria of the genus Microcystis in the Curonian Lagoon (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, O. I.; Dmitrieva, O. A.; Gladkikh, A. S.; Sorokovikova, E. G.

    2013-02-01

    In 2002-2008, seasonal (April-November) monitoring of the phytoplankton in the Russian part of the Curonian Lagoon at five fixed sites was performed. A total of 91 Cyanobacteria, 100 Bacillariophyta, 280 Chlorophyta, 21 Cryptophyta, and 24 Dinophyta species were found. Six potentially toxic species of cyanobacteria: Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Anabaena sp., Microcystis aeruginosa, M. viridis, M. wesenbergii, and Planktothrix agardhii dominated the phytoplankton biomass and caused water blooms. The seasonal average phytoplankton biomass ranged from 30 to 137 g/m3. The cyanobacteria's biomass varied from 10 to 113 g/m3 forming 30-82% of the total with a mean of 50%. With the aid of genetic markers (microcystin ( mcy) and nodularin synthetases), six variants of the microcystin-producing gene mcyE from the genus Microcystis were identified. Due to the intensive and lengthy blooms of potentially toxic and toxigenic cyanobacteria, the environmental conditions in the Curonian Lagoon appear unfavorable. The water should be monitored for cyanotoxins with analytical methods in order to determine if the area is safe for recreational use.

  14. Ammonium photo-production by heterocytous cyanobacteria: potentials and constraints.

    PubMed

    Grizeau, Dominique; Bui, Lan Anh; Dupré, Catherine; Legrand, Jack

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, production of microalgae and cyanobacteria has been developed for several applications, including novel foods, cosmetic ingredients and more recently biofuel. The sustainability of these promising developments can be hindered by some constraints, such as water and nutrient footprints. This review surveys data on N2-fixing cyanobacteria for biomass production and ways to induce and improve the excretion of ammonium within cultures under aerobic conditions. The nitrogenase complex is oxygen sensitive. Nevertheless, nitrogen fixation occurs under oxic conditions due to cyanobacteria-specific characteristics. For instance, in some cyanobacteria, the vegetative cell differentiation in heterocyts provides a well-adapted anaerobic microenvironment for nitrogenase protection. Therefore, cell cultures of oxygenic cyanobacteria have been grown in laboratory and pilot photobioreactors (Dasgupta et al., 2010; Fontes et al., 1987; Moreno et al., 2003; Nayak & Das, 2013). Biomass production under diazotrophic conditions has been shown to be controlled by environmental factors such as light intensity, temperature, aeration rate, and inorganic carbon concentration, also, more specifically, by the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the culture medium. Currently, there is little information regarding the production of extracellular ammonium by heterocytous cyanobacteria. This review compares the available data on maximum ammonium concentrations and analyses the specific rate production in cultures grown as free or immobilized filamentous cyanobacteria. Extracellular production of ammonium could be coupled, as suggested by recent research on non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, to that of other high value metabolites. There is little information available regarding the possibility for using diazotrophic cyanobacteria as cellular factories may be in regard of the constraints due to nitrogen fixation. PMID:25613641

  15. Effects of trophic status on microcystin production and the dominance of cyanobacteria in the phytoplankton assemblage of Mediterranean reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Padedda, Bachisio Mario; Kaštovský, Jan; Buscarinu, Paola; Sechi, Nicola; Virdis, Tomasa; Lugliè, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the abundance of cyanobacteria and microcystins in four Sardinian reservoirs (Italy) characterised by different trophic status to define a reference picture for future changes. Increasing levels of eutrophication and the abundance of cyanobacteria are expected to occur due to climate change, especially in the southern Mediterranean. Consequently, an in-depth study of the occurrence of harmful cyanobacteria is important to develop appropriate management strategies for water resources at a local scale. Monthly samples were collected at one station in each reservoir over an 18-month period. The Analysis of similarity indicated that cyanobacterial abundance and species composition differed significantly among the reservoirs. The Redundancy analysis highlighted their relationship to trophic, hydrological and seasonal patterns. Spearman’s analysis indicated that there were significant correlations among the most important species (Planktothrix agardhii–rubescens group, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Dolichospermum planctonicum), nutrients and microcystins. We highlighted that the species composition during periods of maximum microcystin concentrations differed from those typically reported for other Mediterranean sites. We found new potential microcystin producers (Aphanizomenon klebahnii, Dolichospermum macrosporum and Dolichospermum viguieri), which emphasised the high diversity of cyanobacteria in the Mediterranean area and the need for detailed research at the local scale. PMID:26648532

  16. Sustainable life support on Mars - the potential roles of cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verseux, Cyprien; Baqué, Mickael; Lehto, Kirsi; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Billi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Even though technological advances could allow humans to reach Mars in the coming decades, launch costs prohibit the establishment of permanent manned outposts for which most consumables would be sent from Earth. This issue can be addressed by in situ resource utilization: producing part or all of these consumables on Mars, from local resources. Biological components are needed, among other reasons because various resources could be efficiently produced only by the use of biological systems. But most plants and microorganisms are unable to exploit Martian resources, and sending substrates from Earth to support their metabolism would strongly limit the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of their cultivation. However, resources needed to grow specific cyanobacteria are available on Mars due to their photosynthetic abilities, nitrogen-fixing activities and lithotrophic lifestyles. They could be used directly for various applications, including the production of food, fuel and oxygen, but also indirectly: products from their culture could support the growth of other organisms, opening the way to a wide range of life-support biological processes based on Martian resources. Here we give insights into how and why cyanobacteria could play a role in the development of self-sustainable manned outposts on Mars.

  17. Potassium Salts Inhibit Growth of the Cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Pond Water and Defined Media: Implications for Control of Microcystin-Producing Aquatic Blooms

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D. L.; Kumar, H. D.; Rai, L. C.; Singh, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    Ten metals were assayed in 21 Indian ponds which comprised three groups: (i) eutrophic alkaline ponds containing <2.5 mM potassium and thick growths of Microcystis aeruginosa or Microcystis flos-aquae during most of the year, (ii) equally eutrophic alkaline ponds containing >2.8 mM potassium and no detectable Microcystis growth, and (iii) oligo- or mesotrophic ponds with various potassium and hydrogen ion concentrations and no persistent Microcystis blooms. The effects of potassium on Microcystis growth were examined in filter-sterilized pond water and in defined culture media. A 50% reduction in the 10-day yield of cultured M. aeruginosa was observed in DP medium and pond water supplemented with 1 and 3 mM KCl, respectively. In contrast, the addition of 2 to 30 mM NaCl did not suppress the growth of M. aeruginosa in either DP medium or pond water. Both 5 mM KCl and 20 mM KHCO(inf3) in J medium strongly inhibited the growth of M. flos-aquae C3-9, whereas 5 to 30 mM NaCl had no effect and 20 mM NaHCO(inf3) was stimulatory. For pond water cultured with a mixture of M. aeruginosa and the duckweed Wolffia arrhiza, M. aeruginosa dominated in unsupplemented water and W. arrhiza dominated in water supplemented with 4.8 mM KCl. Implications for the ecology and control of Microcystis blooms are discussed. PMID:16535629

  18. Potassium Salts Inhibit Growth of the Cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Pond Water and Defined Media: Implications for Control of Microcystin-Producing Aquatic Blooms.

    PubMed

    Parker, D L; Kumar, H D; Rai, L C; Singh, J B

    1997-06-01

    Ten metals were assayed in 21 Indian ponds which comprised three groups: (i) eutrophic alkaline ponds containing <2.5 mM potassium and thick growths of Microcystis aeruginosa or Microcystis flos-aquae during most of the year, (ii) equally eutrophic alkaline ponds containing >2.8 mM potassium and no detectable Microcystis growth, and (iii) oligo- or mesotrophic ponds with various potassium and hydrogen ion concentrations and no persistent Microcystis blooms. The effects of potassium on Microcystis growth were examined in filter-sterilized pond water and in defined culture media. A 50% reduction in the 10-day yield of cultured M. aeruginosa was observed in DP medium and pond water supplemented with 1 and 3 mM KCl, respectively. In contrast, the addition of 2 to 30 mM NaCl did not suppress the growth of M. aeruginosa in either DP medium or pond water. Both 5 mM KCl and 20 mM KHCO(inf3) in J medium strongly inhibited the growth of M. flos-aquae C3-9, whereas 5 to 30 mM NaCl had no effect and 20 mM NaHCO(inf3) was stimulatory. For pond water cultured with a mixture of M. aeruginosa and the duckweed Wolffia arrhiza, M. aeruginosa dominated in unsupplemented water and W. arrhiza dominated in water supplemented with 4.8 mM KCl. Implications for the ecology and control of Microcystis blooms are discussed. PMID:16535629

  19. Influence of zeta potential on the flocculation of cyanobacteria cells using chitosan modified soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Zhang, Honggang; Pan, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Using chitosan modified soil to flocculate and sediment algal cells has been considered as a promising strategy to combat cyanobacteria blooms in natural waters. However, the flocculation efficiency often varies with algal cells with different zeta potential (ZP) attributed to different growth phases or water conditions. This article investigated the relationship between ZP of Microcystis aeruginosa and its influence to the flocculation efficiency using chitosan modified soil. Results suggested that the optimal removal efficiency was obtained when the ZP was between -20.7 and -6.7 mV with a removal efficiency of more than 80% in 30 min and large floc size of >350 μm. When the algal cells were more negatively charged than -20.7 mV, the effect of chitosan modified soil was depressed (<60%) due to the insufficient charge density of chitosan to neutralize and destabilize the algal suspension. When the algal cells were less negative than -6.7 mV or even positively charged, a small floc size (<120 μm) was formed, which may be difficult to sink under natural water conditions. Therefore, manipulation of ZP provided a viable tool to improve the flocculation efficiency of chitosan modified soil and an important guidance for practical engineering of cyanobacteria bloom control. PMID:25662238

  20. Molecular (PCR-DGGE) versus morphological approach: analysis of taxonomic composition of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in freshwater lakes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microscopic Utermöhl method is commonly used for the recognition of the presence and taxonomic composition of potentially toxic cyanobacteria and is especially useful for monitoring reservoirs used as drinking water, recreation and fishery resources. However, this method is time-consuming and does not allow potentially toxic and nontoxic cyanobacterial strains to be distinguished. We have developed a method based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the marker gene ITS and the mcy-gene cluster, and DNA sequencing. We have attempted to calibrate the DGGE-method with a microscopic procedure, using water samples taken in 2011 from four lakes of the Great Mazurian Lakes system. Results Results showed that the classic microscopic method was much more precise and allowed the classification of the majority of cyanobacterial taxa to the species or genus. Using the molecular approach, most of the sequences could only be assigned to a genus or family. The results of DGGE and microscopic analyses overlapped in the detection of the filamentous cyanobacteria. For coccoid cyanobacteria, we only found two taxa using the molecular method, which represented 17% of the total taxa identified using microscopic observations. The DGGE method allowed the identification of two genera of cyanobacteria (Planktothrix and Microcystis) in the studied samples, which have the potential ability to produce toxins from the microcystins group. Conclusions The results confirmed that the molecular approach is useful for the rapid detection and taxonomic distinction of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in lake-water samples, also in very diverse cyanobacterial communities. Such rapid detection is unattainable by other methods. However, with still limited nucleotide sequences deposited in the public databases, this method is currently not sufficient to evaluate the entire taxonomic composition of cyanobacteria in lakes. PMID:24517495

  1. Chemical compounds toxic to invertebrates isolated from marine cyanobacteria of potential relevance to the agricultural industry.

    PubMed

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2014-11-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  2. Chemical Compounds Toxic to Invertebrates Isolated from Marine Cyanobacteria of Potential Relevance to the Agricultural Industry

    PubMed Central

    Essack, Magbubah; Alzubaidy, Hanin S.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Archer, John A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of advances in invertebrate pest management, the agricultural industry is suffering from impeded pest control exacerbated by global climate changes that have altered rain patterns to favour opportunistic breeding. Thus, novel naturally derived chemical compounds toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates are of interest, as potential pesticides. In this regard, marine cyanobacterium-derived metabolites that are toxic to both terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates continue to be a promising, but neglected, source of potential pesticides. A PubMed query combined with hand-curation of the information from retrieved articles allowed for the identification of 36 cyanobacteria-derived chemical compounds experimentally confirmed as being toxic to invertebrates. These compounds are discussed in this review. PMID:25356733

  3. Identification of Conserved and Potentially Regulatory Small RNAs in Heterocystous Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brenes-Álvarez, Manuel; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Vioque, Agustín; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are a growing class of non-protein-coding transcripts that participate in the regulation of virtually every aspect of bacterial physiology. Heterocystous cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic organisms that exhibit multicellular behavior and developmental alternatives involving specific transcriptomes exclusive of a given physiological condition or even a cell type. In the context of our ongoing effort to understand developmental decisions in these organisms we have undertaken an approach to the global identification of sRNAs. Using differential RNA-Seq we have previously identified transcriptional start sites for the model heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Here we combine this dataset with a prediction of Rho-independent transcriptional terminators and an analysis of phylogenetic conservation of potential sRNAs among 89 available cyanobacterial genomes. In contrast to predictive genome-wide approaches, the use of an experimental dataset comprising all active transcriptional start sites (differential RNA-Seq) facilitates the identification of bona fide sRNAs. The output of our approach is a dataset of predicted potential sRNAs in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, with different degrees of phylogenetic conservation across the 89 cyanobacterial genomes analyzed. Previously described sRNAs appear among the predicted sRNAs, demonstrating the performance of the algorithm. In addition, new predicted sRNAs are now identified that can be involved in regulation of different aspects of cyanobacterial physiology, including adaptation to nitrogen stress, the condition that triggers differentiation of heterocysts (specialized nitrogen-fixing cells). Transcription of several predicted sRNAs that appear exclusively in the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria is experimentally verified by Northern blot. Cell-specific transcription of one of these sRNAs, NsiR8 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 8), in developing heterocysts is also demonstrated. PMID

  4. Identification of Conserved and Potentially Regulatory Small RNAs in Heterocystous Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Álvarez, Manuel; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Vioque, Agustín; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are a growing class of non-protein-coding transcripts that participate in the regulation of virtually every aspect of bacterial physiology. Heterocystous cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic organisms that exhibit multicellular behavior and developmental alternatives involving specific transcriptomes exclusive of a given physiological condition or even a cell type. In the context of our ongoing effort to understand developmental decisions in these organisms we have undertaken an approach to the global identification of sRNAs. Using differential RNA-Seq we have previously identified transcriptional start sites for the model heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Here we combine this dataset with a prediction of Rho-independent transcriptional terminators and an analysis of phylogenetic conservation of potential sRNAs among 89 available cyanobacterial genomes. In contrast to predictive genome-wide approaches, the use of an experimental dataset comprising all active transcriptional start sites (differential RNA-Seq) facilitates the identification of bona fide sRNAs. The output of our approach is a dataset of predicted potential sRNAs in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, with different degrees of phylogenetic conservation across the 89 cyanobacterial genomes analyzed. Previously described sRNAs appear among the predicted sRNAs, demonstrating the performance of the algorithm. In addition, new predicted sRNAs are now identified that can be involved in regulation of different aspects of cyanobacterial physiology, including adaptation to nitrogen stress, the condition that triggers differentiation of heterocysts (specialized nitrogen-fixing cells). Transcription of several predicted sRNAs that appear exclusively in the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria is experimentally verified by Northern blot. Cell-specific transcription of one of these sRNAs, NsiR8 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 8), in developing heterocysts is also demonstrated. PMID

  5. Exploring bioactive properties of marine cyanobacteria isolated from the Portuguese coast: high potential as a source of anticancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Garcia, Mónica; Costa-Rodrigues, João; Costa, Maria Sofia; Ribeiro, Maria João; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Barros, Piedade; Barreiro, Aldo; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Martins, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    The oceans remain a major source of natural compounds with potential in pharmacology. In particular, during the last few decades, marine cyanobacteria have been in focus as producers of interesting bioactive compounds, especially for the treatment of cancer. In this study, the anticancer potential of extracts from twenty eight marine cyanobacteria strains, belonging to the underexplored picoplanktonic genera, Cyanobium, Synechocystis and Synechococcus, and the filamentous genera, Nodosilinea, Leptolyngbya, Pseudanabaena and Romeria, were assessed in eight human tumor cell lines. First, a crude extract was obtained by dichloromethane:methanol extraction, and from it, three fractions were separated in a Si column chromatography. The crude extract and fractions were tested in eight human cancer cell lines for cell viability/toxicity, accessed with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactic dehydrogenase release (LDH) assays. Eight point nine percent of the strains revealed strong cytotoxicity; 17.8% showed moderate cytotoxicity, and 14.3% assays showed low toxicity. The results obtained revealed that the studied genera of marine cyanobacteria are a promising source of novel compounds with potential anticancer activity and highlight the interest in also exploring the smaller filamentous and picoplanktonic genera of cyanobacteria. PMID:24384871

  6. Exploring Bioactive Properties of Marine Cyanobacteria Isolated from the Portuguese Coast: High Potential as a Source of Anticancer Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Margarida; Garcia, Mónica; Costa-Rodrigues, João; Costa, Maria Sofia; Ribeiro, Maria João; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Barros, Piedade; Barreiro, Aldo; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Martins, Rosário

    2013-01-01

    The oceans remain a major source of natural compounds with potential in pharmacology. In particular, during the last few decades, marine cyanobacteria have been in focus as producers of interesting bioactive compounds, especially for the treatment of cancer. In this study, the anticancer potential of extracts from twenty eight marine cyanobacteria strains, belonging to the underexplored picoplanktonic genera, Cyanobium, Synechocystis and Synechococcus, and the filamentous genera, Nodosilinea, Leptolyngbya, Pseudanabaena and Romeria, were assessed in eight human tumor cell lines. First, a crude extract was obtained by dichloromethane:methanol extraction, and from it, three fractions were separated in a Si column chromatography. The crude extract and fractions were tested in eight human cancer cell lines for cell viability/toxicity, accessed with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactic dehydrogenase release (LDH) assays. Eight point nine percent of the strains revealed strong cytotoxicity; 17.8% showed moderate cytotoxicity, and 14.3% assays showed low toxicity. The results obtained revealed that the studied genera of marine cyanobacteria are a promising source of novel compounds with potential anticancer activity and highlight the interest in also exploring the smaller filamentous and picoplanktonic genera of cyanobacteria. PMID:24384871

  7. Potential use of dissolved cyanobacterial DNA for monitoring toxic Microcystis cyanobacteria in filtered water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbukwa, Elbert A.; Boussiba, Sammy; Wepener, Victor; Leu, Stefan; Yuval, Kaye; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    Toxic and non-toxic Microcystis sp. are morphologically indistinguishable cyanobacteria that are increasingly posing health problems in fresh water systems by producing odours and/or toxins. Toxic Microcystis sp. produces toxicologically stable water soluble toxic compounds called microcystins (MCs) that have been associated with cases of aquatic life and wildlife poisoning and kills including some cases of human illnesses/deaths around the world. Thus, the need for rapid detection of toxic Microcystis sp. in surface water is imperatively a necessity for early mitigation purposes. Genomic DNA from potentially toxic Microcystis sp. comprises of ten microcystin synthetase (mcy) genes of which six major ones are directly involved in MCs biosynthesis. In Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methodsmcy genes can be amplified from intracellular/extracellular genomic DNA using PCR primers. However, little is known about the limitations of sourcing genomic DNA templates from extracellular DNA dissolved in water. In this work, filtered water (0.45 μM) from a Microcystis infested Dam (South Africa) was re-filtered on 0.22 μM syringe filters followed by genomic DNA isolation and purification from micro-filtrates (9 mL). Six major mcy genes (mcyABCDEG) from the isolated DNA were amplified using newly designed as well as existing primers identified from literature. PCR products were separated by gel electrophoresis and visualized after staining with ethidium bromide. The limitation of using dissolved DNA for amplification of mcy genes was qualitatively studied by establishing the relationship between input DNA concentrations (10.0-0.001 ng/μL) and the formation of respective PCR products. The amplification of mcyA gene using new primers with as little as 0.001 ng/μL of DNA was possible. Other mcy gene sensitivities reached 0.1 ng/μL DNA dilution limits. These results demonstrated that with appropriately optimized PCR conditions the method can provide accurate cost

  8. Reconstruction and Comparison of the Metabolic Potential of Cyanobacteria Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajib; Verseput, Alex T.; Berla, Bertram M.; Mueller, Thomas J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of photoautotrophic organisms that can synthesize valuable bio-products by harnessing solar energy. They are endowed with high photosynthetic efficiencies and diverse metabolic capabilities that confer the ability to convert solar energy into a variety of biofuels and their precursors. However, less well studied are the similarities and differences in metabolism of different species of cyanobacteria as they pertain to their suitability as microbial production chassis. Here we assemble, update and compare genome-scale models (iCyt773 and iSyn731) for two phylogenetically related cyanobacterial species, namely Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All reactions are elementally and charge balanced and localized into four different intracellular compartments (i.e., periplasm, cytosol, carboxysome and thylakoid lumen) and biomass descriptions are derived based on experimental measurements. Newly added reactions absent in earlier models (266 and 322, respectively) span most metabolic pathways with an emphasis on lipid biosynthesis. All thermodynamically infeasible loops are identified and eliminated from both models. Comparisons of model predictions against gene essentiality data reveal a specificity of 0.94 (94/100) and a sensitivity of 1 (19/19) for the Synechocystis iSyn731 model. The diurnal rhythm of Cyanothece 51142 metabolism is modeled by constructing separate (light/dark) biomass equations and introducing regulatory restrictions over light and dark phases. Specific metabolic pathway differences between the two cyanobacteria alluding to different bio-production potentials are reflected in both models. PMID:23133581

  9. Cyanobacteria: State Monitoring Programs, Beach Closures, and Potential Human Health Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    New England is rich in freshwater lakes and ponds, many of which are subject to cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) blooms that can limit recreational use and cause health problems. This study was conducted to better understand the health risks to human and animal populations that a...

  10. Calcifying cyanobacteria--the potential of biomineralization for carbon capture and storage.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Christer; Northen, Trent

    2010-06-01

    Employment of cyanobacteria in biomineralization of carbon dioxide by calcium carbonate precipitation offers novel and self-sustaining strategies for point-source carbon capture and sequestration. Although details of this process remain to be elucidated, a carbon-concentrating mechanism, and chemical reactions in exopolysaccharide or proteinaceous surface layers are assumed to be of crucial importance. Cyanobacteria can utilize solar energy through photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide to recalcitrant calcium carbonate. Calcium can be derived from sources such as gypsum or industrial brine. A better understanding of the biochemical and genetic mechanisms that carry out and regulate cynaobacterial biomineralization should put us in a position where we can further optimize these steps by exploiting the powerful techniques of genetic engineering, directed evolution, and biomimetics. PMID:20456936

  11. Calcifying Cyanobacteria - The potential of biomineralization for Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer G; Northen, Trent

    2010-03-26

    Employment of cyanobacteria in biomineralization of carbon dioxide by calcium carbonate precipitation offers novel and self-sustaining strategies for point-source carbon capture and sequestration. Although details of this process remain to be elucidated, a carbon-concentrating mechanism, and chemical reactions in exopolysaccharide or proteinaceous surface layers are assumed to be of crucial importance. Cyanobacteria can utilize solar energy through photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide to recalcitrant calcium carbonate. Calcium can be derived from sources such as gypsum or industrial brine. A better understanding of the biochemical and genetic mechanisms that carry out and regulate cynaobacterial biomineralization should put us in a position where we can further optimize these steps by exploiting the powerful techniques of genetic engineering, directed evolution, and biomimetics.

  12. Climate change and regulation of hepatotoxin production in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gehringer, Michelle M; Wannicke, Nicola

    2014-04-01

    Harmful, bloom-forming cyanobacteria (CyanoHABs) are occurring with increasing regularity in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The most commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxins are the hepatotoxic microcystin and nodularin. These cyclic hepta- and pentapeptides are synthesised nonribosomally by the gene products of the toxin gene clusters mcy and nda, respectively. Understanding of the regulation of hepatotoxin production is incomplete, although there is strong evidence supporting the roles of iron, light, higher nitrate availability and inorganic carbon in modulating microcystin levels. The majority of these studies have focused on the unicellular freshwater, microcystin-producing strain of Microcystis aeruginosa, with little attention being paid to terrestrial or marine toxin producers. This review intends to investigate the regulation of microcystin and nodularin production in unicellular and filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria against the background of changing climate conditions. Special focus is given to diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria, for example Nodularia spumigena, capable of regulating their nitrogen levels by actively fixing dinitrogen. By combining data from significant studies, an overall scheme of the regulation of toxin production is presented, focussing specifically on nodularin production in diazotrophs against the background of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and temperatures envisaged under current climate change models. Furthermore, the risk of sustaining and spreading CyanoHABs in the future ocean is evaluated. PMID:24490596

  13. Elucidation of taste- and odor-producing bacteria and toxigenic cyanobacteria in a Midwestern drinking water supply reservoir by shotgun metagenomics analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otten, Timothy; Graham, Jennifer; Harris, Theodore D.; Dreher, Theo

    2016-01-01

    While commonplace in clinical settings, DNA-based assays for identification or enumeration of drinking water pathogens and other biological contaminants remain widely unadopted by the monitoring community. In this study, shotgun metagenomics was used to identify taste-and-odor producers and toxin-producing cyanobacteria over a 2-year period in a drinking water reservoir. The sequencing data implicated several cyanobacteria, including Anabaena spp.,Microcystis spp., and an unresolved member of the order Oscillatoriales as the likely principal producers of geosmin, microcystin, and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively. To further demonstrate this, quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting geosmin-producing Anabaena and microcystin-producing Microcystis were utilized, and these data were fitted using generalized linear models and compared with routine monitoring data, including microscopic cell counts, sonde-based physicochemical analyses, and assays of all inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus forms and fractions. The qPCR assays explained the greatest variation in observed geosmin (adjusted R2 = 0.71) and microcystin (adjusted R2 = 0.84) concentrations over the study period, highlighting their potential for routine monitoring applications. The origin of the monoterpene cyclase required for MIB biosynthesis was putatively linked to a periphytic cyanobacterial mat attached to the concrete drinking water inflow structure. We conclude that shotgun metagenomics can be used to identify microbial agents involved in water quality deterioration and to guide PCR assay selection or design for routine monitoring purposes. Finally, we offer estimates of microbial diversity and metagenomic coverage of our data sets for reference to others wishing to apply shotgun metagenomics to other lacustrine systems.

  14. Cosmopolitan Cyanobacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furey, Paula C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a poem on the distribution and adaptation of blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria). The poem describes some of the diverse habitats of cyanobacteria including examples from extreme and unique environments such as hot springs, and polar bear hair. The poem also describes some of the adaptations of cyanobacteria…

  15. Cyanobacteria toxins in the Salton Sea

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Wayne W; Li, RenHui

    2006-01-01

    laboratory strain of Synechococcus was identified by PCR as being closest to known marine forms of this genus. Analyses of affected grebe livers found microcystins at levels that may account for some of the acute mortalities. Conclusion The production of microcystins by a marine Synechococcus indicates that microcystins may be a more common occurrence in marine environments – a finding not recognized before this work. Further research should be done to define the distribution of microcystin producing marine cyanobacteria and to determine exposure/response effects of microcystins and possibly other cyanotoxins in the Salton Sea. Future efforts to reduce avian mortalities and remediate the Salton Sea should evaluate vectors by which microcystins enter avian species and ways to control and mitigate toxic cyanobacteria waterblooms at the Salton Sea. PMID:16623944

  16. Monitoring of potentially toxic cyanobacteria using an online multi-probe in drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Zamyadi, A; McQuaid, N; Prévost, M; Dorner, S

    2012-02-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria threaten the water quality of drinking water sources across the globe. Two such water bodies in Canada (a reservoir on the Yamaska River and a bay of Lake Champlain in Québec) were monitored using a YSI 6600 V2-4 (YSI, Yellow Springs, Ohio, USA) submersible multi-probe measuring in vivo phycocyanin (PC) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) fluorescence, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, temperature, and turbidity in parallel. The linearity of the in vivo fluorescence PC and Chl-a probe measurements were validated in the laboratory with Microcystis aeruginosa (r(2) = 0.96 and r(2) = 0.82 respectively). Under environmental conditions, in vivo PC fluorescence was strongly correlated with extracted PC (r = 0.79) while in vivo Chl-a fluorescence had a weaker relationship with extracted Chl-a (r = 0.23). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant correlations between extracted Chl-a, extracted PC and cyanobacterial biovolume and in vivo fluorescence parameters measured by the sensors (i.e. turbidity and pH). This information will help water authorities select the in vivo parameters that are the most useful indicators for monitoring cyanobacteria. Despite highly toxic cyanobacterial bloom development 10 m from the drinking water treatment plant's (DWTP) intake on several sampling dates, low in vivo PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial biovolume, and microcystin concentrations were detected in the plant's untreated water. The reservoir's hydrodynamics appear to have prevented the transport of toxins and cells into the DWTP which would have deteriorated the water quality. The multi-probe readings and toxin analyses provided critical evidence that the DWTP's untreated water was unaffected by the toxic cyanobacterial blooms present in its source water. PMID:22159157

  17. [Seasonal variation of cyanobacteria and its potential relationship with key environmental factors in Xiaojiang backwater area, Three Gorges Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Guo, Jing-song; Fang, Fang; Gao, Xu; Sheng, Jin-ping; Zhou, Hong; Long, Man

    2010-02-01

    Eutrophication and algal blooms occurred in the backwater areas of tributaries in Three Gorges Reservoir were the hot ecological issues in recent years. A one year field survey on cyanobacteria was put forward from May, 2007 to May, 2008 in Xiaojiang backwater area. 15 genera and 40 species of cyanophyta were detected. Mean value of cyanobacterial cell density was (23.50 +/- 10.30) x 10(5) cells x L(-1), i.e., 24.1% in the algal community, while the biomass was (768.70 +/- 287.40) microg x L(-1) which was 8.9% in the total biomass of algal community. Seasonal variation of cyanobacteria was apparent. Generally, cyanobacteria bloom occurred during late spring and early summer. Its abundance decreased after summer and reached the minimum level in winter. Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Microcystis, Merismopedia and Phormidium were the common cynaobacterial genera. The cumulated cell density of these five genera of cyanobacteria above accounted up to 79.1% in the total cell density of cyanobacteria, while that of biomass accounted up to 77.6%. Spearman correlation analysis among the cell density, biomass as well as the key environmental factors indicated that utilization of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for anabolism was evident; however, nitrate would be the major nitrogen source for cyanobacteria. Moreover, increase of temperature and decrease of depth of euphotic zone had a significant effect on the abundance of cyanobacteria. According to co-analysis of hydrology and rainfall data in the whole year circle, it was found that nitrogen and phosphorus were input by the heavy rain and surface runoff with inorganic sediments, offering the enriched nutrients in water column. Meanwhile, turbidity increased by the inorganic suspended sediments decreased the depth of euphotic zone. The physiological advantage of cyanobacteria in low light and high turbidity environment might be the cause of cyanobacteria bloom in Xiaojiang backwater area. PMID:20391694

  18. Two strictly polyphosphate-dependent gluco(manno)kinases from diazotrophic Cyanobacteria with potential to phosphorylate hexoses from polyphosphates.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2015-05-01

    The single-copy genes encoding putative polyphosphate-glucose phosphotransferases (PPGK, EC 2.7.1.63) from two nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria, Nostoc sp. PCC7120 and Nostoc punctiforme PCC73102, were cloned and functionally characterized. In contrast to their actinobacterial counterparts, the cyanobacterial PPGKs have shown the ability to phosphorylate glucose using strictly inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) as phosphoryl donors. This has proven to be an economically attractive reagent in contrast to the more costly ATP. Cyanobacterial PPGKs had a higher affinity for medium-long-sized polyP (greater than ten phosphoryl residues). Thus, longer polyP resulted in higher catalytic efficiency. Also in contrast to most their homologs in Actinobacteria, both cyanobacterial PPGKs exhibited a modest but significant polyP-mannokinase activity as well. Specific activities were in the range of 180-230 and 2-3 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with glucose and mannose as substrates, respectively. No polyP-fructokinase activity was detected. Cyanobacterial PPGKs required a divalent metal cofactor and exhibited alkaline pH optima (approx. 9.0) and a remarkable thermostability (optimum temperature, 45 °C). The preference for Mg(2+) was noted with an affinity constant of 1.3 mM. Both recombinant PPGKs are homodimers with a subunit molecular mass of ca. 27 kDa. Based on database searches and experimental data from Southern blots and activity assays, closely related PPGK homologs appear to be widespread among unicellular and filamentous mostly nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacteria. Overall, these findings indicate that polyP may be metabolized in these photosynthetic prokaryotes to yield glucose (or mannose) 6-phosphate. They also provide evidence for a novel group-specific subfamily of strictly polyP-dependent gluco(manno)kinases with ancestral features and high biotechnological potential, capable of efficiently using polyP as an alternative and cheap source of energy-rich phosphate instead of costly ATP

  19. Biomarkers involved in energy metabolism and oxidative stress response in the liver of Goodea gracilis Hubbs and Turner, 1939 exposed to the microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa LB85 strain.

    PubMed

    Olivares Rubio, Hugo F; Martínez-Torres, M Lysset; Nájera-Martínez, Minerva; Dzul-Caamal, Ricardo; Domínguez-López, María Lilia; García-Latorre, Ethel; Vega-López, Armando

    2015-09-01

    Goodea gracilis is an endemic fish that only habitats in some water bodies of Central Mexico that are contaminated with cyanobacteria-producing microcystins (MC); however, a lack of information on this topic prevails. With the aim to generate the first approximation about the physiological changes elicited by cyanobacterium that produce MC congeners in this fish species, specimens born in the laboratory was exposed for 96 h to cell densities of 572.5, 1145, 2290, 4580, and 9160 × 10(6) cells of Microcystis aeruginosa strain LB85/L, and a set of novel endpoint related to hepatic gluconeogenesis (ADH/LDH) and pro-oxidant forces O2., H2 O2 ) in addition to biomarkers of oxidative damage and antioxidant response was evaluated in the liver. Results suggest that high inhibition of protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PP) may trigger many metabolic processes, such as those related to hepatic gluconeogenesis (ADH/LDH) and pro-oxidant O2⋅, H2 O2 , TBARS, ROOH, RC=O) as well as antioxidant (SOD, CAT, GPx) response to oxidative stress. Particularly, we observed that inhibition of LDH and PP, and H2 O2 increase and TBARS production were the key damages induced by high densities of M. aeruginosa. However, changes between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism related with ROS metabolism and ADH/LDH balance are apparently an acclimation of this fish species to exposure to cyanobacteria or their MCs. Fish species living in environments potentially contaminated with cyanobacteria or their MCs possess mechanisms of acclimation that allow them to offset the damage induced, even in the case of fish that have never been exposed to MCs. PMID:24639371

  20. Application of a spectrofluorimetric tool (bbe BenthoTorch) for monitoring potentially toxic benthic cyanobacteria in rivers.

    PubMed

    Echenique-Subiabre, Isidora; Dalle, Caroline; Duval, Charlotte; Heath, Mark W; Couté, Alain; Wood, Susanna A; Humbert, Jean-François; Quiblier, Catherine

    2016-09-15

    Over the last decade reports of animal poisoning following accidental consumption of neurotoxin-producing benthic cyanobacteria (mainly Phormidium spp.) have increased. There is a need for rapid and cost-effective tools to survey benthic cyanobacteria. In this study we assessed the performance of the BenthoTorch, a fluorometric probe that provides in situ estimations of cyanobacteria, diatoms and green algae biomass in biofilms. Biofilms (n = 288) were analysed from two rivers in France and eight in New Zealand. Correlations between chlorophyll-a measured using the BenthoTorch and spectrophotometry were higher for thin (<2 mm) compared to thick (>2 mm) biofilms (r(2) = 0.58 and 0.27 respectively; p < 0.001). When cyanobacteria represented less than 50% of the total biomass (based on biovolumes), microscopic and BenthoTorch compositional estimations were significantly correlated (r(2) = 0.53, p < 0.001). Conversely, there was no correlation when cyanobacteria exceeded 50% of the total biomass. Under this scenario diatoms were overestimated. Our results suggest that the observed biases occur because the BenthoTorch only measures the upper biofilm layer and it underestimates the biomass of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria. To improve the performance of this sensor and render it a useful tool for a rapid evaluation of benthic cyanobacterial biomass in rivers, we propose that: (i) the algorithms based on the LEDs responses currently available on this tool need revision, (ii) new excitation wavelengths should be included that allow the fingerprints of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria to be discriminated, and (iii) a sensor that penetrates the biofilms is needed to obtain more accurate estimates of cyanobacterial biomass. PMID:27286469

  1. Presence of potential toxin-producing cyanobacteria in an oligo-mesotrophic lake in Baltic Lake District, Germany: an ecological, genetic and toxicological survey.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Pawan K; Selmeczy, Géza B; Vasas, Gábor; Padisák, Judit; Arp, Wolfgang; Tapolczai, Kálmán; Casper, Peter; Krienitz, Lothar

    2014-10-01

    Massive developments of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in Lake Stechlin, an oligo-mesotrophic lake in the Baltic Lake District of Germany raised concerns about toxic contamination of these important ecosystems. Field samples in the phase of mass developments of cyanobacteria were used for genetic and toxicological analyses. Microcystins and microcystin genes were detected in field samples of the lake for the first time. However, the toxins were not produced by the dominant taxa (Dolichospermum circinale and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) but by taxa, which were present only in low biomass in the samples (Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Planktothrix rubescens). The phytoplankton successions during the study period revealed an increase of cyanobacterial populations. The findings contribute to the changes that have been investigated in Lake Stechlin since the mid-1990s. The possible reasons behind these developments may be climate change, special weather conditions and an increased nutrient pool. PMID:25268981

  2. Environmental influence on cyanobacteria abundance and microcystin toxin production in a shallow temperate lake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tammy A; Rollwagen-Bollens, Gretchen; Bollens, Stephen M; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J

    2015-04-01

    The increasing frequency of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater systems is a commonly recognized problem due to detrimental effects on water quality. Vancouver Lake, a shallow, tidally influenced lake in the flood plain of the Columbia River within the city of Vancouver, WA, USA, has experienced numerous summertime cyanobacterial blooms, dominated by Aphanizomenon sp. and Anabaena sp. Cyanobacteria abundance and toxin (microcystin) levels have been monitored in this popular urban lake for several years; however, no previous studies have identified which cyanobacteria species produce toxins, nor analyzed how changes in environmental variables contribute to the fluctuations in toxic cyanobacteria populations. We used a suite of molecular techniques to analyze water samples from Vancouver Lake over two summer bloom cycles (2009 and 2010). Both intracellular and extracellular microcystin concentrations were measured using an ELISA kit. Intracellular microcystin concentrations exceeded WHO guidelines for recreational waters several times throughout the sampling period. PCR results demonstrated that Microcystis sp. was the sole microcystin-producing cyanobacteria species present in Vancouver Lake, although Microcystis sp. was rarely detected in microscopical counts. qPCR results indicated that the majority of the Microcystis sp. population contained the toxin-producing gene (mcyE), although Microcystis sp. abundance rarely exceeded 1 percent of overall cyanobacteria abundance. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) revealed that PO4-P was the main environmental variable influencing the abundance of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria, as well as intracellular microcystin concentrations. Our study underscores the importance of using molecular genetic techniques, in addition to traditional microscopy, to assess the importance of less conspicuous species in the dynamics of harmful algal blooms. PMID:25060409

  3. EPS composition and calcification potential of tufa-dominating cyanobacteria investigated by Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zippel, Barbara; Dynes, James J.; Obst, Martin; Lawrence, John R.; Neu, Thomas R.

    2010-05-01

    Tufa deposits in freshwater habitats are the result of calcium carbonate precipitation within interfacial microbial ecosystems. Calcite precipitation is influenced by the saturation index and the occurrence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which are produced by a variety of microorganisms. In theory, the first important step of biologically induced calcification processes is the adsorption of calcium ions by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by cyanobacteria. In the present study we take advantage of Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) and combine it with Synchrotron imaging using Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). STXM represents a technique that allows simultaneous analysis of inorganic and organic constituents as a scale of 50 nm. By means of STXM it is possible to differentiate between calcium carbonate phases at the Ca L-edge. Furthermore, STXM has also been used at the C K-edge to map the major biomolecules (proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides). The purpose of this study is to find out if there are differences in calcium adsorption depending on specific composition of the EPS produced by filamentous cyanobacteria isolated from a German hard water creek (Westerhöfer Bach, Harz Mountains). The goal was to elucidate the potential of biofilms constituents, including microbial cell surfaces as well as extracellular polymeric substances, in triggering the formation of calcium carbonate in tufa systems. For this purpose three filamentous cyanobacteria (Pseudanabaena sp., Leptolyngbya sp. and Nostoc sp.) were cultivated in creek-adapted as well as standard media (BG11) on polycarbonate slides. In situ EPS composition was detected by means of fluorescence lectin-binding approach (FLBA) using 23 commercially available lectins with different specificities for mono- and disaccharides and amino sugars. For CaCO3 nucleation experiments cyanobacterial biofilms grown on polycarbonate slides were deposited in NaHCO3/CaCl2 solutions

  4. Calcification and silicification: fossilization potential of cyanobacteria from stromatolites of Niuafo'ou's Caldera Lakes (Tonga) and implications for the early fossil record.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Barbara; Kazmierczak, Józef; Lukomska-Kowalczyk, Maja; Kempe, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Calcification and silicification processes of cyanobacterial mats that form stromatolites in two caldera lakes of Niuafo'ou Island (Vai Lahi and Vai Si'i) were evaluated, and their importance as analogues for interpreting the early fossil record are discussed. It has been shown that the potential for morphological preservation of Niuafo'ou cyanobacteria is highly dependent on the timing and type of mineral phase involved in the fossilization process. Four main modes of mineralization of cyanobacteria organic parts have been recognized: (i) primary early postmortem calcification by aragonite nanograins that transform quickly into larger needle-like crystals and almost totally destroy the cellular structures, (ii) primary early postmortem silicification of almost intact cyanobacterial cells that leave a record of spectacularly well-preserved cellular structures, (iii) replacement by silica of primary aragonite that has already recrystallized and obliterated the cellular structures, (iv) occasional replacement of primary aragonite precipitated in the mucopolysaccharide sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances by Al-Mg-Fe silicates. These observations suggest that the extremely scarce earliest fossil record may, in part, be the result of (a) secondary replacement by silica of primary carbonate minerals (aragonite, calcite, siderite), which, due to recrystallization, had already annihilated the cellular morphology of the mineralized microbiota or (b) relatively late primary silicification of already highly degraded and no longer morphologically identifiable microbial remains. PMID:22794297

  5. Calcification and Silicification: Fossilization Potential of Cyanobacteria from Stromatolites of Niuafo‘ou's Caldera Lakes (Tonga) and Implications for the Early Fossil Record

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Józef; Łukomska-Kowalczyk, Maja; Kempe, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Calcification and silicification processes of cyanobacterial mats that form stromatolites in two caldera lakes of Niuafo‘ou Island (Vai Lahi and Vai Si‘i) were evaluated, and their importance as analogues for interpreting the early fossil record are discussed. It has been shown that the potential for morphological preservation of Niuafo‘ou cyanobacteria is highly dependent on the timing and type of mineral phase involved in the fossilization process. Four main modes of mineralization of cyanobacteria organic parts have been recognized: (i) primary early postmortem calcification by aragonite nanograins that transform quickly into larger needle-like crystals and almost totally destroy the cellular structures, (ii) primary early postmortem silicification of almost intact cyanobacterial cells that leave a record of spectacularly well-preserved cellular structures, (iii) replacement by silica of primary aragonite that has already recrystallized and obliterated the cellular structures, (iv) occasional replacement of primary aragonite precipitated in the mucopolysaccharide sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances by Al-Mg-Fe silicates. These observations suggest that the extremely scarce earliest fossil record may, in part, be the result of (a) secondary replacement by silica of primary carbonate minerals (aragonite, calcite, siderite), which, due to recrystallization, had already annihilated the cellular morphology of the mineralized microbiota or (b) relatively late primary silicification of already highly degraded and no longer morphologically identifiable microbial remains. Key Words: Stromatolites—Cyanobacteria—Calcification—Silicification—Niuafo‘ou (Tonga)—Archean. Astrobiology 12, 535–548. PMID:22794297

  6. *CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, are naturally-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. These photosynthesizing prokaryotes thrive in warm, shallow, nutrient-rich waters. Many produce potent toxins as secondary metabolites. Cyanobacteria toxins have been document...

  7. Evolutionary significance of osmoregulatory mechanisms in cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yopp, J. H.; Pavlicek, J. H.; Sibley, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological processes of all life forms on this planet are intrinsically related to their intracellular water potential. The overall goal was the elucidation of the mechanism(s) whereby the first oxygenic phtoautotrophs (the cyanobacteria) adjust their water potential to that of a changing external water potential (that is, osmoregulate). Osmoregulation is achieved by intracellular adjustment of inorganic and/or organic solutes (osmolytes) involving specific biochemical mechanisms. Structural and biochemical evolution within the cyanobacteria is believed completed (and fixed in present day forms) by the end of the Precambrain eon. Therefore, research using cyanobacteria of all three structural types (unicellular, filamentous, and branched), each grown in the photoautotrophic (PA), photoheterotrophic (PG), and chemotrophic (CH) modes of nutrition, should provide insight into the origin and evolution of the photosynthetically related osmoregulatory mechanisms of eukaryotic organisms. The chloroplasts of these organisms are phylogenetically related to the cyanobacteria.

  8. Recent developments in therapeutic applications of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Raja, Rathinam; Hemaiswarya, Shanmugam; Ganesan, Venkatesan; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are photosynthetic prokaryotes having applications in human health with numerous biological activities and as a dietary supplement. It is used as a food supplement because of its richness in nutrients and digestibility. Many cyanobacteria (Microcystis sp, Anabaena sp, Nostoc sp, Oscillatoria sp., etc.) produce a great variety of secondary metabolites with potent biological activities. Cyanobacteria produce biologically active and chemically diverse compounds belonging to cyclic peptides, lipopeptides, fatty acid amides, alkaloids and saccharides. More than 50% of the marine cyanobacteria are potentially exploitable for extracting bioactive substances which are effective in killing cancer cells by inducing apoptotic death. Their role as anti-viral, anti-tumor, antimicrobial, anti-HIV and a food additive have also been well established. However, such products are at different stages of clinical trials and only a few compounds have reached to the market. PMID:25629310

  9. Engineering cyanobacteria for fuels and chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Yin

    2010-03-01

    The world's energy and global warming crises call for sustainable, renewable, carbon-neutral alternatives to replace fossil fuel resources. Currently, most biofuels are produced from agricultural crops and residues, which lead to concerns about food security and land shortage. Compared to the current biofuel production system, cyanobacteria, as autotrophic prokaryotes, do not require arable land and can grow to high densities by efficiently using solar energy, CO(2), water, and inorganic nutrients. Moreover, powerful genetic techniques of cyanobacteria have been developed. For these reasons, cyanobacteria, which carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, are attractive hosts for production of fuels and chemicals. Recently, several chemicals including ethanol, isobutanol and isoprene have been produced by engineered cyanobacteria directly using solar energy, CO(2), and water. Cyanobacterium is therefore a potential novel cell factory for fuels and chemicals production to address global energy security and climate change issues. PMID:21203966

  10. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  11. CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Science Questions

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and ...

  12. Genetically Engineered Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Ruanbao (Inventor); Gibbons, William (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The disclosed embodiments provide cyanobacteria spp. that have been genetically engineered to have increased production of carbon-based products of interest. These genetically engineered hosts efficiently convert carbon dioxide and light into carbon-based products of interest such as long chained hydrocarbons. Several constructs containing polynucleotides encoding enzymes active in the metabolic pathways of cyanobacteria are disclosed. In many instances, the cyanobacteria strains have been further genetically modified to optimize production of the carbon-based products of interest. The optimization includes both up-regulation and down-regulation of particular genes.

  13. Proteomic analysis of post translational modifications in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-16

    Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria and the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Recently, cyanobacteria have attracted great interest due to their crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles and their ability to produce clean and renewable biofuels. To survive in various environmental conditions, cyanobacteria have developed a complex signal transduction network to sense environmental signals and implement adaptive changes. The post-translational modifications (PTMs) systems play important regulatory roles in the signaling networks of cyanobacteria. The systematic investigation of PTMs could contribute to the comprehensive description of protein species and to elucidate potential biological roles of each protein species in cyanobacteria. Although the proteomic studies of PTMs carried out in cyanobacteria were limited, these data have provided clues to elucidate their sophisticated sensing mechanisms that contribute to their evolutionary and ecological success. This review aims to summarize the current status of PTM studies and recent publications regarding PTM proteomics in cyanobacteria, and discuss the novel developments and applications for the analysis of PTMs in cyanobacteria. Challenges, opportunities and future perspectives in the proteomics studies of PTMs in cyanobacteria are also discussed. PMID:26254007

  14. Monitoring Indicators of Harmful Cyanobacteria in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiesling, Richard L.; Gary, Robin H.; Gary, Marcus O.

    2008-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms can occur when certain types of microscopic algae grow quickly in water, forming visible patches that might harm the health of the environment, plants, or animals. In freshwater, species of Cyanobacteria (also known as bluegreen algae) are the dominant group of harmful, bloom-forming algae. When Cyanobacteria form a harmful algal bloom, potential impairments include restricted recreational activities because of algal scums or algal mats, potential loss of public water supply because of taste and odor compounds (for example, geosmin), and the production of toxins (for example, microcystin) in amounts capable of threatening human health and wildlife.

  15. Monitoring indicators of harmful cyanobacteria in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiesling, Richard L.; Gary, Robin H.; Gary, Marcus O.

    2008-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms can occur when certain types of microscopic algae grow quickly in water, forming visible patches that might harm the health of the environment, plants, or animals. In freshwater, species of Cyanobacteria (also known as bluegreen algae) are the dominant group of harmful, bloom-forming algae. When Cyanobacteria form a harmful algal bloom, potential impairments include restricted recreational activities because of algal scums or algal mats, potential loss of public water supply because of taste and odor compounds (for example, geosmin), and the production of toxins (for example, microcystin) in amounts capable of threatening human health and wildlife.

  16. Breakthrough of cyanobacteria in bank filtration.

    PubMed

    Pazouki, Pirooz; Prévost, Michèle; McQuaid, Natasha; Barbeau, Benoit; de Boutray, Marie-Laure; Zamyadi, Arash; Dorner, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    The removal of cyanobacteria cells in well water following bank filtration was investigated from a source water consisting of two artificial lakes (A and B). Phycocyanin probes used to monitor cyanobacteria in the source and in filtered well water showed an increase of fluorescence values demonstrating a progressive seasonal growth of cyanobacteria in the source water that were correlated with cyanobacterial biovolumes from taxonomic counts (r = 0.59, p < 0.00001). A strong correlation was observed between the cyanobacterial concentrations in the lake water and in the well water as measured by the phycocyanin probe (p < 0.001, 0.73 ≤ r(2) ≤ 0.94). Log removals from bank filtration estimated from taxonomic counts ranged from 0.96 ± (0.5) and varied according to the species of cyanobacteria. Of cyanobacteria that passed through bank filtration, smaller cells were significantly more frequent in well water samples (p < 0.05) than larger cells. Travel times from the lakes to the wells were estimated as 2 days for Lake B and 10 days for Lake A. Cyanobacterial species in the wells were most closely related to species found in Lake B. Thus, a travel time of less than 1 week permitted the breakthrough of cyanobacteria to wells. Winter samples demonstrated that cyanobacteria accumulate within bank filters, leading to continued passage of cells beyond the bloom season. Although no concentrations of total microcystin-LR were above detection limits in filtered well water, there is concern that cyanobacterial cells that reach the wells have the potential to contain intracellular toxins. PMID:27343842

  17. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  18. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to freshwater cyanobacteria – human volunteer studies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Robertson, Ivan M; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Pruritic skin rashes associated with exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria are infrequently reported in the medical and scientific literature, mostly as anecdotal and case reports. Diagnostic dermatological investigations in humans are also infrequently described. We sought to conduct a pilot volunteer study to explore the potential for cyanobacteria to elicit hypersensitivity reactions. Methods A consecutive series of adult patients presenting for diagnostic skin patch testing at a hospital outpatient clinic were invited to participate. A convenience sample of volunteers matched for age and sex was also enrolled. Patches containing aqueous suspensions of various cyanobacteria at three concentrations were applied for 48 hours; dermatological assessment was made 48 hours and 96 hours after application. Results 20 outpatients and 19 reference subjects were recruited into the study. A single outpatient produced unequivocal reactions to several cyanobacteria suspensions; this subject was also the only one of the outpatient group with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. No subjects in the reference group developed clinically detectable skin reactions to cyanobacteria. Conclusion This preliminary clinical study demonstrates that hypersensitivity reactions to cyanobacteria appear to be infrequent in both the general and dermatological outpatient populations. As cyanobacteria are widely distributed in aquatic environments, a better appreciation of risk factors, particularly with respect to allergic predisposition, may help to refine health advice given to people engaging in recreational activities where nuisance cyanobacteria are a problem. PMID:16584576

  19. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  20. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. PMID:25463663

  1. Cyanobacteria as a Source for Novel Anti-Leukemic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Humisto, Anu; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Karkman, Antti; Bjørnstad, Ronja; Choudhury, Romi R; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an inspiring source of bioactive secondary metabolites. These bioactive agents are a diverse group of compounds which are varying in their bioactive targets, the mechanisms of action, and chemical structures. Cyanobacteria from various environments, especially marine benthic cyanobacteria, are found to be rich sources for the search for novel bioactive compounds. Several compounds with anticancer activities have been discovered from cyanobacteria and some of these have succeeded to enter the clinical trials. Varying anticancer agents are needed to overcome increasing challenges in cancer treatments. Different search methods are used to reveal anticancer compounds from natural products, but cell based methods are the most common. Cyanobacterial bioactive compounds as agents against acute myeloid leukemia are not well studied. Here we examined our new results combined with previous studies of anti-leukemic compounds from cyanobacteria with emphasis to reveal common features in strains producing such activity. We report that cyanobacteria harbor specific anti-leukemic compounds since several studied strains induced apoptosis against AML cells but were inactive against non-malignant cells like hepatocytes. We noted that particularly benthic strains from the Baltic Sea, such as Anabaena sp., were especially potential AML apoptosis inducers. Taken together, this review and re-analysis of data demonstrates the power of maintaining large culture collections for the search for novel bioactivities, and also how anti-AML activity in cyanobacteria can be revealed by relatively simple and low-cost assays. PMID:26306745

  2. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential. PMID:26580631

  3. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential. PMID:26580631

  4. Nitrogen Fixation and Hydrogen Metabolism in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Hermann; Schmitz, Oliver; Yates, M. Geoffrey; Newton, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: This review summarizes recent aspects of (di)nitrogen fixation and (di)hydrogen metabolism, with emphasis on cyanobacteria. These organisms possess several types of the enzyme complexes catalyzing N2 fixation and/or H2 formation or oxidation, namely, two Mo nitrogenases, a V nitrogenase, and two hydrogenases. The two cyanobacterial Ni hydrogenases are differentiated as either uptake or bidirectional hydrogenases. The different forms of both the nitrogenases and hydrogenases are encoded by different sets of genes, and their organization on the chromosome can vary from one cyanobacterium to another. Factors regulating the expression of these genes are emerging from recent studies. New ideas on the potential physiological and ecological roles of nitrogenases and hydrogenases are presented. There is a renewed interest in exploiting cyanobacteria in solar energy conversion programs to generate H2 as a source of combustible energy. To enhance the rates of H2 production, the emphasis perhaps needs not to be on more efficient hydrogenases and nitrogenases or on the transfer of foreign enzymes into cyanobacteria. A likely better strategy is to exploit the use of radiant solar energy by the photosynthetic electron transport system to enhance the rates of H2 formation and so improve the chances of utilizing cyanobacteria as a source for the generation of clean energy. PMID:21119016

  5. Antifungal Compounds from Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Tânia K.; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P.; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P. D.; Fiore, Marli F.; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  6. Fluorescent minerals - A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  7. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    PubMed

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. PMID:26256632

  8. MCEARD - CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more spatially and temporally prevalent in the US and worldwide. Waterborne cyanobacteria and their highly potent toxins are a significant hazard for human health and the ecosystem....

  9. Chemodiversity in Freshwater and Terrestrial Cyanobacteria – a Source for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chlipala, George E.; Mo, Shunyan; Orjala, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered a promising source for new pharmaceutical lead compounds and a large number of chemically diverse and bioactive metabolites have been obtained from cyanobacteria over the last few decades. This review highlights the structural diversity of natural products from freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacteria. The review is divided into three areas: cytotoxic metabolites, protease inhibitors, and antimicrobial metabolites. The first section discusses the potent cytotoxins cryptophycin and tolytoxin. The second section covers protease inhibitors from freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacteria and is divided in five subsections according to structural class: aeruginosins, cyanopeptolins, microviridins, anabaenopeptins, and microginins. Structure activity relationships are discussed within each protease inhibitor class. The third section, antimicrobial metabolites from freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacteria, is divided by chemical class in three subsections: alkaloids, peptides and terpenoids. These examples emphasize the structural diversity and drug development potential of natural products from freshwater and terrestrial cyanobacteria. PMID:21561419

  10. Cyanobacteria: Photoautotrophic Microbial Factories for the Sustainable Synthesis of Industrial Products.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Matsui, Minami; Abdullah, Amirul Al-Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are widely distributed Gram-negative bacteria with a long evolutionary history and the only prokaryotes that perform plant-like oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as hosts for biotechnological applications, including simple growth requirements, ease of genetic manipulation, and attractive platforms for carbon neutral production process. The use of photosynthetic cyanobacteria to directly convert carbon dioxide to biofuels is an emerging area of interest. Equipped with the ability to degrade environmental pollutants and remove heavy metals, cyanobacteria are promising tools for bioremediation and wastewater treatment. Cyanobacteria are characterized by the ability to produce a spectrum of bioactive compounds with antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antialgal properties that are of pharmaceutical and agricultural significance. Several strains of cyanobacteria are also sources of high-value chemicals, for example, pigments, vitamins, and enzymes. Recent advances in biotechnological approaches have facilitated researches directed towards maximizing the production of desired products in cyanobacteria and realizing the potential of these bacteria for various industrial applications. In this review, the potential of cyanobacteria as sources of energy, bioactive compounds, high-value chemicals, and tools for aquatic bioremediation and recent progress in engineering cyanobacteria for these bioindustrial applications are discussed. PMID:26199945

  11. Cyanobacteria: Photoautotrophic Microbial Factories for the Sustainable Synthesis of Industrial Products

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Matsui, Minami; Abdullah, Amirul Al-Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are widely distributed Gram-negative bacteria with a long evolutionary history and the only prokaryotes that perform plant-like oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as hosts for biotechnological applications, including simple growth requirements, ease of genetic manipulation, and attractive platforms for carbon neutral production process. The use of photosynthetic cyanobacteria to directly convert carbon dioxide to biofuels is an emerging area of interest. Equipped with the ability to degrade environmental pollutants and remove heavy metals, cyanobacteria are promising tools for bioremediation and wastewater treatment. Cyanobacteria are characterized by the ability to produce a spectrum of bioactive compounds with antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antialgal properties that are of pharmaceutical and agricultural significance. Several strains of cyanobacteria are also sources of high-value chemicals, for example, pigments, vitamins, and enzymes. Recent advances in biotechnological approaches have facilitated researches directed towards maximizing the production of desired products in cyanobacteria and realizing the potential of these bacteria for various industrial applications. In this review, the potential of cyanobacteria as sources of energy, bioactive compounds, high-value chemicals, and tools for aquatic bioremediation and recent progress in engineering cyanobacteria for these bioindustrial applications are discussed. PMID:26199945

  12. Multiple Gene Repression in Cyanobacteria Using CRISPRi.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lun; Cengic, Ivana; Anfelt, Josefine; Hudson, Elton P

    2016-03-18

    We describe the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) for gene repression in the model cyanobacterium Synechcocystis sp. PCC 6803. The nuclease-deficient Cas9 from the type-II CRISPR/Cas of Streptrococcus pyogenes was used to repress green fluorescent protein (GFP) to negligible levels. CRISPRi was also used to repress formation of carbon storage compounds polyhydroxybutryate (PHB) and glycogen during nitrogen starvation. As an example of the potential of CRISPRi for basic and applied cyanobacteria research, we simultaneously knocked down 4 putative aldehyde reductases and dehydrogenases at 50-95% repression. This work also demonstrates that tightly repressed promoters allow for inducible and reversible CRISPRi in cyanobacteria. PMID:26689101

  13. Genetic engineering of cyanobacteria as biodiesel feedstock.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffing, Anne M.; Trahan, Christine Alexandra; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels are a renewable energy source with the potential to replace conventional petroleum-based fuels, while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The economic feasibility of commercial algal fuel production, however, is limited by low productivity of the natural algal strains. The project described in this SAND report addresses this low algal productivity by genetically engineering cyanobacteria (i.e. blue-green algae) to produce free fatty acids as fuel precursors. The engineered strains were characterized using Sandia's unique imaging capabilities along with cutting-edge RNA-seq technology. These tools are applied to identify additional genetic targets for improving fuel production in cyanobacteria. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates successful fuel production from engineered cyanobacteria, identifies potential limitations, and investigates several strategies to overcome these limitations. This project was funded from FY10-FY13 through the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering, a program sponsored by the LDRD office at Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Cyanobacteria-bryophyte symbioses.

    PubMed

    Adams, David G; Duggan, Paula S

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a large group of photosynthetic prokaryotes of enormous environmental importance, being responsible for a large proportion of global CO(2) and N(2) fixation. They form symbiotic associations with a wide range of eukaryotic hosts including plants, fungi, sponges, and protists. The cyanobacterial symbionts are often filamentous and fix N(2) in specialized cells known as heterocysts, enabling them to provide the host with fixed nitrogen and, in the case of non-photosynthetic hosts, with fixed carbon. The best studied cyanobacterial symbioses are those with plants, in which the cyanobacteria can infect the roots, stems, leaves, and, in the case of the liverworts and hornworts, the subject of this review, the thallus. The symbionts are usually Nostoc spp. that gain entry to the host by means of specialized motile filaments known as hormogonia. The host plant releases chemical signals that stimulate hormogonia formation and, by chemoattraction, guide the hormogonia to the point of entry into the plant tissue. Inside the symbiotic cavity, host signals inhibit further hormogonia formation and stimulate heterocyst development and dinitrogen fixation. The cyanobionts undergo morphological and physiological changes, including reduced growth rate and CO(2) fixation, and enhanced N(2) fixation, and release to the plant much of the dinitrogen fixed. This short review summarizes knowledge of the cyanobacterial symbioses with liverworts and hornworts, with particular emphasis on the importance of pili and gliding motility for the symbiotic competence of hormogonia. PMID:18267939

  15. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600–2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500–542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600–1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000–542 Mya). PMID:26621203

  16. Oleic acid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    VanDusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids in cyanobacteria is very similar to the well characterized system found in green plants. However, the initial desaturation of stearic acid in cyanobacteria appears to represent a significant departure from plant systems in which stearoyl-ACP is the exclusive substrate for desaturation. In Anabaena variabilis, the substrate appears to be monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a lipid not found in plants. The authors examined five different cyanobacteria to determine if the pathway in A. variabilis was generally present in other cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria studied were A. variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis marina, and Anacystis nidulans. Each were grown in liquid culture, harvested, and examined for stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity or incubated with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. None of the cyanobacteria contained any stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity in whole homogenates or 105,000g supernatants. All were capable of incorporating /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and results from incubations of 20 min, 1 hr, 1 hr + 10 hr chase were consistent with monoglucosyldiacylglycerol serving as precursor for monogalctosyldiacylglycerol. Thus, initial evidence is consistent with oleic acid biosynthesis occurring by desaturation of stearoyl-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol in all cyanobacteria.

  17. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600-2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500-542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600-1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000-542 Mya). PMID:26621203

  18. Ethanol synthesis by genetic engineering in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, M.D.; Coleman, J.R.

    1999-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are autotrophic prokaryotes which carry out oxygenic photosynthesis and accumulate glycogen as the major form of stored carbon. In this research, the authors introduced new genes into a cyanobacterium in order to create a novel pathway for fixed carbon utilization which results in the synthesis of ethanol. The coding sequences of pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh) from the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis were cloned into the shuttle vector pCB4 and then used to transform the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. Under control of the promoter from the rbcLS operon encoding the cyanobacterial ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the pdc and adh genes were expressed at high levels, as demonstrated by Western blotting and enzyme activity analyses. The transformed cyanobacterium synthesized ethanol, which diffused from the cells into the culture medium. As cyanobacteria have simple growth requirements and use light, CO{sub 2}, and inorganic elements efficiently, production of ethanol by cyanobacteria is a potential system for bioconversion of solar energy and CO{sub 2} into a valuable resource.

  19. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source. PMID:16371161

  20. Cyanobacteria of the Genus Prochlorothrix†

    PubMed Central

    Pinevich, Alexander; Velichko, Natalia; Ivanikova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Green cyanobacteria differ from the blue–green cyanobacteria by the possession of a chlorophyll-containing light-harvesting antenna. Three genera of the green cyanobacteria namely Acaryochloris, Prochlorococcus, and Prochloron are unicellular and inhabit marine environments. Prochlorococcus marinus attracts most attention due to its prominent role in marine primary productivity. The fourth genus Prochlorothrix is represented by the filamentous freshwater strains. Unlike the other green cyanobacteria, Prochlorothrix strains are remarkably rare: to date, living isolates have been limited to two European locations. Taking into account fluctuating blooms, morphological resemblance to Planktothrix and Pseudanabaena, and unsuccessful attempts to obtain enrichments of Prochlorothrix, the most successful strategy to search for this cyanobacterium involves PCR with environmental DNA and Prochlorothrix-specific primers. This approach has revealed a broader distribution of Prochlorothrix. Marker genes have been found in at least two additional locations. Despite of the growing evidence for naturally occurring Prochlorothrix, there are only a few cultured strains with one of them (PCC 9006) being claimed to be axenic. In multixenic cultures, Prochlorothrix is accompanied by heterotrophic bacteria indicating a consortium-type association. The genus Prochlorothrix includes two species: P. hollandica and P. scandica based on distinctions in genomic DNA, cell size, temperature optimum, and fatty acid composition of membrane lipids. In this short review the properties of cyanobacteria of the genus Prochlorothrix are described. In addition, the evolutionary scenario for green cyanobacteria is suggested taking into account their possible role in the origin of simple chloroplast. PMID:22783229

  1. Genome fluctuations in cyanobacteria reflect evolutionary, developmental and adaptive traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria belong to an ancient group of photosynthetic prokaryotes with pronounced variations in their cellular differentiation strategies, physiological capacities and choice of habitat. Sequencing efforts have shown that genomes within this phylum are equally diverse in terms of size and protein-coding capacity. To increase our understanding of genomic changes in the lineage, the genomes of 58 contemporary cyanobacteria were analysed for shared and unique orthologs. Results A total of 404 protein families, present in all cyanobacterial genomes, were identified. Two of these are unique to the phylum, corresponding to an AbrB family transcriptional regulator and a gene that escapes functional annotation although its genomic neighbourhood is conserved among the organisms examined. The evolution of cyanobacterial genome sizes involves a mix of gains and losses in the clade encompassing complex cyanobacteria, while a single event of reduction is evident in a clade dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria. Genome sizes and gene family copy numbers evolve at a higher rate in the former clade, and multi-copy genes were predominant in large genomes. Orthologs unique to cyanobacteria exhibiting specific characteristics, such as filament formation, heterocyst differentiation, diazotrophy and symbiotic competence, were also identified. An ancestral character reconstruction suggests that the most recent common ancestor of cyanobacteria had a genome size of approx. 4.5 Mbp and 1678 to 3291 protein-coding genes, 4%-6% of which are unique to cyanobacteria today. Conclusions The different rates of genome-size evolution and multi-copy gene abundance suggest two routes of genome development in the history of cyanobacteria. The expansion strategy is driven by gene-family enlargment and generates a broad adaptive potential; while the genome streamlining strategy imposes adaptations to highly specific niches, also reflected in their different functional capacities. A few

  2. Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations.

    PubMed

    Drugă, Bogdan; Turko, Patrick; Spaak, Piet; Pomati, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Zooplankton communities can be strongly affected by cyanobacterial blooms, especially species of genus Daphnia, which are key-species in lake ecosystems. Here, we explored the effect of microcystin/nonmicrocystin (MC/non-MC) producing cyanobacteria in the diet of experimental Daphnia galeata populations composed of eight genotypes. We used D. galeata clones hatched from ephippia 10 to 60 years old, which were first tested in monocultures, and then exposed for 10 weeks as mixed populations to three food treatments consisting of green algae combined with cyanobacteria able/unable of producing MC. We measured the expression of nine genes potentially involved in Daphnia acclimation to cyanobacteria: six protease genes, one ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene, and two rRNA genes, and then we tracked the dynamics of the genotypes in mixed populations. The expression pattern of one protease and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes was positively correlated with the increased fitness of competing clones in the presence of cyanobacteria, suggesting physiological plasticity. The genotype dynamics in mixed populations was only partially related to the growth rates of clones in monocultures and varied strongly with the food. Our results revealed strong intraspecific differences in the tolerance of D. galeata clones to MC/non-MC-producing cyanobacteria in their diet, suggesting microevolutionary effects. PMID:26943751

  3. Cyanobacteria as a Platform for Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Nozzi, Nicole E.; Oliver, John W. K.; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have great potential as a platform for biofuel production because of their fast growth, ability to fix carbon dioxide gas, and their genetic tractability. Furthermore they do not require fermentable sugars or arable land for growth and so competition with cropland would be greatly reduced. In this perspective we discuss the challenges and areas for improvement most pertinent for advancing cyanobacterial fuel production, including: improving genetic parts, carbon fixation, metabolic flux, nutrient requirements on a large scale, and photosynthetic efficiency using natural light. PMID:25022311

  4. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  5. cyanoScope: Mapping cyanobacteria one slide at a time

    EPA Science Inventory

    cyanoScope is a new initiative for engaging the public, and particularly citizen scientists, to assist with mapping potentially harmful algal blooms throughout New England. Cyanobacteria are important members of the phytoplankton assemblages in lakes. In most situations these p...

  6. Evaluation of cyanobacteria cell count detection derived from MERIS imagery across the eastern USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inland waters across the United States (US) are at potential risk for increased outbreaks of toxic cyanobacteria (Cyano) harmful algal bloom (HAB) events resulting from elevated water temperatures and extreme hydrologic events attributable to climate change and increased nutrient...

  7. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  8. Bioactivity of Benthic and Picoplanktonic Estuarine Cyanobacteria on Growth of Photoautotrophs: Inhibition versus Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Viviana R.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding potential biochemical interactions and effects among cyanobacteria and other organisms is one of the main keys to a better knowledge of microbial population structuring and dynamics. In this study, the effects of cyanobacteria from benthos and plankton of estuaries on other cyanobacteria and green algae growth were evaluated. To understand how the estuarine cyanobacteria might influence the dynamics of phytoplankton, experiments were carried out with the freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp., and the marine Synechocystis salina and Nannochloropsis sp. exposed to aqueous and organic (70% methanol) crude extracts of cyanobacteria for 96 h. The most pronounced effect observed was the growth stimulation. Growth inhibition was also observed for S. salina and M. aeruginosa target-species at the highest and lowest concentrations of cyanobacterial extracts. The methanolic crude extract of Phormidium cf. chalybeum LEGE06078 was effective against S. salina growth in a concentration-dependent manner after 96 h-exposure. All of the cyanobacterial isolates showed some bioactivity on the target-species growth, i.e., inhibitory or stimulating effects. These results indicate that the analyzed cyanobacterial isolates can potentially contribute to blooms’ proliferation of other cyanobacteria and to the abnormal growth of green algae disturbing the dynamic of estuarine phytoplankton communities. Since estuaries are transitional ecosystems, the benthic and picoplanktonic estuarine cyanobacteria can change both freshwater and marine phytoplankton succession, competition and bloom formation. Furthermore, a potential biotechnological application of these isolates as a tool to control cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferation can be feasible. This work is the first on the subject of growth responses of photoautotrophs to cyanobacteria from Atlantic estuarine environments. PMID:21673889

  9. TOXINS FROM CYANOBACTERIA IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is part of a larger U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) effort, which includes the Office of Water, to investigate algal toxins in surface water supplies and drinking water. Toxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are among the most potent known ...

  10. In the Limelight: Photoreceptors in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain cyanobacteria look green if grown in red light and vice versa. This dramatic color change, called complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), is caused by alterations of the major colored light-harvesting proteins. A major controller of CCA is the cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) RcaE, a red-green reversible photoreceptor that triggers a complex signal transduction pathway. Now, a new study demonstrates that CCA is also modulated by DpxA, a CBCR that senses yellow and teal (greenish blue) light. DpxA acts to expand the range of wavelengths that can impact CCA, by fine-tuning the process. This dual control of CCA might positively impact the fitness of cells growing in the shade of competing algae or in a water column where light levels and spectral quality change gradually with depth. This discovery adds to the growing number of light-responsive phenomena controlled by multiple CBCRs. Furthermore, the diverse CBCRs which are exclusively found in cyanobacteria have significant biotechnological potential. PMID:27353763

  11. In the Limelight: Photoreceptors in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    Certain cyanobacteria look green if grown in red light and vice versa. This dramatic color change, called complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), is caused by alterations of the major colored light-harvesting proteins. A major controller of CCA is the cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) RcaE, a red-green reversible photoreceptor that triggers a complex signal transduction pathway. Now, a new study demonstrates that CCA is also modulated by DpxA, a CBCR that senses yellow and teal (greenish blue) light. DpxA acts to expand the range of wavelengths that can impact CCA, by fine-tuning the process. This dual control of CCA might positively impact the fitness of cells growing in the shade of competing algae or in a water column where light levels and spectral quality change gradually with depth. This discovery adds to the growing number of light-responsive phenomena controlled by multiple CBCRs. Furthermore, the diverse CBCRs which are exclusively found in cyanobacteria have significant biotechnological potential. PMID:27353763

  12. Fossilized glycolipids reveal past oceanic N2 fixation by heterocystous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Thorsten; Speelman, Eveline N; Hopmans, Ellen C; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2010-11-01

    N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria play an essential role in sustaining primary productivity in contemporary oceans and freshwater systems. However, the significance of N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria in past nitrogen cycling is difficult to establish as their preservation potential is relatively poor and specific biological markers are presently lacking. Heterocystous N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria synthesize unique long-chain glycolipids in the cell envelope covering the heterocyst cell to protect the oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. We found that these heterocyst glycolipids are remarkably well preserved in (ancient) lacustrine and marine sediments, unambiguously indicating the (past) presence of N(2)-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria. Analysis of Pleistocene sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea showed that heterocystous cyanobacteria, likely as epiphytes in symbiosis with planktonic diatoms, were particularly abundant during deposition of sapropels. Eocene Arctic Ocean sediments deposited at a time of large Azolla blooms contained glycolipids typical for heterocystous cyanobacteria presently living in symbiosis with the freshwater fern Azolla, indicating that this symbiosis already existed in that time. Our study thus suggests that heterocystous cyanobacteria played a major role in adding "new" fixed nitrogen to surface waters in past stratified oceans. PMID:20966349

  13. Fossilized glycolipids reveal past oceanic N2 fixation by heterocystous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bauersachs, Thorsten; Speelman, Eveline N.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe

    2010-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria play an essential role in sustaining primary productivity in contemporary oceans and freshwater systems. However, the significance of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in past nitrogen cycling is difficult to establish as their preservation potential is relatively poor and specific biological markers are presently lacking. Heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacteria synthesize unique long-chain glycolipids in the cell envelope covering the heterocyst cell to protect the oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. We found that these heterocyst glycolipids are remarkably well preserved in (ancient) lacustrine and marine sediments, unambiguously indicating the (past) presence of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria. Analysis of Pleistocene sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea showed that heterocystous cyanobacteria, likely as epiphytes in symbiosis with planktonic diatoms, were particularly abundant during deposition of sapropels. Eocene Arctic Ocean sediments deposited at a time of large Azolla blooms contained glycolipids typical for heterocystous cyanobacteria presently living in symbiosis with the freshwater fern Azolla, indicating that this symbiosis already existed in that time. Our study thus suggests that heterocystous cyanobacteria played a major role in adding “new” fixed nitrogen to surface waters in past stratified oceans. PMID:20966349

  14. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  15. Formation and diagenesis of modern marine calcified cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Planavsky, N; Reid, R P; Lyons, T W; Myshrall, K L; Visscher, P T

    2009-12-01

    Calcified cyanobacterial microfossils are common in carbonate environments through most of the Phanerozoic, but are absent from the marine rock record over the past 65 Myr. There has been long-standing debate on the factors controlling the formation and temporal distribution of these fossils, fostered by the lack of a suitable modern analog. We describe calcified cyanobacteria filaments in a modern marine reef setting at Highborne Cay, Bahamas. Our observations and stable isotope data suggest that initial calcification occurs in living cyanobacteria and is photosynthetically induced. A single variety of cyanobacteria, Dichothrix sp., produces calcified filaments. Adjacent cyanobacterial mats form well-laminated stromatolites, rather than calcified filaments, indicating there can be a strong taxonomic control over the mechanism of microbial calcification. Petrographic analyses indicate that the calcified filaments are degraded during early diagenesis and are not present in well-lithified microbialites. The early diagenetic destruction of calcified filaments at Highborne Cay indicates that the absence of calcified cyanobacteria from periods of the Phanerozoic is likely to be caused by low preservation potential as well as inhibited formation. PMID:19796131

  16. Synthetic biology of cyanobacteria: unique challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Berla, Bertram M.; Saha, Rajib; Immethun, Cheryl M.; Maranas, Costas D.; Moon, Tae Seok; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, and especially cyanobacteria, hold great promise as sources of renewably-produced fuels, bulk and specialty chemicals, and nutritional products. Synthetic biology tools can help unlock cyanobacteria's potential for these functions, but unfortunately tool development for these organisms has lagged behind that for S. cerevisiae and E. coli. While these organisms may in many cases be more difficult to work with as “chassis” strains for synthetic biology than certain heterotrophs, the unique advantages of autotrophs in biotechnology applications as well as the scientific importance of improved understanding of photosynthesis warrant the development of these systems into something akin to a “green E. coli.” In this review, we highlight unique challenges and opportunities for development of synthetic biology approaches in cyanobacteria. We review classical and recently developed methods for constructing targeted mutants in various cyanobacterial strains, and offer perspective on what genetic tools might most greatly expand the ability to engineer new functions in such strains. Similarly, we review what genetic parts are most needed for the development of cyanobacterial synthetic biology. Finally, we highlight recent methods to construct genome-scale models of cyanobacterial metabolism and to use those models to measure properties of autotrophic metabolism. Throughout this paper, we discuss some of the unique challenges of a diurnal, autotrophic lifestyle along with how the development of synthetic biology and biotechnology in cyanobacteria must fit within those constraints. PMID:24009604

  17. Collection, purification, and culture of cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Court, G J; Kycia, J H; Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    Detailed studies of the structure, physiology, biochemistry, and toxin production of cyanobacteria require a dependable and reproducible supply of selected organisms. Axenic cloned strains of cyanobacteria should be used whenever possible. Several physical and chemical techniques are available to purify cultures to the axenic condition. Cultural techniques are described here which can be used to grow adequate amounts, greater than 100 g fresh weight, of cyanobacteria in about four weeks.

  18. Utilization of the terrestrial cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Furukawa, Jun; Kimura, Shunta; Yokoshima, Mika; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroyuki

    The terrestrial, N _{2}-fixing cyanobacterium, Nostoc commune has expected to utilize for agriculture, food and terraforming cause of its extracellular polysaccharide, desiccation tolerance and nitrogen fixation. Previously, the first author indicated that desiccation related genes were analyzed and the suggested that the genes were related to nitrogen fixation and metabolisms. In this report, we suggest possibility of agriculture, using the cyanobacterium. Further, we also found radioactive compounds accumulated N. commune (cyanobacterium) in Fukushima, Japan after nuclear accident. Thus, it is investigated to decontaminate radioactive compounds from the surface soil by the cyanobacterium and showed to accumulate radioactive compounds using the cyanobacterium. We will discuss utilization of terrestrial cyanobacteria under closed environment. Keyword: Desiccation, terrestrial cyanobacteria, bioremediation, agriculture

  19. High-sensitivity Stokes spectropolarimetry on cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, W. E.; Hesse, E.; Hough, J. H.; Gledhill, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the spectral signatures arising from the optical properties of chlorophyll in linear and circularly polarised scattered light from cyanobacteria. We include Stokes scattering coefficient measurements on two cyanobacteria species, Chroococcidiopsis and Synechococcus to a fractional polarisation of ±0.0001 across visible wavelengths. We find that the largest circularly polarised optical signatures from our cyanobacteria samples can be described by optical scattering from spheroidal objects with internal reflections and absorption and, importantly, light scattering from chiral processes is not identifiable in our narrow band light scattering data. We believe previous light scattering measurements attributing chirality effects to cyanobacteria may have been dominated by internal scattering processes.

  20. Manipulating cyanobacteria: Spirulina for potential CELSS diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadros, Mahasin G.; Smith, Woodrow; Mbuthia, Peter; Joseph, Beverly

    1989-01-01

    Spirulina sp. as a bioregenerative photosynthetic and an edible alga for spacecraft crew in a CELSS, was characterized for the biomass yield in batch cultures, under various environmental conditions. The partitioning of the assimalitory products (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids) were manipulated by varying the environmental growth conditions. Experiments with Spirulina have shown that under stress conditions (i.e., high light 160 uE/sq m/s, temperature 38 C, nitrogen or phosphate limitation; 0.1 M sodium chloride) carbohydrates increased at the expense of proteins. In other experiments, where the growth media were sufficient in nutrients and incubated under optimum growth conditions, the total of the algal could be manipulated by growth conditions. These results support the feasibility of considering Spirulina as a subsystem in CELSS because of the ease with which its nutrient content can be manipulated.

  1. Cyanobacteria blooms produce teratogenic retinoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wan, Yi; Giesy, John P.; Hu, Jianying

    2012-01-01

    Deformed amphibians have been observed in eutrophic habitats, and some clues point to the retinoic acids (RAs) or RA mimics. However, RAs are generally thought of as vertebrate-specific hormones, and there was no evidence that RAs exist in cyanobacteria or algae blooms. By analyzing RAs and their analogs 4-oxo-RAs in natural cyanobacteria blooms and cultures of cyanobacteria and algae, we showed that cyanobacteria blooms could produce RAs, which were powerful animal teratogens. Intracellular RAs and 4-oxo-RAs with concentrations between 0.4 and 4.2 × 102 ng/L were detected in all bloom materials, and extracellular concentrations measured in water from Taihu Lake, China, were as great as 2.0 × 10 ng/L, which might pose a risk to wildlife through chronic exposure. Further examination of 39 cyanobacteria and algae species revealed that 32 species could produce RAs and 4-oxo-RAs (1.6–1.4 × 103 ng/g dry weight), and the dominant cyanobacteria species in Taihu Lake, Microcystis flos-aquae and Microcystis aeruginosa, produced high amounts of RAs and 4-oxo-RAs with concentrations of 1.4 × 103 and 3.7 × 102 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Most genera of cyanobacteria that could produce RAs and 4-oxo-RAs, such as Microcystis, Anabaena, and Aphanizomenon, often occur dominantly in blooms. Production of RAs and 4-oxo-RAs by cyanobacteria was associated with species, origin location, and growth stage. These results represent a conclusive demonstration of endogenous production of RAs in freshwater cyanobacteria blooms. The observation of teratogenic RAs in cyanobacteria is evolutionarily and ecologically significant because RAs are vertebrate-specific hormones, and cyanobacteria form extensive and highly visible blooms in many aquatic ecosystems. PMID:22645328

  2. Genetic Instability in Cyanobacteria – An Elephant in the Room?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    Many research groups are interested in engineering the metabolism of cyanobacteria with the objective to convert solar energy, CO2, and water (perhaps also N2) into commercially valuable products. Toward this objective, many challenges stand in the way before sustainable production can be realized. One of these challenges, potentially, is genetic instability. Although only a handful of reports of this phenomenon are available in the scientific literature, it does appear to be a real issue that so far has not been studied much in cyanobacteria. With this brief perspective, I wish to raise the awareness of this potential issue and hope to inspire future studies on the topic as I believe it will make an important contribution to enabling sustainable large-scale biotechnology in the future using aquatic photobiological microorganisms. PMID:25152885

  3. Responses to oxidative and heavy metal stresses in cyanobacteria: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk. PMID:25561236

  4. Responses to Oxidative and Heavy Metal Stresses in Cyanobacteria: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only known prokaryotes that perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, are receiving strong attention in basic and applied research. In using solar energy, water, CO2 and mineral salts to produce a large amount of biomass for the food chain, cyanobacteria constitute the first biological barrier against the entry of toxics into the food chain. In addition, cyanobacteria have the potential for the solar-driven carbon-neutral production of biofuels. However, cyanobacteria are often challenged by toxic reactive oxygen species generated under intense illumination, i.e., when their production of photosynthetic electrons exceeds what they need for the assimilation of inorganic nutrients. Furthermore, in requiring high amounts of various metals for growth, cyanobacteria are also frequently affected by drastic changes in metal availabilities. They are often challenged by heavy metals, which are increasingly spread out in the environment through human activities, and constitute persistent pollutants because they cannot be degraded. Consequently, it is important to analyze the protection against oxidative and metal stresses in cyanobacteria because these ancient organisms have developed most of these processes, a large number of which have been conserved during evolution. This review summarizes what is known regarding these mechanisms, emphasizing on their crosstalk. PMID:25561236

  5. Cyanobacteria as Cell Factories to Produce Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yong; He, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria represent a promising platform for the production of plant secondary metabolites. Their capacity to express plant P450 proteins, which have essential functions in the biosynthesis of many plant secondary metabolites, makes cyanobacteria ideal for this purpose, and their photosynthetic capability allows cyanobacteria to grow with simple nutrient inputs. This review summarizes the advantages of using cyanobacteria to transgenically produce plant secondary metabolites. Some techniques to improve heterologous gene expression in cyanobacteria are discussed. PMID:25973419

  6. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  7. Direct Use of Mineral Carbonate for Autotrophy Among Euendolithic Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs, and arguably the most important primary producers on the planet, fixing carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the aquatic environment, and directly from atmospheric CO2 in terrestrial systems. Euendolithic cyanobacteria occupy a very specific niche, inside rocks, which can potentially preclude them from easily accessing those carbon pools, and yet, natural euendolithic communities can support food webs in habitats where they are prominent, such as in marine carbonate platforms and desert carbonate outcrops. In a recently proposed model describing the mechanism of cyanobacterial carbonate boring, we postulated that as the organism dissolves the mineral, liberated CO32- anions will be quickly converted to HCO3- and assimilated directly, making the cyanobacterium independent of external DIC pools for autotrophy. We used natural abundance and tracer stable carbon (13C) isotope analyses accompanied by nanoSIMS imaging in model laboratory systems of cultivated cyanobacteria and in natural mixed communities of marine euendoliths to study the ultimate source of carbon in their biomass. Our results clearly demonstrate that endolithic biomass of these cyanobacteria is significantly derived from mineral carbonate, as opposed to free-living or epilithic biomass, where the source is mixed or coming from the dissolved pool, this holds for model cultures as well as natural communities. In fact, we can increase the lifestyle preference of cultures for endolithic growth versus planktonic or benthic growth, by simply imposing an external DIC limitation in the presence of a carbonate substrate. Our results predict that benthic communities (extant or fossil) that rely heavily on primary production by euendolithic primary producers may show 13C signatures that mimic those of the surrounding carbonate substrate rather than from those of the local seawater.

  8. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  9. INVESTIGATOIN OF CYANOBACTERIA TOXINS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction:

    Approximately 80 alkaloid and cyclic peptide toxins produced by various freshwater and marine cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) have been identified and their structures determined. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified two neurotoxin alkalo...

  10. Deep water ventilation traced by Synechococcus cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Šantić, Danijela

    2008-07-01

    The paper describes a finding of photoautotroph cyanobacteria Synechococcus in deep Adriatic waters during the spring of 2006. The maximum abundance in early May was positioned at 800 m, being of order of the values referred for the surface waters in the Adriatic Sea. The deep abundance maximum has been associated to the fast ventilation of deep Adriatic waters, usually occurring during wintertime strong cooling events. Two processes were detected: (1) deep convection in the South Adriatic Pit (SAP) and (2) density current going downslope. The first process was responsible for bringing the cyanobacteria down to 600-m depth in the area of convection, and the second one triggered the downslope transport of the cyanobacteria to the SAP very bottom. The depletion rate of Synechoccocus cyanobacteria in an extremely hostile environment has been computed to equal about 1 month.

  11. Peroxiredoxins in Plants and Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are central elements of the antioxidant defense system and the dithiol-disulfide redox regulatory network of the plant and cyanobacterial cell. They employ a thiol-based catalytic mechanism to reduce H2O2, alkylhydroperoxide, and peroxinitrite. In plants and cyanobacteria, there exist 2-CysPrx, 1-CysPrx, PrxQ, and type II Prx. Higher plants typically contain at least one plastid 2-CysPrx, one nucleo-cytoplasmic 1-CysPrx, one chloroplast PrxQ, and one each of cytosolic, mitochondrial, and plastidic type II Prx. Cyanobacteria express variable sets of three or more Prxs. The catalytic cycle consists of three steps: (i) peroxidative reduction, (ii) resolving step, and (iii) regeneration using diverse electron donors such as thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, cyclophilins, glutathione, and ascorbic acid. Prx proteins undergo major conformational changes in dependence of their redox state. Thus, they not only modulate cellular reactive oxygen species- and reactive nitrogen species-dependent signaling, but depending on the Prx type they sense the redox state, transmit redox information to binding partners, and function as chaperone. They serve in context of photosynthesis and respiration, but also in metabolism and development of all tissues, for example, in nodules as well as during seed and fruit development. The article surveys the current literature and attempts a mostly comprehensive coverage of present day knowledge and concepts on Prx mechanism, regulation, and function and thus on the whole Prx systems in plants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1129–1159. PMID:21194355

  12. Toward a systems-level understanding of gene regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic networks in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Semeniuk, Trudi A.; Futschik, Matthias E.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are essential primary producers in marine ecosystems, playing an important role in both carbon and nitrogen cycles. In the last decade, various genome sequencing and metagenomic projects have generated large amounts of genetic data for cyanobacteria. This wealth of data provides researchers with a new basis for the study of molecular adaptation, ecology and evolution of cyanobacteria, as well as for developing biotechnological applications. It also facilitates the use of multiplex techniques, i.e., expression profiling by high-throughput technologies such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics. However, exploration and analysis of these data is challenging, and often requires advanced computational methods. Also, they need to be integrated into our existing framework of knowledge to use them to draw reliable biological conclusions. Here, systems biology provides important tools. Especially, the construction and analysis of molecular networks has emerged as a powerful systems-level framework, with which to integrate such data, and to better understand biological relevant processes in these organisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the advances and experimental approaches undertaken using multiplex data from genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, we summarize currently available web-based tools dedicated to cyanobacteria, i.e., CyanoBase, CyanoEXpress, ProPortal, Cyanorak, CyanoBIKE, and CINPER. Finally, we present a case study for the freshwater model cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, to show the power of meta-analysis, and the potential to extrapolate acquired knowledge to the ecologically important marine cyanobacteria genus, Prochlorococcus. PMID:25071821

  13. Bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations during primary succession in recently Deglaciated areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile).

    PubMed

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De Los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T G Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition. PMID:24819926

  14. Bryophyte-Cyanobacteria Associations during Primary Succession in Recently Deglaciated Areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile)

    PubMed Central

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T. G. Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G.

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition. PMID:24819926

  15. BASIC: Baltic Sea cyanobacteria. An investigation of the structure and dynamics of water blooms of cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea—responses to a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stal, Lucas J.; Albertano, Patrizia; Bergman, Birgitta; Bröckel, Klaus von; Gallon, John R.; Hayes, Paul K.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Walsby, Anthony E.

    2003-11-01

    The blooms of cyanobacteria that develop each summer in the Baltic Sea are composed of two functional groups, namely the small-sized picocyanobacteria ( Synechococcus sp.) and the larger, colony-forming, filamentous N 2-fixing cyanobacteria. The former encompassed both red (phycoerythrin-rich) and blue-green (phycocyanin-rich) species. The majority of the picocyanobacteria measured less than 1 μm and this size fraction comprised as much as 80% of the total cyanobacterial biomass and contributed as much as 50% of the total primary production of a cyanobacterial bloom. The picocyanobacteria are incapable of fixing N 2, do not possess gas vesicles and are not toxic. However, a small filamentous Pseudanabaena sp. that could potentially fix N 2 was isolated from the picocyanobacteria fraction. The larger cyanobacteria may form surface scums because they possess gas vesicles that make them buoyant. Although their biomass was less than the picocyanobacteria, they therefore form the more conspicuous and nuisance-forming part of the bloom. The larger cyanobacteria were composed mainly of three different species: Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Anabaena sp. These all belong to the heterocystous, N 2-fixing cyanobacteria. N. spumigena and A. flos-aquae were the dominant species; only N. spumigena was toxic. Although individual Nodularia filaments showed a range of different phenotypes, they all belong to one species as judged from 16S rDNA sequencing. Through determination of the genotypes of many individual Nodularia filaments, it was shown that this population was not clonal and that horizontal exchange of genetic information occurs. N. spumigena and A. flos-aquae were different with respect to their photosynthetic and N 2-fixing potentials. Depending on prevailing environmental conditions, these differences would promote the proliferation of one species over the other and hence would determine overall the toxicity of a bloom. Daily integrals of photon

  16. Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins: The Influence of Nitrogen versus Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, Andrew M.; Rücker, Jacqueline; Pick, Frances R.; Fastner, Jutta; Rohrlack, Thomas; Mischke, Ute; Wiedner, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The importance of nitrogen (N) versus phosphorus (P) in explaining total cyanobacterial biovolume, the biovolume of specific cyanobacterial taxa, and the incidence of cyanotoxins was determined for 102 north German lakes, using methods to separate the effects of joint variation in N and P concentration from those of differential variation in N versus P. While the positive relationship between total cyanobacteria biovolume and P concentration disappeared at high P concentrations, cyanobacteria biovolume increased continually with N concentration, indicating potential N limitation in highly P enriched lakes. The biovolumes of all cyanobacterial taxa were higher in lakes with above average joint NP concentrations, although the relative biovolumes of some Nostocales were higher in less enriched lakes. Taxa were found to have diverse responses to differential N versus P concentration, and the differences between taxa were not consistent with the hypothesis that potentially N2-fixing Nostocales taxa would be favoured in low N relative to P conditions. In particular Aphanizomenon gracile and the subtropical invasive species Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii often reached their highest biovolumes in lakes with high nitrogen relative to phosphorus concentration. Concentrations of all cyanotoxin groups increased with increasing TP and TN, congruent with the biovolumes of their likely producers. Microcystin concentration was strongly correlated with the biovolume of Planktothrix agardhii but concentrations of anatoxin, cylindrospermopsin and paralytic shellfish poison were not strongly related to any individual taxa. Cyanobacteria should not be treated as a single group when considering the potential effects of changes in nutrient loading on phytoplankton community structure and neither should the N2-fixing Nostocales. This is of particular importance when considering the occurrence of cyanotoxins, as the two most abundant potentially toxin producing Nostocales in our study were

  17. Forecasting cyanobacteria dominance in Canadian temperate lakes.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Anurani D; Paterson, Andrew M; Dillon, Peter J; Winter, Jennifer G; Palmer, Michelle; Somers, Keith M

    2015-03-15

    Predictive models based on broad scale, spatial surveys typically identify nutrients and climate as the most important predictors of cyanobacteria abundance; however these models generally have low predictive power because at smaller geographic scales numerous other factors may be equally or more important. At the lake level, for example, the ability to forecast cyanobacteria dominance is of tremendous value to lake managers as they can use such models to communicate exposure risks associated with recreational and drinking water use, and possible exposure to algal toxins, in advance of bloom occurrence. We used detailed algal, limnological and meteorological data from two temperate lakes in south-central Ontario, Canada to determine the factors that are closely linked to cyanobacteria dominance, and to develop easy to use models to forecast cyanobacteria biovolume. For Brandy Lake (BL), the strongest and most parsimonious model for forecasting % cyanobacteria biovolume (% CB) included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP, and % cyanobacteria biovolume two weeks prior. For Three Mile Lake (TML), the best model for forecasting % CB included water column stability, hypolimnetic TP concentration, and 7-d mean wind speed. The models for forecasting % CB in BL and TML are fundamentally different in their lag periods (BL = lag 1 model and TML = lag 2 model) and in some predictor variables despite the close proximity of the study lakes. We speculate that three main factors (nutrient concentrations, water transparency and lake morphometry) may have contributed to differences in the models developed, and may account for variation observed in models derived from large spatial surveys. Our results illustrate that while forecast models can be developed to determine when cyanobacteria will dominate within two temperate lakes, the models require detailed, lake-specific calibration to be effective as risk-management tools. PMID:25585147

  18. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N; Singh, Devendra P

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet. PMID:27148218

  19. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N.; Singh, Devendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet. PMID:27148218

  20. Cyanobacteria and prawn farming in northern New South Wales, Australia--a case study on cyanobacteria diversity and hepatotoxin bioaccumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanpaeae, Harri T.; Holliday, Jon; Schroeder, Helge; Goddard, Timothy J.; Fister, Richard von; Carmichael, Wayne W

    2005-03-15

    Harmful cyanobacteria pose a hazard to aquatic ecosystems due to toxins (hepatotoxic microcystins, nodularins, and cylindrospermopsin) they produce. The microcystins and nodularins are potent toxins, which are also tumor promoters. The microcystins and nodularins may accumulate into aquatic organisms and be transferred to higher trophic levels, and eventually affect vector animals and consumers. Prawn farming is a rapidly growing industry in Australia. Because information regarding effects of cyanobacteria at prawn farms was lacking, we examined diversity of cyanobacteria and toxin production plus bioaccumulation into black tiger prawns (Penaeus monodon) under both field (northern New South Wales, Australia, December 2001-April 2002) and laboratory conditions. Samples were analyzed for hepatotoxins using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The maximum density of cyanobacteria (1 x 10{sup 6} to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l) was reached in April. Cyanobacteria encountered were Oscillatoria sp. (up to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Pseudanabaena sp. (up to 1.8 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), Microcystis sp. (up to 3.5 x 10{sup 4} cells/l), and Aphanocapsa sp. (up to 2 x 10{sup 4} cells/l). An uncommon cyanobacterium, Romeria sp. (up to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} cells/l), was also observed. Contrasting earlier indications, toxic Nodularia spumigena was absent. Despite that both Oscillatoria sp. and Microcystis sp. are potentially hepatotoxic, hepatotoxin levels in phytoplankton samples remained low (up to 0.5-1.2 mg/kg dw; ELISA) in 2001-2002. ELISA was found suitable not only for phytoplankton but prawn tissues as well. Enzymatic pretreatment improved extractability of hepatotoxin from cyanobacteria (nodularin from N. spumigena as an example), but did not generally increase toxin recovery from prawn hepatopancreas. There were slightly increasing hepatotoxin concentrations in prawn hepatopancreas (from 6-20 to 20-80 {mu}g/kg dw; ELISA) during the

  1. Description of new filamentous toxic Cyanobacteria (Oscillatoriales) colonizing the sulfidic periphyton mat in marine mangroves.

    PubMed

    Guidi-Rontani, Chantal; Jean, Maïtena R N; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Bolte-Kluge, Susanne; Gros, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    In this multidisciplinary study, we combined morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic approaches to identify three dominant water bloom-forming Cyanobacteria in a tropical marine mangrove in Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences place these marine Cyanobacteria in the genera Oscillatoria (Oscillatoria sp. clone gwada, strain OG) or Planktothricoides ('Candidatus Planktothricoides niger' strain OB and 'Candidatus Planktothricoides rosea' strain OP; both provisionally novel species within the genus Planktothricoides). Bioassays showed that 'Candidatus Planktothricoides niger' and 'Candidatus Planktothricoides rosea' are toxin-producing organisms. This is the first report of the characterization of Cyanobacteria colonizing periphyton mats of a tropical marine mangrove. We describe two novel benthic marine species and provide new insight into Oscillatoriaceae and their potential role in marine sulfide-rich environments such as mangroves. PMID:25088450

  2. Epidemiology of recreational exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria – an international prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Fleming, Lora E; Burns, John W; Gantar, Miroslav; Backer, Lorraine C; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Case studies and anecdotal reports have documented a range of acute illnesses associated with exposure to cyanobacteria and their toxins in recreational waters. The epidemiological data to date are limited; we sought to improve on the design of some previously conducted studies in order to facilitate revision and refinement of guidelines for exposure to cyanobacteria in recreational waters. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence of acute symptoms in individuals exposed, through recreational activities, to low (cell surface area <2.4 mm2/mL), medium (2.4–12.0 mm2/mL) and high (>12.0 mm2/mL) levels of cyanobacteria in lakes and rivers in southeast Queensland, the central coast area of New South Wales, and northeast and central Florida. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were employed; models adjusted for region, age, smoking, prior history of asthma, hay fever or skin disease (eczema or dermatitis) and clustering by household. Results Of individuals approached, 3,595 met the eligibility criteria, 3,193 (89%) agreed to participate and 1,331 (37%) completed both the questionnaire and follow-up interview. Respiratory symptoms were 2.1 (95%CI: 1.1–4.0) times more likely to be reported by subjects exposed to high levels of cyanobacteria than by those exposed to low levels. Similarly, when grouping all reported symptoms, individuals exposed to high levels of cyanobacteria were 1.7 (95%CI: 1.0–2.8) times more likely to report symptoms than their low-level cyanobacteria-exposed counterparts. Conclusion A significant increase in reporting of minor self-limiting symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms, was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria of mixed genera. We suggest that exposure to cyanobacteria based on total cell surface area above 12 mm2/mL could result in increased incidence of symptoms. The potential for severe, life-threatening cyanobacteria-related illness is likely to be

  3. Tiny Microbes with a Big Impact: The Role of Cyanobacteria and Their Metabolites in Shaping Our Future.

    PubMed

    Mazard, Sophie; Penesyan, Anahit; Ostrowski, Martin; Paulsen, Ian T; Egan, Suhelen

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria are among the first microorganisms to have inhabited the Earth. Throughout the last few billion years, they have played a major role in shaping the Earth as the planet we live in, and they continue to play a significant role in our everyday lives. Besides being an essential source of atmospheric oxygen, marine cyanobacteria are prolific secondary metabolite producers, often despite the exceptionally small genomes. Secondary metabolites produced by these organisms are diverse and complex; these include compounds, such as pigments and fluorescent dyes, as well as biologically-active compounds with a particular interest for the pharmaceutical industry. Cyanobacteria are currently regarded as an important source of nutrients and biofuels and form an integral part of novel innovative energy-efficient designs. Being autotrophic organisms, cyanobacteria are well suited for large-scale biotechnological applications due to the low requirements for organic nutrients. Recent advances in molecular biology techniques have considerably enhanced the potential for industries to optimize the production of cyanobacteria secondary metabolites with desired functions. This manuscript reviews the environmental role of marine cyanobacteria with a particular focus on their secondary metabolites and discusses current and future developments in both the production of desired cyanobacterial metabolites and their potential uses in future innovative projects. PMID:27196915

  4. One Health and Cyanobacteria in Freshwater Systems: Animal Illnesses and Deaths Are Sentinel Events for Human Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Beasley, Val R.

    2015-01-01

    Harmful cyanobacterial blooms have adversely impacted human and animal health for thousands of years. Recently, the health impacts of harmful cyanobacteria blooms are becoming more frequently detected and reported. However, reports of human and animal illnesses or deaths associated with harmful cyanobacteria blooms tend to be investigated and reported separately. Consequently, professionals working in human or in animal health do not always communicate findings related to these events with one another. Using the One Health concept of integration and collaboration among health disciplines, we systematically review the existing literature to discover where harmful cyanobacteria-associated animal illnesses and deaths have served as sentinel events to warn of potential human health risks. We find that illnesses or deaths among livestock, dogs and fish are all potentially useful as sentinel events for the presence of harmful cyanobacteria that may impact human health. We also describe ways to enhance the value of reports of cyanobacteria-associated illnesses and deaths in animals to protect human health. Efficient monitoring of environmental and animal health in a One Health collaborative framework can provide vital warnings of cyanobacteria-associated human health risks. PMID:25903764

  5. Tiny Microbes with a Big Impact: The Role of Cyanobacteria and Their Metabolites in Shaping Our Future

    PubMed Central

    Mazard, Sophie; Penesyan, Anahit; Ostrowski, Martin; Paulsen, Ian T.; Egan, Suhelen

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are among the first microorganisms to have inhabited the Earth. Throughout the last few billion years, they have played a major role in shaping the Earth as the planet we live in, and they continue to play a significant role in our everyday lives. Besides being an essential source of atmospheric oxygen, marine cyanobacteria are prolific secondary metabolite producers, often despite the exceptionally small genomes. Secondary metabolites produced by these organisms are diverse and complex; these include compounds, such as pigments and fluorescent dyes, as well as biologically-active compounds with a particular interest for the pharmaceutical industry. Cyanobacteria are currently regarded as an important source of nutrients and biofuels and form an integral part of novel innovative energy-efficient designs. Being autotrophic organisms, cyanobacteria are well suited for large-scale biotechnological applications due to the low requirements for organic nutrients. Recent advances in molecular biology techniques have considerably enhanced the potential for industries to optimize the production of cyanobacteria secondary metabolites with desired functions. This manuscript reviews the environmental role of marine cyanobacteria with a particular focus on their secondary metabolites and discusses current and future developments in both the production of desired cyanobacterial metabolites and their potential uses in future innovative projects. PMID:27196915

  6. The origin of multicellularity in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are one of the oldest and morphologically most diverse prokaryotic phyla on our planet. The early development of an oxygen-containing atmosphere approximately 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago is attributed to the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria. Furthermore, they are one of the few prokaryotic phyla where multicellularity has evolved. Understanding when and how multicellularity evolved in these ancient organisms would provide fundamental information on the early history of life and further our knowledge of complex life forms. Results We conducted and compared phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences from a large sample of taxa representing the morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria. We reconstructed ancestral character states on 10,000 phylogenetic trees. The results suggest that the majority of extant cyanobacteria descend from multicellular ancestors. Reversals to unicellularity occurred at least 5 times. Multicellularity was established again at least once within a single-celled clade. Comparison to the fossil record supports an early origin of multicellularity, possibly as early as the "Great Oxygenation Event" that occurred 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago. Conclusions The results indicate that a multicellular morphotype evolved early in the cyanobacterial lineage and was regained at least once after a previous loss. Most of the morphological diversity exhibited in cyanobacteria today —including the majority of single-celled species— arose from ancient multicellular lineages. Multicellularity could have conferred a considerable advantage for exploring new niches and hence facilitated the diversification of new lineages. PMID:21320320

  7. Stable bio-oil production from proteinaceous cyanobacteria: tail gas reactive pyrolysis of spirulina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis of Spirulina, a cyanobacteria with high levels of protein (74 wt %) and low levels of lipid (0.8 wt %) content, has the potential to produce fuels and platform chemicals that differ from those produced from lignocellulosic materials. The yields and product distribution from fluidized-bed p...

  8. Oxygen relations of nitrogen fixation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Fay, P

    1992-01-01

    The enigmatic coexistence of O2-sensitive nitrogenase and O2-evolving photosynthesis in diazotrophic cyanobacteria has fascinated researchers for over two decades. Research efforts in the past 10 years have revealed a range of O2 sensitivity of nitrogenase in different strains of cyanobacteria and a variety of adaptations for the protection of nitrogenase from damage by both atmospheric and photosynthetic sources of O2. The most complex and apparently most efficient mechanisms for the protection of nitrogenase are incorporated in the heterocysts, the N2-fixing cells of cyanobacteria. Genetic studies indicate that the controls of heterocyst development and nitrogenase synthesis are closely interrelated and that the expression of N2 fixation (nif) genes is regulated by pO2. Images PMID:1620069

  9. Color of cyanobacteria: some methodological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, Beatriz; Sanmartin, Patricia; Aira, Noelia; Silva, Benita

    2010-04-10

    Although the color of cyanobacteria is a very informative characteristic, no standardized protocol has, so far, been established for defining the color in an objective way, and, therefore, direct comparison of experimental results obtained by different research groups is not possible. In the present study, we used colorimetric measurements and conventional statistical tools to determine the effects on the measurement of the color of cyanobacteria, of the concentration of the microorganisms and their moisture content, as well as of the size of the target area and the minimum number of measurements. It was concluded that the color measurement is affected by every factor studied, but that this can be controlled for by making at least 10 consecutive measurements/9.62 cm{sup 2} at different randomly selected points on the surface of filters completely covered by films of cyanobacteria in which the moisture contents are higher than 50%.

  10. Mesoproterozoic Archaeoellipsoides: akinetes of heterocystous cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubic, S.; Sergeev, V. N.; Knoll, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    The genus Archaeoellipsoides Horodyski & Donaldson comprises large (up to 135 micrometers long) ellipsoidal and rod-shaped microfossils commonly found in silicified peritidal carbonates of Mesoproterozoic age. Based on morphometric and sedimentary comparisons with the akinetes of modern bloom-forming Anabaena species, Archaeoellipsoides is interpreted as the fossilized remains of akinetes produced by planktic heterocystous cyanobacteria. These fossils set a minimum date for the evolution of derived cyanobacteria capable of marked cell differentiation, and they corroborate geochemical evidence indicating that atmospheric oxygen levels were well above 1% of present day levels 1,500 million years ago.

  11. Microfossils of Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes have been used at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center to investigate freshly fractured interior surfaces of a large number of different types of meteorites. Large, complex, microfossils with clearly recognizable biological affinities have been found embedded in several carbonaceous meteorites. Similar forms were notably absent in all stony and nickel-iron meteorites investigated. The forms encountered are consistent in size and morphology with morphotypes of known genera of Cyanobacteria and microorganisms that are typically encountered in associated benthic prokaryotic mats. Even though many coccoidal and isodiametric filamentous cyanobacteria have a strong morphological convergence with some other spherical and filamentous bacteria and algae, many genera of heteropolar cyanobacteria have distinctive apical and basal regions and cellular differentiation that makes it possible to unambiguously recognize the forms based entirely upon cellular dimensions, filament size and distinctive morphological characteristics. For almost two centuries, these morphological characteristics have historically provided the basis for the systematics and taxonomy of cyanobacteria. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images of embedded filaments and thick mats found in-situ in the Murchison CM2 and Orgueil cn carbonaceous meteorites. Comparative images are also provided for known genera and species of cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments typically exhibit dramatic chemical differentiation with distinctive difference between the possible microfossil and the meteorite matrix in the immediate proximity. Chemical differentiation is also observed within these microstructures with many of the permineralized filaments enveloped within electron transparent carbonaceous sheaths. Elemental distributions of

  12. Structural Diversity of Bacterial Communities Associated with Bloom-Forming Freshwater Cyanobacteria Differs According to the Cyanobacterial Genus

    PubMed Central

    Louati, Imen; Pascault, Noémie; Debroas, Didier; Bernard, Cécile; Humbert, Jean-François; Leloup, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The factors and processes driving cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems have been extensively studied in the past decade. A growing number of these studies concern the direct or indirect interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria. The presence of bacteria that are directly attached or immediately adjacent to cyanobacterial cells suggests that intense nutrient exchanges occur between these microorganisms. In order to determine if there is a specific association between cyanobacteria and bacteria, we compared the bacterial community composition during two cyanobacteria blooms of Anabaena (filamentous and N2-fixing) and Microcystis (colonial and non-N2 fixing) that occurred successively within the same lake. Using high-throughput sequencing, we revealed a clear distinction between associated and free-living communities and between cyanobacterial genera. The interactions between cyanobacteria and bacteria appeared to be based on dissolved organic matter degradation and on N recycling, both for N2-fixing and non N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Thus, the genus and potentially the species of cyanobacteria and its metabolic capacities appeared to select for the bacterial community in the phycosphere. PMID:26579722

  13. Structural Diversity of Bacterial Communities Associated with Bloom-Forming Freshwater Cyanobacteria Differs According to the Cyanobacterial Genus.

    PubMed

    Louati, Imen; Pascault, Noémie; Debroas, Didier; Bernard, Cécile; Humbert, Jean-François; Leloup, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The factors and processes driving cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems have been extensively studied in the past decade. A growing number of these studies concern the direct or indirect interactions between cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria. The presence of bacteria that are directly attached or immediately adjacent to cyanobacterial cells suggests that intense nutrient exchanges occur between these microorganisms. In order to determine if there is a specific association between cyanobacteria and bacteria, we compared the bacterial community composition during two cyanobacteria blooms of Anabaena (filamentous and N2-fixing) and Microcystis (colonial and non-N2 fixing) that occurred successively within the same lake. Using high-throughput sequencing, we revealed a clear distinction between associated and free-living communities and between cyanobacterial genera. The interactions between cyanobacteria and bacteria appeared to be based on dissolved organic matter degradation and on N recycling, both for N2-fixing and non N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Thus, the genus and potentially the species of cyanobacteria and its metabolic capacities appeared to select for the bacterial community in the phycosphere. PMID:26579722

  14. Optical researches for cyanobacteria bloom monitoring in Curonian Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Budylin, Gleb B.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Voloshina, Olga V.; Karabashev, Genrik S.; Evdoshenko, Marina A.; Fadeev, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria bloom is a great ecological problem of Curonian Lagoon and Baltic Sea. The development of novel methods for the on-line control of cyanobacteria concentration and, moreover, for prediction of bloom spreading is of interest for monitoring the state of ecosystem. Here, we report the results of the joint application of hyperspectral measurements and remote sensing of Curonian Lagoon in July 2015 aimed at the assessment of cyanobacteria communities. We show that hyperspectral data allow on-line detection and qualitative estimation of cyanobacteria concentration, while the remote sensing data indicate the possibility of cyanobacteria bloom detection using the spectral features of upwelling irradiation.

  15. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants. PMID:24705871

  16. Climate change: links to global expansion of harmful cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Paul, Valerie J

    2012-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are the Earth's oldest (∼3.5 bya) oxygen evolving organisms, and they have had major impacts on shaping our modern-day biosphere. Conversely, biospheric environmental perturbations, including nutrient enrichment and climatic changes (e.g. global warming, hydrologic changes, increased frequencies and intensities of tropical cyclones, more intense and persistent droughts), strongly affect cyanobacterial growth and bloom potentials in freshwater and marine ecosystems. We examined human and climatic controls on harmful (toxic, hypoxia-generating, food web disrupting) bloom-forming cyanobacteria (CyanoHABs) along the freshwater to marine continuum. These changes may act synergistically to promote cyanobacterial dominance and persistence. This synergy is a formidable challenge to water quality, water supply and fisheries managers, because bloom potentials and controls may be altered in response to contemporaneous changes in thermal and hydrologic regimes. In inland waters, hydrologic modifications, including enhanced vertical mixing and, if water supplies permit, increased flushing (reducing residence time) will likely be needed in systems where nutrient input reductions are neither feasible nor possible. Successful control of CyanoHABs by grazers is unlikely except in specific cases. Overall, stricter nutrient management will likely be the most feasible and practical approach to long-term CyanoHAB control in a warmer, stormier and more extreme world. PMID:21893330

  17. Siderophilic Cyanobacteria: Implications for Early Earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Sarkisova, S.; Shen, G.; Bryant, D. A.; Lindsay, J.; Garrison, D.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Of all extant environs, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may exhibit the greatest similarity to late Precambrian shallow warm oceans in regards to temperature, O2 gradients and dissolved iron and H2S concentrations. Despite the insights into the ecology, evolutionary biology, paleogeobiochemistry, and astrobiology examination of IDHS could potentially provide, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting IDHS have been conducted. Results. Here we describe the phylogeny, physiology, ultrastructure and biogeochemical activity of several recent CB isolates from two different greater Yellowstone area IDHS, LaDuke and Chocolate Pots. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that 6 of 12 new isolates examined couldn't be placed within established CB genera. Some of the isolates exhibited pronounced requirements for elevated iron concentrations, with maximum growth rates observed when 0.4-1 mM Fe(3+) was present in the media. In light of "typical" CB iron requirements, our results indicate that elevated iron likely represents a salient factor selecting for "siderophilicM CB species in IDHS. A universal feature of our new isolates is their ability to produce thick EPS layers in which iron accumulates resulting in the generation of well preserved signatures. In parallel, siderophilic CB show enhanced ability to etch the analogs of iron-rich lunar regolith minerals and impact glasses. Despite that iron deposition by CB is not well understood mechanistically, we recently obtained evidence that the PS I:PS II ratio is higher in one of our isolates than for other CB. Although still preliminary, this finding is in direct support of the Y. Cohen hypothesis that PSI can directly oxidize Fe(2+). Conclusion. Our results may have implications for factors driving CB evolutionary relationships and biogeochemical processes on early Earth and probably Mars.

  18. Agencies collaborate, develop a cyanobacteria assessment network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Blake A.; Loftin, Keith A.; Stumpf, Richard P.; Werdell, P. Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing tools may enable policy makers and environmental managers to assess the sustainability of watershed ecosystems and the services they provide, now and in the future. Satellite technology allows us to develop early-warning indicators of cyanobacteria blooms at the local scale while maintaining continuous national coverage.

  19. CLASSIFICATION AND NOMENCLATURE OF VIRUSES OF CYANOBACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Study Group finds it appropriate that viruses which have as their host cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) should be grouped within the well-categorized families of the bacterial viruses. Thus, the term cyanophage is adopted as a synonym for the vernacular name BGA virus (BGAV) ...

  20. Role of Spermidine in Overwintering of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhi; Li, Qiong; Yin, Chuntao; Fang, Xiantao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyamines are found in all groups of cyanobacteria, but their role in environmental adaptation has been barely investigated. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, inactivation of spermidine synthesis genes significantly reduced the survivability under chill (5°C)-light stress, and the survivability could be restored by addition of spermidine. To analyze the effects of spermidine on gene expression at 5°C, lacZ was expressed from the promoter of carboxy(nor)spermidine decarboxylase gene (CASDC) in Synechocystis. Synechocystis 6803::PCASDC-lacZ pretreated at 15°C showed a high level of LacZ activity for a long period of time at 5°C; without the pretreatment or with protein synthesis inhibited at 5°C, the enzyme activity gradually decreased. In a spermidine-minus mutant harboring PCASDC-lacZ, lacZ showed an expression pattern as if protein synthesis were inhibited at 5°C, even though the stability of its mRNA increased. Four other genes, including rpoA that encodes the α subunit of RNA polymerase, showed similar expression patterns. The chill-light stress led to a rapid increase of protein carbonylation in Synechocystis. The protein carbonylation then quickly returned to the background level in the wild type but continued to slowly increase in the spermidine-minus mutant. Our results indicate that spermidine promotes gene expression and replacement of damaged proteins in cyanobacteria under the chill-light stress in winter. IMPORTANCE Outbreak of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater lakes is a worldwide environmental problem. In the annual cycle of bloom-forming cyanobacteria, overwintering is the least understood stage. Survival of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 under long-term chill (5°C)-light stress has been established as a model for molecular studies on overwintering of cyanobacteria. Here, we show that spermidine, the most common polyamine in cyanobacteria, promotes the survivability of Synechocystis under long-term chill-light stress and

  1. Some aspects of the ecophysiology of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mur, L R

    1983-01-01

    Fresh waters rich in nutrients often show mass development of cyanobacteria. The kind of cyanobacteria to be found depends on the properties of the lake. In non-stratified shallow lakes, the most common species Oscillatoria agardhii. In stratified lakes, cyanobacteria can be found in restricted zones of the deeper part of the lakes, and always possess cells with very active gas vacuoles. The most common species are Microcystis aeruginosa, Oscillatoria agardhii var isothrix, Oscillatoria "var red" and different Anabaena species. In lakes with prolonged nitrogen limitation, genera such as Anabaena and Aphanizomenon are common. Two important factors determine the distribution of these organisms: the light climate and the availability of nutrients. We have limited our discussion in this paper to the influence of the light climate. This influence of the light climate on growth can be determined in different ways. The influence of light intensity on the growth rate of Oscillatoria agardhii can be described using a Monod-like relation with light inhibition at light intensities above 40 W m-2. Studies with other species of cyanobacteria like Microcystis aeruginosa and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae support the assumption that most cyanobacteria living in fresh water are extremely sensitive to high light intensities. The energy balance of phototrophic growth can be described by the equation mu = qE . c - mue where mu is the specific growth rate, mue the specific maintenance energy rate and qE the specific light energy uptake rate; c represents the growth efficiency factor with which light energy is converted into cell material. In this equation, there are two factors which determine the growth of the organisms: ue and c. It was found that the value of mue of Oscillatoria was extremely low (mue approximately 0.001 h-1) compared with a eukaryotic organism (Scenedesmus: mue 0.008 h-1). The value of c was found to be dependent on the growth rate, but did not greatly differ from

  2. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  3. Mixotrophic cyanobacteria and microalgae as distinctive biological agents for organic pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Subashchandrabose, Suresh R; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Millions of natural and synthetic organic chemical substances are present in both soil and aquatic environments. Toxicity and/or persistence determine the polluting principle of these substances. The biological responses to these pollutants include accumulation and degradation. The responses of environments with organic pollutants are perceptible from the dwindling degradative abilities of microorganisms. Among different biological members, cyanobacteria and microalgae are highly adaptive through many eons, and can grow autotrophically, heterotrophically or mixotrophically. Mixotrophy in cyanobacteria and microalgae can provide many competitive advantages over bacteria and fungi in degrading organic pollutants. Laboratory culturing of strict phototrophic algae has limited the realization of their potential as bioremediation agents. In the natural assemblages, mixotrophic algae can contribute to sequestration of carbon, which is otherwise emitted as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere under heterotrophic conditions by other organisms. Molecular methods and metabolic and genomic information will help not only in identification and selection of mixotrophic species of cyanobacteria and microalgae with capabilities to degrade organic pollutants but also in monitoring the efficiency of remediation efforts under the field conditions. These organisms are relatively easier for genetic engineering with desirable traits. This review presents a new premise from the literature that mixotrophic algae and cyanobacteria are distinctive bioremediation agents with capabilities to sequester carbon in the environment. PMID:23201778

  4. Determination and occurrence of retinoids in a eutrophic lake (Taihu Lake, China): cyanobacteria blooms produce teratogenic retinal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Jieqiong; Hu, Jianying

    2013-01-15

    Besides retinoic acids (RAs), some retinoids such as retinal (RAL) and retinol (ROH), which are considered as RA precursors in vertebrates, are also reported to be teratogenic agents. In this study we investigated four RA precursors including RAL, ROH, retinyl palmitate, and β-carotene in the eutrophic Taihu Lake, China, by developing a sensitive analytical method. RAL and β-carotene were widely detected in natural cyanobacteria blooms and lake water. Intracellular concentrations of RAL and β-carotene in blooms were 9.4 to 6.9 × 10(3) and 3.4 to 1.8 × 10(5) ng L(-1), respectively, and their concentrations in lake water were up to 1.4 × 10 ng L(-1) (RAL) and 9.8 × 10(2) ng L(-1) (β-carotene). The good correlation between intracellular concentrations of RAL and RAs implied that RAL was involved in the production of RAs by cyanobacteria blooms. Further examination of 39 cyanobacteria and algae species revealed that most species could produce RAL and β-carotene. The greatest amount of RAL was found in Chlamydomonas sp. (FACHB-715; 1.9 × 10(3) ng g(-1) dry weight). As the main cyanobacteria in Taihu Lake, many Microcystis species could produce high amounts of RAL and were thought to greatly contribute to the production of RAL measured in the blooms. Productions of RAL and β-carotene by cyanobacteria were associated with species, origin location, and growth stage. The results in this study present the existence of a potential risk to aquatic animals living in a eutrophic environment from a high concentration of RAL in cyanobacteria blooms and also provide a clue for further investigating the mechanism underlying the biosynthetic pathway of RAs in cyanobacteria and algae. PMID:23256639

  5. Unscrambling Cyanobacteria Community Dynamics Related to Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bertos-Fortis, Mireia; Farnelid, Hanna M.; Lindh, Markus V.; Casini, Michele; Andersson, Agneta; Pinhassi, Jarone; Legrand, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Future climate scenarios in the Baltic Sea project an increase of cyanobacterial bloom frequency and duration, attributed to eutrophication and climate change. Some cyanobacteria can be toxic and their impact on ecosystem services is relevant for a sustainable sea. Yet, there is limited understanding of the mechanisms regulating cyanobacterial diversity and biogeography. Here we unravel successional patterns and changes in cyanobacterial community structure using a 2-year monthly time- series during the productive season in a 100 km coastal-offshore transect using microscopy and high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A total of 565 cyanobacterial OTUs were found, of which 231 where filamentous/colonial and 334 picocyanobacterial. Spatial differences in community structure between coastal and offshore waters were minor. An “epidemic population structure” (dominance of asingle cluster) was found for Aphanizomenon/Dolichospermum within the filamentous/colonial cyanobacterial community. In summer, this clusters imultaneously occurred with opportunistic clusters/OTUs, e.g., Nodularia spumigena and Pseudanabaena. Picocyanobacteria, Synechococcus/Cyanobium, formeda consistent but highly diverse group. Overall, the potential drivers structuring summer cyanobacterial communities were temperature and salinity. However, the different responses to environmental factors among and within genera suggest high niche specificity for individual OTUs. The recruitment and occurrence of potentially toxic filamentous/colonial clusters was likely related to disturbance such as mixing events and short-term shifts in salinity, and not solely dependent on increasing temperature and nitrogen-limiting conditions. Nutrients did not explain further the changes in cyanobacterial community composition. Novel occurrence patterns were identified as a strong seasonal succession revealing a tight coupling between the emergence of opportunistic picocynobacteria and the bloom

  6. Fatty acid production in genetically modified cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyao; Sheng, Jie; Curtiss III, Roy

    2011-01-01

    To avoid costly biomass recovery in photosynthetic microbial biofuel production, we genetically modified cyanobacteria to produce and secrete fatty acids. Starting with introducing an acyl–acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene, we made six successive generations of genetic modifications of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 wild type (SD100). The fatty acid secretion yield was increased to 197 ± 14 mg/L of culture in one improved strain at a cell density of 1.0 × 109 cells/mL by adding codon-optimized thioesterase genes and weakening polar cell wall layers. Although these strains exhibited damaged cell membranes at low cell densities, they grew more rapidly at high cell densities in late exponential and stationary phase and exhibited less cell damage than cells in wild-type cultures. Our results suggest that fatty acid secreting cyanobacteria are a promising technology for renewable biofuel production. PMID:21482809

  7. Structural studies on photosystem II of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gabdulkhakov, A G; Dontsova, M V

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important chemical processes in the biosphere responsible for the maintenance of life on Earth. Light energy is converted into energy of chemical bonds in photoreaction centers, which, in particular, include photosystem II (PS II). PS II is a multisubunit pigment-protein complex located in the thylakoid membrane of cyanobacteria, algae and plants. PS II realizes the first stage of solar energy conversion that results in decomposition of water to molecular oxygen, protons, and bound electrons via a series of consecutive reactions. During recent years, considerable progress has been achieved in determination of the spatial structures of PS II from various cyanobacteria. In the present review, we outline the current state of crystallographic studies on PS II. PMID:24490738

  8. Analysis of photosystem II biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Steffen; Liauw, Pasqual; Nickelsen, Jörg; Nowaczyk, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), a large multisubunit membrane protein complex found in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae and plants, catalyzes light-driven oxygen evolution from water and reduction of plastoquinone. Biogenesis of PSII requires coordinated assembly of at least 20 protein subunits, as well as incorporation of various organic and inorganic cofactors. The stepwise assembly process is facilitated by numerous protein factors that have been identified in recent years. Further analysis of this process requires the development or refinement of specific methods for the identification of novel assembly factors and, in particular, elucidation of the unique role of each. Here we summarize current knowledge of PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria, focusing primarily on the impact of methodological advances and innovations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26592144

  9. Blooms of cyanobacteria on the potomac river.

    PubMed

    Krogmann, D W; Butalla, R; Sprinkle, J

    1986-03-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have appeared on the Potomac River near Washington, DC in years of drought and low river volume. The location of the bloom may be related to tidal activity. In 1983, the bloom of Microcystis aeruginosa used ammonia as its nitrogen source and contained low levels of toxic peptides. Cells collected from this bloom proved to be homogeneous and were an excellent source material for the isolation of proteins involved in photosynthesis. PMID:16664682

  10. Modes of Fatty Acid Desaturation in Cyanobacteria: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Los, Dmitry A.; Mironov, Kirill S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid composition of individual species of cyanobacteria is conserved and it may be used as a phylogenetic marker. The previously proposed classification system was based solely on biochemical data. Today, new genomic data are available, which support a need to update a previously postulated FA-based classification of cyanobacteria. These changes are necessary in order to adjust and synchronize biochemical, physiological and genomic data, which may help to establish an adequate comprehensive taxonomic system for cyanobacteria in the future. Here, we propose an update to the classification system of cyanobacteria based on their fatty acid composition. PMID:25809965

  11. Advances in Metabolic Engineering of Cyanobacteria for Photosynthetic Biochemical Production.

    PubMed

    Lai, Martin C; Lan, Ethan I

    2015-01-01

    Engineering cyanobacteria into photosynthetic microbial cell factories for the production of biochemicals and biofuels is a promising approach toward sustainability. Cyanobacteria naturally grow on light and carbon dioxide, bypassing the need of fermentable plant biomass and arable land. By tapping into the central metabolism and rerouting carbon flux towards desirable compound production, cyanobacteria are engineered to directly convert CO₂ into various chemicals. This review discusses the diversity of bioproducts synthesized by engineered cyanobacteria, the metabolic pathways used, and the current engineering strategies used for increasing their titers. PMID:26516923

  12. Advances in Metabolic Engineering of Cyanobacteria for Photosynthetic Biochemical Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Martin C.; Lan, Ethan I.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering cyanobacteria into photosynthetic microbial cell factories for the production of biochemicals and biofuels is a promising approach toward sustainability. Cyanobacteria naturally grow on light and carbon dioxide, bypassing the need of fermentable plant biomass and arable land. By tapping into the central metabolism and rerouting carbon flux towards desirable compound production, cyanobacteria are engineered to directly convert CO2 into various chemicals. This review discusses the diversity of bioproducts synthesized by engineered cyanobacteria, the metabolic pathways used, and the current engineering strategies used for increasing their titers. PMID:26516923

  13. Adventures with Cyanobacteria: A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Govindjee; Shevela, Dmitriy

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, or the blue-green algae as they used to be called until 1974, are the oldest oxygenic photosynthesizers. We summarize here adventures with them since the early 1960s. This includes studies on light absorption by cyanobacteria, excitation energy transfer at room temperature down to liquid helium temperature, fluorescence (kinetics as well as spectra) and its relationship to photosynthesis, and afterglow (or thermoluminescence) from them. Further, we summarize experiments on their two-light reaction – two-pigment system, as well as the unique role of bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) on the electron-acceptor side of their photosystem II, PSII. This review, in addition, includes a discussion on the regulation of changes in phycobilins (mostly in PSII) and chlorophyll a (Chl a; mostly in photosystem I, PSI) under oscillating light, on the relationship of the slow fluorescence increase (the so-called S to M rise, especially in the presence of diuron) in minute time scale with the so-called state-changes, and on the possibility of limited oxygen evolution in mixotrophic PSI (minus) mutants, up to 30 min, in the presence of glucose. We end this review with a brief discussion on the position of cyanobacteria in the evolution of photosynthetic systems. PMID:22645530

  14. Cyanobacteria bloom: selective filter for zooplankton?

    PubMed

    Mello, N A S T; Maia-Barbosa, P M

    2015-01-01

    The Ibirité reservoir is an urban and eutrophic environment, with regular occurrences of cyanobacteria blooms. The reservoir is warm monomict and remains stratified most of the year, circulating in the dry season (winter). During the hydrological cycle of October/07 to October/08 there were four scenarios with different environmental conditions, which influenced the structure of the zooplankton community, as confirmed in a previous study. Changes in the zooplankton community structure between the scenarios were studied, aiming at analyzing the stability and persistence of this community. The Spearman's coefficient of correlation was used to measure the stability; the persistence was evaluated through a cluster analysis and changes in community composition were estimated by the "temporal" β diversity index. Considering the distribution patterns of abundance, the community was stable only in the transition between scenarios 1 and 2 (n = 30, r = 0.71, p = 0.00001), when there were no cyanobacteria blooms. The persistence of zooplankton between the scenarios was low, showing a distinct species composition for each scenario. The highest variations in species composition, observed by the values of temporal β diversity index, were the transitions between scenarios 3-0 (1.45) and 0-1 (1.05), and the lowest variations occurred in the transition between scenarios 1-2 (0.57). The results suggest that the cyanobacteria blooms at Ibirité reservoir are be acting as "selective filters", and are, thus, disturbances with sufficient ability to change the structure of the zooplankton community. PMID:25945634

  15. Recent Applications of Metabolomics Toward Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Doreen; Orf, Isabel; Kopka, Joachim; Hagemann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge on cyanobacterial molecular biology increased tremendously by the application of the “omics” techniques. Only recently, metabolomics was applied systematically to model cyanobacteria. Metabolomics, the quantitative estimation of ideally the complete set of cellular metabolites, is particularly well suited to mirror cellular metabolism and its flexibility under diverse conditions. Traditionally, small sets of metabolites are quantified in targeted metabolome approaches. The development of separation technologies coupled to mass-spectroscopy- or nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based identification of low molecular mass molecules presently allows the profiling of hundreds of metabolites of diverse chemical nature. Metabolome analysis was applied to characterize changes in the cyanobacterial primary metabolism under diverse environmental conditions or in defined mutants. The resulting lists of metabolites and their steady state concentrations in combination with transcriptomics can be used in system biology approaches. The application of stable isotopes in fluxomics, i.e. the quantitative estimation of carbon and nitrogen fluxes through the biochemical network, has only rarely been applied to cyanobacteria, but particularly this technique will allow the making of kinetic models of cyanobacterial systems. The further application of metabolomics in the concert of other “omics” technologies will not only broaden our knowledge, but will also certainly strengthen the base for the biotechnological application of cyanobacteria. PMID:24957891

  16. Interspecific Differences between D. pulex and D. magna in Tolerance to Cyanobacteria with Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Christian J.; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-01-01

    It is known that cyanobacteria negatively affect herbivores due to their production of toxins such as protease inhibitors. In the present study we investigated potential interspecific differences between two major herbivores, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, in terms of their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. Seven clones each of D. magna and of D. pulex were isolated from different habitats in Europe and North America. To test for interspecific differences in the daphnids’ tolerance to cyanobacteria, their somatic and population growth rates were determined for each D. magna and D. pulex clone after exposure to varying concentrations of two Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The M. aeruginosa strains NIVA and PCC− contained either chymotrypsin or trypsin inhibitors, but no microcystins. Mean somatic and population growth rates on a diet with 20% NIVA were significantly more reduced in D. pulex than in D. magna. On a diet with 10% PCC−, the population growth of D. pulex was significantly more reduced than that of D. magna. This indicates that D. magna is more tolerant to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors than D. pulex. The reduction of growth rates was possibly caused by an interference of cyanobacterial inhibitors with proteases in the gut of Daphnia, as many other conceivable factors, which might have been able to explain the reduced growth, could be excluded as causal factors. Protease assays revealed that the sensitivities of chymotrypsins and trypsins to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors did not differ between D. magna and D. pulex. However, D. magna exhibited a 2.3-fold higher specific chymotrypsin activity than D. pulex, which explains the observed higher tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors of D. magna. The present study suggests that D. magna may control the development of cyanobacterial blooms more efficiently than D. pulex due to differences in their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. PMID:23650523

  17. Engineering cyanobacteria to generate high-value products

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2011-02-01

    Although many microorganisms have been used for the bioindustrial generation of valuable metabolites, the productive potential of cyanobacterial species has remained largely unexplored. Cyanobacteria possess several advantages as organisms for bioindustrial processes, including simple input requirements, tolerance of marginal agricultural environments, rapid genetics, and carbon-neutral applications that could be leveraged to address global climate change concerns. Here, we review recent research involving the engineering of cyanobacterial species for the production of valuable bioindustrial compounds, including natural cyanobacterial products (e.g. sugars and isoprene), biofuels (e.g. alcohols, alkanes and hydrogen), and other commodity chemicals. Biological and economic obstacles to scaled cyanobacterial production are highlighted, and methods for increasing cyanobacterial production efficiencies are discussed.

  18. The state of autotrophic ethanol production in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dexter, J; Armshaw, P; Sheahan, C; Pembroke, J T

    2015-07-01

    Ethanol production directly from CO2 , utilizing genetically engineered photosynthetic cyanobacteria as a biocatalyst, offers significant potential as a renewable and sustainable source of biofuel. Despite the current absence of a commercially successful production system, significant resources have been deployed to realize this goal. Utilizing the pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas species, metabolically derived pyruvate can be converted to ethanol. This review of both peer-reviewed and patent literature focuses on the genetic modifications utilized for metabolic engineering and the resultant effect on ethanol yield. Gene dosage, induced expression and cassette optimizat-ion have been analyzed to optimize production, with production rates of 0·1-0·5 g L(-1) day(-1) being achieved. The current 'toolbox' of molecular manipulations and future directions focusing on applicability, addressing the primary challenges facing commercialization of cyanobacterial technologies are discussed. PMID:25865951

  19. NREL Creates New Pathways for Producing Biofuels and Acids from Cyanobacteria (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide into glycogen, a carbohydrate that is stored in the cells as an energy source. However, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that this photosynthesis can be redirected to produce lipids and valuable organic acids. The research could yield a new source of biofuels, because the lipids can potentially be extracted from the bacteria and converted into biodiesel.

  20. Quantitative PCR Enumeration of Total/Toxic Planktothrix rubescens and Total Cyanobacteria in Preserved DNA Isolated from Lake Sediments▿†

    PubMed Central

    Savichtcheva, Olga; Debroas, Didier; Kurmayer, Rainer; Villar, Clement; Jenny, Jean Philippe; Arnaud, Fabien; Perga, Marie Elodie; Domaizon, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The variability of spatial distribution and the determinism of cyanobacterial blooms, as well as their impact at the lake scale, are still not understood, partly due to the lack of long-term climatic and environmental monitoring data. The paucity of these data can be alleviated by the use of proxy data from high-resolution sampling of sediments. Coupling paleolimnological and molecular tools and using biomarkers such as preserved DNA are promising approaches, although they have not been performed often enough so far. In our study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique was applied to enumerate total cyanobacterial and total and toxic Planktothrix communities in preserved DNA derived from sediments of three lakes located in the French Alps (Lake Geneva, Lake Bourget, and Lake Annecy), containing a wide range of cyanobacterial species. Preserved DNA from lake sediments was analyzed to assess its quality, quantity, and integrity, with further application for qPCR. We applied the qPCR assay to enumerate the total cyanobacterial community, and multiplex qPCR assays were applied to quantify total and microcystin-producing Planktothrix populations in a single reaction tube. These methods were optimized, calibrated, and applied to sediment samples, and the specificity and reproducibility of qPCR enumeration were tested. Accurate estimation of potential inhibition within sediment samples was performed to assess the sensitivity of such enumeration by qPCR. Some precautions needed for interpreting qPCR results in the context of paleolimnological approaches are discussed. We concluded that the qPCR assay can be used successfully for the analysis of lake sediments when DNA is well preserved in order to assess the presence and dominance of cyanobacterial and Planktothrix communities. PMID:21984244

  1. Acetylcholinesterase in Biofouling Species: Characterization and Mode of Action of Cyanobacteria-Derived Antifouling Agents.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Joana R; Freitas, Micaela; Cruz, Susana; Leão, Pedro N; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cunha, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Effective and ecofriendly antifouling (AF) compounds have been arising from naturally produced chemicals. The objective of this study is to use cyanobacteria-derived agents to investigate the role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as an effect and/or mode of action of promising AF compounds, since AChE inhibitors were found to inhibit invertebrate larval settlement. To pursue this objective, in vitro quantification of AChE activity under the effect of several cyanobacterial strain extracts as potential AF agents was performed along with in vivo AF (anti-settlement) screening tests. Pre-characterization of different cholinesterases (ChEs) forms present in selected tissues of important biofouling species was performed to confirm the predominance of AChE, and an in vitro AF test using pure AChE activity was developed. Eighteen cyanobacteria strains were tested as source of potential AF and AChE inhibitor agents. Results showed effectiveness in selecting promising eco-friendly AF agents, allowing the understanding of the AF biochemical mode of action induced by different compounds. This study also highlights the potential of cyanobacteria as source of AF agents towards invertebrate macrofouling species. PMID:26213967

  2. Acetylcholinesterase in Biofouling Species: Characterization and Mode of Action of Cyanobacteria-Derived Antifouling Agents

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joana R.; Freitas, Micaela; Cruz, Susana; Leão, Pedro N.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cunha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Effective and ecofriendly antifouling (AF) compounds have been arising from naturally produced chemicals. The objective of this study is to use cyanobacteria-derived agents to investigate the role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as an effect and/or mode of action of promising AF compounds, since AChE inhibitors were found to inhibit invertebrate larval settlement. To pursue this objective, in vitro quantification of AChE activity under the effect of several cyanobacterial strain extracts as potential AF agents was performed along with in vivo AF (anti-settlement) screening tests. Pre-characterization of different cholinesterases (ChEs) forms present in selected tissues of important biofouling species was performed to confirm the predominance of AChE, and an in vitro AF test using pure AChE activity was developed. Eighteen cyanobacteria strains were tested as source of potential AF and AChE inhibitor agents. Results showed effectiveness in selecting promising eco-friendly AF agents, allowing the understanding of the AF biochemical mode of action induced by different compounds. This study also highlights the potential of cyanobacteria as source of AF agents towards invertebrate macrofouling species. PMID:26213967

  3. Nonlinear optical transmission of cyanobacteria-derived optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Edward H.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Zhao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria-derived optical materials for optical limiting applications have been studied in this work. Six samples have been prepared from cyanobacteria including cyanobacteria suspension in water, extracts in water, methanol, and N,N-dimethylformamide, and pyrolyzed cyanobacteria (PCYB) dispersed in dsDNA (sodium salt from salmon testes) solution and sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, respectively. The extracts contain phycocyanin, chlorophyll a, and carotenoids as measured by optical absorption spectroscopy, while the PCYB is a nanostructural composite composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoringes, and multilayer graphenes, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. The optical limiting responses of the samples have been measured at 532 and 756 nm. The PCYB in dsDNA solution has the best limiting performance out of all the cyanobacteria-derived samples. It outperforms carbon black suspension standard at 532 nm and is a broadband limiter, which makes it attractive for optical limiting applications.

  4. Genes, Genomes, and Assemblages of Modern Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as Proxies for Ancient Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, S. L.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic (OP) cyanobacteria were responsible for the production of O2 during the Proterozoic. However, the extent and degree of oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans varied for over 2 Ga after OP cyanobacteria first appeared in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) may have altered the trajectory of oxygenation, yet the scope of their role in the Proterozoic is not well known. Modern cyanobacterial populations from Middle Island Sinkhole (MIS), Michigan and a handful of cultured cyanobacterial strains, are capable of OP and AP. With their metabolic versatility, these microbes may approximate ancient cyanobacterial assemblages that mediated Earth's oxygenation. To better characterize the taxonomic and genetic signatures of these modern AP/OP cyanobacteria, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes and conducted 'omics analyses on cultured strains, lab mesocosms, and MIS cyanobacterial mat samples collected over multiple years from May to September. Diversity in the MIS cyanobacterial mat is low, with one member of Oscillatoriales dominating at all times. However, Planktothrix members are more abundant in the cyanobacterial community in late summer and fall. The shift in cyanobacterial community composition may be linked to seasonally changing light intensity. In lab mesocosms of MIS microbial mat, we observed a shift in dominant cyanobacterial groups as well as the emergence of Chlorobium, bacteria that specialize in AP. These shifts in microbial community composition and metabolism are likely in response to changing environmental parameters such as the availability of light and sulfide. Further research is needed to understand the impacts of the changing photosynthetic community on oxygen production and the entire microbial consortium. Our study connects genes and genomes of AP cyanobacteria to their environment, and improves understanding of cyanobacterial metabolic strategies that may have shaped Earth's redox evolution.

  5. Recreational and occupational field exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria – a review of anecdotal and case reports, epidemiological studies and the challenges for epidemiologic assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are common inhabitants of freshwater lakes and reservoirs throughout the world. Under favourable conditions, certain cyanobacteria can dominate the phytoplankton within a waterbody and form nuisance blooms. Case reports and anecdotal references dating from 1949 describe a range of illnesses associated with recreational exposure to cyanobacteria: hay fever-like symptoms, pruritic skin rashes and gastro-intestinal symptoms are most frequently reported. Some papers give convincing descriptions of allergic reactions while others describe more serious acute illnesses, with symptoms such as severe headache, pneumonia, fever, myalgia, vertigo and blistering in the mouth. A coroner in the United States found that a teenage boy died as a result of accidentally ingesting a neurotoxic cyanotoxin from a golf course pond. This death is the first recorded human fatality attributed to recreational exposure to cyanobacteria, although uncertainties surround the forensic identification of the suspected cyanotoxin in this case. We systematically reviewed the literature on recreational exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria. Epidemiological data are limited, with six studies conducted since 1990. Statistically significant increases in symptoms were reported in individuals exposed to cyanobacteria compared to unexposed counterparts in two Australian cohort studies, though minor morbidity appeared to be the main finding. The four other small studies (three from the UK, one Australian) did not report any significant association. However, the potential for serious injury or death remains, as freshwater cyanobacteria under bloom conditions are capable of producing potent toxins that cause specific and severe dysfunction to hepatic or central nervous systems. The exposure route for these toxins is oral, from ingestion of recreational water, and possibly by inhalation. A range of freshwater microbial agents may cause acute conditions that present with features that resemble

  6. Cyanobacteria cultivation in industrial wastewaters and biodiesel production from their biomass: a review.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Lavanya; Subramanian, Geetha; Nazeer, Thayiba Thanveer; Simpson, Hannah Shalini; Rahuman, Shifina T; Raju, Preetha

    2011-01-01

    As an alternative fuel biodiesel has become increasingly important due to diminishing petroleum reserves and adverse environmental consequences of exhaust gases from petroleum-fueled engines. Recently, research interest has focused on the production of biofuel from microalgae. Cyanobacteria appeared to be suitable candidates for cultivation in wastes and wastewaters because they produce biomass in satisfactory quantity and can be harvested relatively easily due to their size and structure. In addition, their biomass composition can be manipulated by several environmental and operational factors to produce biomass with concrete characteristics. Herein, we review the culture of cyanobacteria in wastewaters and also the potential resources that can be transformed into biodiesel successfully for meeting the ever-increasing demand for biodiesel production. PMID:21838795

  7. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins: from impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health to anticarcinogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Zanchett, Giliane; Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C

    2013-10-01

    Cyanobacteria or blue-green algae are among the pioneer organisms of planet Earth. They developed an efficient photosynthetic capacity and played a significant role in the evolution of the early atmosphere. Essential for the development and evolution of species, they proliferate easily in aquatic environments, primarily due to human activities. Eutrophic environments are conducive to the appearance of cyanobacterial blooms that not only affect water quality, but also produce highly toxic metabolites. Poisoning and serious chronic effects in humans, such as cancer, have been described. On the other hand, many cyanobacterial genera have been studied for their toxins with anticancer potential in human cell lines, generating promising results for future research toward controlling human adenocarcinomas. This review presents the knowledge that has evolved on the topic of toxins produced by cyanobacteria, ranging from their negative impacts to their benefits. PMID:24152991

  8. Collective evolution of cyanobacteria and cyanophages mediated by horizontal gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Rogers, Tim; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    We describe a model for how antagonistic predator-prey coevolution can lead to mutualistic adaptation to an environment, as a result of horizontal gene transfer. Our model is a simple description of ecosystems such as marine cyanobacteria and their predator cyanophages, which carry photosynthesis genes. These genes evolve more rapidly in the virosphere than the bacterial pan-genome, and thus the bacterial population could potentially benefit from phage predation. By modeling both the barrier to predation and horizontal gene transfer, we study this balance between individual sacrifice and collective benefits. The outcome is an emergent mutualistic coevolution of improved photosynthesis capability, benefiting both bacteria and phage. This form of multi-level selection can contribute to niche stratification in the cyanobacteria-phage ecosystem. This work is supported in part by a cooperative agreement with NASA, Grant NNA13AA91A/A0018.

  9. Nezha, a novel active miniature inverted-repeat transposable element in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengfeng; Tran Thao; Xu Ying

    2008-01-25

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) were first identified in plants and exerted extensive proliferations throughout eukaryotic and archaeal genomes. But very few MITEs have been characterized in bacteria. We identified a novel MITE, called Nezha, in cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Nezha, like most previously known MITEs in other organisms, is small in size, non-coding, carrying TIR and DR signals, and of potential to form a stable RNA secondary structure, and it tends to insert into A+T-rich regions. Recent transpositions of Nezha were observed in A. variabilis ATCC 29413 and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, respectively. Nezha might have proliferated recently with aid from the transposase encoded by ISNpu3-like elements. A possible horizontal transfer event of Nezha from cyanobacteria to Polaromonas JS666 is also observed.

  10. Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins: From Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems and Human Health to Anticarcinogenic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zanchett, Giliane; Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria or blue-green algae are among the pioneer organisms of planet Earth. They developed an efficient photosynthetic capacity and played a significant role in the evolution of the early atmosphere. Essential for the development and evolution of species, they proliferate easily in aquatic environments, primarily due to human activities. Eutrophic environments are conducive to the appearance of cyanobacterial blooms that not only affect water quality, but also produce highly toxic metabolites. Poisoning and serious chronic effects in humans, such as cancer, have been described. On the other hand, many cyanobacterial genera have been studied for their toxins with anticancer potential in human cell lines, generating promising results for future research toward controlling human adenocarcinomas. This review presents the knowledge that has evolved on the topic of toxins produced by cyanobacteria, ranging from their negative impacts to their benefits. PMID:24152991

  11. Absence of sterols constrains food quality of cyanobacteria for an invasive freshwater bivalve.

    PubMed

    Basen, Timo; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass may severely affect the performance of aquatic consumers. Here, we investigated the role of sterols in determining the food quality of cyanobacteria for the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea, which has become a common benthic invertebrate in many freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. In standardized growth experiments, juvenile clams were fed mixtures of different cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis, Aphanothece clathrata, Synechococcus elongatus) or sterol-containing eukaryotic algae (Cryptomonas sp., Nannochloropsis limnetica, Scenedesmus obliquus). In addition, the cyanobacterial food was supplemented with different sterols. We provide evidence that somatic growth of C. fluminea on cyanobacterial diets is constrained by the absence of sterols, as indicated by a growth-enhancing effect of sterol supplementation. Thus, our findings contribute to our understanding of the consequences of cyanobacterial mass developments for benthic consumers and highlight the importance of considering sterols as potentially limiting nutrients in aquatic food webs. PMID:22398861

  12. Dataset exploited for the development and validation of automated cyanobacteria quantification algorithm, ACQUA.

    PubMed

    Gandola, Emanuele; Antonioli, Manuela; Traficante, Alessio; Franceschini, Simone; Scardi, Michele; Congestri, Roberta

    2016-09-01

    The estimation and quantification of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in lakes and reservoirs are often used as a proxy of risk for water intended for human consumption and recreational activities. Here, we present data sets collected from three volcanic Italian lakes (Albano, Vico, Nemi) that present filamentous cyanobacteria strains at different environments. Presented data sets were used to estimate abundance and morphometric characteristics of potentially toxic cyanobacteria comparing manual Vs. automated estimation performed by ACQUA ("ACQUA: Automated Cyanobacterial Quantification Algorithm for toxic filamentous genera using spline curves, pattern recognition and machine learning" (Gandola et al., 2016) [1]). This strategy was used to assess the algorithm performance and to set up the denoising algorithm. Abundance and total length estimations were used for software development, to this aim we evaluated the efficiency of statistical tools and mathematical algorithms, here described. The image convolution with the Sobel filter has been chosen to denoise input images from background signals, then spline curves and least square method were used to parameterize detected filaments and to recombine crossing and interrupted sections aimed at performing precise abundances estimations and morphometric measurements. PMID:27500194

  13. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, Chad; Hauser, Loren John; Boyer, Gergory; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloomassociated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised .90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloomassociated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  14. Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Paula; Axelsson, Rikard; Lindberg, Pia; Oxelfelt, Fredrik; Wünschiers, Röbbe; Lindblad, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria may possess several enzymes that are directly involved in dihydrogen metabolism: nitrogenase(s) catalyzing the production of hydrogen concomitantly with the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia, an uptake hydrogenase (encoded by hupSL) catalyzing the consumption of hydrogen produced by the nitrogenase, and a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxFUYH) which has the capacity to both take up and produce hydrogen. This review summarizes our knowledge about cyanobacterial hydrogenases, focusing on recent progress since the first molecular information was published in 1995. It presents the molecular knowledge about cyanobacterial hupSL and hoxFUYH, their corresponding gene products, and their accessory genes before finishing with an applied aspect—the use of cyanobacteria in a biological, renewable production of the future energy carrier molecular hydrogen. In addition to scientific publications, information from three cyanobacterial genomes, the unicellular Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 and the filamentous heterocystous Anabaena strain PCC 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme (PCC 73102/ATCC 29133) is included. PMID:11875125

  15. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  16. Estimating Cyanobacteria Community Dynamics and its Relationship with Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenhuai; Chen, Huirong; Lei, Anping; Lu, Jun; Hu, Zhangli

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacteria community dynamics in two eutrophic freshwater bodies (Tiegang Reservoir and Shiyan Reservoir) was studied with both a traditional microscopic counting method and a PCR-DGGE genotyping method. Results showed that cyanobacterium Phormidium tenue was the predominant species; twenty-six cyanobacteria species were identified in water samples collected from the two reservoirs, among which fourteen were identified with the morphological method and sixteen with the PCR-DGGE method. The cyanobacteria community composition analysis showed a seasonal fluctuation from July to December. The cyanobacteria population peaked in August in both reservoirs, with cell abundances of 3.78 × 108 cells L-1 and 1.92 × 108 cells L-1 in the Tiegang and Shiyan reservoirs, respectively. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was applied to further investigate the correlation between cyanobacteria community dynamics and environmental factors. The result indicated that the cyanobacteria community dynamics was mostly correlated with pH, temperature and total nitrogen. This study demonstrated that data obtained from PCR-DGGE combined with a traditional morphological method could reflect cyanobacteria community dynamics and its correlation with environmental factors in eutrophic freshwater bodies. PMID:24448632

  17. Field and laboratory guide to freshwater cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms for Native American and Alaska Native communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Barry H.; Ann St. Amand

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can produce toxins and form harmful algal blooms. The Native American and Alaska Native communities that are dependent on subsistence fishing have an increased risk of exposure to these cyanotoxins. It is important to recognize the presence of an algal bloom in a waterbody and to distinguish a potentially toxic harmful algal bloom from a non-toxic bloom. This guide provides field images that show cyanobacteria blooms, some of which can be toxin producers, as well as other non-toxic algae blooms and floating plants that might be confused with algae. After recognition of a potential toxin-producing cyanobacterial bloom in the field, the type(s) of cyanobacteria present needs to be identified. Species identification, which requires microscopic examination, may help distinguish a toxin-producer from a non-toxin producer. This guide also provides microscopic images of the common cyanobacteria that are known to produce toxins, as well as images of algae that form blooms but do not produce toxins.

  18. Catalog of microscopic organisms of the Everglades, Part 1—The cyanobacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Barry H.; Mareš, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic organisms of the Everglades include numerous prokaryotic organisms, including the eubacteria, such as the cyanobacteria and non-photosynthetic bacteria, as well as several eukaryotic algae and protozoa that form the base of the food web. This report is part 1 in a series of reports that describe microscopic organisms encountered during the examination of several hundred samples collected in the southern Everglades. Part 1 describes the cyanobacteria and includes a suite of images and the most current taxonomic treatment of each taxon. The majority of the images are of live organisms, allowing their true color to be represented. A number of potential new species are illustrated; however, corroborating evidence from a genetic analysis of the morphological characteristics is needed to confirm these designations as new species. Part 1 also includes images of eubacteria that resemble cyanobacteria. Additional parts of the report on microscopic organisms of the Everglades are currently underway, such as the green algae and diatoms. The report also serves as the basis for a taxonomic image database that will provide a digital record of the Everglades microscopic flora and fauna. It is anticipated that these images will facilitate current and future ecological studies on the Everglades, such as understanding food-web dynamics, sediment formation and accumulation, the effects of nutrients and flow, and climate change.

  19. Inhibition of the growth of cyanobacteria during the recruitment stage in Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Kong, Fanxiang

    2016-03-01

    Microcystis is the dominant algal bloom genus in Lake Taihu. Thus, controlling the recruitment and growth of Microcystis is the most crucial aspect of solving the problem of algal blooms. Different concentrations (0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 g L(-1)) of tea extract were used to treat barrels of lake water at the recruitment stage of cyanobacteria. There was an inhibitory effect on algal growth in all treatment groups. The inhibitory effect on cyanobacteria was stronger than on other algae. The metabolic activity of cells in the treatment groups was significantly enhanced compared to the control, as an adaptation to the stress caused by tea polyphenols. The photosynthetic activity diminished in the treatment groups and was barely detected in the 0.05 and 0.1 g L(-1) treatments. The levels of reactive oxygen species increased substantially in treated cells with the algal cells experiencing oxidative damage. The effect of tea on zooplankton was also studied. The number of Bosmina fatalis individuals did not change significantly in the 0.025 and 0.05 g L(-1) treatments. These results suggested that the application of tea extracts, during the recruitment stage of blue-green algae, suppressed the recruitment and growth of cyanobacteria, thus offering the potential to prevent cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:26590061

  20. Harnessing the self-harvesting capability of benthic cyanobacteria for use in benthic photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Benthic species of algae and cyanobacteria (i.e., those that grow on surfaces), may provide potential advantages over planktonic species for some commercial-scale biotechnological applications. A multitude of different designs of photobioreactor (PBR) are available for growing planktonic species but to date there has been little research on PBR for benthic algae or cyanobacteria. One notable advantage of some benthic cyanobacterial species is that during their growth cycle they become positively buoyant, detach from the growth surface and form floating mats. This 'self-harvesting' capability could be advantageous in commercial PBRs as it would greatly reduce dewatering costs. In this study we compared the growth rates and efficiency of 'self-harvesting' among three species of benthic cyanobacteria; Phormidium autumnale; Phormidium murrayi and Planktothrix sp.. Phormidium autumnale produced the greatest biomass and formed cohesive mats once detached. Using this strain and an optimised MLA media, a variety of geometries of benthic PBRs (bPBRs) were trialed. The geometry and composition of growth surface had a marked effect on cyanobacterial growth. The highest biomass was achieved in a bPBR comprising of a vertical polyethylene bag with loops of silicone tubing to provide additional growth surfaces. The productivity achieved in this bPBR was a similar order of magnitude as planktonic species, with the additional advantage that towards the end of the exponential phase the bulk of the biomass detached forming a dense mat at the surface of the medium. PMID:21906375

  1. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    PubMed

    Bradley, Walter G; Borenstein, Amy R; Nelson, Lorene M; Codd, Geoffrey A; Rosen, Barry H; Stommel, Elijah W; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-09-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5-10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals. PMID:23286757

  2. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Walter G.; Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Rosen, Barry H.; Stommel, Elijah W.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-01-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5–10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  3. Mechanisms and fitness implications of photomorphogenesis during chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms absorb photons and convert light energy to chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. Photosynthetic efficiency is tuned in response to the availability of light, carbon dioxide and nutrients to promote maximal levels of carbon fixation, while simultaneously limiting the potential for light-associated damage or phototoxicity. Given the central dependence on light for energy production, photosynthetic organisms possess abilities to tune their growth, development and metabolism to external light cues in the process of photomorphogenesis. Photosynthetic organisms perceive light intensity and distinct wavelengths or colors of light to promote organismal acclimation. Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that exhibit abilities to alter specific aspects of growth, including photosynthetic pigment composition and morphology, in responses to changes in available wavelengths and intensity of light. This form of photomorphogenesis is known as chromatic acclimation and has been widely studied. Recent insights into the photosensory photoreceptors found in cyanobacteria and developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms initiated by light sensing to affect the changes characteristic of chromatic acclimation are discussed. I consider cyanobacterial responses to light, the broad diversity of photoreceptors encoded by these organisms, specific mechanisms of photomorphogenesis, and associated fitness implications in chromatically acclimating cyanobacteria. PMID:27217547

  4. Response of Daphnia's Antioxidant System to Spatial Heterogeneity in Cyanobacteria Concentrations in a Lowland Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Wojtal-Frankiewicz, Adrianna; Bernasińska, Joanna; Frankiewicz, Piotr; Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Jurczak, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Many species and clones of Daphnia inhabit ecosystems with permanent algal blooms, and they can develop tolerance to cyanobacterial toxins. In the current study, we examined the spatial differences in the response of Daphnia longispina to the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa in a lowland eutrophic dam reservoir between June (before blooms) and September (during blooms). The reservoir showed a distinct spatial pattern in cyanobacteria abundance resulting from the wind direction: the station closest to the dam was characterised by persistently high Microcystis biomass, whereas the upstream stations had a significantly lower biomass of Microcystis. Microcystin concentrations were closely correlated with the cyanobacteria abundance (r = 0.93). The density of daphniids did not differ among the stations. The main objective of this study was to investigate how the distribution of toxic Microcystis blooms affects the antioxidant system of Daphnia. We examined catalase (CAT) activity, the level of the low molecular weight antioxidant glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and oxidative stress parameters, such as lipid peroxidation (LPO). We found that the higher the abundance (and toxicity) of the cyanobacteria, the lower the values of the antioxidant parameters. The CAT activity and LPO level were always significantly lower at the station with the highest M. aeruginosa biomass, which indicated the low oxidative stress of D. longispina at the site with the potentially high toxic thread. However, the low concentration of GSH and the highest activity of GST indicated the occurrence of detoxification processes at this site. These results demonstrate that daphniids that have coexisted with a high biomass of toxic cyanobacteria have effective mechanisms that protect them against the toxic effects of microcystins. We also conclude that Daphnia's resistance capacity to Microcystis toxins may differ within an ecosystem, depending on the bloom's spatial

  5. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present in drinking water impoundments and groundwater wells in desert environments.

    PubMed

    Chatziefthimiou, Aspassia D; Metcalf, James S; Glover, W Broc; Banack, Sandra A; Dargham, Soha R; Richer, Renee A

    2016-05-01

    Desert environments and drylands experience a drastic scarcity of water resources. To alleviate dependence on freshwater for drinking water needs, countries have invested in infrastructure development of desalination plants. Collectively, the countries of the Arabian Gulf produce 45% of the world's desalinated water, which is stored in dams, mega-reservoirs and secondary house water tanks to secure drinking water beyond daily needs. Improper storage practices of drinking water in impoundments concomitant with increased temperatures and light penetration may promote the growth of cyanobacteria and accumulation of cyanotoxins. To shed light on this previously unexplored research area in desert environments, we examined drinking and irrigation water of urban and rural environments to determine whether cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are present, and what are the storage and transportation practices as well as the environmental parameters that best predict their presence. Cyanobacteria were present in 80% of the urban and 33% of the rural water impoundments. Neurotoxins BMAA, DAB and anatoxin-a(S) were not detected in any of the water samples, although they have been found to accumulate in the desert soils, which suggests a bioaccumulation potential if they are leached into the aquifer. A toxic BMAA isomer, AEG, was found in 91.7% of rural but none of the urban water samples and correlated with water-truck transportation, light exposure and chloride ions. The hepatotoxic cyanotoxin microcystin-LR was present in the majority of all sampled impoundments, surpassing the WHO provisional guideline of 1 μg/l in 30% of the urban water tanks. Finally, we discuss possible management strategies to improve storage and transportation practices in order to minimize exposure to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, and actions to promote sustainable use of limited water resources. PMID:26921462

  6. Live-cell imaging of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Rayka; Hood, Rachel D; Savage, David F

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are a diverse bacterial phylum whose members possess a high degree of ultrastructural organization and unique gene regulatory mechanisms. Unraveling this complexity will require the use of live-cell fluorescence microscopy, but is impeded by the inherent fluorescent background associated with light-harvesting pigments and the need to feed photosynthetic cells light. Here, we outline a roadmap for overcoming these challenges. Specifically, we show that although basic cyanobacterial biology creates challenging experimental constraints, these restrictions can be mitigated by the careful choice of fluorophores and microscope instrumentation. Many of these choices are motivated by recent successful live-cell studies. We therefore also highlight how live-cell imaging has advanced our understanding of bacterial microcompartments, circadian rhythm, and the organization and segregation of the bacterial nucleoid. PMID:25366827

  7. Biosynthesis and Function of Extracellular Glycans in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Dittmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of cyanobacteria is covered with glycans that confer versatility and adaptability to a multitude of environmental factors. The complex carbohydrates act as barriers against different types of stress and play a role in intra- as well as inter-species interactions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the chemical composition, biosynthesis and biological function of exo- and lipo-polysaccharides from cyanobacteria and give an overview of sugar-binding lectins characterized from cyanobacteria. We discuss similarities with well-studied enterobacterial systems and highlight the unique features of cyanobacteria. We pay special attention to colony formation and EPS biosynthesis in the bloom-forming cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. PMID:25587674

  8. An Expanded Genomic Representation of the Phylum Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Rochelle M.; Skennerton, Connor T.; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Imelfort, Michael; Paech, Samuel J.; Dennis, Paul G.; Steen, Jason A.; Parks, Donovan H.; Tyson, Gene W.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveys of aphotic habitats have indicated the presence of major uncultured lineages phylogenetically classified as members of the Cyanobacteria. One of these lineages has recently been proposed as a nonphotosynthetic sister phylum to the Cyanobacteria, the Melainabacteria, based on recovery of population genomes from human gut and groundwater samples. Here, we expand the phylogenomic representation of the Melainabacteria through sequencing of six diverse population genomes from gut and bioreactor samples supporting the inference that this lineage is nonphotosynthetic, but not the assertion that they are strictly fermentative. We propose that the Melainabacteria is a class within the phylogenetically defined Cyanobacteria based on robust monophyly and shared ancestral traits with photosynthetic representatives. Our findings are consistent with theories that photosynthesis occurred late in the Cyanobacteria and involved extensive lateral gene transfer and extends the recognized functionality of members of this phylum. PMID:24709563

  9. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  10. Application of synthetic biology in cyanobacteria and algae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria and algae are becoming increasingly attractive cell factories for producing renewable biofuels and chemicals due to their ability to capture solar energy and CO2 and their relatively simple genetic background for genetic manipulation. Increasing research efforts from the synthetic biology approach have been made in recent years to modify cyanobacteria and algae for various biotechnological applications. In this article, we critically review recent progresses in developing genetic tools for characterizing or manipulating cyanobacteria and algae, the applications of genetically modified strains for synthesizing renewable products such as biofuels and chemicals. In addition, the emergent challenges in the development and application of synthetic biology for cyanobacteria and algae are also discussed. PMID:23049529

  11. 2-Methylhopanoids: Biomarkers for Cyanobacteria and for Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summons, R. E.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hope, J. M.; Logan, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports new biomarker and carbon isotopic data for cultured cyanobacteria, cyano-bacterially- dominated ecosystems and ancient sedi-ments and petroleum. We found that cyanobacteria are the predominant source of a distinctive membrane lipid biomarker, namely 2- methylbacteriohopanepolyol (2-Me-BHP). We then sought evidence for a geochemical record of the fossil hydrocarbon analogues of these compounds (2- methylhopanes) and found a trend toward their in-creased relative abundance in marine sediments going back through geological time to 2500 Ma. We conclude that cyanobacteria were the dominant form of phytoplankton and source of molecular oxygen in the Proterozoic ocean. Extending the geological record of cyanobacteria further to Archean times is now a matter of finding a suitably preserved rock record. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Cyanobacteria for Human Habitation beyond Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor; Jones, Jeff; Bayless, David; Sarkisova, Svetlana; Garrison, Dan; McKay, David S.

    2007-01-01

    In light of the President s Moon/Mars initiative, lunar exploration has once again become a priority for NASA. In order to establish permanent bases on the Moon and proceed with human exploration of Mars, two key problems will be addressed: first, the production of O2 and second, the production of methane (CH4). While O2 is required for life support systems (LSS), both liquid O2 and CH4 are needed as an oxidizer and a propellant, respectively for the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Unlike previous propulsion systems, the new CEV will use liquid oxygen (LO2) as an oxidizer and liquid methane (LCH4) as a propellant. Existing technology (e.g. hydrogen reduction) for the production of liquid oxygen from lunar regolith is very energy intensive and requires high temperature reactors. We propose an alternative approach using iron-tolerant cyanobacteria. We have found that iron-tolerant cyanobacteria (IT CB) are capable of etching iron-bearing minerals, which may lead to bonds breaking between Fe and O of common lunar mare basalt Fe-oxides including ilmenite, pseudobrookite, ferropseudobrookite, and armalcolite with the subsequent release of both Fe, Ti and oxygen as byproducts. We also propose to use CB biomass for CH4 production as carbon stock and a propellant. Both processes can be accomplished in an energy and cost effective manner because sunlight will be used as an energy source and allows the reactions at ambient temperatures between 10-60 C. Current evaluations include assessing the thermodynamics of such biogenic reactions using a variety of nutrients and atmospheric parameters, as well as assessing the rates and species variation effects of the driving reactions.

  13. Morphology and Elemental Composition of Recent and Fossil Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintAmand, Ann; Hoover, Richard B.; Jerman, Gregory; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (cyanophyta, cyanoprokaryota, and blue-green algae) are an ancient, diverse and abundant group of photosynthetic oxygenic microorganisms. Together with other bacteria and archaea, the cyanobacteria have been the dominant life forms on Earth for over 3.5 billion years. Cyanobacteria occur in some of our planets most extreme environments - hot springs and geysers, hypersaline and alkaline lakes, hot and cold deserts, and the polar ice caps. They occur in a wide variety of morphologies. Unlike archaea and other bacteria, which are typically classified in pure culture by their physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic properties, the cyanobacteria have historically been classified based upon their size and morphological characteristics. These include the presence or absence of heterocysts, sheath, uniseriate or multiseriate trichomes, true or false branching, arrangement of thylakoids, reproduction by akinetes, binary fission, hormogonia, fragmentation, presence/absence of motility etc. Their antiquity, distribution, structural and chemical differentiation, diversity, morphological complexity and large size compared to most other bacteria, makes the cyanobacteria ideal candidates for morphological biomarkers in returned Astromaterials. We have obtained optical (nomarski and phase contrast)/fluorescent (blue and green excitation) microscopy images using an Olympus BX60 compound microscope and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy images and EDAX elemental compositions of living and fossil cyanobacteria. The S-4000 Hitachi Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) has been used to investigate microfossils in freshly fractured interior surfaces of terrestrial rocks and the cells, hormogonia, sheaths and trichomes of recent filamentous cyanobacteria. We present Fluorescent and FESEM Secondary and Backscattered Electron images and associated EDAX elemental analyses of recent and fossil cyanobacteria, concentrating on representatives of the

  14. Identification of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in cyanobacteria and molecular detection methods for the producers of these compounds.

    PubMed

    Suurnäkki, Suvi; Gomez-Saez, Gonzalo V; Rantala-Ylinen, Anne; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are muddy/earthy off-flavor metabolites produced by a range of bacteria. Cyanobacteria are the major producers of the volatile metabolites geosmin and MIB which produce taste and odor problems in drinking water and fish worldwide. Here we detected geosmin and MIB by studying 100 cyanobacteria strains using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). A total of 21 geosmin producers were identified from six cyanobacteria genera. Two of the geosmin producers also produced MIB. A PCR protocol for the detection of geoA and MIB synthase genes involved in the biosynthesis of geosmin and MIB was developed. The geoA and MIB synthase genes were detected in all strains shown to produce geosmin and MIB, respectively. Cyanobacterial geoA and MIB synthase sequences showed homology to terpene synthases genes of actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Additional off-flavor compounds, nor-carotenoids β-ionone and β-cyclocitral, were found from 55 strains among the 100 cyanobacterial strains studied; β-ionone was present in 45 and β-cyclocitral in 10 strains. Six of the cyanobacteria which contain off-flavor compounds also produced toxins, anatoxin-a or microcystins. The molecular method developed is a useful tool in monitoring potential cyanobacterial producers of geosmin and MIB. PMID:25462716

  15. The effects of three chemical algaecides on cell numbers and toxin content of the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaenopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Dianne I; Duquette, Ashley; Goodson, Abby; Keppler, Charles J; Williams, Sarah H; Brock, Larissa M; Stackley, Krista D; White, David; Wilde, Susan B

    2014-11-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria blooms are a growing concern for public health and safety, due in part to the production of the hepatotoxin microcystin by certain species, including Microcystis aeruginosa. Management strategies for controlling cyanobacteria blooms include algaecide treatments, often with copper sulfate, and more recently oxidizers such as sodium percarbonate that produce hydrogen peroxide. This study assessed the effects of two copper-containing algaecides and one sodium percarbonate-containing algaecide on mitigating cell numbers and toxin content of cultured M. aeruginosa and summer (July) bloom samples of Anabaenopsis sp. in a brackish stormwater detention pond. Monitoring of the bloom revealed that Anabaenopsis sp. was associated with elevated levels of orthophosphate compared to nitrogen (dissolved inorganic nitrogen to phosphorus ratios were 0.19-1.80), and the bloom decline (September-October) was likely due to lower autumn water temperatures combined with potential grazing by the dinoflagellate Protoperidinium quinquecorne. Laboratory-based algaecide experiments included three dose levels, and cyanobacteria cell numbers and microcystin concentrations (particulate and dissolved) were evaluated over 7 d. Following exposure, copper-containing treatments generally had lower cell numbers than either sodium percarbonate-containing or control (no algaecide) treatments. Addition of algaecides did not reduce overall microcystin levels, and a release of toxin from the particulate to dissolved phase was observed in most treatments. These findings indicate that algaecide applications may visibly control cyanobacteria bloom densities, but not necessarily toxin concentrations, and have implications for public health and safety. PMID:25078538

  16. Towards clarifying what distinguishes cyanobacteria able to resurrect after desiccation from those that cannot: The photosynthetic aspect.

    PubMed

    Raanan, Hagai; Oren, Nadav; Treves, Haim; Keren, Nir; Ohad, Itzhak; Berkowicz, Simon M; Hagemann, Martin; Koch, Moriz; Shotland, Yoram; Kaplan, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Organisms inhabiting biological soil crusts (BSCs) are able to cope with extreme environmental conditions including daily hydration/dehydration cycles, high irradiance and extreme temperatures. The photosynthetic machinery, potentially the main source of damaging reactive oxygen species during cessation of CO(2) fixation in desiccating cells, must be protected to avoid sustained photodamage. We compared certain photosynthetic parameters and the response to excess light of BCS-inhabiting, desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya ohadii and Nostoc reinholdii with those observed in the "model" organisms Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, able to resurrect after mild desiccation, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that are unable to recover from dehydration. Desiccation-tolerant strains exhibited a transient decline in the photosynthetic rate at light intensities corresponding to the inflection point in the PI curve relating the O(2) evolution rate to light intensity. They also exhibited a faster and larger loss of variable fluorescence and profoundly faster Q(A)(-) re-oxidation rates after exposure to high illumination. Finally, a smaller difference was found in the temperature of maximal thermoluminescence signal in the absence or presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) than observed in "model" cyanobacteria. These parameters indicate specific functional differences of photosystem II (PSII) between desiccation tolerant and sensitive cyanobacteria. We propose that exposure to excess irradiation activates a non-radiative electron recombination route inside PSII that minimizes formation of damaging singlet oxygen in the desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria and thereby reduces photodamage. PMID:26896589

  17. The Effects of Three Chemical Algaecides on Cell Numbers and Toxin Content of the Cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaenopsis sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Dianne I.; Duquette, Ashley; Goodson, Abby; Keppler, Charles J.; Williams, Sarah H.; Brock, Larissa M.; Stackley, Krista D.; White, David; Wilde, Susan B.

    2014-11-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria blooms are a growing concern for public health and safety, due in part to the production of the hepatotoxin microcystin by certain species, including Microcystis aeruginosa. Management strategies for controlling cyanobacteria blooms include algaecide treatments, often with copper sulfate, and more recently oxidizers such as sodium percarbonate that produce hydrogen peroxide. This study assessed the effects of two copper-containing algaecides and one sodium percarbonate-containing algaecide on mitigating cell numbers and toxin content of cultured M. aeruginosa and summer (July) bloom samples of Anabaenopsis sp. in a brackish stormwater detention pond. Monitoring of the bloom revealed that Anabaenopsis sp. was associated with elevated levels of orthophosphate compared to nitrogen (dissolved inorganic nitrogen to phosphorus ratios were 0.19-1.80), and the bloom decline (September-October) was likely due to lower autumn water temperatures combined with potential grazing by the dinoflagellate Protoperidinium quinquecorne. Laboratory-based algaecide experiments included three dose levels, and cyanobacteria cell numbers and microcystin concentrations (particulate and dissolved) were evaluated over 7 d. Following exposure, copper-containing treatments generally had lower cell numbers than either sodium percarbonate-containing or control (no algaecide) treatments. Addition of algaecides did not reduce overall microcystin levels, and a release of toxin from the particulate to dissolved phase was observed in most treatments. These findings indicate that algaecide applications may visibly control cyanobacteria bloom densities, but not necessarily toxin concentrations, and have implications for public health and safety.

  18. Selective inhibition of toxic cyanobacteria by β-carboline-containing bacterium Bacillus flexus isolated from Saudi freshwaters

    PubMed Central

    Alamri, Saad A.; Mohamed, Zakaria A.

    2013-01-01

    A bacterial strain SSZ01 isolated from a eutrophic lake in Saudi Arabia dominated by cyanobacterial blooms, showed an antialgal activity against cyanobacteria species. Based on the analysis of the 16S rDNA gene sequence, the isolated strain (SSZ01) most likely belonged to the genus Bacillus with a 99% similarity to Bacillus flexus strain EMGA5. The thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of the ethyl acetate extract of this bacterium revealed that this strain can produce harmine and norharmane compared to different β-carboline analog standards. Harmine and norharmane were also detected in considerable amounts in bacterial growth medium, indicating a potential excretion of these compounds into the aquatic environment. The crude extract of Bacillus flexus as well as pure materials of harmine and norharmane inhibited the growth of tested species of cyanobacteria. However, the bacterial crude extract has a higher toxicity against tested species of cyanobacteria than harmine and norharmane. In addition, harmine was more toxic to cyanobacteria than norharmane. On the other hand, neither pure compounds of harmine and norharmane nor crude bacterial extract showed any antialgal activity against tested species of green algae. The results of the present study suggest that B. flexus SSZ01 or its crude extract containing harmine and norharmane could be a candidate for the selective control of cyanobacterial blooms without affecting other algal species. PMID:24235872

  19. [CO2-Concentrating Mechanism and Its Traits in Haloalkaliphilic Cyanobacteria].

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Samylina, O S

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of oxygenic phototrophs existing for at least 3.5 Ga. Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by cyanobacteria occurs via the Calvin cycle, with RuBisCO, its key enzyme, having very low affinity to CO2. This is due to the fact that atmospheric CO2 concentration in Archaean, when the photosynthetic apparatus evolved, was several orders higher than now. Later, in the epoch of Precambrian microbial communities, CO2 content in the atmosphere decreased drastically. Thus, present-day phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, require adaptive mechanisms for efficient photosynthesis. In cyanobacterial cells, this function is performed by the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which creates elevated CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCO active centers, thus significantly increasing the rate of CO2 fixation in the Calvin cycle. CCM has been previously studied only for freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We were the first to investigate CCM in haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria from soda lakes. Extremophilic haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria were shown to possess a well-developed CCM with the structure and functional principles similar to those of freshwater and marine strains. Analysis of available data suggests that regulation of the amount of inorganic carbon transported into the cell is probably the general CCM function under these conditions. PMID:26263620

  20. Hypoxia Sustains Cyanobacteria Blooms in the Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is one of the classic triggering mechanisms for the occurrence of cyanobacteria blooms in aquatic ecosystems. In the Baltic Sea, cyanobacteria regularly occur in the late summer months and form nuisance accumulations in surface waters and their abundance has intensified significantly in the past 50 years attributed to human-induced eutrophication. However, the natural occurrence of cyanobacteria during the Holocene is debated. In this study, we present records of cyanobacteria pigments, water column redox proxies, and nitrogen isotopic signatures for the past ca. 8000 years from Baltic Sea sediment cores. Our results demonstrate that cyanobacteria abundance and nitrogen fixation are correlated with hypoxia occurring during three main intervals: (1) ca. 7000–4000 B.P. during the Littorina transgression, (2) ca. 1400–700 B.P. during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, and (3) from ca. 1950 A.D. to the present. Issues of preservation were investigated, and we show that organic matter and pigment profiles are not simply an artifact of preservation. These results suggest that cyanobacteria abundance is sustained during periods of hypoxia, most likely because of enhanced recycling of phosphorus in low oxygen conditions. PMID:24512281

  1. Hypoxia sustains cyanobacteria blooms in the Baltic sea.

    PubMed

    Funkey, Carolina P; Conley, Daniel J; Reuss, Nina S; Humborg, Christoph; Jilbert, Tom; Slomp, Caroline P

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is one of the classic triggering mechanisms for the occurrence of cyanobacteria blooms in aquatic ecosystems. In the Baltic Sea, cyanobacteria regularly occur in the late summer months and form nuisance accumulations in surface waters and their abundance has intensified significantly in the past 50 years attributed to human-induced eutrophication. However, the natural occurrence of cyanobacteria during the Holocene is debated. In this study, we present records of cyanobacteria pigments, water column redox proxies, and nitrogen isotopic signatures for the past ca. 8000 years from Baltic Sea sediment cores. Our results demonstrate that cyanobacteria abundance and nitrogen fixation are correlated with hypoxia occurring during three main intervals: (1) ca. 7000-4000 B.P. during the Littorina transgression, (2) ca. 1400-700 B.P. during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, and (3) from ca. 1950 A.D. to the present. Issues of preservation were investigated, and we show that organic matter and pigment profiles are not simply an artifact of preservation. These results suggest that cyanobacteria abundance is sustained during periods of hypoxia, most likely because of enhanced recycling of phosphorus in low oxygen conditions. PMID:24512281

  2. Use of cyanobacteria for in-situ resource use in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, Karen; Cockell, Charles S.

    2010-08-01

    The regolith of other planetary bodies, such as the Moon and Mars, is rich in inorganic elements that could potentially be exploited for space applications. Lithotrophic microorganisms that are capable of utilising rocks as a growth substrate, and facilitate the extraction of elements, are ideal candidates for in-situ resource use. Of particular interest are the cyanobacteria, which have been suggested for applications, such as oxygen, fuel and biomass production, nutrient acquisition, and feedstock provisions. In this study, Gloeocapsa strain OU_20, isolated from a rock-dwelling community exposed to low Earth orbit; Leptolyngbya strain OU_13 and Phormidium strain OU_10, both isolated from a rock-dwelling community exposed to Mars simulated conditions; Chroococcidiopsis 029; Arthrospira platensis; Synechococcus elongatus; and Anabaena cylindrica, were examined as potential organisms for space in-situ resource use. Volcanic rocks, including basalt (low in SiO 2) analogous to martian and lunar basalt, rhyolite (high in SiO 2), and anorthosite analogous to lunar regolith were used as growth substrates. The growth rate and rock dissolution were significantly lower with rhyolite demonstrating the importance of silica content in defining the potential for in-situ resource use. Biological weathering resulted in the release of bio-essential elements from the rock matrix, highlighting the potential of cyanobacteria for applications such as bio-mining and nutrient acquisition, on other planets. A. cylindrica produced the maximum biomass with the three rock-types and the optimal value was obtained with the basalt. Exposure experiments demonstrated that A. cylindrica, Chroococcidiopsis 029, Gloeocapsa strain OU_20, Phormidium strain OU_10, and Leptolyngbya strain OU_13 were able to survive 28 days of exposure to desiccation and Mars simulated conditions, which is beneficial in case of system malfunction and for storage. The results from this study indicate that cyanobacteria

  3. Diversity and Physiology of Siderophilic Cyanobacteria: Implication for the Bioenergetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor; Sarkisova, Svetlana; Thomas-Kerprta, Kathie; McKay, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Prior to 2.4 Ga, global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron (Rouxel, Bekker, Edwards, 2005), a condition that is not conducive to the growth of most contemporary mesophilic cyanobacteria (CB). Recent studies of the mechanisms of iron-deficiency stress in CB suggest that contemporary mesophilic freshwater and marine B underwent long-term adaptation to a permanent decrease in soluble iron in the ocean environment (Boyer, et al., 1987; Braun, Hantke, and Koster, 1998). Of all extant environments, iron-depositing hot springs may constitute the most appropriate natural models for analysis of the transition of ancestral cyanobacteria (CB) or protocyanobacteria (PCB) (Olson, 2001) from anoxygenic photosynthesis to oxygenic one and biogeochemical processes in the late Archean and early Paleoproterozoic eras. In particular, Olson (2001) proposed the definition for PCB and postulated that the common ancestor of PCB and CB might well have used Fe(OH)+ as the principal electron donor for CO2 fixation (Widdel, et al., 1993; Ehrenreich and Widdel, 1994; Pierson and Olson, 1989; Olson, 2006). Olson (2001) proposed that the driving force for the evolution of RC2, in addition to RC1, was the necessity to use Fe(OH)+ effectively for CO2 fixation in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. The global decrease of dissolved environmental reduced iron could have been the driving force for the transition from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis (Brown et al., 2007). Despite the insights into the ecology, evolutionary biology, paleogeobiochemistry, and astrobiology the examination of iron depositing hot springs (IDHS) could potentially provide, very few studies dedicated to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria inhabiting IDHS have been conducted. Here we describe the phylogeny, physiology and ultrastructure and biogeochemical activity of several recent CB isolates from two different greater Yellowstone area IDHS, e.g. LaDuke and Chocolate Pots

  4. Nitrogen Fixed By Cyanobacteria Is Utilized By Deposit-Feeders

    PubMed Central

    Karlson, Agnes M. L.; Gorokhova, Elena; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    Benthic communities below the photic zone depend for food on allochthonous organic matter derived from seasonal phytoplankton blooms. In the Baltic Sea, the spring diatom bloom is considered the most important input of organic matter, whereas the contribution of the summer bloom dominated by diazotrophic cyanobacteria is less understood. The possible increase in cyanobacteria blooms as a consequence of eutrophication and climate change calls for evaluation of cyanobacteria effects on benthic community functioning and productivity. Here, we examine utilization of cyanobacterial nitrogen by deposit-feeding benthic macrofauna following a cyanobacteria bloom at three stations during two consecutive years and link these changes to isotopic niche and variations in body condition (assayed as C:N ratio) of the animals. Since nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria have δ15N close to -2‰, we expected the δ15N in the deposit-feeders to decrease after the bloom if their assimilation of cyanobacteria-derived nitrogen was substantial. We also expected the settled cyanobacteria with their associated microheterotrophic community and relatively high nitrogen content to increase the isotopic niche area, trophic diversity and dietary divergence between individuals (estimated as the nearest neighbour distance) in the benthic fauna after the bloom. The three surface-feeding species (Monoporeia affinis, Macoma balthica and Marenzelleria arctia) showed significantly lower δ15N values after the bloom, while the sub-surface feeder Pontoporeia femorata did not. The effect of the bloom on isotopic niche varied greatly between stations; populations which increased niche area after the bloom had better body condition than populations with reduced niche, regardless of species. Thus, cyanobacterial nitrogen is efficiently integrated into the benthic food webs in the Baltic, with likely consequences for their functioning, secondary production, transfer efficiency, trophic interactions, and intra- and

  5. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  6. Controlling Harmful Cyanobacteria: Taxa-Specific Responses of Cyanobacteria to Grazing by Large-Bodied Daphnia in a Biomanipulation Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Ekvall, Mattias K.; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Lake restoration practices based on reducing fish predation and promoting the dominance of large-bodied Daphnia grazers (i.e., biomanipulation) have been the focus of much debate due to inconsistent success in suppressing harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While most studies have explored effects of large-bodied Daphnia on cyanobacterial growth at the community level and/or on few dominant species, predictions of such restoration practices demand further understanding on taxa-specific responses in diverse cyanobacterial communities. In order to address these questions, we conducted three grazing experiments during summer in a eutrophic lake where the natural phytoplankton community was exposed to an increasing gradient in biomass of the large-bodied Daphnia magna. This allowed evaluating taxa-specific responses of cyanobacteria to Daphnia grazing throughout the growing season in a desired biomanipulation scenario with limited fish predation. Total cyanobacterial and phytoplankton biomasses responded negatively to Daphnia grazing both in early and late summer, regardless of different cyanobacterial densities. Large-bodied Daphnia were capable of suppressing the abundance of Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis and Planktothrix bloom-forming cyanobacteria. However, the growth of the filamentous Dolichospermum crassum was positively affected by grazing during a period when this cyanobacterium dominated the community. The eutrophic lake was subjected to biomanipulation since 2005 and nineteen years of lake monitoring data (1996–2014) revealed that reducing fish predation increased the mean abundance (50%) and body-size (20%) of Daphnia, as well as suppressed the total amount of nutrients and the growth of the dominant cyanobacterial taxa, Microcystis and Planktothrix. Altogether our results suggest that lake restoration practices solely based on grazer control by large-bodied Daphnia can be effective, but may not be sufficient to control the overgrowth of all

  7. Controlling Harmful Cyanobacteria: Taxa-Specific Responses of Cyanobacteria to Grazing by Large-Bodied Daphnia in a Biomanipulation Scenario.

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Ekvall, Mattias K; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Lake restoration practices based on reducing fish predation and promoting the dominance of large-bodied Daphnia grazers (i.e., biomanipulation) have been the focus of much debate due to inconsistent success in suppressing harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While most studies have explored effects of large-bodied Daphnia on cyanobacterial growth at the community level and/or on few dominant species, predictions of such restoration practices demand further understanding on taxa-specific responses in diverse cyanobacterial communities. In order to address these questions, we conducted three grazing experiments during summer in a eutrophic lake where the natural phytoplankton community was exposed to an increasing gradient in biomass of the large-bodied Daphnia magna. This allowed evaluating taxa-specific responses of cyanobacteria to Daphnia grazing throughout the growing season in a desired biomanipulation scenario with limited fish predation. Total cyanobacterial and phytoplankton biomasses responded negatively to Daphnia grazing both in early and late summer, regardless of different cyanobacterial densities. Large-bodied Daphnia were capable of suppressing the abundance of Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis and Planktothrix bloom-forming cyanobacteria. However, the growth of the filamentous Dolichospermum crassum was positively affected by grazing during a period when this cyanobacterium dominated the community. The eutrophic lake was subjected to biomanipulation since 2005 and nineteen years of lake monitoring data (1996-2014) revealed that reducing fish predation increased the mean abundance (50%) and body-size (20%) of Daphnia, as well as suppressed the total amount of nutrients and the growth of the dominant cyanobacterial taxa, Microcystis and Planktothrix. Altogether our results suggest that lake restoration practices solely based on grazer control by large-bodied Daphnia can be effective, but may not be sufficient to control the overgrowth of all

  8. Alleviation of high light-induced photoinhibition in cyanobacteria by artificially conferred biosilica shells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Yang, Zhou; Zhai, Hailei; Wang, Guangchuan; Xu, Xurong; Ma, Weimin; Tang, Ruikang

    2013-09-01

    Bioinspired by diatoms, biomimetic silicification confers an artificial shell on cyanobacteria to alleviate photoinhibition; thus, the photosynthesis of the resulting cyanobacteria@SiO2 becomes more efficient under high light conditions. PMID:23863928

  9. Expanding models of lake trophic state to predict cyanobacteria in lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Cyanobacteria are a primary taxonomic group associated with harmful algal blooms in lakes. Understanding the drivers of cyanobacteria presence has important implications for lake management and for the protection of human and ecosystem health. Chlor...

  10. Expanding Models of Lake Trophic State to Predict Cyanobacteria in Lakes: A Data Mining Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Cyanobacteria are a primary taxonomic group associated with harmful algal blooms in lakes. Understanding the drivers of cyanobacteria presence has important implications for lake management and for the protection of human and ecosystem health. Chloro...

  11. A Mechanism of Energy Dissipation in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Berera, Rudi; van Stokkum, Ivo H.M.; d'Haene, Sandrine; Kennis, John T.M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Dekker, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    When grown under a variety of stress conditions, cyanobacteria express the isiA gene, which encodes the IsiA pigment-protein complex. Overexpression of the isiA gene under iron-depletion stress conditions leads to the formation of large IsiA aggregates, which display remarkably short fluorescence lifetimes and thus a strong capacity to dissipate energy. In this work we investigate the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy allowed us to follow the process of energy dissipation in real time. The light energy harvested by chlorophyll pigments migrated within the system and eventually reaches a quenching site where the energy is transferred to a carotenoid-excited state, which dissipates it by decaying to the ground state. We compare these findings with those obtained for the main light-harvesting complex in green plants (light-harvesting complex II) and artificial light-harvesting antennas, and conclude that all of these systems show the same mechanism of energy dissipation, i.e., one or more carotenoids act as energy dissipators by accepting energy via low-lying singlet-excited S1 states and dissipating it as heat. PMID:19289052

  12. Photobiological production of hydrogen using cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Borthakur, D.; McKinley, K.R.; Bylina, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are capable of generating hydrogen using sunlight and water. In both Spirulina and Anabaena, there is a soluble reversible hydrogenase that is involved in hydrogen evolution under anaerobic conditions in the dark. In addition, the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena produces hydrogen as a by-product of nitrogen fixation. Most of this hydrogen is recaptured by a membrane-bound uptake hydrogenase present in Anabaena cells. Experiments have continued to develop a gene transfer system in Spirulina in preparation for improved hydrogen production via genetic manipulation of the reversible hydrogenase. We have identified and characterized four restriction enzymes in Spirulina and cloned the genes for two methylases that protect their own DNA from cleavage by restriction enzymes. We have also cloned and sequenced parts of hupB and hupM genes involved in the synthesis of uptake hydrogenase in Anabaena. Successful cloning of these hup genes represents an important and necessary step in our project because this will enable us to construct Anabaena strains with enhanced hydrogen production ability by disrupting the hup genes involved in hydrogen uptake. We are also setting up a bio-reactor to determine the amount of hydrogen released by different Spirulina and Anabaena strains under different physiological conditions.

  13. Protein translocation and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Frain, Kelly M; Gangl, Doris; Jones, Alexander; Zedler, Julie A Z; Robinson, Colin

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria exhibit a complex form of membrane differentiation that sets them apart from most bacteria. Many processes take place in the plasma membrane, but photosynthetic light capture, electron transport and ATP synthesis take place in an abundant internal thylakoid membrane. This review considers how this system of subcellular compartmentalisation is maintained, and how proteins are directed towards the various subcompartments--specifically the plasma membrane, periplasm, thylakoid membrane and thylakoid lumen. The involvement of Sec-, Tat- and signal recognition particle- (SRP)-dependent protein targeting pathways is discussed, together with the possible involvement of a so-called 'spontaneous' pathway for the insertion of membrane proteins, previously characterised for chloroplast thylakoid membrane proteins. An intriguing aspect of cyanobacterial cell biology is that most contain only a single set of genes encoding Sec, Tat and SRP components, yet the proteomes of the plasma and thylakoid membranes are very different. The implications for protein sorting mechanisms are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26341016

  14. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria. PMID:25009182

  15. Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase?

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, David R.; Romanovicz, Dwight K.; Brown, R. Malcolm

    2001-01-01

    Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose in these organisms. Based on the results of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy of microfibrils, and cellobiohydrolase I-gold labeling, we report the occurrence of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species representing three of the five sections of cyanobacteria. Sequence analysis of the genomes of four cyanobacteria revealed the presence of multiple amino acid sequences bearing the DDD35QXXRW motif conserved in all cellulose synthases. Pairwise alignments demonstrated that CesAs from plants were more similar to putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 than any other cellulose synthases in the database. Multiple alignments of putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and N. punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 with the cellulose synthases of other prokaryotes, Arabidopsis, Gossypium hirsutum, Populus alba × Populus tremula, corn (Zea mays), and Dictyostelium discoideum showed that cyanobacteria share an insertion between conserved regions U1 and U2 found previously only in eukaryotic sequences. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the cyanobacterial cellulose synthases share a common branch with CesAs of vascular plants in a manner similar to the relationship observed with cyanobacterial and chloroplast 16s rRNAs, implying endosymbiotic transfer of CesA from cyanobacteria to plants and an ancient origin for cellulose synthase in eukaryotes. PMID:11598227

  16. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria. PMID:25009182

  17. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems. PMID:22952848

  18. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Morgan M.; Li, Zhou; Effler, T. Chad; Hauser, Loren J.; Boyer, Gregory L.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems. PMID:22952848

  19. Salt Acclimation of Cyanobacteria and Their Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Pade, Nadin; Hagemann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The long evolutionary history and photo-autotrophic lifestyle of cyanobacteria has allowed them to colonize almost all photic habitats on Earth, including environments with high or fluctuating salinity. Their basal salt acclimation strategy includes two principal reactions, the active export of ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes. Cyanobacterial salt acclimation has been characterized in much detail using selected model cyanobacteria, but their salt sensing and regulatory mechanisms are less well understood. Here, we briefly review recent advances in the identification of salt acclimation processes and the essential genes/proteins involved in acclimation to high salt. This knowledge is of increasing importance because the necessary mass cultivation of cyanobacteria for future use in biotechnology will be performed in sea water. In addition, cyanobacterial salt resistance genes also can be applied to improve the salt tolerance of salt sensitive organisms, such as crop plants. PMID:25551682

  20. Is Monoglucosyldiacylglycerol a Precursor to Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol in All Cyanobacteria?

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is ubiquitous in the photosynthetic membranes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. It is synthesized by galactosylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) in the chloroplasts, whereas it is produced by epimerization of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (GlcDG) in at least several cyanobacteria that have been analyzed such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A previous study, however, showed that the mgdE gene encoding the epimerase is absent in some cyanobacteria such as Gloeobacter violaceus, Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Acaryochloris marina. In addition, the N-terminal 'fatty acid hydroxylase' domain is lacking in the MgdE protein of Prochlorococcus marinus. These problems may cast doubt upon the general (or exclusive) role of MgdE in the epimerization of GlcDG to MGDG in cyanobacteria. In addition, GlcDG is usually present at a very low level, and the structural determination of endogenous GlcDG has not been accomplished with cyanobacterial samples. In this study, I determined the structure of GlcDG from Anabaena variabilis by (1)H- and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. I then showed that G. violaceus, T. elongatus, A. marina and P. marinus contain GlcDG. In all cases, GlcDG consisted of fewer unsaturated molecular species than MGDG, providing further evidence that GlcDG is a precursor to MGDG. The conversion of GlcDG to MGDG was also demonstrated by radiolabeling and chase experiments in G. violaceus and P. marinus. These results demonstrate that all the analyzed cyanobacteria contain GlcDG, which is converted to MGDG, and suggest that an alternative epimerase is required for MGDG synthesis in these cyanobacteria. PMID:26276824

  1. Phylogeny of culturable cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Silva, Caroline Souza Pamplona; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal Vieira; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2014-03-01

    The cyanobacterial community from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems was examined using a culture-dependent method. Fifty cyanobacterial strains were isolated from soil, water and periphytic samples collected from Cardoso Island and Bertioga mangroves using specific cyanobacterial culture media. Unicellular, homocytous and heterocytous morphotypes were recovered, representing five orders, seven families and eight genera (Synechococcus, Cyanobium, Cyanobacterium, Chlorogloea, Leptolyngbya, Phormidium, Nostoc and Microchaete). All of these novel mangrove strains had their 16S rRNA gene sequenced and BLAST analysis revealed sequence identities ranging from 92.5 to 99.7% when they were compared with other strains available in GenBank. The results showed a high variability of the 16S rRNA gene sequences among the genotypes that was not associated with the morphologies observed. Phylogenetic analyses showed several branches formed exclusively by some of these novel 16S rRNA gene sequences. BLAST and phylogeny analyses allowed for the identification of Nodosilinea and Oxynema strains, genera already known to exhibit poor morphological diacritic traits. In addition, several Nostoc and Leptolyngbya morphotypes of the mangrove strains may represent new generic entities, as they were distantly affiliated with true genera clades. The presence of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, polyketide synthase, microcystin and saxitoxin genes were detected in 20.5%, 100%, 37.5% and 33.3%, respectively, of the 44 tested isolates. A total of 134 organic extracts obtained from 44 strains were tested against microorganisms, and 26% of the extracts showed some antimicrobial activity. This is the first polyphasic study of cultured cyanobacteria from Brazilian mangrove ecosystems using morphological, genetic and biological approaches. PMID:24461713

  2. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  3. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins

  4. Spatial and temporal patterns in the seasonal distribution of toxic cyanobacteria in Western Lake Erie from 2002-2014.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Timothy T; Stumpf, Richard P

    2015-05-01

    Lake Erie, the world's tenth largest freshwater lake by area, has had recurring blooms of toxic cyanobacteria for the past two decades. These blooms pose potential health risks for recreation, and impact the treatment of drinking water. Understanding the timing and distribution of the blooms may aid in planning by local communities and resources managers. Satellite data provides a means of examining spatial patterns of the blooms. Data sets from MERIS (2002-2012) and MODIS (2012-2014) were analyzed to evaluate bloom patterns and frequencies. The blooms were identified using previously published algorithms to detect cyanobacteria (~25,000 cells mL-1), as well as a variation of these algorithms to account for the saturation of the MODIS ocean color bands. Images were binned into 10-day composites to reduce cloud and mixing artifacts. The 13 years of composites were used to determine frequency of presence of both detectable cyanobacteria and high risk (>100,000 cells mL-1) blooms. The bloom season according to the satellite observations falls within June 1 and October 31. Maps show the pattern of development and areas most commonly impacted during all years (with minor and severe blooms). Frequencies during years with just severe blooms (minor bloom years were not included in the analysis) were examined in the same fashion. With the annual forecasts of bloom severity, these frequency maps can provide public water suppliers and health departments with guidance on the timing of potential risk. PMID:25985390

  5. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in the Seasonal Distribution of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Western Lake Erie from 2002–2014

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, Timothy T.; Stumpf, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Erie, the world’s tenth largest freshwater lake by area, has had recurring blooms of toxic cyanobacteria for the past two decades. These blooms pose potential health risks for recreation, and impact the treatment of drinking water. Understanding the timing and distribution of the blooms may aid in planning by local communities and resources managers. Satellite data provides a means of examining spatial patterns of the blooms. Data sets from MERIS (2002–2012) and MODIS (2012–2014) were analyzed to evaluate bloom patterns and frequencies. The blooms were identified using previously published algorithms to detect cyanobacteria (~25,000 cells mL−1), as well as a variation of these algorithms to account for the saturation of the MODIS ocean color bands. Images were binned into 10-day composites to reduce cloud and mixing artifacts. The 13 years of composites were used to determine frequency of presence of both detectable cyanobacteria and high risk (>100,000 cells mL−1) blooms. The bloom season according to the satellite observations falls within June 1 and October 31. Maps show the pattern of development and areas most commonly impacted during all years (with minor and severe blooms). Frequencies during years with just severe blooms (minor bloom years were not included in the analysis) were examined in the same fashion. With the annual forecasts of bloom severity, these frequency maps can provide public water suppliers and health departments with guidance on the timing of potential risk. PMID:25985390

  6. Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins Occurrence and Removal from Five High-Risk Conventional Treatment Drinking Water Plants

    PubMed Central

    Szlag, David C.; Sinclair, James L.; Southwell, Benjamin; Westrick, Judy A.

    2015-01-01

    An environmental protection agency EPA expert workshop prioritized three cyanotoxins, microcystins, anatoxin-a, and cylindrospermopsin (MAC), as being important in freshwaters of the United States. This study evaluated the prevalence of potentially toxin producing cyanobacteria cell numbers relative to the presence and quantity of the MAC toxins in the context of this framework. Total and potential toxin producing cyanobacteria cell counts were conducted on weekly raw and finished water samples from utilities located in five US states. An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) was used to screen the raw and finished water samples for microcystins. High-pressure liquid chromatography with a photodiode array detector (HPLC/PDA) verified microcystin concentrations and quantified anatoxin-a and cylindrospermopsin concentrations. Four of the five utilities experienced cyanobacterial blooms in their raw water. Raw water samples from three utilities showed detectable levels of microcystins and a fourth utility had detectable levels of both microcystin and cylindrospermopsin. No utilities had detectable concentrations of anatoxin-a. These conventional plants effectively removed the cyanobacterial cells and all finished water samples showed MAC levels below the detection limit by ELISA and HPLC/PDA. PMID:26075379

  7. Natural products from cyanobacteria with antimicrobial and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzi, Fabiana Albani; Vaz, Marcelo G M V; Alvarenga, Danillo O; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important source of structurally bioactive metabolites, with cytotoxic, antiviral, anticancer, antimitotic, antimicrobial, specific enzyme inhibition and immunosuppressive activities. This study focused on the antitumor and antimicrobial activities of intra and extracellular cyanobacterial extracts. A total of 411 cyanobacterial strains were screened for antimicrobial activity using a subset of pathogenic bacteria as target. The in vitro antitumor assays were performed with extracts of 24 strains tested against two murine cancer cell lines (colon carcinoma CT-26 and lung cancer 3LL). Intracellular extracts inhibited 49 and 35% of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacterial growth, respectively. Furthermore, the methanolic intracellular extract of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CYP011K and Nostoc sp. CENA69 showed inhibitory activity against the cancer cell lines. The extracellular extract from Fischerella sp. CENA213 and M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 exhibited inhibitory activity against 3LL lung cancer cells at 0.8 µg ml⁻¹ and Oxynema sp. CENA135, Cyanobium sp. CENA154, M. aeruginosa NPJB-1 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4 presented inhibitory activity against CT26 colon cancer cells at 0.8 µg ml⁻¹. Other extracts were able to inhibit 3LL cell-growth at higher concentrations (20 µg ml⁻¹) such as Nostoc sp. CENA67, Cyanobium sp. CENA154 and M. aeruginosa NPLJ-4, while CT26 cells were inhibited at the same concentration by Nostoc sp. CENA67 and Fischerella sp. CENA213. These extracts presented very low inhibitory activity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The results showed that some cyanobacterial strains are a rich source of natural products with potential for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. PMID:24372264

  8. Oxidative phosphorylation and energy buffering in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschmann, W H; Peschek, G A

    1986-01-01

    The onset of respiration in the cyanobacteria Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc sp. strain Mac upon a shift from dark anaerobic to aerobic conditions was accompanied by rapid energization of the adenylate pool (owing to the combined action of ATP synthase and adenylate kinase) and also the guanylate, uridylate, and cytidylate pools (owing to nucleoside diphosphate and nucleoside monophosphate kinases). Rates of the various transphosphorylation reactions were comparable to the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, thus explaining, in part, low approximately P/O ratios which incorporate adenylates only. The increase of ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP levels (nanomoles per minute per milligram [dry weight]) in oxygen-pulsed cells of A. nidulans and Nostoc species was calculated to be, on average, 2.3, 1.05, 0.8, and 0.57, respectively. Together with aerobic steady-state pool sizes of 1.35, 0.57, 0.5, and 0.4 nmol/mg (dry weight) for these nucleotides, a fairly uniform turnover of 1.3 to 1.5 min-1 was derived. All types of nucleotides, therefore, may be conceived of as being in equilibrium with each other, reflecting the energetic homeostasis or energy buffering of the (respiring) cyanobacterial cell. For the calculation of net efficiencies of oxidative phosphorylation in terms of approximately P/O ratios, this energy buffering was taken into account. Moreover, in A. nidulans an additional 30% of the energy initially conserved in ATP by oxidative phosphorylation was immediately used up by a plasma membrane-bound reversible H+-ATPase for H+ extrusion. Consequently, by allowing for energy buffering and ATPase-linked H+ extrusion, maximum P/O ratios of 2.6 to 3.3 were calculated. By contrast, in Nostoc sp. all the H+ extrusion, appeared to be linked to a plasma membrane-bound respiratory chain, thus bypassing any ATP formation and leading to P/O ratios of only 1.3 to 1.5 despite the correction for energy buffering. PMID:3023299

  9. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B.; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E.; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  10. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  11. Septal Junctions in Filamentous Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris

    2016-02-01

    In the filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, septal junctions that traverse the septal peptidoglycan join adjacent cells, allowing intercellular communication. Perforations in the septal peptidoglycan have been observed, and proteins involved in the formation of such perforations and putative protein components of the septal junctions have been identified, but their relationships are debated. PMID:26748968

  12. CYANOBACTERIA AND FISH: A TOXIC HEALTH THREAT TO TRIBAL COMMUNITIES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is expected that the cyanotoxin microcystin will be found in trout collected from lakes with cyanobacteria blooms. The results from this study will be used in conjunction with a fish consumption survey recently conducted by the Colville Confederated tribes and the U.S. E...

  13. Environmental factors that influence cyanobacteria and geosmin occurrence in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Beaulieu, Karen M.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are small to microscopic, free-floating algae that inhabit the open water of freshwater, estuarine, and saltwater systems. In freshwater lake and reservoirs systems, which are the focus of this chapter, phytoplankton communities commonly consist of assemblages of the major taxonomic groups, including green algae, diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of single-celled organisms that can exist in a wide range of environments, not just open water, because of their adaptability. It is the adaptability of cyanobacteria that enables this group to dominate the phytoplankton community and even form nuisance or harmful blooms under certain environmental conditions. In fact, cyanobacteria are predicted to adapt favorably to future climate change in freshwater systems compared to other phytoplankton groups because of their tolerance to rising temperatures, enhanced vertical thermal stratification of aquatic ecosystems, and alterations in seasonal and interannual weather patterns. Understanding those environmental conditions that favor cyanobacterial dominance and bloom formation has been the focus of research throughout the world because of the concomitant production and release of nuisance and toxic cyanobacterial-derived compounds. However, the complex interaction among the physical, chemical, and biological processes within lakes, reservoirs, and large rivers often makes it difficult to identify primary environmental factors that cause the production and release of these cyanobacterial by-products.

  14. Environmental factors that influence cyanobacteria and geosmin occurrence in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Beaulieu, Karen M.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are small to microscopic, free-floating algae that inhabit the open water of freshwater, estuarine, and saltwater systems. In freshwater lake and reservoirs systems, which are the focus of this chapter, phytoplankton communities commonly consist of assemblages of the major taxonomic groups, including green algae, diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of single-celled organisms that can exist in a wide range of environments, not just open water, because of their adaptability [1-3]. It is the adaptability of cyanobacteria that enables this group to dominate the phytoplankton community and even form nuisance or harmful blooms under certain environmental conditions [3-6]. In fact, cyanobacteria are predicted to adapt favorably to future climate change in freshwater systems compared to other phytoplankton groups because of their tolerance to rising temperatures, enhanced vertical thermal stratification of aquatic ecosystems, and alterations in seasonal and interannual weather patterns [7, 8]. Understanding those environmental conditions that favor cyanobacterial dominance and bloom formation has been the focus of research throughout the world because of the concomitant production and release of nuisance and toxic cyanobacterial-derived compounds [4-6, 7-10]. However, the complex interaction among the physical, chemical, and biological processes within lakes, reservoirs, and large rivers often makes it difficult to identify primary environmental factors that cause the production and release of these cyanobacterial by-products.

  15. Environmental factors that influence cyanobacteria and geosmin occurrence in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Beaulieu, Karen M.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are small to microscopic, free-floating algae that inhabit the open water of freshwater, estuarine, and saltwater systems. In freshwater lake and reservoirs systems, which are the focus of this chapter, phytoplankton communities commonly consist of assemblages of the major taxonomic groups, including green algae, diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of single-celled organisms that can exist in a wide range of environments, not just open water, because of their adaptability [1-3]. It is the adaptability of cyanobacteria that enables this group to dominate the phytoplankton community and even form nuisance or harmful blooms under certain environmental conditions [3-6]. In fact, cyanobacteria are predicted to adapt favorably to future climate change in freshwater systems compared to other phytoplankton groups because of their tolerance to rising temperatures, enhanced vertical thermal stratification of aquatic ecosystems, and alterations in seasonal and interannual weather patterns [7, 8]. Understanding those environmental conditions that favor cyanobacterial dominance and bloom formation has been the focus of research throughout the world because of the concomitant production and release of nuisance and toxic cyanobacterial-derived compounds [4-6, 7-10]. However, the complex interaction among the physical, chemical, and biological processes within lakes, reservoirs, and large rivers often makes it difficult to identify primary environmental factors that cause the production and release of these cyanobacterial by-products [9].

  16. Cyanobacteria HABs - Causes, Prevention, and Mitigation Workgroup Report.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) are estimated to have evolved 3.5 billion years ago, at which time they began to add oxygen to the existing anaerobic atmosphere, actually changing the chemistry of the planet and allowing new life forms to evolve. These ubiquitous microbes are capable of tolerating ...

  17. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW). PMID:26304815

  18. Cyanobacteria in wetlands of the industrialized Sambalpur District of India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are common components of phytoplankton communities in most freshwater ecosystems. Proliferations of cyanobacteria are often caused by high nutrient loading, and as such can serve as indicators of declining water quality. Massive industrialization in developing countries, like India, has polluted fresh water bodies, including wetlands. Many industries directly discard their effluents to nearby water sources without treatment. In the Sambalpur District of India effluents reach the reservoir of the worlds largest earthen dam i.e Hirakud Dam. This study examines cyanobacteria communities in the wetlands of Sambalpur District, Odisha, India, including areas subjected to industrial pollution. Result & Discussion The genera Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Chroococcus, Phormidium were dominant genera of polluted wetlands of Sambalpur districts. A positive correlation was found between total cyanobacterial species and dissolved oxygen levels, but cyanobacterial diversity was inversely related to BOD, COD, TSS, and TDS. High dissolved oxygen content was also associated with regions of lower cyanobacteria biomass. Conclusion Cyanobacterial abundance was positively correlated to content of oxidisable organic matter, but negatively correlated to species diversity. Lower dissolved oxygen was correlated to decreased diversity and increased dominance by Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Chroococcus, Phormidium species, observed in regions characterized by deteriorated water quality. PMID:23845058

  19. DETECTION OF CYANOBACTERIA AND THEIR TOXINS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Blooms of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, have recently become more prevalent worldwide as a result of human activities. The long-term chronic human health hazard attributable to toxic cyanotoxins in drinking water has caused considerable concern in humans. Conti...

  20. The cyanobacteria toxins, microcystins – emerging risks to human health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dialysis patients appear to be at increased risk for exposure to cyanobacteria toxins; episodes of microcystin (MCYST) exposure via dialysate during 1996 and 2001 have been previously reported. During 2001, as many as 44 renal insufficiency patients were exposed to contaminated d...

  1. Common freshwater cyanobacteria grow in 100% CO2.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David J; Sullivan, Shannon L; Price, Amanda L; Zimmerman, Shawn M

    2005-02-01

    Cyanobacteria and similar organisms produced most of the oxygen found in Earth's atmosphere, which implies that early photosynthetic organisms would have lived in an atmosphere that was rich in CO2 and poor in O2. We investigated the tolerance of several cyanobacteria to very high (>20 kPa) concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Cultures of Synechococcus PCC7942, Synechocystis PCC7942, Plectonema boryanum, and Anabaena sp. were grown in liquid culture sparged with CO2-enriched air. All four strains grew when transferred from ambient CO2 to 20 kPa partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), but none of them tolerated direct transfer to 40 kPa pCO2. Synechococcus and Anabaena survived 101 kPa (100%) pCO2 when pressure was gradually increased by 15 kPa per day, and Plectonema actively grew under these conditions. All four strains grew in an anoxic atmosphere of 5 kPa pCO2 in N2. Strains that were sensitive to high CO2 were also sensitive to low initial pH (pH 5-6). However, low pH in itself was not sufficient to prevent growth. Although mechanisms of damage and survival are still under investigation, we have shown that modern cyanobacteria can survive under Earth's primordial conditions and that cyanobacteria-like organisms could have flourished under conditions on early Mars, which probably had an atmosphere similar to early Earth's. PMID:15711170

  2. Photoinhibition of cyanobacteria and its application in cultural heritage conservation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Paul; Pedersen, Jens Z; Bruno, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light has bilateral effects on phototrophic organisms. As cyanobacteria in Roman hypogea are long acclimatized to dim environment, moderate intensity of illumination can be used to alleviate biodeterioration problems on the stone substrata. Moderate intensity of light inactivates cyanobacteria by causing photoinhibition, photobleaching and photodamage to the cells. The effectiveness of light depends not only on its intensity but also on the composition and pigmentation of the component cyanobacteria in the biofilms. Red light is the most effective for the species rich in phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, such as Leptolyngbya sp. and Scytonema julianum, whereas green light is effective to inhibit the species rich in phycoerythrin, like Oculatella subterranea. White light is effective to control the grayish and the black cyanobacteria, such as Symphyonemopsis sp. and Eucapsis sp. abundant in all of these pigments. Blue light is the least effective. 150 μmol photons m(-2)  s(-1) of blue light cannot cause biofilm damage while the same intensity of red, green or white irradiation for 14 days can severely damage the cyanobacterial cells in the biofilms due to ROS formation. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy detected the formation of radicals in different cyanobacterial cellular extracts exposed to 80 μmol photons m(-2)  s(-1) of light. PMID:24320697

  3. Development of a universal microarray based on the ligation detection reaction and 16S rrna gene polymorphism to target diversity of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Bianca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Frosini, Andrea; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rajaniemi, Pirjo; Rantala, Anne; Mugnai, Maria Angela; Ventura, Stefano; Wilmotte, Annick; Boutte, Christophe; Grubisic, Stana; Balthasart, Pierre; Consolandi, Clarissa; Bordoni, Roberta; Mezzelani, Alessandra; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2004-12-01

    The cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes of significant ecological and biotechnological interest, since they strongly contribute to primary production and are a rich source of bioactive compounds. In eutrophic fresh and brackish waters, their mass occurrences (water blooms) are often toxic and constitute a high potential risk for human health. Therefore, rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacterial species in complex environmental samples is important. Here we describe the development and validation of a microarray for the identification of cyanobacteria in aquatic environments. Our approach is based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array. Probes were designed for detecting 19 cyanobacterial groups including Anabaena/Aphanizomenon, Calothrix, Cylindrospermopsis, Cylindrospermum, Gloeothece, halotolerants, Leptolyngbya, Palau Lyngbya, Microcystis, Nodularia, Nostoc, Planktothrix, Antarctic Phormidium, Prochlorococcus, Spirulina, Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Trichodesmium, and Woronichinia. These groups were identified based on an alignment of over 300 cyanobacterial 16S rRNA sequences. For validation of the microarrays, 95 samples (24 axenic strains from culture collections, 27 isolated strains, and 44 cloned fragments recovered from environmental samples) were tested. The results demonstrated a high discriminative power and sensitivity to 1 fmol of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene. Accurate identification of target strains was also achieved with unbalanced mixes of PCR amplicons from different cyanobacteria and an environmental sample. Our universal array method shows great potential for rapid and reliable identification of cyanobacteria. It can be easily adapted to future development and could thus be applied both in research and environmental monitoring. PMID:15574913

  4. Carbon acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  5. Carbon Acquisition by Cyanobacteria: Mechanisms, Comparative Genomics, and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Aaron; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Kahlon, Shira; Ogawa, Teruo

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we mainly focus on the mechanisms of inorganic carbon uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation between the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. We identify the genes involved, their regulation and phylogeny. Living in an environment where the CO₂ concentration is considerably lower than required to saturate their carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), cyanobacteria acquired the CO₂ concentrating mechanism (CCM) that enables them to accumulate CO₂ at the carboxylation site. All the cyanobacteria examined to date are able to fix CO₂ into carbohydrates. However, in addition to variance in the range of physical growth conditions, cyanobacteria also vary substantially in their ability to consume organic carbon from their surroundings. Many strains are obligate photoautotrophs where the sole carbon source is CO₂, while others are able to perform photomixotrophic or even heterotrophic growth using a wide variety of organic substances (c.f. Rippka et al., 1979; Stal and Moezelaar, 1997b). Cyanobacteria constitute a unique case where the anabolic and catabolic carbohydrate metabolisms function in the same cellular compartment. In addition, the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways share components in the thylakoid membranes. Despite its importance to our understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the shifts between photoautotrophic, heterotrophic and photomixotrophic modes of growth, and their regulation; between the different pathways of carbohydrate breakdown- glycolysis, fermentation, the oxidative pentose phosphate, the Krebs cycle and the photorespiratory pathways. In this chapter we shall briefly focus on recent advances in our understanding of the CCM and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

  6. Molybdenum Storage in Cyanobacteria: "Mopping" Up Excess Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Wolfe-Simon, F.; Anbar, A. D.

    2008-12-01

    The heavy metal molybdenum (Mo) plays an essential role in the nitrogen (N) cycle. In order to acquire N from the environment, microorganisms utilize Mo-containing enzymes such as nitrogenase (for N2 fixation) and nitrate reductase (for NO3- assimilation). N2-fixing cyanobacteria likely played an important role in both marine and terrestrial N cycling throughout Earth history. Low Mo levels in Precambrian oceans may have necessitated evolution of cyanobacterial Mo-storage ("Mop") proteins. If so, mop genes were likely lost in marine cyanobacteria after the rise of Mo (to approximately 100 nanomolar (nM) 600 Ma (Scott et al., 2008)). The distribution of mop genes in N2-fixing cyanobacteria supports this hypothesis; freshwater species contain this gene whereas marine species lack it. To assess the importance of Mo-storage in modern environments we are integrating laboratory and field investigations. In the lab, we grew N2-fixing freshwater cyanobacteria possessing the mop gene at high Mo levels (1500 nM) to assess whether excess Mo is accumulated Extremely high intracellular accumulation of Mo, much higher than could be accounted for by nitrogenase requirements alone, was observed. Investigation of mop gene expression and protein localization in Mo-replete and deplete conditions is underway. In the field, we are isolating indigenous cyanobacteria and cloning mop genes from Castle Lake, California. This field locale is of particular interest because previous studies show that periphyton consortia in this lake assimilate large quantities of N, even though Mo concentrations are <5 nM. This adaptation to low Mo may be aided by intracellular Mo storage.

  7. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater Cyanobacteria spp.

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Elsa; Oliveira, Micaela; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Ferreira, Eugénia; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. In this study we aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of four cyanobacterial isolates from different genera (Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon gracile, Chrisosporum bergii, Planktothix agradhii), and among them nine isolates from the same specie (M. aeruginosa) to distinct antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycine, gentamicine, tetracycline, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin). We used a method adapted from the bacteria standard broth microdilution. Cyanobacteria were exposed to serial dilution of each antibiotic (0.0015–1.6 mg/L) in Z8 medium (20 ± 1°C; 14/10 h L/D cycle; light intensity 16 ± 4 μEm−2s−1). Cell growth was followed overtime (OD450nm/microscopic examination) and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were calculated for each antibiotic/isolate. We found that β-lactams exhibited the lower MICs, aminoglycosides, tetracycline and norfloxacine presented intermediate MICs; none of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim and nalidixic acid. The reduced susceptibility of all tested cyanobacteria to some antibiotics suggests that they might be naturally non-susceptible to these compounds, or that they might became non-susceptible due to antibiotic contamination pressure, or to the transfer of genes from resistant bacteria present in the environment. PMID:26322027

  8. Fine-structural analysis of black band disease-infected coral reveals boring cyanobacteria and novel bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron W; Blackwelder, Patricia; Al-Sayegh, Husain; Richardson, Laurie L

    2011-02-22

    Examination of coral fragments infected with black band disease (BBD) at the fine- and ultrastructural levels using scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed novel features of the disease. SEM images of the skeleton from the host coral investigated (Montastraea annularis species complex) revealed extensive boring underneath the BBD mat, with cyanobacterial filaments present within some of the bore holes. Cyanobacteria were observed to penetrate into the overlying coral tissue from within the skeleton and were present throughout the mesoglea between tissue layers (coral epidermis and gastrodermis). A population of novel, as yet unidentified, small filamentous bacteria was found at the leading edge of the migrating band. This population increased in number within the band and was present within degrading coral epithelium, suggesting a role in disease etiology. In coral tissue in front of the leading edge of the band, cyanobacterial filaments were observed to be emerging from bundles of sloughed-off epidermal tissue. Degraded gastrodermis that contained actively dividing zooxanthellae was observed using both TEM and SEM. The BBD mat contained cyanobacterial filaments that were twisted, characteristic of negative-tactic responses. Some evidence of boring was found in apparently healthy control coral fragments; however, unlike in BBD-infected fragments, there were no associated cyanobacteria. These results suggest the coral skeleton as a possible source of pathogenic BBD cyanobacteria. Additionally, SEM revealed the presence of a potentially important group of small, filamentous BBD-associated bacteria yet to be identified. PMID:21516970

  9. Raman Characterization of the UV-Protective Pigment Gloeocapsin and Its Role in the Survival of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Storme, Jean-Yves; Golubic, Stjepko; Wilmotte, Annick; Kleinteich, Julia; Velázquez, David; Javaux, Emmanuelle J

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular UV-screening pigments gloeocapsin and scytonemin present in the exopolysaccharide (EPS) envelopes of extremophilic cyanobacteria of freshwater and marine environments were studied by Raman spectroscopy and compared to their intracellular photosynthetic pigments. This Raman spectral analysis of the extracellular pigment gloeocapsin showed that it shared Raman spectral signatures with parietin, a radiation-protective pigment known in lichens. The UV-light spectra also show similarities. Gloeocapsin occurs in some cyanobacterial species, mostly with exclusion of scytonemin, indicating that these pigments have evolved in cyanobacteria as separate protective strategies. Both gloeocapsin and scytonemin are widely and species-specifically distributed in different cyanobacterial genera and families. The widespread occurrence of these pigments may suggest an early origin, while their detection by Raman spectroscopy makes them potential biosignatures for cyanobacteria in the fossil record and demonstrates the usefulness of nondestructive Raman spectroscopy analyses for the search for complex organics, including possible photosynthetic pigments, if preservable in early Earth and extraterrestrial samples. PMID:26406539

  10. The Regulation of Light Sensing and Light-Harvesting Impacts the Use of Cyanobacteria as Biotechnology Platforms.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Light is harvested in cyanobacteria by chlorophyll-containing photosystems embedded in the thylakoid membranes and phycobilisomes (PBSs), photosystem-associated light-harvesting antennae. Light absorbed by the PBSs and photosystems can be converted to chemical energy through photosynthesis. Photosynthetically fixed carbon pools, which are constrained by photosynthetic light capture versus the dissipation of excess light absorbed, determine the available organismal energy budget. The molecular bases of the environmental regulation of photosynthesis, photoprotection, and photomorphogenesis are still being elucidated in cyanobacteria. Thus, the potential impacts of these phenomena on the efficacy of developing cyanobacteria as robust biotechnological platforms require additional attention. Current advances and persisting needs for developing cyanobacterial production platforms that are related to light sensing and harvesting include the development of tools to balance the utilization of absorbed photons for conversion to chemical energy and biomass versus light dissipation in photoprotective mechanisms. Such tools can be used to direct energy to more effectively support the production of desired bioproducts from sunlight. PMID:25023122