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Sample records for potential molecular dynamics

  1. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-05-18

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ and a/sup 3/..sigma../sup +/ states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm/sup -1/ over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500/sup 0/K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy.

  2. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-03-27

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. As an example, recent calculations of the chi/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ and a/sup 3/..sigma../sup +/ states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the chi/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, highly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm/sup -1/ over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (C?MD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the C?MD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  4. Ridge-based bias potentials to accelerate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Penghao; Duncan, Juliana; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-12-28

    An effective way to accelerate rare events in molecular dynamics simulations is to apply a bias potential which destabilizes minima without biasing the transitions between stable states. This approach, called hyperdynamics, is limited by our ability to construct general bias potentials without having to understand the reaction mechanisms available to the system, a priori. Current bias potentials are typically constructed in terms of a metric which quantifies the distance that a trajectory deviates from the reactant state minimum. Such metrics include detection of negative curvatures of the potential, an energy increase, or deviations in bond lengths from the minimum. When one of these properties exceeds a critical value, the bias potentials are constructed to approach zero. A problem common to each of these schemes is that their effectiveness decreases rapidly with system size. We attribute this problem to a diminishing volume defined by the metrics around a reactant minimum as compared to the total volume of the reactant state basin. In this work, we mitigate the dimensionality scaling problem by constructing bias potentials that are based upon the distance to the boundary of the reactant basin. This distance is quantified in two ways: (i) by following the minimum mode direction to the reactant boundary and (ii) by training a machine learning algorithm to give an analytic expression for the boundary to which the distance can be calculated. Both of these ridge-based bias potentials are demonstrated to scale qualitatively better with dimensionality than the existing methods. We attribute this improvement to a greater filling fraction of the reactant state using the ridge-based bias potentials as compared to the standard potentials. PMID:26723648

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of lattice thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride using two-body interatomic potentials

    E-print Network

    Ruan, Xiulin

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lattice thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride using two potential form have been developed for bismuth telluride, and the potentials are used in molecular dynamics based on Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 when heat flows in the cross-plane direction.1 Bismuth tellu- ride nanowires

  6. New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations

    E-print Network

    de Groot, Bert

    New Soft-Core Potential Function for Molecular Dynamics Based Alchemical Free Energy Calculations accurate free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic integration scheme is often used to calculate changes in the free energy of a system by integrating the change

  7. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of lattice thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride using two-body interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bo; Ruan, Xiulin

    2009-10-01

    Two-body interatomic potentials in the Morse potential form have been developed for bismuth telluride, and the potentials are used in molecular dynamics simulations to predict the thermal conductivity. The density-functional theory with local-density approximations is first used to calculate the total energies for many artificially distorted Bi2Te3 configurations to produce the energy surface. Then by fitting to this energy surface and other experimental data, the Morse potential form is parameterized. The fitted empirical interatomic potentials are shown to reproduce the elastic and phonon data well. Molecular dynamics simulations are then performed to predict the thermal conductivity of bulk Bi2Te3 at different temperatures, and the results agree with experimental data well.

  9. ERRATUM: A `magnetic' interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L, Dudarev S.; M, Derlet P.

    2007-06-01

    Our colleagues pointed out that the format of numerical values given in table 3 of our paper may cause confusion and lead to an error in the numerical implementation of the potential. Below we list the values given in table 3 of our original paper, this time using conventional decimal notations. These values correspond to the same choice of parameter ?c=1. Please see the pdf for table 3

  10. Redox Potentials and Acidity Constants from Density Functional Theory Based Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Xiandong; VandeVondele, Joost; Sulpizi, Marialore; Sprik, Michiel

    2014-11-03

    Implementation. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys 2008, 10, 5238–5249. 11 Cheng, J.; Sulpizi, M.; Sprik, M. Redox Potentials and pKa for Benzoquinone from Den- sity Functional Theory Based Molecular Dynamics. J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 131, 154504. 12 Costanzo, F.; Della Valle, R...

  11. Molecular dynamics in lipid bilayers. Anisotropic diffusion in an odd restoring potential.

    PubMed Central

    Alam, T M

    1993-01-01

    Recent 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spin relaxation studies have questioned the influence of restoring potential parity on the description of lipid or molecular reorientational dynamics. In biomembranes the polar head groups of lipid and sterol constituents are expected to associate with the aqueous interface; therefore, realistic descriptions of molecular reorientation in bilayer systems should use an odd restoring potential. The multiexponential correlation functions and related spectral density functions for small-step anisotropic diffusion in a pseudo-restoring potential of the form U(beta) = -lambda cos beta are evaluated as a function of molecular ordering . From analysis of these results the single exponential approximation used in previous investigations is found to overestimate the decay rate at lower order, but is reliable for > 0.6. The exception to this trend is the decay constant for the G11 (omega; t) correlation function, which is not accurately portrayed by the first-order approximations. A second-order single exponential approximation is presented, and is shown to be equivalent to the weighted sum of the multidecay constants. In general, the potential parity is found to have only minor effects on the spin relaxation rates obtained to describe molecular reorientation in lipid bilayers. PMID:8369401

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of plastocyanin potential energy fluctuations: 1/ f noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Molecular dynamics simulations of plastocyanin, an electron transfer copper containing protein involved in the photosynthetic process, have been performed in both the hydrated and dry state. An analysis of the potential energy fluctuations during a 500 ps dynamical evolution of the macromolecule reveals the presence of a 1/ f? noise in the related spectral density. Such a phenomenon is shown to persist in a wide temperature range (from 100 to 300 K) for both the systems. The occurrence of 1/ f? noise, which can be traced back to the existence, in protein systems, of thermally activated processes, seems to be a peculiarity of the dynamical behaviour of proteins. An analysis of the temperature dependence of the ? exponent allowed us to extract information about the distribution of the conformational energy barriers and its dependence on the hydration level.

  13. An ab initio molecular dynamics analysis of lignin as a potential antioxidant for hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tongyan; Cheng, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Lignins are complex phenolic polymers with limited industrial uses. To identify new applications of lignins, this study aims to evaluate the conifer alcohol lignin as a potential antioxidant for hydrocarbons, using the petroleum asphalt as an example. Using the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method, the evaluation is accomplished by tracking the generation of critical species in a lignin-asphalt mixture under a simulated oxidative condition. The generation of new species was detected using nuclear magnetic resonance and four analytical methods including density of states analysis, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analyses, bonding and energy level analysis, and electrostatic potential energy analysis. Results of the analyses show that the chemical radicals of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur generated in the oxidation process could enhance the agglomeration and/or decomposition tendency of asphalt. The effectiveness of lignins as an antioxidant depends on their chemical compositions. Lignins with a HOMO-LUMO gap larger than the HOMO-LUMO gap of the hydrocarbon system to be protected, such as the conifer alcohol lignin to protect petroleum asphalt as was studied in this work, do not demonstrate beneficial anti-oxidation capacity. Lignins, however, may be effective oxidants for hydrocarbon systems with a larger HOMO-LUMO gap. In addition, lignins may contain more polar sites than the hydrocarbons to be protected; thus the lignins' hydrophobicity and compatibility with the host hydrocarbons need to be well evaluated. The developed AIMD model provides a useful tool for developing antioxidants for generic hydrocarbons. PMID:26562413

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of intergranular fracture in UO2 with nine empirical interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2014-09-01

    The intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a bicrystal model. The anisotropic fracture behavior due to the different grain boundary characters was investigated with the View the MathML source symmetrical tilt S5 and the View the MathML source symmetrical tilt S3 ({1 1 1} twin) grain boundaries. Nine interatomic potentials, seven rigid-ion plus two core–shell ones, were utilized to elucidate possible potential dependence. Initiating from a notch, crack propagation along grain boundaries was observed for most potentials. The S3 boundary was found to be more prone to fracture than the S5 one, indicated by a lower energy release rate associated with the former. However, some potential dependence was identified on the existence of transient plastic deformation at crack tips, and the results were discussed regarding the relevant material properties including the excess energies of metastable phases and the critical energy release rate for intergranular fracture. In general, local plasticity at crack tips was observed in fracture simulations with potentials that predict low excess energies for metastable phases and high critical energy release rates for intergranular fracture.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of intergranular fracture in UO2 with nine empirical interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, Paul C.; Tonks, Michael R.; Bai, Xian-Ming; Biner, S. Bulent

    2014-09-01

    The intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied using molecular dynamics simulations with a bicrystal model. The anisotropic fracture behavior due to the different grain boundary characters was investigated with the <1 0 0> symmetrical tilt ?5 and the <1 1 0> symmetrical tilt ?3 ({1 1 1} twin) grain boundaries. Nine interatomic potentials, seven rigid-ion plus two core-shell ones, were utilized to elucidate possible potential dependence. Initiating from a notch, crack propagation along grain boundaries was observed for most potentials. The ?3 boundary was found to be more prone to fracture than the ?5 one, indicated by a lower energy release rate associated with the former. However, some potential dependence was identified on the existence of transient plastic deformation at crack tips, and the results were discussed regarding the relevant material properties including the excess energies of metastable phases and the critical energy release rate for intergranular fracture. In general, local plasticity at crack tips was observed in fracture simulations with potentials that predict low excess energies for metastable phases and high critical energy release rates for intergranular fracture.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation study reveals potential substrate entry path into ?-secretase/presenilin-1.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ren; Chang, Shan; Xia, Weiming; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-08-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) is the catalytic unit of ?-secretase which cleaves more than one hundred substrates. Among them, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch are notable for their pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and certain types of cancer. The hydrolysis process occurring inside the hydrophobic lipid bilayer remains unclear. With the aim to understand the mechanism of intramembrane proteolysis by ?-secretase, we constructed a homology model of human PS1 and performed molecular dynamics simulation in explicit membrane phospholipids with different components. During the simulation, TM9 was found to exhibit a high level of flexibility that involved in "gate-open" movement of TM2 and TM6, and thus partially exposed the catalytic residues. The highly conserved PALP motif acts as an anchor to mediate the conformation changes of TM6 induced by TM9. Moreover, direct interactions were observed between 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and the active site of ?-secretase, indicating that the lipid molecules have the potential to modulate ?-secretase by contacting with the catalytic residues, i.e., ASP 257 and ASP 385 of PS1. The intermediate states indicate a potential substrate penetration pathway through the interface of TM2 and TM6, which may be induced by changes of TM9. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular simulation study that reveals dynamic behavior of the human PS1 structure in the lipid bilayer and provides insight into the substrate entry path for subsequent intramembrane hydrolysis, which is critical information required for new strategy development of ?-secretase modulators to alleviate devastating AD. PMID:26142917

  17. Redox potentials and acidity constants from density functional theory based molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Xiandong; VandeVondele, Joost; Sulpizi, Marialore; Sprik, Michiel

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: All-atom methods treat solute and solvent at the same level of electronic structure theory and statistical mechanics. All-atom computation of acidity constants (pKa) and redox potentials is still a challenge. In this Account, we review such a method combining density functional theory based molecular dynamics (DFTMD) and free energy perturbation (FEP) methods. The key computational tool is a FEP based method for reversible insertion of a proton or electron in a periodic DFTMD model system. The free energy of insertion (work function) is computed by thermodynamic integration of vertical energy gaps obtained from total energy differences. The problem of the loss of a physical reference for ionization energies under periodic boundary conditions is solved by comparing with the proton work function computed for the same supercell. The scheme acts as a computational hydrogen electrode, and the DFTMD redox energies can be directly compared with experimental redox potentials. Consistent with the closed shell nature of acid dissociation, pKa estimates computed using the proton insertion/removal scheme are found to be significantly more accurate than the redox potential calculations. This enables us to separate the DFT error from other sources of uncertainty such as finite system size and sampling errors. Drawing an analogy with charged defects in solids, we trace the error in redox potentials back to underestimation of the energy gap of the extended states of the solvent. Accordingly the improvement in the redox potential as calculated by hybrid functionals is explained as a consequence of the opening up of the bandgap by the Hartree-Fock exchange component in hybrids. Test calculations for a number of small inorganic and organic molecules show that the hybrid functional implementation of our method can reproduce acidity constants with an uncertainty of 1-2 pKa units (0.1 eV). The error for redox potentials is in the order of 0.2 V. PMID:25365148

  18. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hua Y.

    2015-02-01

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model-the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4-fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased up to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of rs = 0.912.

  19. Redox potentials and pKa for benzoquinone from density functional theory based molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Sulpizi, Marialore; Sprik, Michiel

    2009-10-01

    The density functional theory based molecular dynamics (DFTMD) method for the computation of redox free energies presented in previous publications and the more recent modification for computation of acidity constants are reviewed. The method uses a half reaction scheme based on reversible insertion/removal of electrons and protons. The proton insertion is assisted by restraining potentials acting as chaperones. The procedure for relating the calculated deprotonation free energies to Brønsted acidities (pKa) and the oxidation free energies to electrode potentials with respect to the normal hydrogen electrode is discussed in some detail. The method is validated in an application to the reduction of aqueous 1,4-benzoquinone. The conversion of hydroquinone to quinone can take place via a number of alternative pathways consisting of combinations of acid dissociations, oxidations, or dehydrogenations. The free energy changes of all elementary steps (ten in total) are computed. The accuracy of the calculations is assessed by comparing the energies of different pathways for the same reaction (Hess's law) and by comparison to experiment. This two-sided test enables us to separate the errors related with the restrictions on length and time scales accessible to DFTMD from the errors introduced by the DFT approximation. It is found that the DFT approximation is the main source of error for oxidation free energies.

  20. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    E-print Network

    Hua Y. Geng

    2014-12-19

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model, the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4 fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of $r_{s}=0.912$.

  1. Molecular dynamics modeling using ab initio interatomic potentials for thermal properties of Ni-rich alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.; Cooper, B.R.; Hao, Y.G.; Scoy, F.L. Van

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study thermal expansions of Ni-rich (fcc structure) Ni/Cr alloys (which serve as the basis for practical superalloy systems). This has been done using ab initio interatomic potentials with no experimental input. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as a function of temperature has been calculated. By admixing Re and Me atoms into fee Ni and the fee alloy system Ni/Cr, additive effects on the thermal expansion have been predicted. While addition of Cr lowers the CTE of Ni, and moderate addition of Mo lowers the CTE of Ni over a wide temperature range, moderate addition of Re raises the CTE of both Ni and Ni/Cr alloys over a significant temperature range. An explanation for the contrasting effect of additive Re on the CTE, based on a one-dimensional atomic chain model, is that the trade-off, between atomic volume effects increasing the CTE over that of pure Ni and pair-potential effects (exemplified by the Grueneisen parameter) decreasing the CTE from that of pure nickel, changes for Re compared to Cr and Mo.

  2. Structural disjoining potential for grain-boundary premelting and grain coalescence from molecular-dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Fensin, Saryu J; Olmsted, David; Buta, Dorel; Asta, Mark; Karma, Alain; Hoyt, J J

    2010-03-01

    We describe a molecular-dynamics framework for the direct calculation of the short-ranged structural forces underlying grain-boundary premelting and grain coalescence in solidification. The method is applied in a comparative study of (i) a Sigma9115120 degrees twist and (ii) a Sigma9110{411} symmetric tilt boundary in a classical embedded-atom model of elemental Ni. Although both boundaries feature highly disordered structures near the melting point, the nature of the temperature dependence of the width of the disordered regions in these boundaries is qualitatively different. The former boundary displays behavior consistent with a logarithmically diverging premelted layer thickness as the melting temperature is approached from below, while the latter displays behavior featuring a finite grain-boundary width at the melting point. It is demonstrated that both types of behavior can be quantitatively described within a sharp-interface thermodynamic formalism involving a width-dependent interfacial free energy, referred to as the disjoining potential. The disjoining potential for boundary (i) is calculated to display a monotonic exponential dependence on width, while that of boundary (ii) features a weak attractive minimum. The results of this work are discussed in relation to recent simulation and theoretical studies of the thermodynamic forces underlying grain-boundary premelting. PMID:20365741

  3. Implementing Molecular Dynamics on Hybrid High Performance Computers - Three-Body Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W Michael; Yamada, Masako

    2013-01-01

    The use of coprocessors or accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs) has become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power re- quirements. Hybrid high-performance computers, defined as machines with nodes containing more than one type of floating-point processor (e.g. CPU and GPU), are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. Although there has been extensive research into methods to efficiently use accelerators to improve the performance of molecular dynamics (MD) employing pairwise potential energy models, little is reported in the literature for models that include many-body effects. 3-body terms are required for many popular potentials such as MEAM, Tersoff, REBO, AIREBO, Stillinger-Weber, Bond-Order Potentials, and others. Because the per-atom simulation times are much higher for models incorporating 3-body terms, there is a clear need for efficient algo- rithms usable on hybrid high performance computers. Here, we report a shared-memory force-decomposition for 3-body potentials that avoids memory conflicts to allow for a deterministic code with substantial performance improvements on hybrid machines. We describe modifications necessary for use in distributed memory MD codes and show results for the simulation of water with Stillinger-Weber on the hybrid Titan supercomputer. We compare performance of the 3-body model to the SPC/E water model when using accelerators. Finally, we demonstrate that our approach can attain a speedup of 5.1 with acceleration on Titan for production simulations to study water droplet freezing on a surface.

  4. Development of EEM based silicon–water and silica–water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid–solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water–silicon and water–silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon–water contact angle of 129°, a quartz–water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite–water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  5. Fluid transport properties by equilibrium molecular dynamics. III. Evaluation of united atom interaction potential models for pure alkanes

    E-print Network

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    coefficient studies using five different variants of multicenter united atom UA inter- action potential models united atom model AUA versus the original UA model is also based on the high density comportmentFluid transport properties by equilibrium molecular dynamics. III. Evaluation of united atom

  6. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  7. An interatomic potential model for molecular dynamics simulation of silicon etching by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Iwakawa, A.; Eriguchi, K.; Ono, K.

    2008-10-01

    An interatomic potential model for Si-Br systems has been developed for performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This model enables us to simulate atomic-scale reaction dynamics during Si etching processes by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas such as HBr and Br{sub 2} plasmas, which are frequently utilized in state-of-the-art techniques for the fabrication of semiconductor devices. Our potential form is based on the well-known Stillinger-Weber potential function, and the model parameters were systematically determined from a database of potential energies obtained from ab initio quantum-chemical calculations using GAUSSIAN03. For parameter fitting, we propose an improved linear scheme that does not require any complicated nonlinear fitting as that in previous studies [H. Ohta and S. Hamaguchi, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6679 (2001)]. In this paper, we present the potential derivation and simulation results of bombardment of a Si(100) surface using a monoenergetic Br{sup +} beam.

  8. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-06-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance.

  9. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance. PMID:26103621

  10. Pharmacophore modeling, in silico screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics approaches for potential alpha-delta bungarotoxin-4 inhibitors discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier; Priya, B. Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Background: The alpha-delta bungartoxin-4 (?-?-Bgt-4) is a potent neurotoxin produced by highly venomous snake species, Bungarus caeruleus, mainly targeting neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) and producing adverse biological malfunctions leading to respiratory paralysis and mortality. Objective: In this study, we predicted the three-dimensional structure of ?-?-Bgt-4 using homology modeling and investigated the conformational changes and the key residues responsible for nAchRs inhibiting activity. Materials and Methods: From the selected plants, which are traditionally used for snake bites, the active compounds are taken and performed molecular interaction studies and also used for modern techniques like pharmacophore modeling and mapping and absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity analysis which may increase the possibility of success. Results: Moreover, 100's of drug-like compounds were retrieved and analyzed through computational virtual screening and allowed for pharmacokinetic profiling, molecular docking and dynamics simulation. Conclusion: Finally the top five drug-like compounds having competing level of inhibition toward ?-?-Bgt-4 toxin were suggested based on their interaction with ?-?-Bgt-4 toxin. PMID:26109766

  11. Structural, vibrational, and elastic properties of a calcium aluminosilicate glass from molecular dynamics simulations: the role of the potential.

    PubMed

    Bauchy, M

    2014-07-14

    We study a calcium aluminosilicate glass of composition (SiO2)0.60(Al2O3)0.10(CaO)0.30 by means of molecular dynamics. To this end, we conduct parallel simulations, following a consistent methodology, but using three different potentials. Structural and elastic properties are analyzed and compared to available experimental data. This allows assessing the respective abilities of the potentials to produce a realistic glass. We report that, although all these potentials offer a reasonable glass structure, featuring tricluster oxygen atoms, their respective vibrational and elastic predictions differ. This allows us to draw some general conclusions about the crucial role, or otherwise, of the interaction potential in silicate systems. PMID:25028027

  12. Structural, vibrational, and elastic properties of a calcium aluminosilicate glass from molecular dynamics simulations: The role of the potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bauchy, M.

    2014-07-14

    We study a calcium aluminosilicate glass of composition (SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.60}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.10}(CaO){sub 0.30} by means of molecular dynamics. To this end, we conduct parallel simulations, following a consistent methodology, but using three different potentials. Structural and elastic properties are analyzed and compared to available experimental data. This allows assessing the respective abilities of the potentials to produce a realistic glass. We report that, although all these potentials offer a reasonable glass structure, featuring tricluster oxygen atoms, their respective vibrational and elastic predictions differ. This allows us to draw some general conclusions about the crucial role, or otherwise, of the interaction potential in silicate systems.

  13. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics study of tacrine derivatives as potential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, An; Hu, Jianping; Wang, Lirong; Zhong, Guochen; Pan, Jian; Wu, Zeyu; Hui, Ailing

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is one of the key targets of drugs for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tacrine is an approved drug with AChE-inhibitory activity. In this paper, 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics were carried out in order to study 60 tacrine derivatives and their AChE-inhibitory activities. 3D-QSAR modeling resulted in an optimal CoMFA model with q(2)?=?0.552 and r(2)?=?0.983 and an optimal CoMSIA model with q(2)?=?0.581 and r(2)?=?0.989. These QSAR models also showed that the steric and H-bond fields of these compounds are important influences on their activities. The interactions between these inhibitors and AChE were further explored through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A few key residues (Tyr70, Trp84, Tyr121, Trp279, and Phe330) at the binding site of AChE were identified. The results of this study improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AChE inhibitors and afford valuable information that should aid the design of novel potential AChE inhibitors. Graphical Abstract Superposition of backbone atoms of the lowest-energy structure obtained from MD simulation (magenta) onto those of the structure of the initial molecular docking model (green). PMID:26438408

  14. Momentum-dependent potentials: Towards the molecular dynamics of fermionlike classical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, P. ); Hernandez, E.S. )

    1995-03-01

    We investigate classical Hamiltonian models for particles interacting with steep differential repulsive barriers both in coordinate and momentum space. The final aim is to define a classical system of many particles behaving as fermions in many respects. In this paper we examine the appearance of the phase portrait of one- or two-particle systems to skim the essential features that would later be transcribed to the basic rules of a molecular dynamics algorithm. One of the remarkable properties of the phase portrait is the flow from states that start far away with a wide range of momentum towards a narrow region in momentum---a virtual locking of momentum---in the vicinity of the steepest part of the barrier in momentum space. The central ideas are developed through two examples in one and two dimensions.

  15. Argon Interaction with Gold Surfaces: Ab Initio-Assisted Determination of Pair Ar-Au Potentials for Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Romain; To, Quy-Dong; de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Léonard, Céline

    2015-07-01

    Global potentials for the interaction between the Ar atom and gold surfaces are investigated and Ar-Au pair potentials suitable for molecular dynamics simulations are derived. Using a periodic plane-wave representation of the electronic wave function, the nonlocal van-der-Waals vdW-DF2 and vdW-OptB86 approaches have been proved to describe better the interaction. These global interaction potentials have been decomposed to produce pair potentials. Then, the pair potentials have been compared with those derived by combining the dispersionless density functional dlDF for the repulsive part with an effective pairwise dispersion interaction. These repulsive potentials have been obtained from the decomposition of the repulsive interaction between the Ar atom and the Au2 and Au4 clusters and the dispersion coefficients have been evaluated by means of ab initio calculations on the Ar+Au2 complex using symmetry adapted perturbation theory. The pair potentials agree very well with those evaluated through periodic vdW-DF2 calculations. For benchmarking purposes, CCSD(T) calculations have also been performed for the ArAu and Ar+Au2 systems using large basis sets and extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. This work highlights that ab initio calculations using very small surface clusters can be used either as an independent cross-check to compare the performance of state-of-the-art vdW-corrected periodic DFT approaches or, directly, to calculate the pair potentials necessary in further molecular dynamics calculations. PMID:26046588

  16. Direction dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene: Parameterization of Stillinger-Weber potential and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhu, Liyan; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-06-01

    A Stillinger-Weber interatomic potential is parameterized for phosphorene. It well reproduces the crystal structure, cohesive energy, and phonon dispersion predicted by first-principles calculations. The thermal conductivity of phosphorene is explored by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations adopting the optimal set of potential parameters. At room temperature, the intrinsic thermal conductivities along zigzag and armchair directions are about 152.7 and 33.0 W/mK, respectively, with a large anisotropy ratio of five. The remarkably directional dependence of thermal conductivity in phosphorene, consistent with previous reports, is mainly due to the strong anisotropy of phonon group velocities, and weak anisotropy of phonon lifetimes as revealed by lattice dynamics calculations. Moreover, the effective phonon mean free paths at zigzag and armchair directions are about 141.4 and 43.4 nm, respectively.

  17. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sabli?, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  18. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  19. Molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades in 3C-SiC: Comparison of interatomic potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, German D.; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    We used molecular dynamics modeling of atomic displacement cascades to characterize the nature of primary radiation damage in 3C-SiC. We demonstrated that the most commonly used interatomic potentials are inconsistent with ab initio calculations of defect energetics. Both the Tersoff potential used in this work and a modified embedded-atom method potential reveal a barrier to recombination of the carbon interstitial and carbon vacancy which is much higher than the density functional theory (DFT) results. The barrier obtained with a newer potential by Gao and Weber is closer to the DFT result. This difference results in significant differences in the cascademore »production of point defects. We have completed both 10 keV and 50 keV cascade simulations in 3C-SiC at a range of temperatures. In contrast to the Tersoff potential, the Gao-Weber potential produces almost twice as many C vacancies and interstitials at the time of maximum disorder (~0.2 ps) but only about 25% more stable defects at the end of the simulation. Only about 20% of the carbon defects produced with the Tersoff potential recombine during the in-cascade annealing phase, while about 60% recombine with the Gao-Weber potential.« less

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform ?s-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation. PMID:25330956

  1. Force and heat current formulas for many-body potentials in molecular dynamics simulations with applications to thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheyong; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Donadio, Davide; Harju, Ari

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions of interatomic force and heat current for many-body potentials such as the Tersoff, the Brenner, and the Stillinger-Weber potential used extensively in molecular dynamics simulations of covalently bonded materials. Although these potentials have a many-body nature, a pairwise force expression that follows Newton's third law can be found without referring to any partition of the potential. Based on this force formula, a stress applicable for periodic systems can be unambiguously defined. The force formula can then be used to derive the heat current formulas using a natural potential partitioning. Our heat current formulation is found to be equivalent to most of the seemingly different heat current formulas used in the literature, but to deviate from the stress-based formula derived from two-body potential. We validate our formulation numerically on various systems described by the Tersoff potential, namely three-dimensional silicon and diamond, two-dimensional graphene, and quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanotube. The effects of cell size and production time used in the simulation are examined.

  2. Chemical Potential of Triethylene Glycol Adsorbed on Surfaces Relevant to Gas Transport and Processing - Studies Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Olsen, R.; Sjöblom, S.; Leirvik, K. N.; Kuznetsova, T.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas will inevitably contain trace amounts of water and other impurities during different stages of processing and transport. Glycols, such as triethylene glycol (TEG), will in many cases follow the water. The glycol contents of the gas can originate from preceding glycol-drying units or it can be a residue from the direct injection of glycols used to prevent hydrate formation. Thus, it is important to know how glycol contents will affect the different paths leading to hydrate formation. Glycols may in some cases dominate the condensed water phase. If this occurs, it will lead to the well-documented shift in the hydrate stability curve, due to the altered activity of the water. A great deal of information on the molecular path of a glycol through the system can be obtained from calculating the chemical potential. Due to difficulties in measuring interfacial chemical potentials, these often need to be estimated using theoretical tools. We used molecular dynamics (MD) to study how TEG behaves in the vicinity of mineral surfaces such as calcite and hematite. Many methods exist for estimating chemical potentials based on MD trajectories. These include techniques such as free energy perturbation theory (FEP) and thermodynamic integration (TI). Such methods require sufficient sampling of configurations where free energy is to be estimated. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate chemical potentials on surfaces. There are several methods to circumvent this problem, such as blue moon sampling and umbrella sampling. These have been considered and the most important have been used to estimate chemical potentials of TEG adsorbed on the mineral surfaces. The resulting chemical potentials were compared to the chemical potential of TEG in bulk water, which was estimated using temperature thermodynamic integration.

  3. Shock-induced plasticity in tantalum single crystals: Interatomic potentials and large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.; Guerrero, O.; An, Q.; Holian, B. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report on large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shock wave compression in tantalum single crystals. Two new embedded atom method interatomic potentials of Ta have been developed and optimized by fitting to experimental and density functional theory data. The potentials reproduce the isothermal equation of state of Ta up to 300 GPa. We examined the nature of the plastic deformation and elastic limits as functions of crystal orientation. Shock waves along (100), (110), and (111) exhibit elastic-plastic two-wave structures. Plastic deformation in shock compression along (110) is due primarily to the formation of twins that nucleate at the shock front. The strain-rate dependence of the flow stress is found to be orientation dependent, with (110) shocks exhibiting the weaker dependence. Premelting at a temperature much below that of thermodynamic melting at the shock front is observed in all three directions for shock pressures above about 180 GPa.

  4. Glass Formation of n-Butanol: Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Gay-Berne Potential Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Gui-long; Zhang, Yong-hong; Huang, Shi-ping

    2012-04-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on Gay-Berne potential model, we have simulated the cooling process of liquid n-butanol. A new set of GB parameters are obtained by fitting the results of density functional theory calculations. The simulations are carried out in the range of 290-50 K with temperature decrements of 10 K. The cooling characteristics are determined on the basis of the variations of the density, the potential energy and orientational order parameter with temperature, whose slopes all show discontinuity. Both the radial distribution function curves and the second-rank orientational correlation function curves exhibit splitting in the second peak. Using the discontinuous change of these thermodynamic and structure properties, we obtain the glass transition at an estimate of temperature Tg=120±10 K, which is in good agreement with experimental results 110±1 K.

  5. A new hydrocarbon empirical potential in angle bending calculation for the molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Tan Ai; Hoe, Yeak Su

    2014-07-01

    Typically, short range potential only depends on neighbouring atoms and its parameters function can be categorized into bond stretching, angle bending and bond rotation potential. In this paper, we present our work called Angle Bending (AB) potential, whereas AB potential is the extension of our previous work namely Bond Stretching (BS) potential. Basically, potential will tend to zero after truncated region, potential in specific region can be represented by different piecewise polynomial. We proposed the AB piecewise potential which is possible to solve a system involving three atoms. AB potential able to handle the potential of covalent bonds for three atoms as well as two atoms cases due to its degeneracy properties. Continuity for the piecewise polynomial has been enforced by coupling with penalty methods. There are still plenty of improvement spaces for this AB potential. The improvement for three atoms AB potential will be studied and further modified into torsional potential which are the ongoing current research.

  6. A new hydrocarbon empirical potential in angle bending calculation for the molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Tan Ai; Hoe, Yeak Su

    2014-07-10

    Typically, short range potential only depends on neighbouring atoms and its parameters function can be categorized into bond stretching, angle bending and bond rotation potential. In this paper, we present our work called Angle Bending (AB) potential, whereas AB potential is the extension of our previous work namely Bond Stretching (BS) potential. Basically, potential will tend to zero after truncated region, potential in specific region can be represented by different piecewise polynomial. We proposed the AB piecewise potential which is possible to solve a system involving three atoms. AB potential able to handle the potential of covalent bonds for three atoms as well as two atoms cases due to its degeneracy properties. Continuity for the piecewise polynomial has been enforced by coupling with penalty methods. There are still plenty of improvement spaces for this AB potential. The improvement for three atoms AB potential will be studied and further modified into torsional potential which are the ongoing current research.

  7. Interaction potential for aluminum nitride: a molecular dynamics study of mechanical and thermal properties of crystalline and amorphous aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Rino, Jose Pedro

    2011-01-01

    An effective interatomic interaction potential for AlN is proposed. The potential consists of two-body and three-body covalent interactions. The two-body potential includes steric repulsions due to atomic sizes, Coulomb interactions resulting from charge transfer between atoms, charge-induced dipole-interactions due to the electronic polarizability of ions, and induced dipole–dipole (van der Waals) interactions. The covalent characters of the Al–N–Al and N–Al–N bonds are described by the three-body potential. The proposed three-body interaction potential is a modification of the Stillinger–Weber form proposed to describe Si. Using the molecular dynamics method, the interaction potential is used to study structural, elastic, and dynamical properties of crystalline and amorphous states of AlN for several densities and temperatures. The structural energy for wurtzite (2H) structure has the lowest energy, followed zinc-blende and rock-salt (RS) structures. The pressure for the structural transformation from wurtzite-to-RS from the common tangent is found to be 24 GPa. For AlN in the wurtzite phase, our computed elastic constants ( C{sub 11} , C{sub 12} , C{sub 13} , C{sub 33} , C{sub 44} , and C{sub 66} ), melting temperature, vibrational density-of-states, and specific heat agree well with the experiments. Predictions are made for the elastic constant as a function of density for the crystalline and amorphous phase. Structural correlations, such as pair distribution function and neutron and x-ray static structure factors are calculated for the amorphous and liquid state.

  8. On computing stress in polymer systems involving multi-body potentials from molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yao E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu; Song, Jeong-Hoon E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu

    2014-08-07

    Hardy stress definition has been restricted to pair potentials and embedded-atom method potentials due to the basic assumptions in the derivation of a symmetric microscopic stress tensor. Force decomposition required in the Hardy stress expression becomes obscure for multi-body potentials. In this work, we demonstrate the invariance of the Hardy stress expression for a polymer system modeled with multi-body interatomic potentials including up to four atoms interaction, by applying central force decomposition of the atomic force. The balance of momentum has been demonstrated to be valid theoretically and tested under various numerical simulation conditions. The validity of momentum conservation justifies the extension of Hardy stress expression to multi-body potential systems. Computed Hardy stress has been observed to converge to the virial stress of the system with increasing spatial averaging volume. This work provides a feasible and reliable linkage between the atomistic and continuum scales for multi-body potential systems.

  9. Molecular modeling of hydrate-clathrates via ab initio, cell potential, and dynamic methods

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Brian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    High level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations were used to determine the intermolecular potential energy surface between argon and water, corrected for many- body interactions, to predict monovariant and invariant ...

  10. Molecular electrostatic potentials by systematic molecular fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, David M.; Collins, Michael A.

    2013-11-14

    A simple method is presented for estimating the molecular electrostatic potential in and around molecules using systematic molecular fragmentation. This approach estimates the potential directly from the electron density. The accuracy of the method is established for a set of organic molecules and ions. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by estimating the binding energy of a water molecule in an internal cavity in the protein ubiquitin.

  11. Cavities create a potential back door in epoxide hydrolase Rv1938 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Anitha; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causative organism of tuberculosis. Extensively drug resistant strains and latency have posed formidable challenges in the treatment of tuberculosis. The current study addresses an alpha/beta hydrolase fold bearing enzyme, epoxide hydrolase Rv1938 from Mtb. Epoxide hydrolases are involved in detoxification processes, catabolism and regulation of signaling molecules. Using GROMACS, a 100ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation was performed for Rv1938. Cavities were identified within the protein at various time frames of the simulation and their volumes were computed. During MD simulation, in addition to the substrate binding cavity, opening of two new cavities located behind the active site was observed. These cavities may be similar to the backdoor proposed for acetylcholinesterase. Structural superimposition of epoxide hydrolase from Mtb with the epoxide hydrolase of Agrobacterium radiobacter1 AD1 (Ephy) indicates that cavity1 in Mtb lies at an identical position to that of the water tunnel in Ephy. Further, docking of the substrate and an inhibitor with protein structures obtained from MD simulation at various time frames was also performed. The potential role of these cavities is discussed. PMID:26256802

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials on multiple GPUs—The implementation, package and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qing; Li, Min; Zhou, Yulu; Cui, Jiechao; Cui, Zhenguo; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is an important research tool extensively applied in materials science. Running MD on a graphics processing unit (GPU) is an attractive new approach for accelerating MD simulations. Currently, GPU implementations of MD usually run in a one-host-process-one-GPU (OHPOG) scheme. This scheme may pose a limitation on the system size that an implementation can handle due to the small device memory relative to the host memory. In this paper, we present a one-host-process-multiple-GPU (OHPMG) implementation of MD with embedded-atom-model or semi-empirical tight-binding many-body potentials. Because more device memory is available in an OHPMG process, the system size that can be handled is increased to a few million or more atoms. In comparison with the serial CPU implementation, in which Newton's third law is applied to improve the computational efficiency, our OHPMG implementation has achieved a 28.9x-86.0x speedup in double precision, depending on the system size, the cut-off ranges and the number of GPUs. The implementation can also handle a group of small simulation boxes in one run by combining the small boxes into a large box. This approach greatly improves the GPU computing efficiency when a large number of MD simulations for small boxes are needed for statistical purposes.

  13. Assessing the potential of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to probe reversible protein-protein recognition and binding

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein recognition and binding are governed by diffusion, noncovalent forces and conformational flexibility, entangled in a way that only molecular dynamics simulations can dissect at high resolution. Here we exploited ubiquitin’s noncovalent dimerization equilibrium to assess the potential of atomistic simulations to reproduce reversible protein-protein binding, by running submicrosecond simulations of systems with multiple copies of the protein at millimolar concentrations. The simulations essentially fail because they lead to aggregates, yet they reproduce some specificity in the binding interfaces as observed in known covalent and noncovalent ubiquitin dimers. Following similar observations in literature we hint at electrostatics and water descriptions as the main liable force field elements, and propose that their optimization should consider observables relevant to multi-protein systems and unfolded proteins. Within limitations, analysis of binding events suggests salient features of protein-protein recognition and binding, to be retested with improved force fields. Among them, that specific configurations of relative direction and orientation seem to trigger fast binding of two molecules, even over 50?Å distances; that conformational selection can take place within surface-to-surface distances of 10 to 40?Å i.e. well before actual intermolecular contact; and that establishment of contacts between molecules further locks their conformations and relative orientations. PMID:26023027

  14. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  15. Scalable Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP

    2005-06-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations enable the study of the time evolution of molecular systems by taking many small successive time steps under atomic forces that are calculated from a parameterized set of interaction functions. These are simple functions describing bonded and non-bonded atomic interactions, so that large molecular systems can be simulated for many time steps. The simulations provide energetic and kinetic properties in the form of statistical ensemble averages. The resulting trajectories can be analyzed for a variety of geometric and kinetic properties and correlations between them. These simulations have been carried out for many different systems, especially in computational biochemistry. NWChem is the computational chemistry software suite developed and maintained by the Molecular Sciences Software Group (MSSG) of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This software has been designed to run efficiently on a variety of massively parallel computer architectures, including distributed memory (e.g. IBM-SP, Linux clusters) and shared memory (e.g. CRAY-T3E) architectures. In NWChem the molecular dynamics simulations module is based on domain decomposition. This allows reduction of memory requirements through the distribution of data across many processors as well as reduction of communication requirements because to the locality of interactions in cut-off based atomic interaction lists. This type of decomposition does require sophisticated load balancing techniques to be implemented, however, because of the heterogeneity of biological systems. In NWChem we have implemented a combination of global and local load balancing techniques, resulting in a significant increase of the parallel scaling that can be achieved. In NWChem we use the AMBER force field with the GLYCAM extensions for simulations of saccharides.

  16. Interactive molecular dynamics

    E-print Network

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  17. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  18. Analysing the Effect of Mutation on Protein Function and Discovering Potential Inhibitors of CDK4: Molecular Modelling and Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    N, Nagasundaram; Zhu, Hailong; Liu, Jiming; V, Karthick; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)-cyclin D1 complex plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to S phase of the cell cycle. Among the CDKs, CDK4 is one of the genes most frequently affected by somatic genetic variations that are associated with various forms of cancer. Thus, because the abnormal function of the CDK4-cyclin D1 protein complex might play a vital role in causing cancer, CDK4 can be considered a genetically validated therapeutic target. In this study, we used a systematic, integrated computational approach to identify deleterious nsSNPs and predict their effects on protein-protein (CDK4-cyclin D1) and protein-ligand (CDK4-flavopiridol) interactions. This analysis resulted in the identification of possible inhibitors of mutant CDK4 proteins that bind the conformations induced by deleterious nsSNPs. Using computational prediction methods, we identified five nsSNPs as highly deleterious: R24C, Y180H, A205T, R210P, and R246C. From molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we observed that these deleterious nsSNPs affected CDK4-cyclin D1 and CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. Furthermore, in a virtual screening approach, the drug 5_7_DIHYDROXY_ 2_ (3_4_5_TRI HYDROXYPHENYL) _4H_CHROMEN_ 4_ONE displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations R24C or R246C, the drug diosmin displayed good binding affinity for the protein with the mutation Y180H, and the drug rutin displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations A205T and R210P. Overall, this computational investigation of the CDK4 gene highlights the link between genetic variation and biological phenomena in human cancer and aids in the discovery of molecularly targeted therapies for personalized treatment. PMID:26252490

  19. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shocked PETN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, Joanne; Thompson, Aidan P.; Zybin, Sergey V.

    2008-03-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of PETN crystals subjected to shock along the [100] direction. Using the reactive forcefield, ReaxFF, and the molecular dynamics code, GRASP, allows us to track the chemical reactions that occur as both a function of time and position. By simulating larger systems, we can observe the formation of both primary and secondary products to make comparisons with experiments. Composition profiles of these products will be shown along with profiles of stress, temperature, and potential energy.

  20. Appendix F Molecular Dynamics F.1 Introduction

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    269 Appendix F Molecular Dynamics F.1 Introduction In this chapter, we deal with the theories is the Lagrangian equation of motion d dt@L @ _qk = @L @qk F.1 where the Lagrangian function Lq; _q is de ned in terms of kinetic and potential energies L = K ,V F.2 F.2 NVE Dynamics For an isolated system, we have

  1. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two winning videos in a competition held at the meeting of the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics, held in Atlanta, Georgia, in November 1994. Of great interest was the result that in every shock there were a few high-speed precursor particles racing ahead of the shock, carrying information about its impending arrival. Most recently, Dr. Woo has been applying molecular dynamics techniques to the problem of determining the drag produced by the space station truss structure as it flies through the thin residual atmosphere of low-Earth orbit. This problem is made difficult by the complex structure of the truss and by the extreme supersonic nature of the flow. A fully filled section of the truss has already been examined, and drag predictions have been made. Molecular dynamics techniques promise to make realistic drag calculations possible even for very complex partially filled truss segments flying at arbitrary angles.

  2. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  3. QM/MM molecular dynamics study of the potential of mean force for the association of K{sup +} with dimethyl ether in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.A.

    1995-11-15

    We present a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics study of the free energy profile for the association of K{sup +} with dimethyl ether (DME) in H{sub 2}O. We calculate a potential of mean force and find a weak solvent separated ion-dipole pair (SSIDP) at 5.4 A separation and a contact ion-dipole (CIDP) free energy minimum at 2.7 A separation of the K{sup +} with the oxygen of DME. The latter distance agrees well with the gas-phase optimized K{sup +}/DME structure. This study demonstrates the nonadditive interactions of a solvated cation with a simple monodentate organic ligand. These results are useful for interpreting K{sup +} complexation by multidentate ligands, such as the crown ethers. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Configurational constant pressure molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Carlos; Travis, Karl P.

    2006-03-01

    We propose two new algorithms for generating isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics. The algorithms are based on an extended phase space dynamics where two extra degrees of freedom, representing the thermostat and the barostat, are included. These new methods adopt a totally different approach towards molecular dynamics simulation in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. They are fully configurational in the sense that only the particle positions are required in the control of the system temperature and pressure. Following on from the works of Delhommelle and Evans [Mol. Phys., 99, 1825 (2001)] and of Braga and Travis [J. Chem. Phys., 123, 134101 (2005)] concerning configurational canonical dynamics, these new algorithms can be seen as a natural extension to the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We have validated both of our new configurational isothermal-isobaric schemes by conducting molecular dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid and comparing the static and dynamic properties for a single state point. We find that both schemes generate similar results compared with schemes which use kinetic temperature and pressure control. We have also monitored the response of the system to a series of isothermal compressions and isobaric quenches. We find that the configurational schemes performed at least as well as the kinetic based scheme in bringing the system temperature and pressure into line with the set point values of these variables. These new methods will potentially play a significant role in simulations where the calculation of the kinetic temperature and pressure can be problematic. A well known example resides in the field of nonequilibrium simulations where the kinetic temperature and pressure require a knowledge of the streaming velocity of the fluid in order to calculate the true peculiar velocities (or momenta) that enter into their definitions. These are completely avoided by using our configurational thermostats and barostats, since these are independent of momenta. By extending the analysis of Kusnezov et al. [Ann. Phys., 204, 155 (1990)] in order to derive a set of generalized Nosé-Hoover equations of motion which can generate isothermal-isobaric dynamics in a number of different ways, we are able to show that both of our new configurational barostats and Hoover's kinetic isothermal-isobaric scheme are special cases of this more general set of equations. This generalization can be very powerful in generating constant pressure dynamics for a variety of systems.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of planar elongational flow in a nematic liquid crystal based on the Gay-Berne potential.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of planar elongational flow in a nematic liquid crystal model system based on the Gay-Berne fluid were undertaken by applying the SLLOD equations of motion with an elongational velocity field or strain rate. In order to facilitate the simulation, Kraynik-Reinelt periodic boundary conditions allowing arbitrarily long simulations were used. A Lagrangian constraint algorithm was utilized to fix the director at different angles relative to the elongation direction, so that the various pressure tensor elements could be calculated as a function of this angle. This made it possible to obtain accurate values of the shear viscosities which were found to agree with results previously obtained by shear flow simulations. The torque needed to fix the director at various angles relative to the elongation direction was evaluated in order to determine the stable orientation of the director, where this torque is equal to zero. This orientation was found to be parallel to the elongation direction. It was also noted that the irreversible entropy production was minimal when the director attained this orientation. Since the simulated system was rather large and fairly long simulation runs were undertaken it was also possible to study the cross coupling between the strain rate and the order tensor. It turned out to be very weak at low strain rates but at higher strain rates it could lead to break down of the liquid crystalline order. PMID:25523414

  6. A method to calculate redox potentials relative to the normal hydrogen electrode in nonaqueous solution by using density functional theory-based molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jono, Ryota; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-10-28

    We demonstrate the redox potential calculation relative to the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) in nonaqueous solution using a density functional theory-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulation. The calculation of the NHE in nonaqueous solution consists of two processes: the first step is the equilibrated simulation for a proton in nonaqueous solution to determine the space for inserting a proton in solution, and the second step is the thermodynamic integration method to calculate the solvation energy of the proton in the nonaqueous solution. In this work, we apply the method for a cation and an anion, i.e., copper(ii)/copper(i) and iodine/iodide in acetonitrile solution, and show that the errors in the calculated redox potential from experiments are within 0.21 V. PMID:26412242

  7. Communication: Rate coefficients of the H + CH4 ? H2 + CH3 reaction from ring polymer molecular dynamics on a highly accurate potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-09-14

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations are performed to calculate rate constants for the title reaction on the recently constructed potential energy surface based on permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) neural-network (NN) fitting [J. Li et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204302 (2015)]. By inspecting convergence, 16 beads are used in computing free-energy barriers at 300?K ? T ? 1000?K, while different numbers of beads are used for transmission coefficients. The present RPMD rates are in excellent agreement with quantum rates computed on the same potential energy surface, as well as with the experimental measurements, demonstrating further that the RPMD is capable of producing accurate rates for polyatomic chemical reactions even at rather low temperatures. PMID:26373990

  8. Potential-tuning molecular dynamics studies of fusion, and the question of ideal glassformers: (I) The Gay-Berne model

    E-print Network

    Vitaliy Kapko; Dmitry V. Matyushov; C. Austen Angell

    2011-06-07

    The ability of some liquids to vitrify during supercooling is usually seen as a consequence of the rates of crystal nucleation (and/or crystal growth) becoming small- thus a matter of kinetics. However there is evidence, dating back to the empirics of coal briquetting for maximum trucking efficiency, that ellipsoids pack efficiently when disordered. Noting that key studies of non-spherical object packing have never been followed from hard ellipsoids or spherocylinders (diatomics excepted) into the world of molecules with attractive forces, we have made a molecular dynamics MD study of crystal melting and glass formation on the Gay- Berne (G-B) model of ellipsoidal objects across the aspect ratio range of the hard ellipsoid studies. Here we report that, in the aspect ratio range of maximum ellipsoid packing efficiency, various G-B crystalline states, that cannot be obtained directly from the liquid, disorder spontaneously near 0 K and transform to liquids without any detectable enthalpy of fusion. Without claiming to have proved the existence of single component examples, we use the present observations, together with our knowledge of non-ideal mixing effects, to discuss the probable existence of "ideal glassformers" - single or multicomponent liquids that vitrify before ever becoming metastable with respect to crystals. The existence of crystal-free routes to the glassy state removes any precrystalline fluctuation perspective from the "glass problem". Unexpectedly we find that liquids with aspect ratios in the "crystallophobic" range also behave in an unusual (non-hysteritic) way during temperature cycling through the glass transition. We link this to the highly volume fraction-sensitive ("fragile") behavior observed in recent hard dumbbell studies at similar length/diameter ratios.

  9. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (???), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  10. CO{sub 2} isolated line shapes by classical molecular dynamics simulations: Influence of the intermolecular potential and comparison with new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larcher, G.; Tran, H. Schwell, M.; Chelin, P.; Landsheere, X.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Hu, S.-M.

    2014-02-28

    Room temperature absorption spectra of various transitions of pure CO{sub 2} have been measured in a broad pressure range using a tunable diode-laser and a cavity ring-down spectrometer, respectively, in the 1.6 ?m and 0.8 ?m regions. Their spectral shapes have been calculated by requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. From the time-dependent auto-correlation function of the molecular dipole, including Doppler and collisional effects, spectral shapes are directly computed without the use of any adjusted parameter. Analysis of the spectra calculated using three different anisotropic intermolecular potentials shows that the shapes of pure CO{sub 2} lines, in terms of both the Lorentz widths and non-Voigt effects, slightly depend on the used potential. Comparisons between these ab initio calculations and the measured spectra show satisfactory agreement for all considered transitions (from J = 6 to J = 46). They also show that non-Voigt effects on the shape of CO{sub 2} transitions are almost independent of the rotational quantum number of the considered lines.

  11. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6?-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6?-hydrogen abstraction and the 6?-d1-testosterone 6?-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  12. On quantum potential dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Struyve, Ward

    2015-01-01

    Non-relativistic de Broglie-Bohm theory describes particles moving under the guidance of the wave function. In de Broglie's original formulation, the particle dynamics is given by a first-order differential equation. In Bohm's reformulation, it is given by Newton's law of motion with an extra potential that depends on the wave function—the quantum potential—together with a constraint on the possible velocities. It was recently argued, mainly by numerical simulations, that relaxing this velocity constraint leads to a physically untenable theory. We provide further evidence for this by showing that for various wave functions the particles tend to escape the wave packet. In particular, we show that for a central classical potential and bound energy eigenstates the particle motion is often unbounded. This work seems particularly relevant for ways of simulating wave function evolution based on Bohm's formulation of the de Broglie-Bohm theory. Namely, the simulations may become unstable due to deviations from the velocity constraint.

  13. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  14. Surface Electrostatic Potential and Water Orientation in the presence of Sodium Octanoate Dilute Monolayers Studied by Means of Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Kalil; de Moura, André F

    2015-10-13

    A series of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the present investigation to assess the spontaneous formation of surfactant monolayers of sodium octanoate at the water-vacuum interface. The surfactant surface coverage increased until a saturation threshold was achieved, after which any further surfactant addition led to the formation of micellar aggregates within the solution. The saturated films were not densely packed, as might be expected for short-chained surfactants, and all films regardless of the surface coverage presented surfactant molecules with the same ordering pattern, namely, with the ionic heads toward the aqueous solution and the tails lying nearly parallel to the interface. The major contributions to the electrostatic surface potential came from the charged heads and the counterion distribution, which nearly canceled out each other. The balance between the oppositely charged ions rendered the electrostatic contributions from water meaningful, amounting to ca. 10% of the contributions arising from the ionic species. And even the aliphatic tails, whose atoms bear relatively small partial atomic charges as compared to the polar molecules and molecular fragments, contributed with ca. 20% of the total electrostatic surface potential of the systems under investigation. Although the aliphatic tails were not so orderly arranged as in a compact film, the C-H bonds assumed a preferential orientation, leading to an increased contribution to the electrostatic properties of the interface. The most prominent feature arising from the partitioning of the electrostatic potential into individual contributions was the long-range ordering of the water molecules. This ordering of the water molecules produced a repulsive dipole-dipole interaction between the two interfaces, which increased with the surface coverage. Only for a water layer wider than 10 nm was true bulk behavior observed, and the repulsive dipole-dipole interaction faded away. PMID:26393372

  15. Time-reversible ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Tymczak, C. J.; Challacombe, Matt

    2007-04-01

    Time-reversible ab initio molecular dynamics based on a lossless multichannel decomposition for the integration of the electronic degrees of freedom [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 123001 (2006)] is explored. The authors present a lossless time-reversible density matrix molecular dynamics scheme. This approach often allows for stable Hartree-Fock simulations using only one single self-consistent field cycle per time step. They also present a generalization, introducing an additional "forcing" term, that in a special case includes a hybrid Lagrangian, i.e., Car-Parrinello-type, method, which can systematically be constrained to the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface by using an increasing number of self-consistency cycles in the nuclear force calculations. Furthermore, in analog to the reversible and symplectic leapfrog or velocity Verlet schemes, where not only the position but also the velocity is propagated, the authors propose a Verlet-type density velocity formalism for time-reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

  16. Modeling Molecular Dynamics from Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichs, Nina Singhal

    2009-01-28

    Many important processes in biology occur at the molecular scale. A detailed understanding of these processes can lead to significant advances in the medical and life sciences. For example, many diseases are caused by protein aggregation or misfolding. One approach to studying these systems is to use physically-based computational simulations to model the interactions and movement of the molecules. While molecular simulations are computationally expensive, it is now possible to simulate many independent molecular dynamics trajectories in a parallel fashion by using super- or distributed- computing methods such as Folding@Home or Blue Gene. The analysis of these large, high-dimensional data sets presents new computational challenges. In this seminar, I will discuss a novel approach to analyzing large ensembles of molecular dynamics trajectories to generate a compact model of the dynamics. This model groups conformations into discrete states and describes the dynamics as Markovian, or history-independent, transitions between the states. I will discuss why the Markovian state model (MSM) is suitable for macromolecular dynamics, and how it can be used to answer many interesting and relevant questions about the molecular system. I will also discuss many of the computational and statistical challenges in building such a model, such as how to appropriately cluster conformations, determine the statistical reliability, and efficiently design new simulations.

  17. Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Infrared Spectra of Crystalline Vitamin C with Analysis of Double Minimum Proton Potentials for Medium-Strong Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Brela, Mateusz Z; Wójcik, Marek J; Boczar, Marek; Witek, ?ukasz; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-06-25

    We studied proton dynamics of a hydrogen bonds of the crystalline l-ascorbic acid. Our approach was based on the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The focal point of our study was simulation of the infrared spectra of l-ascorbic acid associated with the O-H stretching modes that are very sensitive to the strength of hydrogen bonding. In the l-ascorbic acid there are four kinds of hydrogen bonds. We calculated their spectra by using anharmonic approximation and the time course of the dipole moment function as obtained from the Car-Parrinello simulation. The quantization of the nuclear motion of the protons was made to perform detailed analysis of strength and properties of hydrogen bonds. We presented double minimum proton potentials with small value of barriers for medium-strong hydrogen bonds. We have also shown the difference character of medium-strong hydrogen bonds compared to weaker hydrogen bonds in the l-ascorbic acid. PMID:26028251

  18. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular February 25, 2003 In ab initio molecular dynamics, whenever information about the potential energy surface advances for both approaches are discussed. Key Words : Ab initio molecular dynamics, Direct classical

  19. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel regulatory protein whose binding to free Ni++ increases its binding affinity for a nickel transporter gene. Three forms of the Pyrococcus Horikoshii species of NikR were simulated including two apo-forms and one nickel-bound form. A quantum-mechanics-based force field parameterization was required to accurately represent the four nickel-centers in the holo-form. Extensive analysis of the three 100-ns-long trajectories was performed.

  20. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-01

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the ?(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the Fe?CH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions. PMID:24692252

  1. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

  2. MOLECULAR PACKING AND NPT-MOLECULAR DYNAMICS INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFERABILITY OF THE RDX INTERMOLECULAR POTENTIAL TO 2,4,6,8,1O,12- HEXANITROHEXAAZAISOWURTZITANE (HNIW)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have explored the degree to which an intermolecular potential for the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-s-triazine (RDX) is transferable for predictions of crystal structures (within the approximation of rigid molecules) of a similar chemical system,in this case, polymo...

  3. Ion Permeation through a Narrow Channel: Using Gramicidin to Ascertain All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Potential of Mean Force Methodology and Biomolecular Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Toby W.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Roux, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    We investigate methods for extracting the potential of mean force (PMF) governing ion permeation from molecular dynamics simulations (MD) using gramicidin A as a prototypical narrow ion channel. It is possible to obtain well-converged meaningful PMFs using all-atom MD, which predict experimental observables within order-of-magnitude agreement with experimental results. This was possible by careful attention to issues of statistical convergence of the PMF, finite size effects, and lipid hydrocarbon chain polarizability. When comparing the modern all-atom force fields of CHARMM27 and AMBER94, we found that a fairly consistent picture emerges, and that both AMBER94 and CHARMM27 predict observables that are in semiquantitative agreement with both the experimental conductance and dissociation coefficient. Even small changes in the force field, however, result in significant changes in permeation energetics. Furthermore, the full two-dimensional free-energy surface describing permeation reveals the location and magnitude of the central barrier and the location of two binding sites for K+ ion permeation near the channel entrance—i.e., an inner site on-axis and an outer site off-axis. We conclude that the MD-PMF approach is a powerful tool for understanding and predicting the function of narrow ion channels in a manner that is consistent with the atomic and thermally fluctuating nature of proteins. PMID:16500984

  4. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-23

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results. PMID:26658834

  5. Mapping molecular dynamics computations to hypercubes 

    E-print Network

    Lakamsani, Vamsee Krishna

    1993-01-01

    This thesis proposes an approach for systematic modeling, mapping and performance analysis of a Grand Challenge application problem in computational biology called Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Proteins. Molecular Dynamics (MD) is an important...

  6. Viscosity calculations at molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirova, E. M.; Norman, G. E.

    2015-11-01

    Viscosity and diffusion are chosen as an example to demonstrate the universality of diagnostics methods in the molecular dynamics method. To emphasize the universality, three diverse systems are investigated, which differ from each other drastically: liquids with embedded atom method and pairwise interatomic interaction potentials and dusty plasma with a unique multiparametric interparticle interaction potential. Both the Einstein-Helfand and Green-Kubo relations are used. Such a particular process as glass transition is analysed at the simulation of the aluminium melt. The effect of the dust particle charge fluctuation is considered. The results are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Sampling of Organic Solutes in Aqueous and Heterogeneous Environments Using Oscillating Excess Chemical Potentials in Grand Canonical-like Monte Carlo-Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Solute sampling of explicit bulk-phase aqueous environments in grand canonical (GC) ensemble simulations suffer from poor convergence due to low insertion probabilities of the solutes. To address this, we developed an iterative procedure involving Grand Canonical-like Monte Carlo (GCMC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Each iteration involves GCMC of both the solutes and water followed by MD, with the excess chemical potential (?ex) of both the solute and the water oscillated to attain their target concentrations in the simulation system. By periodically varying the ?ex of the water and solutes over the GCMC-MD iterations, solute exchange probabilities and the spatial distributions of the solutes improved. The utility of the oscillating-?ex GCMC-MD method is indicated by its ability to approximate the hydration free energy (HFE) of the individual solutes in aqueous solution as well as in dilute aqueous mixtures of multiple solutes. For seven organic solutes: benzene, propane, acetaldehyde, methanol, formamide, acetate, and methylammonium, the average ?ex of the solutes and the water converged close to their respective HFEs in both 1 M standard state and dilute aqueous mixture systems. The oscillating-?ex GCMC methodology is also able to drive solute sampling in proteins in aqueous environments as shown using the occluded binding pocket of the T4 lysozyme L99A mutant as a model system. The approach was shown to satisfactorily reproduce the free energy of binding of benzene as well as sample the functional group requirements of the occluded pocket consistent with the crystal structures of known ligands bound to the L99A mutant as well as their relative binding affinities. PMID:24932136

  8. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  9. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference.

  10. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  11. The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a molecular dynamics simulator that employs ping-pong balls as the atoms or molecules and is suitable for either large lecture halls or small classrooms. Discusses its use in illustrating many of the fundamental concepts related to molecular motion and dynamics and providing a three-dimensional perspective of molecular motion. (JRH)

  12. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  13. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaofan Tong, Qi

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  14. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofan; Tong, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  15. Protein-Folding Dynamics: Overview of Molecular

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Protein-Folding Dynamics: Overview of Molecular Simulation Techniques Harold A. Scheraga, Mey models, force fields Abstract Molecular dynamics (MD) is an invaluable tool with which to study protein folding in silico. Although just a few years ago the dynamic be- havior of a protein molecule could

  16. Jamming phase diagram of colloidal dispersions by molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Jamming phase diagram of colloidal dispersions by molecular dynamics simulations Anil Kumar report a three-dimensional jamming phase diagram of a model colloidal system obtained from molecular­Verwey­Overbeek potential. The jamming threshold is uniquely defined in terms of the critical volume fraction, the critical

  17. Potential energy hypersurface and molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko?a, Jaroslav

    1993-02-01

    The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational potential energy(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, energy level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.

  18. An optimized replica exchange molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2009-02-21

    We introduce a new way to perform swaps between replicas in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The method is based on a generalized canonical probability distribution function and flattens the potential of mean force along the temperature coordinate, such that a random walk in temperature space is achieved. Application to a Go model of protein A showed that the method is more efficient than conventional replica exchange. The method results in a constant probability distribution of the replicas over the thermostats, yields a minimum round-trip time between extremum temperatures, and leads to faster ergodic convergence. PMID:19239315

  19. Potential formulation of sleep dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. J. K.; Robinson, P. A.

    2009-02-01

    A physiologically based model of the mechanisms that control the human sleep-wake cycle is formulated in terms of an equivalent nonconservative mechanical potential. The potential is analytically simplified and reduced to a quartic two-well potential, matching the bifurcation structure of the original model. This yields a dynamics-based model that is analytically simpler and has fewer parameters than the original model, allowing easier fitting to experimental data. This model is first demonstrated to semiquantitatively match the dynamics of the physiologically based model from which it is derived, and is then fitted directly to a set of experimentally derived criteria. These criteria place rigorous constraints on the parameter values, and within these constraints the model is shown to reproduce normal sleep-wake dynamics and recovery from sleep deprivation. Furthermore, this approach enables insights into the dynamics by direct analogies to phenomena in well studied mechanical systems. These include the relation between friction in the mechanical system and the timecourse of neurotransmitter action, and the possible relation between stochastic resonance and napping behavior. The model derived here also serves as a platform for future investigations of sleep-wake phenomena from a dynamical perspective.

  20. Molecular modeling, docking and dynamics simulations of GNA-related lectins for potential prevention of influenza virus (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Xu, Huai-long; Li, Chun-yang; He, Xue-mei; Niu, Ke-qin; Peng, Hao; Li, Wen-wen; Zhou, Cheng-cheng; Bao, Jin-ku

    2012-01-01

    The Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family exhibit significant anti-HIV and anti-HSV properties that are closely related to their carbohydrate-binding activities. However, there is still no conclusive evidence that GNA-related lectins possess anti-influenza properties. The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus is a surface protein that is involved in binding host cell sialic acid during the early stages of infection. Herein, we studied the 3D-QSARs (three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships) of lectin- and HA-sialic acid by molecular modeling. The affinities and stabilities of lectin- and HA-sialic acid complexes were also assessed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, anti-influenza GNA-related lectins that possess stable conformations and higher binding affinities for sialic acid than HAs of human influenza virus were screened, and a possible mechanism was proposed. Accordingly, our results indicate that some GNA-related lectins, such as Yucca filamentosa lectin and Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin, could act as drugs that prevent influenza virus infection via competitive binding. In conclusion, the GNA-related lectin family may be helpful in the design of novel candidate agents for preventing influenza A infection through the use of competitive combination against sialic acid specific viral infection. PMID:21445708

  1. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi

    This dissertation is focused on multimillion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale materials. In the past decade, nanoscale materials have made significant commercial impacts, which will potentially lead to the next industrial revolution. The interest lies in the novel and promising features nanoscale materials exhibit due to their confined sizes. However, not all novel behaviors are understood or controllable. Many uncontrollable parameters, e.g. defects and dangling bonds, are known to hinder the performance of nanodevices. Solutions to these problems rely on our understanding of fundamental elements in nanoscience: isolated individual nanostructures and their assemblies. In this dissertation, we will address atomistic foundations of several problems of technological importance in nanoscience. Specifically, three basic problems are discussed: (1) embrittlement of nanocrystalline metal; (2) novel thermo-mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs); and (3) planar defect generation in NWs. With a scalable algorithm implemented on massively parallel computing platforms and various data mining methods, MD simulations can provide valuable insights into these problems. An essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel was recently discovered experimentally, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Our MD simulations reveal that the large steric size of sulfur impurity causes strong sulfur-sulfur interaction mediated by lattice distortion, which leads to amorphization near the percolation threshold at the sulfur-sulfur network in nickel crystal. The generality of the mechanism due to the percolation of an impurity network is further confirmed by a model binary system. In our study of novel behaviors of semiconductor NWs, MD simulations construct a rich size-temperature `phase diagram' for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, novel transitions are found from brittle cleavage to structural transformation-mediated brittle cleavage to ductile failure. Atomistic mechanisms of the unique nano-thermo-mechanical behavior are elucidated as a consequence of surface-structural relaxation, which in particular predicts spontaneous formation of a core/shell structure under tension. The phase diagram resolves controversies between previous experiments and theory, and the predicted `intrinsic' core/shell structure may find novel device applications. Generation of stacking faults (SFs) during the growth of NWs is a major concern for the efficiency of NW-based devices such as solar cells. MD simulation of a [111]-oriented gallium arsenide NW reveals an atomistic mechanism of SF generation. Spatial distribution of the adatom energy on the (111)B top surface exhibits a novel core/shell structure due to the contraction of atomic bonds at the sidewall surfaces, where SFs are preferentially nucleated in the shell. A nucleation growth model incorporating the core/shell mechanism suggests a size and growth-condition controlled approach for SF-free growth of NWs.

  3. Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Solvation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Keun

    A potential energy surface was constructed for the triatomic molecule Li_2H using a semiempirical method akin to the diatomics-in-molecules theory. Valence bond configurations were chosen to include the major ionic contributions in the ground state potential energy. Quasiclassical trajectories were run on this potential energy surface. The results of these calculations are shown to be generally in accord with the experimental investigations of analogous reactions of H atoms with bigger alkali dimer molecules. Certain aspects of chemical reaction dynamics which have been largely overlooked were examined. These involve correlations of vector properties in chemical reactions. Specifically, the strong correlation between orbital and rotational angular momenta in the product channel of this reaction was shown to be the reason for a seemingly contradictory set of distributions of different angles. Gas phase solvation of nucleic acid base molecules was studied using clusters produced by supersonic expansion. Relative stabilities of the species with different numbers of solvent molecules were studied by varying the expansion conditions. The ionization potentials were measured as a function of the number of solvent molecules. Rather distinct effects of hydration were observed for the ionization potentials of adenine and thymine.

  4. Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: Molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: Molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations t The orientation dependent plasticity in metal nanowires is investigated using molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the orientation of single crystal metal

  5. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show thatmore »the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.« less

  6. Using Molecular Dynamics to quantify the electrical double layer and examine the potential for its direct observation in the in-situ TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, David A.; Mehdi, Beata L.; Hatchell, Hanna J.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-03-25

    Understanding the fundamental processes taking place at the electrode-electrolyte interface in batteries will play a key role in the development of next generation energy storage technologies. One of the most fundamental aspects of the electrode-electrolyte interface is the electrical double layer (EDL). Given the recent development of high spatial resolution in-situ electrochemical cells for scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), there now exists the possibility that we can directly observe the formation and dynamics of the EDL. In this paper we predict electrolyte structure within the EDL using classical models and atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations show that the classical models fail to accurately reproduce concentration profiles that exist within the electrolyte. It is thus suggested that MD must be used in order to accurately predict STEM images of the electrode-electrolyte interface. Using MD and image simulations together for a high contrast electrolyte (the high atomic number CsCl electrolyte), it is determined that, for a smooth interface, concentration profiles within the EDL should be visible experimentally. When normal experimental parameters such as rough interfaces and low-Z electrolytes (like those used in Li-ion batteries) are considered, observation of the EDL appears to be more difficult.

  7. Error in the invariant measure of numerical discretization schemes for canonical sampling of molecular dynamics 

    E-print Network

    Matthews, Charles

    2013-11-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) computations aim to simulate materials at the atomic level by approximating molecular interactions classically, relying on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and semi-empirical potential energy ...

  8. Molecular dynamics at constant pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1983-12-01

    Methods are discussed for generating by molecular dynamics isobaric-isoenthalpic, NPH, isochoric-isothermal, NVT, and isobaric-isothermal, NPT, ensembles. Andersen's constant-pressure method is reformulated so that the ensemble rather than the scaled system is directly calculated. Four constant-temperature schemes were considered. Two involve the addition of a stochastic collision term to the molecular trajectories. The Andersen method and a stochastic dynamics approach were examined. The latter employed a velocity damping term in addition to the random force. Two other methods employed uniform velocity scaling applied to all molecules. The NPT algorithm induces a transition to the dilute phase for a Lennard-Jones fluid in the spinodal region ( p* = 0.5, T* = 1.28) of the phase diagram. The thermodynamic equivalence of the ensembles is demonstrated by long calculations of the chemical potential of Lennard-Jones states by the particle insertion method. The internal energy, pressure, constant volume and pressure specific heats, adiabatic compressibilities, pair radial distribution functions and self-diffusion coefficients are also evaluated. Only for second-order thermodynamic quantities is there evidence of an ensemble dependence.

  9. Molecular dynamics in amorphous ergocalciferol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Sahra; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2014-04-01

    While developing new pharmaceutical products based on drug substances in their amorphous form, the molecular mobility of amorphous active ingredients have to be characterized in detail. The molecular mobility in the supercooled liquid and glassy states of ergocalciferol is studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy over wide frequency and temperature ranges. Dielectric studies revealed a number of relaxation process of different molecular origin.

  10. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  11. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Alexander

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) techniques are uniquely suited for simulating sonoluminescing bubbles, thanks to the bubbles' small size. Unlike hydrodynamic methods, MD does not assume local thermodynamic equilibrium, neither does it require knowledge of equation of state and transport properties at high pressures and temperatures. Full-scale MD simulations of experimentally observable bubbles, however, are still too expensive computationally. A symmetry reduction technique that makes use of the bubble's spherical symmetry is proposed. This technique is shown to be capable of manifold reduction of the machine time required to simulate a bubble collapse, while the few artifacts introduced by it are carefully analyzed. The model developed is then applied to a variety of experimentally observed bubbles, in particular to a class of "extreme" bubbles with collapse ratios of around 25:1. It is shown that different noble gases exhibit vastly different behaviors under such conditions, largely explained by the difference in the speed of sound at a given temperature. Heavier gases generate strong shock waves and reach much higher temperatures than lighter gases. However if a small amount of lighter gas is added to the heavier gas, the two gases will segregate, often completely, during the final stage of the collapse, resulting in the lighter gas being trapped in the center of the bubble and heating up to temperatures by several orders of magnitude exceeding those attained with the lighter gas alone. While the simulations presented in this work constitute an approach to a well defined mathematical problem they have been carried out with goal of gaining insight into a real phenomenon: light emission from a rapidly collapsing bubble of gas. In this process---sonoluminescence---acoustic energy density concentrates by at least 12 orders of magnitude to generate picosecond flashes of ultraviolet light. The simulations in this dissertation are aimed at explaining and predicting the experimental parameters which could lead to even greater levels of energy focusing in these bubbly systems.

  14. Hydration dynamics in water clusters via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Turi, László

    2014-05-28

    We have investigated the hydration dynamics in size selected water clusters with n = 66, 104, 200, 500, and 1000 water molecules using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the most fundamental aspects of relaxation phenomena in clusters, we choose one of the simplest, still realistic, quantum mechanically treated test solute, an excess electron. The project focuses on the time evolution of the clusters following two processes, electron attachment to neutral equilibrated water clusters and electron detachment from an equilibrated water cluster anion. The relaxation dynamics is significantly different in the two processes, most notably restoring the equilibrium final state is less effective after electron attachment. Nevertheless, in both scenarios only minor cluster size dependence is observed. Significantly different relaxation patterns characterize electron detachment for interior and surface state clusters, interior state clusters relaxing significantly faster. This observation may indicate a potential way to distinguish surface state and interior state water cluster anion isomers experimentally. A comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium trajectories suggests that linear response theory breaks down for electron attachment at 200 K, but the results converge to reasonable agreement at higher temperatures. Relaxation following electron detachment clearly belongs to the linear regime. Cluster relaxation was also investigated using two different computational models, one preferring cavity type interior states for the excess electron in bulk water, while the other simulating non-cavity structure. While the cavity model predicts appearance of several different hydrated electron isomers in agreement with experiment, the non-cavity model locates only cluster anions with interior excess electron distribution. The present simulations show that surface isomers computed with the cavity predicting potential show similar dynamical behavior to the interior clusters of the non-cavity type model. Relaxation associated with cavity collapse presents, however, unique dynamical signatures.

  15. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  16. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  17. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  19. Protein dynamics: Moore's law in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-01-25

    The millisecond barrier has been broken in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins. Such simulations are increasingly revealing the inner workings of biological systems by generating atomic-level descriptions of their behaviour that make testable predictions about key molecular processes. PMID:21256436

  20. Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong Laser Fields Bishnu Thapa and H surfaces of methanol neutral, monocation, and singlet and triplet dication were explored using the CBS in the presence of a 2.9 × 1014 W/cm2 800 nm laser field for methanol monocation on the ground state potential

  1. Acoustically induced dynamic potential dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotz, J. A. H.; Alsina, F.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2005-02-01

    Mobile potential dots (dynamic dots, DDs) formed by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are used to transport photogenerated electrons and holes in GaAs quantum wells (QWs). We investigate the interaction between the transported carriers and microscopic trap centers in the QW plane using spatially and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The carriers recombine at the trap site emitting short (width ?0.6 ns) light pulses at a repetition rate corresponding to the SAW frequency. The dependence of the PL intensity from the traps on the number of carriers transported per DD n exhibits a well-defined, distinct plateau for n in the range from 5-20, which is attributed to the emission of a well-defined number of photons.

  2. 1. Deterministic Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Molecular Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-print Network

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Molecular Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.1 Microcanonical Ensemble Molecular Dynamics . . . . . . 13 1.1.2 Canonical Ensemble Molecular Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.1.3 Isothermal-Isobaric Knsemble Molecular Dynamics . . . 25 1.2 Density Functional Method

  3. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  5. A Review of Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Paul E. Grabowski

    2014-08-09

    Warm dense matter systems created in the laboratory are highly dynamical. In such cases electron dynamics is often needed to accurately simulate the evolution and properties of the system. Large systems force one to make simple approximations enabling computationally feasibility. Wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) provides a simple framework for simulating time-dependent quantum plasmas. Here, this method is reviewed. The different variants of WPMD are shown and compared and their validity is discussed.

  6. A Review of Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Grabowski, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    Warm dense matter systems created in the laboratory are highly dynamical. In such cases electron dynamics is often needed to accurately simulate the evolution and properties of the system. Large systems force one to make simple approximations enabling computationally feasibility. Wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) provides a simple framework for simulating time-dependent quantum plasmas. Here, this method is reviewed. The different variants of WPMD are shown and compared and their validity is discussed.

  7. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to choose include Euler (if only for demonstration purposes), Verlet and Velocity Verlet, Leapfrog and Beeman, among others. Electrostatic forces are treated as another potential function, by default using the plug-in implementing the Ewald summation method. Program summaryProgram title: LPMD Catalogue identifier: AEHG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHG_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 509 490 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 814 754 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: 32-bit and 64-bit workstation Operating system: UNIX RAM: Minimum 1024 bytes Classification: 7.7 External routines: zlib, OpenGL Nature of problem: Study of Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of condensed matter systems, as well as kinetics of non-equilibrium processes in the same systems. Solution method: Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method, Monte Carlo methods. Restrictions: Rigid molecules are not supported. Polarizable atoms and chemical bonds (proteins) either. Unusual features: The program is able to change the temperature of the simulation cell, the pressure, cut regions of the cell, color the atoms by properties, even during the simulation. It is also possible to fix the positions and/or velocity of groups of atoms. Visualization of atoms and some physical properties during the simulation. Additional comments: The program does not only perform molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, it is also able to filter and manipulate atomic configurations, read and write different file formats, convert between them, evaluate different structural and dynamical properties. Running time: 50 seconds on a 1000-step simulation of 4000 argon atoms, running on a single 2.67 GHz Intel processor.

  8. ``Ideal glassformers'' vs ``ideal glasses'': Studies of crystal-free routes to the glassy state by ``potential tuning'' molecular dynamics, and laboratory calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapko, Vitaliy; Zhao, Zuofeng; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Austen Angell, C.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of some liquids to vitrify during supercooling is usually seen as a consequence of the rates of crystal nucleation (and/or crystal growth) becoming small [D. R. Uhlmann, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 7, 337 (1972), 10.1016/0022-3093(72)90269-4] - and thus a matter of kinetics. However, there is evidence dating back to the empirics of coal briquetting for maximum trucking efficiency [D. Frenkel, Physics 3, 37 (2010), 10.1103/Physics.3.37] that some object shapes find little advantage in self-assembly to ordered structures - meaning random packings prevail. Noting that key studies of non-spherical object packing have never been followed from hard ellipsoids [A. Donev, F. H. Stillinger, P. M. Chaikin, and S. Torquato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255506 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.255506; A. Donev, I. Cisse, D. Sachs, E. A. Variano, F. H. Stillinger, R. Connelly, S. Torquato, and P. M. Chaikin, Science 303, 990 (2004), 10.1126/science.1093010] or spherocylinders [S. R. Williams and A. P. Philipse, Phys. Rev. E 67, 051301 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevE.67.051301] (diatomics excepted [S.-H. Chong, A. J. Moreno, F. Sciortino, and W. Kob, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 215701 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.215701] into the world of molecules with attractive forces, we have made a molecular dynamics study of crystal melting and glass formation on the Gay-Berne (G-B) model of ellipsoidal objects [J. G. Gay and B. J. Berne, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 3316 (1981), 10.1063/1.441483] across the aspect ratio range of the hard ellipsoid studies. Here, we report that in the aspect ratio range of maximum ellipsoid packing efficiency, various G-B crystalline states that cannot be obtained directly from the liquid, disorder spontaneously near 0 K and transform to liquids without any detectable enthalpy of fusion. Without claiming to have proved the existence of single component examples, we use the present observations, together with our knowledge of non-ideal mixing effects, to discuss the probable existence of "ideal glassformers" - single or multicomponent liquids that vitrify before ever becoming metastable with respect to crystals. We find evidence that "ideal glassformer" systems might also be highly fragile systems, approaching the "ideal glass" condition. We link this to the high "volume fragility" behavior observed in recent hard dumbbell studies at similar length/diameter ratios [R. Zhang and K. S. Schweitzer, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 104902 (2010), 10.1063/1.3483601]. The discussion suggests some unusual systems for laboratory study. Using differential scanning calorimetry detection of fusion points Tm, liquidus temperatures Tl, and glass transition temperatures Tg, we describe a system that would seem incapable of crystallizing before glass transition, i.e., an "ideal glassformer." The existence of crystal-free routes to the glassy state will eliminate precrystalline fluctuations as a source of the dynamic heterogeneities that are generally considered important in the discussion of the "glassy state problem [P. W. Anderson, Science 267, 1615 (1995), 10.1126/science.267.5204.1615-e]."

  9. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian Method for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reacting Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Bass, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general these potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new noholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted model parameters. Example applications of the method show molecular level shock to detonation simulations in nitromethane and RDX. Research supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  10. Histone H2A (H2A.X and H2A.Z) Variants in Molluscs: Molecular Characterization and Potential Implications For Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    González-Romero, Rodrigo; Rivera-Casas, Ciro; Frehlick, Lindsay J.; Méndez, Josefina; Ausió, Juan; Eirín-López, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Histone variants are used by the cell to build specialized nucleosomes, replacing canonical histones and generating functionally specialized chromatin domains. Among many other processes, the specialization imparted by histone H2A (H2A.X and H2A.Z) variants to the nucleosome core particle constitutes the earliest response to DNA damage in the cell. Consequently, chromatin-based genotoxicity tests have been developed in those cases where enough information pertaining chromatin structure and dynamics is available (i.e., human and mouse). However, detailed chromatin knowledge is almost absent in most organisms, specially protostome animals. Molluscs (which represent sentinel organisms for the study of pollution) are not an exception to this lack of knowledge. In the present work we first identified the existence of functionally differentiated histone H2A.X and H2A.Z variants in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z), a marine organism widely used in biomonitoring programs. Our results support the functional specialization of these variants based on: a) their active expression in different tissues, as revealed by the isolation of native MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z proteins in gonad and hepatopancreas; b) the evolutionary conservation of different residues encompassing functional relevance; and c) their ability to confer specialization to nucleosomes, as revealed by nucleosome reconstitution experiments using recombinant MgH2A.X and MgH2A.Z histones. Given the seminal role of these variants in maintaining genomic integrity and regulating gene expression, their preliminary characterization opens up new potential applications for the future development of chromatin-based genotoxicity tests in pollution biomonitoring programs. PMID:22253857

  11. Molecular dynamic simulation of Fe nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kien, P. H.; Hung, P. K.; Thao, N. T.

    2015-11-01

    Fe nanoparticles have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation. The nucleation and crystal growth is analyzed through the potential energy and number of different types of atoms. The simulation shows that when the amorphous sample is annealed at 900 K, it is crystallized into bcc phase. We found that as the crystal cluster has a size larger than some critical value, the mean potential energy of different types of atoms decreases in following orders: amorphous-atom ? surface-crystal atom ? crystal-atom. As a result, the crystal cluster is stable and tends to have a nearly spherical shape. Further, it was shown that small nuclei form frequently in the core and rarely in the surface area. After a long annealing time a cluster expands and reaches the critical radius. Then this cluster grows exponentially with times. The fully crystallized sample consists of the core with crystalline structure and surface shell with amorphous porous structure. The Fe nanoparticle has a number of polymorphs which are stable upon annealing at 300 K. We have analyzed the pair radial distribution function (PRDF) for obtained polymorphs. We found that as the fraction of crystal-atoms is less than 0.18, the PRDF is like those of amorphous metal. However, the left sub-peak is higher than right sub-peak when the fraction of crystal-atoms is less than 0.05.

  12. Dynamic Classification of Defect Structures in Molecular Dynamics Simulation Data

    E-print Network

    Wilkins, John

    . In our prior work [12, 13, 14] we presented techniques for defect detection. Here, we present a two defect evolution, interactions and aggregation. The key challenges are: i) to detect defects; iiDynamic Classification of Defect Structures in Molecular Dynamics Simulation Data Sameep Mehta

  13. Molecular dynamics investigations of protein volumetric properties and electronic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Daren Mackay

    Several theoretical and molecular dynamics investigations. of chemical and biological processes in solution are described. First, a statistical mechanical methodology is developed for evaluating excess volumetric properties of solvation. This methodology makes it possible to analyze volumetric properties in terms of the hydration shell model of solvation. The usefulness of the maximum entropy method for dealing with simulations with which significant statistical error is associated is explored. Second, this methodology is used to isolate additive contributions to the partial molar compressibilities of alcohols in aqueous solution. The magnitude of methyl and hydroxyl group contributions for methanol and ethanol are found to be the same for both solutes within statistical error. Further, the effect of each functional group on the solvent is found to be localized in the vicinity of that functional group, explaining the apparent independence of functional group contributions observed experimentally by other workers. For the potential functions employed, compressibilities calculated via classical molecular dynamics simulations are in best agreement with experiments performed at temperatures higher than those at which the simulations are performed. Finally , the effect of electronic decoherence on electron transfer rates in blue copper proteins is investigated. Electronic decoherence occurs as nuclear trajectories corresponding to alternative electronic states diverge from one another, and higher decoherence rates correspond to reduced direct electron transfer rates. A very short characteristic decoherence time of 2.4 fs is obtained for direct electron transfer between metal centers in ruthenated azurin. Protons in the aqueous solvent molecules have a large effect on the decoherence rate, underscoring the importance of treating the solvent molecules explicitly.

  14. Shell-model molecular dynamics calculations of modified silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilocca, Antonio; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Cormack, Alastair N.

    2006-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of pure silica, sodium silicate, and soda-lime silicate glasses have been carried out using a developed potential that includes polarization effects through the shell model (SM). The potential has been validated using available experimental and ab initio structural data, such as density, radial and angular distributions, coordination environments, and network connectivity. In addition, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations of the soda-lime silicate glass have been carried out to obtain reference data for this system. The performances of the SM and of a rigid-ion potential have been compared with experimental and ab initio data, showing that the inclusion of polarization effects improves the description of the intertetrahedral structure and of the local environment surrounding modifier Na and Ca cations; significant improvements are also obtained in the Qn distribution of the sodium silicate glass. This shows that the inclusion of polarization effects in the potential, even at the approximate level of the shell model, is essential for a reliable modeling of modified bulk glasses. Moreover, the accurate reproduction of the glass density and the direct representation of polarization effects are important requisites that should enable the application of the potential to molecular dynamics simulations of modified glass surfaces.

  15. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  16. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  17. Quantum molecular Dynamics Ronnie Kosloff

    E-print Network

    Kosloff, Ronnie

    demolition if Monotonic Energy Change #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;40 :Chirp Pulses Husimi Plot Frequency Transform Limit Positive Chirp Negative Chirp Time #12;Monotonic population transfer #12;Symmetry breaking #12;#12 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Li2 nuclear dynamics on the E state #12

  18. Nuclear structures within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Neff, Thomas

    .001 0.001 0.01 0.01 0.1 0.1 0.5 1.0 -5 0 5 x [fm] -5 0 5 y[fm] 16 C - n #12;Fermionic Molecular Dynamics Dynamics Time-dependent variational principle dt Q i d dt - ^H Q Q Q = 0 #12;Perform Variation FMD ½ the mean-field may break the symmetries of the Hamiltonian 16 O 40 Ca spherical nuclei 20 Ne 27 Al

  19. Automated Discovery of Reaction Pathways, Rate Constants, and Transition States Using Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Döntgen, Malte; Przybylski-Freund, Marie-Dominique; Kröger, Leif C; Kopp, Wassja A; Ismail, Ahmed E; Leonhard, Kai

    2015-06-01

    We provide a methodology for deducing quantitative reaction models from reactive molecular dynamics simulations by identifying, quantifying, and evaluating elementary reactions of classical trajectories. Simulations of the inception stage of methane oxidation are used to demonstrate our methodology. The agreement of pathways and rates with available literature data reveals the potential of reactive molecular dynamics studies for developing quantitative reaction models. PMID:26575551

  20. Rational Prediction with Molecular Dynamics for Hit Identification

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara E; Swift, Robert V; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Although the motions of proteins are fundamental for their function, for pragmatic reasons, the consideration of protein elasticity has traditionally been neglected in drug discovery and design. This review details protein motion, its relevance to biomolecular interactions and how it can be sampled using molecular dynamics simulations. Within this context, two major areas of research in structure-based prediction that can benefit from considering protein flexibility, binding site detection and molecular docking, are discussed. Basic classification metrics and statistical analysis techniques, which can facilitate performance analysis, are also reviewed. With hardware and software advances, molecular dynamics in combination with traditional structure-based prediction methods can potentially reduce the time and costs involved in the hit identification pipeline. PMID:23110535

  1. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Vascular Network Formation

    E-print Network

    Triolo, Livio

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Vascular Network Formation Paolo Butt`a1 , Fiammetta Cerreti1", Compendio Viminale, 00184 Roma, Italy 4 Dipartimento di Matematica, Universit`a di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via for the formation of the capillary blood vessel network. We describe a system of endothelial cells by means of two

  3. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  4. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  5. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4??-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2?-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Thermal Properties of Ag3SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztek, H. Ö.; Kavanoz, H. B.; Akdere, Ü.; Yilmaz, M.; Ta?seven, ?.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of Ag3SI in contrast pressure and temperature ensemble (NPT) is presented. Interionic interactions were modeled by Vashista-Rahman (VR) type potential which has been used in literature to study structural and transport properties and transition to superionic phase. This research complements the previous studies by including the temperature evaluation of different elastic properties such as lattice parameter, specific heat, bulk modulus etc.

  7. Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.

    1992-07-01

    Our objective, has been to elucidate on a molecular level, at atomic resolution, the structures of DNAs modified by 2-aminofluorene and its N-acetyl derivative, 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). The underlying hypothesis is that DNA replicates with reduced fidelity when its normal right-handed B-structure is altered, and one result is a higher mutation rate. This change in structure may occur normally at a low incidence, for example by the formation of hairpin loops in appropriate sequences, but it may be enhanced greatly after covalent modification by a mutagenic substance. We use computational methods and have been able to incorporate the first data from NMR studies in our calculations. Computational approaches are important because x-ray and spectroscopic studies have not succeeded in producing atomic resolution views of mutagen and carcinogen-oligonucleotide adducts. The specific methods that we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations, with full solvent and salt, of the important static structures are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a medium that mimics the natural aqueous environment of the cell as well as can be done with current available computing resources.

  8. Model interaction potentials for selenium from ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2005-06-01

    We develop model interaction potentials for elemental selenium based on ab initio molecular simulations and cluster expansion theory. Our potentials are used in classical Monte Carlo simulations to characterize the structure of selenium glass.

  9. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dilina; Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  10. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation.

  11. Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sanville, Edward J; Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M; Cawkwell, Marc J; Niklasson, Anders M N; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Stephen; Sewell, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

  12. Quantum Wavepacket Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics: An Approach for Computing Dynamically Averaged Vibrational Spectra Including Critical Nuclear Quantum Effects

    E-print Network

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    Quantum Wavepacket Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics: An Approach for Computing Dynamically Averaged quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum

  13. Software News and Updates Carma: A Molecular Dynamics Analysis Program

    E-print Network

    Glykos, Nikolaos

    Software News and Updates Carma: A Molecular Dynamics Analysis Program NICHOLAS M. GLYKOS: A computer program has been developed to aid the analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories. The program, Inc. J Comput Chem 27: 1765­1768, 2006 Key words: molecular dynamics; principal component analysis

  14. Molecular dynamics calculation of molecular volumes and volumes of activation.

    PubMed

    Spooner, J; Wiebe, H; Boon, N; Deglint, E; Edwards, E; Yanciw, B; Patton, B; Thiele, L; Dance, P; Weinberg, N

    2012-02-21

    Experimentally, the effects of pressure on reaction rates are described by their pressure derivatives, known as volumes of activation. Transition state theory directly links activation volumes to partial molar volumes of reactants and transition states. We discuss a molecular dynamics method for the accurate calculation of molecular volumes, within which the volumes of molecular species are obtained as a difference between the volumes of pure solvent and solvent with a single molecule inserted. The volumes thus obtained depend on the molecular geometry, the strength and type of the solute-solvent interactions, as well as temperature and pressure. The partial molar volumes calculated using this approach agree well with experimental data. Since this method can also be applied to transition state species, it allows for quantitative analysis of experimental volumes of activation in terms of structural parameters of the corresponding transition states. The efficiency of the approach is illustrated by calculation of volumes of activation for three nonpolar reactions in nonpolar solvents. The results agree well with the experimental data. PMID:22237671

  15. Polar solvation dynamics of lysozyme from molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2012-05-01

    The solvation dynamics of a protein are believed to be sensitive to its secondary structures. We have explored such sensitivity in this article by performing room temperature molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of lysozyme. Nonuniform long-time relaxation patterns of the solvation time correlation function for different segments of the protein have been observed. It is found that relatively slower long-time solvation components of the ?-helices and ?-sheets of the protein are correlated with lower exposure of their polar probe residues to bulk solvent and hence stronger interactions with the dynamically restricted surface water molecules. These findings can be verified by appropriate experimental studies.

  16. Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of metal wires in torsion: molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations-4040 Abstract The orientation dependent plasticity in metal nanowires is investigated using molecular dynamics metal wires controls the mechanisms of plastic deformation. For wires oriented along 110 , dislocations

  17. Potential energy surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Tyng

    1991-11-01

    A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global potential energy surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous potential surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.

  18. Random Matrix Theory in molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Palese, Luigi Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that, in some situations, principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on molecular dynamics data results in the appearance of cosine-shaped low index projections. Because this is reminiscent of the results obtained by performing PCA on a multidimensional Brownian dynamics, it has been suggested that short-time protein dynamics is essentially nothing more than a noisy signal. Here we use Random Matrix Theory to analyze a series of short-time molecular dynamics experiments which are specifically designed to be simulations with high cosine content. We use as a model system the protein apoCox17, a mitochondrial copper chaperone. Spectral analysis on correlation matrices allows to easily differentiate random correlations, simply deriving from the finite length of the process, from non-random signals reflecting the intrinsic system properties. Our results clearly show that protein dynamics is not really Brownian also in presence of the cosine-shaped low index projections on principal axes. PMID:25237718

  19. COMPLEX FOREST DYNAMICS INDICATE POTENTIAL FOR

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    COMPLEX FOREST DYNAMICS INDICATE POTENTIAL FOR SLOWING CARBON ACCUMULATION IN THE SOUTHEASTERN for Forest Products Survey and Analytics, Blacksburg, VA 2USFS Center for Integrated Forest Science, Raleigh, weather, insects & diseases · Anthropogenic: effects of forest management (primarily cutting) 3. Provides

  20. Open quantum system parameters from molecular dynamics

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wüster, Sebastian; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We extract the site energies and spectral densities of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment protein complex of green sulphur bacteria from simulations of molecular dynamics combined with energy gap calculations. Comparing four different combinations of methods, we investigate the origin of quantitative differences regarding site energies and spectral densities obtained previously in the literature. We find that different forcefields for molecular dynamics and varying local energy minima found by the structure relaxation yield significantly different results. Nevertheless, a picture averaged over these variations is in good agreement with experiments and some other theory results. Throughout, we discuss how vibrations external- or internal to the pigment molecules enter the extracted quantities differently and can be distinguished. Our results offer some guidance to set up more computationally intensive calculations for a precise determination of spectral densities in the future. These are required to determ...

  1. Molecular profiling of gliomas: potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Alentorn, Agusti; Duran-Peña, Alberto; Pingle, Sandeep C; Piccioni, David E; Idbaih, Ahmed; Kesari, Santosh

    2015-08-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumor. Over the last decade, significant advances have been made in the molecular characterization of this tumor group, identifying predictive biomarkers or molecular actionable targets, and paving the way to molecular-based targeted therapies. This personalized therapeutic approach is effective and illustrated in the present review. Among many molecular abnormalities, BRAF mutation and mTOR activation in pilocytic astrocytomas and subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are actionable targets sensitive to vemurafenib and everolimus, respectively. Chromosome arms 1p/19q co-deletion and IDH mutational status are pivotal in driving delivery of early procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Although consensus to assess MGMT promoter methylation is not reached yet, it may be useful in predicting resistance to temozolomide in elderly patients. PMID:26118895

  2. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  3. A facile and improved synthesis of sildenafil (Viagra) analogs through solid support microwave irradiation possessing tyrosinase inhibitory potential, their conformational analysis and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khalid M; Maharvi, Ghulam M; Khan, Mahmud T H; Perveen, Shahnaz; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Atta-Ur-Rahman

    2005-01-01

    Herein, the synthesis of some analogs of sildenafil (Viagra) (21) is described, employing MW irradiations in key steps such as, SNAr reaction on important precursor bromopyrazole (7). Compound 7 was synthesized by the bromination followed by the amidation of readily available 1-methyl-3-propyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (5). Compounds 9 and 10 were obtained as SNAr reaction products, apparently through the proposed dipolar high-energy transition states TS-1 and TS-2 under MW irradiation, respectively. In contrast, conventional heating failed to produce similar results, even after prolonged heating. Compound 10, upon chlorosulfonation followed by the coupling of various nucleophiles, yielded a series of compounds 12-20 as analogs of sildenafil (21). Compounds 12-21 were subjected to tyrosinase inhibition studies and SAR studies were carried out. This study reflected that the inhibition was enhanced with increase of carbon chain. In case of the compound 17, the -OH group was replaced with -CH2-CH2-OH with a resulting increase in inhibition against tyrosinase. Compound 17 was found to be more potent than the potent reference inhibitor LM and KA. The 2D and 3D hydrogen bonding descriptors that help to study QSPR were also calculated. Energetically most stable conformations of these compounds were analyzed. Their kinetic, potential and total energies were also calculated through MD simulation. PMID:15789547

  4. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor Yuan T. Lee & Professor George Schatz. Professor Lee’s research has been based on the development & use of advanced chemical kinetics & molecular beams to investigate & manipulate the behavior of fundamental chemical reactions. Lee’s work has been recognized by many awards, including the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1986, as well as Sloan Fellow, Dreyfus Scholar, Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Fellowship in the American Physical Society, Guggenheim Fellow, Member National Academy of Sciences, Member Academia Sinica, E.O. Lawrence Award, Miller Professor, Berkeley, Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, Harrison Howe Award, Peter Debye Award, & the National Medal of Science. Lee also has served as the President of the Academia Sinica in Taiwan (ROC). Professor Schatz’s research group is interested in using theory & computation to describe physical phenomena in a broad range of applications relevant to chemistry, physics, biology & engineering. Among the types of applications that we interested are: optical properties of nanoparticles & nanoparticle assemblies; using theory to model polymer properties; DNA structure, thermodynamics & dynamics; modeling self assembly & nanopatterning; & gas phase reaction dynamics. Among his many awards & distinctions have been appointment as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, the Fresenius Award, Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Max Planck Research Award, Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, & election to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences & the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Dr Schatz is also lauded for his highly successful work as Editor for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. We requested $10,000 from DOE in support of this meeting. The money was distributed widely among the student & post doctoral fellows & some used to attract the very best scientists in the field. The organizers were committed to encouraging women & minorities as well as encourage the field of Chemical Physics in scientific

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the melting of uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchenkov, A. S.; Potashnikov, S. I.; Nekrasov, K. A.; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya.

    2012-08-01

    The melting of vacuum-isolated uranium dioxide (UO2) nanocrystals is studied by molecular dynamics simulation using the approximation of pair potentials and point ions. The size dependences of the melting temperature, the heat of melting, and the density jump of cubic crystals up to 1000 nm3 in size are measured for the ten most relevant sets of pair potentials. The linear and parabolic extrapolations of these dependences to macroscopic sizes are considered, and the parabolic extrapolation is found to be better for analyzing data on the melting temperature and heat.

  6. First principles molecular dynamics of molten NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galamba, N.; Costa Cabral, B. J.

    2007-03-01

    First principles Hellmann-Feynman molecular dynamics (HFMD) results for molten NaCl at a single state point are reported. The effect of induction forces on the structure and dynamics of the system is studied by comparison of the partial radial distribution functions and the velocity and force autocorrelation functions with those calculated from classical MD based on rigid-ion and shell-model potentials. The first principles results reproduce the main structural features of the molten salt observed experimentally, whereas they are incorrectly described by both rigid-ion and shell-model potentials. Moreover, HFMD Green-Kubo self-diffusion coefficients are in closer agreement with experimental data than those predicted by classical MD. A comprehensive discussion of MD results for molten NaCl based on different ab initio parametrized polarizable interionic potentials is also given.

  7. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  9. (Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods)

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of our work has been, for many year, to elucidate on a molecular level at atomic resolution the structures of DNAs modified by highly mutagenic polycyclic aromatic amines and hydrocarbons, and their less mutagenic chemically related analogs and unmodified DNAs, as controls. The ultimate purpose of this undertaking is to obtain an understanding of the relationship DNA structures and mutagenicity. Our methods for elucidating structures are computational, but we keep in close contact with experimental developments, and have, very recently, been able to incorporate the first experimental information from NMR studies by other workers in our calculations. The specific computational methods we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space program DUPLEX, developed and written by Dr. Brain Hingerty to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations of the important static structures with full solvation and salt are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a milieu that best mimics the natural environment of the cell. In addition, we have been developing new strategies for searching conformation space and building DNA duplexes from favored subunit structures. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential and incompressibility of nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    V. Zanganeh; N. Wang; O. N. Ghodsi

    2012-03-01

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for some fusion reactions are investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model with different sets of parameters in which the corresponding incompressibility coefficient of nuclear matter is different. Two new sets of parameters SKP* and IQ3 for the ImQMD model are proposed with the incompressibility coefficient of 195 and 225 MeV, respectively. The measured fusion excitation function for 16O+208Pb and the charge distribution of fragments for Ca+Ca and Au+Au in multi-fragmentation process can be reasonably well reproduced. Simultaneously, the influence of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the range of nucleon-nucleon interaction on the nucleus-nucleus dynamic potential is investigated.

  11. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1]. To elucidate this behavior we studied a simplified model comprised of an interface between two stacks of graphene ribbons to mimic the contact between multiwalled nanotubes. Our results, in agreement with experiment, show that the interfacial thermal conductance indeed increases with the number of graphene layers, corresponding to larger diameter and larger number of walls in MWCNT. The role of interfacial layer thickness is investigated by modeling a system of a few layers of graphene sandwiched between two silicon slabs. We show, by wave packet simulation and by theoretical calculation of a spring-mass model, that the transmission coefficient of individual vibrational modes is strongly dependent on the frequency and the number of graphene layers due to coherent interference effects; by contrast, the interfacial thermal conductance obtained in NEMD simulation, which represents an integral over all phonons, is essentially independent of the number of graphene layers, in agreement with recent experiments. Furthermore, when we heat one atomic layer of graphene directly, the effective interfacial conductance associated with heat dissipation to the silicon substrate is very small. We attribute this to the resistance associated with heat transfer between high and low frequency phonon modes within graphene. Finally, we also replaced graphene layers by a few WSe2 sheets and observed that interfacial thermal resistance of a Si/n-WSe2/Si structure increases linearly with interface thickness at least for 1 < n <= 20, indicating diffusive heat transfer mechanism, in contrast to ballistic behavior of a few graphene layers. The corresponding thermal conductivity (0.048 W m-1 K-1) of a few WSe2 layers is rather small. By comparing phonon dispersion of graphene layers and WSe2 sheets, we attribute the diffusive behavior of a few WSe2 sheets to abundant optical phonons at low and medium frequencies leading to very short mean free path. Our computational studies of effects of pressure and structural properties on interfacial thermal conductance provide fundamental in

  12. Cellular/Molecular Stimulus History Reliably Shapes Action Potential

    E-print Network

    Juusola, Mikko

    Cellular/Molecular Stimulus History Reliably Shapes Action Potential Waveforms of Cortical Neurons, they participate in synaptic integration, and thus in the probability of generating succeeding action potentials, in a shape-dependent way. Here we test whether the different action potential waveforms produced during

  13. Confinement of conjugated polymers into soft nanoparticles: molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2013-03-01

    The structure and dynamics of conjugated polymers confined into soft nanoparticles (SNPs) have been studies by molecular dynamic simulations. This new class of tunable luminescent SNPs exhibits an immense potential as bio-markers as well as targeted drug delivery agents where tethering specific groups to the surface particles offers a means to target specific applications. Of particular interest are SNPs that consist of non- crosslinked polymers, decorated with polar groups. These SNPs are potentially tunable through the dynamics of the polymer chains, whereas the polar entity serves as internal stabilizer and surface encore. Confinement of a polymer whose inherent conformation is extended impacts not only their dynamics and as a result their optical properties. Here we will present insight into the structure and dynamics of dialkyl poly para phenylene ethynylene (PPE), decorated by a carboxylate groups, confined into a soft particle. The conformation and dynamics of polymer within SNP will be discussed and compared with that of the linear chain in solution. This work in partially supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-12ER46843

  14. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    E-print Network

    Yongying Jiang; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Werner Scheid

    2010-03-06

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+208Pb and 126Sn+130Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for 40Ca+40Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depth of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of fusion barrier is also investigated. For heavy fusion system, the fusion pocket becomes shallow and almost disappears for symmetric systems and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  15. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  16. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Yongying; Li, Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+208Pb and 126Sn+130Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for 40Ca+40Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depth of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of fusion barrier is also investigated. For heavy fusion system, the fusion pocket becomes shallow and almost disappears for symmetric systems and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  17. DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF HIGHLY EXCITED MOLECULAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. Kellman

    2005-06-17

    Spectra and internal dynamics of highly excited molecules are essential to understanding processes of fundamental importance for combustion, including intramolecular energy transfer and isomerization reactions. The goal of our program is to develop new theoretical tools to unravel information about intramolecular dynamics encoded in highly excited experimental spectra. We want to understand the formations of ''new vibrational modes'' when the ordinary normal modes picture breaks down in highly excited vibrations. We use bifurcation analysis of semiclassical versions of the effective Hamiltonians used by spectroscopists to fit complex experimental spectra. Specific molecular systems are of interest for their relevance to combustion and the availability of high-quality experimental data. Because of its immense importance in combustion, the isomerizing acetylene/vinylidene system has been the object of long-standing experimental and theoretical research. We have made significant progress in systematically understanding the bending dynamics of the acetylene system. We have begun to make progress on extending our methodology to the full bend-stretch vibrational degrees of freedom, including dynamics with multiple wells and above barrier motion, and time-dependent dynamics. For this, development of our previous methods using spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians is needed, for example, for systems with multiple barriers.

  18. Attosecond VUV Coherent Control of Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Ranitovic, P; Riviere, P; Palacios, A; Tong, X M; Toshima, N; Gonzalez-Castrillo, A; Martin, L; Martin, F; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond time-scales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized. This is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep ultraviolet, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a novel approach using attosecond vacuum ultraviolet pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly-ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipula...

  19. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements. PMID:21063448

  20. Microscale swimming: The molecular dynamics approach

    E-print Network

    D. C. Rapaport

    2007-12-06

    The self-propelled motion of microscopic bodies immersed in a fluid medium is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The advantage of the atomistic approach is that the detailed level of description allows complete freedom in specifying the swimmer design and its coupling with the surrounding fluid. A series of two-dimensional swimming bodies employing a variety of propulsion mechanisms -- motivated by biological and microrobotic designs -- is investigated, including the use of moving limbs, changing body shapes and fluid jets. The swimming efficiency and the nature of the induced, time-dependent flow fields are found to differ widely among body designs and propulsion mechanisms.

  1. Molecular effective coverage surface area of optical clearing agents for predicting optical clearing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The improvement of methods for optical clearing agent prediction exerts an important impact on tissue optical clearing technique. The molecular dynamic simulation is one of the most convincing and simplest approaches to predict the optical clearing potential of agents by analyzing the hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type forming between agents and collagen. However, the above analysis methods still suffer from some problem such as analysis of cyclic molecule by reason of molecular conformation. In this study, a molecular effective coverage surface area based on the molecular dynamic simulation was proposed to predict the potential of optical clearing agents. Several typical cyclic molecules, fructose, glucose and chain molecules, sorbitol, xylitol were analyzed by calculating their molecular effective coverage surface area, hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type, respectively. In order to verify this analysis methods, in vitro skin samples optical clearing efficacy were measured after 25 min immersing in the solutions, fructose, glucose, sorbitol and xylitol at concentration of 3.5 M using 1951 USAF resolution test target. The experimental results show accordance with prediction of molecular effective coverage surface area. Further to compare molecular effective coverage surface area with other parameters, it can show that molecular effective coverage surface area has a better performance in predicting OCP of agents.

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of dynamical properties of phosphatidylethanolamine lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Suits, Frank; Gawrisch, Klaus; Feller, Scott E.

    2005-06-01

    We describe the dynamic behavior of a 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (SOPE) bilayer from a 20ns molecular dynamics simulation. The dynamics of individual molecules are characterized in terms of H2 spin-lattice relaxation rates, nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) cross-relaxation rates, and lateral diffusion coefficients. Additionally, we describe the dynamics of hydrogen bonding through an analysis of hydrogen bond lifetimes and the time evolution of clusters of hydrogen bonded lipids. The simulated trajectory is shown to be consistent with experimental measures of internal, intermolecular, and diffusive motion. Consistent with our analysis of SOPE structure in the companion paper, we see hydrogen bonding dominating the dynamics of the interface region. Comparison of H2 T1 relaxation rates for chain methylene segments in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers indicates that slower motion resulting from hydrogen bonding extends at least three carbons into the hydrophobic core. NOESY cross-relaxation rates compare well with experimental values, indicating the observed hydrogen bonding dynamics are realistic. Calculated lateral diffusion rates (4±1×10-8cm2/s) are comparable, though somewhat lower than, those determined by pulsed field gradient NMR methods.

  3. A multiscale molecular dynamics allowing macroscale mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qi; Li, Shaofan

    2015-06-01

    We proposed a novel multiscale molecular-dynamics model in order to apply macroscale boundary conditions to microscale molecular systems, which is difficult for classical molecular dynamics. Unlike in statistical mechanics, in which macroscale quantities such as temperature and pressure are collected from molecular information, the proposed approach is a reversed procedure to find optimal molecular states when macroscale conditions such as traction are enforced. The model is originated from Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics but extends it to solve finite-size, inhomogeneous molecular-dynamics problems by generalizing the representative volume element to a “material point” in continuum mechanics. An example of compressing a nickel nanowire is presented to demonstrate the capacity of the method to simulate localized phase transition in a finite-size molecular system, which validates the effectiveness of the method.

  4. Attosecond VUV Coherent Control of Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    P. Ranitovic; C. W. Hogle; P. Riviere; A Palacios; X. M. Tong; N. Toshima; A. Gonzalez-Castrillo; L. Martin; F. Martin; M. M. Murnane; H. C. Kapteyn

    2013-12-30

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond time-scales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized. This is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep ultraviolet, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a novel approach using attosecond vacuum ultraviolet pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly-ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipulate the ionization and dissociation channels. Furthermore, through advanced theory, we succeed in rigorously modeling multi-scale electron and nuclear quantum control in a molecule for the first time. The observed richness and complexity of the dynamics, even in this very simplest of molecules, is both remarkable and daunting, and presents intriguing new possibilities for bridging the gap between attosecond physics and attochemistry.

  5. Multiple branched adaptive steered molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Gungor; Keyes, Thomas; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-08-01

    Steered molecular dynamics, SMD, [S. Park and K. Schulten, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5946 (2004)] combined with Jarzynski's equality has been used widely in generating free energy profiles for various biological problems, e.g., protein folding and ligand binding. However, the calculated averages are generally dominated by "rare events" from the ensemble of nonequilibrium trajectories. The recently proposed adaptive steered molecular dynamics, ASMD, introduced a new idea for selecting important events and eliminating the non-contributing trajectories, thus decreasing the overall computation needed. ASMD was shown to reduce the number of trajectories needed by a factor of 10 in a benchmarking study of decaalanine stretching. Here we propose a novel, highly efficient "multiple branching" (MB) version, MB-ASMD, which obtains a more complete enhanced sampling of the important trajectories, while still eliminating non-contributing segments. Compared to selecting a single configuration in ASMD, MB-ASMD offers to select multiple configurations at each segment along the reaction coordinate based on the distribution of work trajectories. We show that MB-ASMD has all benefits of ASMD such as faster convergence of the PMF even when pulling 1000 times faster than the reversible limit while greatly reducing the probability of getting trapped in a non-significant path. We also analyze the hydrogen bond breaking within the decaalanine peptide as we force the helix into a random coil and confirm ASMD results with less noise in the numerical averages.

  6. Laser-induced perturbation into molecular dynamics localized in neuronal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Chie; Takeda, Naoko; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics at synaptic terminals in neuronal cells is essential for synaptic plasticity and subsequent modulation of cellular functions in a neuronal network. For realizing artificial control of living neuronal network, we demonstrate laser-induced perturbation into molecular dynamics in the neuronal cells. The optical trapping of cellular molecules such as synaptic vesicles or neural cell adhesion molecules labeled with quantum dots was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The trapping and assembling dynamics was revealed that the molecular motion was constrained at the focal spot of a focused laser beam due to optical trapping force. Our method has a potential to manipulate synaptic transmission at single synapse level.

  7. Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wu, Chang Qiang; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Meng Yue; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of approaches that have been improved to achieve a good understanding of pancreatic cancer (PC), the prognosis of PC remains poor, and the survival rates are dismal. The lack of early detection and effective interventions is the main reason. Therefore, considerable ongoing efforts aimed at identifying early PC are currently being pursued using a variety of methods. In recent years, the development of molecular imaging has made the specific targeting of PC in the early stage possible. Molecular imaging seeks to directly visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. Among different imaging technologies, the magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging has potential in this regard because it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of PC. This topic is reviewed in terms of the contrast agents for MR molecular imaging, the biomarkers related to PC, targeted molecular probes for MRI, and the application of MRI in the diagnosis of PC. PMID:26579537

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Collisions between Hydrogen and Graphite

    E-print Network

    A. Ito; H. Nakamura

    2006-04-26

    Hydrogen adsorption by graphite is examined by classical molecular dynamics simulation using a modified Brenner REBO potential. Such interactions are typical in chemical sputtering experiments, and knowledge of the fundamental behavior of hydrogen and graphene in collisional conditions is essential for modeling the sputtering mechanism. The hydrogen adsorption rate is found to be dependent on the incident hydrogen energy and not on graphene temperature. Rather than destroying the graphene, hydrogen incidence at energies of less than 100 eV can be classified into three regimes of adsorption, reflection and penetration through one or more graphene layers. Incidence at the lowest energies is shown to distort the graphene structure.

  9. Higher-order symplectic Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Niklasson, Anders; Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, Matt; Odell, Anders; Delin, Anna; Johansson, Borje

    2009-01-01

    The extended Lagrangian formulation of time-reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TR-BOMD) enables the use of geometric integrators in the propagation of both the nuclear and the electronic degrees of freedom on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Different symplectic integrators up to the 6th order have been adapted and optimized to TR-BOMD in the framework of ab initio self-consistent-field theory. It is shown how the accuracy can be significantly improved compared to a conventional Verlet integration at the same level of computational cost, in particular for the case of very high accuracy requirements.

  10. Thermal conductivity of ionic systems from equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Salanne, Mathieu; Marrocchelli, Dario; Merlet, Céline; Ohtori, Norikazu; Madden, Paul A

    2011-03-16

    Thermal conductivities of ionic compounds (NaCl, MgO, Mg(2)SiO(4)) are calculated from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the Green-Kubo method. Transferable interaction potentials including many-body polarization effects are employed. Various physical conditions (solid and liquid states, high temperatures, high pressures) relevant to the study of the heat transport in the Earth's mantle are investigated, for which experimental measures are very challenging. By introducing a frequency-dependent thermal conductivity, we show that important coupled thermoelectric effects occur in the energy conduction mechanism in the case of liquid systems. PMID:21335634

  11. Elastic behavior of carbon nanocoils: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeri, Mohammad Mahdi; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    Elastic behavior of carbon nanocoils is investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, spring constants of various nanocoils are derived. To do so, first a geometric model is prepared with the aid of finite element mesh generator. Then applying AIREBO potential, the model is simulated under tensile loading. Using the obtained deformation data, the spring constant is calculated. In order to study the effect of structural parameters, change of elastic properties with helix diameter as well as tube diameter is examined. The results are compared to those obtained via other methods reported in literature.

  12. Shock compression and spallation of tantalum: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; An, Q.; Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.; Tonks, D. L.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2011-06-01

    We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock wave compression and spallation of Ta single crystals with different potentials including embedded-atom method (EAM), first-principles-based EAM (qEAM) and reactive forcefield (ReaxFF). Shock loading is applied along < 100 > , < 110 > and < 111 > . Hugoniot states are obtained from direct shock or Hugoniostat simulations. Anisotropic behaviors are observed in plasticity (including twinning) during compression/tension and in spallation. We present detailed analysis of dislocations, twins and void nucleation and growth, and their implications for the mechanisms of plasticity and spall damage in Ta.

  13. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron–nuclear dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump–probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  14. Dynamics of Nanoscale Grain-Boundary Decohesion in Aluminum by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Phillips, D. R.; Glaessegen, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics and energetics of intergranular crack growth along a flat grain boundary in aluminum is studied by a molecular-dynamics simulation model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions. Using the ability of the molecular-dynamics simulation to identify atoms involved in different atomistic mechanisms, it was possible to identify the energy contribution of different processes taking place during crack growth. The energy contributions were divided as: elastic energy, defined as the potential energy of the atoms in fcc crystallographic state; and plastically stored energy, the energy of stacking faults and twin boundaries; grain-boundary and surface energy. In addition, monitoring the amount of heat exchange with the molecular-dynamics thermostat gives the energy dissipated as heat in the system. The energetic analysis indicates that the majority of energy in a fast growing crack is dissipated as heat. This dissipation increases linearly at low speed, and faster than linear at speeds approaching 1/3 the Rayleigh wave speed when the crack tip becomes dynamically unstable producing periodic dislocation bursts until the crack is blunted.

  15. Deformation processes in polycrystalline Zr by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zizhe; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to characterize the deformation behavior of polycrystalline Zr. The predictions of two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charge optimized many body potential are compared. The experimentally observed prismatic dislocations, pyramidal dislocations and twinning behaviors are produced in the simulations of [ 1 1 2 bar 0 ] and [0 0 0 1] textured structures and in fully 3D structure simulations. The relationship between the generalized stacking fault energy and the mechanical properties is discussed. In particular we find that the different shapes of the generalized stacking-fault energy curve for the two different interatomic descriptions of Zr have a significant effect on the deformation mechanisms. The deformation behavior of Zr is compared with analogous simulations of deformation of polycrystalline Mg.

  16. Comparative molecular field analysis and molecular dynamics studies of ?/? hydrolase domain containing 6 (ABHD6) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Patel, Jayendra Z; Laitinen, Tuomo; Parkkari, Teija; Adams, Yahaya; Nevalainen, Tapio J; Poso, Antti

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system remains an attractive molecular target for pharmacological intervention due to its roles in the central nervous system in learning, thinking, emotional function, regulation of food intake or pain sensation, as well as in the peripheral nervous system, where it modulates the action of cardiovascular, immune, metabolic or reproductive function. ?/? hydrolase domain containing 6 (ABHD6)--an enzyme forming part of the endocannabinoid system--is a newly discovered post-genomic protein acting as a 2-AG (2-arachidonoylglycerol) serine hydrolase. We have recently reported a series of 1,2,5-thiadiazole carbamates as potent and selective ABHD6 inhibitors. Here, we present comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and molecular dynamics studies of these compounds. First, we performed a homology modeling study of ABHD6 based on the assumption that the catalytic triad of ABHD6 comprises Ser148-His306-Asp 278 and the oxyanion hole is formed by Met149 and Phe80. A total of 42 compounds was docked to the homology model using the Glide module from the Schrödinger suite of software and the selected docking poses were used for CoMFA alignment. A model with the following statistics was obtained: R(2) = 0.98, Q(2) = 0.55. In order to study the molecular interactions of the inhibitors with ABHD6 in detail, molecular dynamics was performed with the Desmond program. It was found that, during the simulations, the hydrogen bond between the inhibitor carbonyl group and the main chain of Phe80 is weakened, whereas a new hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser148 is formed, facilitating the possible formation of a covalent bond. Graphical Abstract Left-right: Docking pose of 1 in the binding pocket of ?/? hydrolase domain containing 6 (ABHD6) selected for molecular alignment; CoMFA steric and electrostatic contour fields; changes in potential energy of the complex during simulations for the complex of 6 and ABHD6. PMID:26350245

  17. Multiple ionization and fragmentation dynamics of molecular iodine studied in

    E-print Network

    Kling, Matthias

    Multiple ionization and fragmentation dynamics of molecular iodine studied in IR­XUV pump The ionization and fragmentation dynamics of iodine molecules (I2) are traced using very intense ($1014 W cmÀ2

  18. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ? 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ? 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  19. Heterogeneous dynamics of ionic liquids from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habasaki, J.; Ngai, K. L.

    2008-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the complex and heterogeneous dynamics of ions in ionic liquids. The dynamics of cations and anions in 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate (EMIM-NO3) are characterized by van Hove functions and the corresponding intermediate scattering functions Fs(k,t) and elucidated by the trajectories augmented by the use of singular spectrum analysis (SSA). Several time regions are found in the mean squared displacement of the ions. Change in the slope in a plot of the diffusion coefficient against temperature is found at around 410K in the simulation. Heterogeneous dynamics with the presence of both localized ions and fast ions capable of successive jumps were observed at long time scales in the self-part of the van Hove functions and in the trajectories. Non-Gaussian dynamics are evidenced by the self-part of the van Hove functions and wave number dependence of Fs(k,t) and characterized as Lévy flights. Successive motion of some ions can continue even after several nanoseconds at 370K, which is longer than the onset time of diffusive motion, tdif. Structure of the long time dynamics of fast ions is clarified by the phase space plot of the successive motion using the denoised data by SSA. The continual dynamics are shown to have a long term memory, and therefore local structure is not enough to explain the heterogeneity. The motion connecting localized regions at about 370K is jumplike, but there is no typical one due to local structural changes during jump motion. With the local motion, mutual diffusion between cation and anion occurs. On decreasing temperature, mutual diffusion is suppressed, which results in slowing down of the dynamics. This "mixing effect of cation and anion" is compared with the "mixed alkali effect" found in the ionics in the ionically conducting glasses, where the interception of paths by different alkali metal ions causes the large reduction in the dynamics [J. Habasaki and K. L. Ngai, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 4673 (2007), and references herein]. Although a similar mechanism of the slowing down is observed, strong coupling of the motion of cation and anion prevents complete interception unless deeply supercooled, and this explains the wide temperature region of the existence of the liquid and supercooled liquid states in the ionic liquid.

  20. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chengyuan; Grest, Gary; Cheng, Shengfeng

    2015-03-01

    The evaporation of water from the liquid/vapor interface is studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for systems of more than a million atoms at 550K and 600K. The TIP4P-2005 water model whose liquid/vapor surface tension is in excellent agreement with experiments is used. Evaporative cooling at the interface is observed from temperature profiles determined from both translational and rotational kinetic energy. During evaporation, the density of water is slightly enhanced near the liquid-vapor interface. The velocity distribution of water molecules in the vapor phase during evaporation at various distances relative to the interface fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. While our results indicate an imbalance between evaporating and condensing water molecules, local thermal equilibrium is found to hold in addition to mechanical equilibrium. Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

  2. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Electrical Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zifeng; Milner, Scott; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2015-03-01

    The electrical double layer (EDL) near the polymer/water interface plays a key role in the colloidal stability of latex paint. To elucidate the structure of the EDL at the molecular level, we conducted an all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We studied two representative surface charge groups in latex, the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the grafted short polyelectrolyte charged by dissociated methyl methacrylic acid (MAA) monomers. Our results confirm that the Poisson-Boltzmann theory works well outside the Stern layer. Our calculated electrostatic potential at the Outer Helmholtz Plane (OHP) is close to the zeta potential measured experimentally, which suggests that the potential at the OHP is a good estimate of the zeta potential. We found that the position of the OHP for the MAA polyelectrolyte system extends much further into the aqueous phase than that in the SDS system, resulting in a Stern layer that is twice as thick. This model will allow for future investigations of the interactions of the surface with different surfactants and rheology modifiers, which may serve as a guide to tune the rheology of latex formulations. We thank Dow Chemical Company for financial support.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, R. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis is concerned with the specification and analysis of stochastic models of molecular motion and interaction in simple liquids. Basic chemical terminology is introduced and a brief description is given of the technique of molecular dynamics simulation. Stochastic process theory, in so far as it is relevant to the modelling of molecular trajectories and chemical reaction, is reviewed. First passage densities are shown to be important in the analysis of diffusion controlled chemical reaction. The relationship between first passage densities and flux or flow across the absorbing boundary is given. A formula proposed by Durbin is discussed and shown to be valid for diffusion processes under certain regularity conditions. The simplest integrated diffusion, integrated Brownian motion, is considered and a detailed derivation of McKean's half-winding formula is given. An explicit expression for the return-time density is derived, from which the large time asymptotics can be deduced. Goldman's formula for the density of the hitting-time of positive levels is extended to all real values and a simple intuitive derivation is given. Similar arguments enable the results of Gor'kov to be extended to a wider class of integrated diffusions. First passage time densities are computed numerically using the extension of Goldman's formula and compared with approximations which have been suggested by Hesse. Small drift asymptotics are derived for the escape probability of integrated Brownian motion with drift. A number of results are obtained for the integrated Ornstein -Uhlenbeck process, by using martingale methods. Finally, the empirical observations of Lynden-Bell, Hutchinson and Doyle are analysed. A stochastic model of single-particle motion based on the velocity autocorrelation function is proposed and shown to be in excellent agreement with the computer generated data.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  5. Isobaric molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, T.; Monson, P. A.

    2001-06-01

    We describe an implementation of the Andersen algorithm for simulating the molecular dynamics in the isobaric isoenthalpic (NPH) ensemble for the hard sphere potential. The work is based on the adaptation of the Andersen algorithm to hard spheres by de Smedt et al. For a hard sphere system in the NPH ensemble, the particle velocities are not constant between collisions and we describe an efficient method for handling this part of the dynamics. The method is extended to give an NPT ensemble simulation of hard sphere systems by applying an ad hoc rescaling of the velocities. The accuracy of the algorithms is tested by comparison with traditional NVE simulation results for the structural, thermodynamic, and transport properties.

  6. Disappearing Inflaton Potential via Heavy Field Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Kitajima, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    We propose a possibility that the inflaton potential is significantly modified after inflation due to heavy field dynamics. During inflation there may be a heavy scalar field stabilized at a value deviated from the low-energy minimum. As the heavy field moves to the low-energy minimum, the inflaton potential could be significantly modified. In extreme cases, the inflaton potential vanishes and the inflaton becomes almost massless at some time after inflation. Such transition of the inflaton potential has interesting implications for primordial density perturbations, reheating, creation of unwanted relics, dark radiation, and experimental search for light degrees of freedom. To be concrete, we consider a chaotic inflation in supergravity where the inflaton mass parameter is promoted to a modulus field, finding that the inflaton becomes stable after the transition and contributes to dark matter. Another example is the new inflation by the MSSM Higgs field which acquires a large expectation value just after infl...

  7. Molecular-Dynamics Study Melting Aluminum at High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Maklashova, I. V.; Selezenev, A. A.; Kozlova, S. A.

    The dependence of the melting temperature versus the pressure under static conditions and under shock-wave compression of aluminum was calculated by molecular-dynamic modeling technique. The Morse potential and EAM potential (embedded atom method) was used for the interatomic interaction for the solid and liquid phases of aluminum. The calculations show a change of crystal structure of aluminum close to the melting range static compression and compression in the shock wave. Melting point was determined by analysis of the radial distribution function and the standard deviation of the atoms with the visualization of crystal structure. The results of molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with experimental data on the compressibility of the shock wave up to 200 GPa. Static melting results are consistent across the field of experimental data up to 30 GPa. A short-term compression in the shock wave, accompanied by the increase of entropy can be leads to overheating nonequilibrium substances. Under these conditions, the melting temperature under static and shock compression may be different from each other. However, the calculations showed on pressure in the shock wave 122 GPa aluminum melting occurs at temperatures close to the melting temperature in static conditions.

  8. Molecular dynamics modeling of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J.N.; Belak, J.; Philpott, M.R.

    1995-05-01

    Amorphous carbon films about 20 mn thick are used by the computer industry as protective coatings on magnetic disks. The structure and function of this family of materials at the atomic level is poorly understood. The growth and properties of a:C and a:CH films 1 to 5 nm thick has been simulated using classical molecular dynamics and a bond-order potential with torsional terms. Studies of quenched melts that verify the ability of this potential to reproduce known features of extended structures of carbon in two and three dimensions are briefly described. In molecular dynamics calculations the incident species were neutral atoms C, or C and H with energies up to 100 eV. The stoichiometry, chemical bonding and distribution functions within the films were analyzed using IBM`s Power Visualization System for different incident gas energies. Microscopic features such as multiple ring structures, including planar graphitic structures, were easily identified. Some preliminary studies of the nanotribology of the a:C films are described, including nano-indentation and sliding in contact with a rigid probe.

  9. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electric Conduction Tatsuro YUGE

    E-print Network

    Shimizu, Akira

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electric Conduction Tatsuro YUGE Ã , Nobuyasu ITO1y for electric conduction, and study transport phenomena by molecular dynamics simulation. We observe. The electrical conductivity is almost independent of the impurity distribution and the system size

  10. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  11. Deformation in Silica via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Cindy; Talamali, Mehdi; Bonamy, Daniel; Vandembroucq, Damien; Roux, Stephane; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2007-03-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations probing the atomistic aspects of dynamic fracture in amorphous silica (a-SiO2) reveal nanometer scale cavities nucleating, augmenting, and coalescing with one another up to 20 nm ahead of the crack tip [1, 2]. After which these cavities were seen to merge with the advancing crack to cause mechanical failure. This scenario was also observed experimentally during stress corrosion ultra-slow fracture of glass using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) [3, 4]. In order to characterize the irreversible changes in structure taking place within the process zone (i.e. the zone ahead of the crack tip where pores are opening), a variety of simulations have been carried out using 1) cyclic loading and unloading in hydrostatic pressure and 2) cyclic loading and unloading in shear. Structural changes revealed by these simulations have been analyzed in various ways (static structure factor, analysis of the ring structure, evolution of the fabric tensor). [1] C.L. Rountree, et. al. Annual Review of Materials Research. 2002. 32:377-400. [2] L.Van Brutzel, et. al. Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 2002. 703:V3.9.1- V3.9.6. [4] F. Celarie, et. al.. Phys. Rev. Lett. Vol. 90 (2003), 075504/1-4. [5] S. Prades, et. al. Int. J. Sol. Struct. Vol. 42 (2005), 637-645.

  12. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation in virus research

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Masaaki; Kitamura, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru; Sato, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    Virus replication in the host proceeds by chains of interactions between viral and host proteins. The interactions are deeply influenced by host immune molecules and anti-viral compounds, as well as by mutations in viral proteins. To understand how these interactions proceed mechanically and how they are influenced by mutations, one needs to know the structures and dynamics of the proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful computational method for delineating motions of proteins at an atomic-scale via theoretical and empirical principles in physical chemistry. Recent advances in the hardware and software for biomolecular simulation have rapidly improved the precision and performance of this technique. Consequently, MD simulation is quickly extending the range of applications in biology, helping to reveal unique features of protein structures that would be hard to obtain by experimental methods alone. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in MD simulations in the study of virus–host interactions and evolution, and present future perspectives on this technique. PMID:22833741

  14. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    Polyelectrolytes are polymers with ionizable groups. In polar solvents, these groups dissociate releasing counterions into solution and leaving uncompensated charges on the polymer backbone. Examples of polyelectrolytes include biopolymers such as DNA and RNA, and synthetic polymers such as poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(acrylic acids). In this talk I will discuss recent molecular dynamics simulations of static and dynamic properties of polyelectrolyte solutions. These simulations show that in dilute and semidilute polyelectrolyte solutions the electrostatic induced chain persistence length scales with the solution ionic strength as I - 1 / 2. This dependence of the chain persistence length is due to counterion condensation on the polymer backbone. In dilute polyelectrolyte solutions the chain size decreases with increasing the salt concentration as R ~ I- 1 / 5. This is in agreement with the scaling of the chain persistence length on the solution ionic strength, lp ~ I- 1 / 2. In semidilute solution regime at low salt concentrations the chain size decreases with increasing polymer concentration, R ~ cp-1 / 4 . While at high salt concentrations one observes a weaker dependence of the chain size on the solution ionic strength, R ~ I- 1 / 8. Analysis of the simulation data throughout the studied salt and polymer concentration ranges shows that there exist general scaling relations between multiple quantities X (I) in salt solutions and corresponding quantities X (I0) in salt-free solutions, X (I) = X (I0) (I /I0) ? . The exponent ? = -1/2 for chain persistence length lp , ? = 1/4 for solution correlation length, ? = -1/5 and ? = -1/8 for chain size R in dilute and semidilute solution regimes respectively. Furthermore, the analysis of the spectrum and of the relaxation times of Rouse modes confirms existence of the single length scale (correlation length) that controls both static and dynamic properties of semidilute polyelectrolyte solutions. These findings confirm predictions of the scaling model of polyelectrolyte solutions. NSF DMR-1004576.

  16. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  17. The MOLDY short-range molecular dynamics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, G. J.; D'Mellow, K.; Daraszewicz, S. L.; Hepburn, D. J.; Uhrin, M.; Stratford, K.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a parallelised version of the MOLDY molecular dynamics program. This Fortran code is aimed at systems which may be described by short-range potentials and specifically those which may be addressed with the embedded atom method. This includes a wide range of transition metals and alloys. MOLDY provides a range of options in terms of the molecular dynamics ensemble used and the boundary conditions which may be applied. A number of standard potentials are provided, and the modular structure of the code allows new potentials to be added easily. The code is parallelised using OpenMP and can therefore be run on shared memory systems, including modern multicore processors. Particular attention is paid to the updates required in the main force loop, where synchronisation is often required in OpenMP implementations of molecular dynamics. We examine the performance of the parallel code in detail and give some examples of applications to realistic problems, including the dynamic compression of copper and carbon migration in an iron-carbon alloy. Program summaryProgram title: MOLDY Catalogue identifier: AEJU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 382 881 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 705 242 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95/OpenMP Computer: Any Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. OpenMP is required for parallel execution RAM: 100 MB or more Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: Moldy addresses the problem of many atoms (of order 10 6) interacting via a classical interatomic potential on a timescale of microseconds. It is designed for problems where statistics must be gathered over a number of equivalent runs, such as measuring thermodynamic properities, diffusion, radiation damage, fracture, twinning deformation, nucleation and growth of phase transitions, sputtering etc. In the vast majority of materials, the interactions are non-pairwise, and the code must be able to deal with many-body forces. Solution method: Molecular dynamics involves integrating Newton's equations of motion. MOLDY uses verlet (for good energy conservation) or predictor-corrector (for accurate trajectories) algorithms. It is parallelised using open MP. It also includes a static minimisation routine to find the lowest energy structure. Boundary conditions for surfaces, clusters, grain boundaries, thermostat (Nose), barostat (Parrinello-Rahman), and externally applied strain are provided. The initial configuration can be either a repeated unit cell or have all atoms given explictly. Initial velocities are generated internally, but it is also possible to specify the velocity of a particular atom. A wide range of interatomic force models are implemented, including embedded atom, Morse or Lennard-Jones. Thus the program is especially well suited to calculations of metals. Restrictions: The code is designed for short-ranged potentials, and there is no Ewald sum. Thus for long range interactions where all particles interact with all others, the order- N scaling will fail. Different interatomic potential forms require recompilation of the code. Additional comments: There is a set of associated open-source analysis software for postprocessing and visualisation. This includes local crystal structure recognition and identification of topological defects. Running time: A set of test modules for running time are provided. The code scales as order N. The parallelisation shows near-linear scaling with number of processors in a shared memory environment. A typical run of a few tens of nanometers for a few nanoseconds will run on a timescale of days on a multiprocessor desktop.

  18. Electron momentum spectroscopy of 1-butene: a theoretical analysis using molecular dynamics and molecular quantum similarity.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, S H Reza; Vandenbussche, Jelle; Deleuze, Michael S; Bultinck, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    The results of experimental studies of the valence electronic structure of 1-butene by means of electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) have been reinterpreted on the basis of molecular dynamical simulations in conjunction with the classical MM3 force field. The computed atomic trajectories demonstrate the importance of thermally induced nuclear dynamics in the electronic neutral ground state, in the form of significant deviations from stationary points on the potential energy surface and considerable variations of the C-C-C-C dihedral angle. These motions are found to have a considerable influence on the computed spectral bands and outer-valence electron momentum distributions. Euclidean distances between spherically averaged electron momentum densities confirm that thermally induced nuclear motions need to be fully taken into account for a consistent interpretation of the results of EMS experiments on conformationally flexible molecules. PMID:23902590

  19. Hydration Effect on Temperature Dependence of Protein Dynamics Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crystalline Protein

    E-print Network

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    Hydration Effect on Temperature Dependence of Protein Dynamics Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crystalline Protein Yasumasa JOTI and Akio KITAO Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, University of Tokyo 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 1. Introduction Proteins are molecular

  20. Molecular and chemical engineering of bacteriophages for potential medical applications.

    PubMed

    Hodyra, Katarzyna; D?browska, Krystyna

    2015-04-01

    Recent progress in molecular engineering has contributed to the great progress of medicine. However, there are still difficult problems constituting a challenge for molecular biology and biotechnology, e.g. new generation of anticancer agents, alternative biosensors or vaccines. As a biotechnological tool, bacteriophages (phages) offer a promising alternative to traditional approaches. They can be applied as anticancer agents, novel platforms in vaccine design, or as target carriers in drug discovery. Phages also offer solutions for modern cell imaging, biosensor construction or food pathogen detection. Here we present a review of bacteriophage research as a dynamically developing field with promising prospects for further development of medicine and biotechnology. PMID:25048831

  1. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  2. Effect of pressure on molecular photodissociation in matrices: Molecular dynamics simulations of Cl, in Xe

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    , in Xe R. Alimi Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics via charge-transfer (harpooning) mechanisms is, how- ever, a very efficient process even at low Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,Jerusa- lem

  3. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y; Amar, J G

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what reaction pathways may be important, we return instead to a molecular dynamics treatment, in which the trajectory itself finds an appropriate way to escape from each state of the system. Since a direct integration of the trajectory would be limited to nanoseconds, while we are seeking to follow the system for much longer times, we modify the dynamics in some way to cause the first escape to happen much more quickly, thereby accelerating the dynamics. The key is to design the modified dynamics in a way that does as little damage as possible to the probability for escaping along a given pathway - i.e., we try to preserve the relative rate constants for the different possible escape paths out of the state. We can then use this modified dynamics to follow the system from state to state, reaching much longer times than we could reach with direct MD. The dynamics within any one state may no longer be meaningful, but the state-to-state dynamics, in the best case, as we discuss in the paper, can be exact. We have developed three methods in this accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) class, in each case appealing to TST, either implicitly or explicitly, to design the modified dynamics. Each of these methods has its own advantages, and we and others have applied these methods to a wide range of problems. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a brief introduction to how these methods work, and discuss some of the recent developments that have been made to improve their power and applicability. Note that this brief review does not claim to be exhaustive: various other methods aiming at similar goals have been proposed in the literature. For the sake of brevity, our focus will exclusively be on the methods developed by the group.

  4. BiophysicalJournal Volume 72 January 1997 5-17 5 Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Photoinduced Electron

    E-print Network

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    - induced electron transfer in plastocyanin. The blue copper protein is modeled using a molecular mechanics potential; potential parameters for the copper-protein interactions are determined using an xBiophysicalJournal Volume 72 January 1997 5-17 5 Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation

  5. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  6. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics: a foundation for multiscale dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Jain, Abhinandan

    2015-01-29

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  7. Study of the dynamical potential barriers in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Long; Su, Jun; Xie, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2013-10-01

    The nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials for the fusion reactions 16O + 208Pb, 64Ni + 64Ni, 58Ni + 58Ni and 16O + 154Sm are extracted from the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The shell correction effects are discussed. The negative shell correction energies lower potential barriers of a certain reaction. The incident energy dependence of the potential barrier is investigated for each system. A complex phenomenon of energy dependence is observed. It is also found that incident energy dependence of the barrier radius and barrier height shows opposite behaviors. The Coulomb potential shows weak energy dependence when distance of two colliding nuclei is lower than the touching distance. The isospin effects of the potential barrier are investigated. The orientation effects of the potential barrier is also discussed for the system 16O + 154Sm. The fusion cross sections that correspond to the equatorial orientation of 154Sm are very low in sub-barrier region because of the high fusion barriers and the shallow potential pockets.

  8. Structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer in Si/Ge superlattices: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen; Yang, Mo

    2013-12-21

    The structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer process in Si/Ge superlattices are studied by analyzing the trajectories generated by the ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution functions and mean square displacements are calculated and further discussions are made to explain and probe the structural changes relating to the heat transfer phenomenon. Furthermore, the vibrational density of states of the two layers (Si/Ge) are computed and plotted to analyze the contributions of phonons with different frequencies to the heat conduction. Coherent heat conduction of the low frequency phonons is found and their contributions to facilitate heat transfer are confirmed. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation outputs in the work show reasonable thermophysical results of the thermal energy transport process and shed light on the potential applications of treating the heat transfer in the superlattices of semiconductor materials from a quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulation perspective.

  9. Structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer in Si/Ge superlattices: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen; Yang, Mo

    2013-12-01

    The structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer process in Si/Ge superlattices are studied by analyzing the trajectories generated by the ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution functions and mean square displacements are calculated and further discussions are made to explain and probe the structural changes relating to the heat transfer phenomenon. Furthermore, the vibrational density of states of the two layers (Si/Ge) are computed and plotted to analyze the contributions of phonons with different frequencies to the heat conduction. Coherent heat conduction of the low frequency phonons is found and their contributions to facilitate heat transfer are confirmed. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation outputs in the work show reasonable thermophysical results of the thermal energy transport process and shed light on the potential applications of treating the heat transfer in the superlattices of semiconductor materials from a quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulation perspective.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutical Targets in Huntington's Disease

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Molecular Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutical Targets in Huntington's Disease CHIARA ZUCCATO to Huntington's Disease 906 A. Historical background 906 B. Neuropathology 907 C. Symptoms 908 D. Gene hunters VII. Targeting Cell Loss: Cell Replacement Approaches 956 VIII. Biomarkers in Huntington's Disease 957

  11. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis
    New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa:
    Potential for Infertility Research

    David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3
    1Reproductive ...

  12. Modeling Of Blood Vessel Constriction In 2-D Case Using Molecular Dynamics Method

    E-print Network

    Mohamad Rendi; Suprijadi; Sparisoma Viridi

    2013-06-25

    Blood vessel constriction is simulated with particle-based method using a molecular dynamics authoring software known as Molecular Workbench (WM). Blood flow and vessel wall, the only components considered in constructing a blood vessel, are all represented in particle form with interaction potentials: Lennard-Jones potential, push-pull spring potential, and bending spring potential. Influence of medium or blood plasma is accommodated in plasma viscosity through Stokes drag force. It has been observed that pressure p is increased as constriction c is increased. Leakage of blood vessel starts at 80 % constriction, which shows existence of maximum pressure that can be overcome by vessel wall.

  13. Molecular dynamics of polystyrene solutions in microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdue, Mark J.; MacElroy, J. M. D.; O'Shea, D. F.; Okuom, Macduff O.; Blum, Frank D.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation techniques were used to assess the influence of an applied microwave field on the dynamics of methylamine-methanol and methylamine-dimethylformamide (DMF) solutions bound within atactic polystyrene over a range of polymer densities from 35to96wt% polymer. Atomistically detailed systems were studied, ranging from 3000 to 10 644 particles, using previously established potential models. Structural and dynamical properties were determined in the canonical (NVT) ensemble at 298K. The simulated DMF self-diffusion coefficients in polystyrene solutions were compared with the zero-field experimental results established with pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR spectrometry. A simulated external microwave field, with a rms electric field intensity of 0.1V/Å, was applied to these systems and the simulated dynamical results over field frequencies up to 104GHz were compared with the zero-field values. Simulated evidence of athermal effects on the diffusive characteristics of these mixtures is reported.

  14. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Eric; Viktor, Herna L.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods. PMID:25785262

  15. Phonon modes in single-walled molybdenum disulphide nanotubes: lattice dynamics calculation and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Bing-Shen; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-03-01

    We study the phonon modes in single-walled MoS2 nanotubes via lattice dynamics calculation and molecular dynamics simulation. The phonon spectra for tubes of arbitrary chiralities are calculated from a dynamical matrix constructed by the combination of an empirical potential with the conserved helical quantum numbers (?, n). In particular, we show that the frequency (?) of the radial breathing mode is inversely proportional to the tube diameter (d) as ? = 665.3/d cm-1. The eigenvectors of the twenty lowest-frequency phonon modes are illustrated. Based on these eigenvectors, we demonstrate that the radial breathing oscillation is initially disturbed by phonon modes of three-fold symmetry, then eventually the tube is squashed by modes of two-fold symmetry . Our study provides fundamental knowledge for further investigations of the thermal and mechanical properties of MoS2 nanotubes.

  16. Reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties of chemically reacting mixtures

    E-print Network

    Lisal, Martin

    Reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties cell (termed dynamic cell) to a reaction mixture simulation cell (termed control cell) that is formulated upon the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC) method, hence the term reaction ensemble molecular

  17. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Enhanced molecular dynamics sampling of drug target conformations.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bussey, Isela G; Doshi, Urmi; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Computational docking and virtual screening are two main important methods employed in structure-based drug design. Unlike the traditional approach that allows docking of a flexible ligand against a handful of receptor structures, receptor flexibility has now been appreciated and increasingly incorporated in computer-aided docking. Using a diverse set of receptor conformations increases the chances of finding potential drugs and inhibitors. Molecular dynamics (MD) is greatly useful to generate various receptor conformations. However, the diversity of the structures of the receptor, which is usually much larger than the ligand, depends on the sampling efficiency of MD. Enhanced sampling methods based on accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) can alleviate the sampling limitation of conventional MD and aid in representation of the phase space to a much greater extent. RaMD-db, a variant of aMD that applies boost potential to the rotatable dihedrals and non-bonded diffusive degrees of freedom has been proven to reproduce the equilibrium properties more accurately and efficiently than aMD. Here, we discuss recent advances in the aMD methodology and review the applicability of RaMD-db as an enhanced sampling method. RaMD-db is shown to be able to generate a broad distribution of structures of a drug target, Cyclophilin A. These structures that have never been observed previously in very long conventional MD can be further used for structure-based computer-aided drug discovery, and docking, and thus, in the identification and design of potential novel inhibitors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 35-42, 2015. PMID:26352326

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  20. Spontaneous formation of polyglutamine nanotubes with molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2010-04-28

    Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) beyond the pathogenic threshold (35-40 Gln) is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, several forms of spinocerebellar ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. To determine the structure of polyglutamine aggregates we perform replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations coupled with the optimized potential for effective peptide forcefield. Using a range of temperatures from 250 to 700 K, we study the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine monomer and dimer with chain lengths from 30 to 50 residues. All monomers show a similar structural change at the same temperature from alpha-helical structure to random coil, without indication of any significant beta-strand. For dimers, by contrast, starting from random structures, we observe spontaneous formation of antiparallel beta-sheets and triangular and circular beta-helical structures for polyglutamine with 40 residues in a 400 ns 50 temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation (total integrated time 20 micros). This approximately 32 A diameter structure reorganizes further into a tight antiparallel double-stranded approximately 22 A nanotube with 22 residues per turn close to Perutz' model for amyloid fibers as water-filled nanotubes. This diversity of structures suggests the existence of polymorphism for polyglutamine with possibly different pathways leading to the formation of toxic oligomers and to fibrils. PMID:20441310

  1. Spontaneous formation of polyglutamine nanotubes with molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) beyond the pathogenic threshold (35-40 Gln) is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, several forms of spinocerebellar ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. To determine the structure of polyglutamine aggregates we perform replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations coupled with the optimized potential for effective peptide forcefield. Using a range of temperatures from 250 to 700 K, we study the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine monomer and dimer with chain lengths from 30 to 50 residues. All monomers show a similar structural change at the same temperature from ?-helical structure to random coil, without indication of any significant ?-strand. For dimers, by contrast, starting from random structures, we observe spontaneous formation of antiparallel ?-sheets and triangular and circular ?-helical structures for polyglutamine with 40 residues in a 400 ns 50 temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation (total integrated time 20 ?s). This ˜32 Å diameter structure reorganizes further into a tight antiparallel double-stranded ˜22 Å nanotube with 22 residues per turn close to Perutz' model for amyloid fibers as water-filled nanotubes. This diversity of structures suggests the existence of polymorphism for polyglutamine with possibly different pathways leading to the formation of toxic oligomers and to fibrils.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do?Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Study of Helicobacter pylori Urease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori have been implicated in an array of gastrointestinal disorders including, but not limited to, gastric and duodenal ulcers and adenocarcinoma. This bacterium utilizes an enzyme, urease, to produce copious amounts of ammonia through urea hydrolysis in order to survive the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on the H. pylori urease enzyme have been employed in order to study structural features of this enzyme that may shed light on the hydrolysis mechanism. A total of 400 ns of MD simulation time were collected and analyzed in this study. A wide-open flap state previously observed in MD simulations on Klebsiella aerogenes [Roberts et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2012, 134, 9934] urease has been identified in the H. pylori enzyme that has yet to be experimentally observed. Critical distances between residues on the flap, contact points in the closed state, and the separation between the active site Ni2+ ions and the critical histidine ?322 residue were used to characterize flap motion. An additional flap in the active site was elaborated upon that we postulate may serve as an exit conduit for hydrolysis products. Finally we discuss the internal hollow cavity and present analysis of the distribution of sodium ions over the course of the simulation. PMID:24839409

  4. Folding Very Short Peptides Using Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Bosco K; Dill, Ken A

    2006-01-01

    Peptides often have conformational preferences. We simulated 133 peptide 8-mer fragments from six different proteins, sampled by replica-exchange molecular dynamics using Amber7 with a GB/SA (generalized-Born/solvent-accessible electrostatic approximation to water) implicit solvent. We found that 85 of the peptides have no preferred structure, while 48 of them converge to a preferred structure. In 85% of the converged cases (41 peptides), the structures found by the simulations bear some resemblance to their native structures, based on a coarse-grained backbone description. In particular, all seven of the ? hairpins in the native structures contain a fragment in the turn that is highly structured. In the eight cases where the bioinformatics-based I-sites library picks out native-like structures, the present simulations are largely in agreement. Such physics-based modeling may be useful for identifying early nuclei in folding kinetics and for assisting in protein-structure prediction methods that utilize the assembly of peptide fragments. PMID:16617376

  5. Fracture simulations via massively parallel molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.; Abraham, F.F.; Ravelo, R.

    1993-09-01

    Fracture simulations at the atomistic level have heretofore been carried out for relatively small systems of particles, typically 10,000 or less. In order to study anything approaching a macroscopic system, massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) must be employed. In two spatial dimensions (2D), it is feasible to simulate a sample that is 0.1 {mu}m on a side. We report on recent MD simulations of mode I crack extension under tensile loading at high strain rates. The method of uniaxial, homogeneously expanding periodic boundary conditions was employed to represent tensile stress conditions near the crack tip. The effects of strain rate, temperature, material properties (equation of state and defect energies), and system size were examined. We found that, in order to mimic a bulk sample, several tricks (in addition to expansion boundary conditions) need to be employed: (1) the sample must be pre-strained to nearly the condition at which the crack will spontaneously open; (2) to relieve the stresses at free surfaces, such as the initial notch, annealing by kinetic-energy quenching must be carried out to prevent unwanted rarefactions; (3) sound waves emitted as the crack tip opens and dislocations emitted from the crack tip during blunting must be absorbed by special reservoir regions. The tricks described briefly in this paper will be especially important to carrying out feasible massively parallel 3D simulations via MD.

  6. Efficient compression of molecular dynamics trajectory files.

    PubMed

    Marais, Patrick; Kenwood, Julian; Smith, Keegan Carruthers; Kuttel, Michelle M; Gain, James

    2012-10-15

    We investigate whether specific properties of molecular dynamics trajectory files can be exploited to achieve effective file compression. We explore two classes of lossy, quantized compression scheme: "interframe" predictors, which exploit temporal coherence between successive frames in a simulation, and more complex "intraframe" schemes, which compress each frame independently. Our interframe predictors are fast, memory-efficient and well suited to on-the-fly compression of massive simulation data sets, and significantly outperform the benchmark BZip2 application. Our schemes are configurable: atomic positional accuracy can be sacrificed to achieve greater compression. For high fidelity compression, our linear interframe predictor gives the best results at very little computational cost: at moderate levels of approximation (12-bit quantization, maximum error ? 10(-2) Å), we can compress a 1-2 fs trajectory file to 5-8% of its original size. For 200 fs time steps-typically used in fine grained water diffusion experiments-we can compress files to ~25% of their input size, still substantially better than BZip2. While compression performance degrades with high levels of quantization, the simulation error is typically much greater than the associated approximation error in such cases. PMID:22730053

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biotin Carboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Sten O. Nilsson; Gao, Jiali; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2009-01-01

    Biotin carboxylase catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin, and is one component of the multienzyme complex acetyl-CoA carboxylase that catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid synthesis in all organisms. Biotin carboxylase from Escherichia coli, whose crystal structures with and without ATP bound have been determined, has served as a model system for this component of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase complex. The two crystal structures revealed a large conformational change of one domain relative to the other domains when ATP is bound. Unfortunately, the crystal structure with ATP bound was obtained with an inactive site-directed mutant of the enzyme. As a consequence the structure with ATP bound lacked key structural information such as for the Mg2+ ions and contained altered conformations of key active site residues. Therefore, nanosecond molecular dynamics studies of the wild-type biotin carboxylase were undertaken to supplant and amend the results of the crystal structures. Specifically, the protein-metal interactionsof the two catalytically critical Mg2+ ions bound in the active site are presented along with a reevaluation of the conformations of active site residues bound to ATP. In addition, the regions of the polypeptide chain that serve as hinges for the large conformational change were identified. The results of the hinge analysis complemented a covariance analysis that identified the individual structural elements of biotin carboxylase that change their conformation in response to ATP binding. PMID:18271571

  8. Dynamics, flexibility, and allostery in molecular chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Skjærven, Lars; Cuellar, Jorge; Martinez, Aurora; Valpuesta, José María

    2015-09-14

    The chaperonins are a family of molecular chaperones present in all three kingdoms of life. They are classified into Group I and Group II. Group I consists of the bacterial variants (GroEL) and the eukaryotic ones from mitochondria and chloroplasts (Hsp60), while Group II consists of the archaeal (thermosomes) and eukaryotic cytosolic variants (CCT or TRiC). Both groups assemble into a dual ring structure, with each ring providing a protective folding chamber for nascent and denatured proteins. Their functional cycle is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis, which drives a series of structural rearrangements that enable encapsulation and subsequent release of the substrate protein. Chaperonins have elaborate allosteric mechanisms to regulate their functional cycle. Long-range negative cooperativity between the two rings ensures alternation of the folding chambers. Positive intra-ring cooperativity, which facilitates concerted conformational transitions within the protein subunits of one ring, has only been demonstrated for Group I chaperonins. In this review, we describe our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms and the structure-function relationships in these complex protein systems with a particular focus on the structural dynamics, allostery, and associated conformational rearrangements. PMID:26140986

  9. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  10. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  11. Multiscale molecular dynamics using the matched interface and boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Weihua; Wei, G.W.

    2011-01-20

    The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is an established multiscale model for electrostatic analysis of biomolecules and other dielectric systems. PB based molecular dynamics (MD) approach has a potential to tackle large biological systems. Obstacles that hinder the current development of PB based MD methods are concerns in accuracy, stability, efficiency and reliability. The presence of complex solvent-solute interface, geometric singularities and charge singularities leads to challenges in the numerical solution of the PB equation and electrostatic force evaluation in PB based MD methods. Recently, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method has been utilized to develop the first second order accurate PB solver that is numerically stable in dealing with discontinuous dielectric coefficients, complex geometric singularities and singular source charges. The present work develops the PB based MD approach using the MIB method. New formulation of electrostatic forces is derived to allow the use of sharp molecular surfaces. Accurate reaction field forces are obtained by directly differentiating the electrostatic potential. Dielectric boundary forces are evaluated at the solvent-solute interface using an accurate Cartesian-grid surface integration method. The electrostatic forces located at reentrant surfaces are appropriately assigned to related atoms. Extensive numerical tests are carried out to validate the accuracy and stability of the present electrostatic force calculation. The new PB based MD method is implemented in conjunction with the AMBER package. MIB based MD simulations of biomolecules are demonstrated via a few example systems.

  12. Enhanced molecular dynamics for simulating porous interphase layers in batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lee, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level using computational techniques is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating anistropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An important technological example is ion transport through solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers that form in many common types of batteries. These layers regulate the rate at which electro-chemical reactions occur, affecting power, safety, and reliability. In this work, we develop a model for incorporating electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. In this application, the electric potential is represented on a FE mesh and is calculated from a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagates to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical or theoretical solutions are known. Calculations of salt water solutions in complex domains are performed to understand how ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the melting of nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Paras M.; Rice, Betsy M.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2003-11-01

    Molecular dynamic studies of melting of nitromethane have been carried out using two methods: (1) void-nucleated melting with the gradual heating of the lattice and (2) equilibration of coexisting liquid and solid phases. The results are in near agreement with each other; the small difference is attributed to the hysteresis effect associated with the direct heating process. The values of the melting temperature Tm computed by using the intermolecular interaction potential of Sorescu et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)] are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data at various values of pressure ranging from 1 atm to 30 kbar. The computed values of the melting temperature satisfy the Simon-Glatzel equation P(kbar)=aTmb+c, where a=1.597×10-5, b=2.322, c=-6.74, and Tm is in kelvin. A comparison of computed Tm with and without the presence of molecular vibrations reveals that Tm is insensitive to the intramolecular interaction term of the potential energy function, but depends strongly on the intermolecular interactions, particularly the Coulombic term (i.e., the partial charges on atoms).

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study of Void Growth and Dislocations in Dynamic Fracture of FCC and BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2003-06-17

    Void growth with concomitant dislocation formation has been studied in single crystal face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic metals using molecular dynamics method with Embedded-Atom and Finnis-Sinclair potentials for copper and tantalum, respectively. We have concentrated on the quantitative analysis of the void shape evolution, on the structure of dislocations, which emerge from the void, and on the continuum measures such as plastic strain. The effects of strain-rate, differences between lattice structures, and loading conditions as uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial expansion on the shape of the void and on the dislocations have been investigated.

  15. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed quartz.

    PubMed

    Farrow, M R; Probert, M I J

    2011-07-28

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer, and van Santen [Phys. Rev. B 43, 5068 (1991)] to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geometry optimised system of a polar slab in a three-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under representative pressure conditions of the Earth core, but unsuitable for high-pressure shock wave simulations. We also find that the BKS potential incorrectly prefers the ?-quartz phase over the ?-quartz phase at zero-temperature, and that there is a ? ? ? phase-transition at 6 GPa. PMID:21806139

  16. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan P; Cheng, H P

    2014-08-01

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions. PMID:25106591

  17. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-01

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  18. Vectorization for Molecular Dynamics on Intel Xeon Phi Corpocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongsuk

    2014-03-01

    Many modern processors are capable of exploiting data-level parallelism through the use of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) execution. The new Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor supports 512 bit vector registers for the high performance computing. In this paper, we have developed a hierarchical parallelization scheme for accelerated molecular dynamics simulations with the Terfoff potentials for covalent bond solid crystals on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor systems. The scheme exploits multi-level parallelism computing. We combine thread-level parallelism using a tightly coupled thread-level and task-level parallelism with 512-bit vector register. The simulation results show that the parallel performance of SIMD implementations on Xeon Phi is apparently superior to their x86 CPU architecture.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Guillaume; Garcia, Philippe; Sabathier, Catherine; Palancher, Hervé; Maillard, Serge

    2014-06-01

    The primary damage induced within a uranium dioxide matrix subjected to a flux of energetic ions was investigated by classical molecular dynamics. UO2 was modeled using the set of empirical potentials based on a rigid ion model. Displacement cascades were initiated by accelerating a uranium primary knock-on atom to a kinetic energy up to 100 keV. It was first shown that the estimated RID a-thermal coefficient is well below those which are deemed relevant for spent nuclear fuels. Cascades were then purposely overlapped within the same simulation box so as to study the response of the material to increasing damage levels. During cascade overlap sequences, the growth of nanometric voids was observed. Obtained results evidenced a radiation damage controlled heterogeneous mechanism for insoluble fission product segregation in UO2.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of dislocations in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Paul; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Devincre, Benoît

    2013-11-01

    The plasticity of the fluorite structure in UO2 is investigated with molecular dynamics simulation and empirical potential. The stacking fault energies and the dislocation core structures with Burgers vector a2<110> are systematically calculated. All dislocation core structures show a significant increase of the oxygen sub-lattice disorder at temperatures higher than 1500 K. The threshold stress for dislocation glide is found to decrease with increasing temperature but its values is always very high, several GPa at 0 K and several hundred of MPa at 2000 K. A relation between the dislocation mobility dependence with temperature and the increase of the oxygen sub-lattice disorder in the dislocation cores is established.

  2. The Study on the Gas Permeabilities of the ETHYLENE/1-HEXENE Copolymer by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sizhu; Yi, Jun; Zhang, Lishu; Zhang, Liqun; Mark, James E.

    In this research, molecular dynamics(MD) simulations were used to study the transport properties of small gas molecules in poly(ethylene-co-1-hexene) copolymer. The condensed-phase optimized molecular potentials for atomistic simulation studies (COMPASS) forcefield was applied. The diffusion coefficients were obtained from MD (NVT ensemble). The results indicated that the diffusion coefficient of oxygen increased with increasing 1-hexene content in copolymer membrane.

  3. Modeling shockwave deformation via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD), where the equations of motion of up to thousands of interacting atoms are solved on the computer, has proven to be a powerful tool for investigating a wide variety of nonequilibrium processes from the atomistic viewpoint. Simulations of shock waves in three-dimensional (3D) solids and fluids have shown conclusively that shear-stress relaxation is achieved through atomic rearrangement. In the case of fluids, the transverse motion is viscous, and the constitutive model of Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics has been shown to be accurate - even on the time and distance scales of MD experiments. For strong shocks in solids, the plastic flow that leads to shear-stress relaxation in MD is highly localized near the shock front, involving a slippage along close-packed planes. For shocks of intermediate strength, MD calculations exhibit an elastic precursor running out in front of the steady plastic wave, where slippage similar in character to that in the very strong shocks leads to shear-stress relaxation. An interesting correlation between the maximum shear stress and the Hugoniot pressure jump is observed for both 3D and fluid shockwave calculations, which may have some utility in modeling applications. At low shock strengths, the MD simulations show only elastic compression, with no permanent transverse atomic strains. The result for perfect 3D crystals is also seen in calculations for 1D chains. It is speculated that, if it were practical, a very large MD system containing dislocations could be expected to exhibit more realistic plastic flow for weak shock waves, too.

  4. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  5. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  6. Massive thermostatting in isothermal density functional molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windiks, René; Delley, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the excellent temperature control and rapid equipartioning of the kinetic energy of the massive generalized Gaussian moment thermostat (MGGMT, one thermostat is coupled to each degree of freedom) in isothermal density functional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. The MGGMT is implemented in the DMoL3 approach and, as far as we know, it is the first time in literature that the MGGMT is combined with density functional methods. The performance of the MGGMT approach is illustrated with MD simulations of the iron porphyrin-imidazole-carbon monoxide [FeP(Im)(CO)] complex and compared with constant energy MD simulations on the same system. Both MD approaches lead to similar average structures of the FeP(Im)(CO) complex. The examination of the frequency distribution functions reveals that the structural dynamics are not seriously affected by the dynamics of the parameters introduced by the MGGMT. The equipartitioning rates in the MGGMT simulations are significantly faster than in the constant energy simulation. We recommend the MGGMT approach as an very efficient equilibration technique in MD simulations and it emerges as a useful technique for, e.g., simulated annealing and nonequilibrium MD simulations.

  7. Zoonotic Potential and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia Species and Giardiasis†

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination. PMID:21233509

  8. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  9. Protein dynamics and the immunological evolution of molecular recognition

    E-print Network

    Yin, Jun

    Protein dynamics and the immunological evolution of molecular recognition Ralph Jimenez , Georgina for review September 8, 2003) While it is accepted that protein flexibility plays a role in protein folding, catalysis, and molecular recognition, few techniques are capable of the rigorous measurement of protein

  10. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  11. Bohm's Quantum Potential and the Visualization of Molecular Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    David Bohm's ontological interpretation of quantum theory can shed light on otherwise counter-intuitive quantum mechanical phenomena including chemical bonding. In the field of quantum chemistry, Richard Bader has shown that the topology of the Laplacian of the electronic charge density characterizes many features of molecular structure and reactivity. Visual and computational examination suggests that the Laplacian of Bader and the quantum potential of Bohm are morphologically equivalent. It appears that Bohmian mechanics and the quantum potential can make chemistry as clear as they makes physics.

  12. EDITORIAL: 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, A. J. C.

    2011-08-01

    This special section of Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (CAMOP) in Physica Scripta collects some of the papers that have been presented at the 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems MOLEC 2010 held in September 2010 in Curia, Portugal, as part of a series of biennial MOLEC conferences. This started in 1976 in Trento, Italy, and has continued, visiting 17 cities in 11 countries, namely Denmark, The Netherlands, Israel, France, Italy, Germany, Czech Republic, Spain, United Kingdom, Turkey and Russia. Following the MOLEC tradition, the scientific programme of the Curia meeting focused on experimental and theoretical studies of molecular interactions, collision dynamics, spectroscopy, and related fields. It included invited speakers from 22 countries, who were asked to summarize the problems reported in their presentations with the objective of revealing the current thinking of leading researchers in atomic, molecular and optical physics. It is hoped that their authoritative contributions presented in this CAMOP special section will also appeal to non-specialists through their clear and broad introductions to the field as well as references to the accessible literature. This CAMOP special section comprises ten contributions, which cover theoretical studies on the electronic structure of molecules and clusters as well as dynamics of elastic, inelastic and reactive encounters between atoms, molecules, ions, clusters and surfaces. Specifically, it includes electronic structure calculations using the traditional coupled-cluster method (Barreto et al 028111), the electron-attached equation-of-motion coupled cluster method (Hansen et al 028110), the diffusion Monte Carlo method (López-Durán et al 028107) and the path-integral Monte Carlo method (Barragán et al 028109). The contributions on molecular dynamics include on-the-fly quasi-classical trajectories on a five-atom molecule (Yu 028104), quantum reaction dynamics on triatomics (Bovino et al 028103, and Hankel et al 028102) and statistical reaction dynamics using a model based on the long-range interaction potential (McCarroll 028106). A contribution on gas-surface interactions is also included (Sahoo et al 028105) as well as first-principles ab initio calculations to explore the hydrogen-graphene interaction (Irving et al 028108). These articles reflect the recent progress made in this field and constructively build on work described in the previous three MOLEC special sections of CAMOP published in Physica Scripta. I thank, on behalf of the scientific organizing committee of MOLEC, all the authors who contributed and Physica Scripta for providing a platform for the publication of this special section dedicated to MOLEC 2010. A special thanks goes to the CAMOP Editor, Harold Linarz, for the excellent guidance in handling the editorial work. I hope that the articles catalyze the attention of the readers towards the topics covered and contribute in attracting them to attend MOLEC 2012 in Oxford, UK.

  13. Coupled thermal and electromagnetic induced decomposition in the molecular explosive ?HMX; a reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mitchell A; van Duin, Adri C T; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations with the reactive potential ReaxFF to investigate the initial reactions and subsequent decomposition in the high-energy-density material ?-HMX excited thermally and via electric fields at various frequencies. We focus on the role of insult type and strength on the energy increase for initial decomposition and onset of exothermic chemistry. We find both of these energies increase with the increasing rate of energy input and plateau as the processes become athermal for high loading rates. We also find that the energy increase required for exothermic reactions and, to a lesser extent, that for initial chemical reactions depend on the insult type. Decomposition can be induced with relatively weak insults if the appropriate modes are targeted but increasing anharmonicities during heating lead to fast energy transfer and equilibration between modes that limit the effect of loading type. PMID:24400687

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Dynamics and Kinetics of Folding Peptides in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Litinas, Iraklis; Koutselos, Andreas D

    2015-12-31

    The conformations of flexible molecular species, such as oligomers and oligopeptides, and their interconversion in the gas phase have been probed by ion mobility spectrometry measurements. The ion motion is interpreted through the calculation of effective cross sections in the case of stable conformations of the macromolecules. However, when the molecular structures transform to each other as the ions collide with gas atoms during their flight through the drift tube, the introduction of an average cross section is required. To provide a direct way for the reproduction of the ion motion, we employ a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation method and consider a molecular model that consists of two connected stiff cylindrical bodies interacting through an intramolecular model potential. With this procedure we have calculated the ion mobility as a function of temperature for a prototype peptide that converts between a helical and an extended globular form. The results are in good agreement with ion mobility spectrometry data confirming that an angular vibration coordinate can be used for the interpretation of the shifting of the drift-time distributions at high temperatures. The approach produces mean kinetic energies as well as various combined distributions of the ion degrees of freedom. It is easily applied to flexible macromolecular ions and can be extended to include additional degrees of freedom. PMID:26641107

  15. Energy Conservation in Adaptive Hybrid Atomistic/ Coarse-Grain Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Energy Conservation in Adaptive Hybrid Atomistic/ Coarse-Grain Molecular Dynamics Bernd Ensing to recover the total energy as a conserved quantity, even when the total number of degrees of freedom changes and space. We supplement the potential and kinetic energy expressions with auxiliary terms in order

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compression of nickel: From monocrystals to nanocrystals

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Marc A.

    ­J potentials that, at shock strengths above the Hugoniot elas- tic limit (HEL), shock waves traveling alongMolecular dynamics simulations of shock compression of nickel: From monocrystals to nanocrystals H Available online 6 September 2008 Abstract Shock compression of mono- and nanocrystalline (nc) nickel

  17. J. Phys. Chem. 1903, 87, 4277-4201 4277 Molecular Dynamics Study of Ice Crystallite Melting

    E-print Network

    Stillinger, Frank

    J. Phys. Chem. 1903, 87, 4277-4201 4277 Molecular Dynamics Study of Ice Crystallite Melting Thomas been used to examine the melting process for a 250-moleculeice Ih crystallite. The ST2 potential on those interactions. Melting was observed to begin at the crystallite surface and to proceed inward

  18. Statistical temperature molecular dynamics: Application to coarse-grained -barrel-forming protein models

    E-print Network

    Straub, John E.

    , exhibiting rugged potential energy landscapes with a high degree of frustration. STMD simulations combined by a multitude of local minima sepa- rated by barriers.1 Thus conventional canonical simulations using Monte Carlo MC or molecular dynamics MD algo- rithms can fail to sample the thermally significant phase space

  19. Mixtures of protic ionic liquids and molecular cosolvents: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Gómez-González, Víctor; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Rodríguez, Julio R.; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J.; Varela, Luis M.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the effect of molecular cosolvents (water, ethanol, and methanol) on the structure of mixtures of these compounds with a protic ionic liquid (ethylammonium nitrate) is analyzed by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. Included are as-yet-unreported measurements of the densities of these mixtures, used to test our parameterized potential. The evolution of the structure of the mixtures throughout the concentration range is reported by means of the calculation of coordination numbers and the fraction of hydrogen bonds in the system, together with radial and spatial distribution functions for the various molecular species and molecular ions in the mixture. The overall picture indicates a homogeneous mixing process of added cosolvent molecules, which progressively accommodate themselves in the network of hydrogen bonds of the protic ionic liquid, contrarily to what has been reported for their aprotic counterparts. Moreover, no water clustering similar to that in aprotic mixtures is detected in protic aqueous mixtures, but a somehow abrupt replacing of [NO3]- anions in the first hydration shell of the polar heads of the ionic liquid cations is registered around 60% water molar concentration. The spatial distribution functions of water and alcohols differ in the coordination type, since water coordinates with [NO3]- in a bidentate fashion in the equatorial plane of the anion, while alcohols do it in a monodentate fashion, competing for the oxygen atoms of the anion. Finally, the collision times of the different cosolvent molecules are also reported by calculating their velocity autocorrelation functions, and a caging effect is observed for water molecules but not in alcohol mixtures.

  20. Mixtures of protic ionic liquids and molecular cosolvents: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Gómez-González, Víctor; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Rodríguez, Julio R; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the effect of molecular cosolvents (water, ethanol, and methanol) on the structure of mixtures of these compounds with a protic ionic liquid (ethylammonium nitrate) is analyzed by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. Included are as-yet-unreported measurements of the densities of these mixtures, used to test our parameterized potential. The evolution of the structure of the mixtures throughout the concentration range is reported by means of the calculation of coordination numbers and the fraction of hydrogen bonds in the system, together with radial and spatial distribution functions for the various molecular species and molecular ions in the mixture. The overall picture indicates a homogeneous mixing process of added cosolvent molecules, which progressively accommodate themselves in the network of hydrogen bonds of the protic ionic liquid, contrarily to what has been reported for their aprotic counterparts. Moreover, no water clustering similar to that in aprotic mixtures is detected in protic aqueous mixtures, but a somehow abrupt replacing of [NO3](-) anions in the first hydration shell of the polar heads of the ionic liquid cations is registered around 60% water molar concentration. The spatial distribution functions of water and alcohols differ in the coordination type, since water coordinates with [NO3](-) in a bidentate fashion in the equatorial plane of the anion, while alcohols do it in a monodentate fashion, competing for the oxygen atoms of the anion. Finally, the collision times of the different cosolvent molecules are also reported by calculating their velocity autocorrelation functions, and a caging effect is observed for water molecules but not in alcohol mixtures. PMID:24908021

  1. Phonon properties of graphene derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Kalosakas, George; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A method that utilises atomic trajectories and velocities from molecular dynamics simulations has been suitably adapted and employed for the implicit calculation of the phonon dispersion curves of graphene. Classical potentials widely used in the literature were employed. Their performance was assessed for each individual phonon branch and the overall phonon dispersion, using available inelastic x-ray scattering data. The method is promising for systems with large scale periodicity, accounts for anharmonic effects and non-bonding interactions with a general environment, and it is applicable under finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the phonon dispersion curves has been examined with emphasis on the doubly degenerate Raman active ?-E2g phonon at the zone centre, where experimental results are available. The potentials used show diverse behaviour. The Tersoff-2010 potential exhibits the most systematic and physically sound behaviour in this regard, and gives a first-order temperature coefficient of ??=??0.05?cm?1/K for the ?-E2g shift in agreement with reported experimental values. PMID:26316252

  2. Molecular Dynamics Study of Thermal Properties of Intermetallic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kart, H. H.; Tomak, Mehmet; Ça?in, Tahír

    2006-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of bulk copper, gold pure metals and their ordered intermetallics alloys of Cu3Au(L12) and CuAu3(L12) have been carried out between above 0 K and below the their melting points of the materials for predicting their temperature-dependent thermophysical properties. The effects of temperature and concentration on the physical properties such as enthalpy, volume, heat capacity, thermal expansion and density of CuxAu1-x are studied. Especially, temperature-dependent polynomial functions of enthalpy, volume and density are obtained. Sutton-Chen (SC) and Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) many-body potentials are used in the constant enthalpy-constant pressure ensemble (HPN) and constant pressure-constant temperature ensemble (TPN). Three important properties such as the coefficient of thermal volume expansion, heat capcity and density are correctly found to increase with temperature. Q-SC potential parameter results are usually closer to experimental values than the ones predicted from SC potential parameters.

  3. Phonon properties of graphene derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Kalosakas, George; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos

    2015-08-01

    A method that utilises atomic trajectories and velocities from molecular dynamics simulations has been suitably adapted and employed for the implicit calculation of the phonon dispersion curves of graphene. Classical potentials widely used in the literature were employed. Their performance was assessed for each individual phonon branch and the overall phonon dispersion, using available inelastic x-ray scattering data. The method is promising for systems with large scale periodicity, accounts for anharmonic effects and non-bonding interactions with a general environment, and it is applicable under finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the phonon dispersion curves has been examined with emphasis on the doubly degenerate Raman active ?-E2g phonon at the zone centre, where experimental results are available. The potentials used show diverse behaviour. The Tersoff-2010 potential exhibits the most systematic and physically sound behaviour in this regard, and gives a first-order temperature coefficient of ??=?-0.05?cm-1/K for the ?-E2g shift in agreement with reported experimental values.

  4. Molecular-bond hardening and dynamics of molecular stabilization and trapping in intense laser pulses

    E-print Network

    Yao, Guanhua; Chu, Shih-I

    1993-07-01

    We extend our previous study [Chem. Phys. Lett. 197, 413 (1992)] of the molecular stabilization in intense laser fields by considering the dynamical behavior of the H(+)(2) molecules in intense femtosecond short laser pulses at 775 nm. Significant...

  5. Molecular-bond hardening and dynamics of molecular stabilization and trapping in intense laser pulses

    E-print Network

    Chu, Shih-I; Yao, Guanhua

    1993-07-01

    We extend our previous study [Chem. Phys. Lett. 197, 413 (1992)] of the molecular stabilization in intense laser fields by considering the dynamical behavior of the H+2 molecules in intense femtosecond short laser pulses at 775 nm. Significant...

  6. Thermodynamics of site-specific small molecular ion interactions with DNA duplex: a molecular dynamics study

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2015-01-01

    The stability and dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is affected by the preferential occupancy of small monovalent molecular ions. Small metal and molecular ions such as sodium and alkyl ammonium have crucial biological functions in human body, affect the thermodynamic stability of the duplex DNA and exhibit preferential binding. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the preferential binding of metal ion such as Na+ and molecular ions such as tetramethyl ammonium (TMA+) and 2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium (CHO+) to double stranded DNA. The thermodynamic driving force for a particular molecular ion- DNA interaction is determined by decomposing the free energy of binding into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Our simulations show that each of these molecular ions preferentially binds to the minor groove of the DNA and the extent of binding is highest for CHO+. The ion binding processes are found to be entropically favourable. In addition, the contribution of hy...

  7. The Art of Molecular Dynamics Simulation (by D. C. Rapaport)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molner, Stephen P.

    1999-02-01

    Cambridge University Press: New York, 1996. 400 pp. ISBN 0 521 44561 2. $74.95. This book describes the extremely powerful techniques of molecular dynamics simulation. The techniques involve solving the classical many-body problems in contexts relevant to the study of matter at the atomic level. The method allows the prediction of static and dynamics properties of substances directly from the underlying interactions between molecules. This is, of course, a very broad subject and the author has adopted a dual approach in that the text is partly tutorial and also contains a large number of computer programs for practical use. Rapaport has adopted the attitude of trying the simplest method first. Atoms are modeled as point particles interacting through point potentials. Molecules are represented by atoms with orientation dependent forces, or as extended structures each containing several interaction sites. The molecules may be rigid, flexible, or somewhere in between, and if there are internal degrees of freedom there will be internal forces as well. The intent of the book is not to discuss the design of molecular models, but rather to make use of existing models, and from a pedagogical viewpoint the simpler the model the better. The aim of the book is to demonstrate the general methodology of molecular dynamics simulation by example, not to review the large body of literature covering the many different kinds of models developed for specific applications. The text is partly tutorial, but also contains a large number of computer programs for practical use. This volume will serve as an introduction to the subject for beginners and as a reference manual for the more experienced practitioner. The material covers a wide range of practical methods and real applications and is organized as a series of case studies. The typical case study includes a summary of the theoretical background used for the formulation of the computational approach. That is described by either a complete program listing or a series of modifications or additions to a program from an earlier case study. The initial conditions of the model, organization of the input and output, accuracy, convergence, and efficiency are also addressed for each case and, of course, the results of the computation are given and discussed. The book begins with the simplest case of basic molecular dynamics, a sift-disk fluid. The development is discussed in considerable depth to set the tone of the work. Later chapters extend the basic model in various directions, deal with various types of measurements, improve the computational methods, and introduce new models for more complex problems. These chapters also discuss the methodology for simulating monatomic systems and focus on measuring the thermodynamic and structural properties of systems in equilibrium. Consideration is given to the dynamical properties of equilibrium systems, including transport coefficients and the correlation functions that characterize space- and time-dependent properties. Chapters are devoted to the study of systems under constant temperature and pressure and the dynamics of rigid systems. It is difficult to cover all aspects of such a broad topic as the subject of this book; and the author has not attempted an exhaustive or encyclopedic coverage, but has produced an excellent introduction to the subject. The publisher has made the implementation of the numerous programs essentially painless by making them available via browser and the World Wide Web. The easy availability of the software, written in C, was welcomed by this old Fortran programmer. It is to be hoped that this service is representative of a trend in technical publishing. Overall this work is a pleasure to read and study and would be a valuable addition to the library of both the beginner and the experienced practitioner of the art.

  8. Control of molecular dynamics with zero-area fields: Application to molecular orientation and photofragmentation

    E-print Network

    D. Sugny; Stéphane Vranckx; Mamadou Ndong; Nathalie Vaeck; Osman Atabek; Michèle Desouter-Lecomte

    2014-12-15

    The constraint of time-integrated zero-area on the laser field is a fundamental, both theoretical and experimental requirement in the control of molecular dynamics. By using techniques of local and optimal control theory, we show how to enforce this constraint on two benchmark control problems, namely molecular orientation and photofragmentation. The origin and the physical implications on the dynamics of this zero-area control field are discussed.

  9. Unfixed cryosections of striated muscle to study dynamic molecular events.

    PubMed Central

    Ménétret, J F; Craig, R

    1994-01-01

    The structures of the actin and myosin filaments of striated muscle have been studied extensively in the past by sectioning of fixed specimens. However, chemical fixation alters molecular details and prevents biochemically induced structural changes. To overcome these problems, we investigate here the potential of cryosectioning unfixed muscle. In cryosections of relaxed, unfixed specimens, individual myosin filaments displayed the characteristic helical organization of detached cross-bridges, but the filament lattice had disintegrated. To preserve both the filament lattice and the molecular structure of the filaments, we decided to section unfixed rigor muscle, stabilized by actomyosin cross-bridges. The best sections showed periodic, angled cross-bridges attached to actin and their Fourier transforms displayed layer lines similar to those in x-ray diffraction patterns of rigor muscle. To preserve relaxed filaments in their original lattice, unfixed sections of rigor muscle were picked up on a grid and relaxed before negative staining. The myosin and actin filaments showed the characteristic helical arrangements of detached cross-bridges and actin subunits, and Fourier transforms were similar to x-ray patterns of relaxed muscle. We conclude that the rigor structure of muscle and the ability of the filament lattice to undergo the rigor-relaxed transformation can be preserved in unfixed cryosections. In the future, it should be possible to carry out dynamic studies of active sacromeres by cryo-electron microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7819493

  10. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  11. Comparing Molecular Dynamics Models for Electrolyte Solutions in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Templeton, Jeremy

    2012-11-01

    In electrolyte modelling, it is common to simplify the solvent using the three-component model (3CM), i.e. a single-site, chargeless Lennard-Jones atom as the solvent component. To account for the dielectric nature of typical solvents, a relative permittivity value is applied to all Coulombic interactions, thus weakening ion-ion interactions as if each ion is surrounded by a solvation shell. Fluid Density Functional Theory, Monte Carlo simulation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation all commonly employ the 3CM to facilitate calculations, but the consequences are not well characterized. We used MD to compare the 3CM electrolyte to a molecular solvent model (MSM) where the solvent is a three-site H2O) molecule. Special care was taken to compare cases with the same thermodynamic state by having a quantifiable reference state, and cases covered a range of applied surface charge in a nanochannel configuration. At a glance, the two models give qualitatively similar density profiles. However, we find that many profile features, physical quantities such as electric field and potential, as well as ionic packing structure near the surface evolve quite differently as the load is varied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the USDoE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  13. Ab Initio Interactive Molecular Dynamics on Graphical Processing Units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Luehr, Nathan; Jin, Alex G B; Martínez, Todd J

    2015-10-13

    A virtual molecular modeling kit is developed based on GPU-enabled interactive ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). The code uses the TeraChem and VMD programs with a modified IMD interface. Optimization of the GPU accelerated TeraChem program specifically for small molecular systems is discussed, and a robust multiple time step integrator is employed to accurately integrate strong user-supplied pulling forces. Smooth and responsive visualization techniques are developed to allow interactive manipulation at minimum simulation rates below five MD steps per second. Representative calculations at the Hartree-Fock level of theory are demonstrated for molecular systems containing up to a few dozen atoms. PMID:26574246

  14. Attosecond molecular dynamics: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Franck; Ivanov, Misha Y.; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2014-03-01

    The emerging application of attosecond techniques to molecular systems allows the role of electronic coherence in the control of chemical reactions to be investigated. Prompt ionization of molecules by an attosecond pulse may induce charge migration across a molecular structure on attosecond to few-femtosecond timescales, thereby possibly determining the subsequent relaxation pathways that a molecule may take. We discuss how proposals for this 'charge-directed reactivity' fit within the current understanding of quantum control and review the current state of the art of attosecond molecular science. Specifically, we review the role of electronic coherence and coupling of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in high-harmonic spectroscopy and in the first attosecond pump-probe experiments on molecular systems.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  16. Effect of orbital and ionic dynamics coupling in barrier crossing rates for Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanam, L. N.; Ong, S. W.; Tok, E. S.; Kang, H. C.

    2015-02-01

    Even though the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) method provides excellent sampling for thermal equilibrium, coupling between ionic motion and the fictitious orbital dynamics leads to an underestimation of ionic vibration frequencies In this letter we examine how this coupling affects calculated rates of energy-barrier crossing. Simulating double-well potentials in 'toy' models based on H3O2- and H5O2+ complexes, we demonstrate that barrier crossing rates can be dramatically affected depending upon how orbitals evolve at the top of the reaction barrier. Thus, it is important that calculated dynamical quantities such as chemical reaction rates be assessed for this coupling effect.

  17. Dynamical model of the molecular bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GryziSki, Micha

    1994-01-01

    A particular one-dimensional case of a classical three-body problem which is supposed to represent a molecular system is investigated. It is shown that the "free-fall molecular oscillator" consisting of two nuclei and an electron moving rapidly along a straight line from one nucleus to the other represents properties of the metallic bond. In particular, formulae describing elasticity and thermal expansion of metals are derived. The physical nature of the Fermi energy is identified.

  18. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  19. Dynamical Properties of Surface-mounted Dipolar Molecular Rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Jason; Price, John; Caskey, Douglas; Michl, Josef

    2007-03-01

    We use dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) to study the rotational dynamics of dipolar molecules mounted on fused SiO2 surfaces. Each ``molecular rotor'' consists of three parts: 1) a mounting group for attachment to the substrate, 2) a rotating group having a permanent dipole moment, and 3) an axis connecting the rotor to the attachment group. Attachment is facilitated either by covalent bonding through reaction of silane groups with surface hydroxyls or by van der Waals interactions. Fused SiO2 substrates are patterned with interdigitated electrode Au capacitors (C ˜ 1 pF), and rotor molecule dynamics are characterized by measurement of the capacitance C and loss tangent ??ReZ/ImZ. We employ a ratio-transformer bridge technique to measure these quantities, with sensitivities in C and ? of 1 aF and 1 ppm, respectively. A unique aspect of this work is the experimental apparatus, which allows us to prepare sub-monolayer films, determine coverage via two independent methods (DRS and XPS), and study molecule rotational motion, in-situ in ultra-high vacuum. Results will be presented on the kinetics of rotor adsorption/desorption, barrier height and asymmetry of the rotational potential of the molecules, and the effects of varying rotor coverages and adventitious H2O.

  20. Application of molecular dynamics simulations for structural studies of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bródka, A; Ko?oczek, J; Burian, A

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics studies based on the Brenner-Tersoff second-generation reactive empirical bond order potential and the Lennard-Jones carbon-carbon potential for intra- and inter-layer interactions have been performed for carbon nanotubes. These potentials reproduce reasonably the carbon-carbon distances and inter-layer spacing. The structure factors and the reduced radial distribution functions computed from the cartesian coordinates, resulting from energy minimisation and molecular dynamics simulations at 2 K and 300 K have been obtained for two models of two- and five-wall carbon nanotubes containing defects in the form of five and seven membered carbon rings. The results of computations have been compared with experimental data obtained from neutron and X-ray diffraction. The energy relaxation and the molecular dynamics simulations at 2 K and 300 K with appropriate values of the Debye-Waller factor lead practically to the same results which are in a good agreement with the experimental data indicating that molecular dynamics reproduce all structure features of the investigated carbon nanotubes together with thermal oscillations. Possible applications of this approach for other carbon nanotubes and related materials have been also discussed. PMID:17450918

  1. Free energy calculations using dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Retegan, Marius; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel F.

    2010-08-14

    We describe an efficient and accurate method to compute free energy changes in complex chemical systems that cannot be described through classical molecular dynamics simulations, examples of which are chemical and photochemical reactions in solution, enzymes, interfaces, etc. It is based on the use of dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. A low-level quantum mechanical method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force through the umbrella sampling technique. Then, a high-level quantum mechanical method is used to estimate a free energy correction on selected points of the reaction coordinate using perturbation theory. The precision of the results is comparable to that of ab initio molecular dynamics methods such as the Car-Parrinello approach but the computational cost is much lower, roughly by two to three orders of magnitude. The method is illustrated by discussing the association free energy of simple organometallic compounds, although the field of application is very broad.

  2. Free energy calculations using dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Retegan, Marius; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2010-08-14

    We describe an efficient and accurate method to compute free energy changes in complex chemical systems that cannot be described through classical molecular dynamics simulations, examples of which are chemical and photochemical reactions in solution, enzymes, interfaces, etc. It is based on the use of dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. A low-level quantum mechanical method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force through the umbrella sampling technique. Then, a high-level quantum mechanical method is used to estimate a free energy correction on selected points of the reaction coordinate using perturbation theory. The precision of the results is comparable to that of ab initio molecular dynamics methods such as the Car-Parrinello approach but the computational cost is much lower, roughly by two to three orders of magnitude. The method is illustrated by discussing the association free energy of simple organometallic compounds, although the field of application is very broad. PMID:20707557

  3. Free energy calculations using dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retegan, Marius; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    2010-08-01

    We describe an efficient and accurate method to compute free energy changes in complex chemical systems that cannot be described through classical molecular dynamics simulations, examples of which are chemical and photochemical reactions in solution, enzymes, interfaces, etc. It is based on the use of dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. A low-level quantum mechanical method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force through the umbrella sampling technique. Then, a high-level quantum mechanical method is used to estimate a free energy correction on selected points of the reaction coordinate using perturbation theory. The precision of the results is comparable to that of ab initio molecular dynamics methods such as the Car-Parrinello approach but the computational cost is much lower, roughly by two to three orders of magnitude. The method is illustrated by discussing the association free energy of simple organometallic compounds, although the field of application is very broad.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations on the hydration of fluoroalcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Kenichi; Nakanishi, Koichiro

    1988-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been carried out for aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and its fluorinated compounds, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol (TFIPA) and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIPA). The simulated systems were canonical ensembles containing 216 molecules in each, one of which was alcohol and the temperature was set to 298.15 K. The MCY (Matsuoka-Clementi-Yoshimine) potential was used for water-water interaction, whereas new potential functions were determined for alcohol-water interactions, on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations on more than 1100 different dimeric configurations for each alcohol-water pair. The static properties of solvent water in the vicinity of each functional group of solute were obtained from MD calculations. It is found that the promotion of water structure and the increase of hydrogen bond between water molecules occurs not only near the fluoroalkyl group but also even near hydroxyl group of fluoroalcohols. Furthermore, the alcohol-water interaction is stronger for fluoroalcohols than for aliphatic alcohols, owing to the electronegativity and the electron withdrawing effect of fluorine atoms. The enthalpies of hydration for fluoroalcohols include the contributions from these features of both water-water and alcohol-water interactions. This is not the case for the hydration of aliphatic alcohols, and is the reason for the lack of regular change of enthalpies of hydration with the degree of the substitution of CH3 by the CF3 group. The hydration of IPA is similar to that of other aliphatic alcohols; hydrophobic hydration near the apolar group and the energetic unstabilization of water near the hydroxyl group are observed.

  5. Multifractal analysis of dynamic potential surface of ion-conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habasaki, Junko; Ngai, K. L.

    2005-06-01

    A multifractal analysis using singularity spectra [T.C. Halsey et al., Phys. Rev. A 33, 1141 (1986)] provides a general tool to study the temporal-spatial properties of particles in complex disordered materials such as ions in ionically conducting glasses and melts. Obtained by molecular-dynamics simulations, the accumulated positions of the particles dynamically form a structural pattern called the dynamical potential surface. In this work, the complex dynamical potential surfaces of Li ions in the lithium silicates were visualized and characterized by the multifractal analysis. The fractal dimensions and strength of the singularity related to the spatial intermittency of the dynamics are examined, and the relationship between dynamics and the singularity spectra is discussed.

  6. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  8. Ultrafast Dynamics of Myoglobin without the Distal Histidine: Stimulated Vibrational Echo Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Myoglobin without the Distal Histidine: Stimulated Vibrational Echo Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulations Ilya J. Finkelstein, Anne Goj, Brian L. McClain, Aaron MVersity, Ithaca, New York 14853 ReceiVed: April 4, 2005; In Final Form: July 2, 2005 Ultrafast protein dynamics

  9. Quantum wave packet ab initio molecular dynamics: An approach to study quantum dynamics in large systems

    E-print Network

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    calculations are provided for proton transfer systems and the dynamics results are compared with exactQuantum wave packet ab initio molecular dynamics: An approach to study quantum dynamics in large systems Srinivasan S. Iyengara and Jacek Jakowski Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine dioxide photoexcitation

    E-print Network

    Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine The solvation dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide OClO in different solvents are investigated chemistry.1­3 Representative of this group of compounds, chlorine dioxide OClO has been the subject of much

  11. Phenol-benzene complexation dynamics: Quantum chemistry calculation, molecular dynamics simulations, and two dimensional IR spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Phenol-benzene complexation dynamics: Quantum chemistry calculation, molecular dynamics simulations the nature and dynamics of the phenol-benzene complex in the mixed solvent, benzene/CCl4. Under thermal used for the phenol-benzene interaction in the MD simulations is in good accord with the highest level

  12. What Molecular Abundances can Tell us about the Dynamics of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular clouds are the sites where new stars form. Spectroscopic observations of different molecular species in these clouds can provide invaluable information regarding the dynamical evolution of star forming sites: first, they provide direct dynamical information (velocities as a function of density); second, they reveal the abundance of various molecules, which in turn depends on the chemodynamical evolutionary stage and history of the observed region. However, the connection between theoretical models of cloud dynamics and astronomical molecular spectroscopy is far from straight forward. The chemistry and dynamics of the clouds are interlinked, and various parameters such as the cloud temperature and its initial elemental abundances affect theoretical predictions, resulting in large model degeneracies: radically different dynamical models can often result in similar molecular abundances. In this talk, I will discuss first results from a massive effort undertaken to overcome this problem. By coupling non-equilibrium chemistry with a large array of different dynamical models of molecular cloud evolution, we are looking for these molecular line observables that are least affected by varying parameters and model degeneracies, and can be used to drastically constrain the possible dynamical histories of observed star-forming regions. To this end, we have studied a variety of dynamical models describing the evolution of pre- stellar molecular cloud cores (the initial phase of star formation) that cover the entire spectrum of proposed mechanisms, including pure hydrodynamical collapse and magnetically mediated collapse at various levels of importance of the magnetic field in the cloud dynamics. These models have been coupled to a network of chemical reactions that follow the relative abundances for ˜100 molecular species, by solving the non- equilibrium chemical reactions for the first time simultaneously with the dynamical equations. I will present highlights from the results of this work, including newly proposed observables with maximal potential for discrimination between different models of cloud evolution and star formation. These results are especially timely as ALMA is able to measure many of these quantities and contribute to the resolution of long-standing questions in star formation, such as the timescale of pre-stellar core evolution, and the relative importance of magnetic field and turbulence in their dynamics.

  13. Plasticity of metallic nanostructures : molecular dynamics simulations 

    E-print Network

    Healy, Con

    2014-11-27

    During high speed cutting processes, metals are subject to high strains and strain rates. The dynamic nature of the deformation during high speed cutting makes it difficult to detect atomic scale deformation mechanisms ...

  14. Molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol with a flexible three-site model

    SciTech Connect

    Palinkas, G.; Hawlicka, E.; Heinzinger, K.

    1987-07-30

    A new potential is presented which describes the methanol-methanol interactions on the basis of a flexible three-site model. The intramolecular part of the potential has been derived from spectroscopic data. A molecular dynamics study has been performed with this potential at 286 K. The structural properties of liquid methanol calculated from the simulations are in good agreement with X-ray measurements. The average geometrical arrangement of nearest neighbors and their hydrogen bonding are discussed. The potential describes correctly the gas-liquid frequency shifts of the intramolecular vibrations. Several thermodynamic properties calculated from the simulation compare favorably with experimental results.

  15. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    PubMed

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. PMID:26489820

  16. Dynamics of Molecular Hydrogen in Hypersaline Microbial Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Visscher, Pieter T.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Early Earth microbial communities that centered around the anaerobic decomposition of organic molecular hydrogen as a carrier of electrons, regulator of energy metabolism, and facilitator of syntroph'c microbial interactions. The advent of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms added a highly dynamic and potentially dominant term to the hydrogen economy of these communities. We have examined the daily variations of hydrogen concentrations in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats from hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico. These mats bring together phototrophic and anaerobic bacteria (along with virtually all other trophic groups) in a spatially ordered and chemically dynamic matrix that provides a good analog for early Earth microbial ecosystems. Hydrogen concentrations in the photic zone of the mat can be three orders of magnitude or more higher than in the photic zone, which are, in turn, an order of magnitude higher than in the unconsolidated sediments underlying the mat community. Within the photic zone, hydrogen concentrations can fluctuate dramatically during the diel (24 hour day-night) cycle, ranging from less than 0.001% during the day to nearly 10% at night. The resultant nighttime flux of hydrogen from the mat to the environment was up to 17% of the daytime oxygen flux. The daily pattern observed is highly dependent on cyanobacterial species composition within the mat, with Lyngbya-dominated systems having a much greater dynamic range than those dominated by Microcoleus; this may relate largely to differing degrees of nitrogen-fixing and fermentative activity in the two mats. The greatest H2 concentrations and fluxes were observed in the absence of oxygen, suggesting an important potential feedback control in the context of the evolution of atmospheric composition. The impact of adding this highly dynamic photosynthetic term to the hydrogen economy of early microbial ecosystems must have been substantial. From an evolutionary standpoint, the H2 generated in mats could have represented a very important new source of electrons and energy - but one that could not be harnessed without substantial adaptation to the highly variable chemistry of the mat surface. In addition, the emergent chemistry of anaerobic communities is often highly dependent on ambient hydrogen concentrations, so that incorporation of these communities into photosynthetic mats could have significantly affected the composition and flux of reduced "biosignature' gases to the environment.

  17. Review on Molecular and Therapeutic Potential of Thymoquinone in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sanjeev; Padhye, Subhash; Azmi, Asfar; Wang, Zhiwei; Philip, Philip A.; Kucuk, Omer; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.

    2014-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is the predominant bioactive constituent present in black seed oil (Nigella sativa) and has been tested for its efficacy against cancer. Here, we summarize the literature about TQ’s molecular mechanism of action and its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in preclinical models. TQ has anti-inflammatory effects, and it inhibits tumor cell proliferation through modulation of apoptosis signaling, inhibition of angiogenesis, and cell cycle arrest. Chemosensitization by TQ is mostly limited to in vitro studies, and it has potential in therapeutic strategy for cancer. The results favor efficacy and enhancement of therapeutic benefit against tumor cells resistant to therapy based on cellular targets that are molecular determinants for cancer cell survival and progression. There have been attempts to synthesize novel analogs of TQ directed toward superior effects in killing tumor cells with more enhanced chemosensitizing potential than parent TQ compound. Based on published reports, we believe that further in-depth studies are warranted including investigation of its bioavailability and Phase I toxicity profiling in human subjects. The results from such studies will be instrumental in advancing this field in support of initiating clinical trials for testing the effects of this ancient agent in cancer therapy. PMID:20924969

  18. Relaxation dynamics in glass forming liquids with related molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeming; Bi, Dongyang; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Li-Min; Ngai, Kia L.

    2012-11-01

    The relaxation dynamics of a series of molecular liquids with modified structures from aldehyde with a fixed number of carbon atoms is studied. Structural modification is made by introducing oxygen into the main chain, or by incorporating end group moieties such as ethyl, acrylate, methacrylate and dihydroxyl. Broadband dielectric measurements were performed on the glass-formers. The experimental results emphasize the importance of intermolecular interactions and molecular rigidity in determining the kinetic fragility and non-exponential parameters of the structural ?-relaxation.

  19. Aneesur Rahman Prize Talk: Dynamics of Entangled Polymer Melts: Perceptive from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years ago at the APS March Meeting, Kurt Kremer and I presented the first numerical evidence from computer simulations that the reptation model of Edwards and de Gennes correctly describes the dynamics of entangled linear polymer melts. For chains longer than the entanglement length Ne, the monomers of a chain move predominantly along their own contour. The distinctive signature of reptation dynamics, which we observed, was that on intermediate time scales, the mean squared displacement of a monomer increases with time as t^ 1/4. Though these early simulations were limited to chains of a few Ne, they demonstrated the potential of computer simulations to contribute to our understanding of polymer dynamics. Here I will review the progress over the past twenty years and present an outlook for the future in modeling entangled polymer melts and networks. With present day computers coupled with efficient parallel molecular dynamics codes, it is now possible to follow the equilibrium dynamics of chains of length 10-20Ne from the early Rouse regime to the long time diffusive regime. Result of these simulations support the earlier results obtained on chains of only a few Ne. Further evidence for the tube models of polymer dynamics has been obtained by identifying the primitive path mesh that characterizes the microscopic topological state of the computer- generated conformations of the chains. In particular, the plateau moduli derived on the basis of this analysis quantitatively reproduce experimental data for a wide spectrum of entangled polymer liquids including semi-dilute theta solutions of synthetic polymers, the corresponding dense melts, and solutions of semi-flexible (bio)polymers such as f-actin or suspensions of rodlike viruses. We also find that in agreement with the reptation model, the stress, end-to-end distance and entanglement length of an entangled melt subjected to uniaxial elongation, all relax on the same time scale.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pu

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of the phase behavior, the response to an applied field of nematic liquid crystalline (LC) materials and interactions of nanoparticles in isotropic mesogenic materials are presented in this work. Molecular models used include the rigid bead-necklace model and soft spherocylinders. Free energy calculations applying thermodynamic integration and the Gibbs-Duhem integration method were used to establish the (T, P) phase diagram of the repulsive bead-necklace model, subsequently the Gibbs-Duhem integration method was further utilized to investigate the influence of attractive interactions on the phase behavior of the bead-necklace model. Analysis of order and thermodynamics of LC phase transitions (Isotropic-Nematic transition and Nematic-Smectic A transition) demonstrate that this simple model can capture the basic physics of liquid crystalline phases, and good agreement with experimental results is obtained. Further addition of chemical details to this multiple interaction sites model is much easier than to the idealized models (Gay-Berne, Spherocylinders) while the computation cost increase with respect to these idealized models is minimal. With a mean field representation of field-molecules interaction, MD simulation studies of the switching behavior of nematic LC, which is the basis of many LC devices, were performed. The switching mechanisms were explained in terms of the compromise between the elastic energy and field-molecules interactions. Qualitative agreement with experiments confirmed the validity of the mean field approximation. Finally, using the standard umbrella sampling technique and MD simulations, the potential of mean force between two nanoparticles in solvent of spherocylinders is calculated. It is found that while dispersed nanoparticles will delay the Isotropic-Nematics transition to higher density (lower temperature), they can induce local ordering fluctuations (within a few molecular lengths of the solvent rods), which are different from natural paranematic fluctuations by faster decay with respect to distance and broader distribution of local ordering. Apart from the expected short ranged nanoparticle interactions due to molecular packing effects, the above mentioned induced fluctuations will cause long range repulsions, a novel interaction being discovered and characterized for the first time.

  1. Topographies and dynamics on multidimensional potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Keith Douglas

    The stochastic master equation is a valuable tool for elucidating potential energy surface (PES) details that govern structural relaxation in clusters, bulk systems, and protein folding. This work develops a comprehensive framework for studying non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics using the master equation. Since our master equations depend upon accurate partition function models for use in Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRK(M) transition state theory, this work introduces several such models employing various harmonic and anharmonic approximations and compares their predicted equilibrium population distributions with those determined from molecular dynamics. This comparison is performed for the fully-delineated surfaces (KCl)5 and Ar9 to evaluate model performance for potential surfaces with long- and short-range interactions, respectively. For each system, several models perform better than a simple harmonic approximation. While no model gives acceptable results for all minima, and optimal modeling strategies differ for (KCl)5 and Ar9, a particular one-parameter model gives the best agreement with simulation for both systems. We then construct master equations from these models and compare their isothermal relaxation predictions for (KCl)5 and Ar9 with molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first comprehensive test of the kinetic performance of partition function models of its kind. Our results show that accurate modeling of transition-state partition functions is more important for (KCl)5 than for Ar9 in reproducing simulation results, due to a marked stiffening anharmonicity in the transition-state normal modes of (KCl)5. For both systems, several models yield qualitative agreement with simulation over a large temperature range. To examine the robustness of the master equation when applied to larger systems, for which full topographical descriptions would be either impossible or infeasible, we compute relaxation predictions for Ar11 using a master equation constructed from data representing the full PES, and compare these predictions to those of reduced master equations based on statistical samples of the full PES. We introduce a sampling method which generates random, Boltzmann-weighted, energetically 'downhill' sequences. The study reveals that, at moderate temperatures, the slowest relaxation timescale converges as the number of sequences in a sample grows to ~1000. Furthermore, the asymptotic timescale is comparable to the full-PES value.

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics: molecular mechanisms and the role in the heart.

    PubMed

    Jazbutyte, V

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles which actively move along the cytoskeleton within the cell, change their shape and undergo fusion and fission. The heart is a metabolically active organ with high energy demands and rich in mitochondria. Mitochondria not only supply the heart with the high energy compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but also actively participate in cell signaling and apoptotic events and communicate with the cytosol. Recent advantages in molecular biology and imaging techniques helped to study mitochondrial dynamics directly in the cell and under real time conditions. In this review, I will briefly summarize current knowledge about molecular machinery mediating mitochondrial fusion/ fission, its link to apoptosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20440252

  3. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services. PMID:25849093

  4. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  5. Van der Waals Interactions in Pyridine and Pyridine-like Molecular Crystals: An ab initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hsin-Yu; Distasio, Robert A., Jr.; Santra, Biswajit; Car, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Pyridine has recently been investigated as a potentially effective material for use in artificial light harvesting.In this work, we propose the use of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to gain valuable physical insight into the artificial photosynthetic processes occurring in condensed-phase pyridine, the study of which has been limited to semi-empirical force fields to date.For this purpose, we introduce an accurate and efficient AIMD method, based on density functional theory (DFT) and a self-consistent pairwise description of van der Waals (vdW) interactions, for use in finite temperature and pressure (NPT) simulations on pyridine and several pyridine-like molecular crystals (PLMCs). Utilizing this approach, we demonstrate that vdW forces play a crucial role in the theoretical prediction of the structure and density of pyridine and PLMCs, and therefore must be accounted for in studies of these potential alternative energy materials. DOE: DE-SC0008626, NSF: DMS-1065894.

  6. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  7. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating ?-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  8. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  9. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  10. Nuclear Structure of light Nuclei in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Neff, Thomas

    ] 16 O and 40 Ca are not "closed shell" nuclei ! #12;Nuclear Chart FMD DPG Spring Meeting, 8 Mar 20.1 0.5 1.0 -5 0 5 x [fm] -5 0 5 y[fm] 16 C - n #12;Fermionic Molecular Dynamics DPG Spring Meeting, 8 Dynamics Time-dependent variational principle dt Q i d dt - ^H Q Q Q = 0 #12;Perform Variation FMD DPG

  11. Molecular docking using the molecular lipophilicity potential as hydrophobic descriptor: impact on GOLD docking performance.

    PubMed

    Nurisso, Alessandra; Bravo, Juan; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Daina, Antoine

    2012-05-25

    GOLD is a molecular docking software widely used in drug design. In the initial steps of docking, it creates a list of hydrophobic fitting points inside protein cavities that steer the positioning of ligand hydrophobic moieties. These points are generated based on the Lennard-Jones potential between a carbon probe and each atom of the residues delimitating the binding site. To thoroughly describe hydrophobic regions in protein pockets and properly guide ligand hydrophobic moieties toward favorable areas, an in-house tool, the MLP filter, was developed and herein applied. This strategy only retains GOLD hydrophobic fitting points that match the rigorous definition of hydrophobicity given by the molecular lipophilicity potential (MLP), a molecular interaction field that relies on an atomic fragmental system based on 1-octanol/water experimental partition coefficients (log P(oct)). MLP computations in the binding sites of crystallographic protein structures revealed that a significant number of points considered hydrophobic by GOLD were actually polar according to the MLP definition of hydrophobicity. To examine the impact of this new tool, ligand-protein complexes from the Astex Diverse Set and the PDB bind core database were redocked with and without the use of the MLP filter. Reliable docking results were obtained by using the MLP filter that increased the quality of docking in nonpolar cavities and outperformed the standard GOLD docking approach. PMID:22462609

  12. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Balachandran, V.; Perumal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm-1 has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation.

  13. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  14. Thermostatted molecular dynamics: How to avoid the Toda demon hidden in Nose-Hoover dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.; Voter, A.F.; Ravelo, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Nose-Hoover thermostat, which is often used in the hope of modifying molecular dynamics trajectories in order to achieve canonical-ensemble averages, has hidden in it a Toda ``demon,`` which can give rise to unwanted, noncanonical undulations in the instantaneous kinetic temperature. We show how these long-lived oscillations arise from insufficient coupling of the thermostat to the atoms, and give straightforward, practical procedures for avoiding this weak-coupling pathology in isothermal molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Molecularly-imprinted polymer sensors: realising their potential.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Lokman; Turner, Anthony P F

    2016-02-15

    In parallel with recent developments in communications, nanotechnology and materials sciences, there has been extraordinary growth in the area of biosensors, with almost half of the total number of papers ever published (1962-2015) appearing in the last five-years (2010-2015). Molecular imprinting offers a route to the creation of specific and selective cavities in a 3D-polymeric network, which are complementary not only to the size and shape of a target species, but also provide interaction points and a coordination sphere around the template molecule. Given the challenges facing biosensor technologists, it is natural that this approach to create potentially highly stable synthetic ligands as an alternative to, or to compliment natural receptors, should emerge as a key line of interdisciplinary research. Despite the profuse amount of recent literature on molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) and some limited commercial activity, these promising materials still need to overcome some limitations before taking their place in analytical market. In this review, we have focused on the most promising advances in MIP-based biosensors to illustrate how close to market they really are. We present our material under five main sections covering computational design, polymerisation strategies, material combinations, recent sensor designs and manufacturing issues. Each section provides technical details and evaluates the effect on sensor performance. PMID:26189406

  16. Molecular Dynamics Study of Polymer Separation Using a Nanofluidic Staircase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.; Forrey, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    The diffusive behavior of isolated polymer chains in a nanofluidic staircase has recently been studied experimentally [Strychalski et al., Macromolecules, 45(3), 1602, (2012); Stavis et al., Lab Chip, 12(19), 1174, (2012)] and by simulation [Phelan et al., in preparation, (2012)]. Chains are observed to exhibit spontaneous 1-D biased diffusion from regions of high to low confinement, without the use of external forces, under conditions where the local confinement lies in either the Odijk or de Gennes regimes. The transport mechanism is that of a Brownian motor, where the polymer free energy is used to generate directed transport using thermal fluctuations and the biased structural features of the device. The nanostaircase has potential for a number of applications in polymer measurement science and transport, an important one of which could be separations. To study this, we examine polymer separation in the nanofluidic staircase using the molecular dynamics simulation software LAMMPS. Length based separations of linear polymers as applicable to DNA separations are the main topic of the study, but the effect of more complex architectures such as branching are also examined.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of beta-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Varady, J; Ng, L; Sung, S S

    1999-11-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of beta-hairpin folding have been carried out with a solvent-referenced potential at 274 K. The model peptide V4DPGV4 formed stable beta-hairpin conformations and the beta-hairpin ratio calculated by the DSSP algorithm was about 56% in the 50-ns simulation. Folding into beta-hairpin conformations is independent of the initial conformations. The simulations provided insights into the folding mechanism. The hydrogen bond often formed in a beta-turn first, and then propagated by forming more hydrogen bonds along the strands. Unfolding and refolding occurred repeatedly during the simulations. Both the hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic interaction played important roles in forming the ordered structure. Without the hydrophobic effect, stable beta-hairpin conformations did not form in the simulations. With the same energy functions, the alanine-based peptide (AAQAA)3Y folded into helical conformations, in agreement with experiments. Folding into an alpha-helix or a beta-hairpin is amino acid sequence-dependent. PMID:10591094

  18. Metastability of multitwinned Ag nanorods: Molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, J.; Hoyt, J. J.; Farkas, D.

    2008-07-01

    Nanoscale rods have been shown to exhibit a multiple twinned structure. The rods grow along a [110]-type crystallographic direction and have a pentagonal cross section with five (111) twins connecting the wire center to the corners of the pentagon. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations with an embedded atom method interatomic potential for Ag to compute the ground-state energies of the multitwinned rods and compare with the bulk equilibrium crystal shape, as estimated from a Wulff construction. The excess energy of the nontwinned equilibrium nanorods and the multitwinned nanorods was obtained as a function of the wire length (L) as well as the cross sectional area (Acs) . Various contributions to the total energy, such as twin boundary energy and surface energies, are discussed and included in an analytical model that compares favorably with the simulation results. Our results show that for infinitely long nanowires with Acs<1500nm2 , the nontwinned structure is always energetically favorable. However, if the energy of the dipyramidal atomic structure at the nanorod ends is included in the model then the twinned nanorods are stable with respect to the nontwinned rods below a critical aspect ratio (L/Acs) .

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galamba, N.

    2010-09-01

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (NanCln)n=2-4. The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation indicating cold denaturation of ?-hairpins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2013-02-01

    The folding of a series of ?-hairpin structured polypeptides, which share high sequence similarity but differ significantly in structure resistance to temperature decrease, was investigated in the present study using integrated-tempering-sampling molecular dynamics simulations on microsecond time scale. MrH3a is a single mutant (I16A) and MrH4a is a double mutant (Y3L/I16A) of the wild-type polypeptide MrH1. MrH3b and MrH4b have an additional mutation in the turn region (INGK ? IDPGK) of MrH3a and MrH4a, respectively. It was observed in the present study that the cold denaturation tendency follows the order of MrH1 > MrH4a > MrH3a, while the folded structures of MrH3b and MrH4b have the enhanced stability and are not subject to cold denaturation. These observations are in good agreement with experimental results of Maynard et al. and Dyer et al. Comparative analysis of simulation results for the 5 polypeptides revealed potential mechanism of ?-hairpin cold denaturation. The main determinant of cold denaturation tendency is likely the stability decrease of backbone hydrogen bonds at low temperatures, which in turn is affected by the packing manner of the hydrophobic core cluster of ?-hairpin structures.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Studies on Thermal Transport Through Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Jie; Cao, Bing-Yang; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the temperature and strength of the inter-wall interaction on the thermal conductivities of the (5,5) and (10, 10) double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) is studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with two different temperature control methods. One method is imposing heat baths (HBs) only on the outer wall, while the other is imposing HBs on both the two walls. The results show that the thermal conductivities of the DWNTs with the first method are about two-third of those with the second method. The relationship is the same even if the temperature and strength of the inter-wall interaction vary. Besides, the thermal conductivities of the DWNTs with the two different temperature control methods both slightly increase with the increasing energy parameters of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential describing the inter-wall interaction and decrease with increasing temperature. Based on the analyses of the temperature profiles and phonon density of states (PDOS) spectra of the DWNTs with the two different temperature control methods, the results are well explained and the thermal transport mechanisms of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under different conditions are explored. PMID:26353525

  2. Free energy from molecular dynamics with multiple constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Otter, W. K.; Briels, W. J.

    In molecular dynamics simulations of reacting systems, the key step to determining the equilibrium constant and the reaction rate is the calculation of the free energy as a function of the reaction coordinate. Intuitively the derivative of the free energy is equal to the average force needed to constrain the reaction coordinate to a constant value, but the metric tensor effect of the constraint on the sampled phase space distribution complicates this relation. The appropriately corrected expression for the potential of mean constraint force method (PMCF) for systems in which only the reaction coordinate is constrained was published recently. Here we will consider the general case of a system with multiple constraints. This situation arises when both the reaction coordinate and the 'hard' coordinates are constrained, and also in systems with several reaction coordinates. The obvious advantage of this method over the established thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation methods is that it avoids the cumbersome introduction of a full set of generalized coordinates complementing the constrained coordinates. Simulations of n -butane and n -pentane in vacuum illustrate the method.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of cluster formation in femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatomi, Daiki; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Nishikino, Masaharu

    2013-09-01

    Short-period laser ablation of a platinum solid target was investigated through three-dimensional classical molecular dynamics simulations using the embedded atom method potential. The platinum target was ablated by an ultrashort-pulse laser with three different fluences near the ablation threshold and single 100-fs pulse. Although each laser fluence causes melting and evaporation of the target surface, ablation processes are morphologically different. When the laser fluence is just above the ablation threshold, the surface layer of the solid target breaks away, and so-called spallation occurs. With the moderate laser fluence, homogeneous nucleation of nano-sized clusters takes place in the liquidized layer at the surface, resulting in the homogenization in the emitted cluster size, while the surface layer fragments and vaporizes with the higher fluence. Moreover, in the spallation regime, the recreated surface has nano-sized roughness and is formed after the surface oscillates with a rv20-ns period. This inherent roughness formation may be a seed of the nano-sized regular structure observed by past experiments with repetitive pulses.

  4. Orbital-Free Molecular Dynamics Simulations at Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, J. D.; Collins, L. A.; Ticknor, C.

    2015-06-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in an orbital-free (OF) density-functional theory (DFT) formulation have been performed for pure and mixed species over a broad range of temperatures (T) and densities (?) that includes the warm, dense matter and high-energy density physics regimes. A finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi-Dirac form with a local-density exchange-correlation potential and a regularized electron-ion interaction represents the quantum nature of the electrons. In particular, we examine the efficacy of the OFMD approach as an effective bridge between Kohn-Sham DFT MD at low temperatures and simple, fully-ionized plasma models at high temperatures. Comparisons against intermediate-range constructions such as the Yukawa and one-component plasmas are also made. We examine the mass transport (diffusion, viscosity) properties of various systems, ranging from light to heavy elements, including lithium hydride (LiH), mixtures of LiH with uranium, mixtures of deuterium-tritium (DT) with plutonium and mixtures of DT with plastic (CH). The OFMD mass transport results have been fitted to simple functions of ? and T suitable for use in hydrodynamics simulation codes.

  5. Potential molecular mechanisms for combined toxicity of arsenic and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous environmental factor that has been identified as a risk factor for a wide range of human diseases. Alcohol is clearly a toxic substance when consumed in excess. Alcohol abuse results in a variety of pathological effects, including damages to liver, heart, and brain, as well as other organs, and is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancers. In history, arsenic-contaminated beers caused severe diseases. There are populations who are exposed to relatively high levels of arsenic in their drinking water and consume alcohol at the same time. In this focused review, we aim to discuss important molecular mechanisms responsible for arsenic toxicity and potential combined toxic effects of alcohol and arsenic. PMID:20817264

  6. Studies of atomic and molecular dynamics using photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canton, Sophie E.

    Photoexcitation and photoionization studies of free atoms and molecules in the gas phase provide a unique view into various aspects of radiation-matter interactions that are used as basic building blocks in many branches of physics, such as Solid State, Plasma Physics, Photochemistry or Astrophysics. With the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources delivering high photon flux (>1015 photons/s) with unprecedented resolving power over a broad energy range, it has become possible to investigate in great detail not only the internal structure of the targets, but also the dynamics of the process. Born in the 1960s, photoelectron spectroscopy specifically analyzes the kinetic energy and emission angle of the ionized electrons. It is now coming to maturity with the availability of spectrometers designed to achieve high performances. This thesis work presents three examples of experiments made possible by the combination of the radiation from the Advanced Light Source with state of the art spectrometers. First, the measurements of the partial photoionization cross sections below the second ionization potential in argon and neon have uncovered weak and narrow resonances. Their mirroring profiles in the two open channels, which had prevented them from being detected in non-differential measurements, have been explained by their LS-forbidden nature. Second, the Auger spectra produced by decay of core-excited HF have revealed specific nuclear wavepacket interferences that occur when the electronic lifetime, the nuclear dynamics and the excitation prolongation, defined as the inverse of the photon bandwidth, have comparable time scales. Third, the analysis of the underlying structure in the first ionization band for free C60 has allowed the vibronic coupling of the singly charged molecular ion to be characterized.

  7. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  8. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  9. Molecular Dynamics Method in Microscale Heat Transfer Shigeo Maruyama

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Molecular Dynamics Method in Microscale Heat Transfer Shigeo Maruyama Department of Mechanical simulations are becoming more practical for microscale and nanoscale heat transfer problems. For example, studies of basic mechanisms of heat transfer such as in phase change heat transfer demand the microscopic

  10. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    E-print Network

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    centuries ago and an early competitor of the steam engine, continues to attract interest owing to itsSimulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine D 2009; published 30 April 2009 A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has

  11. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  12. Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-print Network

    Hydrogen Raman shifts in carbon nanotubes from molecular dynamics simulation S.J.V. Frankland *, D hydrogen in individual single-shell carbon nanotubes and nanotube ropes using a semiclassical model. The calculations predict that isolated hydrogen molecules inside of nanotubes have a Raman frequency that increases

  13. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20?ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  14. FIRST-PRINCIPLES MOLECULAR DYNAMICS Roberto Car1

    E-print Network

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    . Car et al. elements such as hydrogen; classical or ab initio path integral approaches can1.4 FIRST-PRINCIPLES MOLECULAR DYNAMICS Roberto Car1 , Filippo de Angelis2 , Paolo Giannozzi3 in the last two decades as a powerful tool to probe the properties of matter at the microscopic scale

  15. CALCULATION OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUID NICKEL BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHODS

    E-print Network

    Deymier, Pierre

    CALCULATION OF VISCOSITY OF LIQUID NICKEL BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHODS F.J. Cherne III and P to the conservation equation for momentum. The viscosity of liquid metals is therefore required in the solution to the momentum equation. Unfortunately, viscosity data for metallic alloys are sparse. Even the viscosity data

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Elastic Moduli of

    E-print Network

    Ferrari, Patrik L.

    #ness when compared to typical carbon­fiber­reinforced poly­ mer composites. Therefore, nanotubeMolecular Dynamics Simulations of the Elastic Moduli of Polymer­Carbon Nanotube Composites Michael and Numerical Simulation, University of Bonn, Germany Abstract The elastic moduli of polymer­carbon nanotube

  17. Fracture toughness of calciumsilicatehydrate from molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    Fracture toughness of calcium­silicate­hydrate from molecular dynamics simulations M. Bauchy a, , H Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States b Concrete Sustainability Hub form 26 March 2015 Accepted 28 March 2015 Available online xxxx Keywords: Calcium­silicate­hydrate

  18. Dynamics of Molecular Motors in Reversible Burnt-Bridge Models

    E-print Network

    Maxim N. Artyomov; Alexander Yu. Morozov; Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

    2009-11-22

    Dynamic properties of molecular motors whose motion is powered by interactions with specific lattice bonds are studied theoretically with the help of discrete-state stochastic "burnt-bridge" models. Molecular motors are depicted as random walkers that can destroy or rebuild periodically distributed weak connections ("bridges") when crossing them, with probabilities $p_1$ and $p_2$ correspondingly. Dynamic properties, such as velocities and dispersions, are obtained in exact and explicit form for arbitrary values of parameters $p_1$ and $p_2$. For the unbiased random walker, reversible burning of the bridges results in a biased directed motion with a dynamic transition observed at very small concentrations of bridges. In the case of backward biased molecular motor its backward velocity is reduced and a reversal of the direction of motion is observed for some range of parameters. It is also found that the dispersion demonstrates a complex, non-monotonic behavior with large fluctuations for some set of parameters. Complex dynamics of the system is discussed by analyzing the behavior of the molecular motors near burned bridges.

  19. Relating Soil Organic Matter Dynamics to its Molecular Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) must be integrated with a sound knowledge of it biochemical complexity. The molecular structure of SOM was determined in 98% sand soils to eliminate the known protective effects of clay on the amount and turnover rate of the SOM constitu...

  20. A FULLERENE FORMATION MODEL PROPOSED FROM MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A FULLERENE FORMATION MODEL PROPOSED FROM MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS Yasutaka Yamaguchi distributed carbon atoms was simulated. A C60 imperfect fullerene obtained in the simulation was kept at 2500 in the clustering simulation. Through successive pentagon-migration transformations, the perfect fullerene structure

  1. A molecular dynamics `Maxwell Demon' experiment for granular mixtures

    E-print Network

    Barrat, Alain

    A molecular dynamics `Maxwell Demon' experiment for granular mixtures ALAIN BARRAT and EMMANUEL] has put forward an analytical approach to explain this apparent intrusion of a `Maxwell Demon, we revisit numerically the Maxwell Demon experiment in the latter case, and consider the specific

  2. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V.; Ruiz, Duncan D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20?ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  3. Thermal decomposition of RDX from reactive molecular dynamics Alejandro Strachana)

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Thermal decomposition of RDX from reactive molecular dynamics Alejandro Strachana) and Edward M time of decomposition that increases with decreasing density and shows an Arrhenius temperature of the decomposition process with similar timescales. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1831277 I

  4. Thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics Zhenhua Yao*

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics Zhenhua Yao* Singapore­MIT Alliance. The thermal conductance of CNT's is also calculated using the Green-Kubo formula from linear response theory conductance instead of conductivity in calculations and discussions. We find that the thermal conductance

  5. Watching coherent molecular structural dynamics during photoreaction: beyond kinetic description

    E-print Network

    Lemke, Henrik T; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Nielsen, Martin M; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of molecular photo-transformations occurring is challenging because of the complex interaction between electronic and nuclear structure. The initially excited electronic energy dissipates into electronic and structural reconfigurations often in less than a billionth of a second. Molecular dynamics induced by photoexcitation have been very successfully studied with femtosecond optical spectroscopies, but electronic and nuclear dynamics are often very difficult to disentangle. X-ray based spectroscopies can reduce the ambiguity between theoretical models and experimental data, but it is only with the recent development of bright ultrafast X-ray sources, that key information during transient molecular processes can be obtained on their intrinsic timescale. We use Free Electron Laser (FEL) based time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements around the Iron K-edge of a spin crossover prototypical compound. We reveal its transformation from the ligand-located electroni...

  6. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    PubMed Central

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable ‘gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational–translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the ‘gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational–translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules. PMID:26160223

  7. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable `gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the `gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules.

  8. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography: Principles and Potential for Pharmaceutical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stuker, Florian; Ripoll, Jorge; Rudin, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopic imaging is widely used in biomedical research to study molecular and cellular processes in cell culture or tissue samples. This is motivated by the high inherent sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, the spatial resolution that compares favorably with cellular dimensions, the stability of the fluorescent labels used and the sophisticated labeling strategies that have been developed for selectively labeling target molecules. More recently, two and three-dimensional optical imaging methods have also been applied to monitor biological processes in intact biological organisms such as animals or even humans. These whole body optical imaging approaches have to cope with the fact that biological tissue is a highly scattering and absorbing medium. As a consequence, light propagation in tissue is well described by a diffusion approximation and accurate reconstruction of spatial information is demanding. While in vivo optical imaging is a highly sensitive method, the signal is strongly surface weighted, i.e., the signal detected from the same light source will become weaker the deeper it is embedded in tissue, and strongly depends on the optical properties of the surrounding tissue. Derivation of quantitative information, therefore, requires tomographic techniques such as fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), which maps the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescent probe or protein concentration. The combination of FMT with a structural imaging method such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will allow mapping molecular information on a high definition anatomical reference and enable the use of prior information on tissue's optical properties to enhance both resolution and sensitivity. Today many of the fluorescent assays originally developed for studies in cellular systems have been successfully translated for experimental studies in animals. The opportunity of monitoring molecular processes non-invasively in the intact organism is highly attractive from a diagnostic point of view but even more so for the drug developer, who can use the techniques for proof-of-mechanism and proof-of-efficacy studies. This review shall elucidate the current status and potential of fluorescence tomography including recent advances in multimodality imaging approaches for preclinical and clinical drug development. PMID:24310495

  9. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  10. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach has the advantage of providing an atomistic (even though approximated) description of the solvent molecules, which is crucial for the characterization of all ultrafast relaxation phenomena that depend on the geometrical arrangement at the interface between a molecule and the solvent, for example, the hydrogen bond network. After a short description of the TDDFT-based implementation of Ehrenfest and trajectory surface hopping dynamics, I will present applications in different domains of molecular chemistry and physics: the analysis and the understanding of (time-resolved) X-ray absorption spectra, the interpretation of the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photoexcited dyes in solution, and the design of specific laser pulses (capable of inducing desired chemical reactions) using local control theory. PMID:25647401

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Liquid-Vapor Coexistence Curves of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2012-07-01

    A Molecular dynamics implementation of Gibbs ensemble method is applied to determine liquid-vapor coexistence curves of metals using embedded atom model potentials. As an application of the code we developed, the liquid-vapor coexistence curves of Aluminum and Copper are simulated using Cai and Ye potential. The critical constants obtained were found to be slightly lower than the range of experimental results. The results show that the potentials parameters obtained by fitting to low temperature solid properties are not adequate to accurately determine the liquid-vapor phase diagram.

  12. Quantum Fragment Based ab Initio Molecular Dynamics for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Xianwei; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2015-12-01

    Developing ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods for practical application in protein dynamics is of significant interest. Due to the large size of biomolecules, applying standard quantum chemical methods to compute energies for dynamic simulation is computationally prohibitive. In this work, a fragment based ab initio molecular dynamics approach is presented for practical application in protein dynamics study. In this approach, the energy and forces of the protein are calculated by a recently developed electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (EE-GMFCC) method. For simulation in explicit solvent, mechanical embedding is introduced to treat protein interaction with explicit water molecules. This AIMD approach has been applied to MD simulations of a small benchmark protein Trpcage (with 20 residues and 304 atoms) in both the gas phase and in solution. Comparison to the simulation result using the AMBER force field shows that the AIMD gives a more stable protein structure in the simulation, indicating that quantum chemical energy is more reliable. Importantly, the present fragment-based AIMD simulation captures quantum effects including electrostatic polarization and charge transfer that are missing in standard classical MD simulations. The current approach is linear-scaling, trivially parallel, and applicable to performing the AIMD simulation of proteins with a large size. PMID:26642993

  13. Long-Time-Step Molecular Dynamics through Hydrogen Mass Repartitioning.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Chad W; Le Grand, Scott; Walker, Ross C; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2015-04-14

    Previous studies have shown that the method of hydrogen mass repartitioning (HMR) is a potentially useful tool for accelerating molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By repartitioning the mass of heavy atoms into the bonded hydrogen atoms, it is possible to slow the highest-frequency motions of the macromolecule under study, thus allowing the time step of the simulation to be increased by up to a factor of 2. In this communication, we investigate further how this mass repartitioning allows the simulation time step to be increased in a stable fashion without significantly increasing discretization error. To this end, we ran a set of simulations with different time steps and mass distributions on a three-residue peptide to get a comprehensive view of the effect of mass repartitioning and time step increase on a system whose accessible phase space is fully explored in a relatively short amount of time. We next studied a 129-residue protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), to verify that the observed behavior extends to a larger, more-realistic, system. Results for the protein include structural comparisons from MD trajectories, as well as comparisons of pKa calculations via constant-pH MD. We also calculated a potential of mean force (PMF) of a dihedral rotation for the MTS [(1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrroline-3-methyl)methanethiosulfonate] spin label via umbrella sampling with a set of regular MD trajectories, as well as a set of mass-repartitioned trajectories with a time step of 4 fs. Since no significant difference in kinetics or thermodynamics is observed by the use of fast HMR trajectories, further evidence is provided that long-time-step HMR MD simulations are a viable tool for accelerating MD simulations for molecules of biochemical interest. PMID:26574392

  14. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  15. Steered molecular dynamics approach for promising drugs for influenza A virus targeting M2 channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung; Le, Ly

    2015-09-01

    We have used steered molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the molecular interactions between four M2 inhibitors (amantadine, rimantadine, and two other amantadine derivatives) and the M2 protein channels of influenza A virus H5N1, including the wild type (WT) and three previously identified drug-resistant variants (G34A, S31N, and V27A). The binding free energies between these four inhibitors and the M2 channel of the WT and the three mutants were also determined by use of the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method. Our study provides important insight into binding affinity, including detailed energy components and interactions at the molecular level of four potential inhibitors with the M2 channel of drug-resistant strains; this may assist further experimental study and strategies for rational design of new inhibitors. PMID:26033540

  16. Drugs That Target Dynamic Microtubules: A New Molecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Richard A.; Gernert, Kim M.; Nettles, James H.; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules have long been considered an ideal target for anticancer drugs because of the essential role they play in mitosis, forming the dynamic spindle apparatus. As such, there is a wide variety of compounds currently in clinical use and in development that act as antimitotic agents by altering microtubule dynamics. Although these diverse molecules are known to affect microtubule dynamics upon binding to one of the three established drug domains (taxane, vinca alkaloid, or colchicine site), the exact mechanism by which each drug works is still an area of intense speculation and research. In this study, we review the effects of microtubule-binding chemotherapeutic agents from a new perspective, considering how their mode of binding induces conformational changes and alters biological function relative to the molecular vectors of microtubule assembly or disassembly. These “biological vectors” can thus be used as a spatiotemporal context to describe molecular mechanisms by which microtubule-targeting drugs work. PMID:21381049

  17. Gramicidin A Backbone and Side Chain Dynamics Evaluated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments. I: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Li, Yuhui; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Gu, Hong; Hinton, James F.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Roux, Benoît; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) channels provide an ideal system to test molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane proteins. The peptide backbone lines a cation-selective pore and, due to the small channel size, the average structure and extent of fluctuations of all atoms in the peptide will influence ion permeation. This raises the question of how well molecular mechanical force fields used in MD simulations and potential of mean force (PMF) calculations can predict structure and dynamics as well as ion permeation. To address this question, we undertook a comparative study of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) observables predicted by fully atomistic MD simulations on a gA dimer embedded in a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle with measurements of the gA dimer backbone and tryptophan side chain dynamics using solution state 15N-NMR on gA dimers in SDS micelles. This comparison enables us to examine the robustness of the MD simulations done using different force fields, as well as their ability to predict important features of the gA channel. We find that MD is able to predict NMR observables, including the generalized order parameters (S2), the 15N spin-lattice (T1), spin-spin (T2) relaxation times, and the 1H-15N nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), with remarkable accuracy. To examine further how differences in the force fields can affect the channel conductance, we calculated the PMF for K+ and Na+ permeation through a gA channel in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer. In this case, we find that MD is less successful in quantitatively predicting the single-channel conductance. PMID:21574563

  18. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  19. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling.

    PubMed

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D

    2014-04-01

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions. PMID:24712782

  20. Response of water to electric fields at temperatures below the glass transition: A molecular dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Elghobashi-Meinhardt, Nadia; Gembris, Daniel; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    The electric field dependence of the structure and dynamics of water at 77 K, i.e., below the glass transition temperature (136 K), is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Transitions are found at two critical field strengths, denoted E1 and E2. The transition around E1 3.5 V/nm is characterized by the onset of significant structural disorder, a rapid increase in the orientational polarization, and a maximum in the dynamical fluctuations. At E2 40 V/nm, the system crystallizes in discrete steps into a body-centered-cubic unit cell that minimizes the potential energy by simultaneous superpolarization of the water molecular dipoles and maximization of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The stepwise and discontinuous increase of the orientational polarization with the increasing electric field indicates that the dipole relaxation in the electric field is highly cooperative.

  1. Response of water to electric fields at temperatures below the glass transition: a molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohu; Elghobashi-Meinhardt, Nadia; Gembris, Daniel; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-10-01

    The electric field dependence of the structure and dynamics of water at 77 K, i.e., below the glass transition temperature (136 K), is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Transitions are found at two critical field strengths, denoted E(1) and E(2). The transition around E(1)?3.5 V/nm is characterized by the onset of significant structural disorder, a rapid increase in the orientational polarization, and a maximum in the dynamical fluctuations. At E(2)?40 V/nm, the system crystallizes in discrete steps into a body-centered-cubic unit cell that minimizes the potential energy by simultaneous superpolarization of the water molecular dipoles and maximization of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The stepwise and discontinuous increase of the orientational polarization with the increasing electric field indicates that the dipole relaxation in the electric field is highly cooperative. PMID:21992324

  2. Structural heterogeneity and dynamics in liquid PbSiO3: insight from analysis and visualization of molecular dynamics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, N. V.; Hong, N. V.; Hung, P. K.; Huy, N. V.

    2015-06-01

    The structure and dynamics of liquid lead silicate (PbSiO3) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation with the pair potentials. The models of PbSiO3 consisting of 5000 atoms (1000 Pb, 1000 Si, and 3000 O atoms) are constructed at 3200 K and in a 0-35 GPa pressure range. The local structure, polymorphism, and dynamics in liquid PbSiO3 are investigated through pair radial distribution function, coordination distribution, topology structure of basic structural units, and mean square displacement. Short-range order (SRO) and intermediate-range order (IRO) are clarified by visualization of simulated data. The local environment around Pb+2 and Si+4 ions, the network structure of SiOx (x = 4, 5, 6) and PbOn (n = 3 - 9) polyhedra, and the correlation between structure and dynamics, as well as their change under compression, are also discussed in detail.

  3. Thermodynamics of Associated Electrolytes in Water: Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Sulfate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Duvail, Magali; Villard, Arnaud; Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Dufrêche, Jean-François

    2015-08-27

    A polarizable force field for the sulfate anion SO4(2–) has been developed and extended from nonpolarizable force fields in order to reproduce its structural and thermodynamics properties in aqueous solution. Two force fields with different atomic partial charges on S and O have been tested and used with molecular dynamics with explicit polarization. The results obtained with our developed force field are in good agreement with the experimental hydration properties of the sulfate anion. In addition to molecular dynamics simulations of the sulfate anion in aqueous solution, potentials of mean force of sulfate electrolytes have been calculated via umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations, i.e., MgSO4, EuSO4(+), and UO2SO4. These potentials allow for calculating pair association constants directly comparable to the experimental ones. In the case of monoatomic cations such as Mg(2+) and Eu(3+), the association constants calculated are in very good agreement with the experimental values, i.e., pKcalc = 2.21 (vs 2.21 experimentally) and 3.86 (vs 3.56–3.78 experimentally) for MgSO4 and EuSO4(+), respectively. In the case of purely molecular electrolyte (UO2SO4), the association constant calculated (pKcalc = 1.58–2.07) is in agreement with the range of values available in the literature (pKexp = 1.17–3.14). PMID:25965186

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of MBE Growth of CdTe/ZnTe/Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenli; Chatterjee, Alok; Grein, Christoph; Ciani, Anthony J.; Chung, Peter W.

    2011-02-01

    We simulate in three dimensions molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of CdTe/ZnTe/Si using classical molecular dynamics. Atomic interactions are simulated with Stillinger-Weber potentials, whose parameters are obtained by fitting to experimental data or density function theory-calculated distortion energies of the component crystals. The effects of substrate temperature and atomic species flux ratios on epilayer morphology are investigated. The agreement between simulations and experiments suggests that this model has reasonable ability to predict the microstructures of CdTe/ZnTe/Si grown by MBE.

  5. Molecular dynamics in nitramines and modified nitramines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, T. B.

    1983-11-01

    The structure of RDX has been compared by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the gas phase, melt phase, solution phase, and the solid Beta and alpha phases. The gas, melt, and solid Beta-RDX phases have not been studied previously. The RDX molecule has essentially C sub 3V molecular structure in all environments except the stable solid Alpha-RDX phase. The RDX and HMX melts were found to be comprised almost entirely of intact nitramine molecules, but decomposition before melting was directly detected in HMX. RDX was found to be a highly flexible molecule. In keeping with this flexibility, the crystal structure of the complex between RDX and sulfolane revealed NN02 groups frozen in axial, equatorial, and planar positions within one molecule. The crystal structure of AZMTTC was determined and its thermal decomposition mechanism empirically reasoned. HN3, not previously recognized as a product, appears to trigger the decomposition of AZMTTC. Copious amounts of N2O and CH2O are then released due to depolymerization of the ring. The IR spectra of the gas and solid phases and the TGA all support this mechanism.

  6. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2015-05-15

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 Å cutoff, correct atom masses, reproducible trajectory, CPU with 3.6 GHz, no turbo boost, 8 AVX registers). The new features include a mixed multiple time-step algorithm (reaching 5 fs), a tuned version of LINCS to constrain bond angles, the fusion of pair list creation and force calculation, pressure coupling with a "densostat," and exploitation of new CPU instruction sets like AVX2. The impact of Intel's new transactional memory, atomic instructions, and sloppy pair lists is also analyzed. The algorithms map well to GPUs and can automatically handle most Protein Data Bank (PDB) files including ligands. An implementation is available as part of the YASARA molecular modeling and simulation program from www.YASARA.org. PMID:25824339

  7. Biochemical characterization and molecular dynamic simulation of ?-sitosterol as a tubulin-binding anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Mahaddalkar, Tejashree; Suri, Charu; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Lopus, Manu

    2015-08-01

    ?eta-sitosterol (?-SITO), a phytosterol present in pomegranate, peanut, corn oil, almond, and avocado, has been recognized to offer health benefits and potential clinical uses. ?-SITO is orally bioavailable and, as a constituent of edible natural products, is considered to have no undesired side effects. It has also been considered as a potent anticancer agent. However, the molecular mechanism of action of ?-SITO as a tubulin-binding anticancer agent and its binding site on tubulin are poorly understood. Using a combination of biochemical analyses and molecular dynamic simulation, we investigated the molecular details of the binding interactions of ?-SITO with tubulin. A polymer mass assay comparing the effects of ?-SITO and of taxol and vinblastine on tubulin assembly showed that this phytosterol stabilized microtubule assembly in a manner similar to taxol. An 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid assay confirmed the direct interaction of ?-SITO with tubulin. Although ?-SITO did not show direct binding to the colchicine site on tubulin, it stabilized the colchicine binding. Interestingly, no sulfhydryl groups of tubulin were involved in the binding interaction of ?-SITO with tubulin. Based on the results from the biochemical assays, we computationally modeled the binding of ?-SITO with tubulin. Using molecular docking followed by molecular dynamic simulations, we found that ?-SITO binds tubulin at a novel site (which we call the 'SITO site') adjacent to the colchicine and noscapine sites. Our data suggest that ?-SITO is a potent anticancer compound that interferes with microtubule assembly dynamics by binding to a novel site on tubulin. PMID:25912799

  8. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF QUASI-BALLISTIC HEAT CONDUCTION IN CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF QUASI-BALLISTIC HEAT CONDUCTION IN CARBON NANOTUBES J Shiomi. While experimental attempts to characterize heat conduction of carbon nanotubes encounter technical difficulties, the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations hold an advantage as the heat conduction

  9. A molecular dynamics simulation study of the Gibbs-Tolman-Koening-Buff equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Sun, Haimei; Zhou, Xiaofang

    2015-09-01

    The applicability of the Gibbs-Tolman-Koening-Buff (GTKB) equation has been a concern. A scheme is designed to test the GTKB equation. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for argon liquid of different systems containing different numbers of atoms with a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential at a temperature of 78 K. The Tolman length and the surface tension are calculated. Based on the analysis, we conclude the GTKB equation is tenable for R*s > 8.

  10. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  11. Thermodynamics of site-specific small molecular ion interactions with DNA duplex: a molecular dynamics study

    E-print Network

    Soumadwip Ghosh; Mayank Kumar Dixit; Rajarshi Chakrabarti

    2015-08-21

    The stability and dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is affected by the preferential occupancy of small monovalent molecular ions. Small metal and molecular ions such as sodium and alkyl ammonium have crucial biological functions in human body, affect the thermodynamic stability of the duplex DNA and exhibit preferential binding. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the preferential binding of metal ion such as Na+ and molecular ions such as tetramethyl ammonium (TMA+) and 2-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium (CHO+) to double stranded DNA. The thermodynamic driving force for a particular molecular ion- DNA interaction is determined by decomposing the free energy of binding into its entropic and enthalpic contributions. Our simulations show that each of these molecular ions preferentially binds to the minor groove of the DNA and the extent of binding is highest for CHO+. The ion binding processes are found to be entropically favourable. In addition, the contribution of hydrophobic effects towards the entropic stabilization (in case of TMA+) and the effect of hydrogen bonding contributing to enthalpic stabilization (in case of CHO+) have also been investigated.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibrium of ethanol by molecular dynamics simulation and Voronoi tessellation.

    PubMed

    Fern, Jared T; Keffer, David J; Steele, William V

    2007-11-22

    Explicit atom simulations of ethanol were performed by molecular dynamics using the OPLS-AA potential. The phase densities were determined self-consistently by comparing the distribution of Voronoi volumes from two-phase and single-phase simulations. This is the first demonstration of the use of Voronoi tessellation in two-phase molecular dynamics simulation of polyatomic fluids. This technique removes all arbitrary determination of the phase diagram by using single-phase simulations to self-consistently validate the probability distribution of Voronoi volumes of the liquid and vapor phases extracted from the two-phase molecular dynamics simulations. Properties from the two phase simulations include critical temperature, critical density, critical pressure, phase diagram, surface tension, and molecule orientation at the interface. The simulations were performed from 375 to 472 K. Also investigated were the vapor pressure and hydrogen bonding along the two phase envelope. The phase envelope agrees extremely well with literature values from GEMC at lower temperatures. The combined use of two-phase molecular dynamics simulation and Voronoi tessellation allows us to extend the phase diagram toward the critical point. PMID:17973521

  13. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  14. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Vrakking, Marc

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, the advent of novel experimental and theoretical approaches has made possible the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain, thus opening completely new avenues for imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, e.g., dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by the realization of the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. In the short term, this will allow one to uncover and control the dynamics of elementary chemical processes such as, e.g., ultrafast charge migration, proton transfer, isomerization or multiple ionization, and to address new key questions about the role of attosecond coherent electron dynamics in chemical reactivity. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules, including biomolecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of the current developments, as well as new concepts that are emerging in this field when studying molecular dynamics at attosecond or few-femtosecond time-scales. It also aims at indicating how such studies are likely to evolve in the coming years. In this context, the present special issue contains contributions from recognized experts on HHG, free electron lasers, attosecond and femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, electron and x-ray diffraction methods, photoionization and theoretical methods specially designed for the analysis of experiments in this field. Seven review articles report on the present status of some selected topics, namely, table-top and free-electron lasers operating in the XUV and x-ray wavelength regimes to investigate ultrafast molecular dynamics, imaging methods to visualize electron and nuclear dynamics, nonlinear optics applications, and recent theoretical developments. These and other topics are covered by 32 research papers, in which new exciting results show the path for future developments in this field.

  15. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  16. Anomalous flow behavior in nanochannels: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail; Luo, Lin; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-06-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of flow of water in nanochannels with a range of surface wettability characteristics (hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic) and driving forces (pressures). Our results show apparently anomalous behavior. At low pressures, the rate is higher in nanochannels with hydrophilic surfaces than that with hydrophobic surfaces; however, with high pressure driven flow we observe opposite trends. This apparently anomalous behavior can be explained on the basis of molecular thermodynamics and fluid mechanics considerations. Understanding such behavior is important in many nanofluidic devices such as nanoreactors, nanosensors, and nanochips that are increasingly being designed and used.

  17. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  18. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  19. Potential Competitive Dynamics of Acoustic Ecology.

    PubMed

    Radford, C A; Montgomery, J C

    2016-01-01

    The top predators in coastal marine ecosystems, such as whales, dolphins, seabirds, and large predatory fishes (including sharks), may compete with each other to exploit food aggregations. Finding these patchy food sources and being first to a food patch could provide a significant competitive advantage. Our hypothesis is that food patches have specific sound signatures that marine predators could detect and that acoustic sources and animal sensory capabilities may contribute to competition dynamics. Preliminary analysis shows that diving gannets have a distinct spectral signature between 80 and 200 Hz, which falls within the hearing sensitivity of large pelagic fishes. Therefore, we suggest that diving birds may contribute to the sound signatures of food aggregations, linking competition dynamics both above and below the water surface. PMID:26611047

  20. Extension of Quantum Molecular Dynamics and its Application to Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-print Network

    Toshiki Maruyama; Koji Niita; Akira Iwamoto

    1995-09-04

    In order to treat low-energy heavy-ion reactions, we make an extension of quantum molecular dynamics method. A phenomenological Pauli potential is introduced into effective interactions to approximate the nature of the Fermion many-body system. We treat the widths of nucleon wave-packets as time-dependent dynamical variables. With these modifications, our model can well describe the ground-state properties in wide mass range. Improvements due to the extension are also obtained in the nucleus-nucleus collision calculations.

  1. Dynamical tropopause based on isentropic potential vorticity gradients

    E-print Network

    Pan, Laura

    Dynamical tropopause based on isentropic potential vorticity gradients A. Kunz,1,2 P. Konopka,1 R than during winter and spring in both hemispheres. Citation: Kunz, A., P. Konopka, R. Müller, and L. L

  2. Dynamics study of Z{sup +}(4430) and X(3872) in molecular picture

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiang; Liu Yanrui; Deng Weizhen

    2008-08-31

    In this talk, we review our recent work about the dynamical studies of Z{sup +}(4430) and X(3872). Z{sup +}(4430) can not be explained as a D{sub 1}{sup '}D* or D{sub 1}D* molecular state only considering one pion exchange potential without the cutoff, which needs to be confirmed by introducing sigma exchange potential and adding the cutoff in the effective potential. One also excludes the possibility of X(3872) as a DD* molecular state by one pion and one sigma exchanges with the cutoff. Fortunately there exists an S-wave BB* bound state with J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++}. we suggest future experiment to search this state.

  3. Quantum dynamics of bio-molecular systems in noisy environments

    E-print Network

    M. B. Plenio; S. F. Huelga

    2012-02-05

    We discuss three different aspects of the quantum dynamics of bio-molecular systems and more generally complex networks in the presence of strongly coupled environments. Firstly, we make a case for the systematic study of fundamental structural elements underlying the quantum dynamics of these systems, identify such elements and explore the resulting interplay of quantum dynamics and environmental decoherence. Secondly, we critically examine some existing approaches to the numerical description of system-environment interaction in the non-perturbative regime and present a promising new method that can overcome some limitations of existing methods. Thirdly, we present an approach towards deciding and quantifying the non-classicality of the action of the environment and the observed system-dynamics. We stress the relevance of these tools for strengthening the interplay between theoretical and experimental research in this field.

  4. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  5. Concise NMR approach for molecular dynamics characterizations in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Courtier-Murias, Denis

    2013-08-22

    Molecular dynamics characterisations in solids can be carried out selectively using dipolar-dephasing experiments. Here we show that the introduction of a sum of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions greatly improve fittings of the "intensity versus time" data for protonated carbons in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The Lorentzian term accounts for remote intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions, which vary from one molecule to another or for different carbons within the same molecule. Thus, by separating contributions from weak remote interactions, more accurate Gaussian decay constants, T(dd), can be extracted for directly bonded (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions. Reorientations of the (1)H-(13)C bonds lead to the increase of T(dd), and by measuring dipolar-dephasing constants, insight can be gained into dynamics in solids. We have demonstrated advantages of the method using comparative dynamics studies in the ? and ? polymorphs of glycine, cyclic amino acids L-proline, DL-proline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, the Ala residue in different dipeptides, as well as adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. It was possible to distinguish subtle differences in dynamics of different carbon sites within a molecule in polymorphs and in L- and DL-forms. The presence of overall molecular motions is shown to lead to particularly large differences in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The differences in dynamics can be attributed to differences in noncovalent interactions. In the case of hexamethylenetetramine, for example, the presence of C-H···N interactions leads to nearly rigid molecules. Overall, the method allows one to gain insight into the role of noncovalent interactions in solids and their influence on the molecular dynamics. PMID:23879450

  6. Dynamics of Quantum Vorticity in a Random Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Bennett

    2009-04-03

    I study the dynamics of a superfluid vortex in a random potential, as in the inner crust of a neutron star. Below a critical flow velocity of the ambient superfluid, a vortex is effectively immobilized by lattice forces even in the limit of zero dissipation. Low-velocity, translatory motion is not dynamically possible, a result with important implications for understanding neutron star precession and the dynamical properties of superfluid nuclear matter.

  7. Pseudo generators for under-resolved molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittracher, A.; Hartmann, C.; Junge, O.; Koltai, P.

    2015-09-01

    Many features of a molecule which are of physical interest (e.g. molecular conformations, reaction rates) are described in terms of its dynamics in configuration space. This article deals with the projection of molecular dynamics in phase space onto configuration space. Specifically, we study the situation that the phase space dynamics is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation and study its relation with the configurational Smoluchowski equation in the three different scaling regimes: Firstly, the Smoluchowski equations in non-Cartesian geometries are derived from the overdamped limit of the Langevin equation. Secondly, transfer operator methods are used to describe the metastable behaviour of the system at hand, and an explicit small-time asymptotics is derived on which the Smoluchowski equation turns out to govern the dynamics of the position coordinate (without any assumptions on the damping). By using an adequate reduction technique, these considerations are then extended to one-dimensional reaction coordinates. Thirdly, we sketch three different approaches to approximate the metastable dynamics based on time-local information only.

  8. Kinetics of Surface Enrichment: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    E-print Network

    Prabhat K. Jaiswal; Sanjay Puri; Subir K. Das

    2010-11-29

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) to study the kinetics of surface enrichment (SE) in a stable homogeneous mixture (AB), placed in contact with a surface which preferentially attracts A. The SE profiles show a characteristic double-exponential behavior with two length scales: \\xi_-, which rapidly saturates to its equilibrium value, and \\xi_+, which diverges as a power-law with time (\\xi_+ \\sim t^\\theta). We find that hydrodynamic effects result in a crossover of the growth exponent from \\theta \\simeq 0.5 to \\theta \\simeq 1.0. There is also a corresponding crossover in the growth dynamics of the SE-layer thickness.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Gumbart, James; Aksimentiev, Alekseij; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Wang, Yi

    2008-01-01

    With recent advances in X-ray crystallography of membrane proteins promising many new high-resolution structures, MD simulations become increasingly valuable for understanding membrane protein function, as they can unleash dynamic behavior concealed in the static structures. Dramatic increase in computational power in synergy with more efficient computational methodologies allows one today to carry out molecular dynamics simulations of any structurally known membrane protein in its native environment, covering the time scale of up to 0.1 ?sec. At the frontier of membrane protein simulations are ion channels, aquaporins, passive and active transporters, and bioenergetic proteins. In this review we summarize recent developments in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:16043343

  10. Collective dynamics of molecular motors pulling on fluid membranes

    E-print Network

    O. Campas; Y. Kafri; K. B. Zeldovich; J. Casademunt; J. -F. Joanny

    2005-12-08

    The collective dynamics of $N$ weakly coupled processive molecular motors are considered theoretically. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the velocity-force curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from a simple mean field prediction. They become essentially independent of $N$ if it is large enough. For strongly biased motors such as kinesin this occurs if $N\\gtrsim 5$. The study of a two-state model shows that the existence of internal states can induce effective interactions.

  11. Dynamic Assessment, Potential Giftedness and Mathematics Achievement in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popa, Nicoleta Laura; Pauc, Ramona Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic assessment is currently discussed in educational literature as one of the most promising practices in stimulating learning among various groups of students, including gifted and potentially gifted students. The present study investigates effects of dynamic assessment on mathematics achievement among elementary school students, with…

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on the local order of liquid and amorphous ZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, José Pedro; Borges, Denilson; Mota, Rita C.; Silva, Maurício A. P.

    2008-05-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of structural and dynamical correlations of molten and vitreous states under several conditions of density and temperature were performed. We use an effective recently proposed interatomic potential, consisting of two- and three-body covalent interactions which has successfully described the structural, dynamical, and structural phase transformation induced by pressure in ZnTe [D. S. Borges and J. P. Rino, Phys. Rev. B 72, 014107 (2005)]. The two-body term of the interaction potential consists of Coulomb interaction resulting from charge transfer, steric repulsion due to atomic sizes, charge-dipole interaction to include the effect of electronic polarizability of anions, and dipole-dipole (van der Waals) interactions. The three-body covalent term is a modification of the Stillinger-Weber potential. Molecular dynamics simulations in isobaric-isenthalpic ensemble have been performed for systems amounting to 4096 and 64 000 particles. Starting from a crystalline zinc-blende (ZB) structure, the system is initially heated until a very homogeneous liquid is obtained. The vitreous zinc telluride phase is attained by cooling the liquid at sufficiently fast cooling rates, while slower cooling rates lead to a disordered ZB crystalline structure. Two- and three-body correlations for the liquid and vitreous phases are analyzed through pair distribution functions, static structure factors, and bond angle distributions. In particular, the neutron static structure factor for the liquid phase is in very good agreement with both the reported experimental data and first-principles simulations.

  13. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    E-print Network

    Myo, Takayuki; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting system. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM). We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  14. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    E-print Network

    Takayuki Myo; Hiroshi Toki; Kiyomi Ikeda; Hisashi Horiuchi; Tadahiro Suhara

    2015-11-23

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting system. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM). We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  15. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-print Network

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  16. Long Timestep Molecular Dynamics on the Graphical Processing Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, James C.; Nowling, Ronald J.; Cickovski, Trevor; Sweet, Christopher R.; Pande, Vijay S.; Izaguirre, Jesús A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations now play a key role in many areas of theoretical chemistry, biology, physics, and materials science. In many cases, such calculations are significantly limited by the massive amount of computer time needed to perform calculations of interest. Herein, we present Long Timestep Molecular Dynamics (LTMD), a method to significantly speed MD simulations. In particular, we discuss new methods to calculate the needed terms in LTMD as well as issues germane to a GPU implementation. The resulting code, implemented in the OpenMM MD library, can achieve a significant 6-fold speed increase, leading to MD simulations on the order of 5 ?s/day using implicit solvent models. PMID:24436689

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of ferredoxin in different electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, Nikolay K.; Lemak, A. S.

    1993-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of bacterial ferredoxin (Peptococcus aerogenes) at constant temperature have been performed. There are two iron-sulfur Fe4S4 clusters in the protein molecule of ferredoxin, which can be in various charge states. After the protein was changed instantaneously from oxidized state in reduced one, the unexpected behavior of the distance between clusters had been observed. Strong coupling of negative charged clusters to the protein matrix provides the clusters come closer together by approximately 0.5 angstroms when the charge on one of them have been increased, even though this charge change leads to an increase in the intercluster repulsion. The molecular dynamics trajectory have been used to specify a quasi-harmonical model to describe a low frequency motions of the protein. In the model each of amino acids and each of iron-sulfur clusters appears as an elementary unit.

  18. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work. PMID:19449821

  19. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Buffalo Prion Protein

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that buffalo is a low susceptibility species resisting to TSEs (Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies) (same as rabbits, horses and dogs). TSEs, also called prion diseases, are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of species (in humans prion diseases are (v)CJDs, GSS, FFI, and kulu etc). It was reported that buffalo is a low susceptibility species resisting to prion diseases (as rabbits, dogs, horses). In molecular structures, these neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein, predominantly with alpha-helices, into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions, rich in beta-sheets. This paper studies the molecular structure and structural dynamics of buffalo prion protein, in order to find out the reason why buffaloes are resistant to prion diseases. We first did molecular modeling a homology structure constructed by one mutation at residue 143 from the Nuclear Magnetic Resonanc...

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of electron irradiated PVDF nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiayuan; Bhatta, Ram; Kisielowski, Christian; Lolla, Dinesh; Reneker, Darrell; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution, aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy was used to observe morphological changes and segmental motion of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofibers in an 80 kilovolt electron beam. Atomic and molecular scale high-resolution images of fibers were made with an aberration corrected electron microscope. Chemical and morphological changes, which include the breaking of the fiber, loss of fluorine atoms and cross-linking of chains, caused by the high-energy electron beam were observed. We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of such atomic and molecular level observations. The calculational models include the influence of chain scission, chain recoiling, and torsional defects on the morphology of a nanofiber. The effects of the loss of fluorine atoms and the applied tension on the morphology of the fibers were also investigated. Work supported by the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Structure and Functions of Water-Membrane Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A large number of essential cellular processes occur at the interfaces between water and membranes. The selectivity and dynamics of these processes are largely determined by the structural and electrical properties of the water-membrane interface. We investigate these properties by the molecular dynamics method. Over the time scales of the simulations, the membrane undergoes fluctuations described by the capillary wave model. These fluctuations produce occasional thinning defects in the membrane which provide effective pathways for passive transport of ions and small molecules across the membrane. Ions moving through the membrane markedly disrupt its structure and allow for significant water penetration into the membrane interior. Selectivity of transport, with respect to ionic charge, is determined by the interfacial electrostatic potential. Many small molecules. of potential significance in catalysis, bioenergetics and pharmacology, are shown to bind to the interface. The energetics and dynamics of this process will be discussed.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  3. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  4. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    E-print Network

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-01-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  5. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  6. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Disorder Induced Amorphization in Pyrochlore

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin; Crocombette, J.-P.; Weber, William J.; Corrales, Louis R.

    2005-01-21

    The defect accumulation of amorphization has been studied for the La2Zr2O7 pyrochlore by means of classical molecular dynamic simulations. Present calculations show that the accumulation of cation Frenkel pairs is the main driving parameter for the amorphization process, while the oxygen atoms simply rearrange around cations. Under Frenkel pair accumulation, the structure follows the pyrochlore-amorphous sequence. Present results consequently provide atomic-level interpretation to previous experimental irradiation observations of the two-step phase transitions.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shear Moduli for Coulomb Crystals

    E-print Network

    C. J. Horowitz; J. Hughto

    2008-12-15

    Torsional (shear) oscillations of neutron stars may have been observed in quasiperiodic oscillations of Magnetar Giant Flares. The frequencies of these modes depend on the shear modulus of neutron star crust. We calculate the shear modulus of Coulomb crystals from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that electron screening reduces the shear modulus by about 10% compared to previous Ogata et al. results. Our MD simulations can be extended to calculate the effects of impurities and or polycrystalline structures on the shear modulus.

  8. An Investigation of Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamic Simulation on Imidazopyridines as B-Raf Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huiding; Li, Yupeng; Yu, Fang; Xie, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Kaixiong; Fu, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    In the recent cancer treatment, B-Raf kinase is one of key targets. Nowadays, a group of imidazopyridines as B-Raf kinase inhibitors have been reported. In order to investigate the interaction between this group of inhibitors and B-Raf kinase, molecular docking, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and binding free energy (?Gbind) calculation were performed in this work. Molecular docking was carried out to identify the key residues in the binding site, and MD simulations were performed to determine the detail binding mode. The results obtained from MD simulation reveal that the binding site is stable during the MD simulations, and some hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in MD simulations are different from H-bonds in the docking mode. Based on the obtained MD trajectories, ?Gbind was computed by using Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA), and the obtained energies are consistent with the activities. An energetic analysis reveals that both electrostatic and van der Waals contributions are important to ?Gbind, and the unfavorable polar solvation contribution results in the instability of the inhibitor with the lowest activity. These results are expected to understand the binding between B-Raf and imidazopyridines and provide some useful information to design potential B-Raf inhibitors. PMID:26580609

  9. Molecular-level dynamics of refractory dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-04-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) accounts for most of the global oceanic organic carbon inventory. Processes leading to its formation and factors determining its stability are still largely unknown. We hypothesize that refractory DOM carries a universal molecular signature. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability in this universal signature is a key to understanding dynamics of refractory DOM. We present results from a long-term study of the DOM geo-metabolome in the open North Sea. Geo-metabolomics considers the entity of DOM as a population of compounds, each characterized by a specific function and reactivity in the cycling of energy and elements. Ten-thousands of molecular formulae were identified in DOM by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry analysis (FT-ICR-MS, Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry). The DOM pool in the North Sea was influenced by a complex interplay of processes that produced, transformed and degraded dissolved molecules. We identified a stable fraction in North Sea DOM with a molecular composition similar to deep ocean DOM. Molecular-level changes in this stable fraction provide novel information on dynamics and interactions of refractory DOM.

  10. Microscopic dynamical description of proton-induced fission with the constrained molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2015-08-01

    The microscopic description of nuclear fission still remains a topic of intense basic research. Understanding nuclear fission, apart from a theoretical point of view, is of practical importance for energy production and the transmutation of nuclear waste. In nuclear astrophysics, fission sets the upper limit to the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements via the r process. In this work we initiated a systematic study of intermediate-energy proton-induced fission using the constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) code. The CoMD code implements an effective interaction with a nuclear matter compressibility of K =200 (soft equation of state) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. Moreover, a constraint is imposed in the phase-space occupation for each nucleon restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. A proper choice of the surface parameter of the effective interaction has been made to describe fission. In this work, we present results of fission calculations for proton-induced reactions on: (a) 232Th at 27 and 63 MeV; (b) 235U at 10, 30, 60, and 100 MeV; and (c) 238U at 100 and 660 MeV. The calculated observables include fission-fragment mass distributions, total fission energies, neutron multiplicities, and fission times. These observables are compared to available experimental data. We show that the microscopic CoMD code is able to describe the complicated many-body dynamics of the fission process at intermediate and high energy and give a reasonable estimate of the fission time scale. Sensitivity of the results to the density dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential (and, thus, the nuclear symmetry energy) is found. Further improvements of the code are necessary to achieve a satisfactory description of low-energy fission in which shell effects play a dominant role.

  11. Molecular Structure and Transport Dynamics in Perfluoro Sulfonyl Imide Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-05-25

    We report a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the nanostructure, transport dynamics of water and hydronium and water percolation in hydrated perfluoro sulfonyl imides (PFSI), a polymer considered for proton transport in PEM fuel cells, using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical changes are related to the changes in the membrane nanostructure. Water network percolation threshold, the level at which a consistent spanning water network starts to develop in the membrane, lies between hydration level (?) 6 and 7. The higher acidity of the sulfonyl imide acid group of PFSI compared to Nafion reported in our earlier ab initio study, translates into more free hydronium ions at low hydration levels. Nevertheless, the calculated diffusion coefficients of the H3O+ ions and H2O molecules as a function the hydration level were observed to be almost the same as that of Nafion, indicating similar conductivity and consistent with the experimental observations. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  12. Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics probed by Vacuum Ultraviolet Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cryan, James; Champenois, Elio; Shivaram, Niranjan; Wright, Travis; Yang, Chan-Shan; Falcone, Roger; Belkacem, Ali

    2014-05-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of the relaxation dynamics in small molecular systems (CO2 and C2H4) following ultraviolet (UV) photo-excitation. We probe these excitations through photoionization and velocity map imaging (VMI) spectroscopy. Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet (VUV/XUV) pump and probe pulses are created by exploiting strong-field high harmonic generation (HHG) from our state-of-the-art 30 mJ, 1 kHz laser system. Three dimensional photoelectron and photoion momentum images recorded with our VMI spectrometer reveal non-Born Oppenheimer dynamics in the vicinity of a conical intersection, and allow us track the state of the system as a function of time. We also present initial experiments with the goal of controlling the dynamics near a conical intersection using a strong-field IR pulse. Finally, we will show progress towards measurements of time-resolved molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (TRMFPADs) by applying our VUV/XUV pulse sequence to an aligned molecular ensemble. Supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  13. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  14. Dynamic Properties of Molecular Motors in Burnt-Bridge Models

    E-print Network

    Maxim N. Artyomov; Alexander Yu. Morozov; Ekaterina Pronina; Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

    2007-05-04

    Dynamic properties of molecular motors that fuel their motion by actively interacting with underlying molecular tracks are studied theoretically via discrete-state stochastic ``burnt-bridge'' models. The transport of the particles is viewed as an effective diffusion along one-dimensional lattices with periodically distributed weak links. When an unbiased random walker passes the weak link it can be destroyed (``burned'') with probability p, providing a bias in the motion of the molecular motor. A new theoretical approach that allows one to calculate exactly all dynamic properties of motor proteins, such as velocity and dispersion, at general conditions is presented. It is found that dispersion is a decreasing function of the concentration of bridges, while the dependence of dispersion on the burning probability is more complex. Our calculations also show a gap in dispersion for very low concentrations of weak links which indicates a dynamic phase transition between unbiased and biased diffusion regimes. Theoretical findings are supported by Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  15. MORATE: a program for direct dynamics calculations of chemical reaction rates by semiempirical molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Thanh N.; Lu, Da-hong; Lynch, Gillian C.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Melissas, Vasilios S.; Stewart, James J. P.; Steckler, Rozeanne; Garrett, Bruce C.; Isaacson, Alan D.; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Rai, Sachchida N.; Hancock, Gene C.; Joseph, Tomi; Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-04-01

    We present a computer program, MORATE (Molecular Orbital RATE calculations), for direct dynamics calculations of unimolecular and bimolecular rate constants of gas-phase chemical reactions involving atoms, diatoms, or polyatomic species. The potential energies, gradients, and higher derivatives of the potential are calculated whenever needed by semiempirical molecular orbital theory without the intermediary of a global or semiglobal fit. The dynamical methods used are conventional or variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical approximations for tunneling and nonclassical reflection. The computer program is conveniently interfaced package consisting of the POLYRATE program, version 4.5.1, for dynamical rate calculations, and the MOPAC program, version 5.03, for semiempirical electronic structure computations. All semiempirical methods available in MOPAC, in particular MINDO/3, MNDO, AM1, and PM3, can be called on to calculate the potential and gradient. Higher derivatives of the potential are obtained by numerical derivatives of the gradient. Variational transition states are found by a one-dimensional search of generalized-transition-state dividing surfaces perpendicular to the minimum-energy path, and tunneling probabilities are evaluated by numerical quadrature.

  16. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  17. MDVRY: a polarizable classical molecular dynamics package for biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souaille, M.; Loirat, H.; Borgis, D.; Gaigeot, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    The MDVRY classical molecular dynamics package is presented for the study of biomolecules in the gas and liquid phase. Electrostatic polarization has been implemented in the formalism of point induced dipoles following the model of Thole. Two schemes have been implemented for the calculation of induced dipoles, i.e. resolution of the self-consistent equations and a 'Car-Parrinello' dynamical approach. In this latter, the induced dipoles are calculated at each time step of the dynamics through the dynamics of additional degrees of freedom associated with the dipoles. This method saves computer time and allows to study polarized solvated proteins at a very low CPU cost. The program is written in C-language and runs on LINUX machines. A detailed manual of the code is given. The main features of the package are illustrated taking on examples of proteins in the gas phase or immersed in liquid water. Program summaryProgram title: MDVRY Catalogue identifier: AEBY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39 156 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 277 197 Distribution format: tar.bz2 Programming language: C Computer: Linux machines with FFTW Fourier Transform package installed Operating system: Linux machines, SUSE & RedHat distributions Classification: 3, 16.13, 23 External routines: FFTW ( http://www.fftw.org/) Nature of problem: Molecular Dynamics Software package. Solution method: Velocity Verlet algorithm. The implemented force field is composed of intra-molecular interactions and inter-molecular interactions (electrostatics, polarization, van der Waals). Polarization is accounted through induced point dipoles at each atomic site. Supplementary degrees of freedom are associated to the induced dipoles so that a modified Hamiltonian of the dynamics is written. This allows to calculate the induced dipoles with a very fast 'Car-Parrinello' type of dynamics. Running time: The test run provided takes approximately 6 minutes to run.

  18. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by two genistein derivatives: kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jiansong; Wu, Ping; Yang, Ranyao; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Song; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this study two genistein derivatives (G1 and G2) are reported as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and differences in the inhibition of AChE are described. Although they differ in structure by a single methyl group, the inhibitory effect of G1 (IC50=264 nmol/L) on AChE was 80 times stronger than that of G2 (IC50=21,210 nmol/L). Enzyme-kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to better understand the molecular basis for this difference. The results obtained by kinetic analysis demonstrated that G1 can interact with both the catalytic active site and peripheral anionic site of AChE. The predicted binding free energies of two complexes calculated by the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms suggested that a difference between the net electrostatic contributions (?Eele+?GGB) was responsible for the binding affinities of these two inhibitors. Additionally, analysis of the molecular mechanics and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition revealed that the difference between G1 and G2 originated from interactions with Tyr124, Glu292, Val294 and Phe338 of AChE. In conclusion, the results reveal significant differences at the molecular level in the mechanism of inhibition of AChE by these structurally related compounds. PMID:26579414

  19. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  20. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  1. Time series analysis of ion dynamics in glassy ionic conductors obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habasaki, J.; Ngai, K. L.; Hiwatari, Y.

    2005-02-01

    We present several characteristics of ionic motion in glassy ionic conductors brought out by time series analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data. Time series analysis of data obtained by MD simulation can provide crucial information to describe, understand and predict the dynamics in many systems. The data have been treated by the singular spectrum analysis (SSA), which is a method to extract information from noisy short time series and thus provide insight into the unknown or partially unknown dynamics of the underlying system that generated the time series. Phase-space plot reconstructed using the principal components of SSA exhibited complex but clear structures, suggesting the deterministic nature of the dynamics.

  2. Neural Dynamics Underlying Event-Related Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Bressler, Steven L.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Ding, Ming-Zhou; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, Istvan; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two opposing hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying sensory event-related potentials (ERPs). One holds that sensory ERPs are generated by phase resetting of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and the other that they result from signal averaging of stimulus-evoked neural responses. We tested several contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by direct intracortical analysis of neural activity in monkeys. Our findings clearly demonstrate evoked response contributions to the sensory ERP in the monkey, and they suggest the likelihood that a mixed (Evoked/Phase Resetting) model may account for the generation of scalp ERPs in humans.

  3. Tensile testing of Fe and FeCr nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Byggmästar, J. Granberg, F.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Henriksson, K. O. E.

    2015-01-07

    Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the behaviour of cylindrical [001]-oriented Fe and FeCr nanowires under uniaxial tensile strain with both an embedded atom method (EAM) and a Tersoff-like bond order potential. The mechanical properties were analysed and the deformation mechanism was studied and compared between the potentials. The effects of chromium content and size of the wire were studied. Both potentials show elongation by deformation twinning in the ?111?/(211) system resulting in a significantly stiffer and stronger [110]-axial nanowire. The pure iron nanowires are elastically softer than bulk iron and an addition of chromium has both a softening and weakening effect. The bond order potential shows a strong dependence on chromium concentration, while the dependence is considerably weaker for the EAM potential.

  4. Self-Assembly and Dynamics of Organic 2D Molecular Sieves: Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Alexander; Wexler, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous molecular self-assembly is a promising route for bottom-up manufacturing of two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with specific topologies on atomically flat surfaces. Of particular interest is the possibility of selective lock-and-key interaction of guest molecules inside cavities formed by complex self-assembled host structures. Our host structure is a monolayer consisting of interdigitated 1,3,5-tristyrylbenzene substituted by alkoxy peripheral chains containing n = 6, 8, 10, 12, or 14 carbon atoms (TSB3,5-C n) deposited on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using ab initio methods from quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations, we construct and analyze the structure and functionality of the TSB3,5-C n monolayer as a molecular sieve. Supported by ACS-PRF 52696-ND5.

  5. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore »system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  6. Comparing the Efficiencies of Stochastic Isothermal Molecular Dynamics Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimkuhler, Ben; Noorizadeh, Emad; Penrose, Oliver

    2011-06-01

    Molecular dynamics typically incorporates a stochastic-dynamical device, a "thermostat," in order to drive the system to the Gibbs (canonical) distribution at a prescribed temperature. When molecular dynamics is used to compute time-dependent properties, such as autocorrelation functions or diffusion constants, at a given temperature, there is a conflict between the need for the thermostat to perturb the time evolution of the system as little as possible and the need to establish equilibrium rapidly. In this article we define a quantity called the "efficiency" of a thermostat which relates the perturbation introduced by the thermostat to the rate of convergence of average kinetic energy to its equilibrium value. We show how to estimate this quantity analytically, carrying out the analysis for several thermostats, including the Nosé-Hoover-Langevin thermostat due to Samoletov et al. (J. Stat. Phys. 128:1321-1336, 2007) and a generalization of the "stochastic velocity rescaling" method suggested by Bussi et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 126:014101, 2007). We find efficiency improvements (proportional to the number of degrees of freedom) for the new schemes compared to Langevin Dynamics. Numerical experiments are presented which precisely confirm our theoretical estimates.

  7. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  8. Dynamics of the molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raff, L. M.; Thompson, D. L.; Sims, L. B.; Porter, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The molecular and atomic mechanisms for the hydrogen-iodine exchange reaction are treated theoretically by means of extensive classical trajectories calculated on a reasonable potential energy surface on which the single adjustable parameter is the iodine-core effective charge. The analysis shows the molecular mechanism to be dynamically forbidden, but gives an over-all rate constant for the atomic mechanism that is in agreement with the experimental values. It is indicated that the formation of a weak H2I complex plays an important dynamical role if the atomic mechanism is limited to reactions with collision complexes involving no more than two hydrogen atoms and two iodine atoms. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained for the rate constant for the recombination I+I+H2 yields I2+H2 and its negative temperature coefficient.

  9. Comparison of path integral molecular dynamics methods for the infrared absorption spectrum of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habershon, Scott; Fanourgakis, George S.; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2008-08-01

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and partially adiabatic centroid molecular dynamics (PA-CMD) methods are compared and contrasted in an application to the infrared absorption spectrum of a recently parametrized flexible, polarizable, Thole-type potential energy model for liquid water. Both methods predict very similar spectra in the low-frequency librational and intramolecular bending region at wavenumbers below 2500 cm-1. However, the RPMD spectrum is contaminated in the high-frequency O-H stretching region by contributions from the internal vibrational modes of the ring polymer. This problem is avoided in the PA-CMD method, which adjusts the elements of the Parrinello-Rahman mass matrix so as to shift the frequencies of these vibrational modes beyond the spectral range of interest. PA-CMD does not require any more computational effort than RPMD and it is clearly the better of the two methods for simulating vibrational spectra.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Phonon Conductivity in Cu-Ni Binary Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Yusuke; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Sato, Kazunori; Asai, Yoshihiro; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    In 2010, a giant Peltier effect was observed in a Cu-Ni/Au junction. It is considered that this giant Peltier effect is caused by nano-scale phase separation formed in the sputtering process. The giant Peltier coefficient in the Cu-Ni/Au junction indicates the great Seebeck coefficient in Cu-Ni alloy. Although this alloy is a prospective thermoelectric material because of its great Seebeck coefficient, the low phonon thermal conductivity is also necessary for a large thermoelectric coefficient ZT. In order to find conditions for the low phonon conductivity, we calculate the thermal conductivity in Cu-Ni Alloy in various shapes with or without nanostructures by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. In this simulation, we use a semi-empirical potential and the reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of an Idealized Shock Tube: N2 in Ar Bath Driven by He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskulich, Ezekiel Ashe; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of 10% N2 in Ar initially at 298 K in an idealized shock tube driven by He was studied using molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed using the Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) code. Nitrogen was modeled as a Morse oscillator and non-covalent interactions were approximated by the Buckingham exponential-6 pair potential. The initial pressures in the He driver gas and the driven N2/Ar gas were 1000 atm and 20 atm, respectively. Microcanonical trajectories were followed for 2 ns following release of the driver gas. Results for excitation and subsequent relaxation of the N2, as well as properties of the gas during the simulations, will be reported.

  12. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  13. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Electrostatic Embedding: Application to Acetylcholinesterase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Lau, Edmond Y; Bennion, Brian J; Huang, Patrick; Lightstone, Felice C

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes are complicated solvated systems that typically require many atoms to simulate their function with any degree of accuracy. We have recently developed numerical techniques for large scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and applied them to the study of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. We carried out density functional theory calculations for a quantum-mechanical (QM) subsystem consisting of 612 atoms with an O(N) complexity finite-difference approach. The QM subsystem is embedded inside an external potential field representing the electrostatic effect due to the environment. We obtained finite-temperature sampling by first-principles molecular dynamics for the acylation reaction of acetylcholine catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase. Our calculations show two energy barriers along the reaction coordinate for the enzyme-catalyzed acylation of acetylcholine. The second barrier (8.5 kcal/mol) is rate-limiting for the acylation reaction and in good agreement with experiment. PMID:26642985

  14. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: Verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-01

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV^{? _? }, where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter ?? was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter ?, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between ? and ?? was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals.

  15. Assessment of the convergence of molecular dynamics simulations of lipopolysaccharide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Straatsma, TP

    2008-03-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is composed of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide outer leaflet. The chemical structure of lipopolysaccharide confers an asymmetric character to outer membranes that has been shown to play an important role in the in the electrical properties of porins, low permeability and intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative bacteria. In the present work, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two different configurations of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under periodic boundary conditions were carried out in order to i) validate model-derived properties against the available experimental data, ii) identify the properties whose dynamics can be sampled on nanosecond timescales, and iii) evaluate the dependence of the convergence of structural and dynamical properties on the initial configuration of the system, within the chosen force field and simulation conditions. Because the relaxation times associated with the motions of individual LPS monomers in outer membranes is very slow, the two initial configurations do not converge to a common ensemble of configuration on the nanosecond time scale. However, a number of properties of the outer membrane that will significantly impact the structural and internal dynamics of transmembrane proteins, most notably the electrostatic potential and molecular density, do converge within the simulated time scale. For these properties, a good agreement with the available experimental data was found. Such molecular model, capable of accounting for the high asymmetry and low fluidity characteristics of outer membranes, will certainly benefit future atomistic simulations of outer membrane proteins.

  16. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-28

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV(??) , where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter ?? was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter ?, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between ? and ?(?) was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals. PMID:24007031

  17. Schrödinger Operators with Dynamically Defined Potentials: A Survey

    E-print Network

    David Damanik

    2015-10-14

    In this survey we discuss spectral and quantum dynamical properties of discrete one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators whose potentials are obtained by real-valued sampling along the orbits of an ergodic invertible transformation. After an introductory part explaining basic spectral concepts and fundamental results, we present the general theory of such operators, and then provide an overview of known results for specific classes of potentials. Here we focus primarily on the cases of random and almost periodic potentials.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  19. Evaluation of enhanced sampling provided by accelerated molecular dynamics with Hamiltonian replica exchange methods.

    PubMed

    Roe, Daniel R; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-04-01

    Many problems studied via molecular dynamics require accurate estimates of various thermodynamic properties, such as the free energies of different states of a system, which in turn requires well-converged sampling of the ensemble of possible structures. Enhanced sampling techniques are often applied to provide faster convergence than is possible with traditional molecular dynamics simulations. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) is a particularly attractive method, as it allows the incorporation of a variety of enhanced sampling techniques through modifications to the various Hamiltonians. In this work, we study the enhanced sampling of the RNA tetranucleotide r(GACC) provided by H-REMD combined with accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD), where a boosting potential is applied to torsions, and compare this to the enhanced sampling provided by H-REMD in which torsion potential barrier heights are scaled down to lower force constants. We show that H-REMD and multidimensional REMD (M-REMD) combined with aMD does indeed enhance sampling for r(GACC), and that the addition of the temperature dimension in the M-REMD simulations is necessary to efficiently sample rare conformations. Interestingly, we find that the rate of convergence can be improved in a single H-REMD dimension by simply increasing the number of replicas from 8 to 24 without increasing the maximum level of bias. The results also indicate that factors beyond replica spacing, such as round trip times and time spent at each replica, must be considered in order to achieve optimal sampling efficiency. PMID:24625009

  20. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of H2 adsorption in tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Lamonte, Kevin; Gómez Gualdrón, Diego A; Cabrales-Navarro, Fredy A; Scanlon, Lawrence G; Sandi, Giselle; Feld, William; Balbuena, Perla B

    2008-12-11

    Tetramethyl ammonium lithium phthalocyanine is explored as a potential material for storage of molecular hydrogen. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the molecular structure and the dimer conformation. Additional scans performed to determine the interactions of a H2 molecule located at various distances from the molecular sites are used to generate a simple force field including dipole-induced-dipole interactions. This force field is employed in molecular dynamics simulations to calculate adsorption isotherms at various pressures. The regions of strongest adsorption are quantified as functions of temperature, pressure, and separation between molecules in the adsorbent phase, and compared to the regions of strongest binding energy as given by the proposed force field. It is found that the total adsorption could not be predicted only from the spatial distribution of the strongest binding energies; the available volume is the other contributing factor even if the volume includes regions of much lower binding energy. The results suggest that the complex anion is primarily involved in the adsorption process with molecular hydrogen, whereas the cation serves to provide access for hydrogen adsorption in both sides of the anion molecular plane, and spacing between the planes. PMID:19367822

  2. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was analyzed in terms of the radial distribution function (RDF), molecular energy, pairwise bond stretch and angle bending. The interfacial properties between graphene and cellulose were studied by analyzing both cohesive and pullout separation of graphene from cellulose matrix. Finally, the Young's modulii calculated from the MD simulation was compared with the tensile test data. The MD results showed a reasonable agreement with the tensile test results. It was addressed that incorporating graphane in cellulose matrix enhances the mechanical property of the cellulose based bio-polymer systems. In the third part of the work, a hierarchical multiscale modeling framework was established between peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation using an intermediate coarse grained atomic model. The peridynamics formulation is based on continuum theory implying nonlocal force based interaction. It means, continuum points are separated by a finite distance and exert force upon each other. Peridynamics applies integral equations rather than partial differential equations as used in the classical continuum mechanics. Hence, the peridynamics (PD) and the molecular dynamics (MD) have similarities since both use a nonlocal force based interaction. In this work PD based continuum model of graphene-epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposite is defined by the Lagrangian PD particles. Atomistic model is coupled with PD model through a hierarchical multiscale framework. The PD particles at a coarse scale interact with the fine scale PD particles by transferring pressure, displacements and velocities among each other. Based on the same hierarchical coupling method, a fine scale PD model is seamlessly interfaced with the atomistic model through an intermediate mesoscale region i.e. coarse-grain model. At the end of this hierarchical downscaling, the information such as the deformation, energy and other important parameters were captured in the atomistic region under the applied force at micro and macro regions. The results from peridynamic based framework for hierarchical multiscale modeling showed reasonab

  3. Level-Set Minimization of Potential Controlled Hadwiger Valuations for Molecular Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; Wang, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    A level-set method is developed for the numerical minimization of a class of Had-wiger valuations with a potential on a set of three-dimensional bodies. Such valuations are linear combinations of the volume, surface area, and surface integral of mean curvature. The potential increases rapidly as the body shrinks beyond a critical size. The combination of the Hadwiger valuation and the potential is the mean-field free-energy functional of the solvation of non-polar molecules in the recently developed variational implicit-solvent model. This functional of surfaces is minimized by the level-set evolution in the steepest decent of the free energy. The normal velocity of this surface evolution consists of both the mean and Gaussian curvatures, and a lower-order, “forcing” term arising from the potential. The forward Euler method is used to discretize the time derivative with a dynamic time stepping that satisfies a CFL condition. The normal velocity is decomposed into two parts. The first part consists of both the mean and Gaussian curvature terms. It is of parabolic type with parameter correction, and is discretized by central differencing. The second part has all the lower-order terms. It is of hyperbolic type, and is discretized by an upwinding scheme. New techniques of local level-set method and numerical integration are developed. Numerical tests demonstrate a second-order convergence of the method. Examples of application to the modeling of molecular solvation are presented. PMID:22323839

  4. A molecular understanding of the dynamic mechanism of aquaporin osmosis

    E-print Network

    Shua, Liangsuo; Qian, Xin; Wanga, Xiyun; Lin, Yixin; Tan, Kai; Shu, Chaohui; Jin, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    AQPs (aquaporins), the rapid water channels of cells, play a key role in maintaining osmotic equilibrium of cells. In this paper, we reported the dynamic mechanism of AQP osmosis at the molecular level. A theoretical model based on molecular dynamics was carried out and verified by the published experimental data. The reflection coefficients ({\\sigma}) of neutral molecules are mainly decided by their relative size with AQPs, and increase with a third power up to a constant value 1. This model also indicated that the reflection coefficient of a complete impermeable solute can be smaller than 1. The H+ concentration of solution can influence the driving force of the AQPs by changing the equivalent diameters of vestibules surrounded by loops with abundant polar amino acids. In this way, pH of solution can regulate water permeability of AQPs. Therefore, an AQP may not only work as a switch to open or close, but as a rapid response molecular valve to control its water flow. The vestibules can prevent the channel b...

  5. A molecular understanding of the dynamic mechanism of aquaporin osmosis

    E-print Network

    Liangsuo Shua; Suyi Huang; Xin Qian; Xiyun Wanga; Yixin Lin; Kai Tan; Chaohui Shu; Shiping Jin

    2014-03-31

    AQPs (aquaporins), the rapid water channels of cells, play a key role in maintaining osmotic equilibrium of cells. In this paper, we reported the dynamic mechanism of AQP osmosis at the molecular level. A theoretical model based on molecular dynamics was carried out and verified by the published experimental data. The reflection coefficients ({\\sigma}) of neutral molecules are mainly decided by their relative size with AQPs, and increase with a third power up to a constant value 1. This model also indicated that the reflection coefficient of a complete impermeable solute can be smaller than 1. The H+ concentration of solution can influence the driving force of the AQPs by changing the equivalent diameters of vestibules surrounded by loops with abundant polar amino acids. In this way, pH of solution can regulate water permeability of AQPs. Therefore, an AQP may not only work as a switch to open or close, but as a rapid response molecular valve to control its water flow. The vestibules can prevent the channel blockage of AQPs by a primary screening before their constriction region. This model also provides a prediction tool to the structure of AQPs by the {\\sigma}s of special solutes. The puzzling variance between {\\sigma} to erythrocytes AQP1 and {\\sigma} to oocytes-expressing AQP1 was also explained.

  6. Efficient global representations of potential energy functions: Trajectory calculations of bimolecular gas-phase reactions by multiconfiguration molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, Oksana; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Multiconfiguration molecular mechanics (MCMM) was previously applied to calculate potential energies, gradients, and Hessians along a reaction path and in the large-curvature tunneling swath, and it was shown that one could calculate variational transition state theory rate constants with optimized multidimensional tunneling without requiring more than a few electronic structure Hessians. It was also used for molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-phase potentials of mean force as functions of a reaction coordinate. In the present article we present some improvements to the formalism and also show that with these improvements we can use the method for the harder problem of trajectory calculations on gas-phase bimolecular reactive collisions. In particular, we apply the MCMM algorithm to the model reaction OH+H2?H2O+H, for which we construct the global full-dimensional interpolated potential energy surfaces with various numbers of electronic structure Hessians and various molecular mechanics force fields, and we assess the quality of these fits by quasiclassical trajectory calculations. We demonstrate that chemical accuracy (1-2 kcal/mol) can be reached for a MCMM potential in dynamically important regions with a fairly small number of electronic structure Hessians. We also discuss the origins of the errors in the interpolated energies and a possible way to improve the accuracy.

  7. Molecular-dynamics study of long-lived structures in a fragile glass-forming liquid Gregory Johnson,1

    E-print Network

    Gould, Harvey

    (k) 1/ 1 ^ (k) , where is the par- ticle density, 1 kBT, and ^ (k) is the Fourier transform of (x). We choose the step potential, (x) 1 for x 1 and (x) 0 for x 1. The Fourier transform ^ (k) is nega- tive published earlier 2 . To help the reader understand our interpretation of the molecular-dynamics data

  8. A combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven molecular dynamics algorithm for the simulation of shock waves in rarefied gases

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2009-12-10

    A novel combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven (ED/TD) algorithm to speed-up the Molecular Dynamics simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials is presented. Due to the low density regime, the proposed method correctly identifies the time that must elapse before the next interaction occurs, similarly to Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics. However, each interaction is treated using Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics, thereby integrating Newton's Second Law using the sufficiently small time step needed to correctly resolve the atomic motion. Although infrequent, many-body interactions are also accounted for with a small approximation. The combined ED/TD method is shown to correctly reproduce translational relaxation in argon, described using the Lennard-Jones potential. For densities between {rho}=10{sup -4}kg/m{sup 3} and {rho}=10{sup -1}kg/m{sup 3}, comparisons with kinetic theory, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, and pure Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics demonstrate that the ED/TD algorithm correctly reproduces the proper collision rates and the evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Finally, the combined ED/TD algorithm is applied to the simulation of a Mach 9 shock wave in rarefied argon. Density and temperature profiles as well as molecular velocity distributions accurately match DSMC results, and the shock thickness is within the experimental uncertainty. For the problems considered, the ED/TD algorithm ranged from several hundred to several thousand times faster than conventional Time-Driven MD. Moreover, the force calculation to integrate the molecular trajectories is found to contribute a negligible amount to the overall ED/TD simulation time. Therefore, this method could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials, either classical or first-principles, to Molecular Dynamics simulations of shock waves in rarefied gases, involving vibrational nonequilibrium and chemical reactivity.

  9. Direct molecular simulation of nitrogen dissociation based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.; Bender, Jason D.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2015-08-01

    The direct molecular simulation (DMS) approach is used to predict the internal energy relaxation and dissociation dynamics of high-temperature nitrogen. An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) is used to calculate the dynamics of two interacting nitrogen molecules by providing forces between the four atoms. In the near-equilibrium limit, it is shown that DMS reproduces the results obtained from well-established quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) analysis, verifying the validity of the approach. DMS is used to predict the vibrational relaxation time constant for N2-N2 collisions and its temperature dependence, which are in close agreement with existing experiments and theory. Using both QCT and DMS with the same PES, we find that dissociation significantly depletes the upper vibrational energy levels. As a result, across a wide temperature range, the dissociation rate is found to be approximately 4-5 times lower compared to the rates computed using QCT with Boltzmann energy distributions. DMS calculations predict a quasi-steady-state distribution of rotational and vibrational energies in which the rate of depletion of high-energy states due to dissociation is balanced by their rate of repopulation due to collisional processes. The DMS approach simulates the evolution of internal energy distributions and their coupling to dissociation without the need to precompute rates or cross sections for all possible energy transitions. These benchmark results could be used to develop new computational fluid dynamics models for high-enthalpy flow applications.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Fracture of Model Epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-01-18

    The failure of thermosetting polymer adhesives is an important problem which particularly lacks understanding from the molecular viewpoint. While linear elastic fracture mechanics works well for such polymers far from the crack tip, the method breaks down near the crack tip where large plastic deformation occurs and the molecular details become important [1]. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of highly crosslinked polymer networks bonded to a solid surface are presented here. Epoxies are used as the guide for modeling. The focus of the simulations is the network connectivity and the interfacial strength. In a random network, the bond stress is expected to vary, and the most stressed bonds will break first [2]. Crack initiation should occur where a cluster of highly constrained bonds exists. There is no reason to expect crack initiation to occur at the interface. The results to be presented show that the solid surface limits the interfacial bonding resulting in stressed interfacial bonds and interfacial fracture. The bonds in highly-crosslinked random networks do not become stressed as expected. The sequence of molecular structural deformations that lead to failure has been determined and found to be strongly dependent upon the network connectivity. The structure of these networks and its influence on the stress-strain behavior will be discussed in general. A set of ideal, ordered networks have been constructed to manipulate the deformation sequence to achieve different fracture modes (i.e. cohesive vs. adhesive).

  11. Molecular dynamics calculation of elastic constants in GayBerne nematic liquid crystals

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Mark R.

    Molecular dynamics calculation of elastic constants in Gay­Berne nematic liquid crystals Michael P a molecular dynamics calculation of the Frank elastic constants of a nematic liquid crystal. We study two well-9606 96 51131-1 I. INTRODUCTION In a nematic liquid crystal, the distribution of molecular positions

  12. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  13. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficientmore »as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.« less

  14. Influence of conformational molecular dynamics on matter wave interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gring, Michael; Gerlich, Stefan; Eibenberger, Sandra; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Berrada, Tarik; Arndt, Markus; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Hornberger, Klaus; Mueri, Marcel; Mayor, Marcel; Boeckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos L.

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the influence of thermally activated internal molecular dynamics on the phase shifts of matter waves inside a molecule interferometer. While de Broglie physics generally describes only the center-of-mass motion of a quantum object, our experiment demonstrates that the translational quantum phase is sensitive to dynamic conformational state changes inside the diffracted molecules. The structural flexibility of tailor-made organic particles is sufficient to admit a mixture of strongly fluctuating dipole moments. These modify the electric susceptibility and through this the quantum interference pattern in the presence of an external electric field. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations combined with density-functional theory allow us to quantify the time-dependent structural reconfigurations and to predict the ensemble-averaged square of the dipole moment which is found to be in good agreement with the interferometric result. The experiment thus opens a different perspective on matter wave interferometry, as we demonstrate here that it is possible to collect structural information about molecules even if they are delocalized over more than 100 times their own diameter.

  15. Stochastic dynamics for a single vibrational mode in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, A.; Perroni, C. A.; Marigliano Ramaglia, V.; Cataudella, V.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a very accurate computational scheme for the dynamics of a classical oscillator coupled to a molecular junction driven by a finite bias, including the finite-mass effect. We focus on two minimal models for the molecular junction: the Anderson-Holstein and two-site Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) models. As concerns the oscillator dynamics, we are able to recover a Langevin equation confirming what has been found by other authors with different approaches and indicating that quantum effects come from the electronic subsystem only. Solving numerically the stochastic equation, we study the position and velocity distribution probabilities of the oscillator and the electronic transport properties at arbitrary values of electron-oscillator interaction and gate and bias voltages. The range of validity of the adiabatic approximation is established in a systematic way by analyzing the behavior of the kinetic energy of the oscillator. Due to the dynamical fluctuations, at intermediate bias voltages, the velocity distributions deviate from a Gaussian shape and the average kinetic energy shows a nonmonotonic behavior. In this same regime of parameters, the dynamical effects favor conduction far from electronic resonances where small currents are observed in the infinite-mass approximation. These effects are enhanced in the two-site SSH model due to the presence of the intermolecular hopping t. For sufficiently large hopping with respect to tunneling on the molecule, small interaction strengths, and at intermediate bias (non-Gaussian regime), we point out a correspondence between the minima of the kinetic energy and the maxima of the dynamical conductance.

  16. Autoinhibitory mechanisms of ERG studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Salsbury, Freddie R.

    2015-01-01

    ERG, an ETS-family transcription factor, acts as a regulator of differentiation of early hematopoietic cells. It contains an autoinhibitory domain, which negatively regulates DNA-binding. The mechanism of autoinhibitory is still illusive. To understand the mechanism, we study the dynamical properties of ERG protein by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations suggest that DNA binding autoinhibition associates with the internal dynamics of ERG. Specifically, we find that (1), The N-C terminal correlation in the inhibited ERG is larger than that in uninhibited ERG that contributes to the autoinhibition of DNA-binding. (2), DNA-binding changes the property of the N-C terminal correlation from being anti-correlated to correlated, that is, changing the relative direction of the correlated motions and (3), For the Ets-domain specifically, the inhibited and uninhibited forms exhibit essentially the same dynamics, but the binding of the DNA decreases the fluctuation of the Ets-domain. We also find from PCA analysis that the three systems, even with quite different dynamics, do have highly similar free energy surfaces, indicating that they share similar conformations.

  17. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubeti?, Ajasja; Urban?i?, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  19. Parallel computing and molecular dynamics of biological membranes

    E-print Network

    G. La Penna; S. Letardi; V. Minicozzi; S. Morante; G. C. Rossi; G. Salina

    1997-09-17

    In this talk I discuss the general question of the portability of Molecular Dynamics codes for diffusive systems on parallel computers of the APE family. The intrinsic single precision arithmetics of the today available APE platforms does not seem to affect the numerical accuracy of the simulations, while the absence of integer addressing from CPU to individual nodes puts strong constraints on the possible programming strategies. Liquids can be very satisfactorily simulated using the "systolic" method. For more complex systems, like the biological ones at which we are ultimately interested in, the "domain decomposition" approach is best suited to beat the quadratic growth of the inter-molecular computational time with the number of elementary components of the system. The promising perspectives of using this strategy for extensive simulations of lipid bilayers are briefly reviewed.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of surface-initiated melting of nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siavosh-Haghighi, Ali; Thompson, Donald L.

    2006-11-01

    The melting of nitromethane initiated at solid-vacuum interfaces has been investigated using molecular dynamics nvt simulations with a realistic force field [D. C. Sorescu et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)]. The calculated melting point (251±5K ) is in good agreement with experiment (244.73K) and values obtained previously (˜255.5 and 266.5±8K) using other simulation methods [P. M. Agrawal et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9617 (2003)]. Analyses of the molecular orientations and diffusion during the simulations as functions of the distance from the exposed surfaces show that the melting is a direct crystal-to-liquid transition, in which the molecules first gain rotational freedom, then mobility. There is a slight dependence of the melting temperature on the exposed crystallographic face.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of surface-initiated melting of nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Siavosh-Haghighi, Ali; Thompson, Donald L

    2006-11-14

    The melting of nitromethane initiated at solid-vacuum interfaces has been investigated using molecular dynamics nvt simulations with a realistic force field [D. C. Sorescu et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)]. The calculated melting point (251+/-5 K) is in good agreement with experiment (244.73 K) and values obtained previously (approximately 255.5 and 266.5+/-8 K) using other simulation methods [P. M. Agrawal et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9617 (2003)]. Analyses of the molecular orientations and diffusion during the simulations as functions of the distance from the exposed surfaces show that the melting is a direct crystal-to-liquid transition, in which the molecules first gain rotational freedom, then mobility. There is a slight dependence of the melting temperature on the exposed crystallographic face. PMID:17115783

  2. Implementation of Green's function molecular dynamics: An extension to LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Bartels, Guido; Campañá, Carlos; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-06-01

    The Green's function molecular dynamics method, which enables one to study the elastic response of a three-dimensional solid to an external stress field by taking into consideration only the surface atoms, was implemented as an extension to an open source classical molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS. This was done in the style of fixes. The first fix, FixGFC, measures the elastic stiffness coefficients for a (small) solid block of a given material by making use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. With the help of the second fix, FixGFMD, the coefficients obtained from FixGFC can then be used to compute the elastic forces for a (large) block of the same material. Both fixes are designed to be run in parallel and to exploit the functions provided by LAMMPS. Program summaryProgram title: FixGFC/FixGFMD Catalogue identifier: AECW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 33 469 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 383 631 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized via MPI RAM: Depends on the problem Classification: 7.7 External routines: MPI, FFTW 2.1.5 ( http://www.fftw.org/), LAMMPS version May 21, 2008 ( http://lammps.sandia.gov/) Nature of problem: Using molecular dynamics to study elastically deforming solids imposes very high computational costs because portions of the solid far away from the interface or contact points need to be included in the simulation to reproduce the effects of long-range elastic deformations. Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) incorporates the full elastic response of semi-infinite solids so that only surface atoms have to be considered in molecular dynamics simulations, thus reducing the problem from three dimensions to two dimensions without compromising the physical essence of the problem. Solution method: See "Nature of problem". Restrictions: The mean equilibrium positions of the GFMD surface atoms must be in a plane and be periodic in the plane, so that the Born-von Karman boundary condition can be used. In addition, only deformation within the harmonic regime is expected in the surface layer during Green's function molecular dynamics. Running time: FixGFC varies from minutes to days, depending on the system size, the numbers of processors used, and the complexity of the force field. FixGFMD varies from seconds to days depending on the system size and numbers of processors used. References: [1] C. Campañá, M.H. Müser, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 075420.

  3. Structural dynamics of supercooled water from quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Johan; Schober, Helmut; Halle, Bertil

    2011-04-01

    One of the outstanding challenges presented by liquid water is to understand how molecules can move on a picosecond time scale despite being incorporated in a three-dimensional network of relatively strong H-bonds. This challenge is exacerbated in the supercooled state, where the dramatic slowing down of structural dynamics is reminiscent of the, equally poorly understood, generic behavior of liquids near the glass transition temperature. By probing single-molecule dynamics on a wide range of time and length scales, quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) can potentially reveal the mechanistic details of water's structural dynamics, but because of interpretational ambiguities this potential has not been fully realized. To resolve these issues, we present here an extensive set of high-quality QENS data from water in the range 253-293 K and a corresponding set of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to facilitate and validate the interpretation. Using a model-free approach, we analyze the QENS data in terms of two motional components. Based on the dynamical clustering observed in MD trajectories, we identify these components with two distinct types of structural dynamics: picosecond local (L) structural fluctuations within dynamical basins and slower interbasin jumps (J). The Q-dependence of the dominant QENS component, associated with J dynamics, can be quantitatively rationalized with a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model with an apparent jump length that depends on low-order moments of the jump length and waiting time distributions. Using a simple coarse-graining algorithm to quantitatively identify dynamical basins, we map the Newtonian MD trajectory on a CTRW trajectory, from which the jump length and waiting time distributions are computed. The jump length distribution is Gaussian and the rms jump length increases from 1.5 to 1.9 Å as the temperature increases from 253 to 293 K. The rms basin radius increases from 0.71 to 0.75 Å over the same range. The waiting time distribution is exponential at all investigated temperatures, ruling out significant dynamical heterogeneity. However, a simulation at 238 K reveals a small but significant dynamical heterogeneity. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient deduced from the QENS data agrees quantitatively with NMR and tracer results. We compare our QENS analysis with existing approaches, arguing that the apparent dynamical heterogeneity implied by stretched exponential fitting functions results from the failure to distinguish intrabasin (L) from interbasin (J) structural dynamics. We propose that the apparent dynamical singularity at ˜220 K corresponds to freezing out of J dynamics, while the calorimetric glass transition corresponds to freezing out of L dynamics.

  4. Comparative Molecular Dynamics Studies of Human DNA Polymerase ?.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Melek N; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-12-28

    High-energy ultraviolet radiation damages DNA through the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, which stall replication. When the lesion is a thymine-thymine dimer (TTD), human DNA polymerase ? (Pol ?) assists in resuming the replication process by inserting nucleotides opposite the damaged site. We performed extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical effects of four different Pol ? complexes with or without a TTD and with either dATP or dGTP as the incoming base. No major differences in the overall structures and equilibrium dynamics were detected among the four systems, suggesting that the specificity of this enzyme is due predominantly to differences in local interactions in the binding regions. Analysis of the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the enzyme and the DNA and dNTP provided molecular-level insights. Specifically, the TTD was observed to engage in more hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme than its undamaged counterpart of two normal thymines. The resulting greater rigidity and specific orientation of the TTD are consistent with the experimental observation of higher processivity and overall efficiency at TTD sites than at analogous sites with two normal thymines. The similarities between the systems containing dATP and dGTP are consistent with the experimental observation of relatively low fidelity with respect to the incoming base. Moreover, Q38 and R61, two strictly conserved amino acids across the Pol ? family, were found to exhibit persistent hydrogen-bonding interactions with the TTD and cation-? interactions with the free base, respectively. Thus, these simulations provide molecular level insights into the basis for the selectivity and efficiency of this enzyme, as well as the roles of the two most strictly conserved residues. PMID:26562587

  5. MDWiZ: a platform for the automated translation of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Victor H; Horta, Vitor A C; Horta, Bruno A C; Lins, Roberto D; Baron, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    A variety of popular molecular dynamics (MD) simulation packages were independently developed in the last decades to reach diverse scientific goals. However, such non-coordinated development of software, force fields, and analysis tools for molecular simulations gave rise to an array of software formats and arbitrary conventions for routine preparation and analysis of simulation input and output data. Different formats and/or parameter definitions are used at each stage of the modeling process despite largely contain redundant information between alternative software tools. Such Babel of languages that cannot be easily and univocally translated one into another poses one of the major technical obstacles to the preparation, translation, and comparison of molecular simulation data that users face on a daily basis. Here, we present the MDWiZ platform, a freely accessed online portal designed to aid the fast and reliable preparation and conversion of file formats that allows researchers to reproduce or generate data from MD simulations using different setups, including force fields and models with different underlying potential forms. The general structure of MDWiZ is presented, the features of version 1.0 are detailed, and an extensive validation based on GROMACS to LAMMPS conversion is presented. We believe that MDWiZ will be largely useful to the molecular dynamics community. Such fast format and force field exchange for a given system allows tailoring the chosen system to a given computer platform and/or taking advantage of a specific capabilities offered by different software engines. PMID:24434017

  6. Molecular nonlinear dynamics and protein thermal uncertainty quantification

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND) as a new approach for describing protein folding and aggregation. By using a mode system, we show that the MND of disordered proteins is chaotic while that of folded proteins exhibits intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs). The stability of ILDMs is found to strongly correlate with protein energies. We propose a novel method for protein thermal uncertainty quantification based on persistently invariant ILDMs. Extensive comparison with experimental data and the state-of-the-art methods in the field validate the proposed new method for protein B-factor prediction. PMID:24697365

  7. Molecular nonlinear dynamics and protein thermal uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824

    2014-03-15

    This work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND) as a new approach for describing protein folding and aggregation. By using a mode system, we show that the MND of disordered proteins is chaotic while that of folded proteins exhibits intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs). The stability of ILDMs is found to strongly correlate with protein energies. We propose a novel method for protein thermal uncertainty quantification based on persistently invariant ILDMs. Extensive comparison with experimental data and the state-of-the-art methods in the field validate the proposed new method for protein B-factor prediction.

  8. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  9. Optimized explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics from scratch.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2008-08-28

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations have become an important tool to study proteins and other biological molecules in silico. However, such investigations require considerable, and often prohibitive, numerical effort when the molecules are simulated in explicit solvents. In this communication we show that in this case the cost can be minimized by choosing the number of replicas as N(opt) approximately 1+0.594 radical C ln(Tmax/Tmin), where C is the specific heat, and the temperatures distributed according to Ti(opt) approximately T min(Tmax/Tmin)(i-1)/(N-1). PMID:18671362

  10. Nanoscale crosslinking in thermoset polymers: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jingtian; Wang, Changguo; Li, Defeng; He, Ge; Tan, Huifeng

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the nanoscale crosslinking process of thermoset polymer is studied using all-atom molecular dynamics. Based on the crosslinking simulations, the elastic properties of typical E51/593 thermoset polymer are predicted and verified by tensile experiments within a 10% error. The proposed method reveals a reliable understanding of the nanoscale crosslinking reactions occurring in thermoset polymers. Changes in system energy and overall density distribution, as well as the quantification of bond formation, yield a better insight into thermoset crosslinking that would be difficult to obtain through experimentation. The results give us confidence in realizing the virtual design of thermosets leading to tunable properties. PMID:26051117

  11. Tight-binding molecular-dynamics simulation of buckyball collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.L.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The collisions between C[sub 60] molecules are studied by tight-binding molecular-dynamics simulations. We observe three different regimes of behavior as the collisions become more and more energetic: bouncing, fusion, and fragmentation. The critical energies for fusion and fragmentation as well as details of the energy transfer during the collision process for the bouncing regime are investigated. The collisions at several specific energies and orientations produce interesting novel molecules, such as small baby cages, caps, and even a Russian-Doll molecule in which a small cage is trapped in a bigger one. 28 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations of warm dense carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Li, Dafang; Zhang, Ping

    2011-08-14

    Using quantum molecular dynamic simulations, we have studied the thermophysical properties of warm dense carbon monoxide under extreme conditions. The principal Hugoniot pressure up to 286 GPa, which is derived from the equation of state, is calculated and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. The chemical decomposition of carbon monoxide has been predicted at 8 GPa by means of pair correlation function and the charge density distribution. Based on Kubo-Greenwood formula, the dc electrical conductivity and the optical reflectivity are determined, and the nonmetal-metal transition for shock compressed carbon monoxide is observed around 40 GPa. PMID:21842937

  13. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: Cytidine deaminase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-01

    We developed and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  15. A multiscale Molecular Dynamics approach to Contact Mechanics

    E-print Network

    C. Yang; U. Tartaglino; B. N. J. Persson

    2006-01-05

    The friction and adhesion between elastic bodies are strongly influenced by the roughness of the surfaces in contact. Here we develop a multiscale molecular dynamics approach to contact mechanics, which can be used also when the surfaces have roughness on many different length-scales, e.g., for self affine fractal surfaces. As an illustration we consider the contact between randomly rough surfaces, and show that the contact area varies linearly with the load for small load. We also analyze the contact morphology and the pressure distribution at different magnification, both with and without adhesion. The calculations are compared with analytical contact mechanics models based on continuum mechanics.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Telomere and TRF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburagi, Masaaki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Hironao; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Takasu, Masako; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    Telomeres play a central role in determining longevity of a cell. Our study focuses on the interaction between telomeric guanines and TRF1 as a means to observe the telomeric based mechanism of the genome protection. In this research, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a telomeric DNA and TRF1. Our results show a stable structure with a high affinity for the specific protein. Additionally, we calculated the distance between guanines and the protein in their complex state. From this comparison, we found the calculated values of distance to be very similar, and the angle of guanines in their complex states was larger than that in their single state.

  17. Mechanical properties of graphynes under tension: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Pei, Q. X.; Wang, C. M.

    2012-08-01

    Graphyne is the allotrope of graphene. In this letter, four different graphynes (?, ?, ?, and 6,6,12-graphenes) are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations to explore their mechanical properties and failure mechanisms. It is found that the presence of the acetylenic linkages in graphynes leads to a significant reduction in fracture stress and Young's modulus with the degree of reduction being proportional to the percentage of the linkages. This deterioration in mechanical properties stems from the low atom density in graphynes and weak single bonds in the acetylenic linkages where the facture is initiated.

  18. Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Niklasson, Anders M. N. Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2014-10-28

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory is generalized in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization prior to the force evaluations. The equations of motion are derived directly from the extended Lagrangian under the condition of an adiabatic separation between the nuclear and the electronic degrees of freedom. We show how this separation is automatically fulfilled and system independent. The generalized equations of motion require only one diagonalization per time step and are applicable to a broader range of materials with improved accuracy and stability compared to previous formulations.

  19. Molecular dynamic study of pressure fluctuations spectrum in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystryi, R. G.

    2015-11-01

    Pressure of plasma is calculated by using classical molecular dynamics method. The formula based on virial theorem was used. Spectrum pressure's fluctuations of singly ionized non-ideal plasma are studied. 1/f-like spectrum behavior is observed. In other words, flicker noise is observed in fluctuations of pressure equilibrium non-ideal plasma. Relations between the obtained result and pressure fluctuations within the Gibbs and Einstein approaches are discussed. Special attention is paid to features of calculating the pressure in strongly coupled systems.

  20. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.