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Sample records for potential pet ligand

  1. Development of indazolylpyrimidine derivatives as high-affine EphB4 receptor ligands and potential PET radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin; Wiemer, Jens; Caballero, Julio; Köckerling, Martin; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Due to their essential role in the pathogenesis of cancer, members of the Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma cell line-A2) receptor tyrosine kinase family represent promising candidates for molecular imaging. Thus, the development and preparation of novel radiotracers for the noninvasive imaging of the EphB4 receptor via positron emission tomography (PET) is described. First in silico investigations with the indazolylpyrimidine lead compound which is known to be highly affine to EphB4 were executed to identify favorable labeling positions for an introduction of fluorine-18 to retain the affinity. Based on this, reference compounds as well as precursors were developed and labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, respectively. For this purpose, a protecting group strategy essentially had to be generated to prevent unwanted methylation and to enable the introduction of fluorine-18. Further, a convenient radiolabeling strategy using [(11)C]methyl iodide was established which afforded the isotopically labeled radiotracer in 30-35% RCY (d.c.) which is identical with the original inhibitor molecule. A spiro ammonium precursor was prepared for radiolabeling with fluorine-18. Unfortunately, the labeling did not lead to the desired (18)F-radiotracer under the chosen conditions. PMID:26189032

  2. (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer: How we review and report.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Isabel; Maurer, Tobias; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Sommer, Wieland H; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using PSMA-ligands has gained high attention as a promising new radiotracer in patients with prostate cancer (PC). Several studies promise accurate staging of primary prostate cancer and restaging after biochemical recurrence with (68)Ga-PSMA ligand Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). However, prospective trials and clinical guidelines for this new technique are still missing. Therefore, we summarized our experience with (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT examinations in patients with primary PC and biochemical recurrence. It focuses on the technical and logistical aspects of (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT examination as well as on the specific background for image reading discussing also potential pitfalls. Further, it includes relevant issues on free-text as well as structured reporting used in daily clinical routine. PMID:27277843

  3. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  4. Preclinical TSPO Ligand PET to Visualize Human Glioma Xenotransplants: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Jason R.; McKinley, Eliot T.; Fu, Allie; Abel, Ty W.; Thompson, Reid C.; Chambless, Lola; Watchmaker, Jennifer M.; Harty, James P.; Cooper, Michael K.; Manning, H. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarkers for detection of infiltrating gliomas are limited. Translocator protein (TSPO) is a novel and promising biomarker for glioma PET imaging. To validate TSPO as a potential target for molecular imaging of glioma, TSPO expression was assayed in a tumor microarray containing 37 high-grade (III, IV) gliomas. TSPO staining was detected in all tumor specimens. Subsequently, PET imaging was performed with an aryloxyanilide-based TSPO ligand, [18F]PBR06, in primary orthotopic xenograft models of WHO grade III and IV gliomas. Selective uptake of [18F]PBR06 in engrafted tumor was measured. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated infiltrative glioma growth that was undetectable by traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary PET with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated a preferential tumor-to-normal background ratio in comparison to 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). These results suggest that TSPO PET imaging with such high-affinity radiotracers may represent a novel strategy to characterize distinct molecular features of glioma growth, as well as better define the extent of glioma infiltration for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517124

  5. Preclinical TSPO Ligand PET to Visualize Human Glioma Xenotransplants: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Buck, Jason R; McKinley, Eliot T; Fu, Allie; Abel, Ty W; Thompson, Reid C; Chambless, Lola; Watchmaker, Jennifer M; Harty, James P; Cooper, Michael K; Manning, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarkers for detection of infiltrating gliomas are limited. Translocator protein (TSPO) is a novel and promising biomarker for glioma PET imaging. To validate TSPO as a potential target for molecular imaging of glioma, TSPO expression was assayed in a tumor microarray containing 37 high-grade (III, IV) gliomas. TSPO staining was detected in all tumor specimens. Subsequently, PET imaging was performed with an aryloxyanilide-based TSPO ligand, [18F]PBR06, in primary orthotopic xenograft models of WHO grade III and IV gliomas. Selective uptake of [18F]PBR06 in engrafted tumor was measured. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated infiltrative glioma growth that was undetectable by traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary PET with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated a preferential tumor-to-normal background ratio in comparison to 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). These results suggest that TSPO PET imaging with such high-affinity radiotracers may represent a novel strategy to characterize distinct molecular features of glioma growth, as well as better define the extent of glioma infiltration for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517124

  6. [11C]vinpocetine: a prospective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand for primate PET studies.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Vas, Adám; Banati, Richard B; Shchukin, Evgeny; Finnema, Sjoerd; Tarkainen, Jari; Tihanyi, Károly; Szilágyi, Géza; Farde, Lars

    2005-03-15

    Vinpocetine, a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, is a widely used drug in neurological practice. We tested the hypothesis that vinpocetine binds to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS) and is therefore a potential ligand of PBBS. Positron emission tomography (PET) measurements in two cynomolgous monkeys showed that pretreatment with vinpocetine markedly reduced the brain uptake of [11C]PK11195, a known PBBS radioligand. On the other hand, whereas pretreatment with PK11195 increased the brain uptake of [11C]vinpocetine due to the blockade of PBBS in the periphery, it significantly reduced the binding potential (BP) values of [11C]vinpocetine in the whole brain and in individual brain structures to PK11195. These findings indicate that, whereas the two ligands have different affinities to PBBS, vinpocetine is a potent ligand of PBBS, which in turn suggests that the pharmacological activity of vinpocetine may involve the regulation of glial functions. PMID:15760643

  7. Ligand Specific Efficiency (LSE) Index for PET Tracer Optimization.

    PubMed

    Auberson, Yves P; Briard, Emmanuelle; Sykes, David; Reilly, John; Healy, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ligand efficiency indices are widely used to guide chemical optimization in drug discovery, due to their predictive value in the early steps of optimization. At later stages, however, as more complex properties become critical for success, indices relying on calculated, rather than experimental, parameters become less informative. This problem is particularly acute when developing positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents, for which nonspecific binding (NSB) to membranes and non-target proteins is a frequent cause of failure. NSB cannot be predicted using in silico parameters. To address this gap, we explored the use of the experimentally determined chromatographic hydrophobicity index on immobilized artificial membranes, CHI(IAM), to guide the optimization of NSB. The ligand specific efficiency (LSE) index was defined as the ratio between affinity (pIC50 or pKd ) and the logarithmic value of CHI(IAM). It allows for quantification of binding affinity to the target of interest, relative to NSB. Its use was illustrated by the optimization of PET tracer candidates for the prostacyclin receptor. PMID:27193393

  8. Analogs of JHU75528, a PET ligand for imaging of cerebral cannabinoid receptors (CB1): development of ligands with optimized lipophilicity and binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong; Kotsikorou, Evangelia; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Holt, Daniel; Hurst, Dow P.; Lupica, Carl R.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Dannals, Robert F.; Horti, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    Cyano analogs of Rimonabant with high binding affinity for the cerebral cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and with optimized lipophilicity have been synthesized as potential positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. The best ligands of the series are optimal targets for the future radiolabeling with PET isotopes and in vivo evaluation as radioligands with enhanced properties for PET imaging of CB1 receptors in human subjects. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings in rodent brain slices demonstrated that JHU75528, 4, the lead compound of the new series, has functional CB antagonist properties that are consistent with its structural relationship to Rimonabant. Molecular modeling analysis revealed an important role of the binding of the cyano-group with the CB1 binding pocket. PMID:18511157

  9. Subdomain 2 of the Autotransporter Pet Is the Ligand Site for Recognizing the Pet Receptor on the Epithelial Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Serapio-Palacios, Antonio; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Most autotransporter passenger domains, regardless of their diversity in function, fold or are predicted to fold as right-handed β-helices carrying various loops that are presumed to confer functionality. Our goal here was to identify the subdomain (loop) or amino acid sequence of the Pet passenger domain involved in the receptor binding site on the host cell for Pet endocytosis. Here, we show that d1 and d2 subdomains, as well as the amino acid sequence linking the subdomain d2 and the adjacent β-helix (PDWET), are not required for Pet secretion through the autotransporter system and that none of our deletion mutants altered the predicted long right-handed β-helical structure. Interestingly, Pet lacking the d2 domain (PetΔd2) was unable to bind on the epithelial cell surface, in contrast to Pet lacking d1 (PetΔd1) subdomain or PDWET sequences. Moreover, the purified d1 subdomain, the biggest subdomain (29.8 kDa) containing the serine protease domain, was also unable to bind the cell surface. Thus, d2 sequence (54 residues without the PDWET sequence) was required for Pet binding to eukaryotic cells. In addition, this d2 sequence was also needed for Pet internalization but not for inducing cell damage. In contrast, PetΔd1, which was able to bind and internalize inside the cell, was unable to cause cell damage. Furthermore, unlike Pet, PetΔd2 was unable to bind cytokeratin 8, a Pet receptor. These data indicate that the surface d2 subdomain is essential for the ligand-receptor (Pet-Ck8) interaction for Pet uptake and to start the epithelial cell damage by this toxin. PMID:27113356

  10. Potential improvements in instrumentation for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    This paper discusses the potential for improved detectors in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and explores the ultimate limits that might be achieved in the areas of spatial resolution, sensitivity, and maximum imaging rates. It is shown that if an ultra-fast, high efficiency scintillator and a thin, low-noise, position-sensitive photodetector were available, a multi-layer time-of-flight tomograph would be possible with a 10 cm axial field of view, a 3-dimensional spatial resolution of 2 mm fwhm, and >700,000 prompt unscattered coincidences per sec for 1 ..mu..Ci per cm/sup 3/ in a 20 cm diam cylinder of water. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies. PMID:26751494

  12. [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe - an attractive ligand for evaluation of muscarinic-cholinergic neuron activity by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The stereoisomers of 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-{alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate ({open_quotes}FQNPe{close_quotes}) have been resolved. (-,-)- receptors (K{sub i}, nM; ml, 0.3; m2, 0.1). [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe demonstrated high cerebral and myocardial uptake in rats in vivo. We now report significant blocking of [F-18]-(-.-)-FQNPe uptake in receptor-rich tissues in rats in vivo after (R)-QNB pretreatment and the absence of any TLC detectable FQNPe metabolites in tissue extracts. Rats were injected with (R)-QNB (3 mg/kg) 1 h prior to [F-18]-FQNPe injection (370-629 KBq). After 1 h, rats were sacrificed and tissues removed and counted. (R)-QNB significantly decreased FQNPe uptake in heart and all receptor-rich regions but not blood (Table; Mean % ID/g, n=5); C, control; Q, (R)-QNB; Hrt, heart; Cer, cerebellum; Pon, pons; Med, medulla; Cor, cortex; Stri, striatum; Hip, hippocampus; Th, thallamus; SuC, superior colliculi; InC, inferior colliculi. Tissues from untreated rats were Folch-extracted and 71-77% of activity was in organic extracts from brain and heart. TLC of organic extracts indicated a single radioactive component with R{sub f} of FQNPe. These combined results demonstrate that [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe does not appear to be metabolized in heart and brain, shows good receptor localization and is thus an attractive ligand for evaluation as a potential imaging agent by PET.

  13. Structure and stability of hexadentate complexes of ligands based on AAZTA for efficient PET labelling with gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Bradley P; Parker, David; Burchardt, Carsten; Yufit, Dmitry S; Zimny, Melanie; Roesch, Frank

    2013-01-21

    Pre-organised tricarboxylate ligands based on 6-amino-perhydro-1,4-diazepine bind (68)Ga rapidly and selectively in acetate buffer at pH 4 to 7, forming kinetically stable complexes suitable for use in PET imaging. PMID:23212712

  14. Potential applications for sigma receptor ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Rybczynska, Anna A; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O

    2015-10-01

    Sigma receptors (sigma-1 and sigma-2) represent two independent classes of proteins. Their endogenous ligands may include the hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and sphingolipid-derived amines which interact with sigma-1 receptors, besides steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone) which bind to both sigma receptor subpopulations. The sigma-1 receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone with various ion channels and G-protein-coupled membrane receptors as clients. The sigma-2 receptor was identified as the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1). Although sigma receptors are over-expressed in tumors and up-regulated in rapidly dividing normal tissue, their ligands induce significant cell death only in tumor tissue. Sigma ligands may therefore be used to selectively eradicate tumors. Multiple mechanisms appear to underlie cell killing after administration of sigma ligands, and the signaling pathways are dependent both on the type of ligand and the type of tumor cell. Recent evidence suggests that the sigma-2 receptor is a potential tumor and serum biomarker for human lung cancer and an important target for inhibiting tumor invasion and cancer progression. Current radiochemical efforts are focused on the development of subtype-selective radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Right now, the mostpromising tracers are [18F]fluspidine and [18F]FTC-146 for sigma-1 receptors and [11C]RHM-1 and [18F]ISO-1 for the sigma-2 subtype. Nanoparticles coupled to sigma ligands have shown considerable potential for targeted delivery of antitumor drugs in animal models of cancer, but clinical studies exploring this strategy in cancer patients have not yet been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25173780

  15. [18F]Fluoroalkyl agents: synthesis, reactivity and application for development of PET ligands in molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2007-01-01

    Fluorine-18 ((18)F, beta(+); 96.7%, T(1/2)=109.8 min) is of considerable importance for developing positron emission tomography (PET) ligands for imaging receptor, enzyme, gene expression etc. in brain, tumor, myocardium and other regions or organs due to its optimal decay characteristics. To synthesize (18)F-labeled PET ligands, reliable labeling techniques inserting (18)F into a target molecule are necessary. [(18)F]Fluoroalkylation is a useful way of introducing (18)F into target molecules containing amino, phenol, thiophenol, and amide functional groups. Here, we review the preparation, reactivity and application of [(18)F]fluoroalkyl agents for the development of (18)F-labeled PET ligands in molecular imaging. [(18)F]Fluoroalkyl agents have been synthesized by reacting [(18)F]F(-) with the corresponding alkyl derivatives containing halogen and sulfonate as leaving groups. After the fluorination reaction, the radiolabeled products with relatively low boiling points were distilled from the reaction mixtures, sometimes added by Sep-Pak or gas chromatography separation. The [(18)F]fluoromethyl agents have high reactivity with nucleophilic substrates, but many [(18)F]fluoromethylated compounds are in vitro unstable. To increase the efficiency of [(18)F]fluoroethylation, [(18)F]FCH2CH2Br, the most frequently used [(18)F]fluoroethyl agent, was converted into [(18)F]FCH2CH2I or [(18)F]FCH2CH2OTf in situ. Most [(18)F]fluoromethylated ligands were found to be in vivo unstable due to defluorination. Deuterium substitution for the fluoromethyl group reduced defluorination to an extent. A number of [(18)F]fluoroethylated PET ligands have been developed for animal evaluation and clinical investigation. PMID:17979790

  16. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a promising σ2-receptor ligand radiolabeled with fluorine-18 or iodine-125 as a PET/SPECT probe for imaging breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Xu, Jinbin; Jones, Lynne A.; Li, Shihong; Zeng, Dexing; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.; Mach, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Sigma-2 receptors represent an endogenous marker for proliferation in solid tumors. The high affinity, high selectivity σ2 receptor ligand N-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-2-(2-fluoroethoxy)-5-iodo-3-methoxybenzamide (3) was separately radiolabeled with F-18 and I-125. The radiolabeling yield was 30% and 70% for [18F]3 and [125I]3, respectively. Studies of [125I]3 using murine 66 breast tumor membrane homogenates and evaluation of [18F]3 and [125I]3 in 66 tumor-bearing mice indicate that this ligand has potential as a PET or a SPECT probe for imaging σ2 receptors in breast cancer. PMID:20594864

  17. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  18. Synthesis, Structure-affinity Relationships and Radiolabeling of Selective High-affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Ligands as Prospective Imaging Probes for PET

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT4 antagonist, (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron-emitter, either carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), and included, i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl or fluoro, ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT4 receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron-emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-11C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT4 receptors. PMID:20812727

  19. Improved PET Imaging of uPAR Expression Using new 64Cu-labeled Cross-Bridged Peptide Ligands: Comparative in vitro and in vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Hosseini, Masood; Madsen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Jensen, Knud J; Kjaer, Andreas; Ploug, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between uPAR expression, cancer cell invasion and metastases is now well-established and has prompted the development of a number of uPAR PET imaging agents, which could potentially identify cancer patients with invasive and metastatic lesions. In the present study, we synthesized and characterized two new cross-bridged 64Cu-labeled peptide conjugates for PET imaging of uPAR and performed a head-to-head comparison with the corresponding and more conventionally used DOTA conjugate. Based on in-source laser-induced reduction of chelated Cu(II) to Cu(I), we now demonstrate the following ranking with respect to the chemical inertness of their complexed Cu ions: DOTA-AE105 << CB-TE2A-AE105 < CB-TE2A-PA-AE105, which is correlated to their corresponding demetallation rate. No penalty in the uPAR receptor binding affinity of the targeting peptide was encountered by conjugation to either of the macrobicyclic chelators (IC50 ~ 5-10 nM) and high yields and radiochemical purities (>95%) were achieved in all cases by incubation at 95ºC. In vivo, they display identical tumor uptake after 1h, but differ significantly after 22 hrs, where the DOTA-AE105 uptake remains surprisingly high. Importantly, the more stable of the new uPAR PET tracers, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105, exhibits a significantly reduced liver uptake compared to 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 as well as 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AE105, (p<0.0001), emphasizing that our new in vitro stability measurements by mass spectrometry predicts in vivo stability in mice. Specificity of the best performing ligand, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105 was finally confirmed in vivo using a non-binding 64Cu-labeled peptide as control (64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105mut). This control PET-tracer revealed significantly reduced tumor uptake (p<0.0001), but identical hepatic uptake compared to its active counterpart (64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105) after 1h. In conclusion, our new approach using in-source laser-induced reduction of Cu(II)-chelated PET-ligands provides useful

  20. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  1. Imaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: the potential role of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    In head and neck oncology, the information provided by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and MRI is often complementary because both the methods are based on different biophysical foundations. Therefore, combining diagnostic information from both modalities can provide additional diagnostic gain. Debates about integrated PET/MRI systems have become fashionable during the past few years, since the introduction and wide adoption of software-based multimodality image registration and fusion and the hardware implementation of integrated hybrid PET/MRI systems in pre-clinical and clinical settings. However, combining PET with MRI has proven to be technically and clinically more challenging than initially expected and, as such, research into the potential clinical role of PET/MRI in comparison with PET/CT, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI) or the combination thereof is still ongoing. This review focuses on the clinical applications of PET/MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We first discuss current evidence about the use of combined PET/CT and DW MRI, and, then, we explain the rationale and principles of PET/MR image fusion before summarizing the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the diagnostic performance of PET/MRI in HNSCC. Feasibility and quantification issues, diagnostic pitfalls and challenges in clinical settings as well as ongoing research and potential future applications are also discussed. PMID:24649835

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  3. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands. PMID:19587856

  4. Endogenously released dopamine inhibits the binding of dopaminergic PET and SPECT ligands in superfused rat striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Gifford, A N; Gatley, S J; Ashby, C R

    1996-03-01

    Pharmacologically induced changes in synaptic levels of dopamine (DA) have been found, in some studies, to affect the in vivo binding of dopaminergic radioligands. In the present study we used a superfused brain slice preparation to examine the effect of synaptically released dopamine on the binding of some commonly used PET and SPECT radioligands under more controlled conditions than those present in vivo. The release of DA was evoked by electrical stimulation of striatal slices and the sensitivity of binding of the D1 receptor ligand, [3H]SCH 23390, the D2 receptor ligands [3H]raclopride and [123I]epidepride, and the DA uptake transporter ligands, [3H]WIN 35,428 and [123I]RTI-55, to the frequency of stimulation examined. Most affected by stimulation was the specific binding of [3H]SCH 23390, which was fully inhibited at 2.5 Hz. This was followed by [3H]raclopride and [123I]epidepride, respectively, the binding of the latter showing only a 50% reduction at the highest frequency of 10 Hz. [3H]WIN 35,428 and [123I]RTI-55 binding was unaffected by stimulation. The effects of stimulation on [3H]raclopride binding were prevented by reserpine pretreatment of the rat, when combined with inclusion of the dopamine synthesis inhibitor, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, in the superfusate medium. We conclude that, in brain slices, the binding of D1 and D2 receptor ligands but not that of DA uptake transporter ligands is readily inhibited by DA released into the synaptic cleft. Brain slices may prove to be a useful model system for the investigation of factors affecting competition between radioligand binding and endogenous neurotransmitters. PMID:9132991

  5. (11) C-labeled and (18) F-labeled PET ligands for subtype-specific imaging of histamine receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Funke, Uta; Vugts, Danielle J; Janssen, Bieneke; Spaans, Arnold; Kruijer, Perry S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Perk, Lars R; Windhorst, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    The signaling molecule histamine plays a key role in the mediation of immune reactions, in gastric secretion, and in the sensory system. In addition, it has an important function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, acting in pituitary hormone secretion, wakefulness, motor and cognitive functions, as well as in itch and nociception. This has raised interest in the role of the histaminergic system for the treatment and diagnosis of various pathologies such as allergy, sleeping and eating disorders, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, mood disorders, and pruritus. In the past 20 years, several ligands targeting the four different histamine receptor subtypes have been explored as potential radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). This contribution provides an overview of the developments of subtype-selective carbon-11-labeled and fluorine-18-labeled compounds for imaging in the brain. Using specific radioligands, the H1 R expression in human brain could be examined in diseases such as schizophrenia, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In addition, the sedative effects of antihistamines could be investigated in terms of H1 R occupancy. The H3 R is of special interest because of its regulatory role in the release of various other neurotransmitters, and initial H3 R PET imaging studies in humans have been reported. The H4 R is the youngest member of the histamine receptor family and is involved in neuroinflammation and various sensory pathways. To date, two H4 R-specific (11) C-labeled ligands have been synthesized, and the imaging of the H4 R in vivo is in the early stage. PMID:24285318

  6. Dopamine transporter ligands: recent developments and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Runyon, Scott P; Carroll, F Ivy

    2006-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a target for the development of pharmacotherapies for a number of central disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Tourette's syndrome, Lesch-Nyhan disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obesity, depression, and stimulant abuse as well as normal aging. Considerable effort continues to be devoted to the development of new ligands for the DAT. In this review, we present some of the more interesting ligands developed during the last few years from the 3-phenytropane, 1,4-dialkylpiperazine, phenylpiperidine, and benztropine classes of DAT uptake inhibitors as well as a few less studied miscellaneous DAT uptake inhibitors. Studies related to the therapeutic potential of some of the more studied compounds are presented. A few of the compounds have been studied as pharmacotherapies for Parkinson's disease, ADHD, and obesity. However, most of the drug discovery studies have been directed toward pharmacotherapies for stimulant abuse (mainly cocaine). A number of the compounds showed decreased cocaine maintained responding in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine. One compound, GBR 12,909, was evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial. PMID:17017960

  7. Bisthioxanthylidene biscrown ethers as potential stereodivergent chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Edzard M; Schoevaars, Anne Marie; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2006-11-21

    The concept of bisthioxanthylidene biscrown ethers as potential stereodivergent chiral ligands in asymmetric synthesis is introduced. Substituted bisthioxanthylidenes may be chiral and can exist as stable enantiomers due to their folded structure. As a result, both a right-handed helix (P) and left-handed helix (M) are present in this type of molecule. This offers the unique possibility to construct two crown ether moieties, attached to the same molecule, of which one exhibits (P)-helicity and the other (M)-helicity. When the crown ether moieties differ in size they can be complexed selectively with a base containing a cation of appropriate diameter. In this manner the (P)-helix and the (M)-helix can be activated selectively to serve as a chiral environment for base catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Thus, we envisioned the new concept of a single chiral ligand to separately synthesize two enantiomers of a chiral product just by varying the added base. For this purpose, four new bisthioxanthylidene monocrown ethers and two new bisthioxanthylidene biscrown ethers were synthesized. Two biscrowns and two monocrowns were separated into their respective enantiomers (HPLC) and optical data (UV and CD) were collected to ensure stability of enantiomers at ambient temperatures. Ion complexation of one mono- and two biscrown ethers with potassium and sodium cations was investigated. PMID:17312964

  8. Quantification of ligand PET studies using a reference region with a displaceable fraction: application to occupancy studies with [11C]-DASB as an example

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Hinz, Rainer; Murthy, Venkatesha; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Grasby, Paul; Howes, Oliver; Rosso, Lula; Bose, Subrata K

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to build novel methodology for the use of a reference region with specific binding for the quantification of brain studies with radioligands and positron emission tomography (PET). In particular: (1) we introduce a definition of binding potential BPD=DVR−1 where DVR is the volume of distribution relative to a reference tissue that contains ligand in specifically bound form, (2) we validate a numerical methodology, rank-shaping regularization of exponential spectral analysis (RS-ESA), for the calculation of BPD that can cope with a reference region with specific bound ligand, (3) we demonstrate the use of RS-ESA for the accurate estimation of drug occupancies with the use of correction factors to account for the specific binding in the reference. [11C]-DASB with cerebellum as a reference was chosen as an example to validate the methodology. Two data sets were used; four normal subjects scanned after infusion of citalopram or placebo and further six test–retest data sets. In the drug occupancy study, the use of RS-ESA with cerebellar input plus corrections produced estimates of occupancy very close the ones obtained with plasma input. Test–retest results demonstrated a tight linear relationship between BPD calculated either with plasma or with a reference input and high reproducibility. PMID:21811290

  9. Quantification of ligand PET studies using a reference region with a displaceable fraction: application to occupancy studies with [(11)C]-DASB as an example.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Selvaraj, Sudhakar; Hinz, Rainer; Murthy, Venkatesha; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Grasby, Paul; Howes, Oliver; Rosso, Lula; Bose, Subrata K

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to build novel methodology for the use of a reference region with specific binding for the quantification of brain studies with radioligands and positron emission tomography (PET). In particular: (1) we introduce a definition of binding potential BP(D)=DVR-1 where DVR is the volume of distribution relative to a reference tissue that contains ligand in specifically bound form, (2) we validate a numerical methodology, rank-shaping regularization of exponential spectral analysis (RS-ESA), for the calculation of BP(D) that can cope with a reference region with specific bound ligand, (3) we demonstrate the use of RS-ESA for the accurate estimation of drug occupancies with the use of correction factors to account for the specific binding in the reference. [(11)C]-DASB with cerebellum as a reference was chosen as an example to validate the methodology. Two data sets were used; four normal subjects scanned after infusion of citalopram or placebo and further six test-retest data sets. In the drug occupancy study, the use of RS-ESA with cerebellar input plus corrections produced estimates of occupancy very close the ones obtained with plasma input. Test-retest results demonstrated a tight linear relationship between BP(D) calculated either with plasma or with a reference input and high reproducibility. PMID:21811290

  10. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  11. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of (S)-[11C]-exaprolol, a novel beta-adrenoceptor ligand for PET.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Doorduin, Janine; de Jong, Johan R; Dierckx, Rudi A; Elsinga, Philip H

    2008-01-01

    Positron-emitting beta-adrenoceptor ligands for the CNS could allow determination of changes in beta-adrenoceptor availability after treatment of patients with norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants, and differential diagnosis between multiple sclerosis and other brain disorders in an early stage of the disease. No ligands suitable for this purpose are available for human use. In order to prepare a tracer for human studies, we labeled the biologically active enantiomer of the beta-blocker exaprolol with (11)C. Exaprolol has the appropriate lipophilicity (log P + 1.6) for entry of the CNS and is claimed to be a very potent beta-adrenoceptor antagonist. (S)-Desisopropyl-exaprolol was synthesized by reaction of 2-hexylphenol with (S)-glycidyl-nosylate followed by ring opening using ammonia gas. The desisopropyl precursor was reacted with (11)C-acetone in methanol to produce (S)-[(11)C]-exaprolol. Radiochemical purification was performed with RP-HPLC and was followed by Sep-Pak formulation. The labeled product was i.v. injected into male Wistar rats. Brain images were acquired using a microPET Focus 220 and the biodistribution of (11)C was assessed. The radiochemical yield of (S)-[(11)C]-exaprolol was 7% with a total synthesis time of 30 min. Specific activities were >10 GBq/micromol. Brain uptake of the tracer reached a maximum after 15 min. Standardized uptake values were moderate (0.5-0.9) but sufficient for imaging. However, beta-blockade (propranolol, 2.5mg/kg body weight) did not lower tracer uptake in any CNS region and washout from the brain was not accelerated when propranolol was administered 40 min after injection of (S)-[(11)C]-exaprolol. Tracer binding in lung, spleen and erythrocytes was lowered after beta-blockade, but the myocardial uptake of radioactivity was not affected. These data indicate that (S)-[(11)C]-exaprolol is not a suitable beta-adrenoceptor ligand for PET, probably because the in vivo affinity of exaprolol to beta

  12. Initial investigation of three selective and potent small molecule oxytocin receptor PET ligands in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron L; Freeman, Sara M; Barnhart, Todd E; Abbott, David H; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Kukis, David L; Bales, Karen L; Goodman, Mark M; Young, Larry J

    2016-07-15

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is part of a neuroendocrine system that has physiological effects ranging from ensuring uterine myometrial contractions at parturition and post-partum mammary gland milk ejection to the modulation of neural control of social relationships. This initial study was performed to investigate the potential use of positron emission tomography (PET) for localizing oxytocin receptors in two New World primates. Three biomarkers for PET (1-3) that are known to have high affinity and selectivity for the human oxytocin receptor were investigated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) via PET imaging. Brain penetration, and uptake in the salivary gland area were both observed with biomarkers 2 and 3. No brain penetration was observed with 1, but uptake was observed more specifically in several peripheral endocrine glands compared to 2 or 3. Biomarker 2, which displayed the best brain penetration of the three biomarkers in the marmoset, was then investigated in the monogamous coppery titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) in a brain scan and a limited full body scan. No significant brain penetration of 2 was observed in the titi monkey, but significant uptake was observed in various locations throughout the periphery. Metabolism of 2 was suspected to have been significant based upon HPLC analysis of blood draws, but parent compound was still present near the end of the scan. Follow-up investigations will focus on next generation biomarkers bearing improved binding characteristics and brain penetrability as well as investigating tissue in regions where biomarker uptake was observed. PMID:27209233

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of novel N-fluoropyridyl derivatives of tropane as potential PET imaging agents for the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingying; Zhu, Lin; Plössl, Karl; Lieberman, Brian P.; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    A series of novel N-fluoropyridyl-containing tropane derivatives were synthesized and their binding affinities for the dopamine transporter (DAT), serotonin transporter (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) were determined via competitive radioligand binding assays. Among these derivatives, compound 6d showed the highest binding affinity to DAT (Ki = 4.1 nM), and selectivity for DAT over SERT (5 fold) and NET (16 fold). Compound 6d was radiolabeled with Fluorine-18 in two steps. Regional brain distribution and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [18F]6d demonstrated that the ligand was selectively localized in the striatum region, where DAT binding sites are highly expressed. [18F]6d may be useful as a potential radioligand for imaging DATs with PET. PMID:21458259

  14. Brain and Whole-Body Imaging of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptor in Humans Using the PET Ligand 11C-NOP-1A

    PubMed Central

    Lohith, Talakad G.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Morse, Cheryl L.; Araneta, Maria F.; Barth, Vanessa N.; Goebl, Nancy A.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor is a new class of opioid receptor that may play a pathophysiologic role in anxiety and drug abuse and is a potential therapeutic target in these disorders. We previously developed a high-affinity PET ligand, 11C-NOP-1A, which yielded promising results in monkey brain. Here, we assessed the ability of 11C-NOP-1A to quantify NOP receptors in human brain and estimated its radiation safety profile. Methods After intravenous injection of 11C-NOP-1A, 7 healthy subjects underwent brain PET for 2 h and serial sampling of radial arterial blood to measure parent radioligand concentrations. Distribution volume (VT; a measure of receptor density) was determined by compartmental (1- and 2-tissue) and noncompartmental (Logan analysis and Ichise’s bilinear analysis [MA1]) methods. A separate group of 9 healthy subjects underwent whole-body PET to estimate whole-body radiation exposure (effective dose). Results After 11C-NOP-1A injection, the peak concentration of radioactivity in brain was high (~5–7 standardized uptake values), occurred early (~10 min), and then washed out quickly. The unconstrained 2-tissue-compartment model gave excellent VT identifiability (~1.1% SE) and fitted the data better than a 1-tissue-compartment model. Regional VT values (mL·cm−3) ranged from 10.1 in temporal cortex to 5.6 in cerebellum. VT was well identified in the initial 70 min of imaging and remained stable for the remaining 50 min, suggesting that brain radioactivity was most likely parent radioligand, as supported by the fact that all plasma radiometabolites of 11C-NOP-1A were less lipophilic than the parent radioligand. Voxel-based MA1 VT values correlated well with results from the 2-tissue-compartment model, showing that parametric methods can be used to compare populations. Whole-body scans showed radioactivity in brain and in peripheral organs expressing NOP receptors, such as heart, pancreas, and spleen. 11C-NOP-1A was significantly

  15. Translational characterization of [11C]GSK931145, a PET ligand for the glycine transporter type 1.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Roger N; Murthy, Venkatesha; Catafau, Ana M; Searle, Graham; Bullich, Santiago; Slifstein, Mark; Ouellet, Daniele; Zamuner, Stefano; Herance, Raul; Salinas, Cristian; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Farre, Magi; Laruelle, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The current interest in developing Glycine transporter Type 1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, for diseases such as schizophrenia, has led to the demand for a GlyT-1 PET molecular imaging tool to aid drug development and dose selection. We report on [(11) C]GSK931145 as a novel GlyT-1 imaging probe in primate and man. Primate PET studies were performed to determine the level of specific binding following homologous competition with GSK931145 and the plasma-occupancy relationship of the GlyT-1 inhibitor GSK1018921. Human PET studies were performed to determine the test-retest reproducibility of [(11) C]GSK931145 and the plasma-occupancy relationship of GSK1018921. [(11) C]GSK931145 entered primate and human brain and yielded a heterogeneous pattern of uptake which was similar in both species with highest uptake in midbrain, thalamus, and cerebellum. Homologous competition in primates indicated no viable reference region and gave binding potential estimates between 1.5 and 3 for midbrain, thalamus and cerebellum, While the distribution and binding potential values were similar across species, both the plasma free fraction (f(P) : 0.8 vs. 8%) and delivery (K(1) : 0.025 vs. 0.126 ml cm(-3) min(-1) ) were significantly lower in humans. Test-retest reproducibility in humans calculated using a two tissue compartmental model was poor (VAR(V(T) ): 29-38%), but was improved using a pseudo reference tissue model (VAR(BP(ND) ): 16-23%). GSK1018921 EC(50) estimates were 22.5 and 45.7 ng/ml in primates and humans, respectively. PMID:21688322

  16. THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL LAWN APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This observational study examined the potential for indoor/outdoor pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objective was to investigate the potential exposures of chi...

  17. Ligand-Mediated Control of the Confinement Potential in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Victor

    This thesis describes the mechanisms by which organic surfactants, particularly thiophenols and phenyldithiocarbamates, reduce the confinement potential experienced by the exciton of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The reduction of the confinement potential is enabled by the creation of interfacial electronic states near the band edge of the QD upon ligand adsorption. In the case of thiophenols, we find that this ligand adsorbs in two distinct binding modes, (i) a tightly bound mode capable of exciton delocalization, and (ii) a more weakly bound mode that has no discernable effect on exciton confinement. Both the adsorption constant and reduction in confinement potential are tunable by para substitution and are generally anticorrelated. For tightly bound thiophenols and other moderately delocalizing ligands, the degree of delocalization induced in the QD is approximately linearly proportional to the fractional surface area occupied by the ligand for all sizes of QDs. In the case of phenyldithiocarbamates, the reduction in the confinement potential is much greater, and ligand adjacency must be accounted for to model exciton delocalization. We find that at high surface coverages, exciton delocalization by phenyldithiocarbamates and other highly delocalizing ligands is dominated by ligand packing effects. Finally, we construct a database of electronic structure calculations on organic molecules and propose an algorithm that combines experimental and computational screening to find novel delocalizing ligands.

  18. 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET: Current Status and Potential Future Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Geraldine J; Clark, Amy S; Schubert, Erin K; Mankoff, David A

    2016-08-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) expression in breast cancer is associated with a more favorable prognosis and is necessary for a response to endocrine therapies. Traditionally, ER expression is assessed by in vitro assays on biopsied tumor tissue. However, recent advances have allowed in vivo evaluation of ER expression with (18)F-fluoroestradiol ((18)F-FES) PET. Clinical studies have demonstrated the use of (18)F-FES PET as a method for quantifying in vivo ER expression and have explored its potential as a predictive assay and method of assessing in vivo pharmacodynamic response to endocrine therapy. This review outlines the biology and pharmacokinetics of (18)F-FES, highlights the current experience with (18)F-FES in patient studies on breast cancer and other diseases, and discusses potential clinical applications and the possible future clinical use of (18)F-FES PET. PMID:27307345

  19. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 18F-labeled PET Ligands for Imaging the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Efange, Simon M. N.; Xu, Jinbin; Li, Shihong; Jones, Lynne A.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Mach, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A new class of vesicular acetylcholine transporter inhibitor that incorporates a carbonyl group into the benzovesamicol structure was synthesized and analogs were evaluated in vitro. (±)-trans-2-Hydroxy-3-(4-(4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl)piperidino)tetralin (9e) has Ki values of 2.70 nM for VAChT, 191 nM for σ1 and 251 nM for σ2. The racemic precursor (9d) was resolved via chiral HPLC and (±)-[18F]9e, (-)-[18F]9e, and (+)-[18F]9e were respectively radiolabeled via microwave irradiation of the appropriate precursors with [18F]/F- and Kryptofix/K2CO3 in DMSO with radiochemical yields ∼50-60% and specific activities >2000 mCi/μmol. (-)-[18F]9e uptake in rat brain was consistent with in vivo selectivity for the VAChT with an initial uptake of 0.911 %ID/g in rat striatum and a striatum: cerebellum ratio of 1.88 by 30 min p.i.. MicroPET imaging of macaques demonstrated a 2.1 ratio of (-)-[18F]9e in putamen versus cerebellum at 2 h. p.i. (-)-[18F]9e has potential to be a PET tracer for clinical imaging of the VAChT. PMID:19203271

  20. Imaging human brown adipose tissue under room temperature conditions with 11C-MRB, a selective norepinephrine transporter PET ligand

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Janice J.; Yeckel, Catherine W.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Aguiar, Renata Belfort-De; Ersahin, Devrim; Gao, Hong; Kapinos, Michael; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Huang, Yiyun; Cheng, David; Carson, Richard E.; Sherwin, Robert; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a critical role in adaptive thermogenesis and is tightly regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). However, current BAT imaging modalities require cold stimulation and are often unreliable to detect BAT in the basal state, at room temperature (RT). We have shown previously that BAT can be detected in rodents under both RT and cold conditions with 11C-MRB ((S,S)-11C-O-methylreboxetine), a highly selective ligand for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). Here, we evaluate this novel approach for BAT detection in adult humans under RT conditions. Methods Ten healthy, Caucasian subjects (5 M: age 24.6±2.6, BMI 21.6±2.7 kg/m2; 5 F: age 25.4±2.1, BMI 22.1±1.0 kg/m2) underwent 11C-MRB PET-CT imaging for cervical/supraclavicular BAT under RT and cold-stimulated conditions (RPCM Cool vest; enthalpy 15°C) compared to 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging. Uptake of 11C-MRB, was quantified as the distribution volume ratio (DVR) using the occipital cortex as a low NET density reference region. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed via bioelectrical impedance analysis. Results As expected, 18F-FDG uptake in BAT was difficult to identify at RT but easily detected with cold stimulation (p=0.01). In contrast, BAT 11C-MRB uptake (also normalized for muscle) was equally evident under both RT and cold conditions (BAT DVR: RT 1.0±0.3 vs. cold 1.1±0.3, p=0.31; BAT/muscle DVR: RT 2.3±0.7 vs. cold 2.5±0.5, p=0.61). Importantly, BAT DVR and BAT/muscle DVR of 11C-MRB at RT correlated positively with core body temperature (r=0.76, p=0.05 and r=0.92, p=0.004, respectively), a relationship not observed with 18F-FDG (p=0.63). Furthermore, there were gender differences in 11C-MRB uptake in response to cold (p=0.03), which reflected significant differences in the change in 11C-MRB as a function of both body composition and body temperature. Conclusions Unlike 18F-FDG, the uptake of 11C-MRB in BAT offers a unique opportunity to

  1. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    PubMed Central

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  2. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach.

    PubMed

    Ioakeimidis, C; Fotopoulou, K N; Karapanagioti, H K; Geraga, M; Zeri, C; Papathanassiou, E; Galgani, F; Papatheodorou, G

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea-E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  3. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-03-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  4. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette Syndrome and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Iaccarino, Leonardo; Perani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Primary dystonia (pD) is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioral changes. GTS and obsessive–compulsive disorders are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting that a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and post-synaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-receptors bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments. PMID:25295029

  5. Screening petting zoo animals for the presence of potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Chitrita; Roberts, Elisabeth

    2006-11-01

    Several outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157 have been reported in petting zoos, resulting in hospitalization of many children. At present, no standard procedure has been adopted to monitor the presence of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) or Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in petting zoo animals. Direct detection of these strains from rectal swabs of animals in petting zoos was developed and obviated the need to culture the organisms. DNA extracted from bacteria in the swabs was tested for the presence of wecA gene specific for E. coli by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The wecA positive samples were further tested for Shiga-toxin genes stxl and stx2, and the intimin eae by multiplex PCR and for the presence of O157 and H7. Swabs (n=104) from 15 animal species in a petting zoo were tested; 7 goats and 3 cows were found to carry STEC. The method is rapid and convenient for monitoring potentially pathogenic E. coli in petting zoo animals. PMID:17121091

  6. Efficient synthesis of hexahydroindenopyridines and their potential as melatoninergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Párraga, Javier; Moreno, Laura; Diaz, Amelia; El Aouad, Noureddine; Galán, Abraham; Sanz, María Jesús; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Figadère, Bruno; Cabedo, Nuria; Cortes, Diego

    2014-10-30

    Hexahydroindenopyridine (HHIP) is an interesting tricyclic piperidine nucleus that is structurally related to melatonin, a serotonin-derived neurohormone. Melatonin receptor ligands have applications in several cellular, neuroendocrine and neurophysiological disorders, including depression and/or insomnia. We report herein an efficient two-step method to prepare new HHIP via enamine C-alkylation-cyclization. The influence of substituents on the benzene ring and the nitrogen atom on melatoninergic receptors has been studied. Among the 25 synthesized HHIPs, some of them containing methylenedioxy (series 2) and 8-chloro-7-methoxy substituents (series 4) on the benzene ring revealed affinity for the MT1 and/or the MT2 receptors within the nanomolar range or low micromolar. Similar activities were also encountered for those presenting urea (4g), N-aryl (2e) and N-alkyl (2f) acetamide functions. Therefore, new synthesized compounds with a HHIP nucleus have emerged as new promising leads towards the discovery of melatoninergic ligands which could provide new therapeutic agents. PMID:25232966

  7. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  8. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1997-01-01

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g. .sup.99m Tc or .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re) or late transition metals (e.g., .sup.105 Rh or .sup.109 Pd). The complexes with these metals .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re, .sup.99m Tc and .sup.109 Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  9. Synthesis of Phthalimide Derivatives as Potential PPAR-γ Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Eom, So Hyeon; Liu, Sen; Su, Mingzhi; Noh, Tae Hwan; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Nam Deuk; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Min Hye; Jung, Jee H.

    2016-01-01

    Paecilocin A, a phthalide derivative isolated from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii, activates PPAR-γ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) in rat liver Ac2F cells. Based on a SAR (Structure-activity relationships) study and in silico analysis of paecilocin A-mimetic derivatives, additional N-substituted phthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for PPAR-γ agonistic activity in both murine liver Ac2F cells and in human liver HepG2 cells by luciferase assay, and for adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 cells. Docking simulation indicated PD6 was likely to bind most strongly to the ligand binding domain of PPAR-γ by establishing crucial H-bonds with key amino acid residues. However, in in vitro assays, PD1 and PD2 consistently displayed significant PPAR-γ activation in Ac2F and HepG2 cells, and adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. PMID:27338418

  10. Potential Clinical Value of Multiparametric PET in the Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueqi; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Rongfu; Cao, Haoyin; Reid, Savina; Gao, Rui; Han, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential clinical value of quantitative functional FDG PET and pathological amyloid-β PET with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and clinical assessments in the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. Methods We studied 82 subjects for up to 96 months (median = 84 months) in a longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. All preprocessed PET images were spatially normalized to standard Montreal Neurologic Institute space. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined on MRI template, and standard uptake values ratios (SUVRs) to the cerebellum for FDG and amyloid-β PET were calculated. Predictive values of single and multiparametric PET biomarkers with and without clinical assessments and CSF biomarkers for AD progression were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression model. Results The posterior precuneus and cingulate SUVRs were identified for both FDG and amyloid-β PET in predicating progression in normal controls (NCs) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). FDG parietal and lateral temporal SUVRs were suggested for monitoring NCs and MCI group progression, respectively. 18F-AV45 global cortex attained (78.6%, 74.5%, 75.4%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy) in predicting NC progression, which is comparable to the 11C-PiB global cortex SUVR’s in predicting MCI to AD. A logistic regression model to combine FDG parietal and posterior precuneus SUVR and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) Total Mod was identified in predicating NC progression with (80.0%, 94.9%, 93.9%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). The selected model including FDG posterior cingulate SUVR, ADAS-Cog Total Mod, and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores for predicating MCI to AD attained (96.4%, 81.2%, 83.6%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). 11C-PiB medial temporal SUVR with MMSE significantly increased 11C-PiB PET AUC to 0.915 (p<0

  11. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  12. Sensitive bioassay for detection of PPARα potentially hazardous ligands with gold nanoparticle probe.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Wan, Yan-Jian; Wang, Xianliang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Chun-Xiang; Xu, Shun-qing

    2011-09-15

    There are so many kinds of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) ligands with hazardous effect for human health in the environment, such as certain herbicides, plasticizers and drugs. Among these agonists, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are mostly investigated due to their persistence and accumulation in environment and their potential toxicity via PPARα. This investigation aims at developing a bioassay method to detect PPARα ligands based on the ligand-receptor interaction on microplate. PPARα, which formed heterodimers with retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα), were activated by PPARα ligands to form ligands-PPARα-RXRα complexes. Then the complexes were transferred into a microplate and captured via monoclonal anti-PPARα antibody. The PPARα responsive elements (PPRE) modified-gold nanoparticle probes were captured by the ligand-PPARα-RXRα complexes immobilized on the microplate, and then could be quantified through measuring the optical density after silver enhancement. The results showed that PFOS was quantified with a linear range from 100 pM to 1 μM and the detection limit was 10 pM. In addition to PFOS, PFOA and MEHP were also quantified within a proper range through the proposed bioassay. This bioassay was compared with that of liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for water spiked samples with a significant correlation (r = 0.9893). This study provides a high-throughput detection method for PPARα ligands in microplate with high sensitivity and wide linear range. It may serve as an assistant of LC-MS for prescreening of PPARα ligands like PFOS. PMID:21726938

  13. Potential Toxicity of Up-Converting Nanoparticles Encapsulated with a Bilayer Formed by Ligand Attraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cellular toxicity of nanoparticles that were capped with a bilayered ligand was studied using an up-converting (UC) phosphor material as a representative nanoparticle (NP). The results indicate that although UC NPs are known to be nontoxic, the toxicity of the NPs depends strongly on ligand coordination conditions, in addition to the other commonly known parameters such as size, structure, surface charge etc. Oleate-capped hydrophobic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs were surface modified to yield three extreme conditions: bare particles that were stripped of the oleate ligands; particles with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands; and particles with an bilayer of PEG-oleate ligands using the oleate surface group that was remained after synthesis. It was found that the bare particles and the covalent PEG NPs induced little toxicity. However, particles that were rendered biocompatible by forming a bilayer with an amphiphilic ligand (i.e., PEG-oleate) resulted in significant cell toxicity. These findings strongly suggest that the PEG-oleate group dissociated from the bilayered oleate-capped NPs, resulting in significant toxicity by exposing the hydrophobic oleate-capped NPs to the cell. Based on results with bare particles, the NaLnF4:Yb,Er (Ln = Y, Gd) up-converting phosphors are essentially less-toxic. Capping and functionalizing these particles with ligand intercalation may, however, not be a suitable method for rendering the NPs suitable for bioapplication as the ligand can potentially dissociate upon cellular interaction, leading to significant toxicity. PMID:24971524

  14. Prospects for vaccination against the ticks of pets and the potential impact on pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Villar, Margarita; Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Merino, Octavio; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, Gabriela; Galindo, Ruth C

    2015-02-28

    Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as ticks greatly impact human and animal health. In particular, many diseases of dogs and cats are potentially transmissible to people by arthropod vectors and therefore their control is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use vector protective antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations and pathogen infection. However, as reviewed in this paper, very little progress has been made for the control of ectoparasite infestations and VBD in pets using vaccination with vector protective antigens. The growing interaction between pets and people underlines the importance of developing new interventions for the monitoring and control of VBD. PMID:25555312

  15. Phthalocyanines: a new class of G-quadruplex-ligands with many potential applications.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2012-06-25

    A G-quadruplex is a four-stranded DNA structure featuring stacked guanine tetrads, G-quartets. Formation of a G-quadruplex in telomere DNA can inhibit telomerase activity; therefore, development of G-quadruplex-ligands, which induce and/or stabilize G-quadruplexes, has become an area of great interest. Phthalocyanine derivatives have substantial potential as high-affinity G-quadruplex-ligands because these planar chromophores are similar in size and shape to the G-quartets. Here, we focus on the latest findings on phthalocyanine derivatives as G-quadruplex-ligands, and discuss the mechanisms by which phthalocyanines bind to G-quadruplexes with high affinity and selectivity. We also discuss potential biomedical and organic electronic applications of phthalocyanines that are dependent on their photophysical properties. PMID:22590705

  16. The Potential Roles of 18F-FDG-PET in Management of Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Yuan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Extensive efforts have recently been devoted to developing noninvasive imaging tools capable of delineating brain tissue viability (penumbra) during acute ischemic stroke. These efforts could have profound clinical implications for identifying patients who may benefit from tPA beyond the currently approved therapeutic time window and/or patients undergoing neuroendovascular treatments. To date, the DWI/PWI MRI and perfusion CT have received the most attention for identifying ischemic penumbra. However, their routine use in clinical settings remains limited. Preclinical and clinical PET studies with [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) have consistently revealed a decreased 18F-FDG uptake in regions of presumed ischemic core. More importantly, an elevated 18F-FDG uptake in the peri-ischemic regions has been reported, potentially reflecting viable tissues. To this end, this paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature on the utilization of 14C-2-DG and 18F-FDG-PET in experimental as well as human stroke studies. Possible cellular mechanisms and physiological underpinnings attributed to the reported temporal and spatial uptake patterns of 18F-FDG are addressed. Given the wide availability of 18F-FDG in routine clinical settings, 18F-FDG PET may serve as an alternative, non-invasive tool to MRI and CT for the management of acute stroke patients. PMID:23762852

  17. Biodistribution and Stability Studies of [18F]Fluoroethylrhodamine B, a Potential PET Myocardial Perfusion Agent

    PubMed Central

    Gottumukkala, Vijay; Heinrich, Tobias K.; Baker, Amanda; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederick H; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Fluorine-18-labeled rhodamine B was developed as a potential PET tracer for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion, but preliminary studies in mice showed no accumulation in the heart suggesting that it was rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo in mice. A study was, therefore, undertaken to further evaluate this hypothesis. Methods [18F]Fluoroethylrhodamine B was equilibrated for 2 h at 37 °C in human, rat and mouse serum and in PBS. Samples were removed periodically and assayed by HPLC. Based on the results of the stability study, microPET imaging and a biodistribution study were carried out in rats. Results In vitro stability studies demonstrated that [18F]fluoroethylrhodamine B much more stable in rat and human sera than in mouse serum. After 2 h, the compound was >80% intact in rat serum but <30% intact in mouse serum. The microPET imaging and biodistribution studies in rats confirmed this result showing high and persistent tracer accumulation in the myocardium compared with the absence of uptake by the myocardium in mice thereby validating our original hypothesis that 18F-labeled rhodamines should accumulate in the heart. Conclusions [18F]Fluoroethyl rhodamine B is more stable in rat and human sera than it is in mouse serum. This improved stability is demonstrated by the high uptake of the tracer in the rat heart in comparison to the absence of visible uptake in the mouse heart. These observations suggest that 18F-labeled rhodamines are promising candidates for more extensive evaluation as PET tracers for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. PMID:20346876

  18. The Potential Applications of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ Ligands in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jaou-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ, also known as PPARβ) has ubiquitous distribution and extensive biological functions. The reproductive function of PPARδ was first revealed in the uterus at the implantation site. Since then, PPARδ and its ligand have been discovered in all reproductive tissues, including the gametes and the preimplantation embryos. PPARδ in preimplantation embryos is normally activated by oviduct-derived PPARδ ligand. PPARδ activation is associated with an increase in embryonic cell proliferation and a decrease in programmed cell death (apoptosis). On the other hand, the role of PPARδ and its ligand in gamete formation and function is less well understood. This review will summarize the reproductive functions of PPARδ and project its potential applications in assisted reproductive technology. PMID:19096716

  19. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  20. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  1. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1997-02-11

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds are derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g., {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) or late transition metals (e.g., {sup 105}Rh or {sup 109}Pd). The complexes with these metals {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 109}Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  2. In Silico Investigation of Potential Src Kinase Ligands from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tou, Weng Ieong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2012-01-01

    Src kinase is an attractive target for drug development based on its established relationship with cancer and possible link to hypertension. The suitability of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compounds as potential drug ligands for further biological evaluation was investigated using structure-based, ligand-based, and molecular dynamics (MD) analysis. Isopraeroside IV, 9alpha-hydroxyfraxinellone-9-O-beta-D-glucoside (9HFG) and aurantiamide were the top three TCM candidates identified from docking. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions were the primary forces governing docking stability. Their stability with Src kinase under a dynamic state was further validated through MD and torsion angle analysis. Complexes formed by TCM candidates have lower total energy estimates than the control Sacaratinib. Four quantitative-structural activity relationship (QSAR) in silico verifications consistently suggested that the TCM candidates have bioactive properties. Docking conformations of 9HFG and aurantiamide in the Src kinase ATP binding site suggest potential inhibitor-like characteristics, including competitive binding at the ATP binding site (Lys295) and stabilization of the catalytic cleft integrity. The TCM candidates have significantly lower ligand internal energies and are estimated to form more stable complexes with Src kinase than Saracatinib. Structure-based and ligand-based analysis support the drug-like potential of 9HFG and aurantiamide and binding mechanisms reveal the tendency of these two candidates to compete for the ATP binding site. PMID:22470466

  3. Correlation of amyloid PET ligand florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) binding with β-amyloid aggregation and neuritic plaque deposition in postmortem brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Rye; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Beach, Thomas G.; Bedell, Barry J.; Zehntner, Simone P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Kung, Hank F.; Skovronsky, Daniel M.; Hefti, Franz; Clark, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) is a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging ligand for the detection of amyloid aggregation associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Earlier data showed that florbetapir F 18 binds with high affinity to β-amyloid plaques in human brain homogenates (Kd = 3.7 nM) and has favorable imaging pharmacokinetic properties, including rapid brain penetration and washout. The present study used human autopsy brain tissue to evaluate the correlation between in vitro florbetapir F 18 binding and β-amyloid density measured by established neuropathological methods. Methods The localization and density of florbetapir F 18 binding in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of postmortem brain tissue from 40 subjects with a varying degree of neurodegenerative pathology was assessed by standard florbetapir F 18 autoradiography and correlated with the localization and density of β-amyloid identified by silver staining, thioflavin S staining, and immunohistochemistry. Results There were strong quantitative correlations between florbetapir F 18 tissue binding and both β-amyloid plaques identified by light microscopy (sliver staining and thioflavin S fluorescence) and by immunohistochemical measurements of β-amyloid using three antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Florbetapir F 18 did not bind to neurofibrillary tangles. Conclusion Florbetapir F 18 selectively binds β-amyloid in human brain tissue. The binding intensity was quantitatively correlated with the density of β-amyloid plaques identified by standard neuropathological techniques and correlated with the density of Aβ measured by immunohistochemistry. Since β-amyloid plaques are a defining neuropathological feature for Alzheimer’s disease, these results support the use of florbetapir F 18 as an amyloid PET ligand to identify the presence of AD pathology in patients with signs and symptoms of progressive late-life cognitive

  4. Spectroelectrochemistry of tris(bipyridyl)silicon(IV): ligand localized reductions with potential electrochromic applications.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Derek M; Dewitt, Domelia R; Patel, Shreya S; Merkert, Jon W; Donovan-Merkert, Bernadette T; Schmedake, Thomas A

    2015-11-21

    Tris(bipyridyl)silicon(iv) was electrochemically reduced in acetonitrile to obtain the UV-vis spectra of its reduced species. Three stable, reversible reduced states (3+, 2+, and 1+) were observed with distinct isosbestic points for each of the redox reactions. The fully oxidized state (4+) is colorless, while the reduced states were green. The absorbance spectra for the three reduced states are consistent with ligand localized reductions. Potential advantages of using these complexes in electrochromic applications are discussed. PMID:26465594

  5. PILOT STUDY OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING LAWN APPLICATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the potential for indoor/outdoor pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objective was to investigate the potential exposures of children and thei...

  6. Metrical oxidation states of 2-amidophenoxide and catecholate ligands: structural signatures of metal-ligand π bonding in potentially noninnocent ligands.

    PubMed

    Brown, Seth N

    2012-02-01

    Catecholates and 2-amidophenoxides are prototypical "noninnocent" ligands which can form metal complexes where the ligands are best described as being in the monoanionic (imino)semiquinone or neutral (imino)quinone oxidation state instead of their closed-shell dianionic form. Through a comprehensive analysis of structural data available for compounds with these ligands in unambiguous oxidation states (109 amidophenolates, 259 catecholates), the well-known structural changes in the ligands with oxidation state can be quantified. Using these correlations, an empirical "metrical oxidation state" (MOS) which gives a continuous measure of the apparent oxidation state of the ligand can be determined based on least-squares fitting of its C-C, C-O, and C-N bond lengths to this single parameter (a simple procedure for doing so is provided via a spreadsheet in the Supporting Information). High-valent d(0) metal complexes, particularly those of vanadium(V) and molybdenum(VI), have ligands with unexpectedly positive, and generally nonintegral, MOS values. The structural effects in these complexes are attributed not to electron transfer, but rather to amidophenoxide- or catecholate-to-metal π bonding, an interpretation supported by the systematic variation of the MOS values as a function of the degree of competition with the other π-donating groups in the structures. PMID:22260321

  7. Potential Applications of Using 68Ga–Evans Blue PET/CT in the Evaluation of Lymphatic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Peilin; Li, Fang; Tong, Guansheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Potentials of 68Ga-NEB as a PET tracer in the evaluation of a variety of lymphatic drainage disorders were analyzed. Methods 68Ga-NEB was injected subcutaneously, and the PET/CT images were acquired in 13 patients with different suspected lymphatic drainage abnormality. The 68Ga-NEB PET/CT findings were compared with 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. Results 68Ga-NEB activity could be clearly observed in the lymphatic route on the PET/CT images from all the patients. In 5 (38.5%) of 13 patients tested, 68Ga-NEB PET/CT provided more information than the 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions 68Ga-NEB PET/CT can be used as an alternative of 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy in the evaluation of lymphatic disorders, which enables fast results and might be more accurate than the conventional 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. PMID:26859218

  8. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein–ligand binding from host–guest affinity data

    PubMed Central

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K.; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the “stalemates” in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein–ligand binding, organic host–guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host–guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein–ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein–ligand systems. PMID:26256816

  9. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  10. Emerging clinical applications of PET based molecular imaging in oncology: the promising future potential for evolving personalized cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Vandana K; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the potential of advanced applications of functional molecular imaging in assessing tumor biology and cellular characteristics with emphasis on positron emission tomography (PET) applications with both 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and non-FDG tracers. The inherent heterogeneity of cancer cells with their varied cellular biology and metabolic and receptor phenotypic expression in each individual patient and also intra-and inter-lesionally in the same individual mandates for transitioning from a generalized “same-size-fits-all” approach to personalized medicine in oncology. The past two decades have witnessed improvement of oncological imaging through CT, MR imaging, PET, subsequent movement through hybrid or fusion imaging with PET/CT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT-CT), and now toward the evolving PET/MR imaging. These recent developments have proven invaluable in enhancing oncology care and have the potential to help image the tumor biology at the cellular level, followed by providing a tailored treatment. Molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics or Radiomics, biology-driven interventional radiology and theranostics, all hold immense potential to serve as a guide to give “start and stop” treatment for a patient on an individual basis. This will likely have substantial impact on both treatment costs and outcomes. In this review, we bring forth the current trends in molecular imaging with established techniques (PET/CT), with particular emphasis on newer molecules (such as amino acid metabolism and hypoxia imaging, somatostatin receptor based imaging, and hormone receptor imaging) and further potential for FDG. An introductory discussion on the novel hybrid imaging techniques such as PET/MR is also made to understand the futuristic trends. PMID:26752813

  11. t-Bu2SiF-derivatized D2-receptor ligands: the first SiFA-containing small molecule radiotracers for target-specific PET-imaging.

    PubMed

    Iovkova-Berends, Ljuba; Wängler, Carmen; Zöller, Thomas; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus Theodor; Rensch, Christian; Bartenstein, Peter; Kostikov, Alexey; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Jurkschat, Klaus; Wängler, Björn

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro evaluation of new silicon-fluoride acceptor (SiFA) derivatized D(2)-receptor ligands is reported. The SiFA-technology simplifies the introduction of fluorine-18 into target specific biomolecules for Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET). However, one of the remaining challenges, especially for small molecules such as receptor-ligands, is the bulkiness of the SiFA-moiety. We therefore synthesized four Fallypride SiFA-conjugates derivatized either directly at the benzoic acid ring system (SiFA-DMFP, SiFA-FP, SiFA-DDMFP) or at the butyl-side chain (SiFA-M-FP) and tested their receptor affinities. We found D(2)-receptor affinities for all compounds in the nanomolar range (K(i(SiFA-DMFP)) = 13.6 nM, K(i(SiFA-FP)) = 33.0 nM, K(i(SiFA-DDMFP)) = 62.7 nM and K(i(SiFA-M-FP)) = 4.21 nM). The radiofluorination showed highest yields when 10 nmol of the precursors were reacted with [(18)F]fluoride/TBAHCO(3) in acetonitrile. After a reversed phased cartridge purification the desired products could be isolated as an injectable solution after only 10 min synthesis time with radiochemical yields (RCY) of more than 40% in the case of SiFA-DMFP resulting in specific activities >41 GBq/µmol (>1,100 Ci/mmol). Furthermore, the radiolabeled products were shown to be stable in the injectable solutions, as well as in human plasma, for at least 90 min. PMID:21892125

  12. A FEASIBILITY STUDY EXAMINING THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL TURF APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The domestic dog may be a vehicle for translocation of pesticide residues following residential applications to turf. In addition, human occupants may be exposed to residues deposited inside homes by pets or by intimate contacts with them. This study examines the potential of ...

  13. A FEASIBILITY STUDY EXAMINING THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN HEALTH EXPOSURE TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL TURF APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The domestic dog may be a vehicle for translocation of pesticide residues following residential applications to turf. In addition, human occupants may be exposed to residues deposited inside homes by pets or by intimate contacts with them. This study examines the potential of a...

  14. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T.; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid β (Aβ) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjugated to a transferrin receptor antibody to enable receptor-mediated transcytosis across the BBB. PET imaging of two different mouse models with Aβ pathology clearly visualize Aβ in the brain. The PET signal increases with age and correlates closely with brain Aβ levels. Thus, we demonstrate that antibody-based PET ligands can be successfully used for brain imaging. PMID:26892305

  15. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Dopamine D2 Receptor Ligands as Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Silva, Andrea G; Loza, María I; Kolb, Peter; Castro, Marián; Poso, Antti

    2016-04-01

    Structure-based virtual screening using a D2 receptor homology model was performed to identify dopamine D2 receptor ligands as potential antipsychotics. From screening a library of 6.5 million compounds, 21 were selected and were subjected to experimental validation. From these 21 compounds tested, ten D2 ligands were identified (47.6 % success rate, among them D2 receptor antagonists, as expected) that have additional affinity for other receptors tested, in particular 5-HT2A receptors. The affinity (Ki values) of the compounds ranged from 58 nm to about 24 μm. Similarity and fragment analysis indicated a significant degree of structural novelty among the identified compounds. We found one D2 receptor antagonist that did not have a protonatable nitrogen atom, which is a key structural element of the classical D2 pharmacophore model necessary for interaction with the conserved Asp(3.32) residue. This compound exhibited greater than 20-fold binding selectivity for the D2 receptor over the D3 receptor. We provide additional evidence that the amide hydrogen atom of this compound forms a hydrogen bond with Asp(3.32), as determined by tests of its derivatives that cannot maintain this interaction. PMID:26990027

  16. Endovanilloids. Putative endogenous ligands of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels.

    PubMed

    Van Der Stelt, Mario; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2004-05-01

    Endovanilloids are defined as endogenous ligands of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) protein, a nonselective cation channel that belongs to the large family of TRP ion channels, and is activated by the pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, capsaicin. TRPV1 is expressed in some nociceptor efferent neurons, where it acts as a molecular sensor of noxious heat and low pH. However, the presence of these channels in various regions of the central nervous system, where they are not likely to be targeted by these noxious stimuli, suggests the existence of endovanilloids. Three different classes of endogenous lipids have been found recently that can activate TRPV1, i.e. unsaturated N-acyldopamines, lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoid anandamide with some of its congeners. To classify a molecule as an endovanilloid, the compound should be formed or released in an activity-dependent manner in sufficient amounts to evoke a TRPV1-mediated response by direct activation of the channel. To control TRPV1 signaling, endovanilloids should be inactivated within a short time-span. In this review, we will discuss, for each of the proposed endogenous ligands of TRPV1, their ability to act as endovanilloids in light of the criteria mentioned above. PMID:15128293

  17. Modeling Structural Coordination and Ligand Binding in Zinc Proteins with a Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajing; Yang, Wei; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    As the second most abundant cation in human body, zinc is vital for the structures and functions of many proteins. Zinc-containing matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been widely investigated as potential drug targets in a range of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disorders to cancers. However, it remains a challenge in theoretical studies to treat zinc in proteins with classical mechanics. In this study, we examined Zn2+ coordination with organic compounds and protein side chains using a polarizable atomic multipole based electrostatic model. We find that polarization effect plays a determining role in Zn2+ coordination geometry in both matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) complexes and in zinc-finger proteins. In addition, the relative binding free energies of selected inhibitors binding with MMP13 have been estimated and compared with experimental results. While not directly interacting with the small molecule inhibitors, the permanent and polarizing field of Zn2+ exerts a strong influence on the relative affinities of the ligands. The simulation results also reveal the polarization effect on binding is ligand dependent and thus difficult to be incorporated into fixed-charge models implicitly. PMID:22754403

  18. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors: ligands, models, oligomers, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, Darius P; Jockers, Ralf; Cecon, Erika; Rivara, Silvia; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2014-04-24

    Numerous physiological functions of the pineal gland hormone melatonin are mediated via activation of two G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2. The melatonergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and TIK-301, are high-affinity nonselective MT1/MT2 agonists. A great number of MT2-selective ligands and, more recently, several MT1-selective agents have been reported to date. Herein, we review recent advances in the field focusing on high-affinity agonists and antagonists and those displaying selectivity toward MT1 and MT2 receptors. Moreover, the existing models of MT1 and MT2 receptors as well as the current status in the emerging field of melatonin receptor oligomerization are critically discussed. In addition to the already existing indications, such as insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, and depression, new potential therapeutic applications of melatonergic ligands including cardiovascular regulation, appetite control, tumor growth inhibition, and neurodegenerative diseases are presented. PMID:24228714

  19. Multilocus genotyping of potentially zoonotic Giardia duodenalis in pet chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) in China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Yu, Fuchang; Li, Shouyi; Wang, Haiyan; Luo, Nannan; Huang, Jianying; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-03-15

    Giardia duodenalis is a common protozoan that colonizes and reproduces in the small intestine, causing giardiasis. This parasite infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including humans, domestic animals and wildlife. It has been suggested that chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) kept as domestic pets are potential reservoirs for the zoonotic transmission of G. duodenalis. In this study, 140 chinchilla samples from four cities in China were examined to determine the prevalence of G. duodenalis. Thirty-eight (27.1%) chinchillas were found to be positive for G. duodenalis. The prevalence of infection was analyzed in relation to collection site, age and sex. Molecular characterization was also carried out on the 38 chinchilla samples to determine common genotypes. G. duodenalis assemblages A and B were identified in the chinchilla samples by analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssur RNA) gene. Genotyping at the subtype level using multiple genes (glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) and β-giardin (bg) genes) determined that the majority of assemblage A isolate sequences were identical to subtype AI. Assemblage B isolates showed variability among the nucleotide sequences belonging to subtype BIV. This is the first report of G. duodenalis in chinchillas from China. As subtype AI and BIV are associated with human infection, G. duodenalis in chinchillas should be regarded as zoonotic. PMID:25704655

  20. (89)Zr, a radiometal nuclide with high potential for molecular imaging with PET: chemistry, applications and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gabriel; Seibold, Uwe; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging-and especially Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-is of increasing importance for the diagnosis of various diseases and thus is experiencing increasing dissemination. Consequently, there is a growing demand for appropriate PET tracers which allow for a specific accumulation in the target structure as well as its visualization and exhibit decay characteristics matching their in vivo pharmacokinetics. To meet this demand, the development of new targeting vectors as well as the use of uncommon radionuclides becomes increasingly important. Uncommon nuclides in this regard enable the utilization of various selectively accumulating bioactive molecules such as peptides, antibodies, their fragments, other proteins and artificial structures for PET imaging in personalized medicine. Among these radionuclides, 89Zr (t1/2 = 3.27 days and mean Eβ+ = 0.389 MeV) has attracted increasing attention within the last years due to its favorably long half-life, which enables imaging at late time-points, being especially favorable in case of slowly-accumulating targeting vectors. This review outlines the recent developments in the field of 89Zr-labeled bioactive molecules, their potential and application in PET imaging and beyond, as well as remaining challenges. PMID:23736785

  1. Test–retest reproducibility of cannabinoid-receptor type 1 availability quantified with the PET ligand [11C]MePPEP

    PubMed Central

    Riaño Barros, Daniela A.; McGinnity, Colm J.; Rosso, Lula; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Howes, Oliver D.; Brooks, David J.; Duncan, John S.; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Hammers, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Endocannabinoids are involved in normal cognition, and dysfunction in cannabinoid-receptor-mediated neurotransmission has been suggested in a variety of neurological and psychiatric pathologies. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is widely expressed in the human central nervous system. The objective of this study was to quantify the test–retest reproducibility of measures of the PET ligand [11C]MePPEP in order to assess the stability of CB1-receptor quantification in humans in vivo. Methods Fifteen healthy subjects (eight females; median age 32 years, range 25 to 65 years) had a 90-minute PET scan on two occasions after injection of a median dose of [11C]MePPEP of 364 MBq. Metabolite-corrected arterial plasma input functions were obtained for all scans. Eight ROIs, reflecting different levels of receptor densities/concentrations, were defined automatically: hippocampus, anterior cingulate gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, and pons. We used seven quantification methods: reversible compartmental models with one and two tissue classes, two and four rate constants, and a variable blood volume term (2kbv; 4kbv); model-free (spectral) analyses with and without regularisation, including one with voxel-wise quantification; the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) with pons as a pseudo-reference region; and modified standard uptake values (mSUVs) calculated for the period of ~ 30–60 min after injection. Percentage test–retest change and between-subject variability were both assessed, and test–retest reliability was quantified by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ratio of binding estimates pallidum:pons served as an indicator of a method's ability to reflect binding heterogeneity. Results Neither the SRTM nor the 4kbv model produced reliable measures, with ICCs around zero. Very good (> 0.75) or excellent (> 0.80) ICCs were obtained with the other methods. The most

  2. Empirical potentials for recombination reactions of photo-dissociated ligands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elber, R.

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this research was to design an appropriate potential and simulation methodology to describe the effect of radiation on ligands bound to metal-proteins. As model systems the authors investigated myoglobin, hemoglobin and their mutants. The great advantage of the globins as a target for theoretical studies is the wealth of experimental data available for them. They focused on studies that combine fast spectroscopy with mutation experiments. The mutations make it possible to examine detailed changes in the kinetic curves with atomically detailed information. The first spectroscopy, which is in the same time scale as of ordinary molecular dynamics (sub nanoseconds), makes it possible to compare the results of the computations to raw experimental data.

  3. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  4. Tiny Turtles Purchased at Pet Stores are a Potential High Risk for Salmonella Human Infection in the Valencian Region, Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Marin, Clara; Vega, Santiago; Marco-Jiménez, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Turtles may be considered unsafe pets, particularly in households with children. This study aimed to assess Salmonella carriage by turtles in pet stores and in private ownership to inform the public of the potential health risk, enabling informed choices around pet selection. During the period between September and October 2013, 24 pet stores and 96 private owners were sampled in the Valencian Region (Eastern Spain). Salmonella identification procedure was based on ISO 6579: 2002 recommendations (Annex D). Salmonella strains were serotyped in accordance with Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique. The rate of isolation of Salmonella was very high from pet store samples (75.0% ± 8.8%) and moderate for private owners (29.0% ± 4.6%). Serotyping revealed 18 different serotypes among two Salmonella enterica subspecies: S. enterica subsp. enterica and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae. Most frequently isolated serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium (39.5%, 17/43) and Salmonella Pomona (9.3%, 4/43). Serotypes identified have previously been reported in turtles, and child Salmonella infections associate with pet turtle exposure. The present study clearly demonstrates that turtles in pet stores, as well as in private owners, could be a direct or indirect source of a high risk of human Salmonella infections. In addition, pet stores should advise their customers of the potential risks associated with reptile ownership. PMID:27228194

  5. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  6. Organometallic Palladium Complexes with a Water-Soluble Iminophosphorane Ligand as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Monica; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Sanaú, Mercedes; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new water-soluble iminophosphorane ligand TPA=N-C(O)-2BrC6H4 (C,N-IM; TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) 1 is reported. Oxidative addition of 1 to Pd2(dba)3 affords the orthopalladated dimer [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) as a mixture of cis and trans isomers (1:1 molar ratio) where the iminophosphorane moeity behaves as a C,N-pincer ligand. By addition of different neutral or monoanionic ligands to 2, the bridging bromide can be cleaved and a variety of hydrophilic or water-soluble mononuclear organometallic palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L-L)] (L-L = acac (3); S2CNMe2 (4); 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulfonic acid disodium salt C12H6N2(C6H4SO3Na)2 (5)); [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L)Br] (L = P(mC6H4SO3Na)3 (6); P(3-Pyridyl)3 (7)) and, [Pd(C6H4(C(O)N=TPA)-2}(TPA)2Br] (8) are obtained as single isomers. All new complexes were tested as potential anticancer agents and their cytotoxicity properties were evaluated in vitro against human Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, normal T-lymphocytes (PBMC) and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. Compounds [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) and [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(acac)] 3 (which has been crystallographically characterized) display the higher cytotoxicity against the above mentioned cancer cell lines while being less toxic to normal T-lymphocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells: PBMC). In addition, 3 is very toxic to cisplatin resistant Jurkat shBak indicating a cell death pathway that may be different to that of cisplatin. The interaction of 2 and 3 with plasmid (pBR322) DNA is much weaker than that of cisplatin pointing to an alternative biomolecular target for these cytotoxic compounds. All the compounds show an interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) faster than that of cisplatin. PMID:23066172

  7. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  8. An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Marsha K. Stout, Daniel M.; Jones, Paul A.; Barr, Dana B.

    2008-07-15

    This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235{+-}267 ng/m{sup 3}) and children's bedrooms (179{+-}246 ng/m{sup 3}) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03{+-}0.04 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1{+-}100.1 ng/cm{sup 2}) compared to mean loadings (<0.09 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings

  9. Evaluation of 5-[18F]fluoropropylepidepride as a potential PET radioligand for imaging dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kessler, R M; Votaw, J R; de Paulis, T; Bingham, D R; Ansari, M S; Mason, N S; Holburn, G; Schmidt, D E; Votaw, D B; Manning, R G

    1993-11-01

    This study evaluated the utility of (S)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-2,3 - dimethoxybenzamide ([18F]fluorpropylepidepride), [18F]5-FPrEpid, as a ligand for PET studies of cerebral dopamine D2 receptors. The in vitro affinity for the rat striatal dopamine D2 receptor, KD 138 pM, was determined by Scatchard analysis of in vitro binding to rat striatal homogenate. The apparent lipophilicity, log kw 1.6, was measured with reverse phase HPLC at pH 7.5. The receptor specificity was determined by competitive displacement of [18F]5-FPrEpid by a variety of neurotransmitter ligands. Only dopamine D2 ligands displaced [18F]5-FPrEpid with high affinity. Positron tomographic imaging studies in primates of [18F]5-FPrEpid demonstrated a stable striatal uptake of 0.02% injected dose/ml for up to 5 h after injection. The striatal: cerebellar ratio increased from 2 at 15 min, to 7 at 200 min, and to 10 at 300 min. Striatal uptake was displaceable by haloperidol (1 mg/kg) or raclopride (2.5 mg/kg) to cerebellar levels with a t1/2 of washout of 9 or 15 min. Striatal uptake was mildly susceptible to displacement by d-amphetamine (1-2 mg/kg) released endogenous dopamine; d-amphetamine administration produced a 10% h increase in the rate of striatal washout. Although uptake in the striatum is reversible, an equilibrium between receptor bound [18F]5-FPrEpid in striatum and [18F]5-FPrEpid in plasma is not reached within 5 h postinjection. PMID:8278895

  10. A perspective on the future role of brain pet imaging in exercise science.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Henning; Drzezga, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) bears a unique potential for examining the effects of physical exercise (acute or chronic) within the central nervous system in vivo, including cerebral metabolism, neuroreceptor occupancy, and neurotransmission. However, application of Neuro-PET in human exercise science is as yet surprisingly sparse. To date the field has been dominated by non-invasive neuroelectrical techniques (EEG, MEG) and structural/functional magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI/fMRI). Despite PET having certain inherent disadvantages, in particular radiation exposure and high costs limiting applicability at large scale, certain research questions in human exercise science can exclusively be addressed with PET: The "metabolic trapping" properties of (18)F-FDG PET as the most commonly used PET-tracer allow examining the neuronal mechanisms underlying various forms of acute exercise in a rather unconstrained manner, i.e. under realistic training scenarios outside the scanner environment. Beyond acute effects, (18)F-FDG PET measurements under resting conditions have a strong prospective for unraveling the influence of regular physical activity on neuronal integrity and potentially neuroprotective mechanisms in vivo, which is of special interest for aging and dementia research. Quantification of cerebral glucose metabolism may allow determining the metabolic effects of exercise interventions in the entire human brain and relating the regional cerebral rate of glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) with behavioral, neuropsychological, and physiological measures. Apart from FDG-PET, particularly interesting applications comprise PET ligand studies that focus on dopaminergic and opioidergic neurotransmission, both key transmitter systems for exercise-related psychophysiological effects, including mood changes, reward processing, antinociception, and in its most extreme form 'exercise dependence'. PET ligand displacement approaches even allow quantifying specific endogenous

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhihao; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yajing; Du, Fenghua; Gan, Hongmei; Qiao, Jinpin; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    group, were successfully prepared. Further biological evaluations are warranted to investigate their potential as PET radioligands for imaging tumor. PMID:21531287

  12. Latest advances in novel cannabinoid CB2 ligands for drug abuse and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-01-01

    The field of cannabinoid (CB) drug research is experiencing a challenge as the CB1 antagonist Rimonabant, launched in 2006 as an anorectic/anti-obesity drug, was withdrawn from the European market due to the complications of suicide and depression as side effects. There is interest in developing CB2 drugs without CB1 psychotropic side effects for drug-abuse treatment and therapeutic medication. The CB1 receptor was discovered predominantly in the brain, whereas the CB2 is mainly expressed in peripheral cells and tissues, and is involved in immune signal transduction. Conversely, the CB2 receptor was recently detected in the CNS, for example, in the microglial cells and the neurons. While the CB2 neurons activity remains controversial, the CB2 receptor is an attractive therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, immune system, cancer and osteoporosis without psychoactivity. This review addresses CB drug abuse and therapeutic potential with a focus on the most recent advances on new CB2 ligands from the literature as well as patents. PMID:22300098

  13. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energies from Explicit and Implicit Solvent Simulations with Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dian; Zhang, Jiajing; Duke, Robert E.; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the binding free energies of a series of benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin with a polarizable force field using both explicit and implicit solvent approaches. Free energy perturbation has been performed for the ligands in bulk water and in protein complex with molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated binding free energies are well within the accuracy of experimental measurement and the direction of change is predicted correctly in call cases. We analyzed the molecular dipole moments of the ligands in gas, water and protein environments. Neither binding affinity nor ligand solvation free energy in bulk water shows much dependence on the molecular dipole moments of the ligands. Substitution of the aromatic or the charged group in the ligand results in considerable change in the solvation energy in bulk water and protein whereas the binding affinity varies insignificantly due to cancellation. The effect of chemical modification on ligand charge distribution is mostly local. Replacing benzene with diazine has minimal impact on the atomic multipoles at the amidinium group. We have also utilized an implicit solvent based end-state approach to evaluate the binding free energies of these inhibitors. In this approach, the polarizable multipole model combined with Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (PMPB/SA) provides the electrostatic interaction energy and the polar solvation free energy. Overall the relative binding free energies obtained from the PMPB/SA model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19399779

  14. Health effects in family pets and 2,3,7,8-TCDD contamination in Missouri: a look at potential animal sentinels

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, R.J.; Stehr-Green, P.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1971, waste oils containing 2,3,7,8:tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) were sprayed in Missouri for dust control. To determine if pets could serve as sentinels of human health risks associated with this contamination, we asked pet owners in a pilot study of exposed human populations about their pets' illnesses. Of 13 pets with owner-reported illnesses, 8 had potential TCDD exposures and 5 did not (p less than .05 by Mantel-Haenzel chi-square analysis stratified by age). Owner-reported illnesses in 2 of 8 illness categories were associated with TCDD contamination after adjusting for age. Although these findings suggest that pets in TCDD-contaminated areas may have greater health risks, the small sample size, unlikely pathologic groupings, and unconfirmed nature of the data fail to support a relationship between pet illnesses and possible TCDD exposure and thus make extrapolation to human populations inappropriate. The limited validity found for owner-reported pet illnesses should caution against using such data in future environmental health studies.

  15. Iodine-122-labeled amphetamine derivative with potential for PET brain blood-flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, C.A.; Sargent, T. 3d.; Shulgin, A.T.

    1985-11-01

    The positron emitter SSI (t1/2 3.6 min) was collected from a xenon- SS/iodine- SS ( SSXe/ SSI) generator and incorporated into an amphetamine analog, 2,4-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl-5-( SSI)iodophenylisopropylamine (5-( SSI)-2,4-DNNA). The remote synthesis was achieved in 3 min with a 50% radioincorporation yield and a product radiopurity of greater than 98%. 5-( SSI)-2,4-DNNA was injected into a beagle dog and a brain section imaged with positron emission tomography (PET). The uptake and retention of 5-( SSI)-2,4-DNNA was compared to that of YSRb in the same animal. Dynamic PET activity data were obtained 0-20 min postinjection of 5-( SSI)-2,4-DNNA and showed rapid uptake by brain and good cerebral/extracerebral tissue distinction. A whole-body scan of a dog was also obtained with 5-123I-2,4-DNNA showing uptake in brain, lung, and other body organs. The feasibility of incorporating SSI into an extracted brain perfusion agent for use with PET is demonstrated.

  16. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  17. Pet health insurances and contract services: the potential for practice involvement.

    PubMed

    King, N; Gripper, J; Hallam, E W; Foster, S L; Walsby, J W; Gunn, S D; Carter, D

    1979-06-01

    Pet medical insurance has appreciable advantages and the existing policies appear to provide a beneficial service. But administrative costs of the small premiums involved make it of doubtful commercial attraction or benefit to the client. However, practice contract service schemes reduce administrative costs and can provide many of the advantages of insurance. Such a scheme is described. A coordinating agency outside the practice to produce promotional material, contracts, formulae for setting premiums and exclusions and to act as an arbitration agency for disputes could be established given the demand. PMID:483538

  18. Paget Disease: A Potential Pitfall in PSMA PET for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blazak, John Kenneth; Thomas, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We present a case of an 81-year-old man with multifocal Paget disease found on bone scan that was performed for incidentally diagnosed prostate cancer. The subsequent Ga-PSMA (HBED-CC) PET scan also displayed increased uptake in the same distribution. Multiple known tumors display increased Ga-PSMA uptake due to neovasculature. We postulate that increased Ga-PSMA uptake within the pagetoid bone relates to neovascularity known to occur in Paget disease. Such pagetic uptake could result in false-positive studies for bone metastases, particularly in the setting of less typical Paget disease. PMID:27405026

  19. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  20. Synthesis, characterisation, spectral, thermal, XRD, molecular modelling and potential antibacterial study of metal complexes containing octadentate azodye ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Bipin Bihari; Chaulia, Satyanarayan; Sarangi, Ashish Kumar; Dehury, Satyanarayan; Panda, Jnyanaranjan

    2015-05-01

    Twelve tetrametallic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) with two new octadentate azodye ligands, 4,4‧-bis(2‧,4‧-dihydroxy-5‧carboxyphenylazo) diphenylether (LH6) and 4,4‧-bis(2‧,4‧-dihydroxy-5‧-acylphenylazo) diphenylether (L‧H4) have been synthesised. The structural elucidation of the complexes was made basing upon analytical, conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, NMR, ESI-MS, TG, DTG, DTA and X-ray diffraction (powder pattern) data. The cobalt (II) and nickel (II) complexes are found to be octahedral, copper (II) complexes are distorted octahedral and a tetrahedral stereochemistry has been suggested to zinc (II), cadmium (II) and mercury (II) complexes. The thermal analysis data provided the kinetic parameters as order of decomposition reaction, activation energy and frequency factor. The geometry of the ligands and their Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were optimised and their physicochemical properties were calculated by using molecular modelling procedure. The ESI-MS determination supports the molecular formula and molecular weight of the ligands and the complexes. The Ni(II) complex is found to have a triclinic crystal system. The potential antibacterial study of the two ligands and eight metal complexes was made by cup-plate method against one gram positive and one gram negative bacteria. The results showed increase in the activity of some metal complexes as compare with azodye ligands.

  1. Herbo-mineral based Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic potential and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Abdul; Laxmi; Arshad, Mohammad; Nami, Shahab A A; Nishat, Nahid

    2016-07-01

    Schiff base ligand, (L), derived from condensation reaction of 1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, (curcumin), with pyridine-3-carboxamide, (nicotinamide), and its complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions, containing 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand were synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From the micro analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes 1:1 (metal: ligand) was ascertained. The Co(II) and Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes, while the geometric structure around Ni(II) atom can be described as square planar. The catalytic potential of the metal complexes have been evaluated by recording the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the percent decomposition of H2O2increases with time and the highest value (50.50%) was recorded for Co(II) complex. The ligand and its complexes were also screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The relative order of antibacterial activity against S. Pyogenes, S. aureus and E. coli is Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II)>(L); while with P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae the order of activity is Cu(II)>Co(II)>Ni(II)>(L). The anthelmintic screening was performed using Pheretima posthuma. The order of anthelmintic activity of ligand and its complexes is [(Phen)CuLCl2]>[(Phen)CoLCl2]>[(Phen)NiL]Cl2>(L). PMID:27107703

  2. Potential impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on surgical approach for operable squamous cell cancer of middle-to-lower esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sujing; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wanghu; Zhang, Baijiang; Ma, Li; Guo, Zhijun; Huang, Yong; Song, Pingping; Yu, Jinming; Guo, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is reported to have a significant advantage over CT for staging esophageal cancer (EC). However, whether PET/CT may play a useful role in guiding surgical approach remains undetermined. Methods Patients with potentially resectable squamous cell EC were randomized into either PET/CT group or CT group. The surgical data and survival outcomes were compared. Results Compared to the CT group, the right-sided approach was more frequently used (42.6% versus 25.5%, P=0.065) in the PET/CT group in order to allow surgical access to radiographically suspicious lymph nodes inaccessible from the left, thus enabling the removal of more involved lymph nodes (2.83 versus 1.76; P=0.039) as well as their stations (1.65 versus 1.08; P=0.042). Although the overall survival between the two groups was similar, the PET/CT group had a longer disease-free survival (DFS) than the CT group (27.1 months versus 18.9 months; P=0.019), especially in the subgroup of node-positive patients (22.5 months versus 13.5 months; P=0.02). Preoperative imaging arm was the only prognostic factor found to independently influence DFS. Conclusion For patients with middle-to-lower EC, surgical approaches directed by PET/CT may increase the likelihood of complete resection and affect DFS. PMID:26955283

  3. Synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled rhodamine B: A potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tobias K.; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Snay, Erin; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing an 18F-labeled PET myocardial perfusion agent. Rhodamine dyes share several properties with 99mTc-MIBI, the most commonly used single-photon myocardial perfusion agent, suggesting that an 18F-labeled rhodamine dye might prove useful for this application. In addition to being lipophilic cations, like 99mTc-MIBI, rhodamine dyes are known to accumulate in the myocardium and are substrates for Pgp, the protein implicated in MDR1 multidrug resistance. As the first step in determining whether 18F-labeled rhodamines might be useful as myocardial perfusion agents for PET, our objective was to develop synthetic methods for preparing the 18F-labeled compounds so that they could be evaluated in vivo. Rhodamine B was chosen as the prototype compound for development of the synthesis because the ethyl substituents on the amine moieties of rhodamine B protect them from side reactions, thus eliminating the need to include (and subsequently remove) protecting groups. The 2′-[18F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B was synthesized by heating rhodamine B lactone with [18F]fluoroethyltosylate in acetonitrile at 165°C for 30 min.using [18F]fluoroethyl tosylate, which was prepared by the reaction of ethyleneglycol ditosylate with Kryptofix 2.2.2, K2CO3, and [18F]NaF in acetonitrile for 10 min. at 90°C. The product was purified by semi-preparative HPLC to produce the 2′-[18F]-fluoroethylester in >97% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 1.3 GBq/μmol, an isolated decay corrected yield of 35%, and a total synthesis time of 90 min. PMID:19783150

  4. Vanadium Complexes with Hydrazone or Thiosemicarbazone Ligands as Potential Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Agents.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula C; Maia, Pedro I S; de Barros, Heloisa B; Leite, Clarice Q F; Deflon, Victor M; Pavan, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and still an important public health problem worldwide. Some factors like the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains make urgent the research of new active compounds. Searching for new inorganic compounds against TB, three new dioxovanadium(V) complexes were obtained upon reaction of [VO(acac)2] with hydrazone and thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from di-2-pyridyl ketone. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetrically oxo bridged binuclear complexes of the type [{VO(L(1,2))}2(μ-O)2], involving the hydrazone ligands, while a mononuclear square pyramidal complex of the type [VO2(L(3))] was formed with the thiosemicarbazone ligand. The compounds were tested against M. tuberculosis and three of them, with MICs values between 2.00 and 3.76 μM were considered promising for TB treatment. Such MIC values are comparable or better than those found for some drugs currently used in TB treatment. PMID:24433444

  5. [11C]PR04.MZ, a promising DAT ligand for low concentration imaging: synthesis, efficient 11C-0-methylation and initial small animal PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.; Alexoff, D.; Kim, Sung-Won; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2009-05-01

    PR04.MZ was designed as a highly selective dopamine transporter inhibitor, derived from natural cocaine. Its binding profile indicates that [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ may be suited as a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of striatal and extrastriatal DAT populations. As a key feature, its structural design facilitates both, labelling with fluorine-18 at its terminally fluorinated butynyl moiety and carbon-11 at its methyl ester function. The present report concerns the efficient [{sup 11}C]MeI mediated synthesis of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ from an O-desmethyl precursor trifluoroacetic acid salt with Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in DMF in up to 95 {+-} 5% labelling yield. A preliminary {mu}PET-experiment demonstrates the reversible, highly specific binding of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ in the brain of a male Sprague-Dawley rat.

  6. Potential clinical relevance of Eph receptors and ephrin ligands expressed in prostate carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brian P; Tabone, Christopher J; Kandpal, Raj P

    2006-04-21

    The family of Eph and ephrin receptors is involved in a variety of functions in normal cells, and the alterations in their expression profiles have been observed in several cancers. We have compared the transcripts for Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in cell lines established from normal prostate epithelium and several carcinoma cell lines isolated from prostate tumors of varying degree of metastasis. These cell lines included NPTX, CTPX, LNCaP, DU145, PC-3, and PC-3ML. The cell lines displayed characteristic pattern of expression for specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands, thus allowing identification of Eph receptor signatures for a particular cell line. The sensitivity of these transcripts to genome methylation is also investigated by treating the cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The comparison of expression profiles revealed that normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cell lines differ in the expression of EphA3, EphB3, and ephrin A3 that are over-expressed in normal prostate. Furthermore, the transcript levels for EphA1 decrease progressively from normal prostate to primary prostate tumor cell line and metastatic tumor cells. A converse relationship was observed for ephrin B2. The treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine revealed the sensitivity of EphA3, EphA10, EphB3, and EphB6 to methylation status of genomic DNA. The utility of methylation specific PCR to identify prostate tumor cells and the importance of specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in initiation and progression of prostate tumor are discussed. PMID:16516143

  7. Recent developments in adenosine receptor ligands and their potential as novel drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christa E.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal chemical approaches have been applied to all four of the adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) to create selective agonists and antagonists for each. The most recent class of selective AR ligands to be reported is the class of A2BAR agonists. The availability of these selective ligands has facilitated research on therapeutic applications of modulating the ARs and in some cases has provided clinical candidates. Prodrug approaches have been developed which improve the bioavailability of the drugs, reduce side-effects, and/or may lead to site-selective effects. The A2A agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan®), a diagnostic drug for myocardial perfusion imaging, is the first selective AR agonist to be approved. Other selective agonists and antagonists are or were undergoing clinical trials for a broad range of indications, including capadenoson and tecadenoson (A1 agonists) for atrial fibrillation, or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, respectively, apadenoson and binodenoson (A2A agonists) for myocardial perfusion imaging, preladenant (A2A antagonist) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and CF101 and CF102 (A3 agonists) for inflammatory diseases and cancer, respectively. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: “Adenosine Receptors”. PMID:21185259

  8. Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: chemical analysis and potential toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bach, Cristina; Dauchy, Xavier; Severin, Isabelle; Munoz, Jean-François; Etienne, Serge; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of temperature on the release of PET-bottle constituents into water and to assess the potential health hazard using in vitro bioassays with bacteria and human cell lines. Aldehydes, trace metals and other compounds found in plastic packaging were analysed in PET-bottled water stored at different temperatures: 40, 50, and 60°C. In this study, temperature and the presence of CO2 increased the release of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and antimony (Sb). In parallel, genotoxicity assays (Ames and micronucleus assays) and transcriptional-reporter gene assays for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity were performed on bottled water extracts at relevant consumer exposure levels. As expected, and in accordance with the chemical formulations specified for PET bottles, neither phthalates nor UV stabilisers were present in the water extracts. However, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, a degradation compound of phenolic antioxidants, was detected. In addition, an intermediary monomer, bis(2-hydroxyethyl)terephthalate, was found but only in PET-bottled waters. None of the compounds are on the positive list of EU Regulation No. 10/2011. However, the PET-bottled water extracts did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or endocrine-disruption activity in the bioassays after exposure. PMID:23561160

  9. Professor Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pet Information Bureau, New York, NY.

    This manual outlines ways in which observation and care of classroom pet animals may be used to enrich the education of elementary school children. Part one deals with the benefits of having pets in the classroom. Part two illustrates ways in which pets can serve as valuable teaching tools and gives examples of lessons in which the use of pets can…

  10. Potential role of pet animals in household transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-06-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals. PMID:21142959

  11. Potential Role of Pet Animals in Household Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals. PMID:21142959

  12. Potential for pet animals to harbor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) when residing with human MRSA patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel O.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Leckerman, Kateri; Edelstein, Paul H.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may be persistent in people, and is horizontally transmissible. The scientific literature suggests that domestic pets may also participate in cross-transmission of MRSA within households. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA carriage by pets residing in households with an MRSA-infected person. From 66 households in which an MRSA infected patient resided, we screened 47 dogs and 52 cats using a swab protocol. Isolates from pets and humans were genotyped using two techniques, and compared for concordance. Human participants completed a 22-question survey of demographic and epidemiologic data relevant to staphylococcal transmission. Eleven of 99 pets (11.5%) representing 9 (13.6%) of households were MRSA-positive, but in only 6 of these households were the human and animal-source strains genetically concordant. Human infection by strain USA 100 was significantly associated with pet carriage [OR = 11.4 (95% C.I. 1.7, 76.9); p=0.013]. Yet, for each day of delay in sampling the pet after the person’s MRSA diagnosis, the odds of isolating any type of MRSA from the pet decreased by 13.9% [(95% C.I. 2.6%, 23.8%); p=0.017)]. It may be concluded that pets can harbor pandemic strains of MRSA while residing in a household with an infected person. However, the source of MRSA to the pet cannot always be attributed to the human patient. Moreover, the rapid attrition of the odds of obtaining a positive culture from pets over time suggests that MRSA carriage may be fleeting. PMID:22233337

  13. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance. PMID:26103621

  14. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-06-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance.

  15. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin injections for melanoma immunotherapy: potential for a false-positive PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Sogge, Steven M; Fotos, Joseph S; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2015-04-01

    An 82-year-old woman presented for routine follow-up PET/CT after undergoing local melanoma resection in the left lower leg, isolated limb infusion chemotherapy, and immunomodulation therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Symmetric, bilateral, moderately intense FDG avid axillary and inguinal cutaneous nodules were observed that were new from the prior PET-CT. The patient had developed skin lesions at the BCG injection sites several months before the study. The case raises awareness to PET/CT appearance of local inflammatory response to BCG injection, which could be mistaken by an unaware reader for recurrent melanoma. PMID:25674877

  16. Household Hazards to Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... health by becoming aware of the most common health hazards found in many pet-owning households. Hazards in the Kitchen Foods Many foods are perfectly safe for humans, but could be harmful or potentially deadly to ...

  17. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each ... Does anyone have pet allergies? What type of animal suits your lifestyle and budget? Once you own ...

  18. A 3-D QSAR-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  19. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: Single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, C.J.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.; Mintun, M.A.; Lich, L.L.; McGuire, A.H.; Zinn, K.R.; John, E.K.; Green, M.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that (62Cu)-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of novel tropane derivatives as potential PET imaging agents for the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hongwen; Zhu, Lin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zha, Zhihao; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of tropane derivatives containing a fluorinated tertiary amino or amide at the 2β position was synthesized, labeled with the positron-emitter fluorine-18 (T1/2 = 109.8 min), and tested as potential in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging agents. The corresponding chlorinated analogs were prepared and employed as precursors for radiolabeling leading to the fluorine-18-labeled derivatives via a one-step nucleophilic aliphatic substitution reaction. In vitro binding results showed that the 2β-amino compounds 6b, 6d and 7b displayed moderately high affinities to DAT (Ki < 10 nM). Biodistribution studies of [18F]6b and [18F]6d showed that the brain uptakes in rats were low. This is likely due to their low lipophilicities. Further structural modifications of these tropane derivatives will be needed to improve their in vivo properties as DAT imaging agents. PMID:22658558

  1. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M; O'Connell, J; O'Sullivan, G; Roche, D; Brady, C; Kelly, J; Collins, J; Shanahan, F

    1999-01-01

    Background—Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. 
Aim—To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. 
Specimens—Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. 
Methods—FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). 
Results—Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. 
Conclusions—Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer. 

 Keywords: Fas ligand; gastric cancer; immune escape; apoptosis; tumour; mRNA PMID:9895372

  2. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  3. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  4. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  5. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  6. Radiolabeled heterobivalent peptidic ligands: an approach with high future potential for in vivo imaging and therapy of malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gabriel; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Two-pronged synergism: We review the recently developed approach of using heterobivalent peptide ligands that interact concomitantly with different receptors on tumor cells. These ligands exhibit highly favorable tumor-targeting properties and pave the way for the development of drugs for specific, sensitive, and noninvasive tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23564566

  7. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor 4 expression in small cell lung cancer - initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Rudelius, Martina; Schmid, Jan-Stefan; Schoene, Alexander; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Pelzer, Theo; Buck, Andreas K.; Kropf, Saskia; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer. This study investigated the feasibility of CXCR4-directed imaging of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine ligand [68Ga]Pentixafor. 10 patients with primarily diagnosed (n=3) or pre-treated (n=7) SCLC (n=9) or large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung (LCNEC, n=1) underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT. 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG, n=6) and/or somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-directed PET/CT with [68Ga]DOTATOC (n=5) and immunohistochemistry (n=10) served as standards of reference. CXCR4-PET was positive in 8/10 patients and revealed more lesions with significantly higher tumor-to-background ratios than SSTR-PET. Two patients who were positive on [18F]FDG-PET were missed by CXCR4-PET, in the remainder [68Ga]Pentixafor detected an equal (n=2) or higher (n=2) number of lesions. CXCR4 expression of tumor lesions could be confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Non-invasive imaging of CXCR4 expression in SCLC is feasible. [68Ga]Pentixafor as a novel PET tracer might serve as readout for confirmation of CXCR4 expression as prerequisite for potential CXCR4-directed treatment including receptor-radio(drug)peptide therapy. PMID:26843617

  8. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    reinnervation, and understand the pathogenesis of arrhytmias. The other uncommon applications of cardiac PET include NaF imaging to identify calcium deposition in atherosclerotic plaques and β-amyloid imaging to diagnose cardiac amyloid involvement. 18F-FDG imaging with a novel PET/MR camera has been reported to be very sensitive and specific for the differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cardiac masses. The other potential applications of PET/MR are cardiac infectious/inflammatory conditions such as endocarditis. PMID:26035516

  9. A COMPUTATIONALLY-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS, PART II. AN EVALUATION OF A HUMAN RECEPTOR-BASED MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of an expert system described in the previous paper (Bradbury et al., 2000; Toxicol. Sci.) to identify the potential for chemicals to act as ligands of mammalian estrogen receptors (ERs). The basis of that algorithm was a...

  10. The ADNI PET Core

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Foster, Norman L.; Landau, Susan M.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Koeppe, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This is a progress report of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) PET Core. Methods The Core has supervised the acquisition, quality control, and analysis of longitudinal [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) data in approximately half of the ADNI cohort. In an “add on” study, approximately 100 subjects also underwent scanning with [11C]PIB-PET for amyloid imaging. The Core developed quality control procedures and standardized image acquisition by developing an imaging protocol that has been widely adopted in academic and pharmaceutical industry studies. Data processing provides users with scans that have identical orientation and resolution characteristics despite acquisition on multiple scanner models. The Core labs have used a number of different approaches to characterize differences between subject groups (AD, MCI, controls), to examine longitudinal change over time in glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition, and to assess the use of FDG-PET as a potential outcome measure in clinical trials. Results ADNI data indicate that FDG-PET increases statistical power over traditional cognitive measures, might aid subject selection, and could substantially reduce the sample size in a clinical trial. PIB-PET data showed expected group differences, and identified subjects with significant annual increases in amyloid load across the subject groups. The next activities of the PET core in ADNI will entail developing standardized protocols for amyloid imaging using the [18F]-labeled amyloid imaging agent AV45, which can be delivered to virtually all ADNI sites. Conclusions ADNI has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of multicenter PET studies and is helping to clarify the role of biomarkers in the study of aging and dementia. PMID:20451870

  11. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Aminoalkylindole Derivatives as Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands with Potential for Treatment of Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Vasiljevik, Tamara; Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Douglas, Justin T.; Prather, Paul L.; Fantegrossi, William E.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation of increased endocannabinoid signaling with a CB1R neutral antagonist might offer a new therapeutic direction for treatment of alcohol abuse. We have recently reported that a mono-hydroxylated metabolite of the synthetic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid JHW-073 (3) exhibits neutral antagonist activity at CB1Rs and thus may serve as a promising lead for the development of novel alcohol abuse therapies. In the current study, we show that systematic modification of an aminoalkylindole scaffold identified two new compounds with dual CB1R antagonist/CB2R agonist activity. Similar to the CB1R antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, analogues 27 and 30 decrease oral alcohol self-administration, without affecting total fluid intake and block the development of alcohol-conditioned place preference. Collectively, these initial findings suggest that design and systematic modification of aminoalkylindoles such as 3 may lead to development of novel cannabinoid ligands with dual CB1R antagonist/CB2R agonist activity with potential for use as treatments of alcohol abuse. PMID:23631463

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of (S)-[(18)F]fesetron in the rat brain as a potential PET imaging agent for serotonin 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pithia, Neema K; Liang, Christopher; Pan, Xiang-Zuo; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2016-04-15

    Serotonin 5-HT3 receptors are involved in various brain functions including as an emesis target during cancer chemotherapy. We report here the development of (S)-2,3-dimethoxy-5-(3'-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)benzamide ([(18)F]fesetron) as a potential PET imaging agent for serotonin 5-HT3 receptors. By radiolabeling((S)-2,3-dimethoxy-5-(3'-tosyloxypropyl)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)benzamide) with fluorine-18, (S)-[(18)F]fesetron was obtained in 5 to 10% decay-corrected yields and with specific activities >74GBq/μmol at the end of radiosynthesis. PET imaging in rats showed low uptake of [(18)F]fesetron in the brain with retention of binding in the striatal and cerebellar regions. Using colliculi as a reference region, ratios were 3.4 for striata and 2.5 for cerebellum. Ex vivo brain PET analysis displayed binding of [(18)F]fesetron in the hippocampus, striatum and cerebellar regions. Cerebellar regions corresponded to area postrema and nucleus tract solitaris known to contain 5-HT3 receptors. Dorsal hippocampus showed the highest uptake with ratio of >17 with respect to colliculi, while area postrema and striata had ratios of >10. Thus, [(18)F]fesetron exhibited a unique binding profile to rat brain regions known to contain significant amounts of serotonin 5-HT3 receptors. However, the very low brain uptake limits its usefulness as a PET radiotracer in this animal model. PMID:26979158

  13. SU-D-9A-01: Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Hristov, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of listmode-driven amplitude based optimal gating (OG) respiratory motion management technique on quantitative PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion signal that is directly coupled with a specific internal organ. A radioactivity-trace was generated from listmode data by accumulating all prompt counts in temporal bins matching the sampling rate of the external tracking device. Decay correction for 18F was performed. The image reconstructions using OG respiratory motion management technique that uses 35% of total radioactivity counts within limited motion amplitudes were performed with external motion and radioactivity traces separately with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with 2 iterations and 21 subsets. Standard uptake values (SUVs) in a tumor region were calculated to measure the effect of using radioactivity trace for motion compensation. Motion-blurred 3D static PET image was also reconstructed with all counts and the SUVs derived from OG images were compared with SUVs from 3D images. Results: A 5.7 % increase of the maximum SUV in the lesion was found for optimal gating image reconstruction with radioactivity trace when compared to a static 3D image. The mean and maximum SUVs on the image that was reconstructed with radioactivity trace were found comparable (0.4 % and 4.5 % increase, respectively) to the values derived from the image that was reconstructed with external trace. Conclusion: The image reconstructed using radioactivity trace showed that the blurring due to the motion was reduced with impact on derived SUVs. The resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with radioactivity trace were comparable to the resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with external respiratory traces. Research supported by Siemens.

  14. System with potential dual modes of metal-ligand cooperation: highly catalytically active pyridine-based PNNH-Ru pincer complexes.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Eran; Garg, Jai Anand; Hu, Peng; Leitus, Gregory; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2014-11-24

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) plays an important role in catalysis. Systems reported so far are generally based on a single mode of MLC. We report here a system with potential for MLC by both amine-amide and aromatization-dearomatization ligand transformations, based on a new class of phosphino-pyridyl ruthenium pincer complexes, bearing sec-amine coordination. These pincer complexes are effective catalysts under unprecedented mild conditions for acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters at 35 °C and hydrogenation of esters at room temperature and 5 atm H2. The likely actual catalyst, a novel, crystallographically characterized monoanionic de-aromatized enamido-Ru(II) complex, was obtained by deprotonation of both the N-H and the methylene proton of the N-arm of the pincer ligand. PMID:25331061

  15. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL): a potential candidate for combined treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Vaccarezza, Mauro; Gonelli, Arianna; Zauli, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF gene superfamily, which induces apoptosis through engagement of death receptors. TRAIL is unusual as compared to the other cytokines of this family, as it interacts with a complex system of receptors consisting of two pro-apoptotic death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2) and three decoy receptors (TRAIL-R3, TRAIL-R4 and osteoprotegerin). Moreover, with respect to other members of the TNF superfamily, such as CD95L and TNF-alpha, TRAIL has generated great interest as a potential tumor-specific cancer therapeutic because as a stable soluble trimer it selectively induces apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Of note, TRAIL cytotoxicity is at least partially independent of the major systems involved in resistance to chemotherapy, such as p53 wild-type function and multidrug resistance (MDR) genes. Since one fundamental problem of most cancers is the development of multiple mechanisms of resistance, which progressively reduce or suppress the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapy, new therapeutic approaches that either restore the pro-apoptotic activity of chemotherapeutic drugs or by-pass the mechanisms of resistance are highly desirable. This review will focus on the potential of TRAIL for its application in the therapy of hematological malignancies, used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The scenario emerging from the literature is that the treatment and management of hematological malignancies will require the rational combination of TRAIL plus conventional or new drugs in a regimen that would optimize the anti-neoplastic activity in malignant cells resistant to chemotherapy through restoration of the pro-apoptotic activity of TRAIL. PMID:15579063

  16. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  17. Radiosynthesis of Carbon-11 Labeled Puromycin as a Potential PET Candidate for Imaging Protein Synthesis in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Aigbirhio, Franklin I

    2016-06-01

    In order to address the limitations associated with the present range of PET radiotracers used for imaging protein synthesis in vivo we have synthesized a candidate PET radiotracer based on Puromycin (3, PURO), a protein synthesis inhibitor. The desmethylPURO 9 precursor for radiolabeling with carbon-11 radioisotope was synthesized in two steps employing EDC/HOBt amide coupling in overall 76% yield. Optimal conditions for radiolabeling were then established via methylation/deprotection sequence. Under these conditions as determined by NMR analysis 9 showed partial stability (ca. 80%) under acidic conditions. Limited evidence of stereochemical stability of 3 was also found. The radiolabeling of intermediate [(11)C]12 was accomplished with up to 57% conversion from [(11)C]iodomethane. An automated method was then developed for high radioactivity radiosynthesis to produce [(11)C]3 ([(11)C]PURO) in 16 ± 6% (n = 3) decay corrected radiochemical yields. PMID:27326342

  18. Determination of ζ-potential, charge, and number of organic ligands on the surface of water soluble quantum dots by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Voráčová, Ivona; Klepárník, Karel; Lišková, Marcela; Foret, František

    2015-03-01

    The number of charges and/or organic ligands covalently attached to the surface of CdTe quantum dot nanoparticles has been determined from their electrophoretic mobilities measured in capillaries filled with free electrolyte buffers. Three sizes of water soluble CdTe quantum dots with 3-mercaptopropionic and thioglycolic acids as surface ligands were prepared. Their electrophoretic mobilities in different pH and ionic strength values of separation buffers were measured by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection. The ζ-potentials determined from electrophoretic mobilities using analytical solution of Henry function proposed by Ohshima were in the range from -30 to -100 mV. Charges of QDs were calculated from ζ-potentials. As a result, numbers of organic ligands bonded to QDs surface were determined to be 13, 14, and 15 for the sizes of 3.1, 3.5, and 3.9 nm, respectively. The dissociation constants of organic ligands bonded on QDs surfaces estimated from the dependence of QDs charge on pH of the separation buffer were 7.8 and 7.9 for 3-mercaptopropionic acid and 6.9 for thioglycolic acid. PMID:25521532

  19. Syntheses of 2-amino and 2-halothiazole derivatives as high-affinity metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 ligands and potential radioligands for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T; Pike, Victor W

    2011-02-10

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu(5) ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu(5) ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed subnanomolar mGlu(5) affinity. 10b also displayed >10000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [(18)F]fluoride ion (t(1/2) = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu(5) with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu(5) and may also serve as a lead to a potential (123)I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu(5) with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  20. Syntheses of 2-Amino and 2-Halothiazole Derivatives as High-Affinity Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Ligands and Potential Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T.; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu5 ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu5 ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed sub-nanomolar mGlu5 affinity. 10b also displayed >10,000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [18F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu5 with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu5 and may also serve as a lead to a potential 123I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu5 with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  1. Reproducibility of quantitative measures of binding potential in rat striatum: A test re-test study using DTBZ dynamic PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Avendaño-Estrada, A. Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila- Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    There is great interest in the study of dopamine (DA) pathways due to the increasing number of patients with illnesses related to the dopaminergic system and molecular imaging based in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been proven helpful for this task. Among the different radiopharmaceuticals available to study DA interaction, [{sup 11}C]Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has a high affinity for the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) and its binding potential (BP) is a marker of DA terminal integrity. This paper reports on the intersubject reproducibility of BP measurements in rat striatum with [11C]DTBZ using the Logańs method.

  2. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration. PMID:25006757

  3. Development of PET and SPECT Probes for Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    l-Glutamate and its receptors (GluRs) play a key role in excitatory neurotransmission within the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Impaired regulation of GluRs has also been implicated in various neurological disorders. GluRs are classified into two major groups: ionotropic GluRs (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels, and metabotropic GluRs (mGluRs), which are coupled to heterotrimeric guanosine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of GluRs could provide a novel view of CNS function and of a range of brain disorders, potentially leading to the development of new drug therapies. Although no satisfactory imaging agents have yet been developed for iGluRs, several PET ligands for mGluRs have been successfully employed in clinical studies. This paper reviews current progress towards the development of PET and SPECT probes for GluRs. PMID:25874256

  4. Tuning redox potentials of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt complexes: an experimental and theoretical study involving solvent and ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Moyses Araujo, C.; Doherty, Mark D.; Konezny, Steven J.; Luca, Oana R.; Usyatinsky, Alex; Grade, Hans; Lobkovsky, Emil; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Batista, Victor S.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and electrochemical properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine CoII complexes (NNN)CoX₂ and [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ (NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(4-R-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine, with R = CN, CF₃, H, CH₃, OCH₃, N(CH₃)₂; NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(2,6-(iPr)₂-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine and X = Cl, Br) were studied using a combination of electrochemical and theoretical methods. Cyclic voltammetry measurements and DFT/B3LYP calculations suggest that in solution (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes exist in equilibrium with disproportionation products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ [CoCl₄]²⁻ with the position of the equilibrium heavily influenced by both the solvent polarity and the steric and electronic properties of the bis(imino)pyridine ligands. In strong polar solvents (e.g., CH₃CN or H₂O) or with electron donating substituents (R = OCH₃ or N(CH₃)₂) the equilibrium is shifted and only oxidation of the charged products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ and [CoCl₄]²⁻ is observed. Conversely, in nonpolar organic solvents such as CH₂Cl₂ or with electron withdrawing substituents (R = CN or CF₃), disproportionation is suppressed and oxidation of the (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes leads to 18e⁻ CoIII complexes stabilized by coordination of a solvent moiety. In addition, the [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ complexes exhibit reversible CoII/III oxidation potentials that are strongly dependent on the electron withdrawing/donating nature of the N-aryl substituents, spanning nearly 750 mV in acetonitrile. The resulting insight on the regulation of redox properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt(II) complexes should be particularly valuable to tune suitable conditions for reactivity.

  5. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. Experimental Approach We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. Key Results ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6/5-HT7/5-HT2A/D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg−1 i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg−1 ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Conclusions and Implications ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. PMID:24199650

  6. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  7. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPARγ) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding

  8. The significance and therapeutic potential of PD-1 and its ligands in ovarian cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinxin; Lang, Jinghe

    2016-07-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the mainstay of malignant cancer treatments. However, with the development of immunology, the emerging immunotherapy represents a rational and alternative approach for the treatment of human cancer, including ovarian cancer (OC). Based on a body of evidence and the clinical success of immunotherapy in many malignancies, it is confirmed that blocking the programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands in OC is feasible and valid both in animal models and patients. Immunotherapy may play a significant role in the future clinical management and improve the prognosis of OC. This review will focus on the biological functions, treatment response, toxicity and viable target of PD-1 and its ligands in OC. Recognition of the multiple functions of PD-1 and its ligands in ovarian cancer will serve to deepen our understanding of the nature of OC, develop novel immunotherapy approaches and discover possible diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in future clinical decisions. PMID:27063803

  9. Potential performance of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT compared with single-time-point imaging for differential diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Deng, Houfu; Hu, Shuang; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, dual-time-point (DTP) fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a new method for evaluating metastatic lymph nodes in cancer patients. We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the performance of DTP PET/CT compared with single-time-point (STP) imaging for differential diagnosis of lymph nodes metastases. On the basis of data from included studies, pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were calculated. Summary receiver-operating characteristic curves were also constructed to assess the diagnostic value of DTP PET/CT and STP imaging in detecting metastatic lymph nodes. Totally, 17 articles were included in the analysis. On a per-patient basis, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.79] and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.72-0.81) for DTP PET/CT and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0.73) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85) for STP PET/CT, respectively. On a per-lesion basis, the pooled sensitivity of DTP and STP PET/CT was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.79-0.84) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.78-0.83), respectively. The pooled specificity was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.86-0.89) for DTP PET/CT and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.80-0.84) for STP PET/CT. Compared with STP imaging, DTP PET/CT has higher sensitivity but lower specificity in detecting lymph nodes metastases on a per-patient analysis, and DTP PET/CT performs only a little better than STP PET/CT on a per-lesion basis. The current results of our meta-analysis do not support the routine use of DTP imaging for the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes. Further prospective research with large samples is required to better define the potential benefits of DTP PET/CT imaging. PMID:25023998

  10. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015: ...

  11. Imatinib Analogs as Potential Agents for PET Imaging of Bcr-Abl/c-KIT Expression at a Kinase Level

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David S.; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Pal, Ashutosh; Wang, Shimei; Balatoni, Julius; Ghosh, Pradip; Lim, Seok T.; Volgin, Andrei; Shavrin, Aleksander; Alauddin, Mian M.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Bornmann, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized two series of imatinib mesylate (STI-571) analogs to develop a Bcr-Abl and c-KIT receptor-specific labeling agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure Bcr-Abl and c-KIT expression levels in a mouse model. The methods of molecular modeling, synthesis of STI-571 and its analogs, in vitro kinase assays, and radiolabeling are described. Molecular modeling revealed that these analogs bind the same Bcr-Abl and c-KIT binding sites as those bound by STI-571. The analogs potently inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl and c-KIT, similarly to STI-571. [18F]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high specific activity (75 GBq/μmol) by nucleophilic displacement and an average radiochemical yield of 12%. [131I]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high purity (>95%) and an average radiochemical yield of 23%. The uptake rates of [18F]-STI-571 in K562 cells expressing Abl and in U87WT cells overexpressing c-KIT were significantly higher than those in the U87 cell and could be inhibited by STI-71 (confirming the specificity of uptake). PET scans of K562 and U87WT tumor-bearing mice with [18F]-STI-571 as a contrast agent showed visible tumor uptake and tumor-to-non-target contrast. PMID:24280068

  12. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  13. Evaluation of carbon-11-labeled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-[4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl]nortropane as a potential radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporter by PET.

    PubMed

    Plisson, Christophe; Jarkas, Nachwa; McConathy, Jon; Voll, Ronald J; Votaw, John; Williams, Larry; Howell, Leonard L; Kilts, Clinton D; Goodman, Mark M

    2006-02-01

    The nortropane cocaine analogue, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-[4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl]nortropane (ZIENT), is a high affinity, selective serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand that has shown promise as a SERT imaging agent for single photon computed tomography (SPECT) when labeled with I-123. Synthesis of the labeling precursor, radiosynthesis of [(11)C]ZIENT, and in vivo evaluation in anesthetized and awake monkeys have been performed to determine the suitability of [(11)C]ZIENT as a PET agent for SERT imaging. PMID:16451060

  14. Uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s Disease of Bone, an Important Potential Pitfall in Clinical Interpretation of PSMA PET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Deville, Curtiland; Paller, Channing; Cho, Steve Y.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Pomper, Martin G.; Ross, Ashley E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging is an emerging technique for evaluating patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in a variety of clinical contexts. As with any new imaging modality, there are interpretive pitfalls that are beginning to be recognized. In this image report, we describe the findings in a 63-year-old male with biochemically recurrent PCa after radical prostatectomy who was imaged with 18F-DCFPyL, a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA. Diffuse radiotracer uptake was noted throughout the sacrum, corresponding to imaging findings on contrast-enhanced CT, bone scan, and pelvic MRI consistent with Paget’s disease of bone. The uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s disease is most likely due to hyperemia and increased radiotracer delivery. In light of the overlap in patients affected by PCa and Paget’s, it is important for nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists interpreting PSMA PET/CT scans to be aware of the potential for this diagnostic pitfall. Correlation to findings on conventional imaging such as diagnostic CT and bone scan can help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26807444

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Ligands Binding and Molecular Simulation: the Potential Investigation of a Biosensor Based on an Insect Odorant Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  18. Ligands binding and molecular simulation: the potential investigation of a biosensor based on an insect odorant binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  19. Competitive Advantage of PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  20. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. PMID:23791129

  1. Quantification of the Serotonin 1A Receptor Using PET: Identification of a Potential Biomarker of Major Depression in Males.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Joshua; Sullivan, Gregory M; Yang, Jie; Ogden, R Todd; Miller, Jeffrey M; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V; DeLorenzo, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Multiple lines of research have implicated the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor in major depressive disorder (MDD). Despite this, quantification of 5-HT1A is yet to yield a clinically relevant MDD biomarker. One reason may be that reported sex differences in the serotonergic system confound the comparison between diagnostic groups. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether differences in 5-HT1A binding between depressed and control subjects are affected by sex. Using positron emission tomography (PET), serotonin 1A binding was quantified in 50 patients with MDD (34 female, 16 male) and 57 healthy controls (32 female, 25 male). The subjects' 5-HT1A density (BPF, equal to the product of the density of available receptors and tracer affinity), was determined by using the PET tracer [carbonyl-C-11]-WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A antagonist. Results indicated that male MDD subjects had a 67.0% higher BPF across 13 brain regions compared with male controls (df=103, p<0.0001). The greatest difference between MDD subjects and controls was in the raphe (132%, p=0.000). Furthermore, by using a threshold, male controls can be distinguished from depressed males with high sensitivity and specificity (both >80%). In females, the separation between diagnostic groups yields much lower sensitivity and specificity. This data therefore suggests a specific biosignature for MDD in males. Identification of such a biosignature could provide a deeper understanding of depression pathology, help identify those at highest risk, and aid in the development of new therapies. Further, these findings suggest that combining male and female cohorts may not be optimal for some MDD studies. PMID:25578798

  2. Quantification of the Serotonin 1A Receptor Using PET: Identification of a Potential Biomarker of Major Depression in Males

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Joshua; Sullivan, Gregory M; Yang, Jie; Ogden, R Todd; Miller, Jeffrey M; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V; DeLorenzo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of research have implicated the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor in major depressive disorder (MDD). Despite this, quantification of 5-HT1A is yet to yield a clinically relevant MDD biomarker. One reason may be that reported sex differences in the serotonergic system confound the comparison between diagnostic groups. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether differences in 5-HT1A binding between depressed and control subjects are affected by sex. Using positron emission tomography (PET), serotonin 1A binding was quantified in 50 patients with MDD (34 female, 16 male) and 57 healthy controls (32 female, 25 male). The subjects' 5-HT1A density (BPF, equal to the product of the density of available receptors and tracer affinity), was determined by using the PET tracer [carbonyl-C-11]-WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A antagonist. Results indicated that male MDD subjects had a 67.0% higher BPF across 13 brain regions compared with male controls (df=103, p<0.0001). The greatest difference between MDD subjects and controls was in the raphe (132%, p=0.000). Furthermore, by using a threshold, male controls can be distinguished from depressed males with high sensitivity and specificity (both >80%). In females, the separation between diagnostic groups yields much lower sensitivity and specificity. This data therefore suggests a specific biosignature for MDD in males. Identification of such a biosignature could provide a deeper understanding of depression pathology, help identify those at highest risk, and aid in the development of new therapies. Further, these findings suggest that combining male and female cohorts may not be optimal for some MDD studies. PMID:25578798

  3. Characterization of Optically Resolved 9-fluoropropyl-dihydrotetrabenazine as a Potential PET Imaging Agent Targeting Vesicular Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Mei-Ping; Hou, Catherine; Goswami, Rajesh; E.Ponde, Datta; Kilbourn, Michael R.; Kung, Hank F.

    2007-01-01

    Labeling derivatives of dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) with F-18 (T1/2 = 110 min) instead of C-11 (T1/2 = 20 min), would improve their utility and availability for imaging vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2) in clinical settings. The successful synthesis, reported previously, of two novel 9-fluoroalkyl(±)-DTBZ ligands prompted us to study the optically resolved active ligand 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-DTBZ (FP-(+)-DTBZ), which may have more promising characteristics. The inhibition constant (Ki) estimated for FP-(+)-DTBZ (using [3H](±)-DTBZ as the labeled ligand in rat striatal homogenates) showed a lower value as compared to the racemic FP-(±)-DTBZ (0.10 ± 0.01 vs 0.19 ± 0.04 nM). The inactive isomer, FP-(−)-DTBZ, displayed a much lower binding affinity with a Ki value >3000 nM. Biodistribution studies in mice after an iv injection of [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ exhibited a ratio of striatum (ST, target) to cerebellum (CB, background) of 4.51 at 30 minutes post-injection, which is a higher value than previously obtained with the racemic ligand [18F]FP-(±)-DTBZ (ST/CB = 2.95). Brain extraction at 30 minutes after the tracer injection in mice showed that >95% of the radioactivity corresponded to the parent, non-metabolized, compound remaining in the striatum, suggesting that the tracer has an excellent in vivo stability. Furthermore, localization of the tracer in the brain examined with ex vivo autoradiography displayed a typical distribution pattern consistent with VMAT2 sites. The highest labeling was observed in monoaminergic neuron regions (caudate putamen, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, substania nigra, dorsal raphe and locus coerules). We also tested the selective labeling of this tracer at the dopamine neurons in unilateral-lesioned mice (treated with 6-hydroxydopamine). When [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ and [125I]IPT ((N-(3'-iodopropen-2'-yl)-2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane, a selective marker for dopamine transporters in dopaminergic neurons) were

  4. Hybrid MR-PET in Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Lá Fougere, C; Ernemann, U

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (MR-PET) is a novel technology with advantages over sequential MR and PET imaging, allowing maintain full individual diagnostic performance with negligible mutual interference between the two hardware settings. Obvious synergies between MR and PET in acquisition of anatomical, functional, and molecular information for neurological diseases into one single image pave the way for establishing clear clinical indications for hybrid MR-PET as well as addressing unmet neuroimaging needs in future clinics and research. Further developments in attenuation correction, quantification, workflow, and effective MR-PET data management might unfold the full potential of integrated multimodality imaging. PMID:26227618

  5. Synthesis and characterisation of new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides as potential adenosine receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda; Gomes, Ligia R.; Low, John Nicolson

    2015-06-01

    Chromones are 4H-benzopyran-4-one heterocycles that have been thoroughly studied due to their interesting biological activities. Thiazole based compounds have been used in therapeutics as antimicrobial, antiviral and as antifungal agents for a long time but, in the past decades, they have been identified as potent and selective ligands for adenosine receptor. In continuation of our project related to the syntheses of pharmacologically important heterocycles, a new series of chromone-thiazole hybrids have been designed as potential ligands for human adenosine receptors. In this context, new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides were synthesized from chromone-2-carboxylic acid by two different amidation methods. The development of dissimilar synthetic approaches provided the possibility of working with diverse reaction conditions, namely with conventional heating and/or microwave irradiation. The structure of the compounds has been established on the basis of NMR and MS spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Relevant data related to the molecular geometry and conformation of the chromone-thiazole hybrids has been acquired which can be of the utmost importance to understand ligand-receptor binding.

  6. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  7. The potential pool of Co, Ni, Cu, Pb and Cd organic complexing ligands in coastal and urban rain waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, Malcolm; Fones, Gary R.

    The detection of dissolved ACSV (adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry) Co, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb in rain waters collected from an urban and a coastal site in the northwest of England is described. The presence of metal complexing organic ligands in rain waters is indicated with an overall percentage of ACSV non - labile dissolved metal of the total dissolved metal fraction ( = %ACSV nl/t) being 33 (33); 28 (35); 26 (32); 33 (25); 27 (34): for Co, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb, respectively, for the urban site (and coastal site). ACSV metal lability is theoretically defined and is dependent upon the a-coefficient ( β' MAL [AL]) of the added ACSV ligand (AL). No major differences were observed between %ACSV nl/t metal fractions in rain waters collected at the two contrasting sites for all the metals considered. As Cu, Pb, Cd and Ni had values greater than 10 for their Ef crust (crustal enrichment factor), rain water collected from both sites had predominantly anthropic chemical characteristics. The commonality of the aerosol chemical characteristics at the two sites may account for the observed similar (relative to total metal concentrations) proportions of metal organic complexation at the two different sites. The general order of increasing organic associations was Cu = Pb = Ni < Co < Cd, although the analytical log α-coefficients ( β' MAL [AL]) for each metal were different (9.62—Ni; 9.27—Cu; 5.29—Co; 2.15—Pb; 1.13—Cd). Significant correlations were encountered between ACSV non - labile and total dissolved trace metal concentrations of the pooled data from both sites, again an indication of the similarity of the chemical characteristics of the scavenged soluble organic ligands associated with background aerosol material.

  8. Novel synthesis and initial preclinical evaluation of (18)F-[FDG] labeled rhodamine: a potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent.

    PubMed

    AlJammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Otaibi, Basim; AlHindas, Hussein; Okarvi, Subhani M

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is one of the most commonly performed investigations in nuclear medicine studies. Due to the clinical importance of [(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and its availability in almost every PET center, a new radiofluorinated [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was synthesized using [(18)F]-FDG as a prosthetic group. In a convenient and simple one-step radiosynthesis, [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was prepared in quantitative radiochemical yields, with total synthesis time of nearly 20 min and radiochemical purity of greater than 98%, without the need for HPLC purification, which make these approaches amenable for automation. Biodistribution studies in normal rats at 60 min post-injection demonstrated a high uptake in the heart (>11% ID/g) and favorable pharmacokinetics. Additionally, [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine showed an extraction value of 27.63%±5.12% in rat hearts. These results demonstrate that [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate may be useful as an imaging agent for the positron emission tomography evaluation of myocardial perfusion. PMID:26160144

  9. A comparative study of zwitterionic ligands-mediated mineralization and the potential of mineralized zwitterionic matrices for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingsheng; Emmons, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Cationic and anionic residues of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of bone play synergistic roles in recruiting precursor ions and templating the nucleation, growth and crystalline transformations of calcium apatite in natural biomineralization. We previously reported that zwitterionic sulfobetaine ligands can template extensive 3-dimensional (3-D) hydroxyapaptite (HA)-mineralization of photo-crosslinked polymethacrylatehydrogels. Here, we compared the potency of two other major zwitterionic ligands, phosphobetaine and carboxybetaine, with that of the sulfobetaine in mediating 3-D mineralization using the crosslinked polymethacrylate hydrogel platform. We confirmed that all three zwitterionic hydrogels were able to effectively template 3-D mineralization, supporting the general ability of zwitterions to mediate templated mineralization. Among them, however, sulfobetaine and phosphobetaine hydrogels templated denser 3-D mineralizationthan the carboxybetaine hydrogel, likely due to their higher free water fractions and better maintenance of zwitterionic nature throughout the pH-changes during the in vitro mineralization process. We further demonstrated that the extensively mineralized zwitterionic hydrogels could be exploited for efficient retention (e.g. 99% retention after 24-h incubation in PBS) of osteogenic growth factor recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and subsequent sustained local release with retained bioactivity. Combined with the excellent cytocompatibility of all three zwitterionic hydrogels and the significantly improved cell adhesive properties of their mineralized matrices, these materials could find promising applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25558374

  10. A bone morphogenetic protein ligand and receptors in mud crab: A potential role in the ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ling; Yang, Yanan; Huang, Huiyang; Ye, Haihui

    2016-10-15

    In vertebrates, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play an important role in various biological processes. However, the function of BMPs in crustaceans is still unknown. In our study, a ligand (BMP7) and two receptors (Sp-BMPRIB and Sp-BMPRII) are cloned firstly in the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain. The qRT-PCR demonstrated that both ligand and receptors were expressed in various tissues, especially in ovary. The expression of BMPRs mRNA increased along the ovarian development, while BMP7 had an opposite tendency. In-situ hybridization revealed that Sp-BMPRIB and Sp-BMPRII were expressed in both oocytes and follicle cells, whereas Sp-BMP7 was exclusively localized in follicle cells. RNAi experiments showed that the expression levels of Smad1 and vitellogenin receptor declined rapidly after BMPRs were silenced. Based on these data, we hypothesized that in S. paramamosain, BMP7 and BMPRs had impact on the ovarian development, presumably via the autocrine/paracrine way. PMID:27345242

  11. Synthesis, structure activity relationship, radiolabeling and preclinical evaluation of high affinity ligands for the ion channel of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor as potential imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Pieter J; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Metaxas, Athanasios; Schuit, Robert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Windhorst, Albert D

    2015-03-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) is involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Currently, it is not possible to assess NMDAr availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NMDAr ion channel. A series of di- and tri-N-substituted diarylguanidines was synthesized. In addition, in vitro binding affinity for the NMDAr ion channel in rat forebrain membrane fractions was assessed. Compounds 10, 11 and 32 were radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Ligands [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 were evaluated ex vivo in B6C3 mice. Biodistribution studies showed higher uptake of [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 in forebrain regions compared with cerebellum. In addition, for [(11)C]10 54% and for [(18)F]32 70% of activity in the brain at 60min was due to intact tracer. Pre-treatment with MK-801 (0.6mg·kg(-1), ip) slightly decreased uptake in NMDAr-specific regions for [(18)F]32, but not for [(11)C]10. As such [(18)F]32 has the best characteristics as a PET tracer for the ion channel of the NMDAr. PMID:25648682

  12. Recent development in PET instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Peng, By Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2010-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr(3), and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  13. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  14. Higher pretreatment 5-HT1A receptor binding potential in bipolar disorder depression is associated with treatment remission: a naturalistic treatment pilot PET study.

    PubMed

    Lan, Martin J; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ciarleglio, Adam; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major cause of disability and a high risk for suicide. The pathophysiology of the disorder remains largely unknown. Medication choice for bipolar depression patients involves trial and error. Our group reported previously that brain serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is higher in bipolar depression. We now investigated whether pretreatment 5-HT(1A) levels correlates with antidepressant medication outcome. Forty-one medication-free DSM-IV diagnosed, bipolar patients in a major depressive episode had brain PET scans performed using [(11)C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. The patients then received naturalistic psychopharmacologic treatment as outpatients and a follow up Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) after 3 months of treatment. Patients with 24 item HDRS scores less than 10 were considered to have remitted. A linear mixed effects model was used to compare BP(F) (binding potential, proportional to the total number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between remitters and nonremitters. Thirty-four patients completed 3 months of treatment and ratings; 9 had remitted. Remitters and nonremitters did not differ in age, sex, or recent medication history with serotonergic medications. Remitters had higher [(11)C]WAY-100635 BP(F) across all brain regions compared with nonremitters (P = 0.02). Higher pretreatment brain 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was associated with remission after 3 months of pharmacological treatment in bipolar depression. Prospective treatment studies are warranted to determine whether this test predicts outcome of specific types of treatment. PMID:23720414

  15. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Łach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA–small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA–ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a “meta-predictor” leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl. PMID:24145824

  16. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know the signs of medical problems. Take your pet to the veterinarian if you notice: Loss of appetite Drinking a lot of water Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up or down Strange lumps

  17. Efficiency gains in tracer identification for nuclear imaging: can in vivo LC-MS/MS evaluation of small molecules screen for successful PET tracers?

    PubMed

    Joshi, Elizabeth M; Need, Anne; Schaus, John; Chen, Zhaogen; Benesh, Dana; Mitch, Charles; Morton, Stuart; Raub, Thomas J; Phebus, Lee; Barth, Vanessa

    2014-12-17

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become a useful noninvasive technique to explore molecular biology within living systems; however, the utility of this method is limited by the availability of suitable radiotracers to probe specific targets and disease biology. Methods to identify potential areas of improvement in the ability to predict small molecule performance as tracers prior to radiolabeling would speed the discovery of novel tracers. In this retrospective analysis, we characterized the brain penetration or peak SUV (standardized uptake value), binding potential (BP), and brain exposure kinetics across a series of known, nonradiolabeled PET ligands using in vivo LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) and correlated these parameters with the reported PET ligand performance in nonhuman primates and humans available in the literature. The PET tracers studied included those reported to label G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), intracellular enzymes, and transporters. Additionally, data for each tracer was obtained from a mouse brain uptake assay (MBUA), previously published, where blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and clearance parameters were assessed and compared against similar data collected on a broad compound set of central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic compounds. The BP and SUV identified via nonradiolabeled LC-MS/MS, while different from the published values observed in the literature PET tracer data, allowed for an identification of initial criteria values we sought to facilitate increased potential for success from our early discovery screening paradigm. Our analysis showed that successful, as well as novel, clinical PET tracers exhibited BP of greater than 1.5 and peak SUVs greater than approximately 150% at 5 min post dose in rodents. The brain kinetics appeared similar between both techniques despite differences in tracer dose, suggesting linearity across these dose ranges. The assessment of tracers in a

  18. Potentiation of the teratogenic effects induced by coadministration of retinoic acid or phytanic acid/phytol with synthetic retinoid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Elmazar, M M A; Nau, H

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory identified retinoid-induced defects that are mediated by RAR-RXR heterodimerization using interaction of synthetic ligands selective for the retinoid receptors RAR and RXR in mice (Elmazar et al. 1997, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 146:21-28; Elmazar et al. 2001, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 170:2-9; Nau and Elmazar 1999, Handbook of experimental pharmacology, vol 139, Retinoids, Springer-Verlag, pp 465-487). The present study was designed to investigate whether these RAR-RXR heterodimer-mediated defects can be also induced by interactions of natural and synthetic ligands for retinoid receptors. A non-teratogenic dose of the natural RXR agonist phytanic acid (100 mg/kg orally) or its precursor phytol (500 mg/kg orally) was coadministered with a synthetic RARalpha-agonist (Am580; 5 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on day 8.25 of gestation (GD8.25). Furthermore, a non-teratogenic dose of the synthetic RXR agonist LGD1069 (20 mg/kg orally) was also coadministered with the natural RAR agonist, all- trans-retinoic acid (atRA, 20 mg/kg orally) or its precursor retinol (ROH, 50 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on GD8.25. The teratogenic outcome was scored in day-18 fetuses. The incidence of Am580-induced resorptions, spina bifida aperta, micrognathia, anotia, kidney hypoplasia, dilated bladder, undescended testis, atresia ani, short and absent tail, fused ribs and fetal weight retardation were potentiated by coadministration of phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. Am580-induced exencephaly and cleft palate, which were not potentiated by coadministration with the synthetic RXR agonists, were also not potentiated by coadministration with either phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. LGD1069 potentiated atRA- and ROH-induced resorption, exencephaly, spina bifida, aperta, ear anotia and microtia, macroglossia, kidney hypoplasia, undescended testis, atresia ani, tail defects and fetal weight retardation, but not cleft palate. These results suggest that synergistic

  19. Mapping neuroinflammation in frontotemporal dementia with molecular PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have led to a renewed interest and support for an active role of inflammation in neurodegenerative dementias and related neurologic disorders. Detection of neuroinflammation in vivo throughout the course of neurodegenerative diseases is of great clinical interest. Studies have shown that microglia activation (an indicator of neuroinflammation) may present at early stages of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of FTD is largely unknown. The first-generation translocator protein (TSPO) ligand ([(11)C]-PK11195) has been used to detect microglia activation in FTD, and the second-generation TSPO ligands have imaged neuroinflammation in vivo with improved pharmacokinetic properties. This paper reviews related literature and technical issues on mapping neuroinflammation in FTD with positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. Early detection of neuroinflammation in FTD may identify new tools for diagnosis, novel treatment targets, and means to monitor therapeutic efficacy. More studies are needed to image and track neuroinflammation in FTD. It is anticipated that the advances of TSPO PET imaging will overcome technical difficulties, and molecular imaging of neuroinflammation will aid in the characterization of neuroinflammation in FTD. Such knowledge has the potential to shed light on the poorly understood pathogenesis of FTD and related dementias, and provide imaging markers to guide the development and assessment of new therapies. PMID:26022249

  20. Sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands as potential regulators of gene expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Belikov, S V; Grokhovsky, S L; Isaguliants, M G; Surovaya, A N; Gursky, G V

    2005-10-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by glucocorticoid hormone. A robust hormone- and receptor-dependent gene activation could be reproduced in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The homogeneous response in this system allowed a detailed analysis of the DNA-protein interactions following hormone activation. The strategy of artificial regulating of gene activity by sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands is very attractive. We have synthesized and studied the interaction with DNA of bis-linked netropsin derivatives in which two monomers are attached via short linkers in head-to-head and tail-to-tail manners. We have found that cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin added to Xenopus oocytes media penetrates cellular and nuclear membrane and binds selectively to the MMTV promoter at the DNA segment that partly overlaps with the site recognized by glucocorticoid receptor. DNase I footprinting studies demonstrate that there are more stronger binding sites for cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin on the naked MMTV DNA which are found to be inaccessible for its binding in oocytes. PMID:16060693

  1. Analogs of LDL Receptor Ligand Motifs in Dengue Envelope and Capsid Proteins as Potential Codes for Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Juan; Romo, Jamie; McWhorter, Troy; Guevara, Natalia Valentinova

    2016-01-01

    It is established that cell entry of low density lipoprotein particles (LLPs) containing Apo B100 and Apo E is mediated by receptors and GAGs. Receptor ligand motifs, XBBBXXBX, XBBXBX, and ΨBΨXB, and mono- and bipartite NLS sequences are abundant in Apo E and Apo B100 as well as in envelope and capsid proteins of Dengue viruses 1–4 (DENV1–4). Synthetic, fluorescence-labeled peptides of sequences in DENV2 envelope protein, and DENV3 capsid that include these motifs were used to conduct a qualitative assessment of cell binding and entry capacity using HeLa cells. DENV2 envelope peptide, Dsp2EP, 0564Gly-Gly0595, was shown to bind and remain at the cell surface. In contrast, DENV3 capsid protein peptide, Dsp3CP, 0002Asn-Gln0028, readily enters HeLa cells and accumulates at discrete loci in the nucleus. FITC-labeled dengue synthetic peptides colocalize with Low Density Lipoprotein-CM-DiI and Apo E-CM-DiI to a degree that suggests that Dengue viruses may utilize cell entry pathways used by LLPs. PMID:27123468

  2. Immobilizing CC chemokine receptor 4's N-terminal extracellular tail on a capillary to study its potential ligands by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjing; Li, Meina; Yakufu, Pazilaiti; Ling, Xiaomei; Qi, Hui; Xiao, Junhai; Wang, Ying

    2012-04-01

    ML40 is the equivalent peptide derived from the N terminal of CCC4 (CC chemokine receptor 4), which plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammation. A new capillary electrophoresis method was developed to study the interactions between ML40 and its potential ligands in which ML40 was immobilized on the inner wall of capillary as the stationary phase based on the covalent linking technique. The interaction between S009, a known CCR4 antagonist, and the immobilized ML40 was studied to validate the bioactivity of ML40. The electropherogram of S009 showed that the peak height was reduced and the peak width was broadened in the ML40 immobilized capillary. Otherwise, 25 computer-aided design and drafting compounds were screened out using this method. Four compounds' peak widths were broadened and their peak heights were reduced, as with S009. Meanwhile, nonlinear chromatography was used to calculate the constants for the ligand-receptor complex formation. Furthermore, the tertiary amine compounds belonging to the chiral tertiary amines of the type NRR'R″, which are optically inactive resulting from rapid pyramide inversion, were chiral separated by our protein immobilization method for the first time. In general, the methodology presented would be applicable to study compound-ML40 interactions as a reliable and robust screening method for CCR4 antagonist discovery. PMID:22245764

  3. Discovery of new human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) inhibitors for potential use as anticancer agents via ligand-based pharmacophore modeling.

    PubMed

    Zalloum, Hiba; Tayyem, Rabab; Irmaileh, Basha'er Abu-; Bustanji, Yasser; Zihlif, Malek; Mohammad, Mohammad; Rjai, Talal Abu; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2015-09-01

    To discover potential antitumor agents directed toward human epidermal growth factor receptor-2HER2/ErbB2 overexpression in cancer, we have explored the pharmacophoric space of 115 HER2/ErbB2 inhibitors. This identified 240 pharmacophores which were subsequently clustered into 20 groups and cluster centers were used as 3D-pharmacophoric descriptors in QSAR analysis with 2D-physicochemical descriptors to select the optimal combination. We were obliged to use ligand efficiency as the response variable because the logarithmic transformation of bioactivities failed to access self-consistent QSAR models. Two binding pharmacophore models emerged in the optimal QSAR equation, suggesting the existence of distinct binding modes accessible to ligands within the HER2/ErbB2 binding pocket. The QSAR equation and its associated pharmacophore models were employed to screen the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Drug Bank databases to search for new, promising, and structurally diverse HER2 inhibitory leads. Inhibitory activities were tested against HER2-overexpressing SKOV3 Ovarian cancer cell line and MCF-7 which express low levels of HER2. In silico mining identified 80 inhibitors out of which four HER2 selective compounds inhibited the growth of SKOV3 cells with IC50 values < 5μM and with virtually no effect in MCF-7 cells. These lead compounds are excellent candidates for further optimization. PMID:26188796

  4. Low energy cyclotron production of multivalent transition metals for PET imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    Recent advances in high-resolution tomographs for small animals require the production of nonconventional long-lived positron emitters to label novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging. Radioisotopes with an appropriate half life to match the kinetics of slow biological processes will allow to researchers to study the phamacokinetics of PET ligands over several hours, or even days, on the same animal, with the injection of a single dose. In addition, radionuclides with a suitable half life can potentially be distributed from a central production site making them available in PET facilities that lack an in-house cyclotron. In the last few years there has been a growing interest in the use of PET ligands labeled with radiometals, particularly isotopes of copper, yttrium and zirconium. Future clinical applications of these tracers will require them to be produced reliably and efficiently. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the production of the multivalent transition metals 61,64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr for molecular PET imaging and therapy. Our findings in the production of these radionuclides at high specific activity on an 11 MeV proton-only cyclotron are presented. Local applications of these tracers, including Cu-ATSM for in vivo quantification of hypoxia, synthesis of targeted radiopharmaceuticals using activated esters of DOTA, and a novel development of positron emitting resin microspheres, are also be discussed. As a result of this thesis work, metallic radionuclides are now efficiently produced on a weekly basis in sufficient quality and quantity for collaborating scientists at UW-Madison and external users in other Universities across the country.

  5. Bile acids and derivatives, their nuclear receptors FXR, PXR and ligands: role in health and disease and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zimber, Amazia; Gespach, Christian

    2008-06-01

    Bile acids, their physiology and metabolism, their role in carcinogenesis and other major human diseases are recently undergoing significant progress. Starting in 1999 when the orphan nuclear receptor FXR was shown to be specifically activated by bile acids, these compounds became part of the arsenal of ligands of the steroid hormone superfamily of nuclear receptors, including receptors of Vitamin D3, retinoids (RAR, RXR), and thyroid hormone. Another decisive discovery pointed later that the pregnane X-receptor (PXR) is activated by the endogenous toxic lithocholic acid, as well as several xenobiotics and drugs. Bile acids have recently emerged as key regulators of their own metabolism, and of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. They have important role as promoters of esophageal and colon cancers, cholangiocarcinoma, as well as new implications in breast cancer development and metastasis. This Review will emphasize novel aspects of bile acids, FXR and PXR as regulators of interfaces at cell proliferation and differentiation, cell death, survival, invasion, and metastasis during normal development and cancer progression. Signaling pathways controlled by bile acids will be presented and discussed in relation to their impact on gene expression. The biological and pharmacological significance of bile acids and their recently developed synthetic derivatives and conjugates, as well as new development in the design of FXR agonists and antagonists for clinical applications in cancer prevention and therapy, will be evaluated. This part includes advances in the utilization of bile acid transporters in drug resistance, therapeutic targeting and delivery of anticancer drugs, as well as therapeutic combinations using new bile acid derivatives, sequestrating agents and reabsorption inhibitors, and their limitations. PMID:18537536

  6. Human health implications of Salmonella-contaminated natural pet treats and raw pet food.

    PubMed

    Finley, Rita; Reid-Smith, Richard; Weese, J Scott

    2006-03-01

    Human salmonellosis occurs mainly as a result of handling or consuming contaminated food products, with a small percentage of cases being related to other, less well-defined exposures, such as contact with companion animals and natural pet treats. The increasing popularity of raw food diets for companion animals is another potential pet-associated source of Salmonella organisms; however, no confirmed cases of human salmonellosis have been associated with these diets. Pets that consume contaminated pet treats and raw food diets can be colonized with Salmonella organisms without exhibiting clinical signs, making them a possible hidden source of contamination in the household. Pet owners can reduce their risk of acquiring Salmonella organisms by not feeding natural pet treats and raw food diets to their pets, whereas individuals who investigate cases of salmonellosis or interpret surveillance data should be aware of these possible sources of Salmonella organisms. PMID:16447116

  7. Reactivity studies of oxo-Mo(IV) complexes containing potential hydrogen-bond acceptor/donor phenolate ligands.

    PubMed

    Ng, Victor Wee Lin; Taylor, Michelle K; Young, Charles G

    2012-03-01

    Reactivity studies of oxo-Mo(IV) complexes, Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R-κ(2)O,O'} (R = Me, Et, OMe, OEt, OPh, NHPh), containing chelated hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor phenolate ligands are reported. Hydrolysis/oxidation of Tp(iPr)MoO(2-OC(6)H(4)CO(2)Ph-κ(2)O,O') in the presence of methanol yields tetranuclear [Tp(iPr)MoO(μ-O)(2)MoO](2)(μ-OMe)(2) (1), while condensation of Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)Me-κ(2)O,O'} and methylamine gives the chelated iminophenolate complex, Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(Me)NMe-κ(2)O,N} (2), rather than the aqua complex, Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(Me)NMe-κO}(OH(2)). The oxo-Mo(IV) complexes are readily oxidized by dioxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the corresponding cis-dioxo-Mo(VI) complexes, Tp(iPr)MoO(2){2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R}; in addition, suitable one-electron oxidants, e.g., [FeCp(2)]BF(4) and [N(C(6)H(4)Br)(3)][SbCl(6)], oxidize the complexes to their EPR-active (g(iso) ≈ 1.942) molybdenyl counterparts (3, 4). Molybdenyl complexes such as Tp(iPr)MoOCl{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R} (5) and Tp(iPr)MoOCl(2) also form when the complexes react with chlorinated solvents. The ester derivatives (R = OMe, OEt, OPh) react with propylene sulfide to form cis-oxosulfido-Mo(VI) complexes, Tp(iPr)MoOS{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R}, that crystallize as dimeric μ-disulfido-Mo(V) species, [Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R}](2)(μ-S(2)) (6-8). The crystal structures of [Tp(iPr)MoO(μ-O)(2)MoO](2)(μ-OMe)(2), Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(Me)NMe}, Tp(iPr)MoOCl{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)NHPh}·{2-HOC(6)H(4)C(O)NHPh}, and [Tp(iPr)MoO{2-OC(6)H(4)C(O)R}](2)(μ-S(2)) (R = OMe, OEt) are reported. PMID:22356251

  8. Potentials and pitfalls using high affinity radioligands in PET and SPET determinations on regional drug induced D2 receptor occupancy--a simulation study based on experimental data.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H; Farde, L

    2001-10-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor density ranges from 0.2 to 40 nM among human brain regions. For high density regions radioligands like [(11)C]raclopride provide accurate and reliable estimates of the receptor density. In research on neuropsychiatric disorders there is, however, a growing need for quantitative approaches that accurately measure D2 dopamine receptor occupancy induced by drugs or endogenous dopamine in regions with low receptor density. The new high affinity radioligands [(11)C]FLB 457 and [(123)I]epidepride have been shown to provide a signal for extrasriatal D2 dopamine receptor populations in the human brain in vivo. Initial observations indicate, however, that the time required to reach equilibrium is dependent on receptor density. Ratio analyses may thus not be readily used for comparisons among different brain regions. The aim of the present simulation study was to examine commonly used approaches for calculation of drug induced D2 dopamine receptor occupancy among regions with widely different receptor density. The input functions and the rate constants of [(11)C]FLB 457 and the reference ligand [(11)C]raclopride were first used in a simulation estimating the effect of receptor density on equilibrium time. In a second step we examined how errors produced by inaccurate determination of the binding potential parameter propagate to calculations of drug induced receptor occupancy. The simulations showed a marked effect of receptor density on equilibrium time for [(11)C]FLB 457, but not for [(11)C]raclopride. For [(11)C]FLB 457, a receptor density above about 7 nM caused the time of equilibrium to fall beyond time of data acquisition (1 h). The use of preequilibrium data caused the peak equilibrium and the end time ratio approaches but not the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) approach to underestimate the binding potential and thus also the drug occupancy calculated for high-density regions. The study supports the use of ratio and SRTM analyses in

  9. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  10. Mathematical simulations of ligand-gated and cell-type specific effects on the action potential of human atrium

    PubMed Central

    Maleckar, Mary M.; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Giles, Wayne R.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian heart, myocytes and fibroblasts can communicate via gap junction, or connexin-mediated current flow. Some of the effects of this electrotonic coupling on the action potential waveform of the human ventricular myocyte have been analyzed in detail. The present study employs a recently developed mathematical model of the human atrial myocyte to investigate the consequences of this heterogeneous cell–cell interaction on the action potential of the human atrium. Two independent physiological processes which alter the physiology of the human atrium have been studied. i) The effects of the autonomic transmitter acetylcholine on the atrial action potential have been investigated by inclusion of a time-independent, acetylcholine-activated K+ current in this mathematical model of the atrial myocyte. ii) A non-selective cation current which is activated by natriuretic peptides has been incorporated into a previously published mathematical model of the cardiac fibroblast. These results identify subtle effects of acetylcholine, which arise from the nonlinear interactions between ionic currents in the human atrial myocyte. They also illustrate marked alterations in the action potential waveform arising from fibroblast–myocyte source–sink principles when the natriuretic peptide-mediated cation conductance is activated. Additional calculations also illustrate the effects of simultaneous activation of both of these cell-type specific conductances within the atrial myocardium. This study provides a basis for beginning to assess the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding detailed cell–cell interactions within the complex paracrine environment of the human atrial myocardium. PMID:19186188

  11. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  12. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  13. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  14. Measurements and Modeling To Determine the Reduction Potential of Uncomplexed Bi(III) in Nitrate Solutions for Application in Bi(III)-Ligand Equilibria Studies by Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Billing, Caren; Cukrowski, Ignacy

    2016-05-12

    The free metal ion potential, E(M), is a critical parameter in the calculation of formation constants when using voltammetry. When studying complex formation of Bi(III), however, E(Bi) cannot be directly measured. In this work a nitrate background electrolyte was employed to obtain reversible reduction waves. To determine E(Bi), measurements have to be made below pH ∼ 2 before the bismuth-oxy-nitrate species precipitates and thus corrections for the diffusion junction potential (monitored using Tl(I) as an internal reference ion) must be made. Additionally shifts in potential due to both Bi(III) hydrolysis and Bi(III) nitrate formation must also be compensated for before E(Bi) can be evaluated. The value of E(Bi) was determined relative to E(Tl) so that in an experiments where ligand is added to determine formation constants, E(Bi) can be determined as accurately as possible (since E(Tl) can generally still be measured). The value of E(Bi) - E(Tl) was found to be 495.6 ± 1.4 mV for the conditions employed. PMID:27088843

  15. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers. PMID:26026069

  16. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M.; Richens, Joanna L.; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G.; Winlove, C. Peter; O’Shea, Paul

    2015-01-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir’s affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers. PMID:26026069

  17. Some metal complexes of three new potentially heptadentate (N4O3) tripodal Schiff base ligands; synthesis, characterizatin and X-ray crystal structure of a novel eight coordinate Gd(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Moradi, Somaeyh; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Blackman, Allan G.

    2016-03-01

    The symmetrical and asymmetrical potentially heptadentate (N4O3) tripodal Schiff base ligands (H3L1-H3L3) were synthesized from the condensation reaction of three tripodal tetraamine ligands tpt (trpn), tris (3-aminopropyl) amine; ppe (abap), (2-aminoethyl)bis(3-aminopropyl)amine, and tren, tris(2-aminoethyl)amine, with 5-methoxysalicylaldehyde. Then, the reaction of Ln(III) (Ln = Gd, La and Sm), Al(III), and Fe(III) metal ions with the above ligands was investigated. The resulting compounds were characterized by IR, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis in all cases and NMR spectroscopy in the case of the Schiff base ligands. The X-ray crystal structure of the Gd complex of H3L3 ligand showed that in addition to all donor atoms of the ligand one molecule of H2O is also coordinated to the metal ion and a neutral eight-coordinate complex is formed.

  18. The retinoid X receptor ligand, 9-cis-retinoic acid, is a potential regulator of early Xenopus development.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, J C; Schuh, T; Juchau, M; Kimelman, D

    1994-01-01

    Endogenous retinoids are potential regulators of vertebrate embryogenesis that have been implicated in early anterior-posterior patterning and limb-bud development. We have characterized the temporal and spatial distribution of 9-cis-retinoic acid in the Xenopus embryo and compared it to two other retinoids, all-trans-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinoyl-beta-glucuronide. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is first detected after the midblastula transition and by the end of gastrulation is localized primarily within the anterior and posterior dorsal regions of the embryo. Since 9-cis-retinoic acid is a 6-fold more potent dysmorphogen than trans-retinoic acid, we suggest that it is involved in the early specification of the Xenopus anterior-posterior axis. Images PMID:8159708

  19. New data analysis in a population study raises the hypothesis that particle size contributes to the pro-asthmatic potential of small pet animal allergens

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Antonios; Dosanjh, Amrita; Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria; Borres, Magnus P.; Högman, Marieann; Alving, Kjell; Janson, Christer; Malinovschi, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Background The size of inhaled particles influences where they deposit and theoretically should be important for the development of airway inflammation and responsiveness. Our aim was to assess if sensitization to smaller-sized aeroallergens relates to higher prevalence of treated asthma, increased airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation. Methods Molecular-based IgE antibody determination was done in 467 subjects. Sensitized subjects were grouped based on the particle size of the aeroallergen: (1) Large particles only (mainly pollen); (2) Medium-sized particles (sensitized to mainly mite and mold and possibly to large particles); and 3) Small particles (sensitized to pet allergens and possibly to medium- and/or large-sized particles). Airway responsiveness to methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and serum eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) were measured. Asthma and rhinitis were questionnaire-assessed. Results Subjects sensitized to small particles had higher prevalence of treated asthma (35% versus 10%, P < 0.001), higher FENO50 (32 versus 17 ppb, P < 0.001), higher S-ECP (10 versus 7.5 ng/mL, P = 0.04), and increased bronchial responsiveness (dose-response slope, 5.6 versus 7.5, P < 0.001) compared with non-atopics. This was consistent after adjusting for potential confounders. Sensitization to only large or to medium and possibly also large aeroallergen particles was not related to any of these outcomes after adjustments. Conclusions Sensitization to smaller particles was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma under treatment, higher airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation. Mapping of IgE sensitization to small particles might help to detect subjects having increased airway and systemic inflammation and bronchial responsiveness, indicating increased risk of developing asthma. PMID:26610050

  20. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta potentiates the cytotoxic effects of exogenous tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Sagrauske, Antje; Müller, Cornelia; Hofmann, Hans-Peter; Beck, James F

    2004-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a highly promising candidate for the treatment of cancer because it elicits cell death in the majority of tumor cells while sparing most normal cells. Some cancers, however, display resistance to TRAIL, suggesting that treatment with TRAIL alone may be insufficient for cancer therapy. In the present study, we explored whether the apoptotic responsiveness of PC-3 prostate cancer cells to TRAIL could be enhanced by targeting the novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoform eta. Transfection of PC-3 cells with second-generation chimeric antisense oligonucleotides against PKCeta caused a time- and dose-dependent knockdown of PKCeta, as revealed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Knockdown of PKCeta resulted in a marked amplification of TRAIL's cytotoxic activity. Cell killing could be substantially prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. In addition, PKCeta knockdown and administration of TRAIL significantly synergized in activation of caspase-3 and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Knockdown of PKCeta augmented TRAIL-induced dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, indicating that PKCeta acts upstream of mitochondria. We conclude that PKCeta represents a considerable resistance factor with respect to TRAIL and a promising target to exploit the therapeutic potential of TRAIL. PMID:15252138

  1. Anticancer potential of a photoactivated transplatin derivative containing the methylazaindole ligand mediated by ROS generation and DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Pracharova, Jitka; Radosova Muchova, Tereza; Dvorak Tomastikova, Eva; Intini, Francesco P; Pacifico, Concetta; Natile, Giovanni; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-08-16

    The limitations associated with the clinical utility of conventional platinum anticancer drugs have stimulated research leading to the design of new metallodrugs with improved pharmacological properties, particularly with increased selectivity for cancer cells. Very recent research has demonstrated that photoactivation or photopotentiation of platinum drugs can be one of the promising approaches to tackle this challenge. This is so because the application of irradiation can be targeted exclusively to the tumor tissue so that the resulting effects could be much more selective and targeted to the tumor. We show in this work that the presence of 1-methyl-7-azaindole in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(L)] (L = 1-methyl-7-azaindole, compound 1) markedly potentiated the DNA binding ability of 1 when irradiated by UVA light in a cell-free medium. Concomitantly, the formation of cytotoxic bifunctional cross-links was markedly enhanced. In addition, 1, when irradiated with UVA, was able to effectively cleave the DNA backbone also in living cells. The incorporation of 1-methyl-7-azaindole moiety had also a profound effect on the photophysical properties of 1, which can generate singlet oxygen responsible for the DNA cleavage reaction. Finally, we found that 1, upon irradiation with UVA light, exhibited a pronounced dose-dependent decrease in viability of A2780 cells whereas it was markedly less cytotoxic if the cells were treated in the absence of light. Hence, it is possible to conclude that 1 is amenable to photodynamic therapy. PMID:27396365

  2. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    neoadjuvant treatment attenuated adverse oncologic impact of high preoperative MTV2.5 (P = 0.210). Preoperatively determined volume-based PET parameter, MTV2.5, can potentially be used as a surrogate marker to estimate tumor biology and tumor recurrence. Individual treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer can be suggested based on patients' preoperative MTV2.5. PMID:26945350

  3. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    neoadjuvant treatment attenuated adverse oncologic impact of high preoperative MTV2.5 (P = 0.210). Preoperatively determined volume-based PET parameter, MTV2.5, can potentially be used as a surrogate marker to estimate tumor biology and tumor recurrence. Individual treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer can be suggested based on patients’ preoperative MTV2.5. PMID:26945350

  4. Multiparametric PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The standardized uptake value (SUV) and other measurements of tumour uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography (PET) can potentially be supplemented by additional imaging parameters derived either from the PET images or from the computed tomography (CT) component of integrated PET/CT examinations including tumour size, CT attenuation, texture (reflecting tumour heterogeneity) and blood flow. This article illustrates the emerging benefits of such a multiparametric approach. Example benefits include greater diagnostic accuracy in characterization of adrenal masses achieved by using both the SUV and measured CT attenuation. Tumour size combined with the SUV can potentially improve the prognostic information available from PET/CT in oesophageal and lung cancer. However, greater improvements may be realized through using CT measurements of texture instead of size. Studies in breast and lung cancer suggest that combined PET/CT measurements of glucose metabolism and blood flow provide correlates for tumour proliferation and angiogenesis, respectively. These combined measurements can be utilized to determine vascular-metabolic phenotypes, which vary with tumour type. Uncoupling of blood flow and metabolism suggests a poor prognosis for larger more advanced tumours, high-grade lesions and tumours responding poorly to treatment. Vascular-metabolic imaging also has the potential to subclassify tumour response to treatment. The additional biomarkers described can be readily incorporated in existing FDG-PET examinations thereby improving the ability of PET/CT to depict tumour biology, characterize potentially malignant lesions, and assess prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:23023069

  5. Two-ligand priming mechanism for potentiated phosphoinositide synthesis is an evolutionarily conserved feature of Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine exchange proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Ghosh, Ratna; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Lönnfors, Max; Somerharju, Pentti; Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2016-07-15

    Lipid signaling, particularly phosphoinositide signaling, plays a key role in regulating the extreme polarized membrane growth that drives root hair development in plants. The Arabidopsis AtSFH1 gene encodes a two-domain protein with an amino-terminal Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP) domain linked to a carboxy-terminal nodulin domain. AtSfh1 is critical for promoting the spatially highly organized phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate signaling program required for establishment and maintenance of polarized root hair growth. Here we demonstrate that, like the yeast Sec14, the AtSfh1 PITP domain requires both its phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)- and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho)-binding properties to stimulate PtdIns-4-phosphate [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis. Moreover, we show that both phospholipid-binding activities are essential for AtSfh1 activity in supporting polarized root hair growth. Finally, we report genetic and biochemical evidence that the two-ligand mechanism for potentiation of PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity is a broadly conserved feature of plant Sec14-nodulin proteins, and that this strategy appeared only late in plant evolution. Taken together, the data indicate that the PtdIns/PtdCho-exchange mechanism for stimulated PtdIns(4)P synthesis either arose independently during evolution in yeast and in higher plants, or a suitable genetic module was introduced to higher plants from a fungal source and subsequently exploited by them. PMID:27193303

  6. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. PMID:26354876

  7. Water-soluble and photo-stable silver(I) dicarboxylate complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapeutic potential, DNA interactions and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Laura; Dixit, Vidya; Assad, Letícia O N; Ribeiro, Thales P; Queiroz, Daniela D; Kellett, Andrew; Casey, Alan; Colleran, John; Pereira, Marcos D; Rochford, Garret; McCann, Malachy; O'Shea, Denis; Dempsey, Rita; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; Walsh, Maureen; Creaven, Bernadette; Howe, Orla; Devereux, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complexes [Ag2(OOC-(CH2)n-COO)] (n=1-10) (1-10) were synthesised and reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) to yield derivatives formulating as [Ag2(phen)x(OOC-(CH2)y-COO)]·zH2O (x=2 or 3; y=1-10; z=1-4) (11-20) which are highly water-soluble and photo-stable in aqueous solution. The phen derivatives 11-20 exhibit chemotherapeutic potential against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against cisplatin-sensitive breast (MCF-7) and resistant ovarian (SKOV-3) cancer cell lines. Cyclic voltammetric analysis and DNA binding and intercalation studies indicate that the mechanism of action of 11-20 is significantly different to that of their silver(I) dicarboxylate precursors and they do not induce DNA damage or ROS generation in mammalian cells. The representative complexes 9 and 19 (containing the undecanedioate ligand) were both found to significantly reduce superoxide and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in the yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:26986979

  8. How Innocent are Potentially Redox Non-Innocent Ligands? Electronic Structure and Metal Oxidation States in Iron-PNN Complexes as a Representative Case Study.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Fillman, Kathlyn L; Bendikov, Tatyana; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Gorelsky, Serge I; Neidig, Michael L; Milstein, David

    2015-05-18

    Herein we present a series of new α-iminopyridine-based iron-PNN pincer complexes [FeBr2LPNN] (1), [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), [Fe(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (3), [Fe(F)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (4), and [Fe(H)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (5) with formal oxidation states ranging from Fe(0) to Fe(II) (LPNN = 2-[(di-tert-butylphosphino)methyl]-6-[1-(2,4,6-mesitylimino)ethyl]pyridine). The complexes were characterized by a variety of methods including (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (31)P NMR, IR, Mössbauer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and X-ray crystallography, focusing on the assignment of the metal oxidation states. Ligand structural features suggest that the α-iminopyridine ligand behaves as a redox non-innocent ligand in some of these complexes, particularly in [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), in which it appears to adopt the monoanionic form. In addition, the NMR spectroscopic features ((13)C, (15)N) indicate the accumulation of charge density on parts of the ligand for 2. However, a combination of spectroscopic measurements that more directly probe the iron oxidation state (e.g., XPS), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and electronic absorption studies combined with time-dependent DFT calculations support the description of the metal atom in 2 as Fe(0). We conclude from our studies that ligand structural features, while useful in many assignments of ligand redox non-innocence, may not always accurately reflect the ligand charge state and, hence, the metal oxidation state. For complex 2, the ligand structural changes are interpreted in terms of strong back-donation from the metal center to the ligand as opposed to electron transfer. PMID:25918944

  9. Pet RX: Implications for Good Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes, C. Newton; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studies reveal that potential health values exist in use of pets in the rehabilitation process. Animal therapy can be a salutary form of rehabilitation if the program is organized, supervised, and implemented in a professional manner. (JD)

  10. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  11. PET Imaging of Inflammation Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Li, Fang; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in many disease processes. Development in molecular imaging in recent years provides new insight into the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of various inflammatory diseases and diseases involving inflammatory process. Positron emission tomography using 18F-FDG has been successfully applied in clinical oncology and neurology and in the inflammation realm. In addition to glucose metabolism, a variety of targets for inflammation imaging are being discovered and utilized, some of which are considered superior to FDG for imaging inflammation. This review summarizes the potential inflammation imaging targets and corresponding PET tracers, and the applications of PET in major inflammatory diseases and tumor associated inflammation. Also, the current attempt in differentiating inflammation from tumor using PET is also discussed. PMID:23843893

  12. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S; Poeppel, Thorsten D; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A M W; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided. PMID:26681984

  13. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S.; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A. M. W.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided. PMID:26681984

  14. PET/MRI – Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Muzic, Raymond F.; DiFilippo, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    PET/MR is a hybrid imaging technology with the potential to combine the molecular and functional information of PET with the soft-tissue contrast of MR. Herein we review the technical features and challenges of putting these different technologies together. We emphasize the conceptual to make the material accessible to a wide audience. We begin by reviewing PET/CT, a more mature multi-modality imaging technology, to provide a basis for comparison to the history of PET/MR development. We discuss the motivation and challenges of PET/MR and different approaches that have been used to meet the challenges. We conclude with a speculation about the future of this exciting imaging method. PMID:25497909

  15. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues E; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  16. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract. PMID:27016770

  17. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues e; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  18. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration in the presurgical evaluation of refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Donaire, A; Serès, E; Setoain, X; Bargalló, N; Falcón, C; Sanmartí, F; Maestro, I; Rumià, J; Pintor, L; Boget, T; Aparicio, J; Carreño, M

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the usefulness of coregistration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (PET/MRI) and of coregistration of PET/MRI with subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) (PET/MRI/SISCOM) in localizing the potential epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. We prospectively included 35 consecutive patients with refractory focal epilepsy whose presurgical evaluation included a PET study. Separately acquired PET and structural MRI images were coregistered for each patient. When possible, ictal SPECT and SISCOM were obtained and coregistered with PET/MRI. The potential location of the epileptogenic zone determined by neuroimaging was compared with the seizure onset zone determined by long-term video-EEG monitoring and with invasive EEG studies in patients who were implanted. Structural MRI showed no lesions in 15 patients. In these patients, PET/MRI coregistration showed a hypometabolic area in 12 (80%) patients that was concordant with seizure onset zone on EEG in 9. In 7 patients without MRI lesions, PET/MRI detected a hypometabolism that was undetected on PET alone. SISCOM, obtained in 25 patients, showed an area of hyperperfusion concordant with the seizure onset zone on EEG in 7 (58%) of the 12 of these patients who had normal MRI findings. SISCOM hyperperfusion was less extensive than PET hypometabolism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery; 11 of these underwent invasive-EEG monitoring and the seizure onset zone was concordant with PET/MRI in all cases. PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration, performed in 4 of these patients, was concordant in 3 (75%). After epilepsy surgery, 13 (68%) patients are seizure-free after a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration are useful for determining the potential epileptogenic zone and thus for planning invasive EEG studies and surgery more precisely, especially in

  19. Breast PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007469.htm Breast PET scan To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. A breast positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that uses a radioactive ...

  20. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  1. Birds Kept as Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricts the importation of pet birds from certain countries and enforces a 30-day quarantine for all imported birds except those that come from Canada. People interested in importing pet birds should visit the USDA non-US Origin Pet Bird Importation website . Choosing a bird Match ...

  2. Enhancing Integrin α1 Inserted (I) Domain Affinity to Ligand Potentiates Integrin α1β1-mediated Down-regulation of Collagen Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mingjian; Pedchenko, Vadim; Greer, Briana H.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Santoro, Samuel A.; Sanders, Charles R.; Hudson, Billy G.; Eichman, Brandt F.; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2012-01-01

    Integrin α1β1 binding to collagen IV, which is mediated by the α1-inserted (I) domain, down-regulates collagen synthesis. When unligated, a salt bridge between Arg287 and Glu317 is thought to keep this domain in a low affinity conformation. Ligand binding opens the salt bridge leading to a high-affinity conformation. How modulating integrin α1β1 affinity alters collagen homeostasis is unknown. To address this question, we utilized a thermolysin-derived product of the α1α2α1 network of collagen IV (α1α2α1(IV) truncated protomer) that selectively binds integrin α1β1. We show that an E317A substitution enhanced binding to the truncated protomer, consistent with a previous finding that this substitution eliminates the salt bridge. Surprisingly, we show that an R287A substitution did not alter binding, whereas R287E/E317R substitutions enhanced binding to the truncated protomer. NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling suggested that eliminating the Glu317 negative charge is sufficient to induce a conformational change toward the open state. Thus, the role played by Glu317 is largely independent of the salt bridge. We further show that cells expressing E317A or R287E/E317R substitutions have enhanced down-regulation of collagen IV synthesis, which is mediated by the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that modulating the affinity of the extracellular α1 I domain to collagen IV enhances outside-in signaling by potentiating ERK activation and enhancing the down-regulation of collagen synthesis. PMID:22888006

  3. Gold Nanorods Conjugated with Doxorubicin and cRGD for Combined Anticancer Drug Delivery and PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuling; Hong, Hao; Matson, Vyara Z.; Javadi, Alireza; Xu, Wenjin; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo; Steeber, Douglas A.; Gong, Shaoqin

    2012-01-01

    A multifunctional gold nanorod (GNR)-based nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumors was developed and characterized. An anti-cancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)) was covalently conjugated onto PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) GNR nanocarriers via a hydrazone bond to achieve pH-sensitive controlled drug release. Tumor-targeting ligands (i.e., the cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys) peptides, cRGD) and 64Cu-chelators (i.e., 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N''-triacetic acid (NOTA)) were conjugated onto the distal ends of the PEG arms to achieve active tumor-targeting and PET imaging, respectively. Based on flow cytometry analysis, cRGD-conjugated nanocarriers (i.e., GNR-DOX-cRGD) exhibited a higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity than non-targeted ones (i.e., GNR-DOX) in vitro. However, GNR-DOX-cRGD and GNR-DOX nanocarriers had similar in vivo biodistribution according to in vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies. Due to the unique optical properties of GNRs, this multifunctional GNR-based nanoplatform can potentially be optimized for combined cancer therapies (chemotherapy and photothermal therapy) and multimodality imaging (PET, optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT), etc.). PMID:22916075

  4. Glyconanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Ligand Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins. PMID:20301131

  5. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the

  6. Probing Ternary Complex Equilibria of Crown Ether Ligands by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ternary complex formation with solvent molecules and other adventitious ligands may compromise the performance of metal-ion-selective fluorescent probes. As Ca(II) can accommodate more than 6 donors in the first coordination sphere, commonly used crown ether ligands are prone to ternary complex formation with this cation. The steric strain imposed by auxiliary ligands, however, may result in an ensemble of rapidly equilibrating coordination species with varying degrees of interaction between the cation and the specific donor atoms mediating the fluorescence response, thus diminishing the change in fluorescence properties upon Ca(II) binding. To explore the influence of ligand architecture on these equilibria, we tethered two structurally distinct aza-15-crown-5 ligands to pyrazoline fluorophores as reporters. Due to ultrafast photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) quenching of the fluorophore by the ligand moiety, the fluorescence decay profile directly reflects the species composition in the ground state. By adjusting the PET driving force through electronic tuning of the pyrazoline fluorophores, we were able to differentiate between species with only subtle variations in PET donor abilities. Concluding from a global analysis of the corresponding fluorescence decay profiles, the coordination species composition was indeed strongly dependent on the ligand architecture. Altogether, the combination of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with selective tuning of the PET driving force represents an effective analytical tool to study dynamic coordination equilibria and thus to optimize ligand architectures for the design of high-contrast cation-responsive fluorescence switches. PMID:25313708

  7. Clinical Utility and Future Applications of PET/CT and PET/CMR in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jonathan A; Salerno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, there have been major advances in cardiovascular positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with either computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). These multi-modality approaches have significant potential to leverage the strengths of each modality to improve the characterization of a variety of cardiovascular diseases and to predict clinical outcomes. This review will discuss current developments and potential future uses of PET/CT and PET/CMR for cardiovascular applications, which promise to add significant incremental benefits to the data provided by each modality alone. PMID:27598207

  8. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  9. Synthesis, 68Ga-radiolabeling, and preliminary in vivo assessment of a depsipeptide-derived compound as a potential PET/CT infection imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Parboosing, Raveen; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R; Sathekge, Mike M

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as (67/68)Ga-citrate or (18)F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with (68)Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by (68)Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3-2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  10. Protonation Studies of a Tungsten Dinitrogen Complex Supported by a Diphosphine Ligand Containing a Pendant Amine

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Charles J.; Egbert, Jonathan D.; Chen, Shentan; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-04-28

    Treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] (dppe = Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2; PEtNMePEt = Et2PCH2N(Me)CH2PEt2) with three equivalents of tetrafluoroboric acid (HBF4∙Et2O) at -78 °C generated the seven-coordinate tungsten hydride trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)][BF4]. Depending on the temperature of the reaction, protonation of a pendant amine is also observed, affording trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, with formation of the hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, as a minor product. Similar product mixtures were obtained using triflic acid (HOTf). Upon acid addition to the carbonyl analogue, cis-[W(CO)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)], the seven-coordinate carbonyl-hydride complex, trans-[W(CO)2(H)(dppe)(PEtN(H)MePEt)][OTf]2 was generated. The mixed diphosphine complex without the pendant amine in the ligand backbone, trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)] (depp = Et2P(CH2)3PEt2), was synthesized and treated with HBF4∙Et2O, selectively generating a hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(F)(dppe)(depp)][BF4]. Computational analysis was used to probe proton affinity of three sites of protonation, the metal, pendant amine, and N2 ligand in these complexes. Room temperature reactions with 100 equivalents of HOTf produced NH4+ from reduction of the N2 ligand (electrons come from W). The addition of 100 equivalents HOTf to trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] afforded 0.88 ± 0.02 equivalents NH4+, while 0.36 ± 0.02 equivalents of NH4+was formed upon treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)], the complex without the pendant amine. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  11. Spin-equilibrium and heme-ligand alteration in a high-potential monoheme cytochrome (cytochrome c554) from Achromobacter cycloclastes, a denitrifying organism.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, L M; Liu, M Y; Payne, W J; Legall, J; Moura, J J; Moura, I

    1990-04-30

    A c-type monoheme cytochrome c554 (13 kDa) was isolated from cells of Achromobacter cycloclastes IAM 1013 grown anaerobically as a denitrifier. The visible absorption spectrum indicates the presence of a band at 695 nm characteristic of heme-methionine coordination (low-spin form) coexisting with a minor high-spin form as revealed by the contribution at 630 nm. Magnetic susceptibility measurements support the existence of a small contribution of a high-spin form at all pH values, attaining a minimum at intermediate pH values. The mid-point redox potential determined by visible spectroscopy at pH 7.2 is +150 mV. The pH-dependent spin equilibrum and other relevant structural features were studied by 300-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy. In the oxidized form, the 1H-NMR spectrum shows pH dependence with pKa values at 5.0 and 8.9. According to these pKa values, three forms designated as I, II and III can be attributed to cytochrome c554. Forms I and II predominate at low pH values, and the 1H-NMR spectra reveal heme methyl proton resonances between 40 ppm and 22 ppm. These forms have a methionyl residue as a sixth ligand, and C6 methyl group of the bound methionine was identified in the low-field region of the NMR spectra. Above pH 9.6, form III predominates and the 1H-NMR spectrum is characterized by down-field hyperfine-shifted heme methyl proton resonances between 29 ppm and 22 ppm. Two new resonances are observed at congruent to 66 ppm and 54 ppm, and are taken as indicative of a new type of heme coordination (probably a lysine residue). These pH-dependent features of the 1H-NMR spectra are discussed in terms of the heme environment structure. The chemical shifts of the methyl resonances at different pH values exhibit anti-Curie temperature dependence. In the ferrous state, the 1H-NMR spectrum shows a methyl proton resonance at -3.9 ppm characteristic of methionine axial ligation. The electron-transfer rate between ferric and ferrous forms has been estimated to be smaller

  12. A Small-Animal Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic PET Study of Central Serotonin 1A Receptor Occupancy by a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Yosuke; Suzuki, Michiyuki; Tokunaga, Masaki; Maeda, Jun; Sakai, Miyuki; Ishihara, Hiroki; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Takenaka, Osamu; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptors have been mechanistically implicated in micturition control, and there has been a need for an appropriate biomarker surrogating the potency of a provisional drug acting on this receptor system for developing a new therapeutic approach to overactive bladder (OAB). Here, we analyzed the occupancy of 5-HT1A receptors in living Sprague-Dawley rat brains by a novel candidate drug for OAB, E2110, using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and assessed the utility of a receptor occupancy (RO) assay to establish a pharmacodynamic index translatable between animals and humans. The plasma concentrations inducing 50% RO (EC50) estimated by both direct and effect compartment models were in good agreement. Dose-dependent therapeutic effects of E2110 on dysregulated micturition in different rat models of pollakiuria were also consistently explained by achievement of 5-HT1A RO by E2110 in a certain range (≥ 60%). Plasma drug concentrations inducing this RO range and EC50 would accordingly be objective indices in comparing pharmacokinetics-RO relationships between rats and humans. These findings support the utility of PET RO and plasma pharmacokinetic assays with the aid of adequate mathematical models in determining the in vivo characteristics of a drug acting on 5-HT1A receptors and thereby counteracting OAB. PMID:24086433

  13. Novel fluorine-18 labeled 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin derivatives as potential PET tracers for in vivo imaging of activated caspases in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Christopher M; Hermann, Sven; Faust, Andreas; Riemann, Burkhard; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter; Kopka, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    The programmed type I cell death, defined as apoptosis, is induced by complex regulated signaling pathways that trigger the intracellular activation of executioner caspases-3, -6 and -7. Once activated, these enzymes initiate cellular death through cleavage of proteins which are responsible for DNA repair, signaling and cell maintenance. Several radiofluorinated inhibitors of caspases-3 and -7, comprising a moderate lipophilic 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)isatin lead structure, are currently being investigated for imaging apoptosis in vivo by us and others. The purpose of this study was to increase the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the aforementioned lead structure to alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of the resulting caspase-3 and -7 targeted radiotracer. Therefore, fluorinated and non-fluorinated derivatives of 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory properties against recombinant caspases-3 and -7. Fluorine-18 has been introduced by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of an alkyne precursor with 2-[(18)F]fluoroethylazide. Using dynamic micro-PET biodistribution studies in vivo the kinetic behavior of one promising PET-compatible 5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl 7-azaisatin derivative has been compared to a previously described isatin based radiotracer. PMID:26210158

  14. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies. PMID:27108800

  15. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)2 to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an important biomarker in malignant cancers. The redox processes ensuing from GGT-mediated metabolism of extracellular GSH are implicated in critical aspects of tumor cell biology. Reportedly, Glutathione monoethyl ester (GSHMe) is a substrate of GGT, which has been used for its rapid transport over glutathione. Exploring GGT to be an important target, a homobivalent peptide system, DT(GSHMe)2 was designed to target GGT-over expressing tumors for diagnostic purposes. DT(GSHMe)2 was synthesized, characterized and preclinically evaluated in vitro using toxicity, cell binding assays and time dependent experiments. Stable and defined radiochemistry with 99mTc and 68Ga was optimized for high radiochemical yield. In vivo biodistribution studies were conducted for different time points along with scintigraphic studies of radiolabeled DT(GSHMe)2 on xenografted tumor models. For further validation, in silico docking studies were performed on GGT (hGGT1, P19440). Preclinical in vitro evaluations on cell lines suggested minimal toxicity of DT(GSHMe)2 at 100 μM concentration. Kinetic analysis revealed transport of 99mTc-DT(GSHMe)2 occurs via a saturable high-affinity carrier with Michaelis constant (Km) of 2.25 μM and maximal transport rate velocity (Vmax) of 0.478 μM/min. Quantitative estimation of GGT expression from western blot experiments showed substantial expression with 41.6 ± 7.07 % IDV for tumor. Small animal micro PET (Positron Emission Tomography)/CT(Computed Tomography) coregistered images depicted significantly high uptake of DT(GSHMe)2 at the BMG-1 tumor site. ROI analysis showed high tumor to contra lateral muscle ratio of 9.33 in PET imaging studies. Avid accumulation of radiotracer was observed at tumor versus inflammation site at 2 h post i.v. injection in an Ehrlich Ascites tumor (EAT) mice model, showing evident specificity for tumor. We propose DT(GSHMe)2 to be an excellent candidate for prognostication and tumor

  16. Characterization of a potentially axially symmetric europium(III) complex of a tetraacetate,tetraaza, macrocyclic ligand by luminescence excitation, emission and lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Michael; de, William; Horrocks, W., Jr.; Liotta, Frank J.

    1982-01-01

    The Eu(III) complex of the octadentate macrocyclic ligand, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N''' -tetraacetate, DOTA, has been examined by luminescence excitation, emission, and lifetime spectroscopy using pulsed dye laser techniques. The results confirm the expected axially symmetric nature of the major component in solution and reveal that 1.2 ± 0.4 water molecules arc coordinatcd to the Eu(III) ion in the complex.

  17. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  18. A survey of attitudes toward responsible pet ownership.

    PubMed

    Selby, L A; Rhoades, J D; Hewett, J E; Irvin, J A

    1979-01-01

    The concerns of medical and community officials about responsible pet ownership have increased. Before a practical solution can be found for irresponsible ownership and community health problems associated with pet populations, the public's attitudes on issues related to responsible pet ownership must be determined. Such issues include attitudes on dog and cat overpopulation, potential public health problems associated with pet populations, and methods of controlling pet populations and stray animals. Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of 910 pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; 414 (45 percent) were men, and 496 (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog, 11 percent showed only a cat, and 36 percent were nonowners. Not only the sex of the respondent but also the category of pet ownership affected opinions on overpopulation of dogs and cats, nuisance and pollution problems associated with these animals, and methods of controlling pet populations in the community. For example, owners agreed strongly on family planning for pets, but a majority of male owners stated that they would not have their dogs neutered. PMID:572978

  19. [Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET].

    PubMed

    Attenberger, U I; Quick, H H; Guimaraes, A; Catalano, O; Morelli, J N; Schoenberg, S O

    2013-12-01

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. PMID:24221697

  20. Integrated Whole Body MR/PET: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Whole body integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET) imaging systems have recently become available for clinical use and are currently being used to explore whether the combined anatomic and functional capabilities of MR imaging and the metabolic information of PET provide new insight into disease phenotypes and biology, and provide a better assessment of oncologic diseases at a lower radiation dose than a CT. This review provides an overview of the technical background of combined MR/PET systems, a discussion of the potential advantages and technical challenges of hybrid MR/PET instrumentation, as well as collection of possible solutions. Various early clinical applications of integrated MR/PET are also addressed. Finally, the workflow issues of integrated MR/PET, including maximizing diagnostic information while minimizing acquisition time are discussed. PMID:25598673

  1. Integrated whole body MR/PET: where are we?

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    Whole body integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET) imaging systems have recently become available for clinical use and are currently being used to explore whether the combined anatomic and functional capabilities of MR imaging and the metabolic information of PET provide new insight into disease phenotypes and biology, and provide a better assessment of oncologic diseases at a lower radiation dose than a CT. This review provides an overview of the technical background of combined MR/PET systems, a discussion of the potential advantages and technical challenges of hybrid MR/PET instrumentation, as well as collection of possible solutions. Various early clinical applications of integrated MR/PET are also addressed. Finally, the workflow issues of integrated MR/PET, including maximizing diagnostic information while minimizing acquisition time are discussed. PMID:25598673

  2. Clinical application of PET/MRI in oncology.

    PubMed

    Sotoudeh, Houman; Sharma, Akash; Fowler, Kathryn J; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid imaging with integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combines the advantages of the high-resolution anatomic data from MRI and functional imaging data from PET, and has the potential to improve the diagnostic evaluation of various types of cancers. The clinical oncologic applications of this newest hybrid imaging technology are evolving and substantial efforts are underway to define the role of PET/MRI in routine clinical use. The current published literature suggests that PET/MRI may play an important role in the evaluation of patients with certain types of malignancies, involving anatomic locations such as the pelvis and the liver. The purpose of this article is to review the current published PET/MRI literature in specific body oncologic applications. In addition, PET/MRI protocols and some of the technical issues of this hybrid imaging will be briefly discussed. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:265-276. PMID:27007987

  3. Does pet arrival trigger prosocial behaviors in individuals with autism?

    PubMed

    Grandgeorge, Marine; Tordjman, Sylvie; Lazartigues, Alain; Lemonnier, Eric; Deleau, Michel; Hausberger, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of social interactions especially prosocial behaviors--an important aspect of development--is one of the characteristics of autistic disorders. Numerous strategies or therapies are used to improve communication skills or at least to reduce social impairments. Animal-assisted therapies are used widely but their relevant benefits have never been scientifically evaluated. In the present study, we evaluated the association between the presence or the arrival of pets in families with an individual with autism and the changes in his or her prosocial behaviors. Of 260 individuals with autism--on the basis of presence or absence of pets--two groups of 12 individuals and two groups of 8 individuals were assigned to: study 1 (pet arrival after age of 5 versus no pet) and study 2 (pet versus no pet), respectively. Evaluation of social impairment was assessed at two time periods using the 36-items ADI-R algorithm and a parental questionnaire about their child-pet relationships. The results showed that 2 of the 36 items changed positively between the age of 4 to 5 (t(0)) and time of assessment (t(1)) in the pet arrival group (study 1): "offering to share" and "offering comfort". Interestingly, these two items reflect prosocial behaviors. There seemed to be no significant changes in any item for the three other groups. The interactions between individuals with autism and their pets were more--qualitatively and quantitatively--reported in the situation of pet arrival than pet presence since birth. These findings open further lines of research on the impact of pet's presence or arrival in families with an individual with autism. Given the potential ability of individuals with autism to develop prosocial behaviors, related studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of such child-pet relationship. PMID:22870246

  4. Electron Transfer Reactions in Colloidal Quantum Dot-Ligand Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris-Cohen, Adam Joshua

    This thesis describes a quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of colloidal II-VI quantum dot (QD)-ligand complexes and transient absorption experiments analyzing the rates of electron transfer reactions in these complexes functionalized with redox active ligands. Chemical analysis reveals that phosphonate impurities in the surfactants used to synthesize CdSe QDs are the dominant ligands on the surface of the QDs, and these phosphonate impurities cause size-dependent Cd-enrichment of the QD surface. A study of the adsorption equilibrium of solution-phase CdS quantum dots and acid-derivatized viologen ligands (V2+) reveals that the structure of the surfaces of the QDs depends on the concentration of the QDs. A new model based on the Langmuir isotherm that treats both the number of adsorbed ligands per QD and the number of available binding sites per QD as binomially-distributed quantities is described. Transient absorption spectroscopy of solution-phase mixtures of colloidal CdS QDs and V2+ indicates electron transfer occurs from the conduction band of the QD to the LUMO of V2+. The rate constant for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is independent of the number of methylene groups in the alkyl chain on the acid-derivatized viologen. The insensitivity of the electron transfer rate constant to the length of the functional groups on the viologen suggests a van der Waals (vdW) pathway for PET, where the electron bypasses the alkylcarboxylate and tunnels through the orbitals of the QD and of the bipyridinium core. The rate of PET from colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to oxo-centered triruthenium clusters (Ru 3O) depends on the structure of the chemical headgroup by which the Ru3O clusters adsorb to the QDs. Complexes comprising QDs and Ru 3O clusters adsorbed through a pyridine-4-carboxylic acid ligand have a PET rate constant of (4.9 ± 0.9)×109 s -1 whereas complexes comprising QDs and Ru3O clusters adsorbed through a 4-mercaptopyridine ligand have an

  5. Design, Synthesis, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of an (18)F-Labeled Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 (S1P1) PET Tracer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Adam J; Liu, Hui; Jin, Hongjun; Yue, Xuyi; Riley, Sean; Brown, Steven J; Tu, Zhude

    2016-07-14

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) plays a pivotal signaling role in inflammatory response; because S1P1 modulation has been identified as a therapeutic target for various diseases, a PET tracer for S1P1 would be a useful tool. Fourteen fluorine-containing analogues of S1P ligands were synthesized and their in vitro binding potency measured; four had high potency and selectivity for S1P1 (S1P1 IC50 < 10 nM, >100-fold selectivity for S1P1 over S1P2 and S1P3). The most potent ligand, 28c (IC50 = 2.63 nM for S1P1) was (18)F-labeled and evaluated in a mouse model of LPS-induced acute liver injury to determine its S1P1-binding specificity. The results from biodistribution, autoradiography, and microPET imaging showed higher [(18)F]28c accumulation in the liver of LPS-treated mice than controls. Increased expression of S1P1 in the LPS model was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis (IHC). These data suggest that [(18)F]28c is a S1P1 PET tracer with high potential for imaging S1P1 in vivo. PMID:27280499

  6. PET/MR in cancers of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Marcelo A; Huellner, Martin W

    2015-05-01

    One early application of PET/MRI in clinical practice may be the imaging of head and neck cancers. This is because the morphologic imaging modalities, CT and MR, are recognized as similarly effective tools in cross-sectional oncological imaging of the head and neck. The addition of PET with FDG is believed to enhance the accuracy of both modalities to a similar degree. However, there are a few specific scenarios in head and neck cancer imaging where MR is thought to provide an edge over CT, including perineural spread of tumors and the infiltration of important anatomical landmarks, such as the prevertebral fascia and great vessel walls. Here, hybrid PET/MR might provide higher diagnostic certainty than PET/CT or a separate acquisition of PET/CT and MR. Another advantage of MR is the availability of several functional techniques. Although some of them might enhance the imaging of head and neck cancer with PET/MR, other functional techniques actually might prove dispensable in the presence of PET. In this overview, we discuss current trends and potential clinical applications of PET/MR in the imaging of head and neck cancers, including clinical protocols. We also discuss potential benefits of implementing functional MR techniques into hybrid PET/MRI of head and neck cancers. PMID:25841279

  7. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  8. Improving Instruction through PET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Pamela Roland

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the content and training methods used in the Program for Effective Teaching (PET), the successful staff development program of Newport News (Virginia). PET promotes application of five instructional skills: selecting learning objectives, teaching to the objectives, establishing learner focus, monitoring learner progress, and enhancing…

  9. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  10. Behavior of the potential antitumor V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands. 3. Antioxidant properties and radical production capability.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Fadda, Angela; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The radical production capability and the antioxidant properties of some V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands were examined. In particular, the bis-chelated species of quercetin (que), [VO(que)2](2-), and morin (mor), [VO(mor)2], were evaluated for their capability to reduce the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and produce the hydroxyl radical (•)OH by Fenton-like reactions, where the reducing agent is V(IV)O(2+). The results were compared with those displayed by other V(IV)O complexes, such as [VO(H2O)5](2+), [VO(acac)2] (acac=acetylacetonate) and [VO(cat)2](2-) (cat=catecholate). The capability of the V(IV)O flavonoids complexes to reduce DPPH is much larger than that of the V(IV)O species formed by non-antioxidant ligands and it is due mainly to the flavonoid molecule. Through the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin trapping assay of the hydroxyl radical it was possible to demonstrate that in acidic solution V(IV)O(2+) has an effectiveness in producing (•)OH radicals comparable to that of Fe(2+). When V(IV)O complexes of flavonoids were taken into account, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced in Fenton-like reactions depends on the specific structure of the ligand and on their capability to reduce H2O2 to give (•)OH. Both the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under physiological conditions by V(IV)O complexes of flavonoid ligands and their radical scavenging capability can be put in relationship with their antitumor effectiveness and it could be possible to modulate these actions by changing the features of the flavonoid coordinated to the V(IV)O(2+) ion, such as the entity, nature and position of the substituents and the number of phenolic groups. PMID:27184413