Science.gov

Sample records for potential repository preliminary

  1. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  2. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy: Study 1

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1995-04-01

    Limited feasible options exist when considering the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. These options are rail or truck; because of the weight associated with transportation casks (68.0 to 113.4 tonnes/75 to 125 tons), heavy-haul trucks are also considered. Yucca Mountain currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way for rail; it also lacks a dedicated highway suitable for heavy-haul trucks. Approximately 11,230 shipments by rail are planned from waste producer sites to Nevada, with an additional 1,041 shipments by legal-weight truck from four reactor sites not capable of upgrading for rail shipment. This study identifies the reasonable alternatives for waste transport to the potential repository site, describes the evaluation process performed to identify those alternatives, and discusses the reasons for elimination of transportation routes deemed to be not reasonable. The study concluded that heavy haul truck transportation is feasible-cost is very favorable when compared to rail-but route restrictions must be further evaluated. In addition to restrictions due to seasonal weather conditions, specific routes have additional restrictions, including no travel on holidays or weekends, and travel during daylight hours only. Further restrictions will be imposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation based on routing of radioactive materials by highway. Operation and maintenance costs for heavy-haul over a 24-year period, based on preliminary information, were calculated on an estimated operational cost of $15,000 per trip, with an estimated 468 trips per year average (11,230 total trips), for an estimated cost of $171 million to $173 million, depending on the route used. Because the initial costs and the total system life cycle costs of heavy-haul are approximately 50 percent lower than the lowest rail cost, this option will continue to be evaluated.

  3. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  4. Preliminary total-system analysis of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Doremus, L.A.; Engel, D.W.; Miley, T.B.; Murphy, M.T.; Nichols, W.E.; White, M.D.; Langford, D.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    The placement of high-level radioactive wastes in mined repositories deep underground is considered a disposal method that would effectively isolate these wastes from the environment for long periods of time. This report describes modeling performed at PNL for Yucca Mountain between May and November 1991 addressing the performance of the entire repository system related to regulatory criteria established by the EPA in 40 CFR Part 191. The geologic stratigraphy and material properties used in this study were chosen in cooperation with performance assessment modelers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia modeled a similar problem using different computer codes and a different modeling philosophy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a few model runs with very complex models, and SNL performed many runs with much simpler (abstracted) models.

  5. Areal power density: A preliminary examination of underground heat transfer in a potential Yucca Mountain repository and recommendations for thermal design approaches; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Ryder, E.E.

    1991-11-01

    The design of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is subject to many thermal goals related to the compliance of the site with federal regulations. This report summarizes a series of sensitivity studies that determined the expected temperatures near the potential repository. These sensitivity studies were used to establish an efficient loading scheme for the spent fuel canisters and a maximum areal power density based strictly on thermal goals. Given the current knowledge of the site, a design-basis areal power density of 80 kW/acre can be justified based on thermal goals only. Further analyses to investigate the impacts of this design-basis APD on mechanical and operational aspects of the potential repository must be undertaken before a final decision is made.

  6. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes''. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 Peer Review'' for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  7. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of techniques for transforming regional climate model output to the potential repository site in support of Yucca Mountain future climate synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Church, H.W.; Zak, B.D.; Behl, Y.K.

    1995-06-01

    The report describes a preliminary evaluation of models for transforming regional climate model output from a regional to a local scale for the Yucca Mountain area. Evaluation and analysis of both empirical and numerical modeling are discussed which is aimed at providing site-specific, climate-based information for use by interfacing activities. Two semiempirical approaches are recommended for further analysis.

  9. Preliminary assessment of clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Bish, D.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    At Yucca Mountain, evidence for at least three distinct temporal groups of clinoptilolites can be delineated from the preliminary K/Ar dates (2--3 Ma; 4--5 Ma; 7--11 Ma). The older K/Ar dates that are similar to published illite/smectite ages (9--12 Ma) may be crystallization ages, whereas the younger dates probably represent continued diagenetic reactions of older clinoptilolites with percolating fluids. The K/Ar dates increase with depth, suggesting minimal argon loss in the deeper samples. Internal consistency of the clinoptilolite K/Ar results at different levels within the drill holes suggest that dating of K-rich zeolites may provide useful information for assessing the zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. Variations in the K/Ar dates are probably related to Ar loss during dissolution of older clinoptilolites and to contamination by finely crystalline feldspars.

  10. Corrosion of breached aluminide fuel under potential repository conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2000-11-06

    Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel is proposed in a repository located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and it is the responsibility of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to provide the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with information related to the release of fission products from the DOE-owned SNF resulting from SNF corrosion. Hydrologically unsaturated spent fuel tests (''drip'' tests) are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under potential exposure conditions in the repository. Of the priority fuels being tested under the NSNFP, the aluminum-based fuels are included because of their high relative volume and uranium enrichment. The Al fuel structure is composed of fissile and aluminum powders pressed and annealed between Al plates to form thin metallic plates. The most widely used fissile powder was the intermetallic compound aluminide UAl{sub x} (where x=2,3,4). As part of this testing program, preliminary corrosion tests using unirradiated UAl{sub x} were initiated to address experimental design, sampling, and analysis issues prior to conducting tests with spent fuels. However, during this program the decision was made by U.S. DOE to convert the aluminum-based fuels to safer enrichment levels by using the melt-dilute process at Savannah River. Nonetheless, the product ingot of the melt-dilute process resembles low enriched UAl{sub x} fuel and corrosion of the fuel is expected to be similar. This paper summarizes the preliminary testing results for the first year of the program and compares them to other corrosion testing results on aluminum fuels as well as other DOE fuel types.

  11. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  12. Defining the potential repository siting block Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Elayer, R.W.; Nolting, R.M. III

    1996-12-01

    Siting activities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain focused on locating a suitable host geologic horizon above the water table. The Topopah Spring Tuff of the Paintbrush Group was identified as the most suitable geologic unit. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) identified six areas as potential repository sites. Area known as the Primary Area, is the site of the present characterization and design activities. To support current repository Advanced Conceptual Design, a reevaluation of the Primary Area was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Project`s Management and Operating Contractor (M&O). The purpose of the study was to more precisely define the block volume that would be suitable for siting the repository. The Lynx Geoscience Modeling software (Lynx) was selected to be used in this work because of its three-dimensional modeling and visualization capability for geology and underground excavation design. The Lynx model YMP.MO2 was developed in the study. The model includes surfaces that were constructed to represent each of the following limiting criteria: faults, overburden, repository host horizon, and groundwater. The resulting potential repository siting block is the useable volume within these limiting criteria.

  13. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities.

  14. Engineered barrier system and waste package design concepts for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Short, D.W.; Ruffner, D.J.; Jardine, L.J.

    1991-10-01

    We are using an iterative process to develop preliminary concept descriptions for the Engineered Barrier System and waste-package components for the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The process allows multiple design concepts to be developed subject to major constraints, requirements, and assumptions. Involved in the highly interactive and interdependent steps of the process are technical specialists in engineering, metallic and nonmetallic materials, chemistry, geomechanics, hydrology, and geochemistry. We have developed preliminary design concepts that satisfy both technical and nontechnical (e.g., programmatic or policy) requirements.

  15. Gradual degradation of concrete fiber containers and preliminary Safety analysis for the Slovak near-surface repository

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, Juraj

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: National Radioactive Waste Repository will be used for safe disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Mochovce, Slovak Republic. The Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) has developed a conceptual model that strongly overestimated radiological exposures for the Normal Evolution Scenario (NES). Radioactive waste management required additional measures for safe disposal of radioactive waste to minimize the potential consequence to the workers and the public. Use of Fiber Reinforced Containers (FRC) is proposed to enhance the performance of the potential repository for safe disposal of radioactive waste and reduce the probability of exposure. This paper contains the description of models, methods, results from experimental measurements and input data, which were used for probabilistic calculations of the lifetime FRC. The Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF) for the FRC lifetime was used to modify the conceptual model for NES. The model assumed gradual degradation of the FRC and gradual intrusion of water to the repository volume. These assumptions are in contrary to the ones in the PSAR that assumed instantaneous degradation of the FRC and instantaneous fill-up of the repository volume. The model showed that the new assumptions resulted in less radiological consequences, which allows for final design modifications of the repository. (author)

  16. Plans for characterization of the potential geologic repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, D.C.; Blanchard, M.B.; Voegele, M.D.; Younker, J.L.

    1990-04-01

    Site investigations in the vicinity of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have occurred for many years. Although information from previous site investigations was adequate to support preliminary evaluations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in the Environmental Assessment and to develop conceptual repository and waste package designs, this information is insufficient to proceed to the advanced designs and performance assessments required for the license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Therefore, intensive site characterization is planned, as described in the December 1988 Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The data acquisition activities described in the SCP are focused on obtaining information to allow evaluations of the natural and engineered barriers considered potentially relevant to repository performance. The site data base must be adequate to allow predictions of the range of expected variation in geologic conditions over the next 10,000 years, as well as predictions of the probabilities for catastrophic geologic events that could affect repository performance. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Evans, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience.

  18. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Analytical model for screening potential CO2 repositories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okwen, R.T.; Stewart, M.T.; Cunningham, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing potential repositories for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide using numerical models can be complicated, costly, and time-consuming, especially when faced with the challenge of selecting a repository from a multitude of potential repositories. This paper presents a set of simple analytical equations (model), based on the work of previous researchers, that could be used to evaluate the suitability of candidate repositories for subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide. We considered the injection of carbon dioxide at a constant rate into a confined saline aquifer via a fully perforated vertical injection well. The validity of the analytical model was assessed via comparison with the TOUGH2 numerical model. The metrics used in comparing the two models include (1) spatial variations in formation pressure and (2) vertically integrated brine saturation profile. The analytical model and TOUGH2 show excellent agreement in their results when similar input conditions and assumptions are applied in both. The analytical model neglects capillary pressure and the pressure dependence of fluid properties. However, simulations in TOUGH2 indicate that little error is introduced by these simplifications. Sensitivity studies indicate that the agreement between the analytical model and TOUGH2 depends strongly on (1) the residual brine saturation, (2) the difference in density between carbon dioxide and resident brine (buoyancy), and (3) the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation. The results achieved suggest that the analytical model is valid when the relationship between relative permeability and brine saturation is linear or quasi-linear and when the irreducible saturation of brine is zero or very small. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Selection and durability of seal materials for a bedded salt repository: preliminary studies

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.; Wakeley, L.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report details preliminary results of both experimental and theoretical studies of cementitious seal materials for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. Effects of changes in bulk composition and environment upon phase stability and physical/mechanical properties have been evaluated for more than 25 formulations. Bonding and interfacial characteristics of the region between host rock and seal material or concrete aggregate and cementitious matrix for selected formulations have been studied. Compatibilities of clays and zeolites in brines typical of the SE New Mexico region have been investigated, and their stabilities reviewed. Results of these studies have led to the conclusion that cementitious materials can be formulated which are compatible with the major rock types in a bedded salt repository environment. Strengths are more than adequate, permeabilities are consistently very low, and elastic moduli generally increase only very slightly with time. Seal formulation guidelines and recommendations for present and future work are presented. 73 references, 25 figures, 61 tables.

  1. Preliminary safety analysis of the Baita Bihor radioactive waste repository, Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Richard; Bond, Alex; Watson, Sarah; Dragolici, Felicia; Matyasi, Ludovic; Matyasi, Sandor; Thorne, Mike

    2007-07-01

    A project funded under the European Commission's Phare Programme 2002 has undertaken an in-depth analysis of the operational and post-closure safety of the Baita Bihor repository. The repository has accepted low- and some intermediate-level radioactive waste from industry, medical establishments and research activities since 1985 and the current estimate is that disposals might continue for around another 20 to 35 years. The analysis of the operational and post-closure safety of the Baita Bihor repository was carried out in two iterations, with the second iteration resulting in reduced uncertainties, largely as a result taking into account new information on the hydrology and hydrogeology of the area, collected as part of the project. Impacts were evaluated for the maximum potential inventory that might be available for disposal to Baita Bihor for a number of operational and postclosure scenarios and associated conceptual models. The results showed that calculated impacts were below the relevant regulatory criteria. In light of the assessment, a number of recommendations relating to repository operation, optimisation of repository engineering and waste disposals, and environmental monitoring were made. (authors)

  2. Seismic considerations in sealing a potential high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.; Lin, Ming

    1993-09-01

    The potential repository system is intended to isolate high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain according the performance objective--10 CFR 60.112. One subsystem that may contribute to achieving this objective is the sealing subsystem. This subsystem is comprised of sealing components in the shafts, ramps, underground network of drifts, and the exploratory boreholes. Sealing components can be rigid, as in the case of a shaft seal, or can be more compressible, as in the case of drift fill comprised of mined rockfill. This paper presents the preliminary seismic response of discrete sealing components in welded and nonwelded tuff. Special consideration is given to evaluating the stress in the seal, and the behavior of the interface between the seal and the rock. The seismic responses are computed using both static and dynamic analyses. Also presented is an evaluation of the maximum seismic response encountered by a drift seal with respect to the angle of incidence of the seismic wave. Mitigation strategies and seismic design considerations are proposed which can potentially enhance the overall response of the sealing component and subsequently, the performance of the overall repository system.

  3. Thermohydeologic Behavior at the Potential Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Rosenburg, N.D.; Gansemer, J.; Sun, Y.

    2000-02-17

    Radioactive decay of high-level nuclear waste emplaced in a Yucca Mountain repository will produce an initial heat flux on the order of 30 to 50 times the heat flux in the Geysers geothermal reservoir in California (Hardin et al., 1998). Even though the rate of heat production decreases rapidly with time after emplacement, this heat flux will change the thermal and hydrologic environment, affecting both the host rock and conditions within the drifts in ways significant to key repository performance variables.

  4. Comparison of potential radiological consequences from a spent-fuel repository and natural uranium deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, O.J.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-09-01

    A general criterion has been suggested for deep geological repositories containing spent fuel - the repositories should impose no greater radiological risk than due to naturally occurring uranium deposits. The following analysis investigates the rationale of that suggestion and determines whether current expectations of spent-fuel repository performance are consistent with such a criterion. In this study, reference spent-fuel repositories were compared to natural uranium-ore deposits. Comparisons were based on intrinsic characteristics, such as radionuclide inventory, depth, proximity to aquifers, and regional distribution, and actual and potential radiological consequences that are now occurring from some ore deposits and that may eventually occur from repositories and other ore deposits. The comparison results show that the repositories are quite comparable to the natural ore deposits and, in some cases, present less radiological hazard than their natural counterparts. On the basis of the first comparison, placing spent fuel in a deep geologic repository apparently reduces the hazard from natural radioactive materials occurring in the earth's crust by locating the waste in impermeable strata without access to oxidizing conditions. On the basis of the second comparison, a repository constructed within reasonable constraints presents no greater hazard than a large ore deposit. It is recommended that if the naturally radioactive environment is to be used as a basis for a criterion regarding repositories, then this criterion should be carefully constructed. The criterion should be based on the radiological quality of the waters in the immediate region of a specific repository, and it should be in terms of an acceptable potential increase in the radiological content of those waters due to the existence of the repository.

  5. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 2: Preliminary Design Concept for the Repository and Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  6. Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J.; Laub, T.W.

    1992-06-01

    This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10{sup {minus}11}/yr to 10{sup {minus}5}/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution.

  7. Transportation cask decontamination and maintenance at the potential Yucca Mountain repository; Yucca Mountain Site characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D.; Hill, R.R.

    1992-04-01

    This study investigates spent fuel cask handling experience at existing nuclear facilities to determine appropriate cask decontamination and maintenance operations at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These operations are categorized as either routine or nonroutine. Routine cask decontamination and maintenance tasks are performed in the cask preparation area at the repository. Casks are taken offline to a separate cask maintenance area for major nonroutine tasks. The study develops conceptual designs of the cask preparation area and cask maintenance area. The functions, layouts, and major features of these areas are also described.

  8. Some geochemical considerations for a potential repository site in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Bish, D.L.; Crowe, B.M.; Daniels, W.R.; Ogard, A.E.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vaniman, D.T.; Wolfsberg, K.

    1982-12-31

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, which is evaluating potential locations for a high-level waste repository at the Nevada Test Site and environs, is currently focusing its investigations on tuff, principally in Yucca Mountain, as a host rock. This paper discusses some of the geochemical investigations. Particular emphasis is placed on definition of some basic elements and necessary technical approaches for the geochemistry data acquisition and modeling program. Some site-specific tuff geochemical information that is important for site selection and repository performance will be identified and the current status of knowledge will then be discussed.

  9. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  10. Physical processes of magmatism and effects on the potential repository: Synthesis of technical work through Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This chapter summarizes data collection and model calculations through FY 95 under Study Plan 8.3.1.8.1.2 Physical Processes of Magmatism and Effects on the Potential Repository. The focus of this study plan is to gather information that ultimately constrains the consequences of small-volume, basaltic magmatic activity at or near a potential repository. This is then combined with event probability estimates, described elsewhere in this synthesis report, to yield a magmatic risk assessment. Tere are two basic classes of effects of magmatisms that are considered here: (1) Eruptive effects, whereby rising magma intersects a potential repository, entrains radioactive waste, and erupts it onto the earth`s surface. (2) Subsurface effects, which includes a wide range of processes such as hydrothermal flow, alteration of mineral assemblages in the potential repository system, and alteration of hydrologic flow properties of the rocks surrounding a potential repository.

  11. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport at the Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, S. R.; Mertz, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    In a geologic repository for nuclear waste, transport of radionuclides on or within colloids may be important for radionuclides of concern that have low solubility and can be entrained in, or sorbed onto, colloidal particles generated within the repository system. It is anticipated that colloids will be formed and mobilized at the potential Yucca Mountain repository as a result of alteration of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste forms, as well as corrosion of engineered barrier system (EBS) components. The abundance of colloids leaving a breached waste package and entering the repository drift will depend on the extent of waste form and EBS component alteration and the alteration products formed. Further, colloid abundance and stability will depend on such environmental factors as the ionic strength, pH, cation concentrations, natural colloid content, and organic acid and microbe content of groundwater entering the waste package from the drift. Colloids may flocculate and settle, be chemically retarded, mechanically filtered, or dissolve. In addition, colloids may sorb readily at the interfaces between air and water in rocks and engineered barriers and, depending upon the characteristics and degree of saturation of the porous medium, may be immobilized, retarded, or transported. A methodology for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain was developed for use in Total System Performance Assessment calculations. The model incorporates several colloid sources and addresses factors affecting colloid stability and concentration as well as distribution and attachment of radionuclides onto colloids. Waste form corrosion tests performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have focused on determination of colloid composition, stability, concentration, size distribution, and associated radionuclide concentration. Data from these experiments were used as model inputs.

  12. Testing claims about volcanic disruption of a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, N. M.; Abramson, L. R.; Marsh, B. D.

    2004-12-01

    Yucca Mountain is a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. We examine claims that the frequency of future basaltic dike intersection could be 1 × 10-6/yr or higher (i.e., on average, one penetration every million yrs). These claims fail simple tests at four time scales. Spatial-temporal models that predict intrusion frequencies >2 × 10-7/yr are overly pessimistic because no dikes have been found in the 13 Myr-old potential repository footprint. More realistic models are developed by considering this non-detection of dikes and by applying probabilistic hazard assessments based on known patterns of Pleistocene volcanism. Using a hazard assessment code, we estimate the frequency of dike intersection at 5.4 × 10-8/yr with an upper 95% confidence bound of 9.8 × 10-8/yr.

  13. Geochemical homogeneity of tuffs at the potential repository level, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, Zell E.; Cloke, Paul

    2001-04-29

    In a potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, radioactive waste and canisters, drip shields protecting the waste from seepage and from rock falls, the backfill and invert material of crushed rock, the host rock, and water and gases contained within pores and fractures in the host rock together would form a complex system commonly referred to as the near-field geochemical environment. Materials introduced into the rock mass with the waste that are designed to prolong containment collectively are referred to as the Engineered Barrier System, and the host rock and its contained water and gases compose the natural system. The interaction of these component parts under highly perturbed conditions including temperatures well above natural ambient temperatures will need to be understood to assess the performance of the potential repository for long-term containment of nuclear waste. The geochemistry and mineralogy of the rock mass hosting the emplacement drifts must be known in order to assess the role of the natural system in the near-field environment. Emplacement drifts in a potential repository at Yucca Mountain would be constructed in the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff which is composed of both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones. The chemical composition of the phenocryst-poor member has been characterized by numerous chemical analyses of outcrop samples and of core samples obtained by surface-based drilling. Those analyses have shown that the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is remarkably uniform in composition both vertically and laterally. To verify this geochemical uniformity and to provide rock analyses of samples obtained directly from the potential repository block, major and trace elements were analyzed in core samples obtained from drill holes in the cross drift, which was driven to provide direct access to the rock mass where emplacement drifts would be constructed.

  14. Expected near-field thermal performance for nuclear waste repositories at potential salt sites: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, E.G.

    1987-08-01

    Thermal analyses were made for the environmental assessments of seven potential salt sites for a nuclear waste repository. These analyses predicted that potential repository sites in domal salts located in the Gulf Coast will experience higher temperature than those in bedded salts of Paradox and Palo Duro Basins, mainly because of higher ambient temperatures at depth. The TEMPV5 code, a semi-analytical heat transfer code for finite line sources, calculated temperatures for commercial high-level waste (CHLW) and spent fuel from pressurized-water reactors (SFPWR). Benchmarks with HEATING6, THAC-SIP-3D, STEALTH, and SPECTROM-41 showed that TEMPV5 agreed closely in the very near field around the waste package and approximately in the near-field and far-field regions of the repository. The analyses used site-specific thermal conductivities that were increased by 40% to compensate for reductions caused by testing technique, salt impurities, and other heterogeneities, and sampling disturbance. Analyses showed peak salt temperatures of 236/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 134/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the bedded salt and 296/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 180/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the domal salt. Analyses with uncorrected laboratory thermal conductivities would increase peak salt temperatures by about 120/sup 0/C for CHLW and about 60/sup 0/C for SFPWR. These temperature increases would increase the thermally induced flow of brine and accelerate corrosion of the waste package. 30 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs.

  15. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, John W.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  16. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.W.; O`Leary, D.W.

    1993-09-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  17. Experimental studies of seal materials for potential use in a Los Medanos-type bedded salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.

    1981-09-01

    This investigation is composed of the following three tasks: (1) materials selection and factors affecting longevity of seal materials; (2) experimental seal materials for shaft, tunnel, and room backfill incorporating rock from the Los Medanos area; and (3) effects of the curing environment on properties of seal materials. Cement-based materials have been studied as candidates for backfilling and sealing boreholes, shafts, tunnels, and rooms in potential repository environments, particularly in bedded salt. In these studies, potential seal materials were selected and subjected to preliminary tests. Then, geochemical factors which control longevity of repository-sealing materials were investigated. The subjects of investigations included: factors controlling the attainment of equilibrium, with time, of the plug components; and the rate of approach of the plug-component subsystem to a state of equilibrium within the total system. The effect of these factors upon changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radwaste species are being determined. High values were obtained for compressive strengths of some concretes (> 35 MPa); these samples also had very low permeabilities to brine (10/sup -7/ or 10/sup -8/ darcy). Highest strengths were obtained from samples cast with dolostone and anhydrite aggregate. Apparently, a strong bond generally was formed between the grout and the various rocks, evidenced by breakage through aggregate particles in tests of compressive strength. An expansive grout mixture containing salt was evaluated in five curing conditions, including: solutions saturated with CaSO/sub 4/, and Ca(OH)/sub 2/; deionized water; naturally occurring brine; and humid air, all at 38/sup 0/C. Expansion due to extensive growth of ettringite occurred in the first three of these five environments.

  18. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  19. Chemical variability of zeolites at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D.E.

    1985-12-31

    The compositions of clinoptilolites and their host tuffs have been examined by electron microprobe and x-ray fluorescence, respectively, to determine their variability at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their sorptive properties, these zeolites could provide important geologic barriers to radionuclide migration. Variations in clinoptilolite composition can strongly affect the mineral`s thermal and ion-exchange properties, thus influencing its behavior in the repository environment. Clinoptilolites and heulandites closest to the proposed repository have calcium-rich compositions (60 to 90 mol. % Ca) and silica-to-aluminum ratios that concentrate between 4.0 and 4.6. In contrast, clinoptilolites and their host tuffs deeper in the volcanic sequence have highly variable compositions that vary vertically and laterally. Deeper-occurring clinoptilolites in the eastern part of Yucca Mountain are characterized by calcic-potassic compositions and tend to become more calcium-rich with depth. Clinoptilolites at equivalent stratigraphic levels on the western side of Yucca Mountain have sodic-potassic compositions and tend to become more sodium-rich with depth. Despite their differences in exchangeable cation compositions these two deeper-occurring compositional suites have similar silica-to-aluminum ratios, concentrating between 4.4 and 5.0. The chemical variability of clinoptilolites and their host tuffs at Yucca Mountain suggest that their physical and chemical properties will also vary. Compositionally-dependent clinoptilolite properties important for repository performance assessment include expansion/contraction behavior, hydration/dehydration behavior, and ion-exchange properties.

  20. Environmental Impacts of Transportation to the Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Sweeney; R. Best; P. Bolton; P. Adams

    2002-01-03

    The Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada analyzes a Proposed Action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As part of the Proposed Action, the EIS analyzes the potential impacts of transporting commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain from 77 sites across the United States. The analysis includes information on the comparative impacts of transporting these materials by truck and rail and discusses the impacts of building a rail line or using heavy-haul trucks to move rail casks from a mainline railroad in Nevada to the site. This paper provides an overview of the analyses and the potential impacts of these transportation activities. The potential transportation impacts were looked at from two perspectives: transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste by legal-weight truck or by rail on a national scale and impacts specific to Nevada from the transportation of these materials from the State borders to the Yucca Mountain site. In order to address the range of impacts that could result from the most likely modes, legal-weight truck and rail, the EIS employed two analytical scenarios--mostly legal-weight truck and mostly rail. Estimated national transportation impacts were based on 24 years of transportation activities. Approximately 8 fatalities could occur from all causes in the nationwide general population from incident-free transportation activities of the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 4 from the mostly rail scenario. The analysis examined the radiological consequences under the maximum foreseeable accident scenario and also overall accident risk. The overall accident risk over the 24 year period would be about 0.0002 latent cancer fatality for

  1. Geochemically Homogeneous Tuffs Host the Potential Nuclear Waste Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Z.E. Peterman

    2001-07-13

    In evaluating a geological environment for the disposition of nuclear waste, the composition of the host rock is an important parameter in characterizing the natural system and its role as a barrier to migration of radionuclides. Emplacement drifts in a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would be constructed in the lower phenocryst-poor rhyolitic member ({approx}300 m thick) of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a felsic pyroclastic ash flow. The rhyolitic member, composed largely of microcrystalline quartz and alkali feldspar, contains localized secondary minerals including vapor-phase silica polymorphs and feldspar typically lining lithophysal cavities, and low-temperature calcite and opal in cavities and fractures. Chemical analyses of Topopah Spring Tuff samples from outcrops and from core obtained by surface-based drilling have shown that the phenocryst-poor rhyolite member at Yucca Mountain is remarkably uniform in composition both vertically and laterally. To verify this geochemical homogeneity in samples collected directly from the repository block where emplacement drifts would be constructed, major and trace elements were analyzed for core samples obtained from 20 systematically spaced drill holes in a drift constructed across the repository block. Means and standard deviations of selected oxides and elements in weight percent indicate geochemical uniformity among these samples: SiO{sub 2}, 76.29 {+-} 0.32; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 12.55 {+-} 0.14; FeO, 0.13 {+-} 0.05; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.97 {+-} 0.07; MgO, 0.12 {+-} 0.02; CaO, 0.50 {+-} 0.03; Na{sub 2}O, 3.52 {+-} 0.11; K{sub 2}O, 4.83 {+-} 0.06; TiO{sub 2}, 0.109 {+-} 0.004; ZrO{sub 2}, 0.016 {+-} 0.001; MnO, 0.068 {+-} 0.008; Cl, 0.017 {+-} 0.004; F, 0.038 {+-} 0.008; and CO{sub 2}, 0.011 {+-} 0.003. Means and standard deviations of selected trace elements, in micrograms per gram, also indicate small compositional variability: Ba, 51 {+-} 12; Cs, 4.2 {+-} 0.3; Li, 25 {+-} 9; Pb, 27 {+-} 1

  2. Analysis of the potential formation of a Breccia chimney beneath the WIPP repository

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegler, P.

    1982-05-01

    This report evaluates the potential formation of a Breccia pipe beginning at the Bell Canyon aquifer beneath the WIPP repository and the resulting release of radioactivity to the surface. Rock mechanics considerations indicate that the formation of a Breccia pipe by collapse of a cavern is not reasonable. Even if rock mechanics is ignored, the overlying strata act as a barrier and would prevent the release of radioactivity to the biosphere. Gradual formation of a Breccia pipe is so slow that the plutonium-239 in the waste (one of the most important long-lived components) would decay during formation. If Bell Lake and San Simon Sinks are the surface manifestation of a regional deep dissolution wedge, such a wedge is too far removed to represent pipe forming activity near the WIPP site. The formation of a Breccia pipe under the WIPP repository is highly unlikely. If it did occur, the concentration of plutonium-239 in brine reaching the surface would be less than the maximum permissible concentration in water specified in the Code of Federal Regulation Title 10, part 20.

  3. Chemistry of diagenetically altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D.E.; Warren, R.G.; Hagan, R.C.; Luedemann, G.

    1986-10-01

    The chemistry of diagenetically altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada is described. These tuffs contain substantial amounts of zeolites that are highly sorptive of certain radionuclides. Because of their widespread distribution, the zeolitic tuffs could provide important barriers to radionuclide migration. Physical properties of these tuffs and of their constituent zeolites are influenced by their chemical compositions. This study defines the amount of chemical variability within diagenetically altered tuffs and within diagenetic minerals at Yucca Mountain. Zeolitic tuffs at Yucca Mountain formed by diagenetic alteration of rhyolitic vitric tuffs. Despite their similar starting compositions, these tuffs developed compositions that vary both vertically and laterally. Widespread chemical variations were the result of open-system chemical diagenesis in which chemical components of the tuffs were mobilized and redistributed by groundwaters. Alkalies, alkaline earths, and silica were the most mobile elements during diagenesis. The zeolitic tuffs can be divided into three compositional groups: (1) calcium- and magnesium-rich tuffs associated with relatively thin zones of alteration in the unsaturated zone; (2) tuffs in thick zones of alteration at and below the water table that grade laterally from sodic compositions on the western side of Yucca Mountain to calcic compositions on the eastern side; and (3) potassic tuffs at the north end of Yucca Mountain. Physical properties of tuffs and their consistuent zeolites at Yucca Mountain may be affected by variations in compositions. Properties important for assessment of repository performance include behavior and ion exchange.

  4. Analysis of water flow paths: methodology and example calculations for a potential geological repository in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Werner, Kent; Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten

    2006-12-01

    Safety assessment related to the siting of a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel deep in the bedrock requires identification of potential flow paths and the associated travel times for radionuclides originating at repository depth. Using the Laxemar candidate site in Sweden as a case study, this paper describes modeling methodology, data integration, and the resulting water flow models, focusing on the Quaternary deposits and the upper 150 m of the bedrock. Example simulations identify flow paths to groundwater discharge areas and flow paths in the surface system. The majority of the simulated groundwater flow paths end up in the main surface waters and along the coastline, even though the particles used to trace the flow paths are introduced with a uniform spatial distribution at a relatively shallow depth. The calculated groundwater travel time, determining the time available for decay and retention of radionuclides, is on average longer to the coastal bays than to other biosphere objects at the site. Further, it is demonstrated how GIS-based modeling can be used to limit the number of surface flow paths that need to be characterized for safety assessment. Based on the results, the paper discusses an approach for coupling the present models to a model for groundwater flow in the deep bedrock. PMID:17334050

  5. Supplemental Performance Analyses for the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S. D.; McNeish, J. A.; Coppersmith, K.; Jenni, K. E.; Rickertsen, L. D.; Swift, P. N.; Wilson, M. L.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. Based on internal reviews of the S&ER and its key supporting references, the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (2) and the Analysis Model Reports and Process Model Reports cited therein, the DOE has recently identified and performed several types of analyses to supplement the treatment of uncertainty in support of the consideration of a possible site recommendation. The results of these new analyses are summarized in the two-volume report entitled FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA) (3,4). The information in this report is intended to supplement, not supplant, the information contained in the S&ER. The DOE recognizes that important uncertainties will always remain in any assessment of the performance of a potential repository over thousands of years (1). One part of the DOE approach to recognizing and managing these uncertainties is a commitment to continued testing and analysis and to the continued evaluation of the technical basis supporting the possible recommendation of the site, such as the analysis contained in the SSPA. The goals of the work described here are to provide insights into the implications of newly quantified uncertainties, updated science, and evaluations of lower operating temperatures on the performance of a potential Yucca Mountain repository and to increase confidence in the results of the TSPA described in the S

  6. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of flooding on a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    This report is a review of the state-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of flooding on a deep radioactive-waste repository, namely, for predicting the future occurrence of catastrophic flooding and for estimating the effect of such flooding on waste containment characteristics. Several detrimental effects are identified: flooding can increase groundwater seepage velocities through a repository within the framework of the existing hydrologic system and thus increase the rate of radioactive-waste leakage to the biosphere; flooding may alter repository hydrology by reversing flow gradients, relocating sources of groundwater recharge and discharge, or shortening seepage paths, thereby producing unpredictable leakage; saturation of a vadose-zone repository during flooding can increase groundwater seepage velocities by several orders of magnitude; and flooding can damage repository-media containment properties by inducing seismic or chemical instability or increasing fracture permeability in relatively shallow repository rock as a result of redistributing in-situ stresses. Short-term flooding frequency and magnitude can be predicted statistically by analyzing historical records of flooding. However, long-term flooding events that could damage a permanent repository cannot be predicted with confidence because the geologic record is neither unique nor sufficienly complete for statistical analysis. It is more important to identify parameters characterizing containment properties (such as permeability, groundwater gradient, and shortest seepage path length to the biosphere) that could be affected by future flooding, estimate the maximum magnitude of flooding that could occur within the life of the repository by examining the geologic record, and determine the impact such flooding could have on the parameter values.

  7. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Peer review report for revision 1 of DOE/RW-0184

    SciTech Connect

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, ``Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes``. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 ``Peer Review`` for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  8. Geochemistry of rock units at the potential repository level, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Cloke, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    The compositional variability of the phenocryst-poor member of the 12.8 Ma Topopah Spring Tuff at the potential repository level was assessed by duplicate analysis of 20 core samples from the cross drift at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previous analyses of outcrop and core samples of the Topopah Spring Tuff showed that the phenocryst-poor rhyolite, which includes both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones, is relatively uniform in composition. Analyses of rock samples from the cross drift, the first from the actual potential repository block, also indicate the chemical homogeneity of this unit excluding localized deposits of vapor-phase minerals and low-temperature calcite and opal in fractures, cavities, and faults. The possible influence of vapor-phase minerals and calcite and opal coatings on rock composition at a scale sufficiently large to incorporate these heterogeneously distributed deposits was evaluated and is considered to be relatively minor. Therefore, the composition of the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is considered to be adequately represented by the analyses of samples from the cross drift. The mean composition as represented by the 10 most abundant oxides in wt. % or g/100 g is: SiO2, 76.29; Al2O3, 12.55; FeO, 0.14; Fe2O3, 0.97; MgO, 0.13; CaO, 0.50; Na2O, 3.52; K2O, 4.83; TiO2, 0.11; and MnO, 0.07. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. GEOCHEMISTRY OF ROCK UNITS AT THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY LEVEL, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    Z.E. Peterman; P.L. Cloke

    2000-12-13

    The compositional variability of the phenocryst-poor member of the 12.8-million-year Topopah Spring Tuff at the potential repository level was assessed by duplicate analysis of 20 core samples from the cross drift at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Previous analyses of outcrop and core samples of the Topopah Spring Tuff showed that the phenocryst-poor rhyolite, which includes both lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones, is relatively uniform in composition. Analyses of rock samples from the cross drift, the first from the actual potential repository block, also indicate the chemical homogeneity of this unit excluding localized deposits of vapor-phase minerals and low-temperature calcite and opal in fractures, cavities, and faults, The possible influence of vapor-phase minerals and calcite and opal coatings on rock composition at a scale sufficiently large to incorporate these heterogeneously distributed deposits was evaluated and is considered to be relatively minor. Therefore, the composition of the phenocryst-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff is considered to be adequately represented by the analyses of samples from the cross drift. The mean composition as represented by the 10 most abundant oxides in weight percent or grams per hundred grams is: SiO{sub 2}, 76.29; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 12.55; FeO, 0.14; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.97; MgO, 0.13; CaO, 0.50; Na{sub 2}O, 3.52; K{sub 2}O, 4.83; TiO{sub 2}, 0.11; and MnO, 0.07.

  10. A preliminary look at electric efficiency potential

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Jess

    2010-01-15

    A systematic review of more than 20 studies of electric efficiency potential suggests that, contrary to what might be desired of such objective analysis, the study author, sponsor, and intended audience may matter in the conclusions that are reached. This pattern warrants further study. (author)

  11. Prediction of release rates for a potential waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, M.M.; Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1990-10-01

    Nuclear waste may be placed in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain in waste packages. The waste will consist of spent fuel assemblies or consolidated fuel rods, as well as borosilicate glass in steel pour containers, each enclosed in sealed containers. Current design calls for the waste packages to be surrounded by an air gap. Although the waste package is generally not seen as the primary barrier for nuclear waste isolation, it must in fact meet specific regulatory requirements. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that the release rate of any radionuclide from the engineered barrier system following the containment period shall not exceed one part in 100,000 per year of the inventory of that radionuclide calculated to be present at 1000 years following permanent closure. For low-inventory radionuclides, those that constitute less than 0.1 percent of the calculated total curie inventory at 1000 years, the allowable annual release is a constant value, equal to 10{sup {minus}8} of the total curie inventory in the repository at 1000 years. Therefore it is necessary to calculate release rates for waste packages at Yucca Mountain. We calculate release rates for key radionuclides using analytic solutions presented in a companion report. We consider both wet-drip and moist- continuous water-contact modes. We consider the release three types of species: solubility-limited species, species released congruent with solid-solid alteration of spent-fuel matrix or borosilicate glass, and readily soluble species from the fuel-cladding gap, gas plenum, and readily accessible grain boundaries. In each case we give the release rates of the species as a function of time. 22 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of Groundwater Pathways and Travel Times From the Nevada Test Site to the Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Ye, M.; Carroll, R. W.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Shafer, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada has been recommended as a deep geological repository for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If YM is licensed as a repository by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, it will be important to identify the potential for radionuclides to migrate from underground nuclear testing areas located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the hydraulically downgradient repository area to ensure that monitoring does not incorrectly attribute repository failure to radionuclides originating from other sources. In this study, we use the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate potential groundwater migration pathways and associated travel times from the NTS to the proposed YM repository area. Using results from the calibrated DVRFS model and the particle tracking post-processing package MODPATH we modeled three-dimensional groundwater advective pathways in the NTS and YM region. Our study focuses on evaluating the potential for groundwater pathways between the NTS and YM withdrawal area and whether travel times for advective flow along these pathways coincide with the prospective monitoring time frame at the proposed repository. We include uncertainty in effective porosity as this is a critical variable in the determination of time for radionuclides to travel from the NTS region to the YM withdrawal area. Uncertainty in porosity is quantified through evaluation of existing site data and expert judgment and is incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulation. Since porosity information is limited for this region, the uncertainty is quite large and this is reflected in the results as a large range in simulated groundwater travel times.

  13. Evaluation Of Groundwater Pathways And Travel Times From The Nevada Test Site To The Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    K.F. Pohlman; J. Zhu; M. Ye; J. Chapman; C. Russell; D.S. Shafer

    2006-08-28

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been recommended as a deep geological repository for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. If YM is licensed as a repository by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, it will be important to identify the potential for radionuclides to migrate from underground nuclear testing areas located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the hydraulically downgradient repository area to ensure that monitoring does not incorrectly attribute repository failure to radionuclides originating from other sources. In this study, we use the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to investigate potential groundwater migration pathways and associated travel times from the NTS to the proposed YM repository area. Using results from the calibrated DVRFS model and the particle tracking post-processing package MODPATH, we modeled three-dimensional groundwater advective pathways in the NTS and YM region. Our study focuses on evaluating the potential for groundwater pathways between the NTS and YM withdrawal area and whether travel times for advective flow along these pathways coincide with the prospective monitoring timeframe at the proposed repository. We include uncertainty in effective porosity, as this is a critical variable in the determination of time for radionuclides to travel from the NTS region to the YM withdrawal area. Uncertainty in porosity is quantified through evaluation of existing site data and expert judgment and is incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulation. Since porosity information is limited for this region, the uncertainty is quite large and this is reflected in the results as a large range in simulated groundwater travel times.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  15. Preliminary Assessment Of SIRE's Potential For Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, D. L.; Muscari, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a contamination analysis and computer modeling study performed for the Space Infrared Experiment (SIRE) using the Space Transport System (STS) Shuttle Orbiter as the launch vehicle for the proposed seven-day sortie mission. These results will provide an accurate description of the deposition levels on the telescope primary mirror and of the molecular number column density (NCD) along the telescope line-of-sight. The planned Helium Purge System was assumed not to be operating. The contri-bution to the contamination environment of any cargo element, other than SIRE and its pallet, was not considered in this study. The study considers five potential contamination sources, including the flash evaporator vent effluents and the vernier reaction control system (VCS) engines plume constituents.

  16. Recent characterization activities of Midway Valley as a potential repository surface facility site

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.D.; Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Bullard, T.F.

    1992-01-31

    Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a possible location for the surface facilities of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository. This structural and topographic valley is bounded by two north- trending, down-to-the-west normal faults: the Paintbrush Canyon fault on the east and the Bow Ridge fault on the west. Surface and near-surface geological data have been acquired from Midway Valley during the past three years with particular emphasis on evaluating the existence of Quaternary faults. A detailed (1:6000) surficial geological map has been prepared based on interpretation of new and existing aerial photographs, field mapping, soil pits, and trenches. No evidence was found that would indicate displacement of these surficial deposits along previously unrecognized faults. However, given the low rates of Quaternary faulting and the extensive areas that are covered by late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits south of Sever Wash, Quaternary faulting between known faults cannot be precluded based on surface evidence alone. Middle to late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Unit Q3) exist at or near the surface throughout Midway Valley. Confidence is increased that the potential for surface fault rupture in Midway Valley can be assessed by excavations that expose the deposits and soils associated with Unit Q3 or older units (middle Pleistocene or earlier).

  17. Preliminary Validation of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutsal, Ebru; Pasli, Figen; Isikli, Sedat; Sahin, Figen; Yilmaz, Gokce; Beyazova, Ufuk

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to provide preliminary findings on the validity of Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAP Inventory) on Turkish sample of 23 abuser and 47 nonabuser parents. To investigate validity in two groups, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Psychopathic Deviate (MMPI-PD) scale is also used along with CAP. The results show…

  18. Potential corrosion and degradation mechanisms of Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, A.J.

    1984-09-01

    A literature review and analysis were made of corrosion and degradation processes applicable to Zircaloy cladding on spent nuclear fuel in a tuff repository. In particular, lifetime sought for the Zircaloy is 10,000 years. Among the potential failure mechanisms examined were: oxidation by steam, air, and water, including the effects of ions whose presence is anticipated in the water; mechanical overload; stress (creep) rupture; stress-corrosion cracking (SCC); and delayed failure due to hydride cracking. The conclusion is that failure due to oxidation is not credible, although a few experiments are suggested to confirm the effect of aqueous fluoride on the Zircaloy cladding. Mechanical overload is not a problem, and failure from stress-rupture does not appear likely based on a modified Larson-Miller analysis. Analysis shows that delayed hydride cracking is not anticipated for the bulk of spent fuel pins. However, for a minority of pins under high stress, there is some uncertainty in the analysis as a result of: (1) uncertainty about crack depths in spent fuel claddings and (2) the effect of slow cooling on the formation of radially oriented hydride precipitates. Experimental resolution is called for. Finally, insufficient information is currently available on stress-corrosion cracking. While evidence is presented that SCC failure is not likely to occur, it is difficult to demonstrate this conclusively because the process is not clearly understood and data are limited. Further experimental work on SCC susceptibility is especially needed.

  19. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

  20. Assessment of the potential for tectonic fault rupture for high-level nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, F.H.; Stepp, J.C.; McGuire, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    Active faults that extend to or near the Earth`s surface may threaten the safety of engineered structures. The threat can be mitigated by appropriate siting and design, which requires understanding of the characteristics and magnitude of the faulting hazard based on detailed site investigations and assessment of the characteristics of faulting that has occurred under the present tectonic regime in the site area. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches are used to assess hazards due to fault rupture for engineering design. A combined probabilistic-deterministic approach provides the broadest perspective both for evaluating the potential fault rupture hazard and for selecting design criteria, which may differ among the various components of the repository depending on their function and importance to safety. Probabilistic analyses that explicitly incorporates uncertainties in parameters that characterize fault activity, the nature and amount of deformation, and the likelihood of occurrence, as well as uncertainties in the analytical methods, enables reasonable design parameters to be selected and the identification of the input parameters and analytical methods that dominate the hazard. Deterministic analyses can then be made to examine in detail those factors that dominate the fault rupture hazard.

  1. Effects of magmatic processes on the potential Yucca Mountain repository: Field and computational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.; Groves, K.R.; Gable, C.W.; Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1993-10-01

    Assessing the risk of future magmatic activity at a potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository requires, in addition to event probabilities, some knowledge of the consequences of such activity. Magmatic consequences are divided into an eruptive component, which pertains to the possibility of radioactive waste being erupted onto the surface of Yucca Mountain, and a subsurface component, which occurs whether there is an accompanying eruption or not. The subsurface component pertains to a suite of processes such as hydrothermal activity, changes in country rock properties, and long term alteration of the hydrologic flow field which change the waste isolation system. This paper is the second in a series describing progress on studies of the effects of magmatic activity. We describe initial results of field analog studies at small volume basaltic centers where detailed measurements are being conducted of the amount of wall rock debris that can be erupted as a function of depth in the volcanic plumbing system. Constraints from field evidence of wall rock entrainment mechanisms are also discussed. Evidence is described for a mechanism of producing subhorizontal sills versus subvertical dikes, an issue that is important for assessing subsurface effects. Finally, new modeling techniques, which are being developed in order to capture the three dimensional complexities of real geologic situations in subsurface effects, are described.

  2. Effects of various radiation source characteristics on shielding requirements at the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.W.; Miller, D.D.; Hill, R.R.

    1992-02-01

    This radiation shielding study provides dose rate information that can be used to estimate required shielding thicknesses for different repository configurations, including various hot cells and vaults in the waste-handling building, the boreholes in the underground emplacement area, and the transfer casks. The study determines gamma and neutron source strengths for various waste types and source geometries representative of conditions at the repository and determines dose rates as a function of shielding thickness for selected materials.

  3. Software Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P., D.

    1983-01-01

    The Common Software Module Repository (CSMR) is computerized library system with high product and service visibility to potential users. Online capabilities of system allow both librarian and user to interact with library. Librarian is responsible for maintaining information in CSMR library. User searches library to locate software modules that meet his or her current needs.

  4. Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2004-10-04

    This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

  5. Mountain-Scale Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes Around the Potential Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthal; C. Haukwa; N. Spycher

    2001-06-04

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) effects on flow and geochemistry in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain at a mountain scale. The major THC processes important in the UZ are (1) mineral precipitation/dissolution affecting flow and transport to and from the potential repository, and (2) changes in the compositions of gas and liquid that may seep into drifts.

  6. The influence of copper on Zircaloy spent fuel cladding degradation under a potential tuff repository condition

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to detect the influence of copper on Zircaloy spent fuel cladding degradation in one possible repository environment. Copper and copper alloys are being considered for use in a tuff repository. The compatibility of a copper waste package container and the Zircaloy cladding on spent fuel has been questioned essentially because copper ion has been observed to accelerate zirconium alloy corrosion in acid environments, as does ferric iron, and a phenomenon called "crud-induced localized corrosion" is observed in some Boiling Water Reactors where thorugh-the-wall corrosion pits develop beneath copper-rich crud deposits. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of tectonism and volcanism on a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    Most estimates of the time required for safe isolation of radioactive wastes from the biosphere range from 100,000 to 1,000,000 years. For such long time spans, it is necessary to assess the potential effects of geologic processes such as volcanism and tectonic activity on the integrity of geologic repositories. Predictions of geologic phenomena can be based on probabilistic models, which assume a random distribution of events. The necessary historic and geologic records are rarely available to provide an adequate data base for such predictions. The observed distribution of volcanic and tectonic activity is not random, and appears to be controlled by extremely complex deterministic processes. The advent of global plate tectonic theory in the past two decades has been a giant step toward understanding these processes. At each potential repository site, volcanic and tectonic processes should be evaluated to provide the most thorough possible understanding of those deterministic processes. Based on this knowledge, judgements will have to be made as to whether or not the volcanic and tectonic processes pose unacceptable risk to the integrity of the repository. This report describes the potential hazards associated with volcanism and tectonism, and the means for evaluating these processes.

  8. 10 CFR Appendix I to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure Repository Performance I Appendix I to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. I Appendix I to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Postclosure...

  9. Flow and radionuclide transport from rock to surface systems: characterization and modelling of potential repository sites in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Kent; Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten

    2007-07-01

    The safety assessments of potential geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden are supported by modelling of groundwater flow in rock, to predict locations (exit points) where radionuclides from the deep repository may enter land, surface waters and associated ecosystems above the rock. This modelling includes detailed rock descriptions, but simplifies the upper part of the flow domain, including representations of meteorological processes and interactions with hydrological objects at the surface. Using the Laxemar candidate site as example, this paper investigates some potentially important consequences of these simplifications. Specifically, it compares particle tracking results obtained by a deep-rock groundwater flow model (CONNECTFLOW) and by MIKE SHE-MIKE 11, which contains detailed descriptions of near-surface/surface water flow. Overall, the models predict similar exit point patterns, occurring as clusters along streams in valleys, at a lake, and in sea bays. However, on a detailed level there are some prediction differences, which may be of importance for biosphere-focused safety assessments. CONNECTFLOW essentially predicts flow paths through the repository that follow fractures and deformation zones, outcropping in valleys. In comparison, MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 provides more detailed information on near-surface water flow paths, including the associated exit points and inputs to assessments of radionuclide retention. (authors)

  10. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used. PMID:23619801

  11. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Slovic, P.

    1989-12-31

    This paper addresses the potential for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to have serious adverse economic impacts on the city of Las Vegas and the State of Nevada. Adverse economic impacts may be expected to result from two related social processes. One has to do with perceptions of risk and socially amplified reactions to unfortunate events associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The second process that may trigger significant adverse impacts is that of stigmatization. The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, social amplification, and stigma are discussed in this paper and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse effects on tourism, migration, and business development.

  12. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Slovic, P.; Layman, M.; Kraus, N.N.; Chalmers, J.; Gesel, G.; Flynn, J.

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes a program of research designed to assess the potential impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse economic impacts may be expected to result from two related social processes. One has to do with perceptions of risk and socially amplified reactions to ``unfortunate events`` associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The second process that may trigger significant adverse impacts is that of stigmatization. The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, social amplification, and stigmatization are discussed in this paper and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse effects on tourism, migration, and business development.

  13. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository.

  14. A comparison of two potential repositories: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Pflum, C.G.

    1994-07-11

    Two repositories in the same country, yet Congress and the DOE manage them differently. While Congress encumbers WIPP with unanticipated oversight and inappropriate regulations, Congress streamlines the commercial repository program and promises improved regulations for Yucca Mountain. While DOE encouraged science at the expense of the WIPP infrastructure, DOE postponed its scientific investigations at Yucca Mountain and constructed an infrastructure, large enough to support an ambitious program that was never realized. Somewhere between WIPP and Yucca Mountain lies an ideal repository program. A program where consistent national policy promotes progress; where lucid regulations inspire confidence; where science and infrastructure are balanced; and where oversight groups do not become the tail that wags the dog. Neither WIPP nor Yucca Mountain are ideal programs, but each has its advantages that approach the ideal. Consistent national policy would steer the ideal repository program in a predictable direction. Here Yucca Mountain has the advantage. Successive legislation has streamlined the siting process and promises better regulations. From the beginning, the ideal program would know its regulators and regulations. Again, Yucca Mountain has the advantage. More familiar with regulators and regulations, the Yucca Mountain program had the foresight not to declare HLW to be hazardous and subject to dual regulations. The ideal program would equitably balance its science and infrastructure. Here neither program has the advantage and could possibly represent extremes. The WIPP`s emphasis on scientific investigations left it with little or no infrastructure to deal with regulations and oversight. A regulatory infrastructure, for example, could have forewarned WIPP that its in situ tests were not relevant to the regulations. On the opposite extreme, the Yucca Mountain`s emphasis on infrastructure left it with less money for scientific investigations.

  15. Clinoptilolite compositions in diagenetically-altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D.E.

    1987-12-31

    The compositions of Yucca Mountain clinoptilolites and their host tuffs are highly variable. Clinoptilolites and heulandites in fractures near the repository and in a thin, altered zone at the top of the Topopah Spring basal vitrophyre have consistent calcium-rich compositions. Below this level, clinoptilolites in thick zones of diagenetic alteration on the east side of Yucca Mountain have calcic-potassic compositions and become more calcium rich with depth. Clinoptilolites in stratigraphically equivalent tuffs to the west have sodic-potassic compositions and become more sodic with depth. Clinoptilolite properties important for repository performance assessment include thermal expansion/contraction behavior, hydration/dehydration behavior, and ion-exchange properties. These properties can be significantly affected by clinoptilolite compositions. The compositional variations for clinoptilolites found by this study suggest that the properties will vary vertically and laterally at Yucca Mountain. Used in conjunction with experimental data, the clinoptilolite compositions presented here can be used to model the behavior of clinoptilolites in the repository environment and along transport pathways.

  16. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Slovic, P.; Layman, M.; Kraus, N.; Flynn, J.; Chalmers, J.; Gesell, G.

    1991-12-01

    This study investigates the potential impacts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse impacts may be expected to result from perceptions of risk, stigmatization, and socially amplified reactions to `unfortunate events` associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, stigmatization, and social amplification are discussed and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse economic effects. The possibility that intense negative imagery associated with the repository may cause significant harm to Nevada`s economy can no longer be ignored by serious attempts to assess the risks and impacts of this unique facility. The behavioral processes described here appear relevant as well to the social impact assessment of any proposed facility that produces, uses, transports, or disposes of hazardous materials.

  17. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levich, R.A.; Linden, R.M.; Patterson, R.L.; Stuckless, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program. The first day focuses on the regional setting with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The field trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, an element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will compromise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, hydrology and geochemistry and will include the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis and the seismicity and seismic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the results of recent hydrologic studies by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Program Office, and the relationship of the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  18. Preliminary examination of the impacts of repository site characterization activities and facility construction and operation activities on Hanford air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-04-01

    Air quality impacts that would result from site characterization activities and from the construction and operation of a high-level nuclear wste repository at Hanford are estimated using two simple atmospheric dispersion models, HANCHI and CHISHORT. Model results indicate that pollutant concentrations would not exceed ambient air quality standards at any point outside the Hanford fenceline or at any publicly accessible location within the Hanford Site. The increase in pollutant concentrations in nearby communities due to site activities would be minimal. HANCHI and CHISHORT are documented in the appendices of this document. Further study of the repository's impact on air quality will be conducted when more detailed project plans and work schedules are available.

  19. Use of swelling clays to reduce permeability and its potential application to nuclear waste repository sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Morrow, C. A.; Byerlee, J. D.

    1982-09-01

    The injection of swelling-clay slurries into joints or faults at a deep-burial nuclear waste disposal site may result in significant permeability reductions for the effective containment of radioactive wastes. In an experiment conducted to illustrate the permeability change accompanying clay swelling, a coarse stone with interconnected pore spaces was injected with a clay-electrolyte slurry, modelling the pressure-grouting of a fractured repository rock. Subsequently, solutions with lower electrolyte concentrations were driven through the clay-filled stone, corresponding to migration of lower salinity ground-waters through the clay-grouted fracture. The initial injection procedure reduced the permeability of the stone from 1-10 darcies to 700 nanodarcies; the changes in solution composition decreased permeability by more than 2 additional orders of magnitude to 3 nanodarcies. For application at a nuclear waste repository, the electrolyte concentration of the injected clay slurry should be made higher than that of the ground-water in the host rock. Subsequent interaction of the ground-water with the clays would initiate swelling and create the additional, post-injection permeability reductions that may be important in preventing the escape of buried radioactive wastes. The measured permeability of the clay filling is considerably lower than that of cement tested for borehole plugging. Clays also have the advantage over cement and chemical grouts in that they are geologically stable at relatively low temperatures and have a high capacity for radionuclide adsorption.

  20. Stability of ceramic waste forms in potential repository environments: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. J.; Palmer, R. A.

    1982-03-31

    Most scenarios for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste include the eventual intrusion of groundwater into the repository. Reactions in the system and eventual release of the radionuclides, if any, will be controlled by the chemistry of the groundwater, the surrounding rock, the waste form, and any engineered barrier materials that are present, as well as by the temperature and pressure of the system. This report is a compilation and evaluation of the work completed to date on interactions within the waste-form/host-rock/groundwater system at various points in its lifetime. General results from leaching experiments are presented as a basis for comparison. The factors involved in studying the complete system are discussed so that future research may avoid some of the oversights of past research. Although relatively little hard data on prototype waste-form/repository-system interactions exist at this time, the available data and their implications are discussed. Sorption studies and models for predicting radionuclide migration are also presented, again with a study of the factors involved.

  1. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A.; Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E.; Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T.; Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A.; Judd, B.R.; Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  2. Long-Term Waste Package Degradation Studies at the Yucca Mountain Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Mon, K. G.; Bullard, B. E.; Longsine, D. E.; Mehta, S.; Lee, J. H.; Monib, A. M.

    2002-02-26

    The Site Recommendation (SR) process for the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underway. Fulfillment of the requirements for substantially complete containment of the radioactive waste emplaced in the potential repository and subsequent slow release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) into the geosphere will rely on a robust waste container design, among other EBS components. Part of the SR process involves sensitivity studies aimed at elucidating which model parameters contribute most to the drip shield and waste package degradation characteristics. The model parameters identified included (a) general corrosion rate model parameters (temperature-dependence and uncertainty treatment), and (b) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model parameters (uncertainty treatment of stress and stress intensity factor profiles in the Alloy 22 waste package outer barrier closure weld regions, the SCC initiation stress threshold, and the fraction of manufacturing flaws oriented favorably for through-wall penetration by SCC). These model parameters were reevaluated and new distributions were generated. Also, early waste package failures due to improper heat treatment were added to the waste package degradation model. The results of these investigations indicate that the waste package failure profiles are governed by the manufacturing flaw orientation model parameters and models used.

  3. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system. Part 1: Theory. [linearized potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Clever, W.; Dunn, K.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive aerodynamic analysis program based on linearized potential theory is described. The solution treats thickness and attitude problems at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Three dimensional configurations with or without jet flaps having multiple non-planar surfaces of arbitrary planform and open or closed slender bodies of non-circular contour may be analyzed. Longitudinal and lateral-directional static and rotary derivative solutions may be generated. The analysis was implemented on a time sharing system in conjunction with an input tablet digitizer and an interactive graphics input/output display and editing terminal to maximize its responsiveness to the preliminary analysis problem. Nominal case computation time of 45 CPU seconds on the CDC 175 for a 200 panel simulation indicates the program provides an efficient analysis for systematically performing various aerodynamic configuration tradeoff and evaluation studies.

  4. Current Status and Potential Impacts Regarding the Proposed Development of a Rail Line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Lanthrum, G.; Gunnerson, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provides a description of the current status regarding the proposed development of a rail line to the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Nye County, Southern Nevada, which includes potential impacts analyzed during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and the subsequent creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the rail line. Potential impacts are addressed within the context of impacts to natural and human environmental resources found within the geographic area of the proposed federal project. Potential impacts to these resources have been fully analyzed in the Rail Alignment Draft EIS (DEIS). This paper includes a summary of the potential impacts analyzed in the DEIS. Examples of potential impacts include land use conflicts, air quality, water use, and impacts to biological and cultural resources, among others. In conclusion: Based on its obligations under the NWPA and its decision to select the mostly rail scenario for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, DOE needs to ship these materials by rail in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. DOE prepared the Rail Alignment EIS to provide the background, data, information, and analyses to help decision makers and the public understand the potential environmental impacts that could result from constructing and operating a railroad for shipment of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing rail line in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain. This railroad would consist of a rail line, railroad operations support facilities, and other related infrastructure. DOE will use the Rail Alignment EIS to decide whether to construct and operate the proposed railroad, and if so, to: - Select a rail alignment (Caliente rail alignment or Mina rail alignment) in which to construct the railroad; - Select the common segments and alternative segments within either a Caliente rail alignment or a Mina

  5. Development of improved methodology for the comparative assesment of potential repository concepts and locations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchi, Hiroyuki; Koike, Akihisa; Sato, Shoko; Kawamura, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    NUMO has adopted a volunteering approach to siting a geological repository for high-level radioactive waste (HLW). It is important for this process that the pros and cons of volunteers can be assessed from literature data in a clear and transparent manner, prior to the very careful selection of those sites that will be carried forward for more detailed characterisation. For this purpose, multi-attribute analysis (MAA) methodology has been developed that allows the technical assessment of criteria to be represented as scoring models. The trickier job of weighting different criteria involves expert opinion, which can be solicited by different methods. In particular, weighting of top-level attributes involves balancing a range of technical and socio-economic issues, which can be examined by considering the viewpoint of different stakeholders. The applicability of the MAA tool and its sensitivity to stakeholder viewpoints have been examined by simple case studies. (authors)

  6. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Randle

    2000-01-07

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I&C) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I&C systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I&C systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored, controlled, and

  7. Geologic and geophysical characterization studies of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential high-level radioactive-waste repository

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, J.W.; Keefer, W.R.

    2000-01-01

    In recognition of a critical national need for permanent radioactive-waste storage, Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada has been investigated by Federal agencies since the 1970's, as a potential geologic disposal site. In 1987, Congress selected Yucca Mountain for an expanded and more detailed site characterization effort. As an integral part of this program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a series of detailed geologic, geophysical, and related investigations designed to characterize the tectonic setting, fault behavior, and seismicity of the Yucca Mountain area. This document presents the results of 13 studies of the tectonic environment of Yucca Mountain, in support of a broad goal to assess the effects of future seismic and fault activity in the area on design, long-term performance, and safe operation of the potential surface and subsurface repository facilities.

  8. 43 CFR 11.25 - Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preassessment screen-preliminary... screen—preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk. (a) Preliminary identification of... toxicological properties of the oil or hazardous substance. (3) Pathways to be considered shall include,...

  9. 43 CFR 11.25 - Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preassessment screen-preliminary... screen—preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk. (a) Preliminary identification of... toxicological properties of the oil or hazardous substance. (3) Pathways to be considered shall include,...

  10. Effects of long-term exposure of tuffs to high-level nuclear waste-repository conditions. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.; Carter, J.; Halleck, P.; Johnson, P.; Shankland, T.; Andersen, R.; Spicochi, K.; Heller, A.

    1982-02-01

    Tests have been performed to explore the effects of extended exposure of tuffs from the southwestern portion of the Nevada Test Site to temperatures and pressures similar to those that will be encountered in a high-level nuclear waste repository. Tuff samples ranging from highly welded, nonzeolitized to unwelded, highly zeolitized varieties were subjected to temperatures of 80, 120, and 180{sup 0}C; confining pressures of 9.7 and 19.7 MPa; and water-pore pressures of 0.5 to 19.7 MPa for durations of 2 to 6 months. The following basic properties were measured before and after exposure and compared: tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, grain density, porosity, mineralogy, permeability, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. Depending on rock type and exposure conditions, significant changes in ambient tensile strength, compressive strength, grain density, and porosity were measured. Mineralogic examination, permeability, and thermal property measurements remain to be completed.

  11. Geotechnical instrumentation for repository shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Lentell, R.L.; Byrne, J.

    1993-09-01

    The US Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1980, which required that three distinctly different geologic media be investigated as potential candidate sites for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The three media that were selected for study were basalt (WA), salt (TX, LA, MS, UT), and tuff (NV). Preliminary Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) designs were prepared for seven candidate salt sites, including bedded and domal salt environments. A bedded-salt site was selected in Deaf Smith County, TX for detailed site characterization studies and ESF Final Design. Although Congress terminated the Salt Repository Program in 1988, Final Design for the Deaf Smith ESF was completed, and much of the design rationale can be applied to subsequent deep repository shafts. This paper presents the rationale for the geotechnical instrumentation that was designed for construction and operational performance monitoring of the deep shafts of the in-situ test facility. The instrumentation design described herein can be used as a general framework in designing subsequent instrumentation programs for future high-level nuclear waste repository shafts.

  12. Repassivation potential for localized corrosion of Alloys 625 and C22 in simulated repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cragnolino, G.A.; Dunn, D.S.; Sridhar, N.

    1998-12-31

    Two corrosion resistant nickel-based alloys, 625 and C22, have been selected by the US Department of Energy as candidate materials for the inner container of high-level radioactive waste packages. The susceptibility of these materials to localized corrosion was evaluated by measuring the repassivation potential as a function of solution chloride concentration and temperature using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and lead-in-pencil potential step test methods. At intermediate Cl{minus} concentrations, e.g., 0.028--0.4 M, the repassivation potential of alloy 625 is greater than that for alloy 825 and is dependent on the Cl{minus} concentration. However, at higher concentrations, the repassivation potential is slightly less than that for alloy 825 and is weakly dependent on Cl{minus} concentration. The repassivation potentials for alloy C-22 under all test conditions are considerably higher than those of either alloy 625 or 825 and are in the range where oxygen evolution is expected to occur.

  13. Application of Non-Human Biota Assessment Methodologies to the Assessment of Potential Impacts from a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.L.; Robinson, C.A.; Ikonen, A.T.K.

    2007-07-01

    The protection of the environment from the effects of ionising radiation has become increasingly more topical over the last few years as the intentions enshrined in international principles and agreements have become more binding through national and international law. For example, the Directive on impact of certain projects on the environment (EIA Directive 85/337/EEC) [CEC, 1985], amended in 1997 [CEC, 1997], places a mandatory requirement on all EU Member States to conduct environmental impact assessments for a range of project having potential impact on the environment, including radioactive waste disposal. Such assessments must consider humans, fauna and flora, the abiotic environment (soil, water, air), material assets and cultural heritage as well as the interactions between these factors. In Finland, Posiva Oy are responsible for the overall repository programme for spent nuclear fuel and, as such, are conducting the Safety Case Assessment for a proposed geological repository for nuclear waste. Within the European legislation framework, the Finnish regulatory body requires that the repository safety case assessment should include not only human radiological safety, but also an assessment of the potential impact upon populations of non-human biota. Specifically, the Safety Case should demonstrate that there will be: - no decline in the biodiversity of currently living populations; - no significant detriment to populations of fauna and flora; and, - no detrimental effects on individuals of domestic animals and rare plants and animals. At present, there are no internationally agreed criteria that explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation. However, over recent years a number of assessment methodologies have been developed including, at a European level, the Framework for the Assessment of Environmental impact (FASSET) and Environmental Risks from Ionising Contaminants (ERICA). The International Committee on Radiation Protection

  14. Identification of New Molecular Entities (NMEs) as Potential Leads against Tuberculosis from Open Source Compound Repository.

    PubMed

    Kotapalli, Sudha Sravanti; Nallam, Sri Satya Anila; Nadella, Lavanya; Banerjee, Tanmay; Rode, Haridas B; Mainkar, Prathama S; Ummanni, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a number of diverse and promising early-lead compounds that will feed into the drug discovery pipeline for developing new antitubercular agents. The results from the phenotypic screening of the open-source compound library against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) with hit validation against M. tuberculosis (H37Rv) have identified novel potent hit compounds. To determine their druglikeness, a systematic analysis of physicochemical properties of the hit compounds has been performed using cheminformatics tools. The hit molecules were analysed by clustering based on their chemical finger prints and structural similarity determining their chemical diversity. The hit compound library is also filtered for druglikeness based on the physicochemical descriptors following Lipinski filters. The robust filtration of hits followed by secondary screening against BCG, H37Rv and cytotoxicity evaluation has identified 12 compounds with potential against H37Rv (MIC range 0.4 to 12.5 μM). Furthermore in cytotoxicity assays, 12 compounds displayed low cytotoxicity against liver and lung cells providing high therapeutic index > 50. To avoid any variations in activity due to the route of chemical synthesis, the hit compounds were re synthesized independently and confirmed for their potential against H37Rv. Taken together, the hits reported here provides copious potential starting points for generation of new leads eventually adds to drug discovery pipeline against tuberculosis. PMID:26642200

  15. Identification of New Molecular Entities (NMEs) as Potential Leads against Tuberculosis from Open Source Compound Repository

    PubMed Central

    Nadella, Lavanya; Banerjee, Tanmay; Rode, Haridas B.; Mainkar, Prathama S.; Ummanni, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a number of diverse and promising early-lead compounds that will feed into the drug discovery pipeline for developing new antitubercular agents. The results from the phenotypic screening of the open-source compound library against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) with hit validation against M. tuberculosis (H37Rv) have identified novel potent hit compounds. To determine their druglikeness, a systematic analysis of physicochemical properties of the hit compounds has been performed using cheminformatics tools. The hit molecules were analysed by clustering based on their chemical finger prints and structural similarity determining their chemical diversity. The hit compound library is also filtered for druglikeness based on the physicochemical descriptors following Lipinski filters. The robust filtration of hits followed by secondary screening against BCG, H37Rv and cytotoxicity evaluation has identified 12 compounds with potential against H37Rv (MIC range 0.4 to 12.5 μM). Furthermore in cytotoxicity assays, 12 compounds displayed low cytotoxicity against liver and lung cells providing high therapeutic index > 50. To avoid any variations in activity due to the route of chemical synthesis, the hit compounds were re synthesized independently and confirmed for their potential against H37Rv. Taken together, the hits reported here provides copious potential starting points for generation of new leads eventually adds to drug discovery pipeline against tuberculosis. PMID:26642200

  16. 43 CFR 11.25 - Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk. 11.25 Section 11.25 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 11.25 Preassessment screen—preliminary identification of...

  17. 43 CFR 11.25 - Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk. 11.25 Section 11.25 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 11.25 Preassessment screen—preliminary identification of...

  18. 43 CFR 11.25 - Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preassessment screen-preliminary identification of resources potentially at risk. 11.25 Section 11.25 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 11.25 Preassessment screen—preliminary identification of...

  19. The importance of zeolites in the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Bish, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    Zeolitic rocks play an important role in retarding the migration of radionuclides that occur in solution as simple cations (Cs, Sr, Ba). However, the interaction of zeolites with complex transuranic species in solution provides little if any advantage over other common silicate minerals. The most important consequences of zeolite occurrences near a high-level radioactive waste repository environment are likely to be their response to thermal loading and their impact on site hydrology. Partial zeolite dehydration during the early thermal pulse from the repository and rehydration as the repository slowly cools can have an important impact on the water budget of a repository in unsaturated rocks, provided that the long-term heating does not result in zeolite destabilization.

  20. The hydrothermal stability of cement sealing materials in the potential Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Myers, J.

    1991-11-26

    Cementitious materials, together with other materials, are being considered to seal a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. A concern with cementitious materials is the chemical and mineralogic changes that may occur as these materials age while in contact with local ground waters. A combined theoretical and experimental approach was taken to determine the ability to theoretically predict mineralogic changes. The cementitious material selected for study has a relatively low Ca:Si ratio approaching that of the mineral tobermorite. Samples were treated hydrothermally at 200{degrees}C with water similar to that obtained from the J-13 well on the Nevada Test Site. Post-test solutions were analyzed for pH as well as dissolved K, Na, Ca, Al, and Si. Solid phases formed during these experiments were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X- ray diffraction. These findings were compared with predictions made by the geochemical modeling code EQ3NR/E06. It was generally found that there was good agreement between predicted and experimental results.

  1. Analysis Repository

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2012-03-16

    The Analysis Repository is a compilation of analyses and analytical models relevant to assessing hydrogen fuel and fuel cell issues. Projects in the repository relate to: hydrogen production, delivery, storage, fuel cells, and hydrogen vehicle technology; hydrogen production feedstock cost and availability; electricity production, central and distributed; energy resource estimation and forecasting.

  2. Estimation of the limitations for surficial water addition above a potential high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, M.E.; Sobolik, S.R.; Gauthier, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to design site characterization activities with minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. One activity of site characterization is the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, consisting of underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and the accompanying surface pad facility and roads. The information in this report addresses the following topics: (1) a discussion of the potential effects of surface construction water on repository-performance, and on surface and underground experiments; (2) one-dimensional numerical calculations predicting the maximum allowable amount of water that may infiltrate the surface of the mountain without affecting repository performance; and (3) two-dimensional numerical calculations of the movement of that amount of surface water and how the water may affect repository performance and experiments. The results contained herein should be used with other site data and scientific/engineering judgement in determining controls on water usage at Yucca Mountain. This document contains information that has been used in preparing Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  3. Identification of structures, systems, and components important to safety at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D.; Klamerus, L.J.

    1991-10-01

    This study recommends which structures, systems, and components of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain are important to safety. The assessment was completed in April 1990 and uses the reference repository configuration in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report and follows the methodology required at that time by DOE Procedure AP6.10-Q. Failures of repository items during the preclosure period are evaluated to determine the potential offsite radiation doses and associated probabilities. Items are important to safety if, in the event they fail to perform their intended function, an accident could result which causes a dose commitment greater than 0.5 rem to the whole body or any organ of an individual in an unrestricted area. This study recommends that these repository items include the structures that house spent fuel and high-level waste, the associated filtered ventilation exhaust systems, certain waste- handling equipment, the waste containers, the waste treatment building structure, the underground waste transporters, and other items listed in this report. This work was completed April 1990. 27 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Coupling Legacy and Contemporary Deterministic Codes to Goldsim for Probabilistic Assessments of Potential Low-Level Waste Repository Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattie, P. D.; Knowlton, R. G.; Arnold, B. W.; Tien, N.; Kuo, M.

    2006-12-01

    project between Sandia National Laboratories and Taiwan's Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low-level waste repository sites. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE AC04 94AL85000.

  5. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Lingineni, S.; Mishra, S; McNeish, J.A.; Sassani, D.C.; Sevougian, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives of the US NRC and the US EPA. The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). Total system performance assessments require the explicit quantification of the relevant processes and process interactions. In addition assessments are useful to help define the most significant processes, the information gaps and uncertainties and therefore the additional information required for more robust and defensible assessment of the overall performance. The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993.

  6. Total system performance assessment - 1995: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating the feasibility of permanently disposing the nation`s commercial high-level radioactive wastes (in the form of spent fuel from the over 100 electric power-generating nuclear reactors across the U.S.) and a portion of the defense high-level radioactive wastes (currently stored at federal facilities around the country) in the unsaturated tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Quantitative predictions based on the most current understanding of the processes and parameters potentially affecting the long-term behavior of the disposal system are used to assess the ability of the site and its associated engineered designs to meet regulatory objectives set forward by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The evaluation of the ability of the overall system to meet the performance objectives specified in the applicable regulatory standards has been termed total system performance assessment (TSPA). The aim of any total system performance assessment is to be as complete and reasonably conservative as possible and to assure that the descriptions of the predictive models and parameters are sufficient to ascertain their accuracy. Total system performance assessments evolve with time. As additional site and design information is generated, performance assessment analyses can be revised to become more representative of the expected conditions and remove some of the conservative assumptions necessitated by the incompleteness of site and design data. Previous iterations of total system performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain site and associated engineered barriers have been conducted in 1991 and 1993. These analyses have been documented in Barnard, Eslinger, Wilson and Andrews.

  7. Impact of transporting defense high-level waste to a geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Boyle, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    This transportation study assumes that defense high-level waste is stored in three locations (the Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho Falls plants) and may be disposed of in (1) a commercial repository or (2) a defense-only repository, either of which could be located at one of the five candidate sites; also documented is a preliminary analysis of the costs and risks of transporting defense high-level waste from the three storage sites to the five potential candidate repository sites. 17 references, 4 figures, 27 tables.

  8. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deeksha

    2016-01-01

    Background The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB) stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India). Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education. Material and Method Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis. Results We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1%) was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB. Conclusion Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking. PMID:27228155

  9. Preliminary Breakdown: Physical Mechanisms and Potential for Energetic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the preliminary breakdown phase of virgin negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning strokes will be presented. Of primary interest are the physical processes responsible for the fast electric field "characteristic" pulses that are often observed during this phase. The pulse widths of characteristic pulses are shown to occur as a superposed bimodal distribution, with the short and long modes having characteristic timescales on the order of 1 microsecond and 10 microseconds, respectively. Analysis of these pulses is based on comparison with laboratory observations of long spark discharge processes and with recently acquired high-speed video observations of a single -CG event. It will be argued that the fast electric field bimodal distribution is the result of conventional discharge processes operating in an extensive strong ambient electric field environment. An important related topic will also be discussed, where it will be argued that preliminary breakdown discharges are capable of generating energetic electrons and may therefore seed relativistic electron avalanches that go on to produce pulsed energetic photon emissions.

  10. Initial results from dissolution rate testing of N-Reactor spent fuel over a range of potential geologic repository aqueous conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Einziger, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Hanford N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (HSNF) may ultimately be placed in a geologic repository for permanent disposal. To determine whether the engineered barrier system that will be designed for emplacement of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel will also suffice for HSNF, aqueous dissolution rate measurements were conducted on the HSNF. The purpose of these tests was to determine whether HSNF dissolves faster or slower than LWR spent fuel under some limited repository-relevant water chemistry conditions. The tests were conducted using a flowthrough method that allows the dissolution rate of the uranium matrix to be measured without interference by secondary precipitation reactions that would confuse interpretation of the results. Similar tests had been conducted earlier with LWR spent fuel, thereby allowing direct comparisons. Two distinct corrosion modes were observed during the course of these 12 tests. The first, Stage 1, involved no visible corrosion of the test specimen and produced no undissolved corrosion products. The second, Stage 2, resulted in both visible corrosion of the test specimen and left behind undissolved corrosion products. During Stage 1, the rate of dissolution could be readily determined because the dissolved uranium and associated fission products remained in solution where they could be quantitatively analyzed. The measured rates were much faster than has been observed for LWR spent fuel under all conditions tested to date when normalized to the exposed test specimen surface areas. Application of these results to repository conditions, however, requires some comparison of the physical conditions of the different fuels. The surface area of LWR fuel that could potentially be exposed to repository groundwater is estimated to be approximately 100 times greater than HSNF. Therefore, when compared on the basis of mass, which is more relevant to repository conditions, the HSNF and LWR spent fuel dissolve at similar rates.

  11. Repository seals requirements study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  12. Draft Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project: Overview. [Second repository

    SciTech Connect

    1986-01-01

    The draft Area Recommendation Report (ARR) for the Crystalline Repository Project identifies portions of crystalline rock bodies as proposed potentially acceptable sites for the Nation's second repository for deep geologic burial of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. This Overview provides a brief summary of that report. The US Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated available geologic and environmental data for 235 crystalline rock bodies in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions to identify preliminary candidate areas. The 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are located in the States of Georgia (1), Maine (2), Minnesota (3), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (2), Virginia (2), and Wisconsin (1). The data, analyses and rationale pertaining to the identification of the 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are presented in the draft ARR. The analyses presented in the draft ARR demonstrate that the evidence available for each proposed potentially acceptable site supports (1) a finding that the site is not disqualified under Appendix III of the DOE Siting Guidelines and (2) a decision to proceed with the continued investigation of the site on the basis of the favorable and potentially adverse conditions identified to date. These potentially acceptable sites will be investigated and evaluated in more detail during the area phase of the siting process and considered along with other candidate sites in a progressive narrowing process to finally choose the site of the second repository in 1998.

  13. Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Preliminary Validation of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory in Chile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haz, Ana Maria; Ramirez, Valeria

    1998-01-01

    The validity of the Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was tested with a sample of 134 Chilean adults. The scale was able to discriminate between abusing and nonabusing individuals. The items which had the greatest discriminating power were related to feelings of depression, loneliness, anxiety, and family problems. (CR)

  15. Supplemental Performance Analyses for Igneous Activity and Human Intrusion at the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, P.; Gaither, K.; Freeze, G.; McCord, J.; Kalinich, D.; Saulnier, G.; Statham, W.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Consequences of hypothetical disruption of the Yucca Mountain site by igneous activity or human intrusion have been evaluated in the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. Since completion of the S&ER, supplemental analyses have examined possible impacts of new information and alternative assumptions on the estimates of the consequences of these events. Specifically, analyses of the consequences of igneous disruption address uncertainty regarding: (1) the impacts of changes in the repository footprint and waste package spacing on the probability of disruption; (2) impacts of alternative assumptions about the appropriat e distribution of future wind speeds to use in the analysis; (3) effects of alternative assumptions about waste particle sizes; and (4) alternative assumptions about the number of waste packages damaged by igneous intrusion; and (5) alternative assumptions about the exposure pathways and the biosphere dose conversion factors used in the analysis. Additional supplemental analyses, supporting the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), have examined the results for both igneous disruption and human intrusion, recalculated for a receptor group located 18 kilometers (km) from the repository (the location specified in 40 CFR 197), rather than at the 20 km distance used in the S&ER analyses.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at the UTTR

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the current state of geologic knowledge concerning potential high-temperature geothermal development on the lands controlled by Hill Air Force Base (HAFB) at the Utah Testing and Training Range (UTTR) and the lands encompassed by the Dugway Proving Grounds (Dugway). This report is based on currently available published and publically available information. Most of the information presented here is purely geologic in nature. Therefore, the logistical issues (such as military exclusion areas, proximity to electrical infrastructure, and access) are additional considerations that are being addressed in a separate report that will be issued to HAFB by the SES corporation.

  17. Preliminary Screening of Potential Control Products against Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Collins, Debbie A; Blackburn, Lisa F; Audsley, Neil; Bell, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    The first recording of Drosophila suzukii in the UK occurred in the south of England during August 2012. Since then sticky traps have continued to record the presence of individuals. Several products (both chemical and biological) were investigated for their efficacy against different life-stages of the pest. Both direct and indirect exposure to control products was assessed. Spinosad, chlorantraniliprole and the experimental product, TA2674, showed excellent potential as control agents when used as either a pre- or post-dipping treatment for blueberries with mortalities of 100%, 93% and 98% mortality, respectively, being achieved following pre-treatment. Direct spray application of all products tested had limited impact upon adult flies. Highest mortality (68%) was achieved following direct application of TA2674. Entomopathogenic agents (nematodes and fungi) tested appeared to reduce fly population development (ranges of 34-44% mortality obtained) but would seem unable to eradicate outbreaks. The potential of the tested products to control D. suzukii is discussed. PMID:26462696

  18. Preliminary Screening of Potential Control Products against Drosophila suzukii

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Collins, Debbie A.; Blackburn, Lisa F.; Audsley, Neil; Bell, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    The first recording of Drosophila suzukii in the UK occurred in the south of England during August 2012. Since then sticky traps have continued to record the presence of individuals. Several products (both chemical and biological) were investigated for their efficacy against different life-stages of the pest. Both direct and indirect exposure to control products was assessed. Spinosad, chlorantraniliprole and the experimental product, TA2674, showed excellent potential as control agents when used as either a pre- or post-dipping treatment for blueberries with mortalities of 100%, 93% and 98% mortality, respectively, being achieved following pre-treatment. Direct spray application of all products tested had limited impact upon adult flies. Highest mortality (68%) was achieved following direct application of TA2674. Entomopathogenic agents (nematodes and fungi) tested appeared to reduce fly population development (ranges of 34–44% mortality obtained) but would seem unable to eradicate outbreaks. The potential of the tested products to control D. suzukii is discussed. PMID:26462696

  19. Preliminary Assessment Of Space Infrared Experiment's (SIRE) Potential For Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, D. L.; Muscari, J. A.

    1982-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a contamination analysis and computer modeling study performed for the Space Infrared Experiment (SIRE) using the Space Transport System (STS) Shuttle Orbiter as the launch vehicle for the proposed seven-day sortie mission. These results will provide an accurate description of the deposition levels on the telescope primary mirror and of the molecular number column density (NCD) along the telescope line-of-sight. The planned Helium Purge System was assumed not to be operating. The contribution to the contamination environment of any cargo element, other than SIRE and its pallet, was not considered in this study. The study considers five potential contamination sources, including the flash evaporator vent effluents and the vernier reaction control system (VCS) engines plume constituents.

  20. Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

    2000-11-01

    The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest

  1. Preliminary thoughts concerning potential US Army threats/roles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.; Solomon, K.A.; Miles, J.T.

    1991-06-01

    The rate at which the current world military/political perspective is changing demands consideration of a broader spectrum of potential threats then has been the case for the past few decades--during which the Soviet Union was the preeminent threat. Seemingly overnight, the cold war ceased, the requirement for massive U.S. military counters to the Soviet Union forces faded, and an era of constant (obvious) military threat disappeared. This situation has in turn been revolutionized by the Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the U.S. response. The paper addresses part of the problem facing military planners by defining a spectrum of threats that typify those the U.S. Army might face over the next decade or two. The purpose of the threat set is to support the evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness, to the U.S. Army, of advanced technologies. The set of threats is intended to provide a complete set of characteristics rather then to be a complete list of the possibilities; it is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Although largely completed before the war with Iraq started, its content is still valid in that its purpose is to provide a framework for thinking about future U.S. Army technology needs.

  2. Scenarios constructed for the effects of tectonic processes on the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, G.E.; Borns, D.J.; Fridrich, C.

    1996-10-01

    A comprehensive collection of scenarios is presented that connect initiating tectonic events with radionuclide releases by logical and physically possible combinations or sequences of features, events and processes. The initiating tectonic events include both discrete faulting and distributed rock deformation developed through the repository and adjacent to it, as well as earthquake-induced ground motion and changes in tectonic stress at the site. The effects of these tectonic events include impacts on the engineered-barrier system, such as container rupture and failure of repository tunnels. These effects also include a wide range of hydrologic effects such as changes in pathways and flow rates in the unsaturated and saturated zones, changes in the water-table configuration, and in the development of perched-water systems. These scenarios are intended go guide performance-assessment analyses and to assist principal investigators in how essential field, laboratory, and calculational studies are used. This suite of scenarios will help ensure that all important aspects of the system disturbance related to a tectonic scenario are captured in numerical analyses. It also provides a record of all options considered by project analysts to provide documentation required for licensing agreement. The final portion of this report discusses issues remaining to be addressed with respect to tectonic activity. 105 refs.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shaoping; Lee, Joon H; Wang, Yifeng

    2010-12-08

    In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

  4. Estimations of the extent of migration of surficially applied water for various surface conditions near the potential repository perimeter; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, S.R.; Fewell, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to support the design of site characterization activities so to have minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. Two examples of site characterization activities are the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, which may include underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and surface-based testing activities, which may require borehole drilling, excavation of test pits, and road watering for dust control. The information in this report pertains to two-dimensional numerical calculations modeling the movement of surficially applied water and the potential effects of that water on repository performance and underground experiments. This document contains information that has been used in preparing recommendations for two Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project documents: Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document, and the Surface-Based Testing Field Requirements Document.

  5. Repository program licensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, T.M.; Gil, A.V.

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being studied by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. DOE has the responsibility to determine the suitability of the site and to develop a license application (LA) for authorization to construct the potential repository. If the site is suitable, the license application would be submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The repository program licensing approach is focused on the timely acquisition of information needed in licensing and the resolution of potential licensing issues with the NRC staff. Licensing involves an iterative process requiring refinements as data are acquired, analyzed, and evaluated. The repository licensing approach presented in this paper ensures that the information is available when needed to facilitate the licensing process. Identifying the information needed to evaluate compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR 60, monitoring the acquisition of such information, and developing a successful license application are integral elements of DOE`s repository program licensing approach. Activities to characterize the site are being systematically conducted as planned in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP). In addition, DOE is implementing the issue resolution initiative, the license application annotated outline (LAAO) process, and interim licensability evaluations to update the early planning in the SCP and to focus site characterization, design, and performance assessment activities on the acquisition of information needed for a site suitability determination and licensing. Collectively, the issue resolution initiative, LAAO process, and interim licensability evaluations are key elements of a transition to the iterative process to answer the question: {open_quotes}When do we have enough data to support licensing?{close_quotes}

  6. Historical development and evolution of EPRI's post-closure dose assessment of potential releases to the biosphere from the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Kozak, Matthew W

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the development and evolution of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) post-closure dose assessment for potential releases of radionuclides from the proposed High Level Waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The starting point for this work was the 1995 publication of Technical Bases for Yucca Mountain Standards by the Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources of the National Research Council. This report proposed the development and application of an individual risk-based standard for releases from the repository to replace the existing one, which was based on radionuclide release limits. This in turn implied the development and application of methods to assess radiation doses to humans. Accordingly, EPRI produced a methodology for such dose assessment as part of its Total System Performance Assessment program for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. The methodology initially addressed releases via groundwater and then releases associated with extrusive igneous events. The methodology was updated and applied over the following years to take account of regulatory developments, changes in estimates of the source term to the biosphere, peer review through international model comparison exercises, new site generic data, and new data concerning conditions at the point of compliance in Amargosa Valley. The main outputs were Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors, which relate radionuclide levels in environmental media to the annual individual doses to a member of a hypothetical critical group and to the regulator-defined Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual. Most recently, consideration has been given to uncertainty in the dose estimates based on a probabilistic analysis. The paper provides a perspective on the evolution of the dose assessments in response to the developments listed above. PMID:22048489

  7. A survey of the repository of groundwater potential and distribution using geoelectrical resistivity method in Itu Local Government Area (L.G.A), Akwa Ibom State, southern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibuot, J. C.; Akpabio, G. T.; George, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical electrical sounding (VES), employing a Schlumberger electrode configuration, was used to investigate the sediments and aquifer repositories in Itu Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom state, southern Nigeria. This was done in sixteen (16) locations/communities with the maximum current electrode spread ranging between 800-1000m. The field data were interpreted using forward and iterative least square inversion modeling, which gives a resolution with 3-5 geoelectric layers. The observed frequencies in curve types include 31.25% of AKH, 18.8% of AAK and HK and 6.25% of K, QHK, AKH, KA and KHQ, respectively. These sets of curves show a wide range of variabilities in resistivities between and within the layers penetrated by current. The presence of K and H curve types in the study area indicates the alteration of the geomaterials with limited hydrologic significance to the prolific groundwater repository. A correlation of the constrained nearby borehole lithology logs with the VES results shows that the layers were all sandy formations (fine and well sorted sands to gravelly sands or medium to coarse-grained sands as described by nearby lithology logs) with some wide ranges of electrical resistivity values and thicknesses caused by electrostratigraphic inhomogeneity. The geologic topsoil (motley topsoil) is generally porous and permeable and as such the longitudinal conductance ( S) values for the covering/protective layer is generally less than unity of Siemens ( S < 1Ω-1), the value considered for efficient protection of the underlying aquifers by the topmost and overlying layer. The spatial orientations and the leveling patterns of the most economically viable potential groundwater repository within the maximum current electrode separations has been delineated in 2-D and 3-D contoured maps. The estimated depth range for the desired groundwater repository is 32.6-113.1m and its average depth value is 74.30m. The thickness of this layer ranges from 27.9-103m

  8. A survey of the repository of groundwater potential and distribution using geoelectrical resistivity method in Itu Local Government Area (L.G.A), Akwa Ibom State, southern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibuot, J.; Akpabio, G.; George, N.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical electrical sounding (VES), employing a Schlumberger electrode configuration, was used to investigate the sediments and aquifer repositories in Itu Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom state, southern Nigeria. This was done in sixteen (16) locations/communities with the maximum current electrode spread ranging between 800-1000m. The field data were interpreted using forward and iterative least square inversion modeling, which gives a resolution with 3-5 geoelectric layers. The observed frequencies in curve types include 31.25% of AKH, 18.8% of AAK and HK and 6.25% of K, QHK, AKH, KA and KHQ, respectively. These sets of curves show a wide range of variabilities in resistivities between and within the layers penetrated by current. The presence of K and H curve types in the study area indicates the alteration of the geomaterials with limited hydrologic significance to the prolific groundwater repository. A correlation of the constrained nearby borehole lithology logs with the VES results shows that the layers were all sandy formations (fine and well sorted sands to gravelly sands or medium to coarse-grained sands as described by nearby lithology logs) with some wide ranges of electrical resistivity values and thicknesses caused by electrostratigraphic inhomogeneity. The geologic topsoil (motley topsoil) is generally porous and permeable and as such the longitudinal conductance (S) values for the covering/protective layer is generally less than unity of Siemens (S < 1Ω-1), the value considered for efficient protection of the underlying aquifers by the topmost and overlying layer. The spatial orientations and the leveling patterns of the most economically viable potential groundwater repository within the maximum current electrode separations has been delineated in 2-D and 3-D contoured maps. The estimated depth range for the desired groundwater repository is 32.6-113.1m and its average depth value is 74.30m. The thickness of this layer ranges from 27.9-103m

  9. Geothermal potential of Ascension Island, south Atlantic. Phase I. Preliminary examination

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbett, B.S.; Neilson, D.L.; Ramsthaler, J.H.; Shane, M.K.

    1982-09-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the potential for an economic geothermal resource at Ascension Island was completed. It is concluded that there is a high potential for the presence of a geothermal resource under the Island. A conceptual plant has been designed assuming the resource potential located near Gannet Hill is developed. A 7% discounted payback of 5.9 years was calculated for the baseline geothermal plant. Geothermal development can be easily integrated into the Ascension Island power system in that a selection of small, portable, skid mounted, turn key power geothermal generating systems are commercially available. Geologic findings and plant analysis are summarized.

  10. Study of thermo-hydro-mechanical processes at a potential site of an Indian nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwar, Sachin; Verma, A. K.; Singh, T. N.; Bajpai, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed scientific study is required for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes because they generate extremely high heat during their half-life period. Although, several methods have been proposed for the disposal of nuclear wastes, deep underground repository is considered to be a suitable option. In this paper, field investigation has been done near to Bhima basin of peninsular India. Detailed fracture analysis near the borehole shows very prominent maxima of fractures striking N55∘E coinciding with the trace of master basement cover metasediment fault. Physico-mechanical properties of rocks have been determined in the laboratory. The host rock chosen is granite and engineered barrier near the canister is proposed to be clay. A thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) analysis has been done to study the effect of heat on deformations, stresses and pore-pressure variation in granite and clay barriers. For this purpose, finite difference method has been used. Suitable rheological models have been used to model elastic canister and elasto-plastic engineered barrier and host rock. It has been found that both temperature and stresses at any point in the rockmass is below the design criteria which are 100∘C for temperature and 0.2 for damage number.

  11. Learning Object Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This chapter looks at the development and nature of learning objects, meta-tagging standards and taxonomies, learning object repositories, learning object repository characteristics, and types of learning object repositories, with type examples. (Contains 1 table.)

  12. Pre-construction geologic section along the cross drift through the potential high-level radioactive waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Day, W.C.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Juan, C.S.; Drake, R.M. II

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Site Characterization effort for the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, tunnels excavated by tunnel boring machines provide access to the volume of rock that is under consideration for possible underground storage of high-level nuclear waste beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Exploratory Studies Facility, a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel, has been excavated, and a 2.8-km-long, 5-m-diameter Cross Drift will be excavated in 1998 as part of the geologic, hydrologic and geotechnical evaluation of the potential repository. The southwest-trending Cross Drift branches off of the north ramp of the horseshoe-shaped Exploratory Studies Facility. This report summarizes an interpretive geologic section that was prepared for the Yucca Mountain Project as a tool for use in the design and construction of the Cross Drift.

  13. Assessing materials (''Getters'') to immobilize or retard the transport of technetium through the engineered barrier system at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    1999-03-15

    Current performance assessment calculations show that technetium (Tc) and neptunium (Np) will deliver the major fraction of the radiation dose to the accessible environment from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Therefore, materials that can immobilize or delay the transport of Tc or Np (getters) are being considered for addition to either the waste-package or the backfill adjacent to the waste-package. Of the two radionuclides, Tc presents the greater challenge in identifying a suitable getter material. This report identifies several materials that warrant further consideration for immobilizing and/or sorbing Tc as additives to the backfill, and recommends active carbon and an inorganic oxide for initial testing. Other materials, such as zero valent iron, might be useful as getters if they were placed in the waste package itself, a subject that merits further investigation.

  14. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ellen D; Saulsbury, Bo

    2008-03-01

    This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

  15. Small scale hydroelectric power potential in Nevada: a preliminary reconnaissance survey

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, G.F.; Fordham, J.W.; Richard, K.; Loux, R.

    1981-04-01

    This preliminary reconnaissance survey is intended to: develop a first estimate as to the potential number, location and characteristics of small-scale (50 kW to 15 MW) hydroelectric sites in Nevada; provide a compilation of various Federal and state laws and regulations, including tax and financing regulations, that affect small-scale hydroelectric development and provide information on sources of small-scale hydroelectric generation hardware and consultants/ contractors who do small scale hydroelectric work. The entire survey has been conducted in the office working with various available data bases. The site survey and site evaluation methods used are described, and data are tabulated on the flow, power potential, predicted capital expenditures required, etc. for 61 potential sites with measured flows and for 77 sites with derived flows. A map showing potential site locations is included. (LCL)

  16. Report of the Peer Review Panel on the early site suitability evaluation of the Potential Repository Site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Yucca mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) assigned Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Technical and Management Support Services (T&MSS) contractor to the YmPo, the task of conducting an Early Site Suitability Evaluation (ESSE) of the Yucca mountain site as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. First, the assignment called for the development of a method to evaluate a single site against the DOE General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories, 10 CFR Part 960. Then, using this method, an evaluation team, the ESSE Core Team, of senior YMP scientists, engineers, and technical experts, evaluated new information obtained about the site since publication of the final Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986) to determine if new suitability/unsuitability findings could be recommended. Finally, the Core Team identified further information and analyses needed to make final determinations for each of the guidelines. As part of the task, an independent peer review of the ESSE report has been conducted. Expertise was solicited that covered the entire spectrum of siting guidelines in 10 CFR Part 960 in order to provide a complete, in-depth critical review of the data evaluated and cited in the ESSE report, the methods used to evaluate the data, and the conclusions and recommendations offered by the report. Fourteen nationally recognized technical experts (Table 2) served on the Peer Review Panel. The comments from the Panel and the responses prepared by the ESSE Core Team, documented on formal Comment Response Forms, constitute the body of this document.

  17. Preliminary limits of a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential in binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang; Li, Zi-Wei; Yuan, Sheng-Feng; Wan, Zhen; Qin, Song-He; Zhu, Kai; Xie, Yi

    2014-10-01

    We obtain preliminary limits on a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential by using five binary pulsars: PSR J0737-3039, PSR B1534+12, PSR J1756-2251, PSR B1913+16 and PSR B2127+11C. This kind of correction may originate from fundamental frameworks, like string theories, effective models of gravity due to quantum effects and the non-local gravity scheme. We estimate the upper limit of the Tohline-Kuhn-Kruglyak parameter λ and the lower limit of the Fabris-Campos parameter α, which parameterize the correction and are connected to each other by αλ = -1. By analyzing the advances of periastron of these binary pulsars, we find that the preliminary upper limit of α is 0.19 ± 0.14 kpc-1 and the preliminary lower limit of λ is -5.2 ± 3.8 kpc. They are compatible with the bounds based on dynamics of spiral galaxies but quite different from those given by solar system dynamics. These results indicate that this logarithmic correction might be more observable in current timings of binary pulsars than in motions of the solar system.

  18. An Optimal Centralized Carbon Dioxide Repository for Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Poiencot, Brandon; Brown, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    For over a decade, the United States Department of Energy, and engineers, geologists, and scientists from all over the world have investigated the potential for reducing atmospheric carbon emissions through carbon sequestration. Numerous reports exist analyzing the potential for sequestering carbon dioxide at various sites around the globe, but none have identified the potential for a statewide system in Florida, USA. In 2005, 83% of Florida’s electrical energy was produced by natural gas, coal, or oil (e.g., fossil fuels), from power plants spread across the state. In addition, only limited research has been completed on evaluating optimal pipeline transportation networks to centralized carbon dioxide repositories. This paper describes the feasibility and preliminary locations for an optimal centralized Florida-wide carbon sequestration repository. Linear programming optimization modeling is used to plan and route an idealized pipeline network to existing Florida power plants. Further analysis of the subsurface geology in these general locations will provide insight into the suitability of the subsurface conditions and the available capacity for carbon sequestration at selected possible repository sites. The identification of the most favorable site(s) is also presented. PMID:21695024

  19. Preliminary phytochemical screening, Antibacterial potential and GC-MS analysis of two medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Vijayaram, Seerangaraj; Kannan, Suruli; Saravanan, Konda Mani; Vasantharaj, Seerangaraj; Sathiyavimal, Selvam; P, Palanisamy Senthilkumar

    2016-05-01

    The presence study was aimed to catalyze the primary metabolites and their confirmation by using GC-MS analysis and antibacterial potential of leaf extract of two important medicinal plant viz., Eucalyptus and Azadirachta indica. The antibacterial potential of the methanol leaf extract of the studied species was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiellap neumoniae, Streptococcus pyogens, Staphylococcus aureus using by agar well diffusion method. The higher zone of inhibition (16mm) was observed against the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 100μl concentration of methanol leaf extract. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of studied species shows that presence of phytochemical compounds like steroids, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. GC-MS analysis confirms the occurrence of 20 different compounds in the methanol leaf extract of the both studied species. PMID:27166527

  20. Exploratory shaft facility: It`s role in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for a potential nuclear repository

    SciTech Connect

    Kalia, H.N.; Merson, T.J.

    1990-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to assess its suitability as a potential site for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense related activities. The assessment activities include surface investigations, drill holes from the surface, and an underground facility for in situ characterization tests. This underground exploratory shaft facility is being designed to meet the criteria for characterizing the mountain as described in the Site Characterization Plan. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T

    2003-10-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  2. Source terms for analysis of accidents at a high level waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Mubayi, V.; Davis, R.E.; Youngblood, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to identifying source terms from possible accidents during the preclosure phase of a high-level nuclear waste repository. A review of the literature on repository safety analyses indicated that source term estimation is in a preliminary stage, largely based on judgement-based scoping analyses. The approach developed here was to partition the accident space into domains defined by certain threshold values of temperature and impact energy density which may arise in potential accidents and specify release fractions of various radionuclides, present in the waste form, in each domain. Along with a more quantitative understanding of accident phenomenology, this approach should help in achieving a clearer perspective on scenarios important to preclosure safety assessments of geologic repositories. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. A biosphere modeling methodology for dose assessments of the potential Yucca Mountain deep geological high level radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B M; Smith, G M; Little, R H; Kessler, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent developments in performance standards for proposed high level radioactive waste disposal at Yucca Mountain suggest that health risk or dose rate limits will likely be part of future standards. Approaches to the development of biosphere modeling and dose assessments for Yucca Mountain have been relatively lacking in previous performance assessments due to the absence of such a requirement. This paper describes a practical methodology used to develop a biosphere model appropriate for calculating doses from use of well water by hypothetical individuals due to discharges of contaminated groundwater into a deep well. The biosphere model methodology, developed in parallel with the BIOMOVS II international study, allows a transparent recording of the decisions at each step, from the specification of the biosphere assessment context through to model development and analysis of results. A list of features, events, and processes relevant to Yucca Mountain was recorded and an interaction matrix developed to help identify relationships between them. Special consideration was given to critical/potential exposure group issues and approaches. The conceptual model of the biosphere system was then developed, based on the interaction matrix, to show how radionuclides migrate and accumulate in the biosphere media and result in potential exposure pathways. A mathematical dose assessment model was specified using the flexible AMBER software application, which allows users to construct their own compartment models. The starting point for the biosphere calculations was a unit flux of each radionuclide from the groundwater in the geosphere into the drinking water in the well. For each of the 26 radionuclides considered, the most significant exposure pathways for hypothetical individuals were identified. For 14 of the radionuclides, the primary exposure pathways were identified as consumption of various crops and animal products following assumed agricultural use of the contaminated

  4. Review and analysis of hydrogeologic conditions near the site of a potential nuclear-waste repository, Eddy and Lea counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Jerry W.; Orr, Brennon R.

    1977-01-01

    This interim report reviews and summarizes the hydrogeology of rocks associated with the Permian salt beds (Castile and Salado Formations) of Los Medanos area in southeastern New Mexico. The information will be considered, together with other factors, in the preparation of an analysis of the impact of a potential nuclear-waste repository on the environment. Most of the geologic units in and adjacent to the Permian salt deposits are characterized by low permeabilities and highly mineralized water. Sandstone of the Delaware Mountain Group, which underlies the salt, has an average hydraulic conductivity of 0.16 ft/d and an average porosity of 15.65 percent. Flow is north-northeastward toward the margin of the Capitan Limestone, at velocities ranging from 0.0005 to 0.0008 ft/d. The Capitan Limestone, a relatively high yielding limestone-reef aquifer adjacent to the study area, has transmissivity values ranging from 500 sq ft/d to 10,000 sq ft/d and an average hydraulic conductivity of about 5 ft/d. Water movement west of the Pecos River is northeastward in the reef, with discharge at Carlsbad Springs. East of the Pecos River, water moves at very low rates and the direction of movement is uncertain. The Castile and Salado Formations, which might be used to contain the nuclear waste, have a few isolated pockets of brine and gas, but generally transmit little or no ground water. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository, B00000000-01717-2200-00099, Rev. 01

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during the site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. A parallel effort was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and is reported in Wilson et al. (1994, in press).

  6. Mineralogy and clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Broxton, D.E.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1993-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. An important aspect of this evaluation is to understand the geologic history of the site including the diagenetic processes that are largely responsible for the present-day chemical and physical properties of the altered tuffs. This study evaluates the use of K/Ar geochronology in determining the alteration history of the zeolitized portions of Miocene tuffs at Yucca Mountain. Clinoptilolite is not generally regarded as suitable for dating because of its open structure and large ion-exchange capacity. However, it is the most abundant zeolite at Yucca Mountain and was selected for this study to assess the feasibility of dating the zeolitization process and/or subsequent processes that may have affected the zeolites. In this study we examine the ability of this mineral to retain all or part of its K and radiogenic Ar during diagenesis and evaluate the usefulness of the clinoptilolite K/Ar dates for determining the history of alteration.

  7. Wellbore enlargement investigation: Potential analogs to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant during inadvertent intrusion of the repository

    SciTech Connect

    Boak, D.M.; Dotson, L.; Aguilar, R.

    1997-01-01

    This study involved the evaluation and documentation of cases in which petroleum wellbores were enlarged beyond the nominal hole diameter as a consequence of erosion during exploratory drilling, particularly as a function of gas flow into the wellbore during blowout conditions. A primary objective was to identify analogs to potential wellbore enlargement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during inadvertent human intrusion. Secondary objectives were to identify drilling scenarios associated with enlargement, determine the physical extent of enlargement, and establish the physical properties of the formation in which the enlargement occurred. No analogs of sufficient quality to establish quantitative limits on wellbore enlargement at the WIPP disposal system were identified. However, some information was obtained regarding the frequency of petroleum well blowouts and the likelihood that such blowouts would bridge downhole, self-limiting the surface release of disposal-system material. Further work would be necessary, however, to determine the conditions under which bridging could occur and the extent to which the bridging might be applicable to WIPP. In addition, data on casing sizes of petroleum boreholes in the WIPP vicinity support the use of a 12-{1/4} inch borehole size in WIPP performance assessment calculations. Finally, although data are limited, there was no evidence of significant wellbore enlargement in any of three blowouts that occur-red in wellbores in the Delaware Basin (South Culebra Bluff Unit No. 1, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) 6, and WIPP 12).

  8. A Method to Evaluate Additional Waste Forms to Optimize Performance of the HLW Repository

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gombert; L. Lauerhass

    2006-02-01

    The DOE high-level waste (HLW) disposal system is based on decisions made in the 1970s. The de facto Yucca Mountain WAC for HLW, contained in the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), and the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) tentatively describes waste forms to be interred in the repository, and limits them to borosilicate glass (BSG). It is known that many developed waste forms are as durable as or better than environmental assessment or “EA”-glass. Among them are the salt-ceramic and metallic waste forms developed at ANL-W. Also, iron phosphate glasses developed at University of Missouri show promise in stabilizing the most refractory materials in Hanford HLW. However, for any of this science to contribute, the current Total System Performance Assessment model must be able to evaluate the additional waste form to determine potential impacts on repository performance. The results can then support the technical bases required in the repository license application. A methodology is proposed to use existing analysis models to evaluate potential additional waste forms for disposal without gathering costly material specific degradation data. The concept is to analyze the potential impacts of waste form chemical makeup on repository performance assuming instantaneous waste matrix dissolution. This assumption obviates the need for material specific degradation models and is based on the relatively modest fractional contribution DOE HLW makes to the repository radionuclide and hazardous metals inventory. The existing analysis models, with appropriate data modifications, are used to evaluate geochemical interactions and material transport through the repository. This methodology would support early screening of proposed waste forms through simplified evaluation of disposal performance, and would provide preliminary guidance for repository license amendment in the future.

  9. Numerical study of the wind energy potential in Bulgaria - Some preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, G.; Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Miloshev, N.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.

    2012-10-01

    The new energy efficiency politics of the EU requires till year 2020 16% of Bulgarian electricity to be produced from renewable sources. The wind is one of renewable energy sources. The ecological benefits of all the kinds of "green" energy are obvious. It is desirable, however, the utilization of renewable energy sources to be as much as possible economically effective. This means that installment of the respective devices (wind farms, solar farms, etc.) should be based on a detailed and reliable evaluation of the real potential of the country. Detailed study of the wind energy potential of the country - spatial distribution, temporal variation, mean and extreme values, fluctuations and statistical characteristics; evaluation from a point of view of industrial applicability can not be made only on the basis of the existing routine meteorological data - the measuring network is not dense enough to catch all the details of the local flow systems, hence of the real wind energy potential of the country spatial distribution. That is why the measurement data has to be supplemented by numerical modeling. The wind field simulations were performed applying the 5th generation PSU/NCAR Meso-Meteorological Model MM5 for years 2000-2007 with a spatial resolution of 3 km over Bulgaria. Some preliminary evaluations of the country wind energy potential, based on the simulation output are demonstrated in the paper.

  10. Mercury exposure on potential plant Ludwigia octovalvis L. - Preliminary toxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrawiq, Huda S. M.; Mushrifah, I.

    2013-11-01

    The preliminary test in phytoremediation is necessaryto determine the ability of plant to survive in media with different concentrations of contaminant. It was conducted to determine the maximum concentration of the contaminant that isharmful to the plant and suppress the plant growth. This study showed the ability of Ludwigia octovalvisto resist mercury (Hg) contaminant in sand containing different concentrations of Hg (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 mg/L). The experimental work wasperformed under greenhouse conditions for an observation period of 4 weeks. Throughout the 4 weeks duration, the resultsshowed that 66.66% of the plants withered for on exposure to Hg concentration of 4 mg/L and 100% withered at higher concentrations of 6 and 8 mg/L. The results of this study may serve as a basis for research that aims to study uptake and accumulation of Hg using potential phytoremediation plants.

  11. The Emperor's New Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The author does not know the first thing about building digital repositories. Maybe that is a strange thing to say, given that he works in a repository development group now, worked on the original DSpace project years ago, and worked on a few repository research projects in between. Given how long he has been around people and projects aiming to…

  12. Preliminary Assessment of the Potential for Inducing Stormwater Infiltration in Cook County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, William S.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2009-01-01

    The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago is responsible for all of the regional stormwater management for Cook County in northeastern Illinois, one of the largest urban areas in the United States. Continuing urban expansion in this area has increased stormwater runoff and combined sewer overflows and likely decreased groundwater recharge. Passive induced-infiltration structures may help reduce stormflow problems and increase infiltration. These structures must be properly located to function effectively. Using hydrogeologic and land cover and use characteristics, maps of Cook County were developed indicating areas having the most potential for inducing stormwater infiltration. This assessment is preliminary because the scale of the mapping only gives a general indication of potential infiltration areas and is not suitable for site-specific investigations. In Cook County, 76,080 of 612,636 acres (12.4 percent) were determined to have the greatest potential for passive induced-infiltration-structure locations. Of these 76,080 acres, 8,650 are within the Lake Michigan surface watershed, with the remaining 67,430 acres within the Illinois River surface watershed. If all the annual rainfall on the 8,650 acres infiltrated and flowed to Lake Michigan, the resulting groundwater flux would be about 33 cubic feet per second (ft3/s).

  13. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Harris R.; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Sutton, Mark; Ross, Amber D.

    2012-07-01

    A combination of transient heat transfer analytical solutions for a finite line source, a series of point sources, and a series of parallel infinite line sources were combined with a quasi-steady-state multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered barriers. This evaluation was performed to provide information to scientists and decision makers to compare candidate geologic media for a repository (crystalline rock [granite], clay, salt, and deep borehole), and to provide input for the future evaluation of the trade-off between pre-emplacement surface storage time, waste package size, and repository footprint. This approach was selected in favor of the finite element solution typically used to analyze the temperature response because it allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. The analytical solution approach used to analyze the repository temperature response allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. This approach allowed investigation of the sensitivity of the results to combinations of parameters that show that there is much flexibility to be gained in terms of spent fuel management options by varying a few key parameters. This initial analysis used representative design concepts and thermal constraints based on international design concepts, and it also included waste forms representing future fuel cycles with high burnup fuels. Unlike repository designs with large open tunnels and pre-closure ventilation, all of the disposal concepts

  14. Geothermal areas as analogues to chemical processes in the near-field and altered zone of the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository

    SciTech Connect

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Meike, A.

    1995-02-01

    The need to bound system performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository for thousands of years after emplacement of high-level nuclear waste requires the use of computer codes. The use of such codes to produce reliable bounds over such long time periods must be tested using long-lived natural and historical systems as analogues. The geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) in New Zealand were selected as the site most amenable to study. The rocks of the TVZ are silicic volcanics that are similar in composition to Yucca Mountain. The area has been subjected to temperatures of 25 to 300 C which have produced a variety of secondary minerals similar to those anticipated at Yucca Mountain. The availability of rocks, fluids and fabricated materials for sampling is excellent because of widespread exploitation of the systems for geothermal power. Current work has focused on testing the ability of the EQ3/6 code and thermodynamic data base to describe mineral-fluid relations at elevated temperatures. Welfare starting long-term dissolution/corrosion tests of rocks, minerals and manufactured materials in natural thermal features in order to compare laboratory rates with field-derived rates. Available field data on rates of silica precipitation from heated fluids have been analyzed and compared to laboratory rates. New sets of precipitation experiments are being planned. The microbially influenced degradation of concrete in the Broadlands-Ohaaki geothermal field is being characterized. The authors will continue to work on these projects in FY 1996 and expand to include the study of naturally occurring uranium and thorium series radionuclides, as a prelude to studying radionuclide migration in heated silicic volcanic rocks. 32 refs.

  15. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXPERIENCE IN CREATING AND COMMUNICATING THE CASE FOR THE SAFETY OF A POTENTIAL YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    W.J. Boyle; A.E. Van Luik

    2005-08-30

    Experience gained by the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) in making the recommendation for the development of the Yucca Mountain site as the nation's first high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository is useful for creating documents to support the next phase in the repository program, the licensing phase. The experience that supported the successful site-recommendation process involved a three-tiered approach. First, was making a highly technical case for regulatory compliance. Second, was making a broader case for safety in an Environmental Impact Statement. And third, producing plain language brochures, made available to the public in hard copy and on the Internet, to explain the Department's action and its legal and scientific bases. This paper reviews lessons learned from this process, and makes suggestions for the next stage of the repository program: licensing.

  16. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

  17. Potential schistosome-vector snails and associated trematodes in ricefields of Corrients province, Argentina. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Rumi, A; Hamann, M I

    1990-01-01

    Considering the possibility of introduction of schistosomiasis mansoni into Argentina as a consequence of dam construction on the Rio De La Plata basin, preliminary studies have been carried out on agrosystems such as ricefields in Corrientes province with the following purposes: 1) to survey and estimate the relative abundance of planorbids and identify potential vector species; 2) to identify environmental factors capable of influencing Biomphalaria population dynamics; and 3) to find out snail-parasite associations and estimate snail infection rates in order to detect possible competitive interactions between larval stages of native trematodes that could be used in biological control of Schistosoma mansoni. Three potential schistosome vectors were detected in ricefields, namely Biomphalaria straminea, B. tenagophila and B. peregrina, although B. orbignyi, a species refractory to infection with S. mansoni, proved the most frequent and abundant. Positive correlations (P less than 0.05) were found between Biomphalaria abundance and some environmental parameters: conductivity, hardness, calcium, nitrites plus nitrates, ammonium and bicarbonates. Water temperature correlation was negative (P less than 0.05). No correlation (P less than 0.05) was found in total iron, phosphates (SRP), pH and soil granulometry. PMID:2134706

  18. Hydrologic and geologic characteristics of the Yucca Mountain site relevant to the performance of a potential repository: Day 1, Las Vegas, Nevada to Pahrump, Nevada: Stop 6A. Keane Wonder Spring and regional groundwater flow in the Death Valley region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinkampf, W.C.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located ~100 mi northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been designated by Congress as a site to be characterized for a potential mined geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This field trip will examine the regional geologic and hydrologic setting for Yucca Mountain, as well as specific results of the site characterization program, The first day focuses on the regional seeing with emphasis on current and paleo hydrology, which are both of critical concern for predicting future performance of a potential repository. Morning stops will be in southern Nevada and afternoon stops will be in Death Valley. The second day will be spent at Yucca Mountain. The filed trip will visit the underground testing sites in the "Exploratory Studies Facility" and the "Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Field Test" plus several surface-based testing sites. Much of the work at the site has concentrated on studies of the unsaturated zone, and element of the hydrologic system that historically has received little attention. Discussions during the second day will comprise selected topics of Yucca Mountain geology, mic hazard in the Yucca Mountain area. Evening discussions will address modeling of regional groundwater flow, the geology and hydrology of Yucca Mountain to the performance of a potential repository. Day 3 will examine the geologic framework and hydrology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Groundwater Basin and then will continue to Reno via Hawthorne, Nevada and the Walker Lake area.

  19. A preliminary census of engineering activities located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Marco; Briffa, Emanuela; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Maiolino, Vincenza; Maugeri, Roberto; Palano, Mimmo; Privitera, Eugenio; Scaltrito, Antonio; Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    The seismic events caused by human engineering activities are commonly termed as "triggered" and "induced". This class of earthquakes, though characterized by low-to-moderate magnitude, have significant social and economical implications since they occur close to the engineering activity responsible for triggering/inducing them and can be felt by the inhabitants living nearby, and may even produce damage. One of the first well-documented examples of induced seismicity was observed in 1932 in Algeria, when a shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake occurred close to the Oued Fodda Dam. By the continuous global improvement of seismic monitoring networks, numerous other examples of human-induced earthquakes have been identified. Induced earthquakes occur at shallow depths and are related to a number of human activities, such as fluid injection under high pressure (e.g. waste-water disposal in deep wells, hydrofracturing activities in enhanced geothermal systems and oil recovery, shale-gas fracking, natural and CO2 gas storage), hydrocarbon exploitation, groundwater extraction, deep underground mining, large water impoundments and underground nuclear tests. In Italy, induced/triggered seismicity is suspected to have contributed to the disaster of the Vajont dam in 1963. Despite this suspected case and the presence in the Italian territory of a large amount of engineering activities "capable" of inducing seismicity, no extensive researches on this topic have been conducted to date. Hence, in order to improve knowledge and correctly assess the potential hazard at a specific location in the future, here we started a preliminary study on the entire range of engineering activities currently located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity. To this end, we performed: • a preliminary census of all engineering activities located in the study area by collecting all the useful information coming from available on-line catalogues; • a detailed compilation

  20. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Trebules

    2006-06-02

    This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

  1. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  2. Preliminary limits on a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xue-Mei; Xie, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Using the supplementary advances of the perihelia provided by INPOP10a (IMCCE, France) and EPM2011 (IAA RAS, Russia) ephemerides, we obtain preliminary limits on a logarithmic correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential in the solar system. This kind of correction may originate from fundamental frameworks, like string theories or effective models of gravity due to quantum effects and the non-local gravity scheme. We estimate upper limit of Tohline-Kuhn-Kruglyak parameter λ and lower bound of Fabris-Campos parameter α, which parametrize the correction and connect each other by αλ=-1. In our estimation, we take the Lense-Thirring effect due to the Sun's angular momentum and the uncertainty of the Sun's quadrupole moment into account. These two factors were usually absent in previous works. We find that INPOP10a yields the upper limit as α=-(0.66±5.82)×10-4 kpc-1 [or the lower limit as λ=(0.15±8.76)×105 kpc] while EPM2011 gives α=(0.52±1.74)×10-4 kpc-1 [or the lower limit as λ=-(0.19±3.29)×105 kpc]. The limits of | λ| are greater than the result based on the rotation curves of spiral galaxies by about 3 orders of magnitude, indicating its effects might be screened in high density regions.

  3. Preliminary Study of Plasma Exosomal Tau as a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Robert A.; Tripodis, Yorghos; Baugh, Christine M.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Martin, Brett M.; Chaisson, Christine; Cantu, Robert C.; Joyce, James A.; Shah, Sahil; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Zhang, Jing; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Taylor, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a tauopathy associated with prior exposure to repetitive head impacts, such as those incurred through American football and other collision sports. Diagnosis is made through neuropathological examination. Many of the clinical features of CTE are common in the general population, with and without a history of head impact exposure, making clinical diagnosis difficult. As is now common in the diagnosis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, there is a need for methods to diagnose CTE during life through objective biomarkers. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine tau-positive exosomes in plasma as a potential CTE biomarker. Methods: Subjects were 78 former National Football League (NFL) players and 16 controls. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from plasma. Fluorescent nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to determine the number of vesicles staining positive for tau. Results: The NFL group had higher exosomal tau than the control group (p <  0.0001). Exosomal tau discriminated between the groups, with 82% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 53% negative predictive value. Within the NFL group, higher exosomal tau was associated with worse performance on tests of memory (p = 0.0126) and psychomotor speed (p = 0.0093). Conclusion: These preliminary findings suggest that exosomal tau in plasma may be an accurate, noninvasive CTE biomarker. PMID:26890775

  4. Large climate-moderating envelopes for enclosed structures: a preliminary evaluation of energy conservation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R.L.; Giles, G.E.; Park, J.E.

    1981-12-01

    An investigation was made of the basic impacts of putting a large secondary enclosure around a number of functions and thereby creating a Large Climate Moderating Envelope (LCME). This study is a preliminary estimate of the energy conservation benefits of an LCME. A hypothetical LMCE design was chosen and a coupled fluid dynamic and energy transport analysis was performed to estimate the energy conservation potential of this design. The heat transfer models included insolation, outside air temperature and wind, thermal radiation exchange with the sky, and between the fabric and ground and thermal storage in the earth mass beneath the LCME. The energy transported within the fluid by the buoyancy driven circulation was modeled as an incompressible fluid utilizing the Boussinesq approximation. The climatic conditions were assumed to vary in smooth repeating daily cycles. The numerical simulation of climatic variation was continued until the results within the LCME achieved a repeating daily cycle. The results for selected seasonally characteristic days were utilized to estimate the annual energy consumption of structures within an LCME relative to similar structures exposed to the exterior environment. The relative annual energy savings for summer-dominated climates was estimated to be approx. 70%. The energy savings for a winter-dominated climate LCME were estimated to be somewhat smaller but the LCME concept could offer significant benefits for agricultural applications for this type of climate.

  5. A preliminary investigation of the potential mechanical sensitivity of vertical comb drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, E.; Moussa, W.

    2014-10-01

    This article describes a preliminary step taken in investigating the potential of vertical comb drives to be used as force-compensation mechanisms in interfacial force microscopes, by exploring the lower limit of the stiffness of the springs the comb drives can be fabricated with. The stiffness of their springs will affect the sensitivity of the microscope. Six vertical comb drives were fabricated for this study; the dimensions of their spring beams were chosen with the intention of giving them stiffnesses of three different orders of magnitude. During fabrication it was found that etching the tops of some of the teeth down to create the vertical offset between the combs can be done using only photoresist to mask the rest of the teeth. The stiffnesses of the fabricated springs were estimated by applying loads to them and measuring their resulting deflections. Weights were applied to the two comb drives with the stiffest springs. Voltages were also applied to them so as to determine the force-voltage relationship for their comb design. Since the other four comb drives had the same comb design, the stiffnesses of their springs could be estimated from the displacements of their movable combs when voltages were applied to them.

  6. Assessment of Nano Cellulose from Peach Palm Residue as Potential Food Additive: Part II: Preliminary Studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dayanne Regina Mendes; Mendonça, Márcia Helena; Helm, Cristiane Vieira; Magalhães, Washington L E; de Muniz, Graciela Ines Bonzon; Kestur, Satyanarayana G

    2015-09-01

    High consumption of dietary fibers in the diet is related to the reduction of the risk of non-transmitting of chronic diseases, prevention of the constipation etc. Rich diets in dietary fibers promote beneficial effects for the metabolism. Considering the above and recognizing the multifaceted advantages of nano materials, there have been many attempts in recent times to use the nano materials in the food sector including as food additive. However, whenever new product for human and animal consumption is developed, it has to be tested for their effectiveness regarding improvement in the health of consumers, safety aspects and side effects. However, before it is tried with human beings, normally such materials would be assessed through biological tests on a living organism to understand its effect on health condition of the consumer. Accordingly, based on the authors' finding reported in a previous paper, this paper presents body weight, biochemical (glucose, cholesterol and lipid profile in blood, analysis of feces) and histological tests carried out with biomass based cellulose nano fibrils prepared by the authors for its possible use as food additive. Preliminary results of the study with mice have clearly brought out potential of these fibers for the said purpose. PMID:26344977

  7. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03

    useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

  8. A preliminary characterization of the spatial variability of precipitation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Ambos, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Isohyetal maps of precipitation and numerical models for simulating precipitation are needed to characterize natural infiltration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of precipitation within the domain of the natural catchments overlying the potential repository, and to define preliminary geostatistical models based on differences in storm type for the numerical simulation of precipitation.

  9. Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration with Biochar: A Preliminary Assessment of its Global Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amonette, J.; Lehmann, J.; Joseph, S.

    2007-12-01

    Biochar technology involves the capture of CO2 from the atmosphere by photosynthesis and its ultimate conversion to biochar by pyrolysis. Energy is obtained during the pyrolysis process and the charcoal, or biochar, which is considerably more stable than biomass, may then be incorporated into agricultural lands where it serves to increase the nutrient- and water-holding capacity of soil. With an estimated half-life in soil on the order of centuries to millenia, biochar offers a way of safely storing C for long periods of time while enhancing the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, biochar technology, like other biomass conversion approaches that include C sequestration options, offers a way to decrease the levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. That is, biochar technology is one of the few inherently "carbon-negative" sources of energy. These positive attributes are of little consequence, however, if the total contribution to sequestration is small compared to the need. In this paper, we provide a preliminary assessment of the potential contribution of biochar technology to the mitigation of climate change, and identify some research needs. Currently, the atmospheric C levels are increasing by about 4.1 Gt/yr, with 7.2 Gt/yr being put into the atmosphere by fossil fuel combustion and cement production, and 3.1 Gt/yr being removed from the atmosphere by the ocean (2.2 Gt/yr) and terrestrial processes (0.9 Gt/yr). The uptake by terrestrial processes can be increased significantly by management of the 60.6 Gt/yr of biomass C that is fixed by photosynthesis (i.e., net primary productivity), of which 59 Gt/yr is decomposed and 1.6 Gt/yr combusted. Biomass pyrolysis converts about 50% of the biomass C to char. Of the other 50% that is converted to bio-oil and bio-gas, the net energy production is about 62% efficient. Thus, pyrolysis of 1 Gt of biomass C would provide energy equivalent to about 0.3 Gt of fossil C and could be used to offset that amount of fossil C

  10. 10 CFR 960.3-1-4-1 - Site identification as potentially acceptable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Site identification as potentially acceptable. 960.3-1-4-1 Section 960.3-1-4-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-1-4-1 Site identification as potentially acceptable. The...

  11. 10 CFR 960.3-1-4-1 - Site identification as potentially acceptable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Site identification as potentially acceptable. 960.3-1-4-1 Section 960.3-1-4-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-1-4-1 Site identification as potentially acceptable. The...

  12. 10 CFR 960.3-1-4-1 - Site identification as potentially acceptable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Site identification as potentially acceptable. 960.3-1-4-1 Section 960.3-1-4-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-1-4-1 Site identification as potentially acceptable. The...

  13. Potential of the Galaxy from the Besançon galaxy model including non-axisymmetric components: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Robin, A. C.; Bienaymé, O.; Reylé, C.; Valenzuela, O.; Pichardo, B.

    2014-07-01

    In this contributed poster we present a preliminary attempt to compute a non-axisymmetric potential together with previous axisymmetric potential of the Besançon galaxy model. The contribution by non-axisymmetric components are modeled by the superposition of inhomogeneous ellipsoids to approximate the triaxial bar and superposition of homogeneous oblate spheroids for a stellar halo, possibly triaxial. Finally, we have computed the potential and force field for these non-axisymmetric components in order to constraint the total mass of the Milky Way. We present preliminary results for the rotation curve and the contribution of the bar to it. This approach will allow future studies of dynamical constraints from comparisons of kinematical simulations with upcoming surveys such as RAVE, BRAVA, APOGEE, and GAIA in the near future. More details, are presented in https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_JG.Fern%e1ndez.pdf.

  14. Progress report on the kinetic measurements of the reactions of the silicates at the Yucca Mountain potential repository site; [Final] report, June 15, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lasaga, A.C.; Ganor, J.

    1994-10-01

    Preliminary results are provided on: Synthesis and characterization of analcime and Na-clinoptilolite (Penn State), batch solubility experiments on analcime and clinoptilolite, thermodynamic modelling of solubility data, and kinetic flow-through experiments on analcime and clinoptilolite.

  15. Preliminary assessment of the potential impact of fog oil smoke on selected threatened and endangered species. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Getz, L.L.; Reinbold, K.A.; Tazik, D.J.; Hayden, T.J.; Cassels, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to smokes and obscurants is perceived to constitute a potential negative impact on individuals or populations of threatened and endangered species present in training areas. This research provides a preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke used in training exercises based on available data and information (and assumptions stated in the report), especially as they might affect threatened and endangered species. This research also identifies specific data and information gaps that should be the focus of future research efforts.

  16. Biospecimen repositories and cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2015-03-01

    Biospecimen repositories are important for the advancement of biomedical research. Literature on the potential for biobanking of fine-needle aspiration, gynecologic, and nongynecologic cytology specimens is very limited. The potential for biobanking of these specimens as valuable additional resources to surgically excised tissues appears to be excellent. The cervicovaginal specimens that can be used for biobanking include Papanicolaou-stained monolayer preparations and residual material from liquid-based cytology preparations. Different types of specimen preparations of fine-needle aspiration and nongynecologic specimens, including Papanicolaou-stained and Diff-Quik-stained smears, cell blocks. and dedicated passes/residual material from fine-needle aspiration stored frozen in a variety of solutions, can be used for biobanking. Because of several gaps in knowledge regarding the standard of operative procedures for the procurement, storage, and quality assessment of cytology specimens, further studies as well as national conferences and workshops are needed not only to create awareness but also to facilitate the use of cytopathology specimens for biobanking. PMID:25524469

  17. Selected extracellular microRNA as potential biomarkers of multiple sclerosis activity--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kacperska, Magdalena Justyna; Jastrzebski, Karol; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Walenczak, Jakub; Konarska-Krol, Maria; Glabinski, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Four distinct disease courses are known, although approximately 90% of patients are diagnosed with the relapsing-remitting form (RRMS). The name "multiple sclerosis" pertains to the underlying pathology: the presence of demyelinating plaques in the CNS, in particular in the periventricular region, corpus callosum, cervical spine, and the cerebellum. There are ongoing efforts to discover biomarkers that would allow for an unequivocal diagnosis, assess the activity of inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes, or warn of disease progression. At present, small noncoding RNA particles-microRNA (miRNA, miR) seem to be particularly noteworthy, as they take part in posttranscriptional regulation of expression of various genes. Changes in composition as well as function of miRNA found in body fluids of MS patients are subjects of research, in the hope they prove accurate markers of MS activity. This preliminary study aims to evaluate the expression of selected extracellular microRNA particles (miRNA-let-7a, miRNA-92a, miRNA-684a) in patients experiencing MS relapse and remission, with healthy volunteers serving as a control group and to evaluate the correlation between miRNA expression and selected clinical parameters of those patients. Thirty-seven patients suffering from MS formed two examined groups: 20 patients undergoing relapse and 17 in remission. Thirty healthy volunteers formed the control group. All patients who were subjects to peripheral blood sampling had been hospitalized in the Department of Neurology and Stroke(1). Four milliliters of venous whole blood had been collected into EDTA tubes. The basis for the selection of the three particular miRNA investigated in this study (miRNA-let-7a, miRNA-92a, miRNA-684a) was a preliminary bioinformatic analysis of data compiled from several medical databases, including Ovid MEDLINE®, Embase, Cochrane Database of

  18. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  19. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age; episodes of symptoms in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... When corticotropin repository injection is used to treat multiple sclerosis, it is usually injected once a day for ...

  20. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-1 - Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-2-1 Section 960.3-2-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-1...

  1. 10 CFR 960.3-1-4-1 - Site identification as potentially acceptable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site identification as potentially acceptable. 960.3-1-4-1 Section 960.3-1-4-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-1-4-1 Site...

  2. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-1 - Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-2-1 Section 960.3-2-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-1...

  3. 10 CFR 960.3-2-1 - Site screening for potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site screening for potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-1 Section 960.3-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-1 Site screening...

  4. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-1 - Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-2-1 Section 960.3-2-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-1...

  5. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-1 - Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-2-1 Section 960.3-2-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-1...

  6. 10 CFR 960.3-2-2-1 - Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation of all potentially acceptable sites. 960.3-2-2-1 Section 960.3-2-2-1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Implementation Guidelines § 960.3-2-2-1...

  7. MAJOR REPOSITORY DESIGN ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    Blink, James A.; Bailey, Jack N.; Chesnut, Dwayne; Compton, James; Snell, Richard D.

    1997-11-10

    The Yucca Mountain Project is focused on producing a four-part viability assessment in late FY98. Its four components (design, performance assessment, cost estimate, and licensing development plan) must be consistent. As a tool to compare design and performance assessment options, a series of repository pictures were developed for the sequential time phases of a repository. The boundaries of the time phases correspond to evolution in the engineered barrier system (EBS).

  8. Managing and Evaluating Digital Repositories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccala, Alesia; Oppenheim, Charles; Dhiensa, Rajveen

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: We examine the role of the digital repository manager, discuss the future of repository management and evaluation and suggest that library and information science schools develop new repository management curricula. Method: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with managers of five different types of repositories and a Web-based…

  9. Estimation of the impact of water movement from sewage and settling ponds near a potential high level radioactive waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolik, S.R.; Fewell, M.E.

    1992-02-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to design site characterization activities with minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. One activity of site characterization is the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, which may include underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and the accompanying ponds used for the storage of sewage water and muck water removed from construction operations. The information in this report pertains to the two-dimensional numerical calculations modelling the movement of sewage and settling pond water, and the potential effects of that water on repository performance and underground experiments. This document contains information that has been used in preparing Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document (ESF DR) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  10. The Fermilab lattice information repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Kriss, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Over the years, it has become increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice and machine information repository with the capability of keeping track of revision information could be of great value. This is especially true in the context of a large accelerator laboratory like Fermilab with six rings and sixteen beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, constantly subject to modifications, improvements and even major redesign. While there exist a handful of potentially suitable revision systems--both freely available and commercial--our experience has shown that expecting beam physicists to become fully conversant with complex revision system software used on an occasional basis is neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the FNAL lattice repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. The FNAL repository has been operational since September 2004; the unique architecture of ''Subversion'' has been a key ingredient of the technical success of its implementation.

  11. Potential landslide activity affecting the archaeological site of Orongo (Easter Island-Chile): preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margottini, C.; Delmonaco, G.; Spizzichino, D.; Pandolfi, O.; Crisostomo, R.; Nohe, S.

    2009-04-01

    landslide crowns are currently located in the same level some hundreds m at west, just below the plain where Orongo is founded, threatening the stability of the petroglyphs area. According to the above observations, although after preliminary superficial surveys, the potential landslide evolution of the area may be the following: i) slope toe affected by coastal erosion; ii) triggering of debris slide/fall in the middle-upper portion of the slope with failure depth of ca. 2.5-4m; iii) increasing of stress and retrogressive landslide activity (debris-slide) towards the crest zone. A possible development of the research will be based on implementation of a multi-temporal analysis of landslide activity through a 3D-GIS modeling coupled with a back analysis in order to define present slope stability conditions and possible evolution of the slope. This to provide useful tools for local authorities in implementing preventive landslide risk mitigation measures for the protection of the cultural heritage in Orongo.

  12. Technical Design and Optimization of a HLW-Repository in the Gorleben Salt Dome including Detailed Design of the Sealing System - 13305

    SciTech Connect

    Bollingerfehr, W.; Filbert, W.; Herold, P.; Lerch, C.; Mueller-Hoeppe, N.; Charlier, F.; Kilger, R.

    2013-07-01

    The preliminary safety analysis for a HLW repository at Gorleben, the potential repository site in Germany, takes into account an updated set of data on the amounts and types of expected heat generating waste, the documented results of the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome, and the 'Safety Requirements Governing the Final Disposal of Heat-Generating Radioactive Waste' as at 30 September 2010. A repository design was developed for two emplacement concepts (drift disposal and borehole disposal) mainly influenced by the thermal impact of the heat-generating waste on the host rock and taking into account mining constrains. According to the objective to create the conditions for a safe containment of the waste containers in the host rock, a closure concept consisting of backfilling and sealing measures was developed. The repository was designed in such a way that retrievability requirements can be met for all waste containers within the operating phase of the repository. In addition, it could be shown that sufficient measures for ensuring subcriticality are provided both during the operational and the post-closure phases of the repository. (authors)

  13. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  14. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs. fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed.

  15. Characterisation and modelling of mixing processes in groundwaters of a potential geological repository for nuclear wastes in crystalline rocks of Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Javier B; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F; Acero, Patricia

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the mixing modelling results for the hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwaters in the Laxemar area (Sweden). This area is one of the two sites that have been investigated, under the financial patronage of the Swedish Nuclear Waste and Management Co. (SKB), as possible candidates for hosting the proposed repository for the long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The classical geochemical modelling, interpreted in the light of the palaeohydrogeological history of the system, has shown that the driving process in the geochemical evolution of this groundwater system is the mixing between four end-member waters: a deep and old saline water, a glacial meltwater, an old marine water, and a meteoric water. In this paper we put the focus on mixing and its effects on the final chemical composition of the groundwaters using a comprehensive methodology that combines principal component analysis with mass balance calculations. This methodology allows us to test several combinations of end member waters and several combinations of compositional variables in order to find optimal solutions in terms of mixing proportions. We have applied this methodology to a dataset of 287 groundwater samples from the Laxemar area collected and analysed by SKB. The best model found uses four conservative elements (Cl, Br, oxygen-18 and deuterium), and computes mixing proportions with respect to three end member waters (saline, glacial and meteoric). Once the first order effect of mixing has been taken into account, water-rock interaction can be used to explain the remaining variability. In this way, the chemistry of each water sample can be obtained by using the mixing proportions for the conservative elements, only affected by mixing, or combining the mixing proportions and the chemical reactions for the non-conservative elements in the system, establishing the basis for predictive calculations. PMID:24070873

  16. Salt repository design approach

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure.

  17. Archaeological data as a basis for repository marker design

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1982-10-01

    This report concerns the development of a marking system for a nuclear waste repository which is very likely to survive for 10,000 years. In order to provide a background on the subject, and for the preliminary design presented in this report, a discussion is presented about the issues involved in human interference with the repository system and the communication of information. A separate chapter summarizes six ancient man-made monuments including: materials, effects of associated textual information on our understanding of the monument, and other features of the ancient monument relevant to marking a repository site. The information presented in the two chapters is used to provide the basis and rationale for a preliminary marker system design presented in a final chapter. 86 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of potential substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rogozen, M.B. )

    1989-12-30

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are organic compounds composed of carbon, chlorine and fluorine. CFCs are widely used as refrigerants, solvents, and blowing agents, and, although they are chemically inert in the lower atmosphere, CFCs break apart upon reaching the stratosphere and release chlorine, which destroys ozone molecules that serve as the earth's natural barrier to harmful ultraviolet radiation. Growing concern about the damage to stratospheric ozone has led to an international treaty to limit production and use of certain chlorofluorocarbons. Since the use of CFCs is so extensive, major efforts are under way to identify, test, and commercialize CFC substitutes. The objectives of the preliminary investigation reported here were to identify likely substitutes for CFCs used a refrigerants at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and to evaluate current information on their feasibility and health effects. Section 2 contains a brief discussion of the regulatory background. Section 3 describes the chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants currently used at LLNL. Substitutes are identified and discussed in Section 4. Section 5 contains recommendations for further research, and references are presented in Section 6. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A preliminary case study of potential ceramic raw materials in the Aileu area of Timor Leste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisboa, J. V.; Carvalho, J. M. F.; Oliveira, A.; Carvalho, C.; Grade, J.

    2007-03-01

    The newly independent country of Timor Leste is located in the eastern half of Timor Island (Indonesian archipelago). Geological studies of the country's mineral resources and extractive activities are practically non-existent. There is evidence of the exploitation of ceramic raw materials at outcrop level and two small brick kilns, nowadays inactive, in the Dili and Aileu areas. Near Aileu, there are light-coloured silt-rich deposits, interpreted as overbank deposits, interbedded with ancient river terraces (post-Pliocene) overlying metamorphic bedrock. These sediments are the subject of this study, which encompassed geological mapping and preliminary characterisation. Tectonically, the area is a graben, preserving alluvium and colluvium deposits. Five channel samples representative of the silt-rich deposits were collected. Semi-quantitative mineralogical analysis shows that the samples are made of illite, quartz and kaolinite clays, with accessory illite/vermiculite interstratified minerals and K-feldspar. The chemical data show agreement with the estimated mineralogical composition. The grain size distribution points to a silt-dominated assemblage. Most samples have a satisfactory extrudability but deficient moulding properties. After firing, the sampled raw materials form a final product with possible ceramic capability for whiteware production.

  20. Research Students and the Loughborough Institutional Repository

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickton, Margaret; McKnight, Cliff

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the potential role for research students in an institutional repository (IR). Face-to-face interviews with 34 research students at Loughborough University were carried out. Using a mixture of closed and open questions, the interviews explored the students' experiences and opinions of publishing, open access and the…

  1. Preliminary assessment of dual use bioenergy-forage potential of exotic and native grasses in Arkansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bioenergy grasses may have dual use potential as livestock feed or bioenergy feedstock. We conducted two studies on exotic and native grasses thought to have primary use as either livestock forage [‘Bumpers’ eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) and ‘Alamo’ switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)] ...

  2. Progress Towards International Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, C.; Chapman, N.

    2002-02-27

    The nuclear fuel cycle is designed to be very international, with some specialist activities (e.g. fuel fabrication, reprocessing, etc.) being confined to a few countries. Nevertheless, political and public opposition has in the past been faced by proposals to internationalise the back-end of the cycle, in particular waste disposal. Attitudes, however, have been changing recently and there is now more acceptance of the general concept of shared repositories and of specific proposals such as that of Pangea. However, as for national facilities, progress towards implementation of shared repositories will be gradual. Moreover, the best vehicle for promoting the concept may not be a commercial type of organization. Consequently the Pangea project team are currently establishing a widely based Association for this purpose.

  3. Repository seals requirement study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  4. Hyaluronic acid as a potential boron carrier for BNCT: Preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zaboronok, A; Yamamoto, T; Nakai, K; Yoshida, F; Uspenskii, S; Selyanin, M; Zelenetskii, A; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a nonimmunogenic, biocompatible polymer found in different biological tissues, has the potential to attach to CD44 receptors on the surface of certain cancer cells, where the receptor is overexpressed compared with normal cells. Boron-hyaluronic acid (BHA) was tested for its feasibility as a potential agent for BNCT. BHA with low-viscosity 30 kDa HA could be administered by intravenous injection. The compound showed a certain degree of cytotoxicity and accumulation in C6 rat glioma cells in vitro. Instability of the chelate bonds between boron and HA and/or insufficient specificity of CD44 receptors on C6 cells to BHA could account for the insufficient in vitro accumulation. To ensure the future eligibility of BHA for BNCT experiments, using alternative tumor cell lines and chemically securing the chelate bonds or synthesizing BHA with boron covalently attached to HA might be required. PMID:26302663

  5. Preliminary study of a potential CO2 reservoir area in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendula, Eszter; Király, Csilla; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Falus, György; Szabó, Csaba; Kovács, István; Füri, Judit; Kónya, Péter; Páles, Mariann; Forray, Viktória

    2014-05-01

    Since the first international agreement in 1997 (the Kyoto Protocol) the reduction of greenhouse gas emission has a key role in the European Union's energy and climate change policy. Following the Directive 2009/31/EC we are experiencing a significant change in the Hungarian national activity. Since the harmonization procedure, which was completed in May 2012, the national regulation obligates the competent authority to collect and regularly update all geological complexes that are potential for CO2 geological storage. In Hungary the most abundant potential storage formations are mostly saline aquifers of the Great Hungarian Plain (SE-Hungary), with sandstone reservoir and clayey caprock. The Neogene basin of the Great Hungarian Plain was subsided and then filled by a prograding delta system from NW and NE during the Late Miocene, mostly in the Pannonian time. The most potential storage rock was formed as a fine-grained sandy turbidite interlayered by thin argillaceous beds in the deepest part of the basin. It has relatively high porosity, depth and more than 1000 m thickness. Providing a regional coverage for the sandy turbidite, a 400-500 m thick argillaceous succession was formed in the slope environment. The composition, thickness and low permeability is expected to make it a suitable, leakage-safe caprock of the storage system. This succession is underlain by argillaceous rocks that were formed in the basin, far from sediment input and overlain by interfingering siltstone, sandstone and claystone succession formed in delta and shoreline environments and in the alluvial plain. Core samples have been collected from the potential reservoir rock and its cap rock in the Great Hungarian Plain's succession. The water compositions of the studied depth were known from well-log database. Using the information, acquired from these archive documents, we have constructed input data for geochemical modeling in order to to study the effect of pCO2 injection in the potential

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of Geothermal Potential at the Cheyenee River Sioux Reservation, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Bergfeld, D.; Bruton, C.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.

    1999-10-01

    A geochemical investigation of well waters from the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota revealed considerable diversity in the chemistry of the fluids and indicated that waters from the Dakota Formation were the best candidates for direct-use geothermal applications. Geothermometry calculations for all wells suggest that formation temperatures are <90 C. Potential scaling problems from utilization of the waters would most likely be restricted to carbonate scale and could be offset by maintaining CO{sub 2} gas in solution.

  7. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  8. Electrochemical corrosion studies of container materials in repository-relevant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Henshall, G.A.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-12-12

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is evaluating Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada to determine its suitability as a site for a mined geologic disposal system for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste. Framatome Cogema Fuels (FCF), as a part of the Management and Operating (M&O) team in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YAD), is responsible for designing and developing the waste package for this potential repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), also a member of the M&O team is responsible for testing materials and developing models for the materials to be used in the waste package. Based on a literature review of the anticipated degradation modes that may occur under the repository-relevant environmental conditions, LLNL has identified a large number of engineering materials for the various components of the waste package. One step in evaluating the performance of these materials is to conduct preliminary tests under these repository-relevant environmental conditions. This report is aimed at presenting the results of scoping electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) experiments using nine candidate waste package container materials in various environments.

  9. MODELING OF THE GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT AROUND A DEEP BOREHOLE NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    N. Lubchenko; M. Rodríguez-Buño; E.A. Bates; R. Podgorney; E. Baglietto; J. Buongiorno; M.J. Driscoll

    2015-04-01

    The concept of disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock is gaining renewed interest and consideration as a viable mined repository alternative. A large amount of work on conceptual borehole design and preliminary performance assessment has been performed by researchers at MIT, Sandia National Laboratories, SKB (Sweden), and others. Much of this work relied on analytical derivations or, in a few cases, on weakly coupled models of heat, water, and radionuclide transport in the rock. Detailed numerical models are necessary to account for the large heterogeneity of properties (e.g., permeability and salinity vs. depth, diffusion coefficients, etc.) that would be observed at potential borehole disposal sites. A derivation of the FALCON code (Fracturing And Liquid CONvection) was used for the thermal-hydrologic modeling. This code solves the transport equations in porous media in a fully coupled way. The application leverages the flexibility and strengths of the MOOSE framework, developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The current version simulates heat, fluid, and chemical species transport in a fully coupled way allowing the rigorous evaluation of candidate repository site performance. This paper mostly focuses on the modeling of a deep borehole repository under realistic conditions, including modeling of a finite array of boreholes surrounded by undisturbed rock. The decay heat generated by the canisters diffuses into the host rock. Water heating can potentially lead to convection on the scale of thousands of years after the emplacement of the fuel. This convection is tightly coupled to the transport of the dissolved salt, which can suppress convection and reduce the release of the radioactive materials to the aquifer. The purpose of this work has been to evaluate the importance of the borehole array spacing and find the conditions under which convective transport can be ruled out as a radionuclide transport mechanism

  10. Preliminary study on the potential usefulness of array processor techniques for structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeser, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the use of array processor techniques within the structural analyzer program, SPAR, are simulated in order to evaluate the potential analysis speedups which may result. In particular the connection of a Floating Point System AP120 processor to the PRIME computer is discussed. Measurements of execution, input/output, and data transfer times are given. Using these data estimates are made as to the relative speedups that can be executed in a more complete implementation on an array processor maxi-mini computer system.

  11. Investigation of the geothermal potential of the UK. A preliminary assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Geologically, Britain is an extremely stable area without active volcanism. In this situation the development of geothermal resources depends upon the occurrence of permeable rocks in deep sedimentary basins or the successful development of the hot dry rock concept. The average geothermal gradient is about 25C/km, but two belts of above average heat flow extend across northern and south-western England. In these areas the gradient can be 30C/km or more. The principal aquifers occur in the Mesozoic and the greatest geothermal potential is in sandstones of the Permo-Triassic where their occurrence at depth coincides with the high heat flow belts.

  12. Preliminary study of the potential for performance improvements in solar desiccant cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlepp, D. R.; Barlow, R.

    1981-10-01

    A second-law thermodynamic system analysis was carried out, demonstrating that present desiccant systems only achieved 10% to 15% of theoretical maximum performance and that a large potential for improvement exists. Computer simulations were used to study the effects of improving desiccant properties and increasing the effectiveness of some components of the system. Results show that modification of desiccant properties can only produce a limited (10%) increase in COP. Larger increases can be achieved by increasing the effectiveness of the sensible heat exchanger. However, it is indicated that the key to obtaining higher COPs is in the design of the dehumidifier. One design that shows promise is the parallel passage dehumidifier.

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Health Risks of Potentially Toxic Elements in Settled Dust over Beijing Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dejun; Zhan, Changlin; Yang, Guanglin; Liu, Xingqi; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    To examine levels, health risks, sources, and spatial distributions of potentially toxic elements in settled dust over Beijing urban area, 62 samples were collected mostly from residential building outdoor surfaces, and their <63 μm fractions were measured for 12 potentially toxic elements. The results show that V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Ba in dust are from predominantly natural sources, whereas Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, and Pb mostly originate from anthropogenic sources. Exposure to these elements in dust has significant non-cancer risks to children but insignificant to adults. Cancer risks of Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd via inhalation and dermal contact are below the threshold of 10−6–10−4 but As via dust ingestion shows a tolerable risk. The non-cancer risks to children are contributed mainly (75%) by As, Pb, and Sb, and dominantly (92%) via dust ingestion, with relatively higher risks mainly occurring in the eastern and northeastern Beijing urban areas. Although Cd, Zn, and Cu in dust are heavily affected by anthropogenic sources, their health risks are insignificant. Source appointments suggest that coal burning emissions, the dominant source of As, are likely the largest contributors to the health risk, and traffic-related and industrial emissions are also important because they contribute most of the Pb and Sb in dust. PMID:27187427

  14. Preliminary nutritional and biological potential of Artocarpus heterophyllus L. shell powder.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anubhuti; Gupta, Priti; Verma, A K

    2015-03-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus shell powder was investigated in terms of its nutritional and biological potential. A thorough examination of shell powder demonstrated its potential as a source of minerals, β carotene and dietary fiber, which were assessed gravimetrically & spectrophotometrically. This showed 3.05 ± 0.19 g 100 g(-1) DW of alkaloids followed by saponins and tannins. Three different extracts; acetone, methanol, & mix solvent were used to evaluate phenolic & flavonoid content, antioxidant & antimicrobial activity, GC/MS screening and quantitative analysis of polyphenols. Among all, the methanol extract showed highest antioxidant activity evaluated by DPPH, FRAP & ABTS assays and was significantly correlated with phenolic and flavonoid contents. Phenolic & flavonoid content was found to be 158 ± 0.34 mg (GAE) and 10.0 ± 0.64 mg (CE) respectively. The results of antimicrobial activity showed that L. monocytogenes was more susceptible to all extracts followed by other microorganisms. Catechin, ascorbic & chlorogenic acids were identified as major polyphenols analyzed by LC-MS/MS. GC/MS analysis showed that it contains a variety of compounds with different therapeutic activities. The study revealed that A. heterophyllus shell is a good source of natural antioxidants & other bioactive compounds and can be used in cosmetics, medicines and functional food application. PMID:25745202

  15. Preliminary Assessment of Health Risks of Potentially Toxic Elements in Settled Dust over Beijing Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dejun; Zhan, Changlin; Yang, Guanglin; Liu, Xingqi; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    To examine levels, health risks, sources, and spatial distributions of potentially toxic elements in settled dust over Beijing urban area, 62 samples were collected mostly from residential building outdoor surfaces, and their <63 μm fractions were measured for 12 potentially toxic elements. The results show that V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Ba in dust are from predominantly natural sources, whereas Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, and Pb mostly originate from anthropogenic sources. Exposure to these elements in dust has significant non-cancer risks to children but insignificant to adults. Cancer risks of Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd via inhalation and dermal contact are below the threshold of 10(-6)-10(-4) but As via dust ingestion shows a tolerable risk. The non-cancer risks to children are contributed mainly (75%) by As, Pb, and Sb, and dominantly (92%) via dust ingestion, with relatively higher risks mainly occurring in the eastern and northeastern Beijing urban areas. Although Cd, Zn, and Cu in dust are heavily affected by anthropogenic sources, their health risks are insignificant. Source appointments suggest that coal burning emissions, the dominant source of As, are likely the largest contributors to the health risk, and traffic-related and industrial emissions are also important because they contribute most of the Pb and Sb in dust. PMID:27187427

  16. Repository performance confirmation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the

  17. Preliminary Study of the Fuel Saving Potential of Regenerative Turbofans for Commercial Subsonic Transports. [engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The fuel savings potential of regenerative turbofans was calculated and compared with that of a reference turbofan. At the design altitude of 10.67 km and Mach 0.80, the turbine-inlet-temperature of the regenerative turbofan was fixed at 1700 K while the overall pressure ratio was varied from 10 to 20. The fan pressure ratio was fixed at 1.6 and the bypass ratio varied from 8 to 10. The heat exchanger design parameters such as pressure drop and effectiveness varied from 4 to 8 percent and from 0.80 to 0.90, respectively. Results indicate a fuel savings due to regeneration of 4.1 percent and no change in takeoff gross weight.

  18. [The subject repositories of strategy of the Open Access initiative].

    PubMed

    Soares Guimarães, M C; da Silva, C H; Horsth Noronha, I

    2012-11-01

    The subject repositories are defined as a set of digital objects resulting from the research related to a specific disciplinary field and occupy a still restricted space in the discussion agenda of the Free Access Movement when compared to amplitude reached in the discussion of Institutional Repositories. Although the Subject Repository comes to prominence in the field, especially for the success of initiatives such as the arXiv, PubMed and E-prints, the literature on the subject is recognized as very limited. Despite its roots in the Library and Information Science, and focus on the management of disciplinary collections (subject area literature), there is little information available about the development and management of subject repositories. The following text seeks to make a brief summary on the topic as a way to present the potential to develop subject repositories in order to strengthen the initiative of open access. PMID:23568395

  19. Exploring Characterizations of Learning Object Repositories Using Data Mining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Alejandra; Vidal, Christian; Menendez, Victor; Zapata, Alfredo; Prieto, Manuel

    Learning object repositories provide a platform for the sharing of Web-based educational resources. As these repositories evolve independently, it is difficult for users to have a clear picture of the kind of contents they give access to. Metadata can be used to automatically extract a characterization of these resources by using machine learning techniques. This paper presents an exploratory study carried out in the contents of four public repositories that uses clustering and association rule mining algorithms to extract characterizations of repository contents. The results of the analysis include potential relationships between different attributes of learning objects that may be useful to gain an understanding of the kind of resources available and eventually develop search mechanisms that consider repository descriptions as a criteria in federated search.

  20. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Application Repository Design and Analysis document describes the STRS application repository for software-defined radio (SDR) applications intended to be compliant to the STRS Architecture Standard. The document provides information about the submission of artifacts to the STRS application repository, to provide information to the potential users of that information, and for the systems engineer to understand the requirements, concepts, and approach to the STRS application repository. The STRS application repository is intended to capture knowledge, documents, and other artifacts for each waveform application or other application outside of its project so that when the project ends, the knowledge is retained. The document describes the transmission of technology from mission to mission capturing lessons learned that are used for continuous improvement across projects and supporting NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs) for performing software engineering projects and NASAs release process.

  1. A Preliminary Study on the Potential of Manuka Honey and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Scott A.; Wolfe, Patricia S.; Spence, Andrew J.; Rodriguez, Isaac A.; McCool, Jennifer M.; Petrella, Rebecca L.; Garg, Koyal; Ericksen, Jeffery J.; Bowlin, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro response of cells critical to the wound healing process in culture media supplemented with a lyophilized preparation rich in growth factors (PRGF) and Manuka honey. Materials and Methods. This study utilized cell culture media supplemented with PRGF, as well as whole Manuka honey and the medical-grade Medihoney (MH), a Manuka honey product. The response of human fibroblasts (hDF), macrophages, and endothelial cells (hPMEC) was evaluated, with respect to cell proliferation, chemotaxis, collagen matrix production, and angiogenic potential, when subjected to culture with media containing PRGF, MH, Manuka honey, and a combination of PRGF and MH. Results. All three cell types demonstrated increases in cellular activity in the presence of PRGF, with further increases in activity seen in the presence of PRGF+MH. hDFs proved to be the most positively responsive cells, as they experienced enhanced proliferation, collagen matrix production, and migration into an in vitro wound healing model with the PRGF+MH-supplemented media. Conclusion. This preliminary in vitro study is the first to evaluate the combination of PRGF and Manuka honey, two products with the potential to increase regeneration individually, as a combined product to enhance dermal regeneration. PMID:23304152

  2. Preliminary mutagenicity and genotoxicity evaluation of selected arylsulfonamide derivatives of (aryloxy)alkylamines with potential psychotropic properties.

    PubMed

    Powroźnik, Beata; Słoczyńska, Karolina; Canale, Vittorio; Grychowska, Katarzyna; Zajdel, Paweł; Pękala, Elżbieta

    2016-05-01

    Determination of the mutagenic and genotoxic liability of biologically active compounds is of great concern for preliminary toxicity testing and drug development. In this study, we focused on the evaluation of the mutagenic and genotoxic effects of selected arylsulfonamide derivatives of aryloxyethyl piperidines and pyrrolidines (1-8), classified as 5-HT7 receptor antagonist with antidepressant and procognitive properties, using in silico and in vitro methods: the Vibrio harveyi assay and the SOS/umu-test (umuC Easy CS test). Finally, the antimutagenic potential of tested compounds was evaluated with the V. harveyi assay. It was demonstrated that none of the examined compounds produced a positive response in in vitro assays and these results were in line with in silico prediction. Additionally, all the tested compounds demonstrated various antimutagenic potential, with compound 1 (5-chloro-N-((1-(2-phenoxyethyl)piperidin-4-yl)methyl)thiophene-2-sulfonamide) being the most active against NQNO-induced mutagenicity. PMID:26440375

  3. Canada's Deep Geological Repository For Used Nuclear Fuel -The Geoscientific Site Evaluation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S.; Ben Belfadhel, M.; Blyth, A.; DesRoches, A. J.; McKelvie, J. R. M.; Parmenter, A.; Sanchez-Rico Castejon, M.; Urrutia-Bustos, A.; Vorauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management, the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. In May 2010, the NWMO published and initiated a nine-step site selection process to find an informed and willing community to host a deep geological repository for Canada's used nuclear fuel. The site selection process is designed to address a broad range of technical and social, economic and cultural factors. The suitability of candidate areas will be assessed in a stepwise manner over a period of many years and include three main steps: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Characterizations. The Preliminary Assessment is conducted in two phases. NWMO has completed Phase 1 preliminary assessments for the first eight communities that entered into this step. While the Phase 1 desktop geoscientific assessments showed that each of the eight communities contains general areas that have the potential to satisfy the geoscientific safety requirements for hosting a deep geological repository, the assessment identified varying degrees of geoscientific complexity and uncertainty between communities, reflecting their different geological settings and structural histories. Phase 2 activities will include a sequence of high-resolution airborne geophysical surveys and focused geological field mapping to ground-truth lithology and structural features, followed by limited deep borehole drilling and testing. These activities will further evaluate the site's ability to meet the safety functions that a site would need to ultimately satisfy in order to be considered suitable. This paper provides an update on the site evaluation process and describes the approach, methods and criteria that are being used to conduct the geoscientific Preliminary Assessments.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Expression and Functionality in MCF-7 Cells: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Raffaella; Cuniberti, Barbara; Racca, Silvia; Abbadessa, Giuliana; Piccione, Francesca; Re, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel belonging to the transient receptor potential family, and it is expressed in different neoplastic tissues. Its activation is associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of this research was to study the expression and pharmacological characteristics of TRPV1 in cells derived from human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods TRPV1 presence was assessed by binding studies and Western blotting. Receptor binding characteristics were evaluated through competition assays, while 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5,-dipheyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays were performed to confirm an early hypothesis regarding the modulation of cancer cell proliferation. The functionality of TRPV1 was evaluated by measuring Ca2+ uptake in the presence of increasing concentrations of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. Results Binding studies identified a single class of TRPV1 (Bmax 1,492±192 fmol/mg protein), and Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of human TRPV1. Among the different tested agonists and antagonists, anandamide (Ki: 2.8×10-11 M) and 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) (Ki: 5.6×10-11 M) showed the highest degrees of affinity for TRPV1, respectively. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. For agonists and antagonists, the efficacy of tested compounds displayed the following rank order: resiniferatoxin>anandamide>capsaicin and 5-I-RTX=capsazepine, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that both TRPV1 agonists and antagonists induce significant inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth. Even though the mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative effects of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists should be further investigated, it has been suggested that agonists cause desensitization of the receptor, leading to alteration in Ca2+-influx regulation. By contrast

  5. MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-11-05

    This analysis was performed by the Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) Safety Assurance Department to identify and document the internal hazards and preliminary events associated with preclosure operations of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Internal hazards are those hazards presented by operation of the facility and associated processes. These are in contrast to external hazards which involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. The hazard analysis methodology used in this analysis provides a systematic means to identify facility hazards and associated events that may result in radiological consequences to the public and facility worker during the MGR preclosure period. The events are documented in a preliminary events list and are intended to be used as input to the MGR Design Basis Event (DBE) selection process. It is expected that the results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of DBE analyses for the preclosure period of repository operation. As the MGR design progresses, this analysis will be reviewed to ensure no new hazards are introduced and that previously evaluated hazards have not increased in severity.

  6. A preliminary study of the Caprella scaura amphipod culture for potential use in aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Rojano, Elena; Calero-Cano, Sandra; Hachero-Cruzado, Ismael; Guerra-García, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The caprellid amphipod Caprella scaura Templeton, 1836 was investigated as a mass culture organism, for potential use as natural prey in aquaculture. C. scaura showed good population growth during 3 months of culturing with nauplii of Artemia sp. and microalgae as food source. A final mean population size of 12,510.67 individuals/tank and a maximum density of 10,460 individuals m- 2 were obtained; a 50-fold increase of the initial population was observed. Juveniles were the most abundant stage in the culture (86.0% of total), followed by mature females (5.4%) and immature males (3.1%). Three kinds of plastic mesh with different complexity levels were used as artificial substrates for amphipods to attach to and shelter. There were no significant differences in the total number of individuals present on each kind of mesh, although female and male adults were more abundant in folded meshes with larger pore diameter. This research demonstrated that the caprellid amphipod C. scaura may be readily cultured at high densities with a variety of mesh morphologies allowing more efficient use of tank volume and improved handling.

  7. Habenula responses to potential and actual loss in major depression: preliminary evidence for lateralized dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Furman, Daniella J; Gotlib, Ian H

    2016-05-01

    The habenula has been implicated in predicting negative events and in responding to unexpected negative outcomes. Animal models of depression have supported the hypothesis that perturbations in habenula activity contribute to the pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), a psychiatric illness characterized by abnormalities in responding to negative feedback and by pessimism in evaluating the likelihood of future events. No research to date, however, has examined human habenula responses to potential and experienced negative outcomes in MDD. In this study, depressed and healthy control participants performed a probabilistic guessing task for monetary rewards and penalties during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging of the habenula. In healthy adults, we observed a pattern of habenula activation consistent with its hypothesized role in predicting future losses and responding to suboptimal outcomes. In contrast, in depressed participants the left habenula was not activated significantly during the prediction or experience of monetary penalty. Complementing this group difference, attenuated habenula activation to negative feedback in control participants was associated with levels of shame and rumination. The results of this study suggest that depressed individuals are characterized by dysfunction in a neural system involved in generating expectations and comparing expectations with objective outcomes. PMID:26884545

  8. Preliminary investigations on the carbon dioxide sequestering potential of the ultramafic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Guthrie, G.; Counce, D.; Kluk, E.; Bergfeld, D.; Snow, M.

    1997-08-01

    Fossil fuels continue to provide major sources of energy to the modern world even though global emissions of CO{sub 2} are presently at levels of 19 Gt/yr. Future antipollution measures may include sequestering of waste CO{sub 2} as magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) by processing ultramafic rocks to obtain reactable Mg. Huge ultramafic deposits consisting of relatively pure Mg-rich silicates exist throughout much of the world in ophiolites and layered intrusions. Peridotites (especially dunites) and serpentinites comprise the best ores because they contain the most Mg by weight and are relatively reactive to hot acids such as HCl. Although mining such deposits on a large scale would have environmental impacts, the sequestering process could provide Cr, Ni, and other metals as byproducts and could dispose of existing waste (white) asbestos. Small ultramafic bodies ({approximately} 1 km{sup 3}) can potentially sequester about 1 Gt of CO{sub 2} or about 20% of annual US emissions. A single large deposit of dunite ({approximately} 30 km{sup 3}) could dispose of about 20 yr of current US CO{sub 2} emissions. The cost and environmental impact of mining these deposits must be weighed against the increased costs of energy and benefits to the atmosphere and climate.

  9. Preliminary analysis of salivary microbiome and their potential roles in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Lu, Wenxin; Tu, Qichao; Ge, Yichen; He, Jinzhi; Zhou, Yu; Gou, Yaping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Qin, Yujia; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Yan; Xiao, Liying; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored the origin and development mechanism of oral lichen planus (OLP) with limited attention to the role of bacteria in the progression of this common oral disease. Here we utilized MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to identify complex oral microbiota associated with OLP from saliva samples of two subtypes (reticular and erosive) of OLP patients and healthy controls. Our analyses indicated that the overall structure of the salivary microbiome was not significantly affected by disease status. However, we did observe evident variations in abundance for several taxonomic groups in OLP. Porphyromonas and Solobacterium showed significantly higher relative abundances, whereas Haemophilus, Corynebacterium, Cellulosimicrobium and Campylobacter showed lower abundances in OLP patients, as compared with healthy controls. In addition, we explored specific microbial co-occurrence patterns in OLP, and revealed significantly fewer linkers of Streptococcus comprising species in erosive OLP. Furthermore, the disease severity and immune dysregulation were also genus-associated, including with Porphyromonas that correlated to disease scores and salivary levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23. Overall, this study provides a general description of oral microbiome in OLP, and it will be useful for further investigation of their potential roles in the initiation and immune modulation of OLP. PMID:26961389

  10. The Greenville Fault: preliminary estimates of its long-term creep rate and seismic potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; Barry, Robert G.; Smith, Forrest E.; Mello, Joseph D.; McFarland, Forrest S.

    2013-01-01

    Once assumed locked, we show that the northern third of the Greenville fault (GF) creeps at 2 mm/yr, based on 47 yr of trilateration net data. This northern GF creep rate equals its 11-ka slip rate, suggesting a low strain accumulation rate. In 1980, the GF, easternmost strand of the San Andreas fault system east of San Francisco Bay, produced a Mw5.8 earthquake with a 6-km surface rupture and dextral slip growing to ≥2 cm on cracks over a few weeks. Trilateration shows a 10-cm post-1980 transient slip ending in 1984. Analysis of 2000-2012 crustal velocities on continuous global positioning system stations, allows creep rates of ~2 mm/yr on the northern GF, 0-1 mm/yr on the central GF, and ~0 mm/yr on its southern third. Modeled depth ranges of creep along the GF allow 5-25% aseismic release. Greater locking in the southern two thirds of the GF is consistent with paleoseismic evidence there for large late Holocene ruptures. Because the GF lacks large (>1 km) discontinuities likely to arrest higher (~1 m) slip ruptures, we expect full-length (54-km) ruptures to occur that include the northern creeping zone. We estimate sufficient strain accumulation on the entire GF to produce Mw6.9 earthquakes with a mean recurrence of ~575 yr. While the creeping 16-km northern part has the potential to produce a Mw6.2 event in 240 yr, it may rupture in both moderate (1980) and large events. These two-dimensional-model estimates of creep rate along the southern GF need verification with small aperture surveys.

  11. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  12. Potential impacts of climate change on tropospheric ozone in California: a preliminary episodic modeling assessment of the Los Angeles basin and the Sacramento valley

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Haider

    2001-01-01

    In this preliminary and relatively short modeling effort, an initial assessment is made for the potential air quality implications of climate change in California. The focus is mainly on the effects of changes in temperature and related meteorological and emission factors on ozone formation. Photochemical modeling is performed for two areas in the state: the Los Angeles Basin and the Sacramento Valley.

  13. Development of a methodology for hydrologic characterization of faults for geological repository siting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, J.; Yoshimura, K.; Moriya, T.; Tsuchi, H.; Karasaki, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Ueta, K.; Kiho, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) will select a site for HLW and TRU waste repository through the three-staged program, namely, the Literature Surveys, the Preliminary Investigations and the Detailed Investigations. Areas that are susceptible to natural hazards such as volcanism, faulting and significant uplift/erosion will be eliminated at first. Then, sites that have more favorable geological environment will be selected with respect to the repository design and long-term safety after closure. It is internationally acknowledged that hydrologic features of faults are of special concern in the above respects. It is highly likely from the experiences of site characterization worldwide that one could encounter numerous faults in an area of one hundred square kilometer assumed for the Preliminary Investigations. Efficient and practical investigation programs, and reliable models/parameters for the repository design and safety analysis are important aspects for implementers. A comprehensive methodology including strategies and procedures for characterizing such faults should thus be prepared prior to the actual investigations. Surveys on the results of site characterization in the world indicate potential contribution of geological features of faults such as host lithology, geometry, slip direction, internal structure and alteration to the fault hydrology. Therefore, NUMO, in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), started a 5-year project in 2007 involving field investigations to develop a comprehensive methodology for hydrologic characterization of faults, with emphasis on the relationship between geological and hydrologic features of faults. A series of field investigations including ground geophysics, geological mapping, trench surveys, borehole investigations, hydrochemical analyses and hydrologic monitoring have been carried out on the Wildcat Fault that runs along the Berkeley Hills, California (see Karasaki, et

  14. National Geoscience Data Repository System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Milling, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed the first phase of a study to assess the feasibility of establishing a National Geoscience Data Repository System to capture and preserve valuable geoscientific data. The study was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geological and geophysical data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the US energy and minerals industry. This report focuses on two major issues. First, it documents the types and quantity of data available for contribution to a National Geoscience Data Repository System. Second, it documents the data needs and priorities of potential users of the system. A National Geoscience Data Repository System would serve as an important and valuable source of information for the entire geoscience community for a variety of applications, including environmental protection, water resource management, global change studies, and basic and applied research. The repository system would also contain critical data that would enable domestic energy and minerals companies to expand their exploration and production programs in the United States for improved recovery of domestic oil, gas, and mineral resources.

  15. Object linking in repositories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David (Editor); Beck, Jon; Atkins, John; Bailey, Bill

    1992-01-01

    This topic is covered in three sections. The first section explores some of the architectural ramifications of extending the Eichmann/Atkins lattice-based classification scheme to encompass the assets of the full life cycle of software development. A model is considered that provides explicit links between objects in addition to the edges connecting classification vertices in the standard lattice. The second section gives a description of the efforts to implement the repository architecture using a commercially available object-oriented database management system. Some of the features of this implementation are described, and some of the next steps to be taken to produce a working prototype of the repository are pointed out. In the final section, it is argued that design and instantiation of reusable components have competing criteria (design-for-reuse strives for generality, design-with-reuse strives for specificity) and that providing mechanisms for each can be complementary rather than antagonistic. In particular, it is demonstrated how program slicing techniques can be applied to customization of reusable components.

  16. Coal repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The Coal Repository Project was initiated in 1980 by the Department of Energy/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to provide a centralized system for the collection of well characterized coal samples, and distribution to organizations involved in the chemical beneficiation of coal and related research. TRW Energy Development Group, together with its subcontractor Commercial Testing and Engineering Company, established the Coal Repository at the TRW Capistrano Chemical Facility, which is the location of the DOE-owned Multi-Use Fuel and Energy Processes Test Plant (MEP). Twenty tons each of three coals (Illinois No. 6, Kentucky No. 11 (West), and Pittsburgh No. 8 (from an Ohio mine)) were collected, characterized, and stored under a nitrogen atmosphere. Ten tons of each coal are 3/8-inch x 0, five tons of each are 14-mesh x 0, and five tons of each are 100-mesh x 0. Although TRW was within budget and on schedule, Department of Energy funding priorities in this area were altered such that the project was terminated prior to completion of the original scope of work. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project: An evaluation. [Crystalline Repository Project

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J E; Lowe, H; Yurkovich, S P

    1986-03-28

    An evaluation is given of DOE's recommendation of the Elk River complex in North Carolina for siting the second repository. Twelve recommendations are made including a strong suggestion that the Cherokee Tribe appeal both through political and legal avenues for inclusion as an affected area primarily due to projected impacts upon economy and public health as a consequence of the potential for reduced tourism.

  18. Control of Relative Air Humidity as a Potential Means to Improve Hygiene on Surfaces: A Preliminary Approach with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zoz, Fiona; Iaconelli, Cyril; Lang, Emilie; Iddir, Hayet; Guyot, Stéphane; Grandvalet, Cosette; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Relative air humidity fluctuations could potentially affect the development and persistence of pathogenic microorganisms in their environments. This study aimed to characterize the impact of relative air humidity (RH) variations on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium persisting on food processing plant surfaces. To assess conditions leading to the lowest survival rate, four strains of L. monocytogenes (EGDe, CCL500, CCL128, and LO28) were exposed to different RH conditions (75%, 68%, 43% and 11%) with different drying kinetics and then rehydrated either progressively or instantaneously. The main factors that affected the survival of L. monocytogenes were RH level and rehydration kinetics. Lowest survival rates between 1% and 0.001% were obtained after 3 hours of treatment under optimal conditions (68% RH and instantaneous rehydration). The survival rate was decreased under 0.001% after prolonged exposure (16h) of cells under optimal conditions. Application of two successive dehydration and rehydration cycles led to an additional decrease in survival rate. This preliminary study, performed in model conditions with L. monocytogenes, showed that controlled ambient RH fluctuations could offer new possibilities to control foodborne pathogens in food processing environments and improve food safety. PMID:26840373

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Habitat Composites' Durability when Exposed to a Long-Term Radiation Environment and Micrometeoroid Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Graves, Russell; Golden, John; Atwell, William; O'Rouke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Alred, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals include extending human presence beyond low earth orbit (LEO). As a result, habitation for crew is a critical requirement for meeting this goal. However, habitats are very large structures that contain a multitude of subsystems to sustain human life over long-durations in space, and one of the key challenges has been keeping weight to a minimum in order to reduce costs. Thus, light-weight and multifunctional structural materials are of great interest for habitation. NASA has started studying polymeric composite materials as potential lightweight and multifunctional structural materials for use in long-duration spaceflight. However, little is known about the survivability of these materials when exposed to the space environment outside of LEO for long durations. Thus, a study has been undertaken to investigate the durability of composite materials when exposed to long-duration radiation. Furthermore, as an addition to the primary study, a secondary preliminary investigation has been started on the micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) susceptibility of these materials after radiation exposure. The combined effects of radiation and MMOD impacts are the focus of this paper.

  20. The study of a potential CO2 repository: Integrating laboratory and field geophysical experiments to characterize the upper Muschelkalk aquifer (northern Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, B.; Zappone, A. S.; Misra, S.; Diamond, L.

    2011-12-01

    The upper Muschelkalk saline aquifer consists of partly dolomitized to completely dolomitized carbonate rocks of mid Triassic age (~230 Ma). This aquifer is present throughout the Swiss Molasse Basin (SMB), north of the Alps. A regional appraisal of the SMB indicates that this Formation is a potential host aquifer for sequestered CO2. However, the spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the porosity, permeability and other relevant physical and mechanical properties of the upper Muschelkalk are still poorly known. The uncertainty in this knowledge stems mainly from the weakly developed oil and gas exploration industry in Switzerland. We use an integrated approach to better constrain the aquifer physical properties, which couples field scale geophysical surveys (borehole logging and seismic reflection profiles) with laboratory analytical data. Here we focus on a set of boreholes from northern Switzerland, where geophysical data and drill core useable for laboratory measurements are available. Two sub-units comprise the upper Muschelkalk Formation. The stratigraphically higher part is a fossiliferous dolomite (>90 vol% CaMg(CO3)2; Trigodonusdolomit). The underlying unit, is composed of micritic calcite and dolomite layers interbedded with fossil-rich layers (Hauptmuschelkalk). Although both units are part of the aquifer formation, they appear to have distinctly different physical properties. The transition from Trigodonusdolomit to the Hauptmuschelkalk is marked by an increase in the sonic velocity, density and acoustic impedance. The magnitude of increase in sonic velocity can be up to 500 m/s, accompanied by an increase in acoustic impedance from 8500 to 15500 (m/s*g/cm3), but varies between the different boreholes. Poisson's ratio, determined from a single borehole, show sharp decrease at the transition. The origin of the changes in the geophysical data is likely reflecting differences in porosity and mineral composition in the Trigodonusdolomit and

  1. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  2. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  3. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  4. Environmental assessment overview, Reference repository location, Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a reference repository location at the Hanford Site in Washington as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Columbia Plateau, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Hanford site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Hanford site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Hanford site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

  5. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories. PMID:27540501

  6. The INDEPTH Data Repository

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Sanjay; Bhattacharjee, Tathagata; Bangha, Martin; Patharia, Nidhi; Tei, Titus; Gilbert, Brendan; Sankoh, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health (INDEPTH) is a global network of research centers that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) currently in 52 health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) field sites situated in sub-Saharan Africa (14 countries), Asia (India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia), and Oceania (Papua New Guinea). Through this network of HDSS field sites, INDEPTH is capable of producing reliable longitudinal data about the lives of people in the research communities as well as how development policies and programs affect those lives. The aim of the INDEPTH Data Repository is to enable INDEPTH member centers and associated researchers to contribute and share fully documented, high-quality datasets with the scientific community and health policy makers. PMID:26297754

  7. The DOE repository program

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by the Congress in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) to characterize the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site as the initial candidate site for the nation's first geologic repository. Site characterization through ongoing surface-based testing has been under way since the President approved the recommendation of the Yucca Mountain site as one of three candidate sites in May 1986. A more extensive site characterization program, including construction of exploratory shafts and an underground testing facility, has been described in the consultative draft site characterization plan (SCP-CD), which was provided to the state of Nevada and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in January 1988 for review and comment. In addition, technical workshops were held with the state of Nevada, the NRC, and their contractors in February and March to discuss specific technical issues in the SCP-CD.

  8. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  9. Design and Development of a Linked Open Data-Based Health Information Representation and Visualization System: Potentials and Preliminary Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kauppinen, Tomi; Keßler, Carsten; Fritz, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations around the world are challenged by pressures to reduce cost, improve coordination and outcome, and provide more with less. This requires effective planning and evidence-based practice by generating important information from available data. Thus, flexible and user-friendly ways to represent, query, and visualize health data becomes increasingly important. International organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly publish vital data on priority health topics that can be utilized for public health policy and health service development. However, the data in most portals is displayed in either Excel or PDF formats, which makes information discovery and reuse difficult. Linked Open Data (LOD)—a new Semantic Web set of best practice of standards to publish and link heterogeneous data—can be applied to the representation and management of public level health data to alleviate such challenges. However, the technologies behind building LOD systems and their effectiveness for health data are yet to be assessed. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Linked Data technologies are potential options for health information representation, visualization, and retrieval systems development and to identify the available tools and methodologies to build Linked Data-based health information systems. Methods We used the Resource Description Framework (RDF) for data representation, Fuseki triple store for data storage, and Sgvizler for information visualization. Additionally, we integrated SPARQL query interface for interacting with the data. We primarily use the WHO health observatory dataset to test the system. All the data were represented using RDF and interlinked with other related datasets on the Web of Data using Silk—a link discovery framework for Web of Data. A preliminary usability assessment was conducted following the System Usability Scale (SUS) method. Results We developed an LOD

  10. Evaluating the potential of multi-purpose nature based solutions in peri-urban landscapes - a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geris, Josie; Wilkinson, Mark; Stutter, Marc; Guenther, Daniel; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality protection and improvement with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). Current mitigation solutions are typically based on isolated design strategies used at specific small scale sites and for storm water only. More holistic catchment scale approaches are urgently required to effectively manage the amount of water flows and protect the raw water quality in peri-urban landscapes. This project aims to provide a better understanding of the connectivity between natural and managed flow pathways, storage, and biogeochemical processes in the peri-urban landscape to eventually aid a more integrated water quantity and quality control design. For an actively urbanising catchment in NE Scotland we seek to understand the spatio-temporal character of the natural flow pathways and associated water quality, and how these may be used to support the design of nature based solutions during urbanisation. We present preliminary findings from a dense and multiscale monitoring network that includes hydrometric, tracer (stable water isotopes) and water quality (turbidity (sediment), nitrate, phosphate) data during a range of contrasting hydroclimatological conditions and at different stages of the development of urban infrastructure. These demonstrate a highly variable nature, both temporally and spatially, with water quality dynamics out of sync with storm responses and depending on management practices. This highlights potential difficulties for managing water quantity and quality simultaneously at the catchment scale, and suggests that a treatment train approach may be required. Well-designed nature based solutions that tackle both water quantity and quality issues will require adaptability and a