Sample records for potential respiratory pathogens

  1. Asymptomatic colonization of upper respiratory tract by potential bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rupak Dhakal; S. Sujatha; S. C. Parija; B. V. Bhat

    2010-01-01

    Objective  To screen for asymptomatic respiratory carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and Group A Streptococcus (GAS) in children attending JIPMER, correlate carriage rate with different socio-demographic factors and to detect antimicrobial\\u000a resistance among the isolates.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Throat swabs were collected from both in patients and out patients (?12 yr of age) and processed. Bacteria were identified\\u000a by Standard techniques. Susceptibility to

  2. Prevalence of potential respiratory pathogens in the mouths of elderly patients and effects of professional oral care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shu Abe; Kazuyuki Ishihara; Katsuji Okuda

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of professional oral health care in reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia, we examined the prevalence of potential respiratory pathogens in gargled samples from elderly persons. Samples were obtained from 54 elderly subjects over 65 years of age who required daily nursing care, from 21 healthy elderly subjects over 65 years old, and from 22 healthy

  3. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  4. Genomic Sequencing Reveals Mutations Potentially Related to the Overattenuation of a Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiuling; Chen, Nanhua; Deng, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhen; Han, Wei; Hu, Dongmei; Wu, Jiajun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Baoyue; Gu, Xiaoxue

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) continues to evolve when serially passaged in Marc-145 cells. In this study, we analyzed the genomic and antigenic variants of HP-PRRSV strain JXA1 during in vitro passage. Protective efficacies of JXA1 from passages 100, 110, 120, 140, and 170 against the high-virulence parental virus were evaluated by inoculating pigs with each of these viruses and then challenging with JXA1 from passage 5 at 28 days postimmunization. We found that the antigenicities of JXA1 from passages after 110 were significantly reduced. Inoculation with JXA1 from passages after 110 provided only insufficient protection against the parental strain challenge, indicating that the immunogenicity of JXA1 is significantly decreased when it is in vitro passaged for 110 times and more. To identify the genomic variants that emerged during the overattenuation, eight complete genomes of highly passaged JXA1 were sequenced. One guanine deletion in the 5? untranslated region (UTR), two nucleotide substitutions in the 3? UTR, and 65 amino acid mutations in nonstructural and structural proteins that accompanied with the attenuation and overattenuation were determined. Genomic sequencing of in vitro serially passaged HP-PRRSV first identified the mutations potentially correlated with the overattenuation of a HP-PRRSV strain. These results facilitate the research aimed at elucidating the mechanisms for PRRSV genomic and antigenic changes and may also contribute to developing a safe and effective PRRSV vaccine. PMID:23408525

  5. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  6. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  7. Bovine Respiratory Disease Pathogens in Pre-weaned Holstein Calves

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Pathogens in Pre-weaned Holstein Calves H.M. Neibergs1, J. Williams1, B. Cases and controls received three swabs (mid-nasal, 2 deep pharyngeal) to determine the pathogens and pathogens. Genetic factors also play a role in the susceptibility of cattle to BRD. The etiologic agents

  8. New and emerging pathogens in canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Priestnall, S L; Mitchell, J A; Walker, C A; Erles, K; Brownlie, J

    2014-03-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease is a common, worldwide disease syndrome of multifactorial etiology. This review presents a summary of 6 viruses (canine respiratory coronavirus, canine pneumovirus, canine influenza virus, pantropic canine coronavirus, canine bocavirus, and canine hepacivirus) and 2 bacteria (Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Mycoplasma cynos) that have been associated with respiratory disease in dogs. For some pathogens a causal role is clear, whereas for others, ongoing research aims to uncover their pathogenesis and contribution to this complex syndrome. Etiology, clinical disease, pathogenesis, and epidemiology are described for each pathogen, with an emphasis on recent discoveries or novel findings. PMID:24232191

  9. Human bocavirus, a real respiratory tract pathogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenqiang Bi; Pierre B. H. Formenty; Cathy E. Roth

    2007-01-01

    A new virus was discovered by molecular techniques in respiratory samples collected from young children with respiratory diseases in Sweden in 2005. The virus, named human bocavirus, is genetically related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, both of which belong to the bocavirus genus of the parvoviridae family. Recent studies conducted in different countries have shown that

  10. Canine respiratory coronavirus: an emerging pathogen in the canine infectious respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Erles, Kerstin; Brownlie, Joe

    2008-07-01

    Infectious respiratory disease in dogs is a constant challenge because of the involvement of several pathogens and environmental factors. Canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) is a new coronavirus of dogs, which is widespread in North America, Japan, and several European countries. CRCoV has been associated with respiratory disease, particularly in kenneled dog populations. The virus is genetically and antigenically distinct from enteric canine coronavirus; therefore, specific tests are required for diagnosis. PMID:18501280

  11. Molecular survey of avian respiratory pathogens in commercial broiler chicken flocks with respiratory diseases in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Roussan, D A; Haddad, R; Khawaldeh, G

    2008-03-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are of paramount importance in the poultry industry. Avian influenza virus (AIV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian pneumovirus (APV), and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) have been recognized as the most important pathogens in poultry. In this study, trachea swabs from 115 commercial broiler chicken flocks that suffered from respiratory disease were tested for AIV subtype H9N2, IBV, NDV, and APV by using reverse transcription PCR and for MG by using PCR. The PCR and reverse transcription PCR results showed that 13 and 14.8% of these flocks were infected with NDV and IBV, respectively, whereas 5.2, 6.0, 9.6, 10.4, 11.3, and 15.7% of these flocks were infected with both NDV and MG; MG and APV; IBV and NDV; IBV and MG; NDV and AIV; and IBV and AIV, respectively. Furthermore, 2.6% of these flocks were infected with IBV, NDV, and APV at the same time. On the other hand, 11.3% of these flocks were negative for the above-mentioned respiratory diseases. Our data showed that the above-mentioned respiratory pathogens were the most important causes of respiratory disease in broiler chickens in Jordan. Further studies are necessary to assess circulating strains, economic losses caused by infections and coinfections of these pathogens, and the costs and benefits of countermeasures. Furthermore, farmers need to be educated about the signs and importance of these pathogens. PMID:18281569

  12. Eosinophils and their Interactions with Respiratory Virus Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are implicated in the pathophysiology of respiratory virus infection, most typically in negative roles, such as promoting wheezing and bronchoconstriction in conjunction with virus-induced exacerbations of reactive airways disease and in association with aberrant hypersensitivity responses to antiviral vaccines. However, experiments carried out in vitro and in vivo suggest positive roles for eosinophils, as they have been shown to reduce virus infectivity in tissue culture and promote clearance of the human pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a mouse challenge model. The related natural rodent pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is highly virulent in mice, and is not readily cleared by eosinophils in vivo. Interestingly, PVM replicates in eosinophils and promotes cytokine release. The molecular basis of virus infection in eosinophils and its relationship to disease outcome is currently under study. PMID:18818885

  13. High seroprevalence of respiratory pathogens in hobby poultry.

    PubMed

    Haesendonck, R; Verlinden, M; Devos, G; Michiels, T; Butaye, P; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F; Martel, A

    2014-12-01

    Seroprevalence studies on respiratory pathogens have been done extensively in commercial laying hens, broilers, and, to a lesser extent, backyard poultry. In Europe, seroprevalence studies in backyard and fancy breed poultry flocks are scarce and limited to a few pathogens, such as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG); others, such as Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), are missing. A commercial ELISA for detection of antibodies against six selected pathogens was performed on 460 serum samples from chickens across Flanders. Anti-ORT antibodies were, by far, the most prevalent, with a prevalence of 95.4%. Infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma synoviae, and avian metapneumovirus antibodies were found in 75.6%, 76.3%, and 63.5% of the animals, respectively. Antibodies against MG and infectious laryngotracheitis virus were found in 36.7% and 30% of the animals, respectively. These data demonstrate the high seroprevalence of respiratory pathogens among hobby poultry; therefore, it is possible that this group could act as a reservoir for commercially kept poultry. PMID:25619008

  14. Early emergence of Yersinia pestis as a severe respiratory pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zimbler, Daniel L.; Schroeder, Jay A.; Eddy, Justin L.; Lathem, Wyndham W.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis causes the fatal respiratory disease pneumonic plague. Y. pestis recently evolved from the gastrointestinal pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis; however, it is not known at what point Y. pestis gained the ability to induce a fulminant pneumonia. Here we show that the acquisition of a single gene encoding the protease Pla was sufficient for the most ancestral, deeply rooted strains of Y. pestis to cause pneumonic plague, indicating that Y. pestis was primed to infect the lungs at a very early stage in its evolution. As Y. pestis further evolved, modern strains acquired a single amino-acid modification within Pla that optimizes protease activity. While this modification is unnecessary to cause pneumonic plague, the substitution is instead needed to efficiently induce the invasive infection associated with bubonic plague. These findings indicate that Y. pestis was capable of causing pneumonic plague before it evolved to optimally cause invasive infections in mammals. PMID:26123398

  15. Early emergence of Yersinia pestis as a severe respiratory pathogen.

    PubMed

    Zimbler, Daniel L; Schroeder, Jay A; Eddy, Justin L; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis causes the fatal respiratory disease pneumonic plague. Y. pestis recently evolved from the gastrointestinal pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis; however, it is not known at what point Y. pestis gained the ability to induce a fulminant pneumonia. Here we show that the acquisition of a single gene encoding the protease Pla was sufficient for the most ancestral, deeply rooted strains of Y. pestis to cause pneumonic plague, indicating that Y. pestis was primed to infect the lungs at a very early stage in its evolution. As Y. pestis further evolved, modern strains acquired a single amino-acid modification within Pla that optimizes protease activity. While this modification is unnecessary to cause pneumonic plague, the substitution is instead needed to efficiently induce the invasive infection associated with bubonic plague. These findings indicate that Y. pestis was capable of causing pneumonic plague before it evolved to optimally cause invasive infections in mammals. PMID:26123398

  16. Clinical differences between respiratory viral and bacterial mono- and dual pathogen detected among Singapore military servicemen with febrile respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Zheng Jie Marc; Zhao, Xiahong; Cook, Alex R; Loh, Jin Phang; Ng, Sock Hoon; Tan, Boon Huan; Lee, Vernon J

    2015-01-01

    Background Although it is known that febrile respiratory illnesses (FRI) may be caused by multiple respiratory pathogens, there are no population-level studies describing its impact on clinical disease. Methods Between May 2009 and October 2012, 7733 FRI patients and controls in the Singapore military had clinical data and nasal wash samples collected prospectively and sent for PCR testing. Patients with one pathogen detected (mono-pathogen) were compared with those with two pathogens (dual pathogen) for differences in basic demographics and clinical presentation. Results In total, 45.8% had one pathogen detected, 20.2% had two pathogens detected, 30.9% had no pathogens detected, and 3.1% had more than two pathogens. Multiple pathogens were associated with recruits, those with asthma and non-smokers. Influenza A (80.0%), influenza B (73.0%) and mycoplasma (70.6%) were most commonly associated with mono-infections, while adenovirus was most commonly associated with dual infections (62.9%). Influenza A paired with S. pneumoniae had higher proportions of chills and rigors than their respective mono-pathogens (P = 0.03, P = 0.009). H. influenzae paired with either enterovirus or parainfluenzae had higher proportions of cough with phlegm than their respective mono-pathogens. Although there were observed differences in mean proportions of body temperature, nasal symptoms, sore throat, body aches and joint pains between viral and bacterial mono-pathogens, there were few differences between distinct dual-pathogen pairs and their respective mono-pathogen counterparts. Conclusion A substantial number of FRI patients have multiple pathogens detected. Observed clinical differences between patients of dual pathogen and mono-pathogen indicate the likely presence of complex microbial interactions between the various pathogens. PMID:25827870

  17. Detection of respiratory pathogens in aerosols from acutely infected pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents that cause respiratory disease in pigs include porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine respiratory corona virus (PRCV), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The objective of...

  18. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. PMID:25929158

  19. The bioactivity of plant extracts against representative bacterial pathogens of the lower respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; del Rayo Camacho-Corona, María; Ramírez-Cabrera, Mónica; Rivera, Gildardo; Garza-González, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Background Lower respiratory tract infections are a major cause of illness and death. Such infections are common in intensive care units (ICU) and their lethality persists despite advances in diagnosis, treatment and prevention. In Mexico, some plants are used in traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases or ailments such as cough, bronchitis, tuberculosis and other infections. Medical knowledge derived from traditional societies has motivated searches for new bioactive molecules derived from plants that show potent activity against bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hexanic, chloroformic (CLO), methanolic (MET) and aqueous extracts from various plants used in Mexican traditional medicine on various microorganisms associated with respiratory disease. Methods thirty-five extracts prepared from nine plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of respiratory infections were evaluated against 15 control bacterial species and clinical isolates. Results Both chloroformic (CLO) and methanolic (MET) extracts of Larrea tridentata were active against Methicillin-resistant S. aureus, B. subtilis and L. monocytogenes. A MET extract of L. tridentata was also active against S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, S. maltophilia, E. faecalis and H. influenzae and the CLO extract was active against A. baumannii. An Aqueous extract of M. acumitata and a MET extract of N. officinale were active against S. pneumoniae. CLO and MET extracts of L. tridentata were active against clinical isolates of S. aureus, S. pneumoniae and E. faecalis. Conclusion Overall, our results support the potential use of L. tridentata as a source of antibacterial compounds. PMID:19486533

  20. Simultaneous typing of nine avian respiratory pathogens using a novel GeXP analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixun; Luo, Sisi; Xie, Liji; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Zhiqin; Fan, Qing; Khan, Mazhar I

    2014-10-01

    A new, rapid, and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP) analyzer-based multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. The respiratory pathogens included in this study were avian influenza subtypes H5, H7, and H9, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Haemophilus paragallinarum (HPG). Ten pairs of primers were designed using conserved and specific sequence genes of AIV subtypes and respiratory pathogens from GenBank. Single and mixed pathogen cDNA/DNA templates were used to evaluate the specificity of the GeXP-multiplex assay. The corresponding specific DNA products were amplified for each pathogen. The specific DNA product amplification peaks of nine respiratory pathogens were observed on the GeXP analyzer. Non-respiratory avian pathogens, including chicken infectious anemia virus, fowl adenovirus, avian reovirus and infectious bursal disease virus, did not produce DNA products. The detection limit for the GeXP-multiplex assay was determined to be 100 copies/?l using various pre-mixed plasmids/ssRNAs containing known target genes of the respiratory pathogens. Further, GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100% specific when 24 clinical samples with respiratory infections were tested in comparison with conventional PCR method. The GeXP-multiplex PCR assay provides a novel tool for simultaneous detection and differentiation of nine avian respiratory pathogens. PMID:25025815

  1. Antibacterial activity of RU 64004 (HMR 3004), a novel ketolide derivative active against respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Agouridas, C; Bonnefoy, A; Chantot, J F

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of RU 64004, a new ketolide, was evaluated against more than 600 bacterial strains and was compared with those of various macrolides and pristinamycin. RU 64004 had good activity against multiresistant pneumococci, whether they were erythromycin A resistant or not, including penicillin-resistant strains. RU 64004 inhibited 90% of pneumococci resistant to erythromycin A and penicillin G at 0.6 and 0.15 microg/ml, respectively. Unlike macrolides, RU 64004 did not induce the phenotype of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B. Its good antibacterial activity against multiresistant pneumococci ran in parallel with its well-balanced activity against all bacteria involved in respiratory infections (e.g., Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pyogenes). In contrast to all comparators (14- and 16-membered-ring macrolides and pristinamycin), RU 64004 displayed high therapeutic activity in animals infected with all major strains, irrespective of the phenotypes of the strains. The results suggest that RU 64004 has potential for use in the treatment of infections caused by respiratory pathogens including multiresistant pneumococci. PMID:9333040

  2. [Clinicoradiological diagnosis of respiratory infections: estimate of pathogens by radiological findings and the strategy for treatment].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Jiro

    2006-03-01

    This review discusses the clinicoradiological findings of community-acquired respiratory infections and the treatment strategy for respiratory infections. To make a differential diagnosis between bacterial pneumonia, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens, and mycobacterial infections, it is very important to analyze the radiological findings of inflammatory lung diseases based on normal antomical structures. If clinicoradiological anlyses could make these differentiations, the appropriate treatment strategy for respiratory infections could be established. To accomplish this, exact orientations of pulmonary lobulus, acinus, and respiratory bronchioles is very important. Then, through analyzing chest CT findings and distribution patterns based on normal anatomical structures, estimation of causative pathogens could be possible. Especially, whether inflammatory exudates could pass Kohn's pores as well as Lambert's channel or not is very important factor to affect radiological findings of several pneumonia (as traditionally called "segmental" and "nonsegmental" distribution). To differentiate infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria, several important criteria have been demonstrated. Briefly, it has been suggested that Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) respiratory infection is increasing especially in elderly women without underlying diseases. In MAC respiratory infection, right middle lobe and left lingula are frequently involved and centrilobular nodules and diffuse bronchiectases are characteristic radiological findings. Finally, the role of telithromycin in the treatment of respiratory infections is discussed. PMID:16629489

  3. Reverse transcription-PCR-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid detection of biothreat and common respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Hardick, Justin; Rothman, Richard; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Peterson, Stephen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Masek, Billie Jo; Carroll, Karen C; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2013-10-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis of reverse transcription (RT)-PCR amplicons from human respiratory samples allows for broad pathogen identification approximately 8 h after collection. We investigated the performance characteristics of a high-throughput RT-PCR-coupled ESI-MS assay for distinguishing biothreat (BT) agents from common bacterial, fungal, and viral respiratory pathogens in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from subjects with suspected respiratory infections. In a retrospective case series, 202 BAL fluid specimens were collected at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between August 2010 and February 2011 from patients with suspected acute respiratory infections. Samples were processed using standard bacterial, viral, and fungal testing in the clinical microbiology laboratory as part of routine care and then were blindly spiked with either water or nucleic acids from BT organisms (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Brucella spp., Burkholderia spp., and Rickettsia prowazekii) and tested by RT-PCR-ESI-MS. The sensitivities and specificities of RT-PCR-ESI-MS versus standard clinical methods were as follows: for mock BT DNA, 98.5% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.2 to 99.7%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 93.1 to 100.0%); for bacterial pathogens, 81.8% sensitivity (95% CI, 74.3 to 87.6%) and 73.6% specificity (95% CI, 64.2 to 81.4%); for viral pathogens, 93.3% sensitivity (95% CI, 66.0 to 99.7%) and 97.3% specificity (95% CI, 89.7 to 99.5%); for fungal pathogens, 42.6% sensitivity (95% CI, 29.5 to 56.7%) and 97.8% specificity (95% CI, 91.8 to 99.6%). Our data suggest that RT-PCR-ESI-MS is a useful adjunct to standard culture protocols for rapid detection of both BT and common respiratory pathogens; further study is required for assay validation, especially for fungal detection, and potential implementation. PMID:23903543

  4. Comparative Respiratory Pathogenicity and Dynamic Tissue Distribution of Chinese Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and its Attenuated Strain in Piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Zhang, W; Gong, W; Zhang, D; She, R; Xu, B; Ning, Y

    2015-07-01

    The outbreak of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (HP-PRRS) in 2006 devastated the Chinese swine industry. HP-PRRS virus is still the predominant strain in mainland China, rather than the classical PRRSV strain, and the attenuated live vaccine remains the preferred choice for protecting piglets against HP-PRRSV infection. To fully evaluate the safety of strain GDr180, the 180th attenuated virus of the HP-PRRSV strain GD, we used clinicopathological, microscopical, ultrastructural, serological and molecular biological methods to assess the different clinical manifestations and respiratory characteristics of piglets inoculated with HP-PRRSV strain GD or strain GDr180. The 5-week-old piglets inoculated with strain GD displayed marked clinical signs, including fever, anorexia, dyspnoea and tachypnoea. Significant interstitial pneumonia was present, characterized by thickened alveolar septa infiltrated with mononuclear cells and cell debris. However, the piglets inoculated with strain GDr180 and the negative control piglets showed neither clinical signs nor microscopical or ultrastructural lesions. Ultrastructural observation of the piglets' tracheas and examination of the dynamic tissue distributions of PRRSV strain GD and attenuated strain GDr180, by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, confirmed significant differences in their pathogenicity and distribution in the respiratory systems of piglets. The differences in pathogenicity are attributable to the different severity of the pathological changes in the pigs inoculated with the two strains. Thus, the HP-PRRSV GDr180 strain is practically harmless to the respiratory systems of piglets and may be a safe candidate for inducing immunity against HP-PRRS. PMID:25980840

  5. Effect of Bovine Respiratory Disease and Overall Pathogenic Disease Incidence on Carcass Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and overall incidence of pathogenic diseases (IPD) on carcass traits. Two independent populations were used; the first population comprised crossbred steers (GPE7; n=642) derived from sires of seven Bos tauru...

  6. Association of targeted multiplex PCR with resequencing microarray for the detection of multiple respiratory pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongwei; Zhu, Bingqing; Wang, Shulian; Mo, Haolian; Wang, Ji; Li, Jin; Zhang, Chen; Zeng, Huashu; Guan, Li; Shi, Weixian; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    A large number of viral and bacterial organisms are responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) which contributes to substantial burden on health management. A new resequencing microarray (RPM-IVDC1) associated with targeted multiplex PCR was recently developed and validated for multiple respiratory viruses detection and discrimination. In this study, we evaluated the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for simultaneous identification of multiple viral and bacterial organisms. The nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) of 110 consecutive CAP patients, aged from 1 month to 96 years old, were collected from five distinct general hospitals in Beijing during 1-year period. The samples were subjected to the RPM-IVDC1 established protocol as compared to a real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which was used as standard. The results of virus detection were consistent with those previously described. A total of 37 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 14 of Haemophilus influenzae, 10 of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, two of Klebsiella pneumoniae and one of Moraxella catarrhalis were detected by RPM-IVDC1. The sensitivities and specificities were compared with those of qRT-PCR for S. pneumoniae (100, 100%, respectively), H. influenzae (92.3, 97.9%, respectively), M. pneumoniae (69.2, 99.0%, respectively), K. pneumoniae (100, 100%, respectively), and M. catarrhalis (100, 100%, respectively). Additional 22 of Streptococcus spp., 24 of Haemophilus spp. and 16 of Neisseria spp. were identified. In addition, methicillin-resistant and carbapenemases allele were also found in nine of Staphylococcus spp. and one of K. pneumoniae, respectively. These results demonstrated the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens in complex backgrounds and the advantage of accessing to the actual sequences, showing great potential use of epidemic outbreak investigation. The detection results should be carefully interpreted when introducing this technique in the clinical diagnostics. PMID:26074910

  7. Transcriptional analysis of the response of poultry species to respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Munir, S; Kapur, V

    2003-06-01

    Respiratory tract diseases are the single most important cause of economic loss due to infections among poultry populations worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to infections remain unknown. Here, we review the literature and describe the adoption of a conceptually simple approach to understand the genetic and biochemical responses of host cells during infection with respiratory pathogens, such as avian pneumovirus (APV). The strategy that we have adopted integrates the powerful techniques of cDNA subtraction hybridization and microarray analysis for global transcriptional profiling. The results of our investigations identify the specific transcriptional alterations in host-cell gene expression that result from an attempt by the host to combat and limit the spread of the pathogen or by the pathogen to enhance its own survival and ability to reproduce. Our studies suggest that a molecular description of host-pathogen interactions in terms of differential gene expression will provide key insights on the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis, pathogen virulence, and host immunity. In addition, the results suggest that the identification of genes and pathways with a role in host response to infection has considerable practical implications for the future design and development of effective immunomodulators and vaccines. PMID:12817442

  8. Piracy of adhesins: attachment of superinfecting pathogens to respiratory cilia by secreted adhesins of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Tuomanen, E

    1986-01-01

    Two proteins secreted by Bordetella pertussis are known to mediate adherence of these bacteria to mammalian respiratory cilia. When either ciliated cells or other pathogenic bacteria were pretreated with these adhesins, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus acquired the ability to adhere to cilia in vitro and in vivo. Such piracy of adhesins may contribute to superinfection in mucosal diseases such as whooping cough. Images PMID:2877952

  9. Piracy of adhesins: attachment of superinfecting pathogens to respiratory cilia by secreted adhesins of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Tuomanen, E

    1986-12-01

    Two proteins secreted by Bordetella pertussis are known to mediate adherence of these bacteria to mammalian respiratory cilia. When either ciliated cells or other pathogenic bacteria were pretreated with these adhesins, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus acquired the ability to adhere to cilia in vitro and in vivo. Such piracy of adhesins may contribute to superinfection in mucosal diseases such as whooping cough. PMID:2877952

  10. Association of serum Clara cell protein CC16 with respiratory infections and immune response to respiratory pathogens in elite athletes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory epithelium integrity impairment caused by intensive exercise may lead to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clara cell protein (CC16) has anti-inflammatory properties and its serum level reflects changes in epithelium integrity and airway inflammation. This study aimed to investigate serum CC16 in elite athletes and to seek associations of CC16 with asthma or allergy, respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and immune response to respiratory pathogens. Methods The study was performed in 203 Olympic athletes. Control groups comprised 53 healthy subjects and 49 mild allergic asthmatics. Serum levels of CC16 and IgG against respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were assessed. Allergy questionnaire for athletes was used to determine symptoms and exercise pattern. Current versions of ARIA and GINA guidelines were used when diagnosing allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. Results Asthma was diagnosed in 13.3% athletes, of whom 55.6% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis without asthma was diagnosed in 14.8% of athletes. Mean CC16 concentration was significantly lower in athletes versus healthy controls and mild asthmatics. Athletes reporting frequent RTIs had significantly lower serum CC16 and the risk of frequent RTIs was more than 2-fold higher in athletes with low serum CC16 (defined as equal to or less than 4.99 ng/ml). Athletes had significantly higher anti-adenovirus IgG than healthy controls while only non-atopic athletes had anti-parainfluenza virus IgG significantly lower than controls. In all athletes weak correlation of serum CC16 and anti-parainfluenza virus IgG was present (R?=?0.20, p?respiratory syncytial virus (R?=?0.29, p?=?0.009), parainfluenza virus (R?=?0.31, p?=?0.01) and adenovirus (R?=?0.27, p?=?0.02) were seen as well. Conclusions Regular high-load exercise is associated with decrease in serum CC16 levels. Athletes with decreased CC16 are more susceptible to respiratory infections. Atopy may be an additional factor modifying susceptibility to infections in subjects performing regular high-load exercise. PMID:24735334

  11. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and other respiratory pathogens: clinical insights - from epidemiology to treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Smit

    2012-01-01

    This thesis contains clinical studies on 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) and other respiratory pathogens. Chapter 1 is a general introduction. Chapter 2 comprises three studies on epidemiology. The first describes epidemiological characteristics of 964 adult outpatients who presented with influenza-like signs and symptoms during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Respiratory pathogens were detected in 41% and pandemic influenza A (H1N1)

  12. Mass gathering and globalization of respiratory pathogens during the 2013 Hajj.

    PubMed

    Memish, Z A; Assiri, A; Turkestani, A; Yezli, S; Al Masri, M; Charrel, R; Drali, T; Gaudart, J; Edouard, S; Parola, P; Gautret, P

    2015-06-01

    Every year, more than 10 million pilgrims arrive in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for the Hajj or Umrah. Crowding conditions lead to high rates of respiratory infections among the pilgrims, representing a significant cause of morbidity and a major cause of hospitalization. Pre- and post-Hajj nasal specimens were prospectively obtained from a paired cohort (692 pilgrims) and from nonpaired cohorts (514 arriving and 470 departing pilgrims) from 13 countries. The countries of residence included Africa (44.2%), Asia (40.2%), the United States (8.4%) and Europe (7.2%). Nasal specimens were tested for 34 respiratory pathogens using RT-PCR. A total of 80 512 PCRs were performed. The prevalence of viruses and bacteria increased, from 7.4% and 15.4% before the Hajj to 45.4% and 31.0% after the Hajj, respectively, due to the acquisition of rhinovirus, coronaviruses (229E, HKU1, OC43), influenza A H1N1, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus. We did not identify Middle East respiratory coronavirus carriage. At arrival, the prevalence of several viruses was clearly dependent on the pilgrim's country of origin. After Hajj participation, these viruses were isolated among pilgrims from all countries, with few exceptions. No significant differences were observed between paired and nonpaired cohort results. Our results strongly suggest that, given the particularly crowded conditions during the rituals, an international mass gathering such as the Hajj may contribute to the globalization of respiratory pathogens after the cross-contamination of pilgrims harbouring pathogens that easily spread among participants. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination, face mask use and hand hygiene should be considered in the context of the Hajj. PMID:25700892

  13. Pathogens of bovine respiratory disease in North American feedlots conferring multidrug resistance via integrative conjugative elements.

    PubMed

    Klima, Cassidy L; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Booker, Calvin W; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD. PMID:24478472

  14. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy in 2007: general view of the pathogens’ antibacterial susceptibility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Niki; H. Hanaki; T. Matsumoto; M. Yagisawa; S. Kohno; N. Aoki; A. Watanabe; J. Sato; R. Hattori; M. Terada; N. Koashi; T. Kozuki; A. Maruo; K. Morita; K. Ogasawara; Y. Takahashi; J. Watanabe; K. Takeuchi; S. Fujimura; H. Takeda; H. Ikeda; N. Sato; K. Niitsuma; M. Saito; S. Koshiba; M. Kaneko; M. Miki; S. Nakanowatari; Y. Honda; J. Chiba; H. Takahashi; M. Utagawa; T. Kondo; A. Kawana; H. Konosaki; Y. Aoki; H. Ueda; H. Sugiura; M. Ichioka; H. Goto; D. Kurai; M. Okazaki; K. Yoshida; T. Yoshida; Y. Tanabe; S. Kobayashi; M. Okada; H. Tsukada; Y. Imai; Y. Honma; K. Nishikawa; T. Yamamoto; A. Kawai; T. Kashiwabara; Y. Takesue; Y. Wada; K. Nakajima; T. Miyara; H. Toda; N. Mitsuno; H. Sugimura; S. Yoshioka; M. Kurokawa; Y. Munekawa; H. Nakajima; S. Kubo; Y. Ohta; K. Mikasa; K. Maeda; K. Kasahara; A. Koizumi; R. Sano; S. Yagi; M. Takaya; Y. Kurokawa; N. Kusano; E. Mihara; M. Kuwabara; Y. Fujiue; T. Ishimaru; N. Matsubara; Y. Kawasaki; H. Tokuyasu; K. Masui; K. Negayama; N. Ueda; M. Ishimaru; Y. Nakanishi; M. Fujita; J. Honda; J. Kadota; K. Hiramatsu; Z. Nagasawa; M. Suga; H. Muranaka; K. Yanagihara; J. Fujita; M. Tateyama; K. Sunakawa; K. Totsuka

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of a nationwide surveillance of the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens in patients\\u000a in Japan, the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy conducted their second year survey, during the period from January to August,\\u000a 2007. A total of 1178 strains were collected from clinical specimens obtained from adult patients with well-diagnosed respiratory\\u000a tract infections. Susceptibility testing was evaluable

  15. Entamoeba histolytica proteins modulate the respiratory burst potential by murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J Y; Keller, K; Chadee, K

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates are important components of macrophage microbicidal mechanisms and pathogenesis of parasitic disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of virulent Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) on respiratory burst potential of macrophages. Pretreatment of elicited peritoneal macrophages (EPM) with crude soluble amoebic proteins from 1 to 6 hr was found to prime EPM for enhanced O2 and H2O2 release in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in a dose-dependent manner, whereas pretreatment with the same concentrations of the non-pathogenic E. histolytica-like Laredo strain was without priming effect. Low molecular weight (MW) amoebic proteins (27,000-67,000) purified by Sephacryl-200 column chromatography and subfractionated by diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography were 10-fold more potent than crude amoebic proteins in priming EPM for an enhanced respiratory burst potential. Both crude and purified amoebic proteins inhibited the priming effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and antagonized the stimulating effect of PMA. Amoebic proteins by themselves were incapable of stimulating EPM respiratory burst. These findings demonstrate that amoebic proteins are capable of modulating the respiratory burst response of macrophages, suggesting an important role for them in the immunoregulation and pathogenesis of amoebiasis. PMID:8386134

  16. PCR based bronchoscopic detection of common respiratory pathogens in chronic cough: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory tract infection is the most frequent cause of acute cough and is reported at onset in about one third of patients with chronic cough. Persistent infection is therefore one possible explanation for the cough reflex hypersensitivity and pulmonary inflammation reported in chronic cough patients. Methods Bronchoscopic endobronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were obtained from ten healthy volunteers and twenty treatment resistant chronic cough patients (10 selected for lavage lymphocytosis). A screen for known respiratory pathogens was performed on biopsy tissue. Chronic cough patients also underwent cough reflex sensitivity testing using citric acid. Results There was no significant difference in incidence of infection between healthy volunteers and chronic cough patients (p?=?0.115) or non-lymphocytic and lymphocytic groups (p?=?0.404). BAL cell percentages were not significantly different between healthy volunteers and chronic cough patients without lymphocytosis. Lymphocytic patients however had a significantly raised percentage of lymphocytes (p?pathogens in either the lung or a distal site could not be ruled out. Trials registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN62337037 & ISRCTN40147207 PMID:22978556

  17. Key role of Chlamydophila psittaci on Belgian turkey farms in association with other respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Van Loock, M; Geens, T; De Smit, L; Nauwynck, H; Van Empel, P; Naylor, C; Hafez, H M; Goddeeris, B M; Vanrompay, D

    2005-04-25

    Two hundred turkey sera from eight Belgian and two French farms were tested for the presence of antibodies against avian pneumovirus (APV), Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma meleagridis and Chlamydophila psittaci. At slaughter, C. psittaci, APV and ORT antibodies were detected in 94, 34 and 6.5% of the turkeys, respectively. No antibodies against M. gallisepticum or M. meleagridis were present. Additionally, turkeys on three Belgian farms were examined from production onset until slaughter using both serology and antigen or gene detection. All farms experienced two C. psittaci infection waves, at 3-6 and 8-12 weeks of age. Each first infection wave was closely followed by an ORT infection starting at the age of 6-8 weeks, which was still detectable when the second C. psittaci infection waves started. Animals on farm A were not vaccinated against APV leading to an APV subtype B outbreak accompanying the first C. psittaci infection wave. Despite subtype A APV vaccination on farms B and C, the second C. psittaci infection waves were accompanied (farm B) or followed (farm C) by a subtype B APV infection. On all farms respiratory signs always appeared together with a proven C. psittaci, APV and/or ORT infection. This study suggests an association between C. psittaci, APV and ORT, and indicates the multi-factorial aetiology of respiratory infections in commercial turkeys. All three pathogens should be considered when developing prevention strategies for respiratory disease. PMID:15795081

  18. Evaluating the Growth Potential of Pathogenic Bacteria in Water ? †

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Stucki, David; Egli, Thomas; Hammes, Frederik

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which a water sample can potentially support the growth of human pathogens was evaluated. For this purpose, a pathogen growth potential (PGP) bioassay was developed based on the principles of conventional assimilable organic carbon (AOC) determination, but using pure cultures of selected pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157, Vibrio cholerae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as the inoculum. We evaluated 19 water samples collected after different treatment steps from two drinking water production plants and a wastewater treatment plant and from ozone-treated river water. Each pathogen was batch grown to stationary phase in sterile water samples, and the concentration of cells produced was measured using flow cytometry. In addition, the fraction of AOC consumed by each pathogen was estimated. Pathogen growth did not correlate with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and correlated only weakly with the concentration of AOC. Furthermore, the three pathogens never grew to the same final concentration in any water sample, and the relative ratio of the cultures to each other was unique in each sample. These results suggest that the extent of pathogen growth is affected not only by the concentration but also by the composition of AOC. Through this bioassay, PGP can be included as a parameter in water treatment system design, control, and operation. Additionally, a multilevel concept that integrates the results from the bioassay into the bigger framework of pathogen growth in water is discussed. The proposed approach provides a first step for including pathogen growth into microbial risk assessment. PMID:20693455

  19. Metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa involved in competition with respiratory bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Marie; Köhler, Thilo; Fontana, Thierry; Tognon, Mikael; Renzoni, Adriana; van Delden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic airway infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa considerably contributes to lung tissue destruction and impairment of pulmonary function in cystic-fibrosis (CF) patients. Complex interplays between P. aeruginosa and other co-colonizing pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia sp., and Klebsiella pneumoniae may be crucial for pathogenesis and disease progression. Methods: We generated a library of PA14 transposon insertion mutants to identify P. aeruginosa genes required for exploitative and direct competitions with S. aureus, Burkholderia cenocepacia, and K. pneumoniae. Results: Whereas wild-type PA14 inhibited S. aureus growth, two transposon insertions located in pqsC and carB, resulted in reduced growth inhibition. PqsC is involved in the synthesis of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), a family of molecules having antibacterial properties, while carB is a key gene in pyrimidine biosynthesis. The carB mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of B. cepacia and K. pneumoniae but not Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis. We further identified a transposon insertion in purF, encoding a key enzyme of purine metabolism. This mutant displayed a severe growth deficiency in the presence of Gram-negative but not of Gram-positive bacteria. We identified a beneficial interaction in a bioA transposon mutant, unable to grow on rich medium. This growth defect could be restored either by addition of biotin or by co-culturing the mutant in the presence of K. pneumoniae or E. coli. Conclusion: Complex interactions take place between the various bacterial species colonizing CF-lungs. This work identified both detrimental and beneficial interactions occurring between P. aeruginosa and three other respiratory pathogens involving several major metabolic pathways. Manipulating these pathways could be used to interfere with bacterial interactions and influence the colonization by respiratory pathogens. PMID:25954256

  20. The vOTU domain of highly-pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus displays a differential substrate preference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arterivirus genus member Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically devastating disease that presents global concerns to the pork industry, which have been exacerbated by the emergence of a highly pathogenic PRRSV strain (HP-PRRSV) in China and Southeast Asia....

  1. Pathogenicity of three type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus strains in experimentally inoculated pregnant gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms of reproductive failure resulting from infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) are still poorly understood. The present study, a side-by-side evaluation of the pathogenicity of three type 2 PRRSv strains in a reproductive model, was used as a pilot study...

  2. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of commonly prescribed oral antibiotics against respiratory bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs) account for a substantial portion of outpatient antibiotic utilization. However, the pharmacodynamic activity of commonly used oral antibiotic regimens has not been studied against clinically relevant pathogens. The objective of this study was to assess the probability of achieving the requisite pharmacodynamic exposure for oral antibacterial regimens commonly prescribed for RTIs in adults against bacterial isolates frequently involved in these processes (S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catharralis). Methods Using a 5000-subject Monte Carlo simulation, the cumulative fractions of response (CFR), (i.e., probabilities of achieving requisite pharmacodynamic targets) for the most commonly prescribed oral antibiotic regimens, as determined by a structured survey of medical prescription patterns, were assessed against local respiratory bacterial isolates from adults in São Paulo collected during the same time period. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 230 isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (103), Haemophilus influenzae (98), and Moraxella catharralis (29) from a previous local surveillance were used. Results The most commonly prescribed antibiotic regimens were azithromycin 500 mg QD, amoxicillin 500 mg TID, and levofloxacin 500 mg QD, accounting for 58% of the prescriptions. Varied doses of these agents, plus gatifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, moxifloxacin, and cefaclor made up the remaining regimens. Utilizing aggressive pharmacodynamic exposure targets, the only regimens to achieve greater than 90% CFR against all three pathogens were amoxicillin/amoxicillin-clavulanate 500 mg TID (> 91%), gatifloxacin 400 mg QD (100%), and moxifloxacin 400 mg QD (100%). Considering S. pneumoniae isolates alone, azithromycin 1000 mg QD also achieved greater than 90% CFR (91.3%). Conclusions The only regimens to achieve high CFR against all three pathogen populations in both scenarios were gatifloxacin 400 mg QD, moxifloxacin 400 mg QD, and amoxicillin-clavulanate 500 mg TID. These data suggest the need for reconsideration of empiric antibiotic regimen selection among adult patients with RTIs in the São Paulo area. Additionally, this type of study could be used to optimize prescribing patterns in specific regions in light of emerging resistance. PMID:22026724

  3. POSTER DISCUSSION PRESENTATION Open Access Respiratory allergens in human milk: potential

    E-print Network

    POSTER DISCUSSION PRESENTATION Open Access Respiratory allergens in human milk: potential impact to environmental allergens during early life on allergic sensitization and disease development is controversial respiratory allergens can take place through breastfeeding. An animal model mimicking the human situation

  4. Complexes of potentially pathogenic microscopic fungi in anthropogenic polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Korneykova, Maria V; Lebedeva, Elena V

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the species' diversity and structure of potentially pathogenic microscopic fungal complexes in podzolic soils polluted by fluorine, heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Co), oil products (diesel fuel, gas condensate, mazut). Lists of potentially pathogenic fungi isolated from soils are made specifically for north-western part of Russia (Kola Peninsula). The majority of studied fungus species belong to the following genera: Penicillium, Aspergillus, Mucor, Lecanicillium and Phoma. Penicillium miczynskii was identified as the most stable type of fungus with respect to all studied types of oil products. Mucor hiemalis was identified as the most sensitive type. An increase of 15% portion of potentially pathogenic fungi as compared to the background soil in zones of aluminum and copper-nickel plants was revealed. The results indicate an increase of 20-25% of potentially pathogenic fungi in pollution of soil with oil products. The structure of fungal complexes was observed to have changed in the polluted soils and the species number and frequency of occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungi were also increased. PMID:23445417

  5. Pathogenic characteristics of three genotype II porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined differences in pathogenicity in pigs from China that had been experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Methods We compared pathogenic characteristics of a field isolate (GX-1/2008F), two PRRSV isolates (HN-1/2008, YN-1/2008) propagated in cells, and GX-1/2008F that had been propagated in cells (GX-1/2008). The clinical courses, along with humoral and cell-mediated responses, were monitored for 21 days post-infection (DPI). Animals were sacrificed and tissue samples used for gross pathological, histopathological and ultrastructure examination. Results At 2–3 DPI, animals infected with cell-propagated viruses exhibited signs of coughing, anorexia and fever. However their rectal temperature did not exceed 40.5°C. Viremia was detectable as early as 3 DPI in animals infected with HN-1/2008 and YN-1/2008. Animals inoculated with GX-1/2008F displayed clinical signs at 6 DPI; the rectal temperature of two animals in this group exceeded 41.0°C, with viremia first detected at 7 DPI. Seroconversion for all challenged pigs, except those infected with GX-1/2008, was seen as early as 7 DPI. All of these pigs had fully seroconverted by 11 DPI. All animals challenged with GX-1/2008 remained seronegative until the end of the experiment. Innate immunity was inhibited, with levels of IFN-? and IL-1 not significantly different between control and infected animals. The cytokines IFN-? and IL-6 transiently increased during acute infection. All virus strains caused gross lesions including multifocal interstitial pneumonia and hyperplasia of lymph nodes. Inflammation of the stomach and small intestine was also observed. Lesions in the group infected with GX-1/2008F were more serious than in other groups. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that alveolar macrophages, plasmacytes and lymphocytes had fractured cytomembranes, and hepatocytes had disrupted organelles and swollen mitochondria. Conclusions The pathogenicity of the PRRSV field isolate became attenuated when propagated in MARC-145 cells. Tissue tropism of highly pathogenic strains prevailing in China was altered compared with classical PRRSV strains. The observed damage to immune cells and modulation of cytokine production could be mechanisms that PRRSV employs to evade host immune responses. PMID:23282224

  6. Potential role of calcineurin in pathogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurji, Khaliq; Sharma, Rajendra K

    2010-05-01

    Since its initial discovery as Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase, calcineurin (CaN) has been extensively studied in many mammalian tissues. CaN has been shown to be involved in various biological and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction pathways. Over the last decade, our laboratory has been interested and has carried out numerous experiments on this specific protein phosphatase. While, a lot of research has been performed studying CaN's involvement in ischemia, the immune system, and various mammalian tissues, not much is known about the potential role of CaN in various eye diseases. This review focuses on the studies that have been carried out in our laboratory on CaN, and specifically CaN's involvement in the eye. We demonstrated that CaN is localized in various eye tissues (cornea, iris, ciliary body, vitreous body, retina, choroid, sclera, and optic nerve) and that both its protein expression and activity were observed in high amounts in the retina, optic nerve and cornea. Recently, we have cloned and characterized the CaN A and B subunits in the bovine retina. These initial findings suggest that CaN may play a potential role in visual transduction and various ocular diseases, including cancer. PMID:19967549

  7. Changes in adherence of respiratory pathogens to HEp-2 cells induced by subinhibitory concentrations of sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, M R; Beumer, H; Hoepelman, A I; Rozenberg-Arska, M; Verhoef, J

    1993-01-01

    Preincubation with subinhibitory concentrations of sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim decreased the adherence of the respiratory pathogens Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis to human larynx carcinoma HEp-2 cells. Subinhibitory concentrations of sparfloxacin did not change the adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumoniae 15.62, but adhesion of S. pneumoniae 15.42 was significantly enhanced by subinhibitory antimicrobial concentrations. PMID:8388203

  8. A multiplexed reverse transcriptase PCR assay for identification of viral respiratory pathogens at point-of-care

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; .Ortiz, J I; Tammero, L; Birch, J M; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Manning, D; McBride, M T

    2007-04-11

    We have developed a nucleic acid-based assay that is rapid, sensitive, specific, and can be used for the simultaneous detection of 5 common human respiratory pathogens including influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza type 1 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus group B, C, and E. Typically, diagnosis on an un-extracted clinical sample can be provided in less than 3 hours, including sample collection, preparation, and processing, as well as data analysis. Such a multiplexed panel would enable rapid broad-spectrum pathogen testing on nasal swabs, and therefore allow implementation of infection control measures, and timely administration of antiviral therapies. This article presents a summary of the assay performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Limits of detection are provided for each targeted respiratory pathogen, and result comparisons are performed on clinical samples, our goal being to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the multiplexed assay to the combination of immunofluorescence and shell vial culture currently implemented at the UCDMC hospital. Overall, the use of the multiplexed RT-PCR assay reduced the rate of false negatives by 4% and reduced the rate of false positives by up to 10%. The assay correctly identified 99.3% of the clinical negatives, 97% of adenovirus, 95% of RSV, 92% of influenza B, and 77% of influenza A without any extraction performed on the clinical samples. The data also showed that extraction will be needed for parainfluenza virus, which was only identified correctly 24% of the time on un-extracted samples.

  9. Bdellovibrios, potential biocontrol bacteria against pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haipeng; He, Shan; Wang, Huicong; Hou, Sanling; Lu, Liqun; Yang, Xianle

    2012-01-27

    Recent studies have revealed that the use of bdellovibrios is an alternative to control bacteriosis. However, no bdellovibrios are available against Aeromonas hydrophila infections in sturgeons. In the present study, a potential Bdellovibrio strain F16 was isolated from sturgeon gut samples, using a sturgeon-pathogenic A. hydrophila as the prey bacterium. It was initially identified as a Bdellovibrio strain using morphological characteristics and specific PCR amplification, and confirmed to be Bdellovibrio sp. strain ETB (GenBank Accession No. DQ302728) and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus strain SRA9 (GenBank Accession No. AF263833) by phylogenetic analysis. In addition, it was shown to be safe for mammalians and sturgeons, had a wide prey range, and exhibited significant bacteriolytic effects on the pathogenic A. hydrophila. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a promising gut Bdellovibrio strain against pathogenic A. hydrophila. PMID:21864996

  10. PATHOGENICITY OF SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY CORONAVIRUS DELETION MUTANTS IN hACE-2 TRANSGENIC MICE

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Pewe, Lecia; Alvarez, Enrique; Rejas, Maria Teresa; Perlman, Stanley; Enjuanes, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory virus (SARS-CoV) variants lacking the group specific genes 6, 7a, 7b, 8a, 8b and 9b (rSARS-CoV-?[6-9b]), the structural gene E (rSARS-CoV-?E), and a combination of both sets of genes (rSARS-CoV-?[E,6-9b]) have been generated. All these viruses were rescued in monkey (Vero E6) cells and were also infectious for human (Huh-7, Huh7.5.1 and CaCo-2) cell lines and for transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the SARS-CoV receptor human angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (hACE-2), indicating that none of these proteins is essential for the viral cycle. Furthermore, in Vero E6 cells, all the viruses showed the formation of particles with the same morphology as the wt virus, indicating that these proteins do not have a high impact in the final morphology of the virions. Nevertheless, in the absence of E protein, release of virus particles efficacy was reduced. Viruses lacking E protein grew about 100-fold lower than the wt virus in lungs of Tg infected mice but did not grow in the brains of the same animals, in contrast to the rSARS-CoV-?[6-9b] virus, which grew almost as well as the wt in both tissues. Viruses lacking E protein were highly attenuated in the highly sensitive hACE-2 Tg mice, in contrast to the minimal rSARS-CoV-?[6-9b] and wt viruses. These data indicate that E gene might be a virulence factor influencing replication level, tissue tropism and pathogenicity of SARS-CoV, suggesting that ?E attenuated viruses are promising vaccine candidates. PMID:18452964

  11. Prevalence of upper respiratory pathogens in four management models for unowned cats in the Southeast United States.

    PubMed

    McManus, C M; Levy, J K; Andersen, L A; McGorray, S P; Leutenegger, C M; Gray, L K; Hilligas, J; Tucker, S J

    2014-08-01

    Upper respiratory infection (URI) is a pervasive problem in cats and impacts the capacity and cost of sheltering programs. This study determined the pattern of respiratory pathogens in cats with and without clinical signs of URI in four different models for managing unowned cats, namely, (1) short-term animal shelters (STS), (2) long-term sanctuaries (LTS), (3) home-based foster care programs (FCP), and (4) trap-neuter-return programs for community cats (TNR). Conjunctival and oropharyngeal swabs from 543 cats, approximately half of which showed clinical signs of URI, were tested for feline herpes virus-1 (FHV), feline calicivirus (FCV), Chlamydia felis, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma felis, and canine influenza virus by real-time PCR. FHV (59%, 41%) and B. bronchiseptica (33%, 24%) were more prevalent in both clinically affected and nonclinical cats, respectively, in STS than other management models. FCV (67%, 51%) and M. felis (84%, 86%) were more prevalent in LTS than any other management model. Clinically affected cats in FCP were more likely to carry FHV (23%, 6%), C. felis (24%, 10%), or M. felis (58%, 38%) than were nonclinical cats. Clinically affected cats in TNR were more likely to carry FCV (55%, 36%) or C. felis (23%, 4%) than were nonclinical cats. The prevalence of individual pathogens varied between different management models, but the majority of the cats in each model carried one or more respiratory pathogens regardless of clinical signs. Both confined and free-roaming cats are at risk of developing infectious respiratory disease and their health should be protected by strategic vaccination, appropriate antibiotic therapy, effective biosecurity, feline stress mitigation, and alternatives to high-density confinement. PMID:24923756

  12. Serologic survey for pathogens potentially affecting pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) fawn recruitment in Arizona, USA.

    PubMed

    Dubay, Shelli A; Noon, Ted H; deVos, James C; Ockenfels, Richard A

    2006-10-01

    During the 1990s, pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) populations declined in Arizona, USA. To investigate potential causes of decline, we collected blood samples from hunter-harvested male pronghorn from 2001 to 2003 on four Arizona sites. Sera were tested for antibody to parainfluenza virus type 3 (PI3), bovine viral diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), bluetongue virus (BTV), and Chlamydia psittaci. Antibody against PI3 was found in 33% of the samples, whereas antibody against BTV/EHDV was found in 77%. Antibodies to other pathogens were found at low prevalence rates. Although pronghorn decline in Arizona is probably not directly related to disease, potential reproductive effects of BTV/EHDV and PI3 infection on pronghorn in Arizona merit further study. PMID:17255453

  13. CRISPR Content Correlates with the Pathogenic Potential of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    García-Gutiérrez, Enriqueta; Almendros, Cristóbal; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Guzmán, Noemí M.; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Guide RNA molecules (crRNA) produced from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays, altogether with effector proteins (Cas) encoded by cognate cas (CRISPR associated) genes, mount an interference mechanism (CRISPR-Cas) that limits acquisition of foreign DNA in Bacteria and Archaea. The specificity of this action is provided by the repeat intervening spacer carried in the crRNA, which upon hybridization with complementary sequences enables their degradation by a Cas endonuclease. Moreover, CRISPR arrays are dynamic landscapes that may gain new spacers from infecting elements or lose them for example during genome replication. Thus, the spacer content of a strain determines the diversity of sequences that can be targeted by the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system reflecting its functionality. Most Escherichia coli strains possess either type I-E or I-F CRISPR-Cas systems. To evaluate their impact on the pathogenicity of the species, we inferred the pathotype and pathogenic potential of 126 strains of this and other closely related species and analyzed their repeat content. Our results revealed a negative correlation between the number of I-E CRISPR units in this system and the presence of pathogenicity traits: the median number of repeats was 2.5-fold higher for commensal isolates (with 29.5 units, range 0–53) than for pathogenic ones (12.0, range 0–42). Moreover, the higher the number of virulence factors within a strain, the lower the repeat content. Additionally, pathogenic strains of distinct ecological niches (i.e., intestinal or extraintestinal) differ in repeat counts. Altogether, these findings support an evolutionary connection between CRISPR and pathogenicity in E. coli. PMID:26136211

  14. Neuroinvasive and neurotropic human respiratory coronaviruses: potential neurovirulent agents in humans.

    PubMed

    Desforges, Marc; Le Coupanec, Alain; Brison, Elodie; Meessen-Pinard, Mathieu; Talbot, Pierre J

    2014-01-01

    In humans, viral infections of the respiratory tract are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several recognized respiratory viral agents have a neuroinvasive capacity since they can spread from the respiratory tract to the central nervous system (CNS). Once there, infection of CNS cells (neurotropism) could lead to human health problems, such as encephalitis and long-term neurological diseases. Among the various respiratory viruses, coronaviruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. Human Coronaviruses (HCoV) usually infect the upper respiratory tract, where they are mainly associated with common colds. However, in more vulnerable populations, such as newborns, infants, the elderly, and immune-compromised individuals, they can also affect the lower respiratory tract, leading to pneumonia, exacerbations of asthma, respiratory distress syndrome, or even severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The respiratory involvement of HCoV has been clearly established since the 1960s. In addition, for almost three decades now, the scientific literature has also demonstrated that HCoV are neuroinvasive and neurotropic and could induce an overactivation of the immune system, in part by participating in the activation of autoreactive immune cells that could be associated with autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. Furthermore, it was shown that in the murine CNS, neurons are the main target of infection, which causes these essential cells to undergo degeneration and eventually die by some form of programmed cell death after virus infection. Moreover, it appears that the viral surface glycoprotein (S) represents an important factor in the neurodegenerative process. Given all these properties, it has been suggested that these recognized human respiratory pathogens could be associated with the triggering or the exacerbation of neurological diseases for which the etiology remains unknown or poorly understood. PMID:24619619

  15. Analysis of the swine tracheobronchial lymphnode transcriptomic response to infection with a Chinese highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Emergence in 2006 of a novel highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) isolate in China necessitated a comparative investigation into the host transcriptome response in tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) 14...

  16. Bioactive potential of Streptomyces against fish and shellfish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, D; Arun, K; Suguna, S; Kumar, D; Dhevendaran, K

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the present study, isolation of Streptomyces associated with marine sponges and its bioactive potential against fish and shellfish pathogens were assessed. The Streptomyces sp. were isolated from the marine sponges namely Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis collected from Vizhinjam port, situated in the South-West coast of India. Materials and Methods The Streptomyces associated with marine sponges were isolated using specific ISP media. The isolates of Streptomyces were characterized for their colony characteristics, morphological properties, physiological and biochemical properties and were tentatively identified. The strains were cultivated on a lab scale level as shake-flask cultures and the crude extracts of the bioactive compounds obtained with ethyl acetate were screened biologically and chemically. By biological screening, the extracts were analyzed for their activity against fish and shellfish pathogens namely Aeromonas hydrophila, Serratia sp. and Vibrio spp, using the disk and agar-well diffusion bioassay method, while by chemical screening the crude culture extracts were analyzed by TLC and UV–Vis spectrophotometer. Results Ninety-four isolates were found to be associated with marine sponges, among them only seven strains showed antagonism against fish and shellfish pathogens. Analysis of morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics suggested that these strains belonged to the genus Streptomyces. The initial screening of the isolates by spot inoculation method exhibited antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila. In-vitro screening of the submerge culture extracts showed positive inhibition against the fish and shellfish pathogens namely Aeromonas hydrophila, Serratia sp. and Vibrio spp. The screening of bioactive compounds confirmed the production of polyene substances by UV spectrum, which resulted in absorbance peaks ranging from 225 to 245 nm and TLC analysis yielded Rf values ranging from 0.40 to 0.78. Conclusion The results suggest that the seven Streptomyces strains isolated from marine sponges produce potential antibacterial compounds against fish and shellfish pathogens. PMID:22347566

  17. A Network Integration Approach to Predict Conserved Regulators Related to Pathogenicity of Influenza and SARS-CoV Respiratory Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Sims, Amy; McDermott, Jason E.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Josset, Laurence; Li, Chengjun; Ellis, Amy L.; Chang, Jean H.; Heegel, Robert A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Neumann, Gabriele; Benecke, Arndt; Smith, Richard D.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2013-07-25

    Respiratory infections stemming from influenza viruses and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV) represent a serious public health threat as emerging pandemics. Despite efforts to identify the critical interactions of these viruses with host machinery, the key regulatory events that lead to disease pathology remain poorly targeted with therapeutics. Here we implement an integrated network interrogation approach, in which proteome and transcriptome datasets from infection of both viruses in human lung epithelial cells are utilized to predict regulatory genes involved in the host response. We take advantage of a novel “crowd-based” approach to identify and combine ranking metrics that isolate genes/proteins likely related to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV and influenza virus. Subsequently, a multivariate regression model is used to compare predicted lung epithelial regulatory influences with data derived from other respiratory virus infection models. We predicted a small set of regulatory factors with conserved behavior for consideration as important components of viral pathogenesis that might also serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating diverse ‘omic datasets to predict and prioritize regulatory features conserved across multiple pathogen infection models.

  18. Distribution of indigenous bacterial pathogens and potential pathogens associated with roof-harvested rainwater.

    PubMed

    Dobrowsky, P H; De Kwaadsteniet, M; Cloete, T E; Khan, W

    2014-04-01

    The harvesting of rainwater is gaining acceptance among many governmental authorities in countries such as Australia, Germany, and South Africa, among others. However, conflicting reports on the microbial quality of harvested rainwater have been published. To monitor the presence of potential pathogenic bacteria during high-rainfall periods, rainwater from 29 rainwater tanks was sampled on four occasions (during June and August 2012) in a sustainable housing project in Kleinmond, South Africa. This resulted in the collection of 116 harvested rainwater samples in total throughout the sampling period. The identities of the dominant, indigenous, presumptive pathogenic isolates obtained from the rainwater samples throughout the sampling period were confirmed through universal 16S rRNA PCR, and the results revealed that Pseudomonas (19% of samples) was the dominant genus isolated, followed by Aeromonas (16%), Klebsiella (11%), and Enterobacter (9%). PCR assays employing genus-specific primers also confirmed the presence of Aeromonas spp. (16%), Klebsiella spp. (47%), Legionella spp. (73%), Pseudomonas spp. (13%), Salmonella spp. (6%), Shigella spp. (27%), and Yersinia spp. (28%) in the harvested rainwater samples. In addition, on one sampling occasion, Giardia spp. were detected in 25% of the eight tank water samples analyzed. This study highlights the diverse array of pathogenic bacteria that persist in harvested rainwater during high-rainfall periods. The consumption of untreated harvested rainwater could thus pose a potential significant health threat to consumers, especially children and immunocompromised individuals, and it is recommended that harvested rainwater be treated for safe usage as an alternative water source. PMID:24487540

  19. Human metapneumovirus and human coronavirus infection and pathogenicity in Saudi children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Al Hajjar, Sami; Al Thawadi, Sahar; Al Seraihi, Amal; Al Muhsen, Saleh; Imambaccus, Hala

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and the Netherlands human coronavirus (HCoV-NL63) have been isolated from children with respiratory tract infection. The prevalence of these viruses has not been reported from Saudi Arabia. We sought to determine whether hMPV and HCoV-NL63 are responsible for acute respiratory illness and also to determine clinical features and severity of illness in the hospitalized pediatric patient population. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective hospital-based study from July 2007 to November 2008. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nasopharyngeal specimens from children less than 16 years old who were suffering from acute respiratory diseases were tested for hMPV and HCoV-NL63 by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Samples were collected from July 2007 to November 2008. RESULTS: Both viruses were found among Saudi children with upper and lower respiratory tract diseases during the autumn and winter of 2007 and 2008, contributing to 11.1% of all viral diagnoses, with individual incidences of 8.3% (hMPV) and 2.8% (HCoV-NL63) among 489 specimens. Initial symptoms included fever, cough, and nasal congestion. Lower respiratory tract disease occurs in immunocompromised individuals and those with underlying conditions. Clinical findings of respiratory failure and culture-negative shock were established in 7 children infected with hMPV and having hematologic malignancies, myelofibrosis, Gaucher disease, and congenital immunodeficiency; 2 of the 7 patients died with acute respiratory failure. All children infected with HCoV-NL63 had underlying conditions; 1 of the 4 patients developed respiratory failure. CONCLUSION: hMPV and HCoV-NL63 are important causes of acute respiratory illness among hospitalized Saudi children. hMPV infection in the lower respiratory tract is associated with morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised children. HCoV-NL63 may cause severe lower respiratory disease with underlying conditions. PMID:21911992

  20. Chemical reactivity measurements: potential for characterization of respiratory chemical allergens.

    PubMed

    Lalko, Jon F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J; Gerberick, G Frank; Sarlo, Katherine; Api, Anne Marie

    2011-03-01

    Allergic diseases of the skin and respiratory tract resulting from exposure to low molecular weight chemicals remain important issues for consumer product development and occupational/environmental health. Widespread opportunities for exposure to chemical allergens require that there are available effective methods for hazard identification and risk assessment. In the search for new tools for hazard identification/characterization there has been interest in developing alternative methods that will reduce, refine or replace the need for animals. One approach that shows promise is based on the measurement of the peptide reactivity of chemicals; the potential to form stable associations with protein/peptide being a key requirement for the induction of sensitization. Recent investigations using these systems have focused primarily on skin sensitizing chemicals. However, there is interest in the possibility of exploiting these same experimental approaches to distinguish between different forms of chemical allergens - as individual materials are primarily associated with one or the other form of sensitization in humans. These investigations may also provide insight into why chemical sensitizers can differ in the form of allergic disease they will preferentially induce. These opportunities are surveyed here against a background of the immunobiology of allergic sensitization and current state-of-the-art approaches to measurement of peptide/protein reactivity. PMID:21092755

  1. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M., E-mail: Pucheu-Haston.Cherie@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, CB 7270, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7270 (United States); Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  2. Comparative analysis of viral pathogens and potential indicators in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Muniain-Mujika, I; Calvo, M; Lucena, F; Girones, R

    2003-05-25

    Shellfish can be responsible of outbreaks of infectious diseases and current health measures do not guarantee the absence of viral pathogens in this product. Here we examine the presence of pathogenic viruses and potential indicators in shellfish in a comparative analysis.Sixty shellfish samples collected in three areas with different levels of faecal contamination were analysed for Escherichia coli, total coliforms, Clostridium perfringens, somatic coliphages, F-specific phages of RNA (F-RNA), bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis RYC2056, human adenovirus, enterovirus and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Viruses were eluted in a glycine buffer at pH 10. The overall percentage of viral pathogens detected was 47% for human adenoviruses, 19% for enteroviruses and 24% for HAV. Since all the samples positive for enterovirus and HAV were also positives for human adenovirus, the latter may be considered useful as a molecular index of viral contamination in shellfish. No significant differences in the bioaccumulation of bacteria and bacteriophages for oysters or mussels were observed. It was found that the probability of detection of any of the pathogenic virus decreases as the temperature of shellfish growing waters increases. However, the probability of detecting viruses increases when phages of B. fragilis are found. Although more data are needed in order to fulfil the need of viral indicators for controlling the presence of human viruses in shellfish, the obtained results indicate that phages infecting B. fragilis RYC2056 could be a suitable group of bacteriophages to be used as an indicator of the presence of viruses in shellfish. PMID:12672594

  3. The pathogenic potential of Yersinia enterocolitica 1A.

    PubMed

    Batzilla, Julia; Heesemann, Juergen; Rakin, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica 1A strains are generally considered apathogenic. However, besides environmental sources, foods and animals, they are repeatedly isolated from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms typical to those evoked by Yersinia of the virulent 1B and 2-4 biotypes. Also, at least 2 gastrointestinal outbreaks associated with 1A strains have been reported. There is a general controversy concerning the pathogenic potential of 1A isolates of clinical and non-clinical origin. To address the 1A puzzle, we have determined the genome sequences of 2 1A strains, a nosocomial O:5 and environmental O:36 isolates, and compared them to each other and to O:8/1B and O:3/4 representatives of the virulent serobiotypes. 1A isolates have mosaic genomes and share genes both with serobiotypes O:8/1B and O:3/4 that implies their common descent. Besides the pYV virulence plasmid, 1A strains lack the classical virulence markers, like the Ail adhesin, the YstA enterotoxin, and the virulence-associated protein C. However, they still possess genes encoding such known and suspect virulence-associated determinants like the YstB enterotoxin, the InvA invasin, the mucoid Yersinia factor MyfA, and the enterochelin utilisation fepBDGC/fepA/fes gene cluster. In contrast to previous studies, we have found that the strains of the 1A group possess the MyfA antigen although with limited similarity to the highly conserved MyfA in the virulent serobiotypes. In turn, the MyfB chaperone coevolved with the MyfA fibrillae, while the MyfC usher retains 90% identity to its MyfC counterparts in O:3/O:8 group. The only notable difference between clinical and non-clinical 1A strains was the presence of a truncated Rtx toxin-like gene cluster and remnants of a P2-like prophage in the hospital O:5 isolate. Taken together, Y. enterocolitica BT 1A group represents opportunistic pathogens whose opportunity to establish infection seems to rely mainly on the state of the host defence system. However, presence of known and putative virulence-associated features shared with the pathogenic serobiotypes compels to reconsider properly the pathogenic potential of this group of emerging pathogens. PMID:21798805

  4. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein and Neutrophils Mediate the Airway Mucin Response to Pathogenic Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Kate L.; Currier, Michael G.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Lee, Sujin; Collins, Peter L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of death due to a viral etiology in infants. RSV disease is characterized by epithelial desquamation, neutrophilic bronchiolitis and pneumonia, and obstructive pulmonary mucus. It has been shown that infection of BALB/cJ mice with RSV clinical isolate A2001/2-20 (2-20) results in a higher early viral load, greater airway necrosis, and higher levels of interleukin-13 (IL-13) and airway mucin expression than infection with RSV laboratory strain A2. We hypothesized that the fusion (F) protein of RSV 2-20 is a mucus-inducing viral factor. In vitro, the fusion activity of 2-20 F but not that of A2 F was enhanced by expression of RSV G. We generated a recombinant F-chimeric RSV by replacing the F gene of A2 with the F gene of 2-20, generating A2–2-20F. Similar to the results obtained with the parent 2-20 strain, infection of BALB/cJ mice with A2–2-20F resulted in a higher early viral load and higher levels of subsequent pulmonary mucin expression than infection with the A2 strain. A2–2-20F infection induced greater necrotic airway damage and neutrophil infiltration than A2 infection. We hypothesized that the neutrophil response to A2–2-20F infection is involved in mucin expression. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in RSV-infected mice resulted in lower tumor necrosis factor alpha levels, fewer IL-13-expressing CD4 T cells, and less airway mucin production in the lung. Our data are consistent with a model in which the F and attachment (G) glycoprotein functional interaction leads to enhanced fusion and F is a key factor in airway epithelium infection, pathogenesis, and subsequent airway mucin expression. PMID:23843644

  5. Host-pathogen interactions during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus 1 infection of piglets.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Francisco J; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Rebel, Johanna M J; Stadejek, Tomasz; Morgan, Sophie B; Graham, Simon P; Steinbach, Falko

    2015-04-16

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a major disease affecting pigs worldwide and resulting in considerable economic losses. While PRRS is a global phenomenon, the causative viruses PRRSV-1 (first detected in Europe) and PRRSV-2 (isolated in North America) are genetically and biologically distinct. In addition, the disease outcome is directly linked to co-infections associated with the porcine respiratory disease complex and the host response is variable between different breeds of pigs. It is therefore warranted when studying the pathogenesis of PRRS to consider each viral genotype separately and apply careful consideration to the disease model studied. We here review the respiratory pig model for PRRSV-1, with a focus on a recent set of studies conducted with carefully selected virus strains and pigs, which may serve as both a baseline and benchmark for future investigation. PMID:25559070

  6. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) as an animal model for respiratory tract infections with human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Green, M Gia; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Respiratory viral infection is a great human health concern, resulting in disease, death and economic losses. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) have been particularly useful in the study of the pathogenesis of human respiratory virus infections, including the development and testing of antiviral compounds and vaccines. In this article, the authors outline the advantages of the cotton rat compared with the mouse as a model for infection with measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, human parainfluenza virus and human metapneumovirus. From the literature and their own experience, the authors summarize guidelines for handling, maintaining and breeding cotton rats. In addition, they offer technical tips for carrying out infection experiments and provide information about the large array of immunological assays and reagents available for the study of immune responses (macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, antibodies, chemokines and cytokines) in cotton rats. PMID:23604159

  7. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, E K; Jewett, L B; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, S D; Krupp, N L; Braciale, T J; Sun, J

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon-STAT1-IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  8. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  9. In vitro Activity of Sparfloxacin Compared with Ciprofloxacin and Ofloxacin against Respiratory Tract Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A.-S. Malmborg; S. Ahlén

    1993-01-01

    The in vitro activity of sparfloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone, was compared with ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against 166 consecutive isolates from the upper respiratory tract of outpatients. The strains were fully susceptible to three quinolones. The antibacterial activity of sparfloxacin was comparable or better than that of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against all strains. Sparfloxacin was fourfold more active against Staphylococcus aureus

  10. Pathogenicity and Molecular Characterization of Emerging Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Vietnam in 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2007, Vietnam experienced swine disease outbreaks causing clinical signs similar to the "porcine high fever disease" that occurred in China during 2006. Analysis of diagnostic samples from the disease outbreaks in Vietnam identified porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and ...

  11. Comparison of the pathogenicity of Chinese and low virulent US porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, a new strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has resulted in huge economic losses in the Chinese pig industry. We imported a cDNA clone of the rJXwn06 Chinese strain from which infectious virus was obtained to test the hypothesis that the novel Chinese PRRSV ...

  12. Norepinephrine increases the pathogenic potential of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, T A; Thomas, A O; Rees, L E N; Taylor, A H; Jepson, M A; Williams, P H; Ketley, J; Humphrey, T J

    2007-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni can cause a spectrum of diseases in humans, ranging from enteritis and diarrhoea to severe inflammation, profuse bloody diarrhoea and chronic relapsing infection. Norepinephrine (NE) levels in the intestine increase under conditions of stress and trauma, and are thought to result in spill over of NE into the intestinal lumen. NE is known to stimulate the growth of a range of bacterial species, and to increase the pathogenicity of Escherichia coli. Aim To determine the effects of NE on the pathogenic potential of C jejuni in a model system. Methods C jejuni was grown in iron?replete and iron?limited media in the presence and absence of 100??M NE. Several virulence?associated characteristics, including motility and cell invasion, were measured. Results When C jejuni was grown in iron?limited media in the presence of NE, growth rate, motility and invasion of cultured epithelial cells were increased compared with cultures grown in the absence of NE. Bacteria exposed to NE during growth also caused greater subsequent disruption of cultured epithelial cell monolayers, inducing widespread breakdown of tight junctions. Conclusion Exposure to NE causes an increase in the virulence?associated properties of Campylobacter. Stress and concomitant infection could therefore be contributory factors to the variable presentation of this disease. PMID:17185353

  13. Personal clothing as a potential vector of respiratory virus transmission in childcare settings.

    PubMed

    Gralton, Jan; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Rawlinson, William D

    2015-06-01

    Previous investigations of fomite transmission have focused on the presence of pathogens on inanimate objects in clinical settings. There has been limited investigation of fomite transmission in non-clinical pediatric settings where there is a high prevalence of respiratory virus infections. Over a 5 week period, this study investigated whether the personal clothing of teachers working in childcare centers was contaminated with viral RNA, and potentially could mediate virus transmission. Matched morning and evening clothing and nasal samples were collected for 313 teacher work days (TWDs). Human rhinoviruses (hRV) RNA were detected from samples using real-time PCR. Human rhinovirus RNA was detected in clothing samples on 16 TWDs and in nasal samples on 32 TWDs. There were no TWDs when teachers provided both positive nasal and clothing samples and only three TWDs when hRV persisted on clothing for the entire day. The detection of hRV RNA was significantly predicted by self-recognition of symptomatic illness by the teacher 2 days prior to detection. These findings suggest that teachers' personal clothing in childcare settings is unlikely to facilitate the transmission of hRV. PMID:25649480

  14. Comparison of fast-track diagnostics respiratory pathogens multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay with in-house singleplex assays for comprehensive detection of human respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Senthilkumar K; Whitaker, Brett; Lu, Xiaoyan; Oliveira, Danielle B L; Stockman, Lauren J; Kamili, Shifaq; Oberste, M Steven; Erdman, Dean D

    2012-11-01

    Fast-track Diagnostics respiratory pathogens (FTDRP) multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay was compared with in-house singleplex real-time RT-PCR assays for detection of 16 common respiratory viruses. The FTDRP assay correctly identified 26 diverse respiratory virus strains, 35 of 41 (85%) external quality assessment samples spiked with cultured virus and 232 of 263 (88%) archived respiratory specimens that tested positive for respiratory viruses by in-house assays. Of 308 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 270 (87.7%) and 265 (86%) were positive by FTDRP and in-house assays for one or more viruses, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (K=0.812, 95% CI=0.786-0.838). Individual FTDRP assays for adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus showed the lowest comparative sensitivities with in-house assays, with most discrepancies occurring with specimens containing low virus loads and failed to detect some rhinovirus strains, even when abundant. The FTDRP enterovirus and human bocavirus assays appeared to be more sensitive than the in-house assays with some specimens. With the exceptions noted above, most FTDRP assays performed comparably with in-house assays for most viruses while offering enhanced throughput and easy integration by laboratories using conventional real-time PCR instrumentation. PMID:22796035

  15. Endobiotic bacteria and their pathogenic potential in cnidarian tentacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuett, Christian; Doepke, Hilke

    2010-09-01

    Endobiotic bacteria colonize the tentacles of cnidaria. This paper provides first insight into the bacterial spectrum and its potential of pathogenic activities inside four cnidarian species. Sample material originating from Scottish waters comprises the jellyfish species Cyanea capillata and C. lamarckii, hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa and sea anemone Sagartia elegans. Mixed cultures of endobiotic bacteria, pure cultures selected on basis of haemolysis, but also lyophilized samples were prepared from tentacles and used for DGGE-profiling with subsequent phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA fragments. Bacteria were detected in each of the cnidarian species tested. Twenty-one bacterial species including four groups of closely related organisms were found in culture material. The species within these groups could not be differentiated from each other (one group of Pseudoalteromonas spp., two groups of Shewanella spp., one group of Vibrio spp.). Each of the hosts exhibits a specific endobacterial spectrum. Solely Cyanea lamarckii harboured Moritella viscosa. Only in Cyanea capillata, members of the Shewanella group #2 and the species Pseudoalteromonas arctica, Shewanella violacea, Sulfitobacter pontiacus and Arcobacter butzleri were detected. Hydrozoa Tubularia indivisa provided an amazingly wide spectrum of nine bacterial species. Exclusively, in the sea anemone Sagartia elegans, the bacterial species P. aliena was found. Overall eleven bacterial species detected were described recently as novel species. Four 16S rDNA fragments generated from lyophilized material displayed extremely low relationship to their next neighbours. These organisms are regarded as members of the endobiotic “terra incognita”. Since the origin of cnidarian toxins is unclear, the possible pathogenic activity of endobiotic bacteria has to be taken into account. Literature data show that their next neighbours display an interesting diversity of haemolytic, septicaemic and necrotic actions including the production of cytotoxins, tetrodotoxin and R-toxin. Findings of haemolysis tests support the literature data. The potential producers are Endozoicimonas elysicola, Moritella viscosa, Photobacterium profundum, P. aliena, P. tetraodonis, Shewanella waksmanii, Vibrio splendidus, V. aestuarius, Arcobacter butzleri.

  16. The complete genome sequence of the murine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Chambaud; Roland Heilig; Stéphane Ferris; Valérie Barbe; Delphine Samson; Frédérique Galisson; I van Moszer; Kevin Dybvig; Henri Wróblewski; Alain Viari; Eduardo P. C. Rocha; Alain Blanchard

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasma pulmonis is a wall-less eubacterium belonging to the Mollicutes (trivial name, myco- plasmas) and responsible for murine respiratory diseases. The genome of strain UAB CTIP is composed of a single circular 963 879 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 26.6 mol%, i.e. the lowest reported among bacteria, Ureaplasma urealyticum apart. This genome contains 782 putative coding

  17. The role of atypical respiratory pathogens in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. W. Diederen; P. D. L. P. M. van der Valk; J. A. W. J. Kluytmans; M. F. Peeters; R. Hendrix

    2007-01-01

    The aetiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is heterogeneous and still under discussion. Serological studies have suggested that Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila may play a role in acute exacerbations of COPD. The presence of these atypical pathogens in sputum samples was investigated in patients with stable COPD and with acute exacerbations of COPD

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Pathogenic Genotype 1 Subtype 3 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (Strain SU1-Bel) from Pig Primary Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zen H; Wilson, Alison D; Wang, Xinglong; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Stadejek, Tomasz; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome of the pathogenic eastern European subtype 3 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain SU1-Bel, sequenced directly from a pig lymph node. While sharing substantial sequence similarity with other subtype 3 strains, SU1-Bel is found to harbor unique indels and contain putative novel subgenomic RNAs. PMID:25999564

  19. Enterohepatic Helicobacter in Ulcerative Colitis: Potential Pathogenic Entities?

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, John M.; Hansen, Richard; Berry, Susan H.; Hope, Mairi E.; Murray, Graeme I.; Mukhopadhya, Indrani; McLean, Mairi H.; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G.; El-Omar, Emad; Hold, Georgina L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Changes in bacterial populations termed “dysbiosis” are thought central to ulcerative colitis (UC) pathogenesis. In particular, the possibility that novel Helicobacter organisms play a role in human UC has been debated but not comprehensively investigated. The aim of this study was to develop a molecular approach to investigate the presence of Helicobacter organisms in adults with and without UC. Methodology/Principal Findings A dual molecular approach to detect Helicobacter was developed. Oligonucleotide probes against the genus Helicobacter were designed and optimised alongside a validation of published H. pylori probes. A comprehensive evaluation of Helicobacter genus and H. pylori PCR primers was also undertaken. The combined approach was then assessed in a range of gastrointestinal samples prior to assessment of a UC cohort. Archival colonic samples were available from 106 individuals for FISH analysis (57 with UC and 49 non-IBD controls). A further 118 individuals were collected prospectively for dual FISH and PCR analysis (86 UC and 32 non-IBD controls). An additional 27 non-IBD controls were available for PCR analysis. All Helicobacter PCR-positive samples were sequenced. The association between Helicobacter and each study group was statistically analysed using the Pearson Chi Squared 2 tailed test. Helicobacter genus PCR positivity was significantly higher in UC than controls (32 of 77 versus 11 of 59, p?=?0.004). Sequence analysis indicated enterohepatic Helicobacter species prevalence was significantly higher in the UC group compared to the control group (30 of 77 versus 2 of 59, p<0.0001). PCR and FISH results were concordant in 74 (67.9%) of subjects. The majority of discordant results were attributable to a higher positivity rate with FISH than PCR. Conclusions/Significance Helicobacter organisms warrant consideration as potential pathogenic entities in UC. Isolation of these organisms from colonic tissue is needed to enable interrogation of pathogenicity against established criteria. PMID:21383845

  20. Inhibitory activity of a standardized elderberry liquid extract against clinically-relevant human respiratory bacterial pathogens and influenza A and B viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Black elderberries (Sambucus nigra L.) are well known as supportive agents against common cold and influenza. It is further known that bacterial super-infection during an influenza virus (IV) infection can lead to severe pneumonia. We have analyzed a standardized elderberry extract (Rubini, BerryPharma AG) for its antimicrobial and antiviral activity using the microtitre broth micro-dilution assay against three Gram-positive bacteria and one Gram-negative bacteria responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, as well as cell culture experiments for two different strains of influenza virus. Methods The antimicrobial activity of the elderberry extract was determined by bacterial growth experiments in liquid cultures using the extract at concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The inhibitory effects were determined by plating the bacteria on agar plates. In addition, the inhibitory potential of the extract on the propagation of human pathogenic H5N1-type influenza A virus isolated from a patient and an influenza B virus strain was investigated using MTT and focus assays. Results For the first time, it was shown that a standardized elderberry liquid extract possesses antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive bacteria of Streptococcus pyogenes and group C and G Streptococci, and the Gram-negative bacterium Branhamella catarrhalis in liquid cultures. The liquid extract also displays an inhibitory effect on the propagation of human pathogenic influenza viruses. Conclusion Rubini elderberry liquid extract is active against human pathogenic bacteria as well as influenza viruses. The activities shown suggest that additional and alternative approaches to combat infections might be provided by this natural product. PMID:21352539

  1. Potential versus actual contribution of vertical transmission to pathogen fitness

    PubMed Central

    Kover, P. X.; Dolan, T. E.; Clay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Theory predicts that virulent parasites cannot be maintained at high prevalence if they are only vertically transmitted. However, parasites with high rates of vertical transmission that cause severe reduction in host fitness have been reported. Atkinsonella hypoxylon is a fungal pathogen capable of both vertical and horizontal transmission that drastically reduces its host's fitness. In contrast with theoretical predictions, field and laboratory observations suggested that the primary mechanism of transmission was vertical. Using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers, we investigated the effective contribution of vertical and horizontal transmission to the genetic structure of three natural populations of A. hypoxylon. We found high genotypic diversity and low linkage disequilibrium, indicating that most established genotypes are derived from horizontally transmitted, sexual spores. The low contribution of vertical transmission to the parasite's fitness despite its high potential might be due to lower establishment of cleistogamous seeds (through which vertical transmission occurs) or lower vigour of vertically transmitted fungal genotypes. Low establishment of vertically infected hosts might explain the persistence of virulent parasites with high apparent vertical transmission. Our results suggest that caution must be taken when using the potential for vertical transmission to make predictions about the evolution of parasite virulence.

  2. Significance of interactions between Escherichia coli and respiratory pathogens in layer hen flocks suffering from colibacillosis-associated mortality.

    PubMed

    Vandekerchove, D; Herdt, P De; Laevens, H; Butaye, P; Meulemans, G; Pasmans, F

    2004-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the significance of interactions between Escherichia coli and various respiratory pathogens during outbreaks of colibacillosis-associated mortality in layer hen flocks under field conditions. For this purpose, a case-control study involving 20 control flocks with baseline mortality and 20 flocks with increased mortality due to E. coli septicaemia and polyserositis, was conducted. In each colibacillosis flock, blood samples were taken from 20 hens at the onset of clinical disease and three times thereafter at 2-week intervals. Control flocks of comparable ages were sampled in the same way. Pooled sera, taken at the first and last sampling, were examined for antibody titres against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and the individual sera from all four samplings were examined for the presence and/or titres of antibodies against avian pneumovirus (APV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma synoviae and Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale. Titre increases were seen for IBV D274 (one control flock) and O. rhinotracheale (one control and one colibacillosis flock). An increase in per cent reactors was seen for APV (one control flock), and for M. synoviae (one control and two colibacillosis flocks). The study failed to detect any consistent interactions between E. coli and the aforementioned pathogens. These results indicate that, at least as observed in this study, outbreaks of increased mortality resulting from colibacillosis are not necessarily associated with IBV, NDV, APV, M. gallisepticum, M. synoviae or O. rhinotracheale infections. PMID:15223556

  3. Host-pathogen interplay in the respiratory environment of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yonker, Lael M; Cigana, Cristina; Hurley, Bryan P; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2015-07-01

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of disease progression in cystic fibrosis (CF), revealing a complex interplay between host and pathogenic organisms. The diverse CF microbiota within the airway activates an aberrant immune response that is ineffective in clearing infection. An appreciation of how the CF host immune system interacts with these organisms is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of CF pulmonary disease. Here we discuss the microbial complexity present in the lungs of individuals with CF, review emerging concepts of innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens that chronically inhabit the CF lung, and discuss therapies that target the aberrant inflammatory response that characterizes CF. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms will shed light on pathogenesis and guide more targeted therapies in the future that serve to reduce infection, minimize lung pathology, and improve the quality of life for patients with CF. PMID:25800687

  4. Antimicrobial activities of cefditoren against respiratory pathogens isolated from children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Seki, H.; Kasahara, Yoshihito; Ohta, Kunio; Ohta, Kazuhide; Saikawa, Yutaka; Sumita, Ryou; Yachie, Akihiro; Fujita Si, Shin-ichi; Koizumi, Shoichi

    1999-03-01

    There is an increasing spread and incidence of penicillin-resistant bacteria that are becoming less susceptible to commonly prescribed oral antimicrobials, including extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Against this background, we undertook this study to determine the prevalence of penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and the in-vitro activity of oral antimitrobials. Between April 1996 and December 1997, in 245 children with respiratory tract infections (bronchitis in 61, pharyngitis in 115, and tonsillitis in 69), 119 strains of Haemophilus influenzae, 89 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes, 61 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 36 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, and 34 strains of Moraxella catarrhalis were isolated from the pharynx. The antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates was assessed by a broth microdilution method. The isolation incidence of penicillin-intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) and penicillin-highly resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) was 59.0% and 13.1%, respectively. Most strains of PISP and PRSP were highly resistant to cefaclor, cefpodoxime, cefteram, cefdinir, clarithromycin, ampicillin, and minocycline, but susceptibile to ofloxacin and cefditoren (CDTR). The in-vitro activity of CDTR was superior to that of other cephalosporins, such as cefaclor, cefdinir, and cefpodoxime, when tested against both the beta-lactamase-positive and -negative H. influenzae isolated. CDTR was also active against all the other strains, including methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, S. pyogenes, and M. catarrhalis. This study suggested that CDTR was a useful oral antibiotic for pediatric respiratory tract infections. PMID:11810485

  5. Potential pathogenic bacteria in metalworking fluids and aerosols from a machining facility.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Sarah D; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-12-01

    The metalworking and machining industry utilizes recirculating metalworking fluids for integral aspects of the fabrication process. Despite the use of biocides, these fluids sustain substantial biological growth. Subsequently, the high-shear forces incurred during metalworking processing aerosolize bacterial cells and may cause dermatologic and respiratory effects in exposed workers. We quantified and identified the bacterial load for metalworking fluid and aerosol samples of a machining facility in the US Midwest during two seasons. To investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in fluid and air, we performed 16S rRNA gene surveys. The concentration of total bacterial cells (including culturable and nonculturable cells) was relatively constant throughout the study, averaging 5.1 × 10? cells mL?¹ in the fluids and 4.8 × 10? cells m?³ in the aerosols. We observed bacteria of potential epidemiologic significance from several different bacterial phyla in both fluids and aerosols. Most notably, Alcaligenes faecalis was identified through both direct sequencing and culturing in every sample collected. Elucidating the bacterial community with gene surveys showed that metalworking fluids were the source of the aerosolized bacteria in this facility. PMID:20955193

  6. LOW PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty-five isolates of HPC bacteria, most of which express virulence-related characteristics are being tested for pathogenicity in immunocompromised mice. All forty-five were negative for facultative intracellular pathogenicity. All twenty-three isolates tested thus far were a...

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility of Estrella lausannensis, a potential emerging pathogen.

    PubMed

    de Barsy, Marie; Bottinelli, Lavinia; Greub, Gilbert

    2014-09-01

    Estrella lausannensis is a new Chlamydia-related bacterium, belonging to the Criblamydiaceae family. As suggested by its species name, this bacterium harbors a peculiar star shape. E. lausannensis is able to infect a wide range of amoebal, fish and mammalian cell lines. Moreover, seroprevalence of 2.9% was reported in children and in women with tubal pathology, showing that humans are commonly exposed to this recently discovered strict intracellular bacteria considered as a potential pathogen. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using two approaches: qPCR and cellular mortality assay. Antibiotics classically used against intracellular bacteria were tested, including ?-lactams, fluoroquinolones, cyclines and macrolides. We showed that E. lausannensis is resistant to ?-lactams and fluoroquinolones, and sensitive to cyclines. Interestingly, E. lausannensis is slightly resistant to azithromycin with a MIC of 2 ?g/ml, which is 10 fold higher compared to Waddlia chondrophila and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae MIC's. A single A2059C mutation in 23S rRNA gene could be responsible for this unexpected resistance. PMID:25150688

  8. Location and Pathogenic Potential of Blastocystis in the Porcine Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqi; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Traub, Rebecca J.; Cuttell, Leigh; Owen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Blastocystis is an ubiquitous, enteric protozoan of humans and many other species. Human infection has been associated with gastrointestinal disease such as irritable bowel syndrome, however, this remains unproven. A relevant animal model is needed to investigate the pathogenesis/pathogenicity of Blastocystis. We concluded previously that pigs are likely natural hosts of Blastocystis with a potentially zoonotic, host-adapted subtype (ST), ST5, and may make suitable animal models. In this study, we aimed to characterise the host-agent interaction of Blastocystis and the pig, including localising Blastocystis in porcine intestine using microscopy, PCR and histopathological examination of tissues. Intestines from pigs in three different management systems, i.e., a commercial piggery, a small family farm and a research herd (where the animals were immunosuppressed) were examined. This design was used to determine if environment or immune status influences intestinal colonisation of Blastocystis as immunocompromised individuals may potentially be more susceptible to blastocystosis and development of associated clinical signs. Intestines from all 28 pigs were positive for Blastocystis with all pigs harbouring ST5. In addition, the farm pigs had mixed infections with STs 1 and/or 3. Blastocystis organisms/DNA were predominantly found in the large intestine but were also detected in the small intestine of the immunosuppressed and some of the farm pigs, suggesting that immunosuppression and/or husbandry factors may influence Blastocystis colonisation of the small intestine. No obvious pathology was observed in the histological sections. Blastocystis was present as vacuolar/granular forms and these were found within luminal material or in close proximity to epithelial cells, with no evidence of attachment or invasion. These results concur with most human studies, in which Blastocystis is predominantly found in the large intestine in the absence of significant organic pathology. Our findings also support the use of pigs as animal models and may have implications for blastocystosis diagnosis/treatment. PMID:25093578

  9. Synergistic effects of sequential infection with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is associated with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in pigs. Coinfection with highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PCV2 in the field has recently become extensive in some Asian countries. A synergistic pathogenicity between PRRSV and PCV2 infections has previously been reported. However, the consequences of the sequential infection of pigs with these two viruses are unknown. Methods Thirty 35-day-old piglets were randomly divided into six groups (n = 5 each): HP-PRRSV/PCV2 (group 1, inoculated with HP-PRRSV, then inoculated with PCV2 one week later), PCV2/HP-PRRSV (group 2, inoculated with PCV2, then inoculated with HP-PRRSV one week later), HP-PRRSV+PCV2 (group 3, inoculated with HP-PRRSV and PCV2 concurrently), HP-PRRSV (group 4, inoculated with HP-PRRSV), PCV2 (group 5, inoculated with PCV2), and the control (group 6, uninfected). This experiment lasted 28 days. Clinical symptoms and rectal temperatures were recorded each day after inoculation, body weight was recorded weekly, and serum samples were obtained for viral nucleic acid quantification and antibody titration. Variations in CD3+, CD4+ CD8–, CD3+, CD4–, and CD8+ cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and mononuclear cells were determined by flow cytometry. The serum concentrations of interferon ? (IFN-?), tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and macrophage granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were determined. Pathological changes in different tissues from the experimentally infected pigs were recorded. Results The piglets in group 1 had the highest viral loads, the lowest antibody titers, the most-severe clinical signs, and the highest mortality (3/5, 60%; the mortality in the other groups was 0%), and interstitial pneumonia was more severe in this group compare to the other HP-PRRSV infected groups. The serum levels of IFN-?, TNF-?, IL-10, and GM-CSF varied (increased or decreased) most widely in group 1, as did each immunocyte subgroup. Conclusions HP-PRRSV infection followed by PCV2 infection enhanced the replication of both viruses in the experimental piglets and led to more-severe clinical signs and lesions, indicating greater synergistic effects during the sequential infection of piglets with HP-PRRSV and then PCV2. PMID:23971711

  10. Lytic bacteriophages: Potential interventions against enteric bacterial pathogens on produce.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manan

    2013-04-01

    Foodborne illnesses resulting from the consumption of produce commodities contaminated with enteric pathogens continue to be a significant public health issue. Lytic bacteriophages may provide an effective and natural intervention to reduce bacterial pathogens on fresh and fresh-cut produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails specific for a single pathogen has been most frequently assessed on produce commodities to minimize the development of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIM) in target pathogen populations. Regulatory approval for the use of several lytic phage products specific for bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in foods and on food processing surfaces has been granted by various agencies in the US and other countries, possibly allowing for the more widespread use of bacteriophages in the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed produce. Research studies have shown lytic bacteriophages specific for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes have been effective in reducing pathogen populations on leafy greens, sprouts and tomatoes. PMID:24228223

  11. Pathogenic Potential of Saccharomyces Strains Isolated from Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, Lucía; Querol, Amparo; Molina, María; Fernández-Espinar, María T.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a beneficial role in health because of its intrinsic nutritional value and bio-functional properties, which is why it is also used as a dietary supplement. However, the perception that S. cerevisiae is harmless has changed due to an increasing number of infections caused by this yeast. Given this scenario, we have tested whether viable strains contained in dietary supplements displayed virulence-associated phenotypic traits that could contribute to virulence in humans. We have also performed an in vivo study of the pathogenic potential of these strains using a murine model of systemic infection by intravenous inoculation. A total of 5 strains were isolated from 22 commercial products and tested. Results highlight one strain (D14) in terms of burden levels in brains and kidneys and ability to cause death, whereas the other two strains (D2 and D4) were considered of low virulence. Our results suggest a strong relationship between some of the virulence-associated phenotypic traits (ability to grow at 39°C and pseudohyphal growth) and the in vivo virulence in a mouse model of intravenous inoculation for isolates under study. The isolate displaying greatest virulence (D14) was evaluated in an experimental murine model of gastrointestinal infection with immunosuppression and disruption of mucosal integrity, which are common risk factors for developing infection in humans, and results were compared with an avirulent strain (D23). We showed that D14 was able to spread to mesenteric nodes and distant organs under these conditions. Given the widespread consumption of dietary supplements, we recommend only safe strains be used. PMID:24879417

  12. Canine respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Buonavoglia, Canio; Martella, Vito

    2007-01-01

    Acute contagious respiratory disease (kennel cough) is commonly described in dogs worldwide. The disease appears to be multifactorial and a number of viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported as potential aetiological agents, including canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus and Bordetella bronchiseptica, as well as mycoplasmas, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, canine herpesvirus and reovirus-1,-2 and -3. Enhancement of pathogenicity by multiple infections can result in more severe clinical forms. In addition, acute respiratory diseases associated with infection by influenza A virus, and group I and II coronaviruses, have been described recently in dogs. Host species shifts and tropism changes are likely responsible for the onset of these new pathogens. The importance of the viral agents in the kennel cough complex is discussed. PMID:17296161

  13. Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy in Thymi of Infected Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yabin; Tong, Jie; Liu, Yonggang; Zhang, Chong; Chang, Yafei; Wang, Shujie; Jiang, Chenggang; Zhou, En-Min; Cai, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) HuN4 strain causes obvious thymic atrophy and thymocytes apoptosis in infected piglets after birth, which is more severe than that induced by classical PRRSV. In this study, we investigated apoptosis and autophagy in the thymus of piglets infected with the HP-PRRSV HuN4 strain, and found that both apoptosis and autophagy occurred in the thymus of piglets infected with HP-PRRSV. In addition to a few virus-infected cells, CD14+ cells, the main autophagic cells in the thymus were thymic epithelial cells. These findings demonstrated that HP-PRRSV induces apoptosis in bystander cells, and induces autophagy in both infected and bystander cells in the thymus of infected piglets. Herein, we first present new data on the thymic lesions induced by HP-PRRSV, and show that apoptosis and autophagy are key mechanisms involved in cell survival and determinants of the severity of thymic atrophy in infected piglets. Finally, future studies of the mechanism underlying immune responses are proposed based on our current understanding of PRRSV-host interactions. PMID:26046751

  14. Antibody-Based Sensors: Principles, Problems and Potential for Detection of Pathogens and Associated Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barry; Stack, Edwina; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-based sensors permit the rapid and sensitive analysis of a range of pathogens and associated toxins. A critical assessment of the implementation of such formats is provided, with reference to their principles, problems and potential for ‘on-site’ analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and additional examples relating to the monitoring of fungal pathogens, viruses, mycotoxins, marine toxins and parasites are also provided. PMID:22408533

  15. Experience with a Mouse Intranasal Test for the Predictive Identification of Respiratory Sensitization Potential of Proteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Blaikie; D. A Basketter

    1999-01-01

    The predictive identification of respiratory allergenic potential is an important primary step in the safety evaluation of (novel) proteins, such as the enzymes used in a range of consumer laundry products. In the past this has been achieved by assessing the relative ability of proteins to give rise to the formation of anaphylactic antibody in the guinea pig. Recently, an

  16. CYTOKINE MRNA PROFILES FOR ISOCYANATES WITH KNOWN AND UNKNOWN POTENTIAL TO INDUCE RESPIRATORY SENSITIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytokine mRNA Profiles for Isocyanates with Known and Unknown Potential to Induce Respiratory Sensitization. Plitnick, L.M., Loveless, S.E., Ladics, G.S., Holsapple, M.P., Smialowicz, R.J., Woolhiser, M.R., Anderson, P.K., Smith, C., Sailstad, D.M. and Selgrade, M.J.K (2002) Tox...

  17. Susceptibility of New Zealand flora to Phytophthora ramorum and pathogen sporulation potential: an approach based

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Susceptibility of New Zealand flora to Phytophthora ramorum and pathogen sporulation potential Zealand, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, PO Box 2526, Wellington, New Zealand. D Corresponding in the western USA and a damaging pathogen in Europe, is a biosecurity threat of unknown magnitude to New Zealand

  18. The Prevalence of Potential Bacterial Pathogens on Inanimate Objects in a State School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandy, Tonja Denise

    2012-01-01

    Cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces can reduce the transmissibility of potential pathogens on school surfaces. Determining the number of bacteria and investigating the presence of pathogens on school surfaces are beginning steps in managing the well-being of students contacting those surfaces. This research study examines the…

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics of a Highly Pathogenic Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus: Analyses of Envelope Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V G; Kim, H K; Moon, H J; Park, S J; Chung, H C; Choi, M K; Park, B K

    2015-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has long been an economically devastating swine viral disease. The recent emergence of a highly pathogenic type 2 PRRSV with high mobility and mortality in China, spreading in Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand has placed neighbouring countries at risk. This study applied a codon-based extension of the Bayesian relaxed clock model and the fixed effects maximum-likelihood method to investigate and compare the evolutionary dynamics of type 2 PRRSV for all of known structural envelope protein-coding genes. By comparing the highly pathogenic type 2 PRRSV clade against the typical type 2 PRRSV clade, this study demonstrated that the highly pathogenic clade evolved at high rates in all of the known structural genes but did not display rapid evolutionary dynamics compared with typical type 2 PRRSV. In contrast, the ORF3, ORF5 and ORF6 genes of the highly pathogenic clade evolved in a qualitatively different manner from the genes of the typical clade. At the population level, several codons of the sequence elements that were involved in viral neutralization, as well as codons that were associated with in vitro attenuation/over-attenuation, were predicted to be selected differentially between the typical clade and the highly pathogenic clade. The results of this study suggest that the multigenic factors of the envelope protein-coding genes contribute to diversifying the biological properties (virulence, antigenicity, etc.) of the highly pathogenic clade compared with the typical clade of type 2 PRRSV. PMID:23981823

  20. Pathogenicity of three type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in experimentally inoculated pregnant gilts.

    PubMed

    Ladinig, Andrea; Detmer, Susan E; Clarke, Kyle; Ashley, Carolyn; Rowland, Raymond R R; Lunney, Joan K; Harding, John C S

    2015-05-01

    Mechanisms of reproductive failure resulting from infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are still poorly understood. Presented herein are the results of a side-by-side evaluation of the pathogenicity of three type 2 PRRSV strains in a reproductive model, from a pilot study used to develop experimental conditions and laboratory methods for a larger experiment. Pregnant gilts were experimentally infected with PRRSV at gestation day 85 or served as uninfected negative controls. After 21 days, all gilts and fetuses were necropsied. Clinical signs, litter outcome, viral load, cytokine levels, and pathology were compared from samples collected among pigs exposed to the three PRRSV strains. Based on differences in histologic lesions, and fetal weights, and numeric differences in gilt serum cytokine levels, litter outcome and virus replication in fetal tissues KS06-483 appeared less virulent than NVSL 97-7895 and KS06-72109 isolates. Levels of chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), interferon alpha (IFN?), and interferon gamma (IFN?) were increased in PPRRSV-infected compared to non-infected gilts (0.01>P<0.06). Inoculation with NVSL 97-7895 induced higher levels of all three cytokines. All three PRRSV isolates were able to induce high mean viral load in individual litters, which was closely related to the proportion of PRRSV positive fetuses in the litter. Viral load in fetal samples was also positively associated with viral load at the maternal-fetal interface. All but one dead fetus were positive for PRRSV RNA, and higher concentrations of PRRSV RNA in fetal thymus increased the odds of fetal death. Our results suggest that virus replication in fetal tissues and the maternal-fetal interface, but not in other gilt tissues, are important for the outcome of reproductive PRRS. Additionally, our data indicate that umbilical lesions decreased corresponding to the use of pentobarbital sedation prior to euthanasia of pregnant gilts by captive bolt. PMID:25796212

  1. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Seabury, Christopher M.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L.; Taylor, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent. PMID:26121276

  2. Prediction and validation of potential pathogenic microRNAs involved in Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Juanjuan; Luan, Yushi; Wang, Weichen; Zhai, Junmiao

    2014-03-01

    Being one kind of approximately 22nt long small RNA, miRNA has shown its roles in host-pathogen interaction, providing one possible way for pathogen infection. Though Phytophthora infestans is a major pathogen that causes devastating late blight of potato, tomato and so on, so far there have not been any systematic researches on miRNAs and even pathogenic miRNAs in P. infestans. Here, for the first time we comprehensively predicted and identified pathogenic miRNAs that may exist in P. infestans. First, a total of 128 putative miRNAs belonging to 66 miRNA family were identified by bioinformatic approaches. Then, 33 vital pathogenic miRNAs were screened by constructing miRNA-miRNA relationship networks. Finally, four potential pathogenic miRNAs were chosen for detection, two of which are chosen for validation. The expression quantity of pi-miR466 and pi-miR1918 changed dramatically during incubation of tomato leaves, implying that they are potential pathogenic miRNAs. PMID:24430294

  3. Air contaminants associated with potential respiratory effects from unconventional resource development activities.

    PubMed

    McCawley, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional natural gas development uses horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing to gain access to natural gas deposits which may be tightly held in shale deposits and unavailable to conventional vertical drilling operations. The intensive work required to extract this source of energy results in higher than usual numbers of vehicles involved, potential release of emissions from those vehicles in congested zones surrounding the drill site, and release of other contaminants from materials drawn back out of the borehole after fracturing of the shale. Typical contaminants would be diesel exhaust particulate and gases, volatile organic compounds and other hydrocarbons both from diesels and the drilling process, crystalline silica, used as part of the hydraulic fracturing process in kiloton quantities, and methane escaping from the borehole and piping. A rise in respiratory disease with proximity to the process has been reported in nearby communities and both silica and diesel exposures at the worksite are recognized respiratory hazards. Because of the relatively short time this process has been used to the extent it is currently being used, it is not possible to draw detailed conclusions about the respiratory hazards that may be posed. However, based on the traffic volume associated with each drill site and the number of drill sites in any locale, it is possible at least to compare the effects to that of large traffic volume highways which are known to produce some respiratory effects in surrounding areas. PMID:26024346

  4. Potential use of microarray technology for rapid identification of central nervous system pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Eric H; Niemeyer, Debra M; Folio, Les; Agan, Brian K; Rowley, Robb K

    2004-08-01

    Outbreaks of central nervous system (CNS) diseases result in significant productivity and financial losses, threatening peace and wartime readiness capabilities. To meet this threat, rapid clinical diagnostic tools for detecting and identifying CNS pathogens are needed. Current tools and techniques cannot efficiently deal with CNS pathogen diversity; they cannot provide real-time identification of pathogen serogroups and strains, and they require days, sometimes weeks, for examination of tissue culture. Rapid and precise CNS pathogen diagnostics are needed to provide the opportunity for tailored therapeutic regimens and focused preventive efforts to decrease morbidity and mortality. Such diagnostics are available through genetic and genomic technologies, which have the potential for reducing the time required in serogroup or strain identification from 500+ hours for some viral cultures to less than 3 hours for all pathogens. In the near future, microarray diagnostics and future derivations of these technologies will change the paradigm used for outbreak investigations and will improve health care for all. PMID:15379069

  5. Pathogenic Potential of Tylenchorhynchus dubius on Selected Turfgrass

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, C. W.; Vargas, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Tylenchorhynchus dubius was observed to feed on 'Toronto' creeping bentgrass and 'Merion' Kentucky bluegrass, and was a key participant in reducing the vegetative growth of both grass species. The severity of foliar and root macrosymptoms incited by T. dubius to 'Toronto' bentgrass was greater on plants grown at 16 C than on plants maintained at 21, 27 and 32 C. These parasitized plants exhibited a suppression of secondary stolon formation, shortened internodes and premature inflorescence initiation. Initial inoculum densities of 500 and 1000 nematodes/test pot produced similar pathogenic effects on the host. Feeding was primarily on root hairs and epidermal cells immediately behind the meristematic region. No necrotic lesions or other diagnostic symptoms were visible at the feeding sites. Nematodes were not observed inside the roots. PMID:19319280

  6. Cryptococcus strains with different pathogenic potentials have diverse protein secretomes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Leona T; Simonin, Anna R; Chen, Cuilan; Ferdous, Jannatul; Padula, Matthew P; Harry, Elizabeth; Hofer, Markus; Campbell, Iain L; Carter, Dee A

    2015-06-01

    Secreted proteins are the frontline between the host and pathogen. In mammalian hosts, secreted proteins enable invasive infection and can modulate the host immune response. Cryptococcosis, caused by pathogenic Cryptococcus species, begins when inhaled infectious propagules establish to produce pulmonary infection, which, if not resolved, can disseminate to the central nervous system to cause meningoencephalitis. Strains of Cryptococcus species differ in their capacity to cause disease, and the mechanisms underlying this are not well understood. To investigate the role of secreted proteins in disease, we determined the secretome for three genome strains of Cryptococcus species, including a hypovirulent and a hypervirulent strain of C. gattii and a virulent strain of C. neoformans. Sixty-seven unique proteins were identified, with different numbers and types of proteins secreted by each strain. The secretomes of the virulent strains were largely limited to proteolytic and hydrolytic enzymes, while the hypovirulent strain had a diverse secretome, including non-conventionally secreted canonical cytosolic and immunogenic proteins that have been implicated in virulence. The hypovirulent strain cannot establish pulmonary infection in a mouse model, but strains of this genotype have caused human meningitis. To directly test brain infection, we used intracranial inoculation and found that the hypovirulent strain was substantially more invasive than its hypervirulent counterpart. We suggest that immunogenic proteins secreted by this strain invoke a host response that limits pulmonary infection but that there can be invasive growth and damage if infection reaches the brain. Given their known role in virulence, it is possible that non-conventionally secreted proteins mediate this process. PMID:25841021

  7. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Leddy, Menu; Murinda, Shelton E

    2013-01-01

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ?400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP), Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%), agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%), and Prado Park sediment (6.00%), respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78-4.08%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health. PMID:24278139

  8. Serologic Survey for Pathogens Potentially Affecting Pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana) Fawn Recruitment in Arizona, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shelli A. Dubay; Ted H. Noon; James C. deVos; Richard A. Ockenfels

    During the 1990s, pronghorn (An- tilocapra americana) populations declined in Arizona, USA. To investigate potential causes of decline, we collected blood samples from hunter-harvested male pronghorn from 2001 to 2003 on four Arizona sites. Sera were tested for antibody to parainfluenza virus type 3 (PI3), bovine viral diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine respiratory syncy- tial virus, epizootic hemorrhagic

  9. Detection of multiple potentially pathogenic bacteria in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Mohd Nasori, Khairul Nazrin; Chew, Li Lee; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2014-06-15

    The deltaic estuarine system of the Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve of Malaysia is a site where several human settlements and brackish water aquaculture have been established. Here, we evaluated the level of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the surface water and sediments. Higher levels of FIB were detected at downstream sampling sites from the fishing village, indicating it as a possible source of anthropogenic pollution to the estuary. Enterococci levels in the estuarine sediments were higher than in the surface water, while total coliforms and E. coli in the estuarine sediments were not detected in all samples. Also, various types of potentially pathogenic bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated. The results indicate that the Matang estuarine system is contaminated with various types of potential human bacterial pathogens which might pose a health risk to the public. PMID:24820641

  10. The 30-Amino-Acid Deletion in the Nsp2 of Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Emerging in China Is Not Related to Its Virulence?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Jialong; Zeng, Jingwen; Yin, Shuoyan; Li, Yanhua; Zheng, Linying; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun

    2009-01-01

    During the past 2 years, an atypical clinical outbreak, caused by a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) with a unique 30-amino-acid deletion in its Nsp2-coding region, was pandemic in China. In this study, we generated four full-length infectious cDNA clones: a clone of the highly virulent PRRSV strain JXwn06 (pWSK-JXwn), a clone of the low-virulence PRRSV strain HB-1/3.9 (pWSK-HB-1/3.9), a chimeric clone in which the Nsp2 region containing the 30-amino-acid deletion was replaced by the corresponding region of the low-virulence PRRSV strain HB-1/3.9 (pWSK-JXwn-HB1nsp2), and a mutated HB-1/3.9 clone with the same deletion in Nsp2 as JXwn06 (pWSK-HB1-ND30). We also investigated the pathogenicities of the rescued viruses (designated RvJXwn, RvJXwn-HB1nsp2, RvHB-1/3.9, and RvHB1-ND30, respectively) in specific-pathogen-free piglets in order to determine the role of the 30-amino-acid deletion in the virulence of the highly pathogenic PRRSV. All the rescued viruses could replicate stably in MARC-145 cells. Our findings indicated that RvJXwn-HB1nsp2 retained high virulence for piglets, like RvJXwn and the parental virus JXwn06, although the survival time of piglets infected with RvJXwn-HB1nsp2 was obviously prolonged. RvHB1-ND30 exhibited low virulence for piglets, like RvHB-1/3.9 and the parental virus HB-1/3.9. Therefore, we conclude that the 30-amino-acid deletion is not related to the virulence of the highly pathogenic PRRSV emerging in China. PMID:19244318

  11. The potential for early and rapid pathogen detection within poultry processing through hyperspectral microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acquisition of hyperspectral microscopic images containing both spatial and spectral data has shown potential for the early and rapid optical classification of foodborne pathogens. A hyperspectral microscope with a metal halide light source and acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) collects 89 ...

  12. Pathogenic Potential of Canine Parvovirus Types 2a and 2c in Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Maki; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Sato, Eiji; Kawakami, Kazuo; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Tohya, Yukinobu; Takahashi, Eiji; Mikami, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Masami

    2001-01-01

    The in vivo pathogenicity of canine parvovirus (CPV) type 2c (strain V203) and of CPV type 2a (strain V154) against cats was investigated. Our results indicate that both types of CPV have the potential to induce disease in cats. PMID:11329478

  13. Identification of Potentially Human-Pathogenic Enterocytozoon bieneusi Genotypes in Various Birds?

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Maria?Luísa?; Xiao, Lihua; Cama, Vitaliano; Magalhães, Nuno; Antunes, Francisco; Matos, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi was detected in 24 of 83 samples from birds of the orders Columbiformes, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes. It was identical to or closely related to the Peru6 genotype, which was previously found in humans in Peru. Thus, various birds can be a significant source of environmental contamination by potentially human-pathogenic E. bieneusi. PMID:16936045

  14. Update on the pathogenic potential and treatment options for Blastocystis sp

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although Blastocystis is one of the most common enteric parasites, there is still much controversy surrounding the pathogenicity and potential treatment options for this parasite. In this review we look at the evidence supporting Blastocystis as an intestinal pathogen as shown by numerous case studies and several in vivo studies and the evidence against. We describe the chronic nature of some infections and show the role of Blastocystis in immunocompromised patients and the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and Blastocystis infection. There have been several studies that have suggested that pathogenicity may be subtype related. Metronidazole is the most widely accepted treatment for Blastocystis but several cases of treatment failure and resistance have been described. Other treatment options which have been suggested include paromomycin and trimethroprim- sulfamethoxazole. PMID:24883113

  15. Occurrence of Potentially Human-Pathogenic Escherichia coli O103 in Norwegian Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sekse, Camilla; Sunde, Marianne; Hopp, Petter; Bruheim, Torkjel; Cudjoe, Kofitsyo Sewornu; Kvitle, Bjørg

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of an outbreak of hemorrhagic-uremic syndrome in Norway in 2006 indicated that the outbreak strain Escherichia coli O103:H25 could originate from sheep. A national survey of the Norwegian sheep population was performed, with the aim of identifying and describing a possible reservoir of potentially human-pathogenic E. coli O103, in particular of the H types 2 and 25. The investigation of fecal samples from 585 sheep flocks resulted in 1,222 E. coli O103 isolates that were analyzed for the presence of eae and stx genes, while a subset of 369 isolates was further examined for flagellar antigens (H typing), stx subtypes, bfpA, astA, and molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The total ovine E. coli O103 serogroup was genetically diverse by numbers of H types, virulotypes, and PFGE banding patterns identified, although a tendency of clustering toward serotypes was seen. The flocks positive for potentially human-pathogenic E. coli O103 were geographically widely distributed, and no association could be found with county or geographical region. The survey showed that eae-negative, stx-negative E. coli O103, probably nonpathogenic to humans, is very common in sheep, with 27.5% of flocks positive. Moreover, the study documented a low prevalence (0.7%) of potentially human-pathogenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O103:H2, while STEC O103:H25 was not detected. However, 3.1% and 5.8% of the flocks were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli O103 belonging to H types 2 and 25, respectively. These isolates are of concern as potential human pathogens by themselves but more importantly as possible precursors for human-pathogenic STEC. PMID:24077709

  16. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16?S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3?h, 0.3% bile salts for 4?h, and 1.9?mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3?h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  17. Probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Shokryazdan, Parisa; Sieo, Chin Chin; Kalavathy, Ramasamy; Liang, Juan Boo; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits. PMID:25105147

  18. Asociación entre anticuerpos contra el virus del síndrome disgenésico y respiratorio porcino y anticuerpos contra otros patógenos Association between antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and other pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Diosdado Vargas; Dolores González-Vega; Luis Pedro Moles-Cervantes; Antonio Morilla González

    In order to investigate a possible association between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and other viral and bacterial pathogenic agents found in swine, a serological model was followed. For this study, 3600, 4 to 6 month-old fi nishers were bled and tested for antibodies against various infectious agents. The specifi c antibodies against PRRSV, Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV),

  19. Comparison of the Idaho Technology FilmArray System to Real-Time PCR for Detection of Respiratory Pathogens in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Virginia M.; Elkan, Michael; Leet, Marilyn; McGowan, Karin L.

    2012-01-01

    The FilmArray Respiratory Panel (RP) multiplexed nucleic acid amplification test (Idaho Technology, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT) was compared to laboratory-developed real-time PCR assays for the detection of various respiratory viruses and certain bacterial pathogens. A total of 215 frozen archived pediatric respiratory specimens previously characterized as either negative or positive for one or more pathogens by real-time PCR were examined using the FilmArray RP system. Overall agreement between the FilmArray RP and corresponding real-time PCR assays for shared analytes was 98.6% (kappa = 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.89 to 0.94]). The combined positive percent agreement was 89.4% (95% CI, 85.4 to 92.6); the negative percent agreement was 99.6% (95% CI, 99.2 to 99.8). The mean real-time PCR threshold cycle (CT) value for specimens with discordant results was 36.46 ± 4.54. Detection of coinfections and correct identification of influenza A virus subtypes were comparable to those of real-time PCR when using the FilmArray RP. The greatest comparative difference in sensitivity was observed for adenovirus; only 11 of 24 (45.8%; 95% CI, 27.9 to 64.9) clinical specimens positive for adenovirus by real-time PCR were also positive by the FilmArray RP. In addition, upon testing 20 characterized adenovirus serotypes prepared at high and low viral loads, the FilmArray RP did not detect serotypes 6 and 41 at either level and failed to detect serotypes 2, 20, 35, and 37 when viral loads were low. The FilmArray RP system is rapid and extremely user-friendly, with results available in just over 1 h with almost no labor involved. Its low throughput is a significant drawback for laboratories receiving large numbers of specimens, as only a single sample can be processed at a time with one instrument. PMID:22116144

  20. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2009: general view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Kohno, Shigeru; Aoki, Nobuki; Oguri, Toyoko; Sato, Junko; Muratani, Tetsuro; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Ogasawara, Kazuhiko; Koashi, Naoto; Kozuki, Tsuneo; Komoto, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshisaburo; Tsuji, Toshikatsu; Terada, Michinori; Nakanishi, Kunio; Hattori, Rikizo; Hirako, Yukio; Maruo, Akinori; Minamitani, Shinichi; Morita, Kohei; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Honda, Yasuhito; Sasaoka, Shoichi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Hideki; Sugai, Atsuko; Miki, Makoto; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takasaki, Jin; Konosaki, Hisami; Aoki, Yasuko; Shoji, Michi; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Katono, Yasuhiro; Kawana, Akihiko; Saionji, Katsu; Miyazawa, Naoki; Sato, Yoshimi; Watanuki, Yuji; Kudo, Makoto; Ehara, Shigeru; Tsukada, Hiroki; Imai, Yumiko; Watabe, Nobuei; Aso, Sakura; Honma, Yasuo; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Yamagishi, Yuka; Takesue, Yoshio; Wada, Yasunao; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Mitsuno, Noriko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Uno, Kenji; Sano, Reiko; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takaya, Mariko; Kuwabara, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Doi, Masao; Shimizu, Satomi; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Kadota, Junichi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Honda, Junichi; Fujita, Masaki; Iwata, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Ezaki, Takayuki; Onodera, Shoichi; Kusachi, Shinya; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Michio; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Niki, Yoshihito; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2012-10-01

    For the purpose of nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from patients in Japan, the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC) started a survey in 2006. From 2009, JSC continued the survey in collaboration with the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology. The fourth-year survey was conducted during the period from January and April 2009 by the three societies. A total of 684 strains were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections. Susceptibility testing was evaluable with 635 strains (130 Staphylococcus aureus, 127 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4 Streptococcus pyogenes, 123 Haemophilus influenzae, 70 Moraxella catarrhalis, 78 Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 103 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). A maximum of 45 antibacterial agents including 26 ?-lactams (four penicillins, three penicillins in combination with ?-lactamase inhibitors, four oral cephems, eight parenteral cephems, one monobactam, five carbapenems, and one penem), four aminoglycosides, four macrolides (including ketolide), one lincosamide, one tetracycline, two glycopeptides, six fluoroquinolones, and one oxazolidinone were used for the study. Analysis was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). Incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was as high as 58.5 %, and that of penicillin-intermediate and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP and PRSP) was 6.3 % and 0.0 %, respectively. Among H. influenzae, 21.1 % of them were found to be ?-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediately resistant (BLNAI), 18.7 % to be ?-lactamase-non-producing ABPC-resistant (BLNAR), and 5.7 % to be ?-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant (BLPAR) strains. A high frequency (76.5 %) of ?-lactamase-producing strains has been suspected in Moraxella catarrhalis isolates. Four (3.2 %) extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae were found among 126 strains. Four isolates (2.5 %) of P. aeruginosa were found to be metallo-?-lactamase-producing strains, including three (1.9 %) suspected multi-drug resistant strains showing resistance against imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin. Continuous national surveillance of the antimicrobial susceptibility of respiratory pathogens is crucial to monitor changing patterns of susceptibility and to be able to update treatment recommendations on a regular basis. PMID:22766652

  1. Comparison of Contact Patterns Relevant for Transmission of Respiratory Pathogens in Thailand and the Netherlands Using Respondent-Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Mart L.; van Steenbergen, Jim E.; Buskens, Vincent; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Chanyasanha, Charnchudhi; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Thorson, Anna E.; Bengtsson, Linus; Lu, Xin; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding infection dynamics of respiratory diseases requires the identification and quantification of behavioural, social and environmental factors that permit the transmission of these infections between humans. Little empirical information is available about contact patterns within real-world social networks, let alone on differences in these contact networks between populations that differ considerably on a socio-cultural level. Here we compared contact network data that were collected in the Netherlands and Thailand using a similar online respondent-driven method. By asking participants to recruit contact persons we studied network links relevant for the transmission of respiratory infections. We studied correlations between recruiter and recruited contacts to investigate mixing patterns in the observed social network components. In both countries, mixing patterns were assortative by demographic variables and random by total numbers of contacts. However, in Thailand participants reported overall more contacts which resulted in higher effective contact rates. Our findings provide new insights on numbers of contacts and mixing patterns in two different populations. These data could be used to improve parameterisation of mathematical models used to design control strategies. Although the spread of infections through populations depends on more factors, found similarities suggest that spread may be similar in the Netherlands and Thailand. PMID:25423343

  2. Genotyping of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains isolated from nasal swabs of healthy individuals in Peru.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Vílchez, Alfonso Martín; Martín-Navarro, Carmen María; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; González, Ana C; Guerra, Humberto; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2013-10-17

    Free Living Amoebae (FLA) of Acanthamoeba genus are widely distributed in the environment and can be found in the air, soil and water; and have also been isolated from air-conditioning units. In humans, they are causative agents of a sight-threating infection of the cornea, Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and a fatal infection of the central nervous system known as Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis (GAE). In this study, a survey was conducted in order to determine the presence and pathogenic potential of free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus in nasal swabs from individuals in two regions of Peru. Identification of isolates was based on cyst morphology and PCR-sequencing of the Diagnostic Fragment 3 to identify strains at the genotype level. The pathogenic potential of the isolates was also assayed using temperature and osmotolerance assays and extracellular proteases zymograms. The obtained results revealed that all isolated strains exhibited pathogenic potential. After sequencing the highly variable DF3 (Diagnostic Fragment 3) region in the 18S rRNA gene as previously described, genotype T4 was found to be the most common one in the samples included in this study but also genotype T15 was identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the characterization of Acanthamoeba strains at the genotype level and the first report of genotype T4 and T15 in Peru. PMID:24140300

  3. Predicting the potential distribution of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in East and Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Sachiko; Tominaga, Atsushi; Irwin, Kelly J; Freake, Michael J; Suzuki, Kazutaka; Goka, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the pathogen responsible for chytridiomycosis, a disease that is associated with a worldwide amphibian population decline. In this study, we predicted the potential distribution of Bd in East and Southeast Asia based on limited occurrence data. Our goal was to design an effective survey area where efforts to detect the pathogen can be focused. We generated ecological niche models using the maximum-entropy approach, with alleviation of multicollinearity and spatial autocorrelation. We applied eigenvector-based spatial filters as independent variables, in addition to environmental variables, to resolve spatial autocorrelation, and compared the model's accuracy and the degree of spatial autocorrelation with those of a model estimated using only environmental variables. We were able to identify areas of high suitability for Bd with accuracy. Among the environmental variables, factors related to temperature and precipitation were more effective in predicting the potential distribution of Bd than factors related to land use and cover type. Our study successfully predicted the potential distribution of Bd in East and Southeast Asia. This information should now be used to prioritize survey areas and generate a surveillance program to detect the pathogen. PMID:25850395

  4. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E; Santander, Ricardo D; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G; López, María M; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  5. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E.; Santander, Ricardo D.; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G.; López, María M.; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle. PMID:25978369

  6. Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of e...

  7. Systems Integration of Biodefense Omics Data for Analysis of Pathogen-Host Interactions and Identification of Potential Targets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter B. McGarvey; Hongzhan Huang; Raja Mazumder; Jian Zhang; Yongxing Chen; Chengdong Zhang; Stephen Cammer; Rebecca Will; Margie Odle; Bruno Sobral; Margaret Moore; Cathy H. Wu; Jörg Hoheisel

    2009-01-01

    The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents.

  8. The effect of glyphosate on potential pathogens and beneficial members of poultry microbiota in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Schrödl, Wieland; Aldin, Alaa A; Hafez, Hafez M; Krüger, Monika

    2013-04-01

    The use of glyphosate modifies the environment which stresses the living microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to determine the real impact of glyphosate on potential pathogens and beneficial members of poultry microbiota in vitro. The presented results evidence that the highly pathogenic bacteria as Salmonella Entritidis, Salmonella Gallinarum, Salmonella Typhimurium, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum are highly resistant to glyphosate. However, most of beneficial bacteria as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus badius, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Lactobacillus spp. were found to be moderate to highly susceptible. Also Campylobacter spp. were found to be susceptible to glyphosate. A reduction of beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract microbiota by ingestion of glyphosate could disturb the normal gut bacterial community. Also, the toxicity of glyphosate to the most prevalent Enterococcus spp. could be a significant predisposing factor that is associated with the increase in C. botulinum-mediated diseases by suppressing the antagonistic effect of these bacteria on clostridia. PMID:23224412

  9. Evaluation of the Efficacy of an Attenuated Live Vaccine against Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xue; Li, Zhenguang; Xia, Mingqi; He, Yanliang

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) is characterized by high fever and high mortality in pigs of all ages and has severely affected the pork industry of China in the last few years. An attenuated HP-PRRSV strain, TJM, was obtained by passaging HP-PRRSV strain TJ on MARC-145 cells for 92 passages. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)- and antibody-free pigs were inoculated intramuscularly with TJM (105.0 50% tissue culture infective doses [TCID50]) and challenged at 28, 60, 120, and 180 days postimmunization (dpi). The results showed that 5/5, 5/5, 5/5, and 4/5 immunized pigs were protected from the lethal challenge and did not develop fever and clinical diseases at each challenge, respectively. Compared to control pigs, vaccinated pigs showed much milder pathological lesions and gained significantly more weight (P < 0.01). Sequence analysis of different passages of strain TJ showed that the attenuation resulted in a deletion of a continuous 120 amino acids (aa), in addition to the discontinuous 30-aa deletion in the nsp2 region. The analysis also demonstrated that the 120-aa deletion was genetically stable in vivo. These results suggested that HP-PRRSV TJM was efficacious against a lethal challenge with a virulent HP-PRRSV strain, and effective protection could last at least 4 months. Therefore, strain TJM is a good candidate for an efficacious modified live virus vaccine as well as a useful molecular marker vaccine against HP-PRRSV. PMID:22695163

  10. Microbial community composition and respiratory potential of deep, subpermafrost brine in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Smithgall, A.; Parsons, A.; Gan, M.; White, D. C.; Onstott, T. C.; Pratt, L.

    2005-12-01

    Saline fracture waters were collected at depths between 800 and 1200 meters from the Lupin gold mine. Microbial community composition was measured by phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Biomass estimates were from less than 0.1 to 22 pmol/L which converts to 1,700 to 545,000 cells/L. Phospholipid compositions reveal large proportions (24 to 60 mole percent) of monounsatruates, which points to a predominance of Gram negative bacteria. Terminally branched and mid-branched saturates, which indicate Gram positive bacteria, were present at 5-19 mole percent and 0 to 7 mole percent, respectively. The cyclopropyl to monounsaturated fatty acid ratios indicate that the bacterial communities are physiologically stressed. Respiratory potential was estimated by examining the ubiquinone and menaquinone compositions of the water samples. Menaquinone 7 was the most prominent followed by menaquinone 6. Together these two quinones represented 88 to 96 percent of the quinone profile. Ubiquinone 6 represented 0.4 to 11 percent of the quinone profile. The ratio of ubiquinone to menaquinone ranged from 0.003 to 0.066 which indicates that these waters have been exposed to anoxic conditions for a long time.

  11. The respiratory cycle modulates brain potentials, sympathetic activity, and subjective pain sensation induced by noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iwabe, Tatsuya; Ozaki, Isamu; Hashizume, Akira

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that a respiratory cycle influences pain processing, we conducted an experimental pain study in 10 healthy volunteers. Intraepidermal electrical stimulation (IES) with a concentric bipolar needle electrode was applied to the hand dorsum at pain perceptual threshold or four times the perceptual threshold to produce first pain during expiration or inspiration either of which was determined by the abrupt change in an exhaled CO2 level. IES-evoked potentials (IESEPs), sympathetic skin response (SSR), digital plethysmogram (DPG), and subjective pain intensity rating scale were simultaneously recorded. With either stimulus intensity, IES during expiration produced weaker pain feeling compared to IES during inspiration. The mean amplitude of N200/P400 in IESEPs and that of SSR were smaller when IES was applied during expiration. The magnitude of DPG wave gradually decreased after IES, but a decrease in the magnitude of DPG wave was less evident when IES was delivered during expiration. Regardless of stimulus timing or stimulus intensity, pain perception was always concomitant with appearance of IESEPs and SSR, and changes in DPG. Our findings suggest that pain processing fluctuates during normal breathing and that pain is gated within the central nervous system during expiration. PMID:24667456

  12. A proposed screen for evaluating low-molecular-weight chemicals as potential respiratory allergens.

    PubMed

    Gauggel, D L; Sarlo, K; Asquith, T N

    1993-01-01

    Allergic asthma can result when reactive low-molecular-weight chemicals (LMWCs) haptenate carrier proteins to form immunogenic conjugates, which then induce specific allergic antibodies. As part of an overall assessment process for evaluating the allergenic potential of LMWCs, an in vitro test for detecting the covalent derivatization of proteins by LMWCs was developed. In the assay, globulin-free serum albumins were incubated with increasing concentrations of a given LMWC and the mixtures separated via reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Derivatization was monitored by shifts in the retention time of native versus modified protein. Retention time shifts were seen for most haptens when incubated with human serum albumin at a 50:1 (hapten:protein) starting molar ratio. Some haptens changed the retention time of the protein at a 5:1 initial ratio. Almost all chemicals that non-covalently bind to proteins did not change the protein retention time, even when incubated at 1500:1 molar ratios. The screen correctly identified 12/14 known human allergenic haptens and 23/24 non-allergenic LMWCs. It cannot detect sensitizers which must be metabolized into reactive haptens. This screen can be incorporated into an overall risk assessment approach for evaluating chemicals as respiratory allergens. PMID:8258626

  13. Analyzing the antagonistic potential of the lichen microbiome against pathogens by bridging metagenomic with culture studies

    PubMed Central

    Cernava, Tomislav; Müller, Henry; Aschenbrenner, Ines A.; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring antagonists toward pathogens play an important role to avoid pathogen outbreaks in ecosystems, and they can be applied as biocontrol agents for crops. Lichens present long-living symbiotic systems continuously exposed to pathogens. To analyze the antagonistic potential in lichens, we studied the bacterial community active against model bacteria and fungi by an integrative approach combining isolate screening, omics techniques, and high resolution mass spectrometry. The highly diverse microbiome of the lung lichen [Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm.] included an abundant antagonistic community dominated by Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Burkholderia. While antagonists represent 24.5% of the isolates, they were identified with only 7% in the metagenome; which means that they were overrepresented in the culturable fraction. Isolates of the dominant antagonistic genus Stenotrophomonas produced spermidine as main bioactive component. Moreover, spermidine-related genes, especially for the transport, were identified in the metagenome. The majority of hits identified belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, while Stenotrophomonas-specific spermidine synthases were not present in the dataset. Evidence for plant growth promoting effects was found for lichen-associated strains of Stenotrophomonas. Linking of metagenomic and culture data was possible but showed partly contradictory results, which required a comparative assessment. However, we have shown that lichens are important reservoirs for antagonistic bacteria, which open broad possibilities for biotechnological applications. PMID:26157431

  14. The Pathogenic Potential of Campylobacter concisus Strains Associated with Chronic Intestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Deshpande, Nandan P.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Tan, Chew Gee; Burgos-Portugal, Jose A.; Raftery, Mark J.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Mitchell, Hazel

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter concisus has garnered increasing attention due to its association with intestinal disease, thus, the pathogenic potential of strains isolated from different intestinal diseases was investigated. A method to isolate C. concisus was developed and the ability of eight strains from chronic and acute intestinal diseases to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells was determined. Features associated with bacterial invasion were investigated using comparative genomic analyses and the effect of C. concisus on host protein expression was examined using proteomics. Our isolation method from intestinal biopsies resulted in the isolation of three C. concisus strains from children with Crohn's disease or chronic gastroenteritis. Four C. concisus strains from patients with chronic intestinal diseases can attach to and invade host cells using mechanisms such as chemoattraction to mucin, aggregation, flagellum-mediated attachment, “membrane ruffling”, cell penetration and damage. C. concisus strains isolated from patients with chronic intestinal diseases have significantly higher invasive potential than those from acute intestinal diseases. Investigation of the cause of this increased pathogenic potential revealed a plasmid to be responsible. 78 and 47 proteins were upregulated and downregulated in cells infected with C. concisus, respectively. Functional analysis of these proteins showed that C. concisus infection regulated processes related to interleukin-12 production, proteasome activation and NF-?B activation. Infection with all eight C. concisus strains resulted in host cells producing high levels of interleukin-12, however, only strains capable of invading host cells resulted in interferon-? production as confirmed by ELISA. These findings considerably support the emergence of C. concisus as an intestinal pathogen, but more significantly, provide novel insights into the host immune response and an explanation for the heterogeneity observed in the outcome of C. concisus infection. Moreover, response to infection with invasive strains has substantial similarities to that observed in the inflamed mucosa of Crohn's disease patients. PMID:22194985

  15. Diagnostic potential of the pulsed discharged helium ionization detector (PDHID) for pathogenic Mycobacterial volatile biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Pimentel, Adam S; Mowry, Curtis D; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Allen, Amy; Schares, Elizabeth S; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic Mycobacteria cause diseases in animals and humans with significant economic and societal consequences. Current methods for Mycobacterial detection relies upon time- and labor-intensive techniques such as culturing or DNA analysis. Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, four volatile compounds (methyl phenylacetate, methyl p-anisate, methyl nicotinate and o-phenyl anisole) were recently proposed as potential biomarkers for Mycobacteria. We demonstrate for the first time the capabilities of a field-deployable, pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID) for sensing these volatiles. We determined the analytical performance of the PDHID toward these Mycobacterial volatiles. Detector performance was moderately affected over the temperature range of 150 to 350 °C. The linear dynamic range for all four analytes exceeded three orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were calculated as 150 and 450 pg respectively, for all compounds, except methyl phenylacetate (LOD and LOQ, 90 and 270 pg, respectively). Control charts revealed that the PDHID detection system was generally stable, and deviations could be traced to common causes and excluded special causes. Grob tests and ionization potential data suggest that the PDHID is capable of detecting Mycobacterial volatiles in a complex milieu such as culture headspace or breath samples from tuberculosis patients. The diagnostic potential of the PDHID is critical to our goal of a handheld, field-deployable 'sniffer' system for biological pathogens and chemical warfare agents. PMID:23867723

  16. Maggots as potential vector for pathogen transmission and consequences for infection control in waste management

    PubMed Central

    Daeschlein, Georg; Reese, Kevin; Napp, Matthias; Spitzmueller, Romy; Hinz, Peter; Juenger, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Debridement therapy with sterile bred larvae in non-healing wounds is a widely accepted safe and efficient treatment modality. However, during application in the contaminated wound bed microbial contamination with potential microbial pathogen spread after escape from the wound or after unreliable disposal procedure may happen, particularly in the case of not using bio-bags. The aims of this work were first to investigate the release of ingested bacteria into the environment by maggots and second to examine the common practice of freezing the maggots after use and/or disposal in trash-bags. Potential methods for hygienic safe disposal of used maggots should be deduced. Methods: First, Maggots were contaminated with S. aureus by allowing them to crawl over an agar surface completely covered with bacterial growth over 24 h at 37°C. After external disinfection maggots were transferred onto sterile Columbia agar plates and shedding of S. aureus was visualized. Second, maggots were frozen at –20°C for 1, 2, 5, 10, 30, and 60 min. After exposure, the larvae were transferred onto Columbia blood agar with consecutive incubation at 37°C over 48 h. The larvae were analyzed visually for mobility and eating activities. The frozen bodies of dead larvae were examined for viable bacteria. Results: We could demonstrate that maggots release formerly ingested pathogens (S. aureus). Freezing at –20°C for at least 60 min was able to kill all maggots, however the contaminant bacteria inside could survive. Conclusion: Since freezing is apparently able to kill maggots but not to reliabely inactivate the ingested bacterial pathogens, we recommend the disposal of free-range larvae in screw cap vials after use to achieve full hygienic control.

  17. Coral transplantation triggers shift in microbiome and promotion of coral disease associated potential pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jordan M; Connolly, Sean R; Ainsworth, Tracy D

    2015-01-01

    By cultivating turf algae and aggressively defending their territories, territorial damselfishes in the genus Stegastes play a major role in shaping coral-algal dynamics on coral reefs. The epilithic algal matrix (EAM) inside Stegastes' territories is known to harbor high abundances of potential coral disease pathogens. To determine the impact of territorial grazers on coral microbial assemblages, we established a coral transplant inside and outside of Stegastes' territories. Over the course of one year, the percent mortality of transplanted corals was monitored and coral samples were collected for microbial analysis. As compared to outside damselfish territories, Stegastes were associated with a higher rate of mortality of transplanted corals. However, 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that territorial grazers do not differentially impact the microbial assemblage of corals exposed to the EAM. Regardless of Stegastes presence or absence, coral transplantation resulted in a shift in the coral-associated microbial community and an increase in coral disease associated potential pathogens. Further, transplanted corals that suffer low to high mortality undergo a microbial transition from a microbiome similar to that of healthy corals to that resembling the EAM. These findings demonstrate that coral transplantation significantly impacts coral microbial communities, and transplantation may increase susceptibility to coral disease. PMID:26144865

  18. Coral transplantation triggers shift in microbiome and promotion of coral disease associated potential pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jordan M.; Connolly, Sean R.; Ainsworth, Tracy D.

    2015-01-01

    By cultivating turf algae and aggressively defending their territories, territorial damselfishes in the genus Stegastes play a major role in shaping coral-algal dynamics on coral reefs. The epilithic algal matrix (EAM) inside Stegastes’ territories is known to harbor high abundances of potential coral disease pathogens. To determine the impact of territorial grazers on coral microbial assemblages, we established a coral transplant inside and outside of Stegastes’ territories. Over the course of one year, the percent mortality of transplanted corals was monitored and coral samples were collected for microbial analysis. As compared to outside damselfish territories, Stegastes were associated with a higher rate of mortality of transplanted corals. However, 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that territorial grazers do not differentially impact the microbial assemblage of corals exposed to the EAM. Regardless of Stegastes presence or absence, coral transplantation resulted in a shift in the coral-associated microbial community and an increase in coral disease associated potential pathogens. Further, transplanted corals that suffer low to high mortality undergo a microbial transition from a microbiome similar to that of healthy corals to that resembling the EAM. These findings demonstrate that coral transplantation significantly impacts coral microbial communities, and transplantation may increase susceptibility to coral disease. PMID:26144865

  19. Potential applications of cryogenic technologies to plant genetic improvement and pathogen eradication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Wang, Ren-Rui; Cui, Zhen-Hua; Bi, Wen-Lu; Li, Jing-Wei; Li, Bai-Quan; Ozudogru, Elif Aylin; Volk, Gayle M; Wang, Qiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Rapid increases in human populations provide a great challenge to ensure that adequate quantities of food are available. Sustainable development of agricultural production by breeding more productive cultivars and by increasing the productive potential of existing cultivars can help meet this demand. The present paper provides information on the potential uses of cryogenic techniques in ensuring food security, including: (1) long-term conservation of a diverse germplasm and successful establishment of cryo-banks; (2) maintenance of the regenerative ability of embryogenic tissues that are frequently the target for genetic transformation; (3) enhancement of genetic transformation and plant regeneration of transformed cells, and safe, long-term conservation for transgenic materials; (4) production and maintenance of viable protoplasts for transformation and somatic hybridization; and (5) efficient production of pathogen-free plants. These roles demonstrate that cryogenic technologies offer opportunities to ensure food security. PMID:24681087

  20. Combined impact of solar UV-B radiation and selenium treatment on respiratory potential in pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mateja GERM

    2005-01-01

    The effects of ambient and filtered solar UV-B radiation and of selenium treatment on respiratory potential measured by electron transport system (ETS) activity in pumpkins, Cucurbita pepo L. were studied. Measurements were conducted three times in the growth period. Solar UV-B radiation decreased ETS activity in plants, regardless selenium treatment. The results suggested that the solar UV-B radiation impaired flow

  1. Dendryphion penicillatum and Pleospora papaveracea, Destructive Seedborne Pathogens and Potential Mycoherbicides for Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, N R; Jennings, J C; Bailey, B A; Farr, D F

    2000-07-01

    ABSTRACT Dendryphion penicillatum and Pleospora papaveracea were isolated from blighted Papaver somniferum and Papaver bracteatum plants grown in growth chambers and the field in Beltsville, MD. The etiology of the diseases was determined, and the fungi are being investigated as potential mycoherbicides to control the narcotic opium poppy plant. P. papaveracea is known to be a highly destructive seedborne pathogen of Papaver somniferum, causing seedling blight, leaf blight, crown rot, and capsule rot. Single conidia and ascospores were isolated and cultures established from naturally infested seed and diseased foliage and pods of opium poppy from Iran, Colombia, Venezuela, Sweden, India, and the United States (Maryland and Washington). Mycelia and conidia of P. papaveracea and D. penicillatum produced on necrotic leaf tissues appear morphologically similar, and the fungi were previously considered to be anamorph and teleomorph. However, no anamorph/teleomorph connection could be established, and the fungi appear to be distinct taxa. P. papaveracea produced conidia, mature pseudothecia, and chlamydospores in vitro and on infected stems. D. penicillatum produced conidia, microsclerotia, and macronematous conidiophores. Although both fungi were pathogenic to three poppy cultivars, conidial inoculum from P. papaveracea cultures was more virulent than conidial inoculum from D. penicillatum. Eight-week-old plants became necrotic and died 8 days after inoculation with a conidial suspension of P. papaveracea at 2 x 10(5) spores per ml. Disease severity was significantly enhanced by inoculum formulations that contained corn oil, by higher conidial inoculum concentrations, and by increased wetness periods. Symptoms on plants inoculated with either pathogen included leaf and stem necrosis, stem girdling, stunting, necrotic leaf spots, and foliar and pod blight. Inoculated seedlings exhibited wire stem, damping-off, and root rot. Conidia, and less frequently pseudothecia, of P. papaveracea and conidia of D. penicillatum were produced abundantly on inoculated, necrotic foliage, pods, and seedlings. Cultures from conidia or ascospores reisolated from these tissues consistently produced fungi whose morphologies were typical of the fungus from which the inoculum was derived. PMID:18944487

  2. The Relationship between Host Lifespan and Pathogen Reservoir Potential: An Analysis in the System Arabidopsis thaliana-Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Hily, Jean Michel; García, Adrián; Moreno, Arancha; Plaza, María; Wilkinson, Mark D.; Fereres, Alberto; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the determinants of pathogen reservoir potential is central to understand disease emergence. It has been proposed that host lifespan is one such determinant: short-lived hosts will invest less in costly defenses against pathogens, so that they will be more susceptible to infection, more competent as sources of infection and/or will sustain larger vector populations, thus being effective reservoirs for the infection of long-lived hosts. This hypothesis is sustained by analyses of different hosts of multihost pathogens, but not of different genotypes of the same host species. Here we examined this hypothesis by comparing two genotypes of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana that differ largely both in life-span and in tolerance to its natural pathogen Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Experiments with the aphid vector Myzus persicae showed that both genotypes were similarly competent as sources for virus transmission, but the short-lived genotype was more susceptible to infection and was able to sustain larger vector populations. To explore how differences in defense against CMV and its vector relate to reservoir potential, we developed a model that was run for a set of experimentally-determined parameters, and for a realistic range of host plant and vector population densities. Model simulations showed that the less efficient defenses of the short-lived genotype resulted in higher reservoir potential, which in heterogeneous host populations may be balanced by the longer infectious period of the long-lived genotype. This balance was modulated by the demography of both host and vector populations, and by the genetic composition of the host population. Thus, within-species genetic diversity for lifespan and defenses against pathogens will result in polymorphisms for pathogen reservoir potential, which will condition within-population infection dynamics. These results are relevant for a better understanding of host-pathogen co-evolution, and of the dynamics of pathogen emergence. PMID:25375140

  3. The relationship between host lifespan and pathogen reservoir potential: an analysis in the system Arabidopsis thaliana--cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hily, Jean Michel; García, Adrián; Moreno, Arancha; Plaza, María; Wilkinson, Mark D; Fereres, Alberto; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Identification of the determinants of pathogen reservoir potential is central to understand disease emergence. It has been proposed that host lifespan is one such determinant: short-lived hosts will invest less in costly defenses against pathogens, so that they will be more susceptible to infection, more competent as sources of infection and/or will sustain larger vector populations, thus being effective reservoirs for the infection of long-lived hosts. This hypothesis is sustained by analyses of different hosts of multihost pathogens, but not of different genotypes of the same host species. Here we examined this hypothesis by comparing two genotypes of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana that differ largely both in life-span and in tolerance to its natural pathogen Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Experiments with the aphid vector Myzus persicae showed that both genotypes were similarly competent as sources for virus transmission, but the short-lived genotype was more susceptible to infection and was able to sustain larger vector populations. To explore how differences in defense against CMV and its vector relate to reservoir potential, we developed a model that was run for a set of experimentally-determined parameters, and for a realistic range of host plant and vector population densities. Model simulations showed that the less efficient defenses of the short-lived genotype resulted in higher reservoir potential, which in heterogeneous host populations may be balanced by the longer infectious period of the long-lived genotype. This balance was modulated by the demography of both host and vector populations, and by the genetic composition of the host population. Thus, within-species genetic diversity for lifespan and defenses against pathogens will result in polymorphisms for pathogen reservoir potential, which will condition within-population infection dynamics. These results are relevant for a better understanding of host-pathogen co-evolution, and of the dynamics of pathogen emergence. PMID:25375140

  4. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed S Abdel-Moneim; Ahmad E Abdel-Ghany; Salama AS Shany

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. METHODS: Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated

  5. Birds as potential reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens: first evidence of bacteraemia with Rickettsia helvetica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Birds have long been known as carriers of ticks, but data from the literature are lacking on their role as a reservoir in the epidemiology of certain tick-borne disease-causing agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of three emerging, zoonotic tick-borne pathogens in blood samples and ticks of birds and to assess the impact of feeding location preference and migration distance of bird species on their tick infestation. Methods Blood samples and ticks of birds were analysed with TaqMan real-time PCRs and conventional PCR followed by sequencing. Results During the spring and autumn bird migrations, 128 blood samples and 140 ticks (Ixodes ricinus, Haemaphysalis concinna and a Hyalomma specimen) were collected from birds belonging to 16 species. The prevalence of tick infestation and the presence of tick species were related to the feeding and migration habits of avian hosts. Birds were shown to be bacteraemic with Rickettsia helvetica and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, but not with Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis. The prevalence of rickettsiae was high (51.4%) in ticks, suggesting that some of them may have acquired their infection from their avian host. Conclusion Based on the present results birds are potential reservoirs of both I. ricinus transmitted zoonotic pathogens, R. helvetica and A. phagocytophilum, but their epidemiological role appears to be less important concerning the latter, at least in Central Europe. PMID:24679245

  6. Enteric bacterial pathogens with zoonotic potential isolated from farm-raised deer.

    PubMed

    French, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2010-09-01

    The raising of captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a growing agricultural industry in Ohio as it is in several other areas of the United States and around the world. Pooled fecal samples were collected from 30 white-tailed deer confinement facilities. Samples were cultured for five enteric bacterial pathogens. Premise prevalence rates were as follows: Escherichia coli O157, 3.3%; Listeria monocytogenes, 3.3%; Salmonella enterica, 0%; Yersinia enterocolitica, 30%; and Clostridium difficile, 36.7%. The ail virulence gene could not be amplified from any of the Y. enterocolitica isolates recovered. Toxigenic strains of C. difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotype 078, an emerging C. difficile genotype of humans and food animals, were recovered from 4 of 11 (36.4%) C. difficile-positive deer farms. Venison from farm-raised deer might become contaminated with foodborne pathogens, deer farmers may have occupational exposure to these zoonotic agents, and farm-raised deer could be a reservoir from which the environment and other livestock may become contaminated with a number of potentially zoonotic bacteria. PMID:20575673

  7. Health assessment and seroepidemiologic survey of potential pathogens in wild Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sulzner, Kathryn; Johnson, Christine Kreuder; Bonde, Robert K.; Gomez, Nicole Auil; Powell, James; Nielsen, Klaus; Luttrell, M. Page; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Aguirre, A. Alonso

    2012-01-01

    The Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), a subspecies of the West Indian manatee, inhabits fresh, brackish, and warm coastal waters distributed along the eastern border of Central America, the northern coast of South America, and throughout the Wider Caribbean Region. Threatened primarily by human encroachment, poaching, and habitat degradation, Antillean manatees are listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. The impact of disease on population viability remains unknown in spite of concerns surrounding the species' ability to rebound from a population crash should an epizootic occur. To gain insight on the baseline health of this subspecies, a total of 191 blood samples were collected opportunistically from wild Antillean manatees in Belize between 1997 and 2009. Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals were established, and antibody prevalence to eight pathogens with zoonotic potential was determined. Age was found to be a significant factor of variation in mean blood values, whereas sex, capture site, and season contributed less to overall differences in parameter values. Negative antibody titers were reported for all pathogens surveyed except for Leptospira bratislava, L. canicola, and L. icterohemorrhagiae, Toxoplasma gondii, and morbillivirus. As part of comprehensive health assessment in manatees from Belize, this study will serve as a benchmark aiding in early disease detection and in the discernment of important epidemiologic patterns in the manatees of this region. Additionally, it will provide some of the initial tools to explore the broader application of manatees as sentinel species of nearshore ecosystem health.

  8. Persistence, Seasonal Dynamics and Pathogenic Potential of Vibrio Communities from Pacific Oyster Hemolymph

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Carolin C.; Batista, Frederico M.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

  9. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W. T.; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Lau, Candy C. Y.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu–Glu–Leu–Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species. PMID:26090713

  10. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W T; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K L; Lau, Candy C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-01-01

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species. PMID:26090713

  11. Health Assessment and Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Wild Antillean Manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus)

    PubMed Central

    Sulzner, Kathryn; Kreuder Johnson, Christine; Bonde, Robert K.; Auil Gomez, Nicole; Powell, James; Nielsen, Klaus; Luttrell, M. Page; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Aguirre, A. Alonso

    2012-01-01

    The Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus), a subspecies of the West Indian manatee, inhabits fresh, brackish, and warm coastal waters distributed along the eastern border of Central America, the northern coast of South America, and throughout the Wider Caribbean Region. Threatened primarily by human encroachment, poaching, and habitat degradation, Antillean manatees are listed as endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. The impact of disease on population viability remains unknown in spite of concerns surrounding the species’ ability to rebound from a population crash should an epizootic occur. To gain insight on the baseline health of this subspecies, a total of 191 blood samples were collected opportunistically from wild Antillean manatees in Belize between 1997 and 2009. Hematologic and biochemical reference intervals were established, and antibody prevalence to eight pathogens with zoonotic potential was determined. Age was found to be a significant factor of variation in mean blood values, whereas sex, capture site, and season contributed less to overall differences in parameter values. Negative antibody titers were reported for all pathogens surveyed except for Leptospira bratislava, L. canicola, and L. icterohemorrhagiae, Toxoplasma gondii, and morbillivirus. As part of comprehensive health assessment in manatees from Belize, this study will serve as a benchmark aiding in early disease detection and in the discernment of important epidemiologic patterns in the manatees of this region. Additionally, it will provide some of the initial tools to explore the broader application of manatees as sentinel species of nearshore ecosystem health. PMID:22984521

  12. Potentially pathogenic bacteria in shower water and air of a stem cell transplant unit.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Sarah D; Mayfield, Jennie; Fraser, Victoria; Angenent, Largus T

    2009-08-01

    Potential pathogens from shower water and aerosolized shower mist (i.e., shower aerosol) have been suggested as an environmental source of infection for immunocompromised patients. To quantify the microbial load in shower water and aerosol samples, we used culture, microscopic, and quantitative PCR methods to investigate four shower stalls in a stem cell transplant unit at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, MO. We also tested membrane-integrated showerheads as a possible mitigation strategy. In addition to quantification, a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey was used to characterize the abundant bacterial populations within shower water and aerosols. The average total bacterial counts were 2.2 x 10(7) cells/liter in shower water and 3.4 x 10(4) cells/m(3) in shower aerosol, and these counts were reduced to 6.3 x 10(4) cells/liter (99.6% efficiency) and 8.9 x 10(3) cells/m(3) (82.4% efficiency), respectively, after membrane-integrated showerheads were installed. Potentially pathogenic organisms were found in both water and aerosol samples from the conventional showers. Most notable was the presence of Mycobacterium mucogenicum (99.5% identity) in the water and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (99.3% identity) in the aerosol samples. Membrane-integrated showerheads may protect immunocompromised patients from waterborne infections in a stem cell transplant unit because of efficient capture of vast numbers of potentially pathogenic bacteria from hospital water. However, an in-depth epidemiological study is necessary to investigate whether membrane-integrated showerheads reduce hospital-acquired infections. The microbial load in shower aerosols with conventional showerheads was elevated compared to the load in HEPA-filtered background air in the stem cell unit, but it was considerably lower than typical indoor air. Thus, in shower environments without HEPA filtration, the increase in microbial load due to shower water aerosolization would not have been distinguishable from anticipated variations in background levels. PMID:19581474

  13. Molecular cloning and characterizations of porcine SAMHD1 and its roles in replication of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shen; Shan, Tongling; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Tong, Wu; Liu, Fei; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Qingzhan; Tong, Guangzhi

    2014-12-01

    The sterile alpha motif and HD domain 1 (SAMHD1) protein is a novel innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells. Here, we cloned the full-length SAMHD1 complementary DNA (cDNA) from porcine peripheral blood lymphocytes. The porcine SAMHD1 cDNA was of 3951?bp with an open reading frame of 1884?bp, encoding a polypeptide of 627 amino acids. Porcine SAMHD1 mRNA was detected in all swine tissues examined, with the higher expression in the tonsil, lung, liver, and lymph node tissues. The SAMHD1 protein was localized to the nucleus. Overexpression of SAMHD1 blocked the proliferation of HuN4, a highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV), in MARC-145 cells, by inhibiting the synthesis of the HuN4 complement RNA. The antiviral effects of the simian SAMHD1 protein were nearly equivalent to those of porcine SAMHD1 in the HuN4-infected MARC-145 cells. Phosphorylation analysis of SAMHD1 showed that overexpressed SAMHD1 protein was in primarily an unphosphorylated state. SAMHD1 overexpression increased the transcript abundance of IFN-stimulated genes ISG15 and ISG56. The mRNA levels of SAMHD1 and ISGs were significantly increased in porcine alveolar macrophages infected with HP-PRRSV. SAMHD1 protein level was also elevated, and the protein was not phosphorylated during infection. Collectively, our data indicate that SAMHDI inhibits HP-PRRSV proliferation through inhibiting the replication of HP-PRRSV. SAMHD1 might be the protein participating in the IFN signaling and is thus an important immunoregulatory protein in innate immunity. PMID:25106914

  14. Structureactivity relationships and computer-assisted analysis of respiratory sensitization potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meryl H. Karol; Cynthia Graham; Robert Gealy; Orest T. Macina; Nancy Sussman; Herbert S. Rosenkranz

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying respiratory sensitivity to chemicals is uncertain but is assumed to involve immunologic components with pharmacologic and neurologic involvement. Predictive testing would be valuable to prevent occurrence of hypersensitivity. Several in vitro and in vivo approaches have been used for predictive purposes. In vitro methods have included assessment of the ability of the chemical to undergo reaction with

  15. Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle makers exposed to stannic chloride solution and other potentially hazardous substances

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Levy; F. Davis; B. Johnson

    1985-01-01

    Concern about upper respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms among workers at a glass bottle manufacturing plant led to an epidemiologic and an industrial hygiene survey. Questionnaire responses from 35 hot end and 53 cold end workers indicated that the incidence of wheezing, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, and cough was significantly elevated among hot end workers. Among both smokers

  16. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells. PMID:25565207

  17. Predatory bacteria: a potential ally against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kadouri, Daniel E; To, Kevin; Shanks, Robert M Q; Doi, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria have emerged as a serious threat to human and animal health. Bdellovibrio spp. and Micavibrio spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that prey on other Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the ability of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus to prey on MDR Gram-negative clinical strains was examined. Although the potential use of predatory bacteria to attack MDR pathogens has been suggested, the data supporting these claims is lacking. By conducting predation experiments we have established that predatory bacteria have the capacity to attack clinical strains of a variety of ß-lactamase-producing, MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Our observations indicate that predatory bacteria maintained their ability to prey on MDR bacteria regardless of their antimicrobial resistance, hence, might be used as therapeutic agents where other antimicrobial drugs fail. PMID:23650563

  18. Prospects for vaccination against the ticks of pets and the potential impact on pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Villar, Margarita; Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Merino, Octavio; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, Gabriela; Galindo, Ruth C

    2015-02-28

    Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as ticks greatly impact human and animal health. In particular, many diseases of dogs and cats are potentially transmissible to people by arthropod vectors and therefore their control is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use vector protective antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations and pathogen infection. However, as reviewed in this paper, very little progress has been made for the control of ectoparasite infestations and VBD in pets using vaccination with vector protective antigens. The growing interaction between pets and people underlines the importance of developing new interventions for the monitoring and control of VBD. PMID:25555312

  19. Potentially Pathogenic Escherichia coli Can Form a Biofilm under Conditions Relevant to the Food Production Chain

    PubMed Central

    Sekse, Camilla; Berg, Kristin; Johannesen, Karianne C. S.; Solheim, Heidi; Vestby, Lene K.; Urdahl, Anne Margrete

    2014-01-01

    The biofilm-producing abilities of potentially human-pathogenic serotypes of Escherichia coli from the ovine reservoir were studied at different temperatures and on different surfaces. A possible influence of the hydrophobicity of the bacterial cells, as well as the presence of two virulence factors, the Shiga toxin-encoding (Stx) bacteriophage and the eae gene, was also studied. A total of 99 E. coli isolates of serotypes O26:H11, O103:H2, and O103:H25 isolated from sheep feces were included. The results show that isolates of all three E. coli serotypes investigated can produce biofilm on stainless steel, glass, and polystyrene at 12, 20, and 37°C. There was a good general correlation between the results obtained on the different surfaces. E. coli O103:H2 isolates produced much more biofilm than those of the other two serotypes at all three temperatures. In addition, isolates of serotype O26:H11 produced more biofilm than those of O103:H25 at 37°C. The hydrophobicity of the isolates varied between serotypes and was also influenced by temperature. The results strongly indicated that hydrophobicity influenced the attachment of the bacteria rather than their ability to form biofilm once attached. Isolates with the eae gene produced less biofilm at 37°C than isolates without this gene. The presence of a Stx bacteriophage did not influence biofilm production. In conclusion, our results show that potentially human-pathogenic E. coli from the ovine reservoir can form biofilm on various surfaces and at several temperatures relevant for food production and handling. PMID:24362422

  20. Characterisation of acute respiratory infections at a United Kingdom paediatric teaching hospital: observational study assessing the impact of influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) on predominant viral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organisation, influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) has moved into the post-pandemic phase, but there were still high numbers of infections occurring in the United Kingdom in 2010-11. It is therefore important to examine the burden of acute respiratory infections at a large children’s hospital to determine pathogen prevalence, occurrence of co-infection, prevalence of co-morbidities and diagnostic yield of sampling methods. Methods This was a retrospective study of respiratory virus aetiology in acute admissions to a paediatric teaching hospital in the North West of England between 1st April 2010 and 31st March 2011. Respiratory samples were analysed either with a rapid RSV test if the patient had symptoms suggestive of bronchiolitis, followed by multiplex PCR testing for ten respiratory viruses, or with multiplex PCR testing alone if the patient had suspected other ARI. Patient demographics and data regarding severity of illness, presence of co-morbidities and respiratory virus sampling method were retrieved from case notes. Results 645 patients were admitted during the study period. 82/645 (12.7%) patients were positive for 2009 pdmH1N1, of whom 24 (29.2%) required PICU admission, with 7.3% mortality rate. Viral co-infection occurred in 48/645 (7.4%) patients and was not associated with more severe disease. Co-morbidities were present more frequently in older children, but there was no significant difference in prevalence of co-morbidity between 2009 pdmH1N1 patients and those with other ARI. NPA samples had the highest diagnostic yield with 192/210 (91.4%) samples yielding an organism. Conclusions Influenza A (2009 pdmH1N1) is an ongoing cause of occasionally severe disease affecting both healthy children and those with co-morbidities. Surveillance of viral pathogens provides valuable information on patterns of disease. PMID:24948099

  1. Survival of Potentially Pathogenic Human-Associated Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Anabelle; Garland, Jay L.; Lim, Daniel V.

    1996-01-01

    Plants may serve as reservoirs for human-associated bacteria (H-AB) in long-term space missions containing bioregenerative life support systems. The current study examined the abilities of five human-associated potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli, to colonize and grow in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat, a candidate crop for life support. All of these bacteria have been recovered from past NASA missions and present potential problems for future missions. The abilities of these organisms to adhere to the roots of axenic five-day-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora rojo) were evaluated by enumeration of the attached organisms after a one hour incubation of roots in a suspension (approximately 10(exp 8 cu/ml)) of the H-AB. Results showed that a greater percentage of P. aeruginosa cells adhered to the wheat roots than the other four H-AB. Similarly incubated seedlings were also grown under attempted axenic conditions for seven days to examine the potential of each organism to proliferate in the rhizosphere (root colonization capacity). P. cepacia and P. aeruginosa showed considerable growth. E. coli and S. aureus showed no significant growth, and S. pyogenes died off in the wheat rhizosphere. Studies examining the effects of competition on the survival of these microorganisms indicated that P. aeruginosa was the only organism that survived in the rhizosphere of hydroponically grown wheat in the presence of different levels of microbial competition.

  2. Coinfection of pigs with Porcine Respiratory Coronavirus and Bordetella bronchisphica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coinfection with two or more pathogens is a common occurrence in respiratory diseases of most species. The manner in which multiple pathogens interact is not always straightforward, however. Bordetella bronchiseptica and porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) are respiratory pathogens of pigs whos...

  3. "Features of two proteins of Leptospira interrogans with potential role in host-pathogen interactions"

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is considered a re-emerging infectious disease caused by pathogenic spirochaetes of the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic leptospires have the ability to survive and disseminate to multiple organs after penetrating the host. Leptospires were shown to express surface proteins that interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to plasminogen (PLG). This study examined the interaction of two putative leptospiral proteins with laminin, collagen Type I, collagen Type IV, cellular fibronectin, plasma fibronectin, PLG, factor H and C4bp. Results We show that two leptospiral proteins encoded by LIC11834 and LIC12253 genes interact with laminin in a dose - dependent and saturable mode, with dissociation equilibrium constants (KD) of 367.5 and 415.4 nM, respectively. These proteins were named Lsa33 and Lsa25 (Leptospiral surface adhesin) for LIC11834 and LIC12253, respectively. Metaperiodate - treated laminin reduced Lsa25 - laminin interaction, suggesting that sugar moieties of this ligand participate in this interaction. The Lsa33 is also PLG - binding receptor, with a KD of 23.53 nM, capable of generating plasmin in the presence of an activator. Although in a weak manner, both proteins interact with C4bp, a regulator of complement classical route. In silico analysis together with proteinase K and immunoflorescence data suggest that these proteins might be surface exposed. Moreover, the recombinant proteins partially inhibited leptospiral adherence to immobilized laminin and PLG. Conclusions We believe that these multifunctional proteins have the potential to participate in the interaction of leptospires to hosts by mediating adhesion and by helping the bacteria to escape the immune system and to overcome tissue barriers. To our knowledge, Lsa33 is the first leptospiral protein described to date with the capability of binding laminin, PLG and C4bp in vitro. PMID:22463075

  4. Potential oversummering and overwintering regions for the wheat stripe rust pathogen in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma-Poudyal, Dipak; Chen, Xianming; Rupp, Richard Alan

    2014-07-01

    Epidemics of wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici ( Pst), are more frequent in the regions where Pst can oversummer and overwinter. Regions for potential oversummering and overwintering of Pst were determined in the contiguous United States using a survival index (SI) ranging from 0 (most unfavorable) to 10 (most favorable) developed based on long-term weather data. The pathogen can survive in cool summer in the most regions north of latitude 40°N, particularly Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and California. Due to limiting high temperatures, it survives marginally during summer in Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island and Texas. Similarly, unfavorable hot summer restricts summer survival of the pathogen in the most regions south of 40°N except for highlands in the Rocky or Appalachian Mountains. Warm winters favor fungal survival in most regions south of 40°N and the Pacific Coast, including Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas and Washington. Severe winters do not allow survival in most regions north of 40°N and east of the Rocky Mountains, whereas less severe winter in Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah and Virginia permits marginal survival of Pst. Most wheat-growing regions have climatic suitability for either oversummering or overwintering. Both oversummering and overwintering can occur in the Pacific Northwest (Idaho, Oregon and Washington), Arizona, California, North Carolina, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. These regions may provide primary inoculum for stripe rust epidemics in their own and surrounding regions.

  5. Protective or pathogenic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as potential biomarker in cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Miriam; Spaccapelo, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the major lethal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is characterized by persistent coma along with symmetrical motor signs. Several clinical, histopathological, and laboratory studies have suggested that cytoadherence of parasitized erythrocytes, neural injury by malarial toxin, and excessive inflammatory cytokine production are possible pathogenic mechanisms. Although the detailed pathophysiology of CM remains unsolved, it is thought that the binding of parasitized erythrocytes to the cerebral endothelia of microvessels, leading to their occlusion and the consequent angiogenic dysregulation play a key role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent evidences showed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor-related molecules are over-expressed in the brain tissues of CM patients, as well as increased levels of VEGF are detectable in biologic samples from malaria patients. Whether the modulation of VEGF is causative agent of CM mortality or a specific phenotype of patients with susceptibility to fatal CM needs further evaluation. Currently, there is no biological test available to confirm the diagnosis of CM and its complications. It is hoped that development of biomarkers to identify patients and potential risk for adverse outcomes would greatly enhance better intervention and clinical management to improve the outcomes. We review and discuss here what it is currently known in regard to the role of VEGF in CM as well as VEGF as a potential biomarker. PMID:24601908

  6. Present-day potentialities of endoscopic diagnostics and treatment of early cancer in respiratory and digestive tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Karpova, E. S.

    1999-12-01

    The paper presents the latest potentialities of the endoscopic fluorescent diagnostics as well as endoscopic electric-, laser surgery and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the early cancer in the respiratory and digestive tracts. We present in detail indication and factors determining the application of the endoscopic resection of the tumor. The advantages of the combination application of PDT, electro-, Nd:YAG laser surgery and brachitherapy are stressed. The near and remote results of endoscopic treatment of the early cancer in larynx (37), lung (109), esophagus (39) and stomach (58) are shown.

  7. Cross-infection potential of crown rot pathogen ( Lasiodiplodia theobromae ) isolates and their management using potential native bioagents in banana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Thangavelu; G. Sangeetha; M. M. Mustaffa

    2007-01-01

    Crown rot infected banana samples collected from different regions of India revealed that the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae was the major pathogen responsible for crown rot and Colletotrichum musae and Fusarium spp. were the minor pathogens. The cross-inoculation experiment, conducted using five different virulent isolates of L. theobromae on five different commercial cultivars of banana, demonstrated that generally the isolates were

  8. Activation of cytokines and NF-kappa B in corneal epithelial cells infected by respiratory syncytial virus: potential relevance in ocular inflammation and respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Bitko, Vira; Garmon, Nicolle E; Cao, Tin; Estrada, Benjamin; Oakes, John E; Lausch, Robert N; Barik, Sailen

    2004-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection, claiming millions of lives annually. The virus infects various cells of the respiratory tract as well as resident inflammatory cells such as macrophages. Infection activates a variety of cellular factors such as cytokines and the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-kappa B, all of which are important players in the respiratory disease. However, the exact natural route of RSV infection and its etiology remain relatively unknown. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that human corneal epithelial cells, which constitute the outermost layer of the cornea, can be infected with RSV, and that the infection leads to the activation of proinflammatory macromolecules. Results Corneal swabs obtained from pediatric patients with acute respiratory disease were found to contain RSV at a high frequency (43 positive out of 72 samples, i.e., 60%). Primary corneal epithelial cells in tissue culture supported robust infection and productive growth of RSV. Infection resulted in the activation of TNF-?, IL-6 and sixteen chemokines as well as NF-?B. Three proinflammatory CXC chemokines (MIG, I-TAC, IP-10) underwent the greatest activation. Conclusions The ocular epithelium is readily infected by RSV. The pro-inflammatory cytokines are likely to play critical roles in the etiology of inflammation and conjunctivitis commonly seen in pediatric patients with respiratory infections. RSV-eye interactions have important implications in RSV transmission, immunopathology of RSV disease, and in the management of conjunctivitis. PMID:15256003

  9. Pre and post harvest interventions for preventing potential contamination of apples with human pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible presence of pathogens on the surface and/or inaccessible sites (calyx, stem, and/or core) of apples has implications for the microbiological safety of supplies to the fresh and fresh-cut industry. Contamination of apples with human pathogen can occur during growth, harvesting, distribut...

  10. Functional analysis of a lipolytic protein, a potential phytoplasma pathogenicity factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wall-less bacteria known as phytoplasmas are obligate transkingdom parasites and pathogens of plants and insect vectors. These unusual bacteria possess some of the smallest genomes known among pathogenic bacteria, and have never been successfully isolated in artificial culture. Disease symptoms in...

  11. Chronic laminitis is associated with potential bacterial pathogens in the laminae.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Janet C; Park, Joong-Wook; Häggblom, Max M; Fennell, Michael J; Fugaro, Michael N

    2012-08-17

    A common sequella of chronic laminitis in horses is repeated abscesses with variable lameness and drainage. It is unclear whether the exudate represents the debridement phase of a non-septic inflammatory process involving clearance of laminar tissue damaged during the acute episode of laminitis, or a response to a microbial infection developed by ascent of microbes from the environment to the tissue via the white line. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility that an undiagnosed microbial infection in laminar tissue is present in laminar tissue collected from chronically laminitic horses without an active hoof abscess. Methods to collect laminar tissue, aseptically, from control (non-laminitic) horses and those with chronic/recurrent laminitis are described. Laminae homogenates were evaluated for the presence of bacteria. Bacteria were identified using biochemical tests and sequencing of 16S rRNA and virulence genes. Laminae from chronically laminitic horses revealed 100-fold higher levels (P=0.002) of bacteria compared to control, non-laminitic horses. Although environmental organisms were identified, potential pathogens were identified. Included were Gram positive bacteria, Brevibacterium luteolum, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. as well as Gram negative bacteria, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Alcaligenes faecalis. Further research is warranted to evaluate the role of bacteria in equine chronic laminitis. PMID:22410310

  12. Host-pathogen Interaction at the Intestinal Mucosa Correlates With Zoonotic Potential of Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; de Greeff, Astrid; van Rooijen, Willemien J. M.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Nielsen, Jens; Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Heuvelink, Annet; van der Ende, Arie; Smith, Hilde; Schultsz, Constance

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Streptococcus suis has emerged as an important cause of bacterial meningitis in adults. The ingestion of undercooked pork is a risk factor for human S. suis serotype 2 (SS2) infection. Here we provide experimental evidence indicating that the gastrointestinal tract is an entry site of SS2 infection. Methods.?We developed a noninvasive in vivo model to study oral SS2 infection in piglets. We compared in vitro interaction of S. suis with human and porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Results.?Two out of 15 piglets showed clinical symptoms compatible with S. suis infection 24–48 hours after ingestion of SS2. SS2 was detected in mesenteric lymph nodes of 40% of challenged piglets. SS2 strains isolated from patients showed significantly higher adhesion to human IEC compared to invasive strains isolated from pigs. In contrast, invasive SS9 strains showed significantly higher adhesion to porcine IEC. Translocation across human IEC, which occurred predominately via a paracellular route, was significantly associated with clonal complex 1, the predominant zoonotic genotype. Adhesion and translocation were dependent on capsular polysaccharide production. Conclusions.?SS2 should be considered a food-borne pathogen. S. suis interaction with human and pig IEC correlates with S. suis serotype and genotype, which can explain the zoonotic potential of SS2. PMID:25525050

  13. Occurrence of potentially pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria in Mexican household potable water: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental opportunistic pathogens found in natural and human-engineered waters, including drinking water distribution systems and household plumbing. This pilot study examined the frequency of occurrence of NTM in household potable water samples in Mexico City. Potable water samples were collected from the “main house faucet” and kitchen faucet. The presence of aerobic-mesophilic bacteria (AMB), total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC) and NTM species were determined. Mycobacteria species were identified by PCR restriction enzyme pattern analysis (PRA) of the 65-kDa heat shock protein gene (hsp65) and sequencing of the hypervariable region 2 (V2) of the 16S rRNA gene and of the rpoB gene. Results AMB (<100 CFU/ml) were present in 118 out of 120 samples; only two samples were outside guidelines ranges (>100 CFU/ml). TC and FC were detected in four and one samples, respectively. NTM species were recovered from 16% samples (19/120) and included M. mucogenicum (nine), M. porcinum (three), M. avium (three), M. gordonae (one), M. cosmeticum (one), M. fortuitum (one), and Mycobacterium sp (one). All household water samples that contained NTM complied with the standards required to grade the water as “good quality” potable water. Conclusion Household potable water may be a potential source of NTM infection in Mexico City. PMID:24330835

  14. Adaptive potential of ash (Fraxinus excelsior) populations against the novel emerging pathogen Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus

    PubMed Central

    Kjær, Erik Dahl; McKinney, Lea Vig; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Hansen, Lars Nørgaard; Hansen, Jon Kehlet

    2012-01-01

    An emerging infectious pathogen Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus has spread across much of Europe within recent years causing devastating damage on European common ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior) and associated plant communities. The present study demonstrates the presence of additive genetic variation in susceptibility of natural F. excelsior populations to the new invasive disease. We observe high levels of additive variation in the degree of susceptibility with relatively low influence of environmental factors (narrow-sense heritability = 0.37–0.52). Most native trees are found to be highly susceptible, and we estimate that only around 1% has the potential of producing offspring with expected crown damage of <10% under the present disease pressure. The results suggest that the presence of additive genetic diversity in natural F. excelsior populations can confer the species with important ability to recover, but that low resistance within natural European populations is to be expected because of a low frequency of the hypo-sensitive trees. Large effective population sizes will be required to avoid genetic bottlenecks. The role of artificial selection and breeding for protection of the species is discussed based on the findings. PMID:25568043

  15. Feline respiratory disease complex.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Leah A

    2011-11-01

    Feline respiratory disease complex (FRDC) refers to the characteristic acute presentation of a contagious respiratory or ocular disease caused by one or multiple pathogens. Environmental and host factors impact the transmission, clinical presentation, preventive strategy, and treatment of affected cats. The FRDC is especially problematic in settings where large numbers of cats cohabit, including animal shelters, catteries, and semi-feral colonies. Although elimination of FRDC is an unrealistic goal, improved understanding can lead to strategies to minimize disease impact. PMID:22041216

  16. Assessing Pathogen Levels in Dairy Lagoon Wastewater and Potential Evaporation Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P.; Biswas, S.; Souza, A.; Silva-del-Rio, N.; Vaddella, V. K.; Castillo, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The ongoing drought in California necessitates the conservation of existing water resources while protecting the water quality. There is a critical need to improve the understanding of evaporation losses from dairy lagoons in California, and their corresponding changes in pathogen levels in the lagoon wastewater. We have carried out preliminary studies involving extensive dairy lagoon water sampling, and batch-scale experiments. The dairy wastewater was collected from both primary and secondary lagoons in three counties of California (Merced, Tulare, and Glenn Counties) for enumerating the levels of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Subsequently, we conducted batch-scale experiments at mesophilic (31 and 37 ?C) and thermophilic temperatures (43 and 49 ?C) to understand the E. coli O157:H7 inactivation process and potential evaporative water losses. In addition, we compared the evaporation losses under the environment of biological activity and the environment of restricted biological activity (extreme environment with low pH). For E. coli O157:H7 enumeration, we used MacConkey agar, while for Salmonella spp., XLD agar was used. Listeria monocytogenes levels were measured using PALCAM agar (with selective supplement). In flushed dairy wastewater (fresh) samples, the average of E. coli O157:H7 levels were 2 × 104 CFU/mL. The average Listeria monocytogenes levels in flushed manure were 9 × 101. The levels of Salmonella spp. were non-detectable. In mesophilic condition (37 ?C) after 5 days of incubation, 8% of total water loss was observed, while at thermophilic temperature (49 ?C), 70% of total water loss was observed. After 5 days of incubation at 37 ?C, E. coli O157:H7 levels in flushed dairy manure were increased from 2.8 × 103 to 5.2 × 104 CFU/mL, while at 49 ?C, E. coli O157:H7 levels were reduced from 2.8 × 103 to 5 × 101 CFU/mL after 4 days of incubation. We anticipate that the results of this study would be useful in understanding the dynamics of water losses and pathogen inactivation in dairy lagoon wastewater.

  17. Loss of pathogenic potential after cloning of the low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi ZS7 tick isolate: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Siebers, A; Zhong, W; Wallich, R; Simon, M M

    1999-12-01

    To study clonal polymorphism of Borrelia hurgdorferi antigens in the course of an experimental infection sequence, the low-passage tick isolate ZS7 was cloned by two rounds of agar subsurface plating. The resulting clones showed a variable pathogenic potential after experimental infection of C.B-17. scid mice. The test clone 4.2.II, selected for virulence by two passages in immunodeficient scid mice, failed to establish a successful infection in immunocompetent AKR/N mice, indicating the loss of pathogenicity traits required for evasion of the specific immune response. Cloning of natural or clinical B. burgdorferi isolates is a prerequisite for analyzing genetic and antigenic variation of the pathogen. However, the inevitable propagation in artificial media during cloning may lead to a loss of pathogenic features rendering the subsequent experimental infection of animals impossible. A combined procedure of in vitro cloning and in vivo selection also does not solve the dilemma because B. burgdorferi variants arise by recombinatorial processes in the pathogen's dynamic genome during the course of infection. Consequently, the resulting bacterial isolates from infected animal tissues represent again non-clonal, heterogeneous B. burgdorferi populations. In principle, cloning of a B. burgdorferi population is the appropriate method to analyze the polymorphism of individual molecules during infection. As a caveat, however, one has to envisage that during propagation of individual clones in vitro and in vivo independent genetic variations PMID:10776842

  18. Secretome analysis identifies potential virulence factors of Diplodia corticola, a fungal pathogen involved in cork oak (Quercus suber) decline.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Isabel; Alves, Artur; Correia, António; Devreese, Bart; Esteves, Ana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The characterisation of the secretome of phytopathogenic fungi may contribute to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis. This is particularly relevant for Diplodia corticola, a fungal plant pathogen belonging to the family Botryosphaeriaceae, whose genome remains unsequenced. This phytopathogenic fungus is recognised as one of the most important pathogens of cork oak, being related to the decline of cork oak forests in the Iberian Peninsula. Unfortunately, secretome analysis of filamentous fungi is limited by the low protein concentration and by the presence of many interfering substances, such as polysaccharides, which affect the separation and analysis by 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis. We compared six protein extraction protocols concerning their suitability for further application with proteomic workflows. The protocols involving protein precipitation were the most efficient, with emphasis on TCA-acetone protocol, allowing us to identify the most abundant proteins on the secretome of this plant pathogen. Approximately 60% of the spots detected were identified, all corresponding to extracellular proteins. Most proteins identified were carbohydrate degrading enzymes and proteases that may be related to D. corticola pathogenicity. Although the secretome was assessed in a noninfection environment, potential virulence factors such as the putative glucan-?-glucosidase, neuraminidase, and the putative ferulic acid esterase were identified. The data obtained forms a useful basis for a deeper understanding of the pathogenicity and infection biology of D. corticola. Moreover, it will contribute to the development of proteomics studies on other members of the Botryosphaeriaceae. PMID:24863480

  19. Glycans in pathogenic bacteria – potential for targeted covalent therapeutics and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Tra, Van N.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial obstacle to the existing treatment of bacterial diseases is the lack of specific probes that can be used to diagnose and treat pathogenic bacteria in a selective manner while leaving the microbiome largely intact. To tackle this problem, there is an urgent need to develop pathogen-specific therapeutics and diagnostics. Here, we describe recent evidence that indicates distinctive glycans found exclusively on pathogenic bacteria could form the basis of targeted therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. In particular, we highlight the use of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to covalently deliver therapeutics and imaging agents to bacterial glycans. PMID:24647371

  20. Potential Role of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Structural Protein GP2 in Apoptosis Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pujhari, Sujit; Baig, Tayyba T.; Zakhartchouk, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a serious threat to the pork industry, and its pathogenesis needs further investigations. To study the role of two structural proteins of PRRSV in virus-host cells interactions, two stable cell lines (MARC-2a and MARC-N) expressing GP2 and N proteins, respectively, were established. We induced apoptosis in these cells by treating them with staurosporine and found a significant reduction in the number of apoptotic cells in MARC-2a as compared to MARC-N and MARC-145 cells. In addition, we found significantly higher activities of transcriptional factors (NF-?B and AP-1) in both cell lines as compared to MARC-145 (parent cells). Overall, our data suggest that, although both stable cell lines activate NF-?B and AP-1, GP2 triggers the antiapoptotic process through an intermediate step that needs to be further investigated. PMID:24511529

  1. Pathogenic potential of escherichia coli O26 and sorbitol-fermenting escherichia coli O157:NM 

    E-print Network

    Rosser, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are important human pathogens that may cause diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Worldwide, non-sorbitol-fermenting (NSF) VTEC O157:H7 is ...

  2. Bacteriophages with Potential for Inactivation of Fish Pathogenic Bacteria: Survival, Host Specificity and Effect on Bacterial Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carla; Silva, Yolanda J.; Santos, Ana L.; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy may represent a viable alternative to antibiotics to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. Its use, however, requires the awareness of novel kinetics phenomena not applied to conventional drug treatments. The main objective of this work was to isolate bacteriophages with potential to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria, without major effects on the structure of natural bacterial communities of aquaculture waters. The survival was determined in marine water, through quantification by the soft agar overlay technique. The host specificity was evaluated by cross infection. The ecological impact of phage addition on the structure of the bacterial community was evaluated by DGGE of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. The survival period varied between 12 and 91 days, with a higher viability for Aeromonas salmonicida phages. The phages of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and of A. salmonicida infected bacteria of different families with a high efficacy of plating. The specific phages of pathogenic bacteria had no detectable impact on the structure of the bacterial community. In conclusion, V. parahaemolyticus and A. salmonicida phages show good survival time in marine water, have only a moderated impact on the overall bacterial community structure and the desired specificity for host pathogenic bacteria, being potential candidates for therapy of fish infectious diseases in marine aquaculture systems. PMID:22163184

  3. A Comparative Study of Metabolic Network Topology between a Pathogenic and a Non-Pathogenic Bacterium for Potential Drug Target Identification

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Deepak; Lim, Chu Sing; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic network provides a unified platform to integrate all the biological information on genes, proteins, metabolites, drugs and drug targets for a comprehensive system level study of the relationship between metabolism and disease. In recent times, drug-target identification by in silico methods has emerged causing a phenomenal achievement in the field of drug discovery. This paper focuses on describing how microbial drug target identification can be carried out using bioinformatic tools. Specifically, it highlights the use of metabolic ‘choke point’ and ‘load point’ analyses to understand the local and global properties of metabolic networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and allow us to identify potential drug targets. We also list out top 10 choke point enzymes based on the load point values and the number of shortest paths. A non-pathogenic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and a related pathogenic bacteria P.aeruginosa PA01 was selected for the network anlaysis. A comparative study of the metabolic networks of these two microbes highlights the analogies and differences between their respective pathways. System analysis of metabolic networks will help us in identifying new drug targets which in turn will generate more in-depth understanding of the mechanism of diseases and thus provide better guidance for drug discovery. PMID:21347179

  4. A Comparative Study of Metabolic Network Topology between a Pathogenic and a Non-Pathogenic Bacterium for Potential Drug Target Identification.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Deepak; Lim, Chu Sing; Sakharkar, Meena K

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic network provides a unified platform to integrate all the biological information on genes, proteins, metabolites, drugs and drug targets for a comprehensive system level study of the relationship between metabolism and disease. In recent times, drug-target identification by in silico methods has emerged causing a phenomenal achievement in the field of drug discovery. This paper focuses on describing how microbial drug target identification can be carried out using bioinformatic tools. Specifically, it highlights the use of metabolic 'choke point' and 'load point' analyses to understand the local and global properties of metabolic networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and allow us to identify potential drug targets. We also list out top 10 choke point enzymes based on the load point values and the number of shortest paths. A non-pathogenic bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and a related pathogenic bacteria P.aeruginosa PA01 was selected for the network anlaysis. A comparative study of the metabolic networks of these two microbes highlights the analogies and differences between their respective pathways. System analysis of metabolic networks will help us in identifying new drug targets which in turn will generate more in-depth understanding of the mechanism of diseases and thus provide better guidance for drug discovery. PMID:21347179

  5. Development of two real-time multiplex PCR assays for the detection and quantification of eight key bacterial pathogens in lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, N J; McHugh, M P; Russell, C D; Mark, H; Conway Morris, A; Laurenson, I F; Hill, A T; Templeton, K E

    2015-08-01

    The frequent lack of a positive and timely microbiological diagnosis in patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is an important obstacle to antimicrobial stewardship. Patients are typically prescribed broad-spectrum empirical antibiotics while microbiology results are awaited, but, because these are often slow, negative, or inconclusive, de-escalation to narrow-spectrum agents rarely occurs in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate two multiplex real-time PCR assays for the sensitive detection and accurate quantification of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Moraxella catarrhalis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We found that all eight bacterial targets could be reliably quantified from sputum specimens down to a concentration of 100 CFUs/reaction (8333 CFUs/mL). Furthermore, all 249 positive control isolates were correctly detected with our assay, demonstrating effectiveness on both reference strains and local clinical isolates. The specificity was 98% on a panel of nearly 100 negative control isolates. Bacterial load was quantified accurately when three bacterial targets were present in mixtures of varying concentrations, mimicking likely clinical scenarios in LRTI. Concordance with culture was 100% for culture-positive sputum specimens, and 90% for bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and additional culture-negative bacterial infections were detected and quantified. In conclusion, a quantitative molecular test for eight key bacterial causes of LRTI has the potential to provide a more sensitive decision-making tool, closer to the time-point of patient admission than current standard methods. This should facilitate de-escalation from broad-spectrum to narrow-spectrum antibiotics, substantially improving patient management and supporting efforts to curtail inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:25980353

  6. Potential of Cerbera odollam as a bio-fungicide for post-harvest pathogen Penicilium digitatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harbant; Yin-Chu, Sue; Al-Samarrai, Ghassan; Syarhabil, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Postharvest diseases due to fungal infection contribute to economic losses in agriculture industry during storage, transportation or in the market. Penicillium digitatum is one of the common pathogen responsible for the postharvest rot in fruits. This disease is currently being controlled by synthetic fungicides such as Guazatine and Imazalil. However, heavy use of fungicides has resulted in environmental pollution, such as residue in fruit that expose a significant risk to human health. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicide to raise customer confidence. In the current research, different concentrations (500 to 3000 ppm) of ethanol extract of Cerbera odollam or commonly known as Pong-pong were compared with Neem and the controls (Positive control/Guazatine; Negative control/DMSO) for the anti-fungicide activity in PDA media contained in 10 cm diameter Petri dishes, using a modification of Ruch and Worf's method. The toxicity (Lc50) of the C.odollam extract was determined by Brine-shrimp test (BST). The results of the research indicated that crude extraction from C.odollam showed the highest inhibition rate (93%) and smallest colony diameter (0.63 cm) at 3000 ppm in vitro compared with Neem (inhibition rate: 88%; colony diameter: 1.33 cm) and control (Positive control/Guazatine inhibition rate: 79%, colony diameter: 1.9 cm; Negative control/DMSO inhibition rate: 0%, colony diameter: 9.2 cm). C.odollam recorded Lc50 value of 5 µg/ml which is safe but to be used with caution (unsafe level: below 2 µg/ml). The above anti-microbial activity and toxicity value results indicate that C.odollam has a potential of being a future bio-fungicide that could be employed as an alternative to synthetic fungicide.

  7. Chemosensory TRP channels in the respiratory tract: role in toxic lung injury and potential as "sweet spots" for targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Büch, Thomas; Schäfer, Eva; Steinritz, Dirk; Dietrich, Alexander; Gudermann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Acute toxic lung injury by reactive inhalational compounds is an important and still unresolved medical problem. Hazardous gases or vapors, e. g. chlorine, phosgene, sulfur mustard or methyl isocyanate, are released during occupational accidents or combustion processes and also represent a potential threat in terroristic scenarios. According to their broad-range chemical reactivity, the mechanism of lung injury evoked by these agents has long been described as rather unspecific. Consequently, therapeutic options are still restricted to symptomatic treatment. However, in recent years, ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified to act as specific sensor molecules expressed in the respiratory tract and to engage defined signaling pathways upon inhalational exposure to toxic challenges. These pulmonary receptor molecules have been primarily characterized in sensory neurons of the lung. However, chemosensory molecules are also expressed in non-neuronal cells, e.g. in the lung epithelium as well as in the pulmonary vasculature. Thus, activation of respiratory chemosensors by toxic inhalants promotes a complex signaling network directly or indirectly regulating pulmonary blood flow, the integrity of the epithelial lining, and the mucociliary clearance of the bronchial system. This review gives a synopsis on reactive lung-toxic agents and their specific target molecules in the lung and summarizes the current knowledge about the pathophysiological role of chemosensory signaling in neuronal and non-neuronal cells in toxic lung injury. Finally, we describe possible future strategies for a causal, specifically tailored treatment option based on the mechanistic understanding of molecular events ensuing inhalation of lung-toxic agents. PMID:23532495

  8. The bryophyte genus Sphagnum is a reservoir for powerful and extraordinary antagonists and potentially facultative human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Opelt, Katja; Berg, Christian; Berg, Gabriele

    2007-07-01

    Sphagnum plants grow in natural, species-poor carpets at low pH but without any known substantial fungal disease. To investigate this phenomenon, we analysed bacterial populations associated with two Sphagnum species with different ecological behaviour, namely S. magellanicum and S. fallax, from three sites in Germany and three in Norway, with a special focus on the functional group of antagonists. The screening of 493 bacterial isolates for antagonistic activity against fungal pathogens resulted in 237 (48%) active isolates. We found a higher proportion of antagonists for S. magellanicum (24%) than we did for S. fallax (19%) in general. The majority of the antagonists belonged to the genera Serratia (15%), Burkholderia (13.5%), Staphylococcus (13.5%), and Pseudomonas (10%). In contrast to the high moss specificity found for antagonistic bacteria, Burkholderia as well as Serratia isolates with highly similar molecular fingerprints as ascertained by BOX-PCR for both Sphagnum species were found. Interestingly, a high proportion of antagonists, for example Staphylococcus, Hafnia, Yersinia, and Pantoea, were identified as strains that are known as facultative pathogens of humans. Sphagnum plants represent an ecological niche not only for diverse and extraordinary microbial populations with a high potential for biological control of plant pathogens but also for opportunistic human pathogens. PMID:17484734

  9. Role of Mycoplasma penetrans Endonuclease P40 as a Potential Pathogenic Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Blanchard, Alain; Loutfi, Mohammed; Montagnier, Luc; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we reported the purification to homogeneity and characterization of Ca2+- and Mg2+-dependent endonuclease P40 produced by Mycoplasma penetrans (M. Bendjennat, A. Blanchard, M. Loutfi, L. Montagnier, and E. Bahraoui, J. Bacteriol. 179; 2210–2220, 1997), a mycoplasma which was isolated for the first time from the urine of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. To evaluate how this nuclease could interact with host cells, we tested its effect on CEM and Molt-4 lymphocytic cell lines and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We observed that 10?7 to 10?9 M P40 is able to mediate a cytotoxic effect. We found that 100% of cells were killed after 24 h of incubation with 10?7 M P40 while only 40% cytotoxicity was obtained after 72 h of incubation with 10?9 M P40. Phase-contrast microscopy observations of P40-treated cells revealed morphological changes, including pronounced blebbing of the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic shrinkage characteristic of programmed cell death, which is in agreement with the internucleosomal fragmentation of P40-treated cell DNA as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis. We showed that 125I-radiolabeled or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled P40 was able to bind specifically in a dose-dependent manner to the cell membrane of CEM cells, which suggested that the cytotoxicity of P40 endonuclease was mediated by its interaction with the cell surface receptor(s). The concentration of unlabeled P40 required to inhibit by 50% the formation of 125I-P40-CEM complexes was about 3 × 10?9 M, indicating a high-affinity interaction. Both P40 interaction and cytotoxicity are Ca2+ dependent. Our results suggest that the cytotoxicity of M. penetrans observed in vitro is mediated at least partially by secreted P40, which, after interaction with host cells, can induce an apoptosis-like death. These results strongly suggest a major role of mycoplasmal nucleases as potential pathogenic determinants. PMID:10456886

  10. Role of Mycoplasma penetrans endonuclease P40 as a potential pathogenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Bendjennat, M; Blanchard, A; Loutfi, M; Montagnier, L; Bahraoui, E

    1999-09-01

    Recently, we reported the purification to homogeneity and characterization of Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-dependent endonuclease P40 produced by Mycoplasma penetrans (M. Bendjennat, A. Blanchard, M. Loutfi, L. Montagnier, and E. Bahraoui, J. Bacteriol. 179; 2210-2220, 1997), a mycoplasma which was isolated for the first time from the urine of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. To evaluate how this nuclease could interact with host cells, we tested its effect on CEM and Molt-4 lymphocytic cell lines and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We observed that 10(-7) to 10(-9) M P40 is able to mediate a cytotoxic effect. We found that 100% of cells were killed after 24 h of incubation with 10(-7) M P40 while only 40% cytotoxicity was obtained after 72 h of incubation with 10(-9) M P40. Phase-contrast microscopy observations of P40-treated cells revealed morphological changes, including pronounced blebbing of the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic shrinkage characteristic of programmed cell death, which is in agreement with the internucleosomal fragmentation of P40-treated cell DNA as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis. We showed that (125)I-radiolabeled or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled P40 was able to bind specifically in a dose-dependent manner to the cell membrane of CEM cells, which suggested that the cytotoxicity of P40 endonuclease was mediated by its interaction with the cell surface receptor(s). The concentration of unlabeled P40 required to inhibit by 50% the formation of (125)I-P40-CEM complexes was about 3 x 10(-9) M, indicating a high-affinity interaction. Both P40 interaction and cytotoxicity are Ca(2+) dependent. Our results suggest that the cytotoxicity of M. penetrans observed in vitro is mediated at least partially by secreted P40, which, after interaction with host cells, can induce an apoptosis-like death. These results strongly suggest a major role of mycoplasmal nucleases as potential pathogenic determinants. PMID:10456886

  11. Sugarcane brown rust – determining genetic variation in the pathogen and identifying potential novel sources of resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major reason for the withdrawal of sugarcane cultivars from production in is the breakdown of resistance to brown rust caused by Puccinia melanaocephala. Genetic characterization of diversity among races of P. melanocephala would help in breeding for resistance to the pathogen. Breeding for durabl...

  12. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Some Plants Against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Satish; M. P. Raghavendra; K. A. Raveesha

    Plants are rich source of antibacterial agents, which could be exploited in human disease management. Aqueous extracts of leaves of 46 plants selected based on an ethnobotanical survey from Mysore region Karnataka (India) were subjected to in vitro antibacterial activity assay against 14 important human pathogenic bacteria employing cup diffusion method. Antibacterial activity of the twelve plants aqueous extracts was

  13. Evaluation of Certain Storage Conditions for Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) Seeds Against Potential Fungal Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MASHOODA BEGUM; S. LOKESH; R. V. RAVISHANKAR; M. D. SHAILAJA; T. V. KUMAR; H. S. SHETTY

    Okra variety Arka Anamika although a most popular, high yielding variety in India, it is susceptible to several fungal pathogens which results in the reduction of yield and nutritional quality. Healthy, moderately and severely infected seeds obtained from local market were evaluated for their storability for a year using different storage containers (cotton, polyethylene and paper bags) at varied temperatures.

  14. Potential alternative hosts for the pea powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe trifolii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Powdery mildew of pea (Pisum sativum) is an important disease in the field and in the greenhouse. The most widely documented powdery mildew pathogen on pea is Erysiphe pisi, but E. baeumleri and E. trifolii have also been reported. We recently showed that E. trifolii is frequently found on pea in th...

  15. Application of a multiplex immunoassay for detection of salivary antibody responses to selected potentially waterborne pathogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Pathogen-specific antibodies in saliva can be used as bioindicators of recent or ongoing infection. Because collection of saliva is easy and painless, i...

  16. THE POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING PHYTOALEXINS TO ENHANCE PLANT RESISTANCE TO OOMYCETE PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoalexins have been shown to be important natural components in plant defense against pathogens. Although the tropical fruit crop papaya (Carica papaya L.) produces several classes of phytoalexins that have been shown to have anti-microbial activity, it is nevertheless highly susceptible to fung...

  17. Fungal diversity and presence of potentially pathogenic fungi in a hospital hot water system treated with on-site monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao; Baron, Julianne L; Vikram, Amit; Stout, Janet E; Bibby, Kyle

    2015-03-15

    Currently, our knowledge of fungal ecology in engineered drinking water systems is limited, despite the potential for these systems to serve as a reservoir for opportunistic pathogens. In this study, hot water samples were collected both prior to and following the addition of monochloramine as an on-site disinfectant in a hospital hot water system. Fungal ecology was then analyzed by high throughput sequencing of the fungal ITS1 region. The results demonstrate that the genera Penicillium, Aspergillus, Peniophora, Cladosporium and Rhodosporidium comprised the core fungal biome of the hospital hot water system. Penicillium dominated the fungal community with an average relative abundance of 88.89% (±6.37%). ITS1 sequences of fungal genera containing potential pathogens such as Aspergillus, Candida, and Fusarium were also detected in this study. No significant change in fungal community structure was observed before and after the initiation of on-site monochloramine water treatment. This work represents the first report of the effects of on-site secondary water disinfection on fungal ecology in premise plumbing system, and demonstrates the necessity of considering opportunistic fungal pathogens during the evaluation of secondary premise plumbing disinfection systems. PMID:25618520

  18. Validity of Methods to Predict the Respiratory Sensitizing Potential of Chemicals: A Study with a Piperidinyl Chlorotriazine Derivative That Caused an Outbreak of Occupational Asthma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeroen A. J. Vanoirbeek; Cindy Mandervelt; Albert R. Cunningham; Peter H. M. Hoet; Haiyan Xu; Hadewijch M. Vanhooren; Benoit Nemery

    2003-01-01

    A piperidinyl chlorotriazine (PCT) derivative, used as a plastic UV-stabilizer, caused an outbreak of occupational asthma. We verified, in BALB\\/c mice, the sensitizing potential of PCT in comparison to a known respiratory sensitizer (toluene diisocya- nate (TDI)) and a known dermal sensitizer (oxazolone), using three different methods in order to evaluate the validity of current models of sensitization. These included

  19. Research on pathogens at Great Lakes beaches: sampling, influential factors, and potential sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    The overall mission of this work is to provide science-based information and methods that will allow beach managers to more accurately make beach closure and advisory decisions, understand the sources and physical processes affecting beach contaminants, and understand how science-based information can be used to mitigate and restore beaches and protect the public. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with many Federal, State, and local agencies and universities, has conducted research on beach health issues in the Great Lakes Region for more than a decade. The work consists of four science elements that align with the USGS Beach Health Initiative Mission: real-time assessments of water quality; coastal processes; pathogens and source tracking; and data analysis, interpretation, and communication. The ongoing or completed research for the pathogens and source tracking topic is described in this fact sheet.

  20. Assessment of oligogalacturonide from citrus pectin as a potential antibacterial agent against foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Chang; Li, Hui-chin; Wu, Po-Hua; Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Wang, Yuh-Tai

    2014-08-01

    Foodborne diseases are an important public health problem in the world. The bacterial resistance against presently used antibiotics is becoming a public health issue; hence, the discovery of new antimicrobial agents from natural sources attracts a lot of attention. Antibacterial activities of oligogalacturonide from commercial microbial pectic enzyme (CPE) treated citrus pectin, which exhibits antioxidant and antitumor activities, against 4 foodborne pathogens including Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was assessed. Pectin hydrolysates from CPE hydrolysis exhibited antibacterial activities. However, no antibacterial activity of pectin was observed. Citrus oligogalacturonide from 24-h hydrolysis exhibited bactericidal effect against all selected foodborne pathogens and displayed minimal inhibitory concentration at 37.5 ?g/mL for P. aeruginosa, L. monocytogenes, and S. Typhimurium, and at 150.0 ?g/mL for S. aureus. PMID:25048440

  1. Acute lower respiratory infections in ?5 year -old hospitalized patients in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country: clinical characteristics and pathogenic etiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few data exist on viral and bacterial etiology of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in ?5 year –old persons in the tropics. Methods We conducted active surveillance of community-acquired ALRI in two hospitals in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country. Patients were tested for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) by direct sputum examination, other bacteria by blood and/or sputum cultures, and respiratory viruses using molecular techniques on nasopharyngeal/throat swabs. Pulmonologists reviewed clinical/laboratory data and interpreted chest X-rays (CXR) to confirm ALRI. Results Between April 2007 - December 2009, 1,904 patients aged ?5 years were admitted with acute pneumonia (50.4%), lung sequelae-associated ALRI (24.3%), isolated pleural effusions (8.9%) or normal CXR-related ALRI (17.1%); 61 (3.2%) died during hospitalization. The two former diagnoses were predominantly due to bacterial etiologies while viral detection was more frequent in the two latter diagnoses. AFB-positive accounted for 25.6% of acute pneumonia. Of the positive cultures (16.8%), abscess-prone Gram-negative bacteria (39.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (38.0%) were most frequent, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (17.7%). Of the identified viruses, the three most common viruses included rhinoviruses (49.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (17.7%) and influenza viruses (12.1%) regardless of the diagnostic groups. Wheezing was associated with viral identification (31.9% vs. 13.8%, p?respiratory viruses and wheezing merits further studies. PMID:23432906

  2. Electroanalytical biosensors and their potential for food pathogen and toxin detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilaria Palchetti; Marco Mascini

    2008-01-01

    The detection and identification of foodborne pathogens continue to rely on conventional culturing techniques. These are very\\u000a elaborate, time-consuming, and have to be completed in a microbiology laboratory and are therefore not suitable for on-site\\u000a monitoring. The need for a more rapid, reliable, specific, and sensitive method of detecting a target analyte, at low cost,\\u000a is the focus of a

  3. A novel nanobody specific for respiratory surfactant protein A has potential for lung targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Mei; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yu, Feng; Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Du, Yu-Kui; Du, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Mulet, Xavier; Coia, Greg; Weng, Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Wu, Min; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lung-targeting drugs are thought to be potential therapies of refractory lung diseases by maximizing local drug concentrations in the lung to avoid systemic circulation. However, a major limitation in developing lung-targeted drugs is the acquirement of lung-specific ligands. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SPA) is predominantly synthesized by type II alveolar epithelial cells, and may serve as a potential lung-targeting ligand. Here, we generated recombinant rat pulmonary SPA (rSPA) as an antigen and immunized an alpaca to produce two nanobodies (the smallest naturally occurring antibodies) specific for rSPA, designated Nb6 and Nb17. To assess these nanobodies’ potential for lung targeting, we evaluated their specificity to lung tissue and toxicity in mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that these anti-rSPA nanobodies selectively bound to rat lungs with high affinity. Furthermore, we intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate-Nb17 in nude mice and observed its preferential accumulation in the lung to other tissues, suggesting high affinity of the nanobody for the lung. Studying acute and chronic toxicity of Nb17 revealed its safety in rats without causing apparent histological alterations. Collectively, we have generated and characterized lung-specific nanobodies, which may be applicable for lung drug delivery. PMID:25926731

  4. A novel nanobody specific for respiratory surfactant protein A has potential for lung targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Mei; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yu, Feng; Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Du, Yu-Kui; Du, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Mulet, Xavier; Coia, Greg; Weng, Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Wu, Min; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lung-targeting drugs are thought to be potential therapies of refractory lung diseases by maximizing local drug concentrations in the lung to avoid systemic circulation. However, a major limitation in developing lung-targeted drugs is the acquirement of lung-specific ligands. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SPA) is predominantly synthesized by type II alveolar epithelial cells, and may serve as a potential lung-targeting ligand. Here, we generated recombinant rat pulmonary SPA (rSPA) as an antigen and immunized an alpaca to produce two nanobodies (the smallest naturally occurring antibodies) specific for rSPA, designated Nb6 and Nb17. To assess these nanobodies' potential for lung targeting, we evaluated their specificity to lung tissue and toxicity in mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that these anti-rSPA nanobodies selectively bound to rat lungs with high affinity. Furthermore, we intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate-Nb17 in nude mice and observed its preferential accumulation in the lung to other tissues, suggesting high affinity of the nanobody for the lung. Studying acute and chronic toxicity of Nb17 revealed its safety in rats without causing apparent histological alterations. Collectively, we have generated and characterized lung-specific nanobodies, which may be applicable for lung drug delivery. PMID:25926731

  5. Influenza Virus Respiratory Infection and Transmission Following Ocular Inoculation in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Belser, Jessica A.; Gustin, Kortney M.; Maines, Taronna R.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of entry for establishment of a respiratory infection. However, the properties which govern ocular tropism of influenza viruses, the mechanisms of virus spread from ocular to respiratory tissue, and the potential differences in respiratory disease initiated from different exposure routes are poorly understood. Here, we established a ferret model of ocular inoculation to explore the development of virus pathogenicity and transmissibility following influenza virus exposure by the ocular route. We found that multiple subtypes of human and avian influenza viruses mounted a productive virus infection in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets following ocular inoculation, and were additionally detected in ocular tissue during the acute phase of infection. H5N1 viruses maintained their ability for systemic spread and lethal infection following inoculation by the ocular route. Replication-independent deposition of virus inoculum from ocular to respiratory tissue was limited to the nares and upper trachea, unlike traditional intranasal inoculation which results in virus deposition in both upper and lower respiratory tract tissues. Despite high titers of replicating transmissible seasonal viruses in the upper respiratory tract of ferrets inoculated by the ocular route, virus transmissibility to naïve contacts by respiratory droplets was reduced following ocular inoculation. These data improve our understanding of the mechanisms of virus spread following ocular exposure and highlight differences in the establishment of respiratory disease and virus transmissibility following use of different inoculation volumes and routes. PMID:22396651

  6. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: Its Potential for Application to Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    BUCHANAN, ROBERT L.; HAVELAAR, ARIE H.; SMITH, MARY ALICE; WHITING, RICHARD C.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    The Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF) is an analytical approach that facilitates the use of currently available data to gain insight regarding dose-response relationships. The use of the KEDRF also helps identify critical knowledge gaps that once filled, will reduce reliance on assumptions. The present study considers how the KEDRF might be applied to pathogenic microorganisms, using fetal listeriosis resulting from maternal ingestion of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes as an initial example. Major biological events along the pathway between food ingestion and the endpoint of concern are systematically considered with regard to dose (i.e., number of organisms), pathogen factors (e.g., virulence), and protective host mechanisms (e.g., immune response or other homeostatic mechanisms). It is concluded that the KEDRF provides a useful structure for systematically evaluating the complex array of host and pathogen factors that influence the dose-response relationship. In particular, the KEDRF supports efforts to specify and quantify the sources of variability, a prerequisite to strengthening the scientific basis for food safety decision making. PMID:19690997

  7. A Novel Bacterial Pathogen of Biomphalaria glabrata: A Potential Weapon for Schistosomiasis Control?

    PubMed Central

    Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Mouahid, Gabriel; Toulza, Eve; Allienne, Jean François; Portela, Julien; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rognon, Anne; Arancibia, Nathalie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is the second-most widespread tropical parasitic disease after malaria. Various research strategies and treatment programs for achieving the objective of eradicating schistosomiasis within a decade have been recommended and supported by the World Health Organization. One of these approaches is based on the control of snail vectors in endemic areas. Previous field studies have shown that competitor or predator introduction can reduce snail numbers, but no systematic investigation has ever been conducted to identify snail microbial pathogens and evaluate their molluscicidal effects. Methodology/Principal findings In populations of Biomphalaria glabrata snails experiencing high mortalities, white nodules were visible on snail bodies. Infectious agents were isolated from such nodules. Only one type of bacteria, identified as a new species of Paenibacillus named Candidatus Paenibacillus glabratella, was found, and was shown to be closely related to P. alvei through 16S and Rpob DNA analysis. Histopathological examination showed extensive bacterial infiltration leading to overall tissue disorganization. Exposure of healthy snails to Paenibacillus-infected snails caused massive mortality. Moreover, eggs laid by infected snails were also infected, decreasing hatching but without apparent effects on spawning. Embryonic lethality was correlated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in eggs. Conclusions/Significance This is the first account of a novel Paenibacillus strain, Ca. Paenibacillus glabratella, as a snail microbial pathogen. Since this strain affects both adult and embryonic stages and causes significant mortality, it may hold promise as a biocontrol agent to limit schistosomiasis transmission in the field. PMID:25719489

  8. Molecular Serotyping and Pathogenic Potential of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Raman; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, an important bacterial pathogen, is responsible for foodborne illnesses worldwide. Examination of food samples for the presence of L. monocytogenes and assessment of their pathogenicity is usually an effective strategy in the prevention of listeriosis. In the present study, we have tested 307 samples of milk and milk products from various places in Tamil Nadu, India for the presence of L. monocytogenes using ISO 11290 and U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual methods. 16S rDNA sequencing and duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for prs and iap genes were used to identify L. monocytogenes at the species level. Fifteen of the 307 samples screen tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Molecular serotyping of the L. monocytogenes isolates by multiplex PCR revealed the predominance of the serogroups 1/2a and 4b. Fourteen of the 15 isolates contained all the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, hlyA, and plcA) screened for using multiplex PCR. Only one isolate of L. monocytogenes was negative for the plcA gene and in vitro phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C activity. L. monocytogenes strains that belong to the serogroup 4b exhibited higher nematocidal activity against Caenorhabditis elegans than the serogroup 1/2a. Worms infected with L. monocytogenes were symptomatic with aberrant contraction of body muscles, loss of pharyngeal pumping, and decreased locomotion, which highlights the pathogenic potential of the L. monocytogenes isolates. PMID:25793931

  9. Regrowth of Potential Opportunistic Pathogens and Algae in Reclaimed-Water Distribution Systems ?

    PubMed Central

    Jjemba, Patrick K.; Weinrich, Lauren A.; Cheng, Wei; Giraldo, Eugenio; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the quality of reclaimed water in treated effluent, after storage, and at three points in the distribution system of four plants in California, Florida, Massachusetts, and New York was conducted for 1 year. The plants had different treatment processes (conventional versus membrane bioreactor), production capacities, and methods for storage of the water, and the intended end uses of the water were different. The analysis focused on the occurrence of indicator bacteria (heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci) and opportunistic pathogens (Aeromonas spp., enteropathogenic E. coli O157:H7, Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., and Pseudomonas spp.), as well as algae. Using immunological methods, E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the effluent of only one system, but it was not detected at the sampling points, suggesting that its survival in the system was poor. Although all of the treatment systems effectively reduced the levels of bacteria in the effluent, bacteria regrew in the reservoir and distribution systems because of the loss of residual disinfectant and high assimilable organic carbon levels. In the systems with open reservoirs, algal growth reduced the water quality by increasing the turbidity and accumulating at the end of the distribution system. Opportunistic pathogens, notably Aeromonas, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Pseudomonas, occurred more frequently than indicator bacteria (enterococci, coliforms, and E. coli). The Mycobacterium spp. were very diverse and occurred most frequently in membrane bioreactor systems, and Mycobacterium cookii was identified more often than the other species. The public health risk associated with these opportunistic pathogens in reclaimed water is unknown. Collectively, our results show the need to develop best management practices for reclaimed water to control bacterial regrowth and degradation of water before it is utilized at the point of use. PMID:20453149

  10. Adaptive Potential of Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster) Populations to the Emerging Pitch Canker Pathogen, Fusarium circinatum

    PubMed Central

    Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; Iturritxa, Eugenia; Majada, Juan; Alia, Ricardo; Raposo, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    There is a concern on how emerging pests and diseases will affect the distribution range and adaptability of their host species, especially due to different conditions derived from climate change and growing globalization. Fusarium circinatum, which causes pitch canker disease in Pinus species, is an exotic pathogen of recent introduction in Spain that threatens its maritime pine (P. pinaster) stands. To predict the impact this disease will have on the species, we examine host resistance traits and their genetic architecture. Resistance phenotyping was done in a clonal provenance/progeny trial, using three-year-old cuttings artificially inoculated with the pathogen and maintained under controlled environmental conditions. A total number of 670 ramets were assessed, distributed in 10 populations, with a total of 47 families, 2 to 5 half-sibs per family, and 3–7 ramets per clone. High genetic variation was found at the three hierarchical levels studied: population, family and clone, being both additive and non-additive effects important. Narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates were relatively high, with respective values of 0.43–0.58 and 0.51–0.8, depending on the resistance traits measured (lesion length, lesion length rate, time to wilting, and survival). These values suggest the species' high capacity of evolutionary response to the F. circinatum pathogen. A population originated in Northern Spain was the most resistant, while another from Morocco was the most susceptible. The total number of plants that did not show lesion development or presented a small lesion (length<30 mm) was 224 out of 670, indicating a high proportion of resistant trees in the offspring within the analyzed populations. We found large differences among populations and considerable genetic variation within populations, which should allow, through natural or artificial selection, the successful adaptation of maritime pine to pitch canker disease. PMID:25500822

  11. Experimental vaccines against potentially pandemic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Alaina J; Tompkins, S Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses continue to emerge and re-emerge, causing outbreaks, epidemics and occasionally pandemics. While the influenza vaccines licensed for public use are generally effective against seasonal influenza, issues arise with production, immunogenicity, and efficacy in the case of vaccines against pandemic and emerging influenza viruses, and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in particular. Thus, there is need of improved influenza vaccines and vaccination strategies. This review discusses advances in alternative influenza vaccines, touching briefly on licensed vaccines and vaccine antigens; then reviewing recombinant subunit vaccines, virus-like particle vaccines and DNA vaccines, with the main focus on virus-vectored vaccine approaches. PMID:23440999

  12. Balamuthia mandrillaris in South America: an emerging potential hidden pathogen in Perú.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Vílchez, Alfonso M; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Salvador; Piñero, José; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a free living amoeba that can be isolated from soil. It is an emerging pathogen causing skin lesions as well as CNS involvement with a fatal outcome if untreated. Further, infections can sometimes can also appear in peripheral areas such as extremities (usually knee), or trunk. Moreover, it often progresses to an infiltrative lesion that occasionally becomes ulcerated. In countries like Peru, a skin lesion will precede other symptoms. This primary cutaneous lesion can be present for weeks or even months. However, the appearance of neurological disease predicts a poor prognosis. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion. PMID:24858923

  13. The gene expression profile of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus indicates overstimulation of the innate immune system by the virus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; An, Tong-Qing; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Wei, Tian-Chao; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Peng, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Since the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) variant emerged in 2006, it has caused death in more than 20 million pigs in China and other Southeast Asian countries, making it the most destructive swine pathogen currently in existence. To characterize the cellular responses to HP-PRRSV infection, the gene expression profile of porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cells, the primary target cells of PRRSV, was analyzed in HP-PRRSV-infected and uninfected PAMs by suppression subtractive hybridization. After confirmation by Southern blot, genes that were differentially expressed in the HP-PRRSV-infected and uninfected PAMs were sequenced and annotated. Genes that were upregulated mainly in HP-PRRSV-infected PAM cells were related to immunity and cell signaling. Among the differentially expressed genes, Mx1 and HSP70 protein expression was confirmed by western blotting, and IL-8 expression was confirmed by ELISA. In PAM cells isolated from HP-PRRSV-infected piglets, the differential expression of 21 genes, including IL-16, TGF-beta type 1 receptor, epidermal growth factor, MHC-I SLA, Toll-like receptor, hepatoma-derived growth factor, FTH1, and MHC-II SLA-DRB1, was confirmed by real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate differential gene expression between HP-PRRSV-infected and uninfected PAMs in vivo. The results indicate that HP-PRRSV infection excessively stimulates genes involved in the innate immune response, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. PMID:25504361

  14. Potentially pathogenic amoeba-associated microorganisms in cooling towers and their control.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Merchat, Michèle; La Scola, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    Cooling towers provide a favorable environment for the proliferation of microorganisms. Cooling towers generate a biofilm and often aerosolize contaminated water, thereby increasing the risk of microorganism dissemination by human inhalation. This pathogen dissemination was first revealed by the epidemics of Legionnaires' disease that were directly related to the presence of cooling towers, and since then, the ecology of Legionella pneumophila has been well studied. Each country has specific standards regarding the acceptable amount of microorganisms in cooling tower systems. However, those standards typically only concern L. pneumophila, even though many other microorganisms can also be isolated from cooling towers, including protozoa, bacteria and viruses. Microbiological control of the cooling tower system can be principally achieved by chemical treatments and also by improving the system's construction. Several new treatments are being studied to improve the efficiency of disinfection. However, as most of these treatments continue to focus solely on L. pneumophila, reports of other types of pathogens continue to increase. Therefore, how their dissemination affects the human populous health should be addressed now. PMID:19492970

  15. The Water Cycle, a Potential Source of the Bacterial Pathogen Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Brillard, Julien; Dupont, Christian M. S.; Berge, Odile; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Oriol-Gagnier, Stéphanie; Doussan, Claude; Broussolle, Véronique; Gillon, Marina; Clavel, Thierry; Bérard, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the sporulating soil-dwelling Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sl) which includes foodborne pathogenic strains has been extensively studied in relation to its various animal hosts. The aim of this environmental study was to investigate the water compartments (rain and soil water, as well as groundwater) closely linked to the primary B. cereus sl reservoir, for which available data are limited. B. cereus sl was present, primarily as spores, in all of the tested compartments of an agricultural site, including water from rain to groundwater through soil. During rain events, leachates collected after transfer through the soil eventually reached the groundwater and were loaded with B. cereus sl. In groundwater samples, newly introduced spores of a B. cereus model strain were able to germinate, and vegetative cells arising from this event were detected for up to 50 days. This first B. cereus sl investigation in the various types of interrelated environments suggests that the consideration of the aquatic compartment linked to soil and to climatic events should provide a better understanding of B. cereus sl ecology and thus be relevant for a more accurate risk assessment of food poisoning caused by B. cereus sl pathogenic strains. PMID:25918712

  16. Characterization of the Viral Microbiome in Patients with Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infections, Using Metagenomic Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrik Lysholm; Anna Wetterbom; Cecilia Lindau; Hamid Darban; Annelie Bjerkner; Kristina Fahlander; A. Michael Lindberg; Bengt Persson; Tobias Allander; Björn Andersson

    2012-01-01

    The human respiratory tract is heavily exposed to microorganisms. Viral respiratory tract pathogens, like RSV, influenza and rhinoviruses cause major morbidity and mortality from respiratory tract disease. Furthermore, as viruses have limited means of transmission, viruses that cause pathogenicity in other tissues may be transmitted through the respiratory tract. It is therefore important to chart the human virome in this

  17. Comparative genomics of multiple strains of Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, a potential model pathogen of both Monocots and Dicots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genomics of closely related pathogens that differ in host range can provide insights into mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and host adaptation. Sequencing multiple strains of the same pathogen further reveals information concerning pathogen diversity and the molecular basis of vi...

  18. Lactobacillus crispatus L1: high cell density cultivation and exopolysaccharide structure characterization to highlight potentially beneficial effects against vaginal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaginal lactic acid bacteria defend the host against pathogens through a combination of competitive exclusion, competition for nutrients, production of antimicrobial substances and through the activation of the immune system. A new human isolate named Lactobacillus crispatus L1 was characterized in this work, and a preliminary evaluation of its probiotic potential is described together with a process to obtain a high productivity of viable biomass. Results In a simulated digestion process 1.8?1010 cells?ml?1 survived the gastric environment with 80% viability, without being affected by small intestine juices. Experiments on six different C sources were performed to analyze growth and organic acids production and, glucose, provided the best performances. A microfiltration strategy was exploited to improve the cellular yield in 2 L-fermentation processes, reaching 27 g?·?l?1 of dry biomass. Moreover, L. crispatus L1 demonstrated a greater stability to high concentrations of lactic acid, compared to other lactobacilli. The specific L. crispatus L1 exopolysaccharide was purified from the fermentation broth and characterized by NMR showing structural features and similarity to exopolysaccharides produced by pathogenic strains. Live L. crispatus L1 cells strongly reduced adhesion of a yeast pathogenic strain, Candida albicans in particular, in adherence assays. Interestingly a higher expression of the human defensin HBD-2 was also observed in vaginal cells treated with the purified exopolysaccharide, indicating a possible correlation with C. albicans growth inhibition. Conclusions The paper describes the evaluation of L. crispatus L1 as potential vaginal probiotic and the fermentation processes to obtain high concentrations of viable cells. PMID:24884965

  19. tRNA Modification Enzymes GidA and MnmE: Potential Role in Virulence of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shippy, Daniel C.; Fadl, Amin A.

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is an RNA molecule that carries amino acids to the ribosomes for protein synthesis. These tRNAs function at the peptidyl (P) and aminoacyl (A) binding sites of the ribosome during translation, with each codon being recognized by a specific tRNA. Due to this specificity, tRNA modification is essential for translational efficiency. Many enzymes have been implicated in the modification of bacterial tRNAs, and these enzymes may complex with one another or interact individually with the tRNA. Approximately, 100 tRNA modification enzymes have been identified with glucose-inhibited division (GidA) protein and MnmE being two of the enzymes studied. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, GidA and MnmE bind together to form a functional complex responsible for the proper biosynthesis of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U34) of tRNAs. Studies have implicated this pathway in a major pathogenic regulatory mechanism as deletion of gidA and/or mnmE has attenuated several bacterial pathogens like Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas syringae, Aeromonas hydrophila, and many others. In this review, we summarize the potential role of the GidA/MnmE tRNA modification pathway in bacterial virulence, interactions with the host, and potential therapeutic strategies resulting from a greater understanding of this regulatory mechanism. PMID:25310651

  20. POTENTIALLY PATHOGENIC FREE-LIVING AMOEBAE IN SOME FLOOD-AFFECTED AREAS DURING 2011 CHIANG MAI FLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Wannasan, Anchalee; Uparanukraw, Pichart; Songsangchun, Apichart; Morakote, Nimit

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The survey was carried out to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) during flood in Chiang Mai, Thailand in 2011. From different crisis flood areas, seven water samples were collected and tested for the presence of amoebae using culture and molecular methods. By monoxenic culture, FLA were detected from all samples at 37 °C incubation. The FLA growing at 37 °C were morphologically identified as Acanthamoeba spp., Naegleria spp. and some unidentified amoebae. Only three samples (42.8%), defined as thermotolerant FLA, continued to grow at 42 °C. By molecular methods, two non-thermotolerant FlA were shown to have 99% identity to Acanthamoeba sp. and 98% identity to Hartmannella vermiformis while the two thermotolerant FLA were identified as Echinamoeba exundans (100% identity) and Hartmannella sp. (99% identity). This first report of the occurrence of FLA in water during the flood disaster will provide information to the public to be aware of potentially pathogenic FLA. PMID:24213194

  1. Emerging Respiratory Viruses: Challenges and Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gillim-Ross, Laura; Subbarao, Kanta

    2006-01-01

    The current threat of avian influenza to the human population, the potential for the reemergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus, and the identification of multiple novel respiratory viruses underline the necessity for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies to combat viral infection. Vaccine development is a key component in the prevention of widespread viral infection and in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with many viral infections. In this review we describe the different approaches currently being evaluated in the development of vaccines against SARS-associated coronavirus and avian influenza viruses and also highlight the many obstacles encountered in the development of these vaccines. Lessons learned from current vaccine studies, coupled with our increasing knowledge of the host and viral factors involved in viral pathogenesis, will help to increase the speed with which efficacious vaccines targeting newly emerging viral pathogens can be developed. PMID:17041137

  2. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm potential of biosurfactants isolated from lactobacilli against multi-drug-resistant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants (BS) are amphiphilic compounds produced by microbes, either on the cell surface or secreted extracellularly. BS exhibit strong antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties, making them good candidates for applications used to combat infections. In this study, our goal was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities of BS produced by Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus rhamnosus against clinical Multidrug Resistant (MDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Cell-bound BS from both L. jensenii and L. rhamnosus were extracted and isolated. The surface activities of crude BS samples were evaluated using an oil spreading assay. The antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activities of both BS against the above mentioned MDR pathogens were determined. Results Surface activities for both BS ranged from 6.25 to 25 mg/ml with clear zones observed between 7 and 11 cm. BS of both L. jensenii and L. rhamnosus showed antimicrobial activities against A. baumannii, E. coli and S. aureus at 25-50 mg/ml. Anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activities were also observed for the aforementioned pathogens between 25 and 50 mg/ml. Finally, analysis by electron microscope indicated that the BS caused membrane damage for A. baumannii and pronounced cell wall damage in S. aureus. Conclusion Our results indicate that BS isolated from two Lactobacilli strains has antibacterial properties against MDR strains of A. baumannii, E. coli and MRSA. Both BS also displayed anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities against A. baumannii, E. coli and S. aureus. Together, these capabilities may open up possibilities for BS as an alternative therapeutic approach for the prevention and/or treatment of hospital-acquired infections. PMID:25124936

  3. Rapid point of care diagnostic tests for viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections--needs, advances, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Enne, Virve I; Kidd, Mike; Drosten, Christian; Breuer, Judy; Muller, Marcel A; Hui, David; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Hakeem, Rafaat; Gray, Gregory; Gautret, Philippe; Al-Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Memish, Ziad A; Gant, Vanya

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory tract infections rank second as causes of adult and paediatric morbidity and mortality worldwide. Respiratory tract infections are caused by many different bacteria (including mycobacteria) and viruses, and rapid detection of pathogens in individual cases is crucial in achieving the best clinical management, public health surveillance, and control outcomes. Further challenges in improving management outcomes for respiratory tract infections exist: rapid identification of drug resistant pathogens; more widespread surveillance of infections, locally and internationally; and global responses to infections with pandemic potential. Developments in genome amplification have led to the discovery of several new respiratory pathogens, and sensitive PCR methods for the diagnostic work-up of these are available. Advances in technology have allowed for development of single and multiplexed PCR techniques that provide rapid detection of respiratory viruses in clinical specimens. Microarray-based multiplexing and nucleic-acid-based deep-sequencing methods allow simultaneous detection of pathogen nucleic acid and multiple antibiotic resistance, providing further hope in revolutionising rapid point of care respiratory tract infection diagnostics. PMID:25189349

  4. Antimicrobial potential of bacteriocin producing Lysinibacillus jx416856 against foodborne bacterial and fungal pathogens, isolated from fruits and vegetable waste.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Varish; Iqbal, A N Muhammad Zafar; Haseeb, Mohd; Khan, Mohd Sajid

    2014-06-01

    In this study, antimicrobial potential, some probiotics properties and bacteriocin nature of Lysinibacillus, isolated from fruits and vegetable waste were evaluated. For this, 125 Lactobacillus isolates were tested against foodborne bacterial and fungal pathogens. Among these, an isolated Bacillus spp. showed significant aggregation-co-aggregation probiotics properties and potentially inhibits the foodborne gram positive microbial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, (22 mm ZOI), Staphylococcus epedermidis and Bacillus cereus (18 mm). Phenotypically and molecularly it was identified as Lysinibacillus (NCBI accession no. JX416856) and it was found closest to Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Lysinibacillus sphaericus and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus. Physico-biochemically, it was found to be negative for amylase, protease, gelatinase, nitrate reductase and urease while positive for catalase. The diagnostic fatty acid was 22;2 (3.51). The growth conditions and bacteriocin activity were found to be optimum with MRS media at pH 7-10, Temperature 35-40 °C and salt tolerance at 1-3%. Eventually its production was optimized with MRS broth at pH 7.6, 37 °C, for 36 h in shaking conditions at the rate of 100 rpm. Active bacteriocin was isolated at 60% ammonium sulfate precipitation. The molecular weight of given bacteriocin was found to be nearly 25-35 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Based on physico- biochemical properties, the isolated bacteriocin was to be categories in class II bacteriocin. The bacteriocin was found to be stable in the range of 4-80 °C temperature, 6-10 pH and even in the presence of surfactant (such as SDS and Tween 80). However, proteases like pepsin and trypsin were found to degrade the bacteriocin. Collectively, the broad spectrum inhibitory potential and physical stability offered the antimicrobial potential to Lysinibacillus, and its relevant bacteriocin might be used as an alternative food preservative or therapeutic agent to control spoilage of different food products. PMID:24735603

  5. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  6. Experimental infection of colostrum deprived piglets with porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) potentiates PCV2 replication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Allan; F. McNeilly; J. Ellis; S. Krakowka; B. Meehan; I. McNair; I. Walker; S. Kennedy

    2000-01-01

    Summary.  ?Experimental infection of colostrum-deprived (CD) pigs with a combined inoculum of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) and porcine\\u000a reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) potentiated the replication and distribution of PCV2 virus, when compared\\u000a with pigs inoculated with PCV2 alone. The replication and distribution of PRRSV in dually infected pigs was not enhanced,\\u000a when compared to pigs inoculated with PRRSV alone.

  7. A study on Blastocystis hominis in food-handlers: diagnosis and potential pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fathy, Fouad M

    2011-08-01

    Proper diagnosis of Blastocystis hominis in not performed routinely in medical laboratories of developing countries; consequently clinical significance of this common intestinal protozoon is liable to remain unsettled. Food-handlers are more prone to get and transmit this feco-oral infection. This work compared the sensitivity of direct diagnostic methods to detect B. hominis in stool, estimate the true prevalence among food-handlers in Sirte-Libya, to clarify the association between the parasite and gastrointestinal symptoms and the response to specific treatment. A total of 400 male food-handlers aged 18-50 year were included. Each was subjected to clinical questionnaire and 3 stool examinations by different methods. The results showed high prevalence of B. hominis in food-handlers (35.5%). Short- term in vitro culture (on Boeck and Derbholav's medium) was the most sensitive method for detection of B. hominis (35.5%), followed by permanent Trichrome-stained smear (27.5%); saline-sedimentation concentrated smear (21%) and direct iodine smear (14%). Of 108 cases having B. hominis alone, 68.5% were symptomatic. Diarrhea was the most frequent symptom (75.6%), followed by abdominal pain (66.2%) and flatulence (43.2%). Fecal parasite-load was significantly higher in symptomatic cases than asymptomatic; parasite and symptoms disappeared after metronidazole treatment. So, culture should be used on routine basis to detect B. hominis which should be considered pathogenic particularly when present alone in large numbers in symptomatic patients. PMID:21980782

  8. [The role of common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in the epidemiology of bacterial, potentially human pathogenic, disease agents].

    PubMed

    Gautsch, S; Odermatt, P; Burnens, A P; Bille, J; Ewald, R

    2000-04-01

    Since a long time a public garden in Basel is known as a site for overnight accommodation and assembly of starlings. The birds cause an immense faecal contamination of the park and the neighbouring district. A nursery and a primary school are directly affected. To evaluate the health risk coming from the starlings droppings for the population, particularly for the children and to assess the role of starlings in the transmission of diseases to humans and in the epidemiology of human diseases the presence of human bacterial pathogens in the faeces of starlings was determined. Some of the isolated strains were further typed and compared to strains of human origin. C. jejuni, L. monocytogenes and C. psittaci were most often found. The typing of some C. jejuni and L. monocytogenes isolates showed a great variety of geno-, sero- respectively phage types that did not belong to the strains most often found in isolates of human origin. Starlings can harbour human pathogens and therefore a potential risk of infection comes from their droppings. It seems however rather improbable, that these birds present a constant direct source of infection for human beings. PMID:10804841

  9. Recent Trends in Rapid Environmental Monitoring of Pathogens and Toxicants: Potential of Nanoparticle-Based Biosensor and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Thasiphu, Thalisa; Weon, Jong-Il; Boonprasert, Rattana; Tuitemwong, Kooranee; Tuitemwong, Pravate

    2015-01-01

    Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed. PMID:25884032

  10. Recent trends in rapid environmental monitoring of pathogens and toxicants: potential of nanoparticle-based biosensor and applications.

    PubMed

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Thasiphu, Thalisa; Weon, Jong-Il; Boonprasert, Rattana; Tuitemwong, Kooranee; Tuitemwong, Pravate

    2015-01-01

    Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed. PMID:25884032

  11. Presence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae strains from well water samples in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Rocío A; Reyes-Batlle, María; Nicola, Graciela G; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Guillermo Esteban, J; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) include opportunistic pathogens such as Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris, and the genera Sappinia and Acanthamoeba. In this study, a survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of potentially pathogenic amoebic strains in water samples collected from wells located in the western part of Guinea-Bissau. The samples were left to precipitate for 48 hours and then the sediments were seeded on non-nutrient agar plates containing Escherichia coli spread and cultures were checked daily for the presence of FLA. Identification of FLA strains was based on the morphological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the 18S rDNA or 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes in the case of Naegleria and Balamuthia genera, respectively. In the case of positive samples of Acanthamoeba, strains were further classified at the genotype level by sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located in the 18S rDNA gene as previously described. Sappinia sp. was not isolated during the study and thus, no molecular analysis was performed for this genus. The obtained results revealed the presence of Acanthamoeba (genotypes T3 and T4), Naegleria fowleri, and Balamuthia mandrillaris. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of FLA in water bodies from Guinea-Bissau and the first report on the isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris from environmental sources in Africa. PMID:24934796

  12. Presence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae strains from well water samples in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Rocío A; Reyes-Batlle, María; Nicola, Graciela G; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Guillermo Esteban, J; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) include opportunistic pathogens such as Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris, and the genera Sappinia and Acanthamoeba. In this study, a survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of potentially pathogenic amoebic strains in water samples collected from wells located in the western part of Guinea-Bissau. The samples were left to precipitate for 48 hours and then the sediments were seeded on non-nutrient agar plates containing Escherichia coli spread and cultures were checked daily for the presence of FLA. Identification of FLA strains was based on the morphological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the 18S rDNA or 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes in the case of Naegleria and Balamuthia genera, respectively. In the case of positive samples of Acanthamoeba, strains were further classified at the genotype level by sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located in the 18S rDNA gene as previously described. Sappinia sp. was not isolated during the study and thus, no molecular analysis was performed for this genus. The obtained results revealed the presence of Acanthamoeba (genotypes T3 and T4), Naegleria fowleri, and Balamuthia mandrillaris. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of FLA in water bodies from Guinea-Bissau and the first report on the isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris from environmental sources in Africa. PMID:24934796

  13. Efficacy of a combined inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine using North American and European strains in specific pathogen free pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Minjoo; Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Song, Daesub; Park, Bongkyun

    2015-05-01

    In Korea, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is caused by European (type 1) and North American (type 2) strains of PRRS virus (PRRSV). In the present study, the efficacy of a multi-strain PRRSV vaccine inactivated with binary ethylenimine (BEI) was evaluated in pigs. The vaccine contained one type 1 strain (GCEU0907) and two type 2 strains (GC4019 and GC6262). Three vaccinated groups (four pigs per group) and three mock vaccinated groups (four pigs per group) were challenged with infectious PRRSV (strains GC4019, GC6262 or GCEU0907), then euthanased at 28 days post-infection. Mean anti-PRRSV neutralising antibody titres were significantly higher in the vaccinated groups than in the mock vaccinated groups. Mean blood virus titres in the mock vaccinated groups were significantly higher than those in the vaccinated groups from 5 to 28 days post-infection. On pathological examination, there were less severe macroscopic and microscopic lesions in vaccinated pigs compared with mock vaccinated pigs. PMID:25920759

  14. The Multifunctional LigB Adhesin Binds Homeostatic Proteins with Potential Roles in Cutaneous Infection by Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Henry A.; Kelley, Melissa M.; Croda, Julio; Matsunaga, James; Babbitt, Jane T.; Ko, Albert I.; Picardeau, Mathieu; Haake, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9–11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis patient antibodies react with the LigB domain, suggesting applications in diagnosis and vaccines that are currently limited by the strain-specific leptospiral lipopolysaccharide coats. PMID:21347378

  15. Potentiation of developmentally regulated plant defense response by AtWRKY18, a pathogen-induced Arabidopsis transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhixiang

    2002-06-01

    AtWRKY18 is a pathogen- and salicylic acid-induced Arabidopsis transcription factor containing the plant-specific WRKY zinc finger DNA-binding motif. In the present study, we have transformed Arabidopsis plants with AtWRKY18 under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Surprisingly, transgenic plants expressing high levels of AtWRKY18 were stunted in growth. When expressed at moderate levels, AtWRKY18 potentiated developmentally regulated defense responses in transgenic plants without causing substantial negative effects on plant growth. As they grew from seedling to mature stages, transgenic AtWRKY18 plant showed marked increase in the expression of pathogenesis-related genes and resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, whereas wild-type plants exhibited little enhancement in these defense responses. Potentiation of developmentally regulated defense responses by AtWRKY18 was not associated with enhanced biosynthesis of salicylic acid but required the disease resistance regulatory protein NPR1/NIM1. Thus, AtWRKY18 can positively modulate defense-related gene expression and disease resistance. To study the regulated expression of AtWRKY18, we have identified a cluster of WRKY binding sites in the promoter of the gene and demonstrated that they acted as negative regulatory elements for the inducible expression of AtWRKY18. These negative cis-acting elements may prevent overexpression of AtWRKY18 during the activation of plant defense responses that could be detrimental to plant growth as inferred from the transgenic plants ectopically expressing the transgene. PMID:12068113

  16. In vitro effects of essential oils on potential pathogens and beneficial members of the normal microbiota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Ouwehand; K. Tiihonen; H. Kettunen; S. Peuranen; H. Schulze; N. Rautonen

    2010-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial growth promoters has been banned in the EU. This has created an inter - est in alternative strategies to prevent an imbalance in the intestinal microbiota and the potential development of intestinal disorders in livestock. Essential oils (EOs) have been known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against specific microbial species and could therefore be considered one such

  17. Mosquito species abundance and diversity in Malindi, Kenya and their potential implication in pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Mwangangi, Joseph M; Midega, Janet; Kahindi, Samuel; Njoroge, Laban; Nzovu, Joseph; Githure, John; Mbogo, Charles M; Beier, John C

    2012-01-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are important vectors of human disease-causing pathogens. Mosquitoes are found both in rural and urban areas. Deteriorating infrastructure, poor access to health, water and sanitation services, increasing population density, and widespread poverty contribute to conditions that modify the environment, which directly influences the risk of disease within the urban and peri-urban ecosystem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mosquito vector abundance and diversity in urban, peri-urban, and rural strata in Malindi along the Kenya coast. The study was conducted in the coastal district of Malindi between January and December 2005. Three strata were selected which were described as urban, peri-urban, and rural. Sampling was done during the wet and dry seasons. Sampling in the wet season was done in the months of April and June to cover the long rainy season and in November and December to cover the short rainy season, while the dry season was between January and March and September and October. Adult mosquito collection was done using Pyrethrum Spray Collection (PSC) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps inside houses and specimens were identified morphologically. In the three strata (urban, peri-urban, and rural), 78.5% of the total mosquito (n?=?7,775) were collected using PSC while 18.1% (n?=?1,795) were collected using the CDC light traps. Using oviposition traps, mosquito eggs were collected and reared in the insectary which yielded 329 adults of which 83.8% (n?=?276) were Aedes aegypti and 16.2% (n?=?53) were Culex quinquefasciatus. The mosquito distribution in the three sites varied significantly in each collection site. Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles funestus and Anopheles coustani were predominant in the rural stratum while C. quinquefasciatus was mostly found in urban and peri-urban strata. However, using PSC and CDC light trap collection techniques, A. aegypti was only found in urban strata. In the three strata, mosquitoes were mainly found in high numbers during the wet season. Further, A. gambiae, C. quinquefasciatus, and A. aegypti mosquitoes were found occurring together inside the houses. This in turn exposes the inhabitants to an array of mosquito-borne diseases including malaria, bancroftian filariasis, and arboviruses (dengue fever, Yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya fever, and West Nile Virus). In conclusion, our findings provide useful information for the design of integrated mosquito and disease control programs in East African environments. PMID:21626425

  18. The impact of dosimetric optimization using respiratory gating and inhomogeneity corrections on potential therapeutic gain in patients with lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente Herman, Tania

    Early stage lung cancer is found with increasing frequency by screening high risk patients. Recently, the use of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has been found to be highly successful. The hypothesis being tested here is that the use of respiratory gating and tissue heterogeneity corrections are necessary to optimize tumor and normal tissue dose distributions for SBRT.

  19. Effects of norspermidine and spermidine on biofilm formation by potentially pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Nesse, Live L; Berg, Kristin; Vestby, Lene K

    2015-03-01

    Polyamines are present in all living cells. In bacteria, polyamines are involved in a variety of functions, including biofilm formation, thus indicating that polyamines may have potential in the control of unwanted biofilm. In the present study, the effects of the polyamines norspermidine and spermidine on biofilms of 10 potentially pathogenic wild-type strains of Escherichia coli serotype O103:H2, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and S. enterica serovar Agona were investigated. We found that exogenously supplied norspermidine and spermidine did not mediate disassembly of preformed biofilm of any of the E. coli and S. enterica strains. However, the polyamines did affect biofilm production. Interestingly, the two species reacted differently to the polyamines. Both polyamines reduced the amount of biofilm formed by E. coli but tended to increase biofilm formation by S. enterica. Whether the effects observed were due to the polyamines specifically targeting biofilm formation, being toxic for the cells, or maybe a combination of the two, is not known. However, there were no indications that the effect was mediated through binding to exopolysaccharides, as earlier suggested for E. coli. Our results indicate that norspermidine and spermidine do not have potential as inhibitors of S. enterica biofilm. Furthermore, we found that the commercial polyamines used contributed to the higher pH of the test medium. Failure to acknowledge and control this important phenomenon may lead to misinterpretation of the results. PMID:25595767

  20. Lack of respiratory and contact sensitizing potential of the intranasal antiviral drug candidate rupintrivir (AG7088): a weight-of-the-evidence evaluation.

    PubMed

    Burns-Naas, Leigh Ann; Lee, Caroline; Evering, Winston; Ahern, Lisa; Webber, Stephanie; Zorbas, Mark

    2005-07-01

    Rupintrivir, also known as AG7088, is a small molecule 3C protease inhibitor designed to target human rhinovirus as a potential intranasal treatment for the common cold. The ability of rupintrivir to induce both respiratory and contact hypersensitivity responses was evaluated using a weight of the evidence approach. A local lymph node assay (LLNA) in mice evaluating concentrations of rupintrivir up to 50% in dimethylformamide showed no evidence of sensitizing capability. An irritation study conducted in rabbits was performed to assess potential dermal irritancy and provide information for worker safety guidelines. The study showed no evidence of skin irritation when the material was placed in direct contact with the skin in a semi-occluded fashion for four days. Quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) following intranasal instillation of the compound into rabbits showed that the compound was retained in the nasal cavity or was swallowed. No radioactivity was observed in the pulmonary regions of these animals. Histopathologic evaluation of the nasopharyngeal tract and the lungs of both rats and dogs exposed by intranasal instillation acutely or following repeated intranasal exposures for 14 (rat) or 28 days (rat and dog) did not reveal any evidence of irritation or inflammation in these regions of the respiratory tract. These data demonstrate that rupintrivir does not cause irritation or inflammatory responses that may precede the development of sensitization of the skin or respiratory tract. It was concluded that the weight of the available toxicologic evidence indicated that rupintrivir was not likely to cause sensitization of either the skin or the respiratory tract in humans following intranasal delivery. PMID:18958666

  1. Effectiveness of serum megakaryocyte potentiating factor in evaluating the effects of chrysotile and its heated products on respiratory organs.

    PubMed

    Takata, Ayako; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Toya, Tadao; Miyamoto-Kohno, Sayako; Iwatatsu, Yuka; Teranaka, Iroha; Aminaka, Masahito; Yamashita, Kiyotsugu; Kohyama, Norihiko

    2011-04-15

    Chrysotile (CH), the most common form of asbestos, is rendered less toxic by heating it at 1000°C and converting it to forsterite (FO-1000). However, further safety tests are needed to evaluate human health risk of these materials. It has been reported that serum concentrations of megakaryocyte potentiating factor N-ERC/mesothelin become elevated in patients with mesotheliomas caused by asbestos exposure. In this study, a single 2mg dose of CH or FO-1000 was intratracheally administered to rats. Within 180days after the administrations, serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations, levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in lung tissues and pathological changes in respiratory organs were determined. In the CH group, a significant increase in serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations was observed immediately after intratracheal administration, and the elevation lasted for 30days. In lung tissues, positive staining for 8-OHdG in bronchioles, alveolar epithelium, inflammatory cells, and granulomas was evidence of a marked DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, measurements of 8-OHdG in lung tissues based on the HPLC-ECD method suggested that serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations tended to increase when there are significant DNA damages in lung tissues. In contrast, in the FO-1000 group, a marked rise in serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations occurred only in the early phase (1-7days) after intratracheal administration. Similarly, FO-1000 induced elevation of 8-OHdG in lung tissues was transient and modest compared with those of the CH-treated animals. In both the CH and FO-1000 groups, we observed significant correlations between serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations and lung 8-OHdG concentrations (r=0.559, p=0.001 for the CH group; r=0.516, p=0.01 for the FO-1000 group). In summary, we demonstrated the possibility of using serum N-ERC/mesothelin concentrations as a useful biomarker for early phase exposure to either CH or FO-1000. PMID:20933535

  2. Production of prodigiosin and chitinases by tropical Serratia marcescens strains with potential to control plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha Ingrid Gutiérrez-Román; Francisco Holguín-Meléndez; Ricardo Bello-Mendoza; Karina Guillén-Navarro; Michael F. Dunn; Graciela Huerta-Palacios

    The potential of three Serratia marcescens strains (CFFSUR-B2, CFFSUR-B3 and CFFSUR-B4) isolated from tropical regions in Mexico to inhibit the mycelial growth and\\u000a conidial germination of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, causal agent of fruit anthracnose, was evaluated. The ability of these strains to produce prodigiosin and chitinases when\\u000a cultivated in oil seed-based media (peanut, sesame, soybean and castor bean) and in Luria–Bertani

  3. Quantitative prediction of respiratory tidal volume based on the external torso volume change: a potential volumetric surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang; Arora, Naveen C.; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Citrin, Deborah; Kaushal, Aradhana; Zach, Leor; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2009-04-01

    An external respiratory surrogate that not only highly correlates with but also quantitatively predicts internal tidal volume should be useful in guiding four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), as well as 4D radiation therapy (4DRT). A volumetric surrogate should have advantages over external fiducial point(s) for monitoring respiration-induced motion of the torso, which deforms in synchronization with a patient-specific breathing pattern. This study establishes a linear relationship between the external torso volume change (TVC) and lung air volume change (AVC) by validating a proposed volume conservation hypothesis (TVC = AVC) throughout the respiratory cycle using 4DCT and spirometry. Fourteen patients' torso 4DCT images and corresponding spirometric tidal volumes were acquired to examine this hypothesis. The 4DCT images were acquired using dual surrogates in ciné mode and amplitude-based binning in 12 respiratory stages, minimizing residual motion artifacts. Torso and lung volumes were calculated using threshold-based segmentation algorithms and volume changes were calculated relative to the full-exhalation stage. The TVC and AVC, as functions of respiratory stages, were compared, showing a high correlation (r = 0.992 ± 0.005, p < 0.0001) as well as a linear relationship (slope = 1.027 ± 0.061, R2 = 0.980) without phase shift. The AVC was also compared to the spirometric tidal volumes, showing a similar linearity (slope = 1.030 ± 0.092, R2 = 0.947). In contrast, the thoracic and abdominal heights measured from 4DCT showed relatively low correlation (0.28 ± 0.44 and 0.82 ± 0.30, respectively) and location-dependent phase shifts. This novel approach establishes the foundation for developing an external volumetric respiratory surrogate.

  4. The effects of antimicrobials and exposure to smoking on bacterial interference in the upper respiratory tract of children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2014-02-01

    Interactions between micro-organisms that include antagonism (interference) and synergism maintain balance between members of the normal endogenous flora, and play a role in preventing colonization by potential pathogens. Bacteria with interference capability of potential respiratory tract pathogens include alpha-hemolytic streptococci, non-hemolytic streptococci, Prevotella spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp. The role of bacterial interference in the occurrence of upper respiratory tract infections and its effect on their eradication is discussed. The infections include otitis media, sinusitis and pharyngo-tonsillitis. Treatment with antimicrobial agents and direct and indirect exposure to smoking, can affect the balance between the interfering organisms and potential pathogens. Introduction into the indigenous microflora of low virulence bacterial strains that are capable of interfering with colonization and infection with virulent organisms has been used to prevent the failure of antimicrobials in the treatment of pharyngo-tonsillitis and otitis media. PMID:24355768

  5. Fusobacterium nucleatum: a commensal-turned pathogen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yiping W

    2015-02-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic oral commensal and a periodontal pathogen associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. This article reviews its implication in adverse pregnancy outcomes (chorioamnionitis, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal sepsis, preeclampsia), GI disorders (colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis), cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, respiratory tract infections, Lemierre's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The virulence mechanisms involved in the diseases are discussed, with emphasis on its colonization, systemic dissemination, and induction of host inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. The FadA adhesin/invasin conserved in F. nucleatum is a key virulence factor and a potential diagnostic marker for F. nucleatum-associated diseases. PMID:25576662

  6. Respiratory Rhythm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher A Del Negro; Consuelo Morgado-Valle; Jack L Feldman

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pacemaker neurons generate breathing rhythm in mammals. We monitored respiratory-related motor nerve rhythm in neonatal rodent slice preparations. Blockade of the persistent sodium current (INaP), which was postulated to underlie voltage-dependent bursting in respiratory pacemaker neurons, with riluzole (?200 ?M) did not alter the frequency of respiratory-related motor output. Yet, in every pacemaker neuron recorded

  7. Evaluation of the vaccine potential of a cytotoxic protease and a protective immunogen from a pathogenic Vibrio harveyi strain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Zhang, Wei-wei; Zhang, Min; Sun, Li

    2010-01-22

    Vibrio harveyi is an important aquaculture pathogen that can infect a number of fish species and marine invertebrates. A putative protease, Vhp1, was identified from a pathogenic V. harveyi strain isolated from diseased fish as a protein with secretion capacity. Vhp1 is 530 amino acids in length and shares high sequence identities with several extracellular serine proteases of the Vibrio species. In silico analysis identified a protease domain in Vhp1, which is preceded by a subtilisin-N domain and followed by a bacterial pre-peptidase C-terminal domain. Purified recombinant protein corresponding to the protease domain of Vhp1 exhibited apparent proteolytic activity that was relatively heat-stable and reached maximum at pH 8.0 and 50 degrees C. The activity of purified recombinant Vhp1 protease was enhanced by Ca(2+) and inhibited by Mn(2+) and ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid. Cytotoxicity analyses indicated that recombinant Vhp1 protease was toxic to cultured Japanese flounder cells and could cause complete cell lysis. Immunoprotective analysis using Japanese flounder as an animal model showed that purified recombinant Vhp1 in the form of a denatured and proteolytically inactive protein was an effective subunit vaccine. To improve the vaccine potential of Vhp1, an Escherichia coli strain that expresses and secrets a cytotoxically impaired Vhp1 was constructed, which, when used as a live vaccine, afforded a high level of protection upon the vaccinated fish against lethal V. harveyi challenge. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Vhp1 is a cytotoxic protease and an effective vaccine candidate against V. harveyi infection. PMID:19897068

  8. The effect of activation of the lactoperoxidase system and souring on certain potential human pathogens in cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Kangumba, J G; Venter, E H; Coetzer, J A

    1997-12-01

    Conventional methods of ensuring the safety and soundness of cows' milk for human consumption, such as pasteurisation, are not always practical in poor socioeconomic conditions or in rural communities that lack modern amenities. Activation of lactoperoxidase (LP) system and souring of milk were investigated as potential alternative methods to sustain the safety of milk by inhibiting certain microorganisms with known pathogenic potential. The activation of the LP-system inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by the order of 2 log values. The inhibition of Brucella abortus was negligible. The replication of Coxiella burnetti in milk was not disturbed even after 17 h of LP-system activation at 20 degrees C, but the outcome of the LP-system treatment on Mycobacterium bovis could not be determined as the conventional culturing technique used to grow this organism did not allow full recovery. Souring inhibited the growth of S. aureus and E. coli also by the order of 2 log values. From the results obtained in this investigation are concluded that the activation of the LP-system and souring can be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and E. coli in cows' milk, thereby increasing its safety. PMID:9561497

  9. Effect of cinnamomum zeylanicum blume essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Egberto Santos; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes; de Souza, Evandro Leite; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume is known for a wide range of medicinal properties. This study aimed to assess the interference of C. zeylanicum essential oil on the growth and morphogenesis of some potentially pathogenic Aspergillus species. The essential oil presented strong antifungal effect causing the growth inhibition of the assayed strains and development of large growth inhibition zones. MIC50 and MIC90 values were 40 and 80 ?L/mL, respectively. 80, 40 and 20 ?L/mL of the oil strongly inhibited the radial mycelial growth of A. niger, A. flavus and A. fumigatus along 14 days. 80 and 40 ?L/mL of the oil caused a 100% inhibition of the fungal spore germination. Main morphological changes observed under light microscopy provided by the essential oil in the fungal strains were decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure indicating fungal wall degeneration. It is concluded that C. zeylanicum essential oil could be known as potential antifungal compound, particularly, to protect against the growth of Aspergillus species. PMID:24031186

  10. Combining Inferential and Deductive Approaches to Estimate the Potential Geographical Range of the Invasive Plant Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Kylie B.; Hardy, Giles E. St. J.; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive plant pathogen of unknown origin, causes considerable and widespread damage in plant industries and natural ecosystems of the USA and Europe. Estimating the potential geographical range of P. ramorum has been complicated by a lack of biological and geographical data with which to calibrate climatic models. Previous attempts to do so, using either invaded range data or surrogate species approaches, have delivered varying results. A simulation model was developed using CLIMEX to estimate the global climate suitability patterns for establishment of P. ramorum. Growth requirements and stress response parameters were derived from ecophysiological laboratory observations and site-level transmission and disease factors related to climate data in the field. Geographical distribution data from the USA (California and Oregon) and Norway were reserved from model-fitting and used to validate the models. The model suggests that the invasion of P. ramorum in both North America and Europe is still in its infancy and that it is presently occupying a small fraction of its potential range. Phytophthora ramorum appears to be climatically suited to large areas of Africa, Australasia and South America, where it could cause biodiversity and economic losses in plant industries and natural ecosystems with susceptible hosts if introduced. PMID:23667628

  11. Proteomic analysis of a drosophila IBMPFD model reveals potential pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsin-Tzu; Lee, Tian-Ren; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lee, Hsiao-Yun; Sang, Tzu-kang; Chan, Hong-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-06-01

    IBMPFD, Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia, is a hereditary degenerative disorder due to single missense mutations in VCP (Valosin-Containing Protein). The mechanisms of how mutations of VCP lead to IBMPFD remain mysterious. Here we utilize two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with mass spectrometry to study the IBMPFD disorder at the protein level. With this set-up, we are able to employ comparative proteomics to analyze IBMPFD disease using Drosophila melanogaster as our disease model organism. Head proteome of transgenic D. melanogaster expressing wild type VCP is compared, respectively, with the head proteome of transgenic mutant type VCPs that correspond to human IBMPFD disease alleles (TER94(A229E), TER94(R188Q), and TER94(R152H)). Of all the proteins identified, a significant fraction of proteins altered in TER94(A229E) and TER94(R188Q) mutants belong to the same functional categories, i.e. apoptosis and metabolism. Among these, Drosophila transferrin is observed to be significantly up-regulated in mutant flies expressing TER94(A229E). A knock-down experiment suggests that fly transferrin might be a potential modifier in IBMPFD disease. The molecular analysis of IBMPFD disease may benefit from the proteomics approach which combines the advantages of high throughput analysis and the focus on protein levels. PMID:22481368

  12. Emerging novel and antimicrobial-resistant respiratory tract infections: new drug development and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Memish, Ziad A; Maeurer, Markus; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Denning, David W; Hayden, Frederick G; Hui, David S

    2014-11-01

    The emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens for which diminishing treatment options are available is of major global concern. New viral respiratory tract infections with epidemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, swine-origin influenza A H1N1, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection, require development of new antiviral agents. The substantial rise in the global numbers of patients with respiratory tract infections caused by pan-antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and multiazole-resistant fungi has focused attention on investments into development of new drugs and treatment regimens. Successful treatment outcomes for patients with respiratory tract infections across all health-care settings will necessitate rapid, precise diagnosis and more effective and pathogen-specific therapies. This Series paper describes the development and use of new antimicrobial agents and immune-based and host-directed therapies for a range of conventional and emerging viral, bacterial, and fungal causes of respiratory tract infections. PMID:25189352

  13. Immunological, Viral, Environmental, and Individual Factors Modulating Lung Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bottau, Paolo; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a worldwide pathogen agent responsible for frequent respiratory tract infections that may become severe and potentially lethal in high risk infants and adults. Several studies have been performed to investigate the immune response that determines the clinical course of the infection. In the present paper, we review the literature on viral, environmental, and host factors influencing virus response; the mechanisms of the immune response; and the action of nonimmunological factors. These mechanisms have often been studied in animal models and in the present review we also summarize the main findings obtained from animal models as well as the limits of each of these models. Understanding the lung response involved in the pathogenesis of these respiratory infections could be useful in improving the preventive strategies against respiratory syncytial virus.

  14. Pseudacteon decapitating flies (Diptera: Phoridae): Are they potential vectors of the fire ant pathogens Kneallhazia(=Thelohania)solenopsae (Microsporidia: Thelohaniidae)and Vairimorpha invictae (Microsporidia: Burenellidae)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire ant decapitating flies in the genus Pseudacteon were tested for their potential as hosts or vectors of two microsporidian pathogens of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Decapitating flies which attacked or were reared from S. invicta workers infected by Kneallhazia (=Thelohania)...

  15. Microbial Monitoring of Pathogens by Comparing Multiple Real-Time PCR Platforms for Potential Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a closed environment wih rotations of crew and equipment each introducing their own microbial flora making it necessary to monitor the air, surfaces, and water for microbial contamination. Current microbial monitoring includes labor and time intensive methods to enumerate total bacterial and fungal cells with limited characterization during in-flight testing. Although this culture-based method has been sufficient for monitoring the ISS, future long duration missions will need to perform more comprehensive characterization in-flight, since sample return and ground characterization may not be available. A workshop was held in 2011 at the Johnson Space Center to discuss alternative methodologies and technologies suitable for microbial monitoring for these longterm exploration missions where molecular-based methodologies, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were recommended. In response, a multi-center (Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Kennedy Space Center) collaborative research effort was initiated to explore novel commercial-off-the-shelf hardware options for spaceflight environmental monitoring. The goal was to evaluate quantitative/semi-quantitative PCR approaches to space applications for low cost in-flight rapid identification of microorganisms affecting crew safety. The initial phase of this project identified commercially available platforms that could be minimally modified to perform nominally in microgravity followed by proof-of-concept testing on the highest qualifying candidates with a universally available test organism, Salmonella enterica. The platforms evaluated during proof-of-concept testing included the iCubate 2.0(TradeMark) (iCubate, Huntsville, AL), RAZOR EX (BioFire Diagnostics; Salt Lake City, Utah) and SmartCycler(TradeMark) (Cepheid; Sunnyvale, CA). The analysis identified two potential technologies (iCubate 2.0 and RAZOR EX) that were able to perform sample-to-answer testing with cell sample concentrations between SO to 400 cells. In addition, the commercial systems were evaluated for initial flight safety and readiness, sample concentration needs were reviewed, and a competitive procurement of commercially available platforms was initiated.

  16. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as bicarbonate, that help restore the body's acid-base balance. Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in ... Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus CV, ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  17. Addressing Potential Contaminants in Soil for the Study of Pathogenic E. coli O157 and O8 Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Foodborne illness associated with leafy greens has illustrated the need for information describing the transmission of pathogens via contaminated soil-amendments. A realistic means of studying the fate of pathogens simulating natural conditions proved difficult due to high levels of ba...

  18. Sialic acid receptor detection in the human respiratory tract: evidence for widespread distribution of potential binding sites for human and avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, John M; Bourne, Anthony J; Chen, Honglin; Guan, Yi; Peiris, JS Malik

    2007-01-01

    Background Influenza virus binds to cell receptors via sialic acid (SA) linked glycoproteins. They recognize SA on host cells through their haemagglutinins (H). The distribution of SA on cell surfaces is one determinant of host tropism and understanding its expression on human cells and tissues is important for understanding influenza pathogenesis. The objective of this study therefore was to optimize the detection of ?2,3-linked and ?2,6-linked SA by lectin histochemistry by investigating the binding of Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) for SA?2,6Gal and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) for SA?2,3Gal in the respiratory tract of normal adults and children. Methods We used fluorescent and biotinylated SNA and MAA from different suppliers on archived and prospectively collected biopsy and autopsy specimens from the nasopharynx, trachea, bronchus and lungs of fetuses, infants and adults. We compared different methods of unmasking for tissue sections to determine if these would affect lectin binding. Using serial sections we then compared the lectin binding of MAA from different suppliers. Results We found that unmasking using microwave treatment in citrate buffer produced increased lectin binding to the ciliated and glandular epithelium of the respiratory tract. In addition we found that there were differences in tissue distribution of the ?2,3 linked SA when 2 different isoforms of MAA (MAA1 and MAA2) lectin were used. MAA1 had widespread binding throughout the upper and lower respiratory tract and showed more binding to the respiratory epithelium of children than in adults. By comparison, MAA2 binding was mainly restricted to the alveolar epithelial cells of the lung with weak binding to goblet cells. SNA binding was detected in bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells and binding of this lectin was stronger to the paediatric epithelium compared to adult epithelium. Furthermore, the MAA lectins from 2 suppliers (Roche and EY Labs) tended to only bind in a pattern similar to MAA1 (Vector Labs) and produced a different binding pattern to MAA2 from Vector Labs. Conclusion The lectin binding pattern of MAA may vary depending on the supplier and the different isoforms of MAA show a different tissue distribution in the respiratory tract. This finding is important if conclusions about the potential binding sites of SA?2,3 binding viruses, such as influenza or human parainfluenza are to be made. PMID:17961210

  19. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Potentially Pathogenic Free-living Amoebae from Water Sources in Kish Island, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Niyyati, Maryam; Lasgerdi, Zohreh; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis, a sight-threatening corneal infection, mainly occurs in contact lens wearers who wash their eyes with tap water. The present research was conducted to identify the occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) in tap water sources on Kish Island, a tourist region in Iran. Amoebae were detected using a culture-enriched method and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/sequencing of the diagnostic fragment 3 region of the 18S rRNA gene of Acanthamoeba. In the case of other free-living amoebae species, PCR/sequencing analysis of the 18S rDNA was conducted. Results of this study showed the presence of Acanthamoeba belonging to T3, T4, T5, and T11 genotypes in tap water sources. Additionally, Vermamoebae vermiformis was detected in three water samples. This is the first report of the Acanthamoeba genotypes T3, T4, T5, and T11 and V. vermiformis species in tap water sources in a tourist region in Iran. PMID:25922581

  20. Network analysis suggests a potentially ‘evil' alliance of opportunistic pathogens inhibited by a cooperative network in human milk bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    (Sam) Ma, Zhanshan; Guan, Qiong; Ye, Chengxi; Zhang, Chengchen; Foster, James A.; Forney, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    The critical importance of human milk to infants and even human civilization has been well established. Yet our understanding of the milk microbiome has been limited to cataloguing OTUs and computation of community diversity. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report on the bacterial interactions within the milk microbiome. To bridge this gap, we reconstructed a milk bacterial community network based on Hunt et al. Our analysis revealed that the milk microbiome network consists of two disconnected sub-networks. One sub-network is a fully connected complete graph consisting of seven genera as nodes and all of its pair-wise interactions among the bacteria are facilitative or cooperative. In contrast, the interactions in the other sub-network of eight nodes are mixed but dominantly cooperative. Somewhat surprisingly, the only ‘non-cooperative' nodes in the second sub-network are mutually cooperative Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium that include some opportunistic pathogens. This potentially ‘evil' alliance between Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium could be inhibited by the remaining nodes that cooperate with one another in the second sub-network. We postulate that the ‘confrontation' between the ‘evil' alliance and ‘benign' alliance and the shifting balance between them may be responsible for dysbiosis of the milk microbiome that permits mastitis. PMID:25651890

  1. Network analysis suggests a potentially 'evil' alliance of opportunistic pathogens inhibited by a cooperative network in human milk bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Sam Ma, Zhanshan; Guan, Qiong; Ye, Chengxi; Zhang, Chengchen; Foster, James A; Forney, Larry J

    2015-01-01

    The critical importance of human milk to infants and even human civilization has been well established. Yet our understanding of the milk microbiome has been limited to cataloguing OTUs and computation of community diversity. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report on the bacterial interactions within the milk microbiome. To bridge this gap, we reconstructed a milk bacterial community network based on Hunt et al. Our analysis revealed that the milk microbiome network consists of two disconnected sub-networks. One sub-network is a fully connected complete graph consisting of seven genera as nodes and all of its pair-wise interactions among the bacteria are facilitative or cooperative. In contrast, the interactions in the other sub-network of eight nodes are mixed but dominantly cooperative. Somewhat surprisingly, the only 'non-cooperative' nodes in the second sub-network are mutually cooperative Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium that include some opportunistic pathogens. This potentially 'evil' alliance between Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium could be inhibited by the remaining nodes that cooperate with one another in the second sub-network. We postulate that the 'confrontation' between the 'evil' alliance and 'benign' alliance and the shifting balance between them may be responsible for dysbiosis of the milk microbiome that permits mastitis. PMID:25651890

  2. Characterization of a potential ?-lactamase inhibitory metabolite from a marine Streptomyces sp. PM49 active against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, J; Senthil, A; Gopikrishnan, V; Balagurunathan, R

    2015-04-01

    Actinobacteria is a prolific producer of complex natural products; we isolated a potential marine Streptomyces sp. PM49 strain from Bay of Bengal coastal area of India. The strain PM49 exhibited highly efficient antibacterial properties on multidrug-resistant pathogens with a zone of inhibition of 14-17 mm. SSF was adopted for the production of the secondary metabolites from PM49 with ISP2; utilizing agricultural wastes for compound extraction was also attempted. Bioactive fraction of Rf value 0.69 resolved using chloroform and ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) was obtained and subjected to further analysis. Based on UV, IR, ESI-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analysis, it was revealed that the compound is closely similar to cyslabdan with a molecular mass of 467.66 corresponding to the molecular formula C25H41NO5S. ESBL and MBL production was screened in the hospital test isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. PCR amplification in the phenotypically positive strains was positive for bla IMP, bla SHV, bla CTX-M, and mec genes. The ?-lactamase enzyme from tested strains had cephalosporinase activity with a 31-kDa protein and isolated compound from the strain possessing ?-lactamase inhibitory potential. MIC of the active fraction was 16-32 ?g/ml on ATCC strains; the ceftazidime and meropenem sensitive and resistant test strains showed MIC of 64-256 ?g/ml. The Streptomyces sp. PM49 aerial mycelium was rectiflexibile; the 16S rRNA showed 99 % identity with Streptomyces rochei and submitted at Genbank with accession no JX904061.1. PMID:25737024

  3. Respiratory System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jim Bidlack

    The purpose, components, and functions of the respiratory system are presented in this learning through disussion and visualizations. Participants learn about the nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli.

  4. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Communities and Detection of Potential Pathogens in a Recirculating Aquaculture System for Scophthalmus maximus and Solea senegalensis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Patrícia; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Pires, Ana C. C.; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study combined a DGGE and barcoded 16S rRNA pyrosequencing approach to assess bacterial composition in the water of a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) with a shallow raceway system (SRS) for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and sole (Solea senegalensis). Barcoded pyrosequencing results were also used to determine the potential pathogen load in the RAS studied. Samples were collected from the water supply pipeline (Sup), fish production tanks (Pro), sedimentation filter (Sed), biofilter tank (Bio), and protein skimmer (Ozo; also used as an ozone reaction chamber) of twin RAS operating in parallel (one for each fish species). Our results revealed pronounced differences in bacterial community composition between turbot and sole RAS, suggesting that in the systems studied there is a strong species-specific effect on water bacterial communities. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in the water supply and all RAS compartments. Other important taxonomic groups included the phylum Bacteriodetes. The saltwater supplied displayed a markedly lower richness and appeared to have very little influence on bacterial composition. The following potentially pathogenic species were detected: Photobacterium damselae in turbot (all compartments), Tenacibaculum discolor in turbot and sole (all compartments), Tenacibaculum soleae in turbot (all compartments) and sole (Pro, Sed and Bio), and Serratia marcescens in turbot (Sup, Sed, Bio and Ozo) and sole (only Sed) RAS. Despite the presence of these pathogens, no symptomatic fish were observed. Although we were able to identify potential pathogens, this approach should be employed with caution when monitoring aquaculture systems, as the required phylogenetic resolution for reliable identification of pathogens may not always be possible to achieve when employing 16S rRNA gene fragments. PMID:24278329

  5. Expression of beta-defensins in the canine respiratory tract and antimicrobial activity against Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Erles, Kerstin; Brownlie, Joe

    2010-05-15

    Beta-defensins are cationic peptides which form part of the innate immune response of the respiratory epithelium. Due to their antimicrobial properties and immunostimulatory activity, beta-defensins are potential tools for the treatment and prevention of respiratory disease. In dogs, infectious respiratory disease is a common problem, particularly in housed animals. This study aimed to assess the presence of four beta-defensins in the canine respiratory tract and to use quantitative real-time PCR to determine mRNA levels following microbial challenge. Three beta-defensins, CBD1, CBD103 and CBD108, were detected in respiratory cells. All three defensins were also readily expressed in skin samples, while their expression in lymphoid tissues and the kidney was low and inconsistent. Treatment of primary tracheal epithelial cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or infection with canine respiratory coronavirus led to decreased expression of CBD103 and CBD108, while cells infected with canine parainfluenza virus had lower levels of CBD1 and CBD108. Furthermore CBD103 was demonstrated to have antimicrobial activity against the respiratory pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica. PMID:19931188

  6. Experimental antibiotic treatment identifies potential pathogens of white band disease in the endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis.

    PubMed

    Sweet, M J; Croquer, A; Bythell, J C

    2014-08-01

    Coral diseases have been increasingly reported over the past few decades and are a major contributor to coral decline worldwide. The Caribbean, in particular, has been noted as a hotspot for coral disease, and the aptly named white syndromes have caused the decline of the dominant reef building corals throughout their range. White band disease (WBD) has been implicated in the dramatic loss of Acropora cervicornis and Acropora palmata since the 1970s, resulting in both species being listed as critically endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red list. The causal agent of WBD remains unknown, although recent studies based on challenge experiments with filtrate from infected hosts concluded that the disease is probably caused by bacteria. Here, we report an experiment using four different antibiotic treatments, targeting different members of the disease-associated microbial community. Two antibiotics, ampicillin and paromomycin, arrested the disease completely, and by comparing with community shifts brought about by treatments that did not arrest the disease, we have identified the likely candidate causal agent or agents of WBD. Our interpretation of the experimental treatments is that one or a combination of up to three specific bacterial types, detected consistently in diseased corals but not detectable in healthy corals, are likely causal agents of WBD. In addition, a histophagous ciliate (Philaster lucinda) identical to that found consistently in association with white syndrome in Indo-Pacific acroporas was also consistently detected in all WBD samples and absent in healthy coral. Treatment with metronidazole reduced it to below detection limits, but did not arrest the disease. However, the microscopic disease signs changed, suggesting a secondary role in disease causation for this ciliate. In future studies to identify a causal agent of WBD via tests of Henle-Koch's postulates, it will be vital to experimentally control for populations of the other potential pathogens identified in this study. PMID:24943374

  7. Annexin V Release and Transmembrane Mitochondrial Potential during Storage of Apheresis-Derived Platelets Treated for Pathogen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Susanne M.; Oustianskaia, Larissa; Schneider, Volker; Gathof, Birgit S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background In vitro function of stored platelet (PLT) con-centrates was analyzed after applying two different techniques of pathogen reduction technology (PRT) treatment, which could increase cellular injury during processing and storage. Methods Nine triple-dose PLT apheresis donations were split into 27 single units designated to riboflavin-UVB (M) or psoralen-UVA (I) treatment or remained untreated (C). Throughout 8 days of storage, samples were analyzed for annexin V release, the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (??) and some classical markers of PLT quality (pH, LDH release, hypotonic shock response (HSR)). Results PLT count and LDH release of all units maintained initial ranges. All units exhibited a decrease in pH and HSR and an increase in annexin V release and ?? disruption. Notably, throughout the entire storage period, annexin V release re-mained lowest in M units. Throughout 7 days of storage, M units remained comparable to C units (p > 0.05), whereas inferior values were observed with I units. Here, differences to C units reached significance by day 1 (pH: p < 0.0001), day 5 (annexin V release: p < 0.014), and day 7 (HSR, ??: p ? 0.003). After PRT treatment, annexin V release and ?? disruption were significantly (p < 0.001) correlated with pH and HSR. Conclusion During storage, all units showed a de-crease in HSR and an increase in acidity, annexin V release and ?? disruption. While M units remained comparable to C units, I units demonstrated significantly inferior values during terminal storage. This could have resulted from differences in PRT treatment or simply be due to differences in storage media and should be analyzed for clinical relevance in future investigations. PMID:20737011

  8. Characterizing the interface between wild ducks and poultry to evaluate the potential of transmission of avian pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Characterizing the interface between wild and domestic animal populations is increasingly recognized as essential in the context of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) that are transmitted by wildlife. More specifically, the spatial and temporal distribution of contact rates between wild and domestic hosts is a key parameter for modeling EIDs transmission dynamics. We integrated satellite telemetry, remote sensing and ground-based surveys to evaluate the spatio-temporal dynamics of indirect contacts between wild and domestic birds to estimate the risk that avian pathogens such as avian influenza and Newcastle viruses will be transmitted between wildlife to poultry. We monitored comb ducks (Sarkidiornis melanotos melanotos) with satellite transmitters for seven months in an extensive Afro-tropical wetland (the Inner Niger Delta) in Mali and characterise the spatial distribution of backyard poultry in villages. We modelled the spatial distribution of wild ducks using 250-meter spatial resolution and 8-days temporal resolution remotely-sensed environmental indicators based on a Maxent niche modelling method. Results Our results show a strong seasonal variation in potential contact rate between wild ducks and poultry. We found that the exposure of poultry to wild birds was greatest at the end of the dry season and the beginning of the rainy season, when comb ducks disperse from natural water bodies to irrigated areas near villages. Conclusions Our study provides at a local scale a quantitative evidence of the seasonal variability of contact rate between wild and domestic bird populations. It illustrates a GIS-based methodology for estimating epidemiological contact rates at the wildlife and livestock interface integrating high-resolution satellite telemetry and remote sensing data. PMID:22085837

  9. Respiratory Hydrogen Use by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is Essential for Virulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Maier; A. Olczak; S. Maier; S. Soni; J. Gunn

    2004-01-01

    Based on available annotated gene sequence information, the enteric pathogen salmonella, like other enteric bacteria, contains three putative membrane-associated H2-using hydrogenase enzymes. These enzymes split molecular H2, releasing low-potential electrons that are used to reduce quinone or heme-containing compo- nents of the respiratory chain. Here we show that each of the three distinct membrane-associated hydrogenases of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

  10. A survey of the fecal bacteria of bison (Bison bison) for potential pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility of bison-origin E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Murray R.; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    An observational study determined the normal fecal bacterial flora of clinically healthy bison, detected the presence of common potential zoonotic pathogens, and determined the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated E. coli strains. Ninety-six fecal samples from 10 captive herds were cultured for aerobic, anaerobic, facultative, and microaerophillic bacteria. Nineteen major genera of gram-positive and 8 genera of gram-negative bacteria were identified. Salmonella spp. were not detected but some of the isolated bacteria are potential gastrointestinal pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 24 antimicrobials were determined for the E. coli isolated. Nearly all were susceptible to 23 of the 24 antimicrobials but there was a reduced susceptibility to sulphonamide. There were fewer resistant strains than were reported in recent studies of generic E. coli from cattle living in the same area. PMID:21731097

  11. A survey of fungal plant pathogens associated with weed infestations of barberry ( Berberis spp.) in New Zealand and their biocontrol potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. W. Waipara; L. A. Smith; A. F. Gianotti; J. P. Wilkie; C. J. Winks; E. H. C. McKenzie

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction and subsequent naturalisation of five species of Berberis into New Zealand, two species, B. glaucocarpa and B. darwinii have become aggressive invaders of both agricultural and native ecosystems throughout many regions. Both are now targets\\u000a for a biological control program. A survey for pathogens to be used as potential classical or inundative biocontrol agents\\u000a was initiated on

  12. Evaluation of Major Types of Shiga Toxin 2e-Producing Escherichia coli Bacteria Present in Food, Pigs, and the Environment as Potential Pathogens for Humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lothar Beutin; Ulrike Kruger; Gladys Krause; Angelika Miko; Annett Martin; Eckhard Strauch

    2008-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2e (Stx2e)-producing strains from food (n 36), slaughtered pigs (n 25), the environment (n 21), diseased pigs (n 19), and humans (n 9) were investigated for production of Stx2e by enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay, for virulence markers by PCR, and for their serotypes to evaluate their role as potential human pathogens. Stx2e production was low in 64% of

  13. Evaluation of the potential of Trichoderma viride in the control of fungal pathogens of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eslaminejad Parizi, T; Ansaria, Mehdi; Elaminejad, Tahereh

    2012-04-01

    The potential of Trichoderma viride as a bio-control agent was evaluated in vitro against Roselle pathogens i.e. Phoma exigua, Fusarium nygamai and Rhizoctonia solani[1] using the dual culture technique. Volatile and non-volatile inhibitors of Trichoderma were also evaluated for this purpose. T. viride[2] was shown to have a marked inhibitory effect on the tested pathogens in vitro. Maximum inhibition occurred against P. exigua, with 71.76% reduction in mycelial radial growth. The three pathogens, P. exigua, F. nygamai and R. solani were also found to be susceptible to the volatile inhibitors produced by T. viride, giving rise to growth inhibition of about 68% in each case. When T. viride non-volatile metabolites were tested against the pathogens, maximum inhibition occurred against R. solani (73.95% mycelial growth inhibition), followed by P. exigua (37.17% inhibition). The inhibitory effect of the non-volatile metabolites on F. nygamai was, however, minimal. PMID:22261114

  14. Full-Genome Analysis of a Canine Pneumovirus Causing Acute Respiratory Disease in Dogs, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Decaro, Nicola; Pinto, Pierfrancesco; Mari, Viviana; Elia, Gabriella; Larocca, Vittorio; Camero, Michele; Terio, Valentina; Losurdo, Michele; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) associated to canine pneumovirus (CnPnV) infection is reported. The outbreak occurred in a shelter of the Apulia region and involved 37 out of 350 dogs that displayed cough and/or nasal discharge with no evidence of fever. The full-genomic characterisation showed that the causative agent (strain Bari/100-12) was closely related to CnPnVs that have been recently isolated in the USA, as well as to murine pneumovirus, which is responsible for respiratory disease in mice. The present study represents a useful contribution to the knowledge of the pathogenic potential of CnPnV and its association with CIRD in dogs. Further studies will elucidate the pathogenicity and epidemiology of this novel pneumovirus, thus addressing the eventual need for specific vaccines. PMID:24400129

  15. Virion packaging of multiple cleavage isoforms of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of a complex disease often resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, highly pathogenic isolates have emerged which have proven to be devastatingly effective pathogens, resulting in rapid systemic deterioration...

  16. Inactivation and potential reactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice following ultraviolet light exposure at three monochromatic wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fugui; Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Gong, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation at 254 nm is considered as a novel non-thermal method for decontamination of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. However, lower penetration depth of UV light at 254 nm in apple juice resulted in higher UV dose consumption during apple juice decontamination. In addition, no studies are available on the reactivation of pathogens following exposure to UV light in drinks and beverages. Two novel monochromatic UV light sources (? = 222 and 282 nm) have been developed for bacterial disinfection. However, the inactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 following exposure to these UV wavelengths is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the inactivation and reactivation potential of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice following exposure to UV light at three monochromatic wavelengths: Far UV (? = 222 nm), Far UV+ (? = 282 nm) and UVC light (? = 254 nm). The results showed that E. coli O157:H7 is acid-resistant, and up to 99.50% of cells survived in apple juice when incubated at 20 °C for 24 h. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to Far UV light (2.81 Log reduction) was higher (P < 0.05) than the inactivation caused by UVC light (1.95 Log reduction) and Far UV+ light (1.83 Log reduction) at the similar levels of UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm(2). No any reactivation potential was observed for E. coli O157:H7 in dark incubation phases after exposure to UV light as determined by the regular plating method. In addition, the exposure to Far UV light at 222 nm followed by incubating at 37 °C significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the survival of E. coli O157:H7 during dark incubation phase compared to that of UVC and Far UV+ light. PMID:25475303

  17. Respiratory effects of intravenous midazolam.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, M; Hunter, K M; Parkinson, R

    1996-09-01

    Thirty-four healthy, young-adult patients receiving intravenous midazolam for third-molar surgery had their respiratory parameters measured by respiratory inductive plethysmography. Tidal volume and minute volume showed significant changes during the initial 5-10 minutes of sedation, the changes being maximal during the first 5 minutes from the completion of injection of midazolam. The measurement of phase angle, an indicator of respiratory asynchrony, showed no significant change from normal, although a few patients showed some asynchrony of breathing, suggesting some amount of respiratory obstruction. A few patients showed a short period of apnoea and a small fall in the oxygen saturation. None of these changes caused any clinical concerns. It is suggested that the absence of stimulation after injection of midazolam, particularly in the initial few minutes, may contribute to the potential onset of respiratory problems. PMID:8910727

  18. Genesis of a highly pathogenic and potentially pandemic H5N1 influenza virus in eastern Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Li; Y. Guan; J. Wang; G. J. D. Smith; K. M. Xu; L. Duan; A. P. Rahardjo; P. Puthavathana; C. Buranathai; T. D. Nguyen; A. T. S. Estoepangestie; A. Chaisingh; P. Auewarakul; H. T. Long; N. T. H. Hanh; R. J. Webby; L. L. M. Poon; H. Chen; K. F. Shortridge; K. Y. Yuen; R. G. Webster; J. S. M. Peiris

    2004-01-01

    A highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, H5N1, caused disease outbreaks in poultry in China and seven other east Asian countries between late 2003 and early 2004; the same virus was fatal to humans in Thailand and Vietnam. Here we demonstrate a series of genetic reassortment events traceable to the precursor of the H5N1 viruses that caused the initial human outbreak

  19. Influenza, a One Health paradigm--novel therapeutic strategies to fight a zoonotic pathogen with pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Stephan; Zell, Roland; Schwemmle, Martin; Herold, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Influenza virus is a paradigm for a pathogen that frequently crosses the species barrier from animals to humans, causing severe disease in the human population. This ranges from frequent epidemics to occasional pandemic outbreaks with millions of death. All previous pandemics in humans were caused by animal viruses or virus reassortants carrying animal virus genes, underlining that the fight against influenza requires a One Health approach integrating human and veterinary medicine. Furthermore, the fundamental question of what enables a flu pathogen to jump from animals to humans can only be tackled in a transdisciplinary approach between virologists, immunologists and cell biologists. To address this need the German FluResearchNet was established as a first nationwide influenza research network that virtually integrates all national expertise in the field of influenza to unravel viral and host determinants of pathogenicity and species transmission and to explore novel avenues of antiviral intervention. Here we focus on the various novel anti-flu approaches that were developed as part of the FluResearchNet activities. PMID:25220817

  20. Simultaneous Identification of Potential Pathogenicity Factors of Mycoplasma agalactiae in the Natural Ovine Host by Negative Selection.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-07-01

    Mycoplasmas possess complex pathogenicity determinants that are largely unknown at the molecular level. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful model to study the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenicity. The generation and in vivo screening of a transposon mutant library of M. agalactiae were employed to unravel its host colonization factors. Tn4001mod mutants were sequenced using a novel sequencing method, and functionally heterogeneous pools containing 15 to 19 selected mutants were screened simultaneously through two successive cycles of sheep intramammary infections. A PCR-based negative selection method was employed to identify mutants that failed to colonize the udders and draining lymph nodes in the animals. A total of 14 different mutants found to be absent from ?95% of samples were identified and subsequently verified via a second round of stringent confirmatory screening where 100% absence was considered attenuation. Using this criterion, seven mutants with insertions in genes MAG1050, MAG2540, MAG3390, uhpT, eutD, adhT, and MAG4460 were not recovered from any of the infected animals. Among the attenuated mutants, many contain disruptions in hypothetical genes, implying their previously unknown role in M. agalactiae pathogenicity. These data indicate the putative role of functionally different genes, including hypothetical ones, in the pathogenesis of M. agalactiae. Defining the precise functions of the identified genes is anticipated to increase our understanding of M. agalactiae infections and to develop successful intervention strategies against it. PMID:25916984

  1. Respiratory muscle injury in animal models and humans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Darlene Reid; Nori A. MacGowan

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory muscle injury may result from excessive loading due to a decrease in respiratory muscle strength, an increase in the work of breathing, or an increase in the rate of ventilation. Other conditions such as hypoxemia, hypercapnia, aging, decreased nutrition, and immobilization may potentiate respiratory muscle injury. Respiratory muscle injury has been shown in animal models using direct muscle or

  2. Reducing the burden of acute respiratory distress syndrome: the case for early intervention and the potential role of the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Kollef, Marin H.

    2014-01-01

    The mortality for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptably high. Success in clinical trials has been limited, resulting in a lack of effective therapies to treat the syndrome. The projected increase in mechanically ventilated patients and global need for critical care services suggests that the clinical and research landscape in ARDS can no longer be confined to the intensive care unit (ICU). A demonstrable minority of patients present to the emergency department (ED) with ARDS, and ARDS onset typically occurs shortly after ICU admission. Furthermore, the ED is an entry point for many of the highest risk patients for ARDS development and progression. These facts, combined with prolonged lengths of stay in the ED, suggest that the ED could represent a window of opportunity for treatment and preventive strategies, as well as clinical trial enrollment. This review aims to discuss some of the potential strategies which may prevent or alter the trajectory of ARDS, with a focus on the potential role the ED could play in reducing the burden of this syndrome. PMID:24469236

  3. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  4. RESPIRATORY/ LOUNGECONSULT

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    CLEAN SUPPLY PAT ROOM 15 PAT ROOM 14 PAT ROOM 16 PAT BAY 2 PAT BAY 1 TEAM ROOM ST TLT RESPIRATORY/ BLOODWORK AREA PAT ROOM 4 PAT ROOM 5 PAT ROOM 6 PAT ROOM 7 PAT ROOM 8 PAT ROOM 3 PAT ROOM 2 TWIN ROOM 1 GAS PAT BAY 7 PAT BAY 8 PAT BAY 5 PAT BAY 6 PAT BAY 3 PAT BAY 4 MEDS PAT ROOM 9 PAT ROOM 10 PAT ROOM

  5. Expression of the beta-glucan receptor, Dectin-1, on murine leukocytes in situ correlates with its function in pathogen recognition and reveals potential roles in leukocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Reid, Delyth M; Montoya, Maria; Taylor, Philip R; Borrow, Persephone; Gordon, Siamon; Brown, Gordon D; Wong, Simon Y C

    2004-07-01

    Dectin-1 is a pathogen-recognition receptor on macrophages (MPhis), neutrophils, and dendritic cells (DCs). On MPhis and bone marrow-derived DCs, it has been shown to mediate the nonopsonic recognition of and response to soluble and particulate yeast beta-glucans. We have optimized the immunohistochemical detection of Dectin-1 and demonstrated its expression on neutrophils, subpopulations of MPhis in splenic red and white pulp, alveolar MPhis, Kupffer cells, and MPhis and DCs in the lamina propria of gut villi. This is consistent with its role in pathogen surveillance. A significant proportion of CD11c(+) splenic DCs expressed Dectin-1, but expression was not restricted to any one subset. Dectin-1 expression was low on resident MPhis and DCs of skin and was not detected on resident MPhis or DCs in kidney, heart, brain, or eye. The proposed, additional role of Dectin-1 as a coreceptor for T cell activation is supported by its expression on DCs in the T cell areas of the spleen and lymph nodes. Strong expression of Dectin-1 on subpopulations of MPhis and DCs in the medullary and corticomedullary regions of the thymus suggests a role distinct from pathogen recognition. Tissue localization thus revealed potential roles of Dectin-1 in leukocyte interactions during innate immune responses and T cell development. PMID:15107454

  6. Transplantation-Associated Long-Term Immunosuppression Promotes Oral Colonization by Potentially Opportunistic Pathogens without Impacting Other Members of the Salivary Bacteriome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bo-Young; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Dupuy, Amanda K.; Angeloni, Mark; Abusleme, Loreto; Terzi, Evimaria; Ioannidou, Effie; Strausbaugh, Linda D.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients rely on pharmacological immunosuppression to prevent allograft rejection. The effect of such chronic immunosuppression on the microflora at mucosal surfaces is not known. We evaluated the salivary bacterial microbiome of 20 transplant recipients and 19 nonimmunosuppressed controls via 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Alpha-diversity and global community structure did not differ between transplant and control subjects. However, principal coordinate analysis showed differences in community membership. Taxa more prevalent in transplant subjects included operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of potentially opportunistic Gammaproteobacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Acinetobacter species, Vibrio species, Enterobacteriaceae species, and the genera Acinetobacter and Klebsiella. Transplant subjects also had increased proportions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter species, Enterobacteriaceae species, and Enterococcus faecalis, among other OTUs, while genera with increased proportions included Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus. Furthermore, in transplant subjects, the dose of the immunosuppressant prednisone positively correlated with bacterial richness, while prednisone and mycophenolate mofetil doses positively correlated with the prevalence and proportions of transplant-associated taxa. Correlation network analysis of OTU relative abundance revealed a cluster containing potentially opportunistic pathogens as transplant associated. This cluster positively correlated with serum levels of C-reactive protein, suggesting a link between the resident flora at mucosal compartments and systemic inflammation. Network connectivity analysis revealed opportunistic pathogens as highly connected to each other and to common oral commensals, pointing to bacterial interactions that may influence colonization. This work demonstrates that immunosuppression aimed at limiting T-cell-mediated responses creates a more permissive oral environment for potentially opportunistic pathogens without affecting other members of the salivary bacteriome. PMID:23616410

  7. Transplantation-associated long-term immunosuppression promotes oral colonization by potentially opportunistic pathogens without impacting other members of the salivary bacteriome.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia I; Hong, Bo-Young; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Dupuy, Amanda K; Angeloni, Mark; Abusleme, Loreto; Terzi, Evimaria; Ioannidou, Effie; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients rely on pharmacological immunosuppression to prevent allograft rejection. The effect of such chronic immunosuppression on the microflora at mucosal surfaces is not known. We evaluated the salivary bacterial microbiome of 20 transplant recipients and 19 nonimmunosuppressed controls via 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Alpha-diversity and global community structure did not differ between transplant and control subjects. However, principal coordinate analysis showed differences in community membership. Taxa more prevalent in transplant subjects included operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of potentially opportunistic Gammaproteobacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Acinetobacter species, Vibrio species, Enterobacteriaceae species, and the genera Acinetobacter and Klebsiella. Transplant subjects also had increased proportions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter species, Enterobacteriaceae species, and Enterococcus faecalis, among other OTUs, while genera with increased proportions included Klebsiella, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus. Furthermore, in transplant subjects, the dose of the immunosuppressant prednisone positively correlated with bacterial richness, while prednisone and mycophenolate mofetil doses positively correlated with the prevalence and proportions of transplant-associated taxa. Correlation network analysis of OTU relative abundance revealed a cluster containing potentially opportunistic pathogens as transplant associated. This cluster positively correlated with serum levels of C-reactive protein, suggesting a link between the resident flora at mucosal compartments and systemic inflammation. Network connectivity analysis revealed opportunistic pathogens as highly connected to each other and to common oral commensals, pointing to bacterial interactions that may influence colonization. This work demonstrates that immunosuppression aimed at limiting T-cell-mediated responses creates a more permissive oral environment for potentially opportunistic pathogens without affecting other members of the salivary bacteriome. PMID:23616410

  8. Potential Biases Arising in the Use of Cascade Impactors to Estimate Respiratory Tract Deposition Patterns of Lead-Acid Battery Plant Aerosols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas G. Hodgkins; Thomas G. Robins; David L. Hinkamp; Steven P. Levine; M. Anthony Schork; William H. Krebs

    1992-01-01

    The region of the respiratory tract where inhaled particles deposit can have important implications for the causation of local or systemic toxic effects. For most aerosols of occupational importance, respiratory tract deposition can be predicted from the aerodynamic diameter of the particles. With the advent of cascade impactors, particularly those of personal sampler size, the determination of the aerodynamic diameters

  9. COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations and disease: insights into pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Debbie S.; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Gould, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) and alpha 2 (COL4A2) constitute one of the most abundant components of nearly all basement membranes. Accordingly, mutations in COL4A1 or COL4A2 are pleiotropic and contribute to a broad spectrum of disorders, including myopathy, glaucoma and hemorrhagic stroke. Here, we summarize the contributions of COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations in human disease, integrate knowledge gained from model organisms and evaluate the implications for pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22914737

  10. Propagation of respiratory aerosols by the vuvuzela.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ka-Man; Bottomley, Christian; McNerney, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Vuvuzelas, the plastic blowing horns used by sports fans, recently achieved international recognition during the FIFA World Cup soccer tournament in South Africa. We hypothesised that vuvuzelas might facilitate the generation and dissemination of respiratory aerosols. To investigate the quantity and size of aerosols emitted when the instrument is played, eight healthy volunteers were asked to blow a vuvuzela. For each individual the concentration of particles in expelled air was measured using a six channel laser particle counter and the duration of blowing and velocity of air leaving the vuvuzela were recorded. To allow comparison with other activities undertaken at sports events each individual was also asked to shout and the measurements were repeated while using a paper cone to confine the exhaled air. Triplicate measurements were taken for each individual. The mean peak particle counts were 658 × 10(3) per litre for the vuvuzela and 3.7 × 10(3) per litre for shouting, representing a mean log(10) difference of 2.20 (95% CI: 2.03,2.36; p < 0.001). The majority (>97%) of particles captured from either the vuvuzela or shouting were between 0.5 and 5 microns in diameter. Mean peak airflows recorded for the vuvuzela and shouting were 6.1 and 1.8 litres per second respectively. We conclude that plastic blowing horns (vuvuzelas) have the capacity to propel extremely large numbers of aerosols into the atmosphere of a size able to penetrate the lower lung. Some respiratory pathogens are spread via contaminated aerosols emitted by infected persons. Further investigation is required to assess the potential of the vuvuzela to contribute to the transmission of aerosol borne diseases. We recommend, as a precautionary measure, that people with respiratory infections should be advised not to blow their vuvuzela in enclosed spaces and where there is a risk of infecting others. PMID:21629778

  11. Propagation of Respiratory Aerosols by the Vuvuzela

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ka-Man; Bottomley, Christian; McNerney, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Vuvuzelas, the plastic blowing horns used by sports fans, recently achieved international recognition during the FIFA World Cup soccer tournament in South Africa. We hypothesised that vuvuzelas might facilitate the generation and dissemination of respiratory aerosols. To investigate the quantity and size of aerosols emitted when the instrument is played, eight healthy volunteers were asked to blow a vuvuzela. For each individual the concentration of particles in expelled air was measured using a six channel laser particle counter and the duration of blowing and velocity of air leaving the vuvuzela were recorded. To allow comparison with other activities undertaken at sports events each individual was also asked to shout and the measurements were repeated while using a paper cone to confine the exhaled air. Triplicate measurements were taken for each individual. The mean peak particle counts were 658×103 per litre for the vuvuzela and 3.7×103 per litre for shouting, representing a mean log10 difference of 2.20 (95% CI: 2.03,2.36; p<0.001). The majority (>97%) of particles captured from either the vuvuzela or shouting were between 0.5 and 5 microns in diameter. Mean peak airflows recorded for the vuvuzela and shouting were 6.1 and 1.8 litres per second respectively. We conclude that plastic blowing horns (vuvuzelas) have the capacity to propel extremely large numbers of aerosols into the atmosphere of a size able to penetrate the lower lung. Some respiratory pathogens are spread via contaminated aerosols emitted by infected persons. Further investigation is required to assess the potential of the vuvuzela to contribute to the transmission of aerosol borne diseases. We recommend, as a precautionary measure, that people with respiratory infections should be advised not to blow their vuvuzela in enclosed spaces and where there is a risk of infecting others. PMID:21629778

  12. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Clare; Lai, Stella; Doherty, Elaine; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub) for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible.

  13. Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Corey, G. Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

  14. Histopathological changes induced in an animal model by potentially pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis strains recovered from ready-to-eat food outlets in Osun State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olawale, Adetunji Kola; David, Oluwole Moses; Oluyege, Adekemi Olubukunola; Osuntoyinbo, Richard Temitope; Laleye, Solomon Anjuwon; Famurewa, Oladiran

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci have been implicated as an emerging important cause of several diseases and multiple antibiotic resistance. However, there is little information about the prevalence of pathogenic and/or antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in ready-to-eat foods in Nigeria. Here we report the pathogenic potential of three selected antibiotic-resistant E. faecalis strains isolated from food canteens and food outlets with different virulence determinant genes, including EFC 12 (with gel+, esp+, cylA+, and asa1+), EFT 148 (with gel+, ace+, and asa1+), and EFS 18 (with esp+ and cylA+) in an animal model. Enterococcemia, hematological parameters, and histopathological changes in organ tissues were examined in experimental animals. The results showed differences in enterococcemia and hematological parameters between the control group and experimental animal group. Enterococcemia was observed for 7 days, and the animal group infected with EFC 12 showed the highest growth rate, followed by EFT 148, with the lowest growth rate seen in the EFS 18-infected group. White blood cell count, packed cell volume, and platelets were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the experimental animals compared with the controls. White blood cells decreased drastically during the study period in rats challenged with EFC 12 (from 7,800 to 6,120 per mm3) but levels remained higher in the control group (from 9,228 to 9,306 per mm3). Histopathological changes included areas of pronounced hemorrhage, necrosis, and distortion in liver tissues, which were more marked in rats infected with EFC 12, followed by EFT 148, then EFS 18. The results of this study suggest the presence of potentially pathogenic E. faecalis strains in food canteens and food outlets; hence, there is a need for strict adherence to good hygiene practices in the study area owing to the epidemiological significance of foods. PMID:26170700

  15. 77 FR 68789 - Establishing a List of Qualifying Pathogens That Have the Potential To Pose a Serious Threat to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...That Have the Potential To Pose a Serious Threat to Public Health; Public Hearing; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and...that have the potential to pose a serious threat to public health), as required under the Food and Drug...

  16. Human Pathogens Abundant in the Bacterial Metagenome of Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Amy R.; Berger, Sibel; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated chemical, heavy metal, and other abiotic substances present in cigarettes and their roles in the development of lung cancer and other diseases, yet no studies have comprehensively evaluated bacterial diversity of cigarettes and the possible impacts of these microbes on respiratory illnesses in smokers and exposed nonsmokers. Objectives The goal of this study was to explore the bacterial metagenomes of commercially available cigarettes. Methods A 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray and cloning and sequencing were used to evaluate total bacterial diversity of four brands of cigarettes. Normalized microarray data were compared using principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis to evaluate potential differences in microbial diversity across cigarette brands. Results Fifteen different classes of bacteria and a broad range of potentially pathogenic organisms were detected in all cigarette samples. Most notably, we detected Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Clostridium, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia in ? 90% of all cigarette samples. Other pathogenic bacteria detected included Campylobacter, Enterococcus, Proteus, and Staphylococcus. No significant variability in bacterial diversity was observed across the four different cigarette brands. Conclusions Previous studies have shown that smoking is associated with colonization by pathogenic bacteria and an increased risk of lung infections. However, this is the first study to show that cigarettes themselves could be the direct source of exposure to a wide array of potentially pathogenic microbes among smokers and other people exposed to secondhand smoke. The overall public health implications of these findings are unclear at this time, and future studies are necessary to determine whether bacteria in cigarettes could play important roles in the development of both infectious and chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:20064769

  17. Evaluation of Unbiased Next-Generation Sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) as a Diagnostic Method in Influenza Virus-Positive Respiratory Samples.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nicole; Indenbirken, Daniela; Meyer, Thomas; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Lellek, Heinrich; Spohn, Michael; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Unbiased nontargeted metagenomic RNA sequencing (UMERS) has the advantage to detect known as well as unknown pathogens and, thus, can significantly improve the detection of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal sequences in public health settings. In particular, conventional diagnostic methods successfully identify the putative pathogenic agent in only 30% to 40% of respiratory specimens from patients with acute respiratory illness. Here, we applied UMERS to 24 diagnostic respiratory specimens (bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] fluid, sputum samples, and a swab) from patients with seasonal influenza infection and 5 BAL fluid samples from patients with pneumonia that tested negative for influenza to validate RNA sequencing as an unbiased diagnostic tool in comparison to conventional diagnostic methods. In addition to our comparison to PCR, we evaluated the potential to retrieve comprehensive influenza virus genomic information and the capability to detect known superinfecting pathogens. Compared to quantitative real-time PCR for influenza viral sequences, UMERS detected influenza viral sequences in 18 of 24 samples. Complete influenza virus genomes could be assembled from 8 samples. Furthermore, in 3 of 24 influenza-positive samples, additional viral pathogens could be detected, and 2 of 24 samples showed a significantly increased abundance of individual bacterial species known to cause superinfections during an influenza virus infection. Thus, analysis of respiratory samples from known or suspected influenza patients by UMERS provides valuable information that is relevant for clinical investigation. PMID:25972420

  18. Urban pigeons (Columba livia) as a potential source of pathogenic yeasts: a focus on antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus strains in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana K F; Sidrim, José J C; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Monteiro, André J; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2010-03-01

    To investigate pigeons as a potential source of pathogenic yeast species, 47 samples of pigeon droppings and 322 samples from pigeon cloacae were evaluated. The samples were also collected from trees located near the pigeon habitats, in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeast Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of these environmental Cryptococcus strains to amphotericin B, azoles and caspofungin. C. neoformans var. neoformans (n = 10), C. laurentii (n = 3), Candida spp. (n = 14), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (n = 6) and Trichosporon sp. (n = 3) were isolated from pigeon droppings. In contrast, only Candida spp. (n = 4), Trichosporon sp. (n = 3) and R. mucilaginosa (n = 2) were recovered from cloacae specimens. Only Candida glabrata (n = 1) was recovered from plant samples. Azole resistance was detected in only one environmental strain of Cryptococcus, which was resistant to itraconazole (MIC = 1 microg/ml). As expected, all Cryptococcus strains were resistant to caspofungin. In summary, the present study confirms that urban pigeons are a potential source of Cryptococcus spp. and other pathogenic yeasts. Additionally, antifungal resistance was observed in one environmental strain of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans in Northeast Brazil. PMID:19847668

  19. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24058905

  20. Pathogenic potential of two sibling species, Anisakis simplex (s.s.) and Anisakis pegreffii (Nematoda: Anisakidae): in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic potentials of two sibling nematodes Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and A. pegreffii were compared by in vitro and in vivo studies. Live third-stage larvae of each species were subjected to agar blocks made using PBS or RPMI-1640, overlaid with different supernatants (artificial gastric juice, PBS, and RPMI-1640), and their penetration ability was compared. Their tolerance of artificial gastric juice was also tested. Further, they were introduced into rats by gastric intubation, and the in vivo locations of them were investigated. A. pegreffii showed higher penetration ability than A. simplex (s.s.) in most of the experimental conditions, except for the RPMI-1640 agar block overlaid with artificial gastric juice. In an acid tolerance test, the mean survival times were 6.1 days for A. simplex (s.s.) and 4.2 days for A. pegreffii. In an animal experiment, A. simplex (s.s.) stayed for a shorter time in the stomachs of rats than A. pegreffii. Some A. pegreffii and A. simplex (s.s.) were embedded in the gastric mucosa or freely existed in the abdominal cavity. All of these results suggest that A. pegreffii has the pathogenic potential to cause anisakidosis in humans when ingested, as does A. simplex (s.s.). PMID:25685821

  1. A review of potential pathogens of sea lice and the application of cleaner fish in biological control.

    PubMed

    Treasurer, James W

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of successful biological control of pest populations in aquatic environments. This approach to sea louse control has environmental benefits and is cost-effective. The range of possible pathogens of lice is reviewed and epibionts recorded from sea lice, including the monogenean Udonella caligorum and ciliates, are examined. Baculoviruses when ingested by insects form occlusion bodies resulting in severe damage to the digestive system and subsequent death, and this may be a promising approach. Cleaner wrasse (Labridae) have been stocked commercially with farmed salmon since 1989, and recent work on improving the method is reviewed. Wrasse are sourced from a wild fishery and stocked at ratios of 1 to 25-150 salmon. Over 5 million wrasse are stocked annually in Norway and c 30% of smolts in Scotland were stocked with wrasse until 1998, when an outbreak of infections salmon anaemia (ISA) deterred many farmers from transferring wild fish to cages. A case study is given showing that salmon in cages stocked with wrasse had a burden of one to eight lice through the first year compared with up to 40 lice per fish on unprotected and untreated fish. Electivity indices were used to compare the relative composition of lice developmental stages on salmon in stocked and unstocked cages, and adult male and female lice were found to comprise only 6% of the population in cages with wrasse, compared with 49% adults on fish in control cages. Measures to improve the efficacy of wrasse as a way of cleaning salmon in the second production year include the use of refuges to assist over-wintering survival, and stocking ballan wrasse. Health hygiene includes sourcing wrasse in the farm locality, testing for pathogens, vaccination of wrasse and ultimately rearing wrasse for stocking. The role of wrasse in an IPM strategy is described. PMID:12138621

  2. Introduction to Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Elizabeth Love; Barbara Jones

    This chapter is a brief introduction to pathogenic microorganisms and also discusses virulence factors. An understanding of\\u000a virulence factors is important, as they represent potential targets for the detection of microbial pathogens. Sources and\\u000a routes of infection are also briefly discussed with reference to specific examples. There are a number of ways in which infection\\u000a could be acquired, including via

  3. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved quality of life and significant cost savings. Your respiratory care ... your family and home situation to help your health care provider plan for your care after you are ...

  4. Biosecurity and Vector Behaviour: Evaluating the Potential Threat Posed by Anglers and Canoeists as Pathways for the Spread of Invasive Non-Native Species and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lucy G.; White, Piran C. L.; Stebbing, Paul D.; Stentiford, Grant D.; Dunn, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive non-native species (INNS) endanger native biodiversity and are a major economic problem. The management of pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment is a key target in the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi biodiversity targets for 2020. Freshwater environments are particularly susceptible to invasions as they are exposed to multiple introduction pathways, including non-native fish stocking and the release of boat ballast water. Since many freshwater INNS and aquatic pathogens can survive for several days in damp environments, there is potential for transport between water catchments on the equipment used by recreational anglers and canoeists. To quantify this biosecurity risk, we conducted an online questionnaire with 960 anglers and 599 canoeists to investigate their locations of activity, equipment used, and how frequently equipment was cleaned and/or dried after use. Anglers were also asked about their use and disposal of live bait. Our results indicate that 64% of anglers and 78.5% of canoeists use their equipment/boat in more than one catchment within a fortnight, the survival time of many of the INNS and pathogens considered in this study and that 12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists do so without either cleaning or drying their kit between uses. Furthermore, 8% of anglers and 28% of canoeists had used their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it after each use which could facilitate both the introduction and secondary spread of INNS in the UK. Our results provide a baseline against which to evaluate the effectiveness of future biosecurity awareness campaigns, and identify groups to target with biosecurity awareness information. Our results also indicate that the biosecurity practices of these groups must improve to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently spreading INNS and pathogens through these activities. PMID:24717714

  5. Attenuated and Replication-Competent Vaccinia Virus Strains M65 and M101 with Distinct Biology and Immunogenicity as Potential Vaccine Candidates against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Replication-competent poxvirus vectors with an attenuation phenotype and with a high immunogenic capacity of the foreign expressed antigen are being pursued as novel vaccine vectors against different pathogens. In this investigation, we have examined the replication and immunogenic characteristics of two vaccinia virus (VACV) mutants, M65 and M101. These mutants were generated after 65 and 101 serial passages of persistently infected Friend erythroleukemia (FEL) cells. In cultured cells of different origins, the mutants are replication competent and have growth kinetics similar to or slightly reduced in comparison with those of the parental Western Reserve (WR) virus strain. In normal and immune-suppressed infected mice, the mutants showed different levels of attenuation and pathogenicity in comparison with WR and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) strains. Wide genome analysis after deep sequencing revealed selected genomic deletions and mutations in a number of viral open reading frames (ORFs). Mice immunized in a DNA prime/mutant boost regimen with viral vectors expressing the LACK (Leishmania homologue for receptors of activated C kinase) antigen of Leishmania infantum showed protection or a delay in the onset of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Protection was similar to that triggered by MVA-LACK. In immunized mice, both polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype were activated by the two mutants, but the DNA-LACK/M65-LACK protocol preferentially induced CD4+ whereas DNA-LACK/M101-LACK preferentially induced CD8+ T cell responses. Altogether, our findings showed the adaptive changes of the WR genome during long-term virus-host cell interaction and how the replication competency of M65 and M101 mutants confers distinct biological properties and immunogenicity in mice compared to those of the MVA strain. These mutants could have applicability for understanding VACV biology and as potential vaccine vectors against pathogens and tumors. PMID:23596295

  6. Biosecurity and vector behaviour: evaluating the potential threat posed by anglers and canoeists as pathways for the spread of invasive non-native species and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lucy G; White, Piran C L; Stebbing, Paul D; Stentiford, Grant D; Dunn, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    Invasive non-native species (INNS) endanger native biodiversity and are a major economic problem. The management of pathways to prevent their introduction and establishment is a key target in the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi biodiversity targets for 2020. Freshwater environments are particularly susceptible to invasions as they are exposed to multiple introduction pathways, including non-native fish stocking and the release of boat ballast water. Since many freshwater INNS and aquatic pathogens can survive for several days in damp environments, there is potential for transport between water catchments on the equipment used by recreational anglers and canoeists. To quantify this biosecurity risk, we conducted an online questionnaire with 960 anglers and 599 canoeists to investigate their locations of activity, equipment used, and how frequently equipment was cleaned and/or dried after use. Anglers were also asked about their use and disposal of live bait. Our results indicate that 64% of anglers and 78.5% of canoeists use their equipment/boat in more than one catchment within a fortnight, the survival time of many of the INNS and pathogens considered in this study and that 12% of anglers and 50% of canoeists do so without either cleaning or drying their kit between uses. Furthermore, 8% of anglers and 28% of canoeists had used their equipment overseas without cleaning or drying it after each use which could facilitate both the introduction and secondary spread of INNS in the UK. Our results provide a baseline against which to evaluate the effectiveness of future biosecurity awareness campaigns, and identify groups to target with biosecurity awareness information. Our results also indicate that the biosecurity practices of these groups must improve to reduce the likelihood of inadvertently spreading INNS and pathogens through these activities. PMID:24717714

  7. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area of investigation. Clearly, regulatory agencies have a major role to play in the evaluation of these new technologies. This chapter will cover the several types of pathogen-reduction systems, mechanisms of action, the inactivation efficacy for specific types of pathogens, toxicology of the various systems and the published research and clinical trial data supporting their potential usefulness. Due to the nature of the field, pathogen reduction is a work in progress and this review should be considered as a snapshot in time rather than a clear picture of what the future will bring. PMID:16377551

  8. Respiratory Burst: Role in Signal Transduction in Alveolar Macrophages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maureen R. Gwinn; Val Vallyathan

    2006-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in defense against airborne pathogens and particles. These macrophages respond through both the adaptive and acquired immune responses, and through the activation of a multitude of signaling pathways. One major macrophage defense mechanism is respiratory burst, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the ROS produced may act directly in pathogen killing, they

  9. Potential new sources of wheat curl mite resistance in wheat to prevent the spread of yield-reducing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Kelly; Miller, Adam D; Hoffmann, Ary A; Larkin, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The wheat curl mite (WCM), Aceria tosichella Keifer (Trombidiformes: Eriophyidae), is a major pest in cropping regions of the world and is recognised as the primary vector of several yield-reducing pathogens, primarily affecting wheat. Management of WCM is complicated due to several aspects of the mite's biology and ecology; however, commercially viable mite resistant wheat varieties may offer practical long-term management options. Unfortunately, mite populations have adapted to previously identified sources of resistance, highlighting the need for further sources of resistance and the value of stacking different resistances to give greater degrees and longevity of control. In this study we assessed the susceptibility of 42 wheat-derived genotypes to mite population growth using a new experimental method that overcomes methodological limitations of previous studies. Experimental wheat lines included a variety of wheat genotypes, related Triticeae species, wheat-alien chromosome amphiploids, and chromosome addition or substitution lines. From these we identify new promising sources of WCM resistance associated with Thinopyrum intermedium, Th. ponticum and Hordeum marinum chromosomes. More specifically we identify group 1J and 5J chromosomes of the L3 and L5 wheat-Th. intermedium addition lines as new sources of resistance that could be exploited to transfer resistance onto homoeologous wheat chromosomes. This study offers new methods for reliable in situ estimations of mite abundance on cereal plants, and new sources of WCM resistance that may assist management of WCM and associated viruses in wheat. PMID:24705793

  10. Re-identification of Aeromonas isolates from chironomid egg masses as the potential pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas aquariorum.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Maria José; Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Senderovich, Yigal; Laviad, Sivan; Halpern, Malka

    2011-04-01

    Egg masses of the non-biting midge Chironomous sp. have recently been found to serve as a reservoir for Vibrio cholerae and Aeromonas species. These insects are widely distributed in freshwater and evidence suggests that they may disseminate pathogenic bacteria species into drinking water systems. In the current study the taxonomy of 26 Aeromonas isolates, previously recovered from chironomid egg masses, was re-evaluated. It was found that 23 isolates, which had previously been identified as Aeromonas caviae, could belong to the recently described species Aeromonas aquariorum by their biochemical traits. To date, A. aquariorum has been found in ornamental fish and also in human extra-intestinal infections. ERIC-PCR genotyping differentiated 11 strains within the 23 A. aquariorum isolates, whose identity was confirmed by their rpoD gene sequences. Strains were found to possess the following virulence-associated genes: alt (90.9%), ahpB (81.8%), pla/lip/lipH3/apl-1/lip (54.5%), fla (27.3%), act/hylA/aerA (27.3%), ascF-ascG (81.8%) and aexT (9%) encoding for the cytotonic heat-labile enterotoxin, elastase, lipase, flagella, cytotoxic enterotoxins, the Type III Secretion System and the AexT toxin delivered by this system respectively. These findings indicate that chironomid egg masses harbour strains of A. aquariorum, which bear an important number of virulence genes, and that this species was misidentified originally as A. caviae. PMID:23761256

  11. Comparative Dynamics, Morbidity and Mortality Burden of Pediatric Viral Respiratory Infections in an Equatorial City

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Wladimir J.; Laranjeira, Bruno J.; Pereira, Samuel A.R.; Florencio, Caroline M.G.D.; Moreno, Eduardo C.; Miller, Mark A.; Giglio, Ricardo; Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Moura, Fernanda E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the global leading cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality, the relative impact of viral pathogens on pediatric ARIs is still poorly understood, especially in equatorial settings. Long-term studies of multiple viruses concurrently circulating in these regions are still lacking. Here we report the results of a systematic prospective surveillance of multiple respiratory viruses conducted every weekday for nearly a decade in an equatorial city in Brazil. Methods We analyze the relative burden of influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus and metapneumovirus, their seasonality and their association with climatic and demographic factors, ARI diagnosis and pediatric mortality. Results and Conclusions RSV was the primary driver of severe childhood respiratory infections, including pneumonia. RSV was also the virus most strongly associated with respiratory-associated deaths, with RSV circulation and pediatric mortality being in phase. Influenza was the second most common cause of childhood ARIs but, similarly to parainfluenza, adenovirus and metapneumovirus, it was mostly associated to upper tract infections, and peaked much earlier than mortality. The results also show that viral circulation can be strongly seasonal even in equatorial regions, which lack seasons with low temperatures: while parainfluenza predominantly circulated in the dry season, RSV and influenza were concentrated in the rainy season. The consistent epidemiological patterns observed can be used for an effective adjustment of the timing of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions in this and potentially other equatorial regions. PMID:22001966

  12. Quantification of the Respiratory Burst Response as an Indicator of Innate Immune Health in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Peterman, Eric; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H.

    2013-01-01

    The phagocyte respiratory burst is part of the innate immune response to pathogen infection and involves the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are toxic and function to kill phagocytized microorganisms. In vivo quantification of phagocyte-derived ROS provides information regarding an organism's ability to mount a robust innate immune response. Here we describe a protocol to quantify and compare ROS in whole zebrafish embryos upon chemical induction of the phagocyte respiratory burst. This method makes use of a non-fluorescent compound that becomes fluorescent upon oxidation by ROS. Individual zebrafish embryos are pipetted into the wells of a microplate and incubated in this fluorogenic substrate with or without a chemical inducer of the respiratory burst. Fluorescence in each well is quantified at desired time points using a microplate reader. Fluorescence readings are adjusted to eliminate background fluorescence and then compared using an unpaired t-test. This method allows for comparison of the respiratory burst potential of zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages and in response to experimental manipulations such as protein knockdown, overexpression, or treatment with pharmacological agents. This method can also be used to monitor the respiratory burst response in whole dissected kidneys or cell preparations from kidneys of adult zebrafish and some other fish species. We believe that the relative simplicity and adaptability of this protocol will complement existing protocols and will be of interest to researchers who seek to better understand the innate immune response. PMID:24056405

  13. Prophylaxis of acute respiratory virus infections using nucleic acid-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan P; Nagata, Les P; Christopher, Mary E; Salazar, Andres M; Dale, Roderic M K

    2005-03-18

    Acute respiratory virus infections such as SARS and pandemic influenza are highly contagious diseases that cause global crisis, and inflict severe human mortality and morbidity. Vaccines against these viruses are either unavailable or do not provide adequate protection. In the absence of effective vaccines, nucleic acid-based immunomodulators have the potential to offer effective, broad-spectrum protection against these deadly pathogens. Poly ICLC and CpG oligonucleotides are promising gene-based drugs which have been shown in animal studies to protect against acute respiratory virus infections. Poly ICLC is a synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and an effective interferon-inducer and natural killer cell activator. When encapsulated in liposomes, poly ICLC offers complete protection (100% survival rate in pretreated group versus 0% survival in control group) against a lethal respiratory challenge of influenza A virus in mice. This antiviral effect has been shown to persist for up to 3 weeks post-drug treatment. Poly ICLC pretreatment also protects mice against a respiratory challenge of western equine encephalitis (WEE) virus, at a level comparable to inactivated WEE vaccine. CpG oligos in liposomes also provided high level of protection against the lethal influenza challenge. Together, these studies suggest nucleic acid-based immunomodulators are promising antiviral agents which can offer effective and non-specific protection against acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:15755608

  14. Analysis of Pineapple Mealybug Wilt Associated Virus -1 and -2 for Potential RNA Silencing Suppressors and Pathogenicity Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Kishore K.; Borth, Wayne B.; Melzer, Michael J.; Wang, Ming-Li; Hu, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants use RNA silencing to defend against viral infections. As a counter defense, plant viruses have evolved proteins that suppress RNA silencing. Mealybug wilt of pineapple (MWP), an important disease of pineapple, has been associated with at least three distinct viruses, Pineapple mealybug wilt associated virus -1, -2, and -3 (PMWaV-1, -2, and -3). Selected open reading frames (ORFs) of PMWaV-1 and PMWaV-2 were screened for their local and systemic suppressor activities in Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays using green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Results indicate that PMWaV-2 utilizes a multiple-component RNA silencing suppression mechanism. Two proteins, p20 and CP, target both local and systemic silencing in N. benthamiana, while the p22 and CPd proteins target only systemic silencing. In the related virus PMWaV-1, we found that only one of the encoded proteins, p61, had only systemic suppressor activity. Of all the proteins tested from both viruses, only the PMWaV-2 p20 protein suppressed local silencing induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but only when low levels of inducing dsRNA were used. None of the proteins analyzed could interfere with the short distance spread of silencing. We examined the mechanism of systemic suppression activity by investigating the effect of PMWaV-2-encoded p20 and CP proteins on secondary siRNAs. Our results suggest that the PMWaV-2 p20 and CP proteins block the systemic silencing signal by repressing production of secondary siRNAs. We also demonstrate that the PMWaV-2 p20 and p22 proteins enhanced the pathogenicity of Potato virus X in N. benthamiana. PMID:25751306

  15. Analysis of pineapple mealybug wilt associated virus -1 and -2 for potential RNA silencing suppressors and pathogenicity factors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Kishore K; Borth, Wayne B; Melzer, Michael J; Wang, Ming-Li; Hu, John S

    2015-03-01

    Higher plants use RNA silencing to defend against viral infections. As a counter defense, plant viruses have evolved proteins that suppress RNA silencing. Mealybug wilt of pineapple (MWP), an important disease of pineapple, has been associated with at least three distinct viruses, Pineapple mealybug wilt associated virus -1, -2, and -3 (PMWaV-1, -2, and -3). Selected open reading frames (ORFs) of PMWaV-1 and PMWaV-2 were screened for their local and systemic suppressor activities in Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays using green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Results indicate that PMWaV-2 utilizes a multiple-component RNA silencing suppression mechanism. Two proteins, p20 and CP, target both local and systemic silencing in N. benthamiana, while the p22 and CPd proteins target only systemic silencing. In the related virus PMWaV-1, we found that only one of the encoded proteins, p61, had only systemic suppressor activity. Of all the proteins tested from both viruses, only the PMWaV-2 p20 protein suppressed local silencing induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but only when low levels of inducing dsRNA were used. None of the proteins analyzed could interfere with the short distance spread of silencing. We examined the mechanism of systemic suppression activity by investigating the effect of PMWaV-2-encoded p20 and CP proteins on secondary siRNAs. Our results suggest that the PMWaV-2 p20 and CP proteins block the systemic silencing signal by repressing production of secondary siRNAs. We also demonstrate that the PMWaV-2 p20 and p22 proteins enhanced the pathogenicity of Potato virus X in N. benthamiana. PMID:25751306

  16. Evaluation of alternative respiratory syndromes for specific syndromic surveillance of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus: a time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Syndromic surveillance is increasingly being evaluated for its potential for early warning of increased disease activity in the population. However, interpretation is hampered by the difficulty of attributing a causative pathogen. We described the temporal relationship between laboratory counts of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection and alternative groupings of Emergency Department (ED) respiratory diagnoses. Methods ED and laboratory data were obtained for the south-eastern area of Sydney, NSW for the period 1 June 2001 - 1 December 2006. Counts of ED visits and laboratory confirmed positive RSV and influenza cases were aggregated by week. Semi-parametric generalized additive models (GAM) were used to determine the association between the incidence of RSV and influenza and the incidence of respiratory syndrome ED presentations while controlling for temporal confounders. Results For every additional RSV laboratory count, ED diagnoses of bronchiolitis increased by 3.1% (95%CI: 2.7%-3.5%) in the same week. For every additional influenza laboratory count, ED diagnoses of influenza-like illness increased by 4.7% (95%CI: 4.2%-5.2%) one week earlier. Conclusion In this study, large increases in ED diagnoses of bronchiolitis and influenza-like illness were independent and proxy indicators for RSV and influenza activity, respectively. PMID:19943970

  17. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, an under-recognised pathogen.

    PubMed

    Van Eldere, Johan; Slack, Mary P E; Ladhani, Shamez; Cripps, Allan W

    2014-12-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a major cause of mucosal infections such as otitis media, sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In some regions, a strong causal relation links this pathogen with infections of the lower respiratory tract. In the past 20 years, a steady but constant increase has occurred in invasive NTHi worldwide, with perinatal infants, young children, and elderly people most at risk. Individuals with underlying comorbidities are most susceptible and infection is associated with high mortality. ?-lactamase production is the predominant mechanism of resistance. However, the emergence and spread of ?-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant strains in many regions of the world is of substantial concern, potentially necessitating changes to antibiotic treatment guidelines for community-acquired infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract and potentially increasing morbidity associated with invasive NTHi infections. Standardised surveillance protocols and typing methodologies to monitor this emerging pathogen should be implemented. International scientific organisations need to raise the profile of NTHi and to document the pathobiology of this microbe. PMID:25012226

  18. Potential spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 by wildfowl: dispersal ranges and rates determined from large-scale satellite telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaidet, Nicolas; Cappelle, Julien; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Douglas, David C.; Perry, William M.; Mundkur, Taej; Newman, Scott H.

    2010-01-01

    1. Migratory birds are major candidates for long-distance dispersal of zoonotic pathogens. In recent years, wildfowl have been suspected of contributing to the rapid geographic spread of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. Experimental infection studies reveal that some wild ducks, geese and swans shed this virus asymptomatically and hence have the potential to spread it as they move. 2. We evaluate the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 viruses by wildfowl through an analysis of the movement range and movement rate of birds monitored by satellite telemetry in relation to the apparent asymptomatic infection duration (AID) measured in experimental studies. We analysed the first large-scale data set of wildfowl movements, including 228 birds from 19 species monitored by satellite telemetry in 2006–2009, over HPAI H5N1 affected regions of Asia, Europe and Africa. 3. Our results indicate that individual migratory wildfowl have the potential to disperse HPAI H5N1 over extensive distances, being able to perform movements of up to 2900 km within timeframes compatible with the duration of asymptomatic infection. 4. However, the likelihood of such virus dispersal over long distances by individual wildfowl is low: we estimate that for an individual migratory bird there are, on average, only 5–15 days per year when infection could result in the dispersal of HPAI H5N1 virus over 500 km. 5. Staging at stopover sites during migration is typically longer than the period of infection and viral shedding, preventing birds from dispersing a virus over several consecutive but interrupted long-distance movements. Intercontinental virus dispersion would therefore probably require relay transmission between a series of successively infected migratory birds. 6. Synthesis and applications. Our results provide a detailed quantitative assessment of the dispersive potential of HPAI H5N1 virus by selected migratory birds. Such dispersive potential rests on the assumption that free-living wildfowl will respond analogously to captive, experimentally-infected birds, and that asymptomatic infection will not alter their movement abilities. Our approach of combining experimental exposure data and telemetry information provides an analytical framework for quantifying the risk of spread of avian-borne diseases.

  19. Regulation of macrophage and dendritic cell function by pathogens and through immunomodulation in the avian mucosa.

    PubMed

    de Geus, Eveline D; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2013-11-01

    Macrophages (MPh) and dendritic cells (DC) are members of the mononuclear phagocyte system. In chickens, markers to distinguish MPh from DC are lacking, but whether MPh and DC can be distinguished in humans and mice is under debate, despite the availability of numerous markers. Mucosal MPh and DC are strategically located to ingest foreign antigens, suggesting they can rapidly respond to invading pathogens. This review addresses our current understanding of DC and MPh function, the receptors expressed by MPh and DC involved in pathogen recognition, and the responses of DC and MPh against respiratory and intestinal pathogens in the chicken. Furthermore, potential opportunities are described to modulate MPh and DC responses to enhance disease resistance, highlighting modulation through nutraceuticals and vaccination. PMID:23542704

  20. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a potential acetone carboxylase that enhances its ability to colonize mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priyanka Brahmachary; Ge Wang; Stéphane L Benoit; Michael V Weinberg; Robert J Maier; Timothy R Hoover

    2008-01-01

    Background  \\u000a Helicobacter pyloricolonizes the human stomach and is the etiological agent of peptic ulcer disease. All threeH. pyloristrains that have been sequenced to date contain a potential operon whose products share homology with the subunits of acetone\\u000a carboxylase (encoded byacxABC) fromXanthobacter autotrophicusstrain Py2 andRhodobacter capsulatusstrain B10. Acetone carboxylase catalyzes the conversion of acetone to acetoacetate. Genes upstream of the putativeacxABCoperon

  1. Masquerading microbial pathogens: Capsular polysaccharides mimic host-tissue molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Brady F.; Englaender, Jacob A.; He, Wenqin; Kasper, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens bearing capsular polysaccharides identical to mammalian glycans benefit from an additional level of protection from host immune response. The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria portends an impending post-antibiotic age, characterized by diminishing efficacy of common antibiotics and routine application of multifaceted, complementary therapeutic approaches to treat bacterial infections, particularly multidrug-resistant organisms. The first line of defense for most bacterial pathogens consists of a physical and immunological barrier known as the capsule, commonly composed of a viscous layer of carbohydrates that are covalently bound to the cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria or often to lipids of the outer membrane in many Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are a diverse class of high molecular weight polysaccharides contributing to virulence of many human pathogens in the gut, respiratory tree, urinary tract, and other host tissues, by hiding cell-surface components that might otherwise elicit host immune response. This review highlights capsular polysaccharides that are structurally identical or similar to polysaccharides found in mammalian tissues, including polysialic acid and glycosaminoglycan capsules hyaluronan, heparosan, and chondroitin. Such non-immunogenic coatings render pathogens insensitive to certain immune responses, effectively increasing residence time in host tissues and enabling pathologically relevant population densities to be reached. Biosynthetic pathways and capsular involvement in immune system evasion are described providing a basis for potential therapies aimed at supplementing or replacing antibiotic treatment. PMID:24372337

  2. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemi)cellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process. PMID:22300648

  3. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  4. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  5. Potato-associated bacteria and their antagonistic potential towards plant-pathogenic fungi and the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood.

    PubMed

    Krechel, Annette; Faupel, Annekathrin; Hallmann, Johannes; Ulrich, Andreas; Berg, Gabriele

    2002-09-01

    To study the effect of microenvironments on potato-associated bacteria, the abundance and diversity of bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, endorhiza, and endosphere of field grown potato was analyzed. Culturable bacteria were obtained after plating on R2A medium. The endophytic populations averaged 10(3) and 10(5) CFU/g (fresh wt.) for the endosphere and endorhiza. respectively, which were lower than those for the ectophytic microenvironments, with 10(5) and 10(7) CFU/g (fresh wt.) for the phyllosphere and rhizosphere, respectively. The composition and richness of bacterial species was microenvironment-dependent. The occurrence and diversity of potato-associated bacteria was additionally monitored by a cultivation-independent approach using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of community composition and suggested the existence of microenvironment-specific communities. In an approach to measure the antagonistic potential of potato-associated bacteria, a total of 440 bacteria was screened by dual testing for in vitro antagonism towards the soilborne pathogens Verticillium dahliae and Rhizoctonia solani. The proportion of isolates with antagonistic activity was highest for the rhizosphere (10%), followed by the endorhiza (9%), phyllosphere (6%), and endosphere (5%). All 33 fungal antagonists were characterized by testing their in vitro antagonistic mechanisms, including their glucanolytic, chitinolytic, pectinolytic, cellulolytic, and proteolytic activity, and by their BOX-PCR fingerprints. In addition, they were screened for their biocontrol activity against Meloidogyne incognita. Overall, nine isolates belonging to Pseudomonas and Streptomyces species were found to control both fungal pathogens and M. incognita and were therefore considered as promising biological control agents. PMID:12455609

  6. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a potential acetone carboxylase that enhances its ability to colonize mice

    PubMed Central

    Brahmachary, Priyanka; Wang, Ge; Benoit, Stéphane L; Weinberg, Michael V; Maier, Robert J; Hoover, Timothy R

    2008-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is the etiological agent of peptic ulcer disease. All three H. pylori strains that have been sequenced to date contain a potential operon whose products share homology with the subunits of acetone carboxylase (encoded by acxABC) from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 and Rhodobacter capsulatus strain B10. Acetone carboxylase catalyzes the conversion of acetone to acetoacetate. Genes upstream of the putative acxABC operon encode enzymes that convert acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA, which is metabolized further to generate two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Results To determine if the H. pylori acxABC operon has a role in host colonization the acxB homolog in the mouse-adapted H. pylori SS1 strain was inactivated with a chloramphenicol-resistance (cat) cassette. In mouse colonization studies the numbers of H. pylori recovered from mice inoculated with the acxB:cat mutant were generally one to two orders of magnitude lower than those recovered from mice inoculated with the parental strain. A statistical analysis of the data using a Wilcoxin Rank test indicated the differences in the numbers of H. pylori isolated from mice inoculated with the two strains were significant at the 99% confidence level. Levels of acetone associated with gastric tissue removed from uninfected mice were measured and found to range from 10–110 ?mols per gram wet weight tissue. Conclusion The colonization defect of the acxB:cat mutant suggests a role for the acxABC operon in survival of the bacterium in the stomach. Products of the H. pylori acxABC operon may function primarily in acetone utilization or may catalyze a related reaction that is important for survival or growth in the host. H. pylori encounters significant levels of acetone in the stomach which it could use as a potential electron donor for microaerobic respiration. PMID:18215283

  7. Pathogenic potential, genetic diversity, and population structure of Escherichia coli strains isolated from a forest-dominated watershed (Comox Lake) in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Abhirosh; Mazumder, Asit

    2015-03-01

    Escherichia coli isolates (n = 658) obtained from drinking water intakes of Comox Lake (2011 to 2013) were screened for the following virulence genes (VGs): stx1 and stx2 (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC]), eae and the adherence factor (EAF) gene (enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC]), heat-stable (ST) enterotoxin (variants STh and STp) and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) genes (enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]), and ipaH (enteroinvasive E. coli [EIEC]). The only genes detected were eae and stx2, which were carried by 37.69% (n = 248) of the isolates. Only eae was harbored by 26.74% (n = 176) of the isolates, representing potential atypical EPEC strains, while only stx2 was detected in 10.33% (n = 68) of the isolates, indicating potential STEC strains. Moreover, four isolates were positive for both the stx2 and eae genes, representing potential EHEC strains. The prevalence of VGs (eae or stx2) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the fall season, and multiple genes (eae plus stx2) were detected only in fall. Repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis of 658 E. coli isolates identified 335 unique fingerprints, with an overall Shannon diversity (H') index of 3.653. Diversity varied among seasons over the years, with relatively higher diversity during fall. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that the majority of the fingerprints showed a tendency to cluster according to year, season, and month. Taken together, the results indicated that the diversity and population structure of E. coli fluctuate on a temporal scale, reflecting the presence of diverse host sources and their behavior over time in the watershed. Furthermore, the occurrence of potentially pathogenic E. coli strains in the drinking water intakes highlights the risk to human health associated with direct and indirect consumption of untreated surface water. PMID:25548059

  8. 7-Ketocholesterol Increases Retinal Microglial Migration, Activation, and Angiogenicity: A Potential Pathogenic Mechanism Underlying Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Indaram, Maanasa; Ma, Wenxin; Zhao, Lian; Fariss, Robert N.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been associated with both accumulation of lipid and lipid oxidative products, as well as increased neuroinflammatory changes and microglial activation in the outer retina. However, the relationships between these factors are incompletely understood. 7-Ketocholesterol (7KCh) is a cholesterol oxidation product localized to the outer retina with prominent pro-inflammatory effects. To explore the potential relationship between 7KCh and microglial activation, we localized 7KCh and microglia to the outer retina of aged mice and investigated 7KCh effects on retinal microglia in both in vitro and in vivo systems. We found that retinal microglia demonstrated a prominent chemotropism to 7KCh and readily internalized 7KCh. Sublethal concentrations of 7KCh resulted in microglial activation and polarization to a pro-inflammatory M1 state via NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Microglia exposed to 7KCh reduced expression of neurotrophic growth factors but increased expression of angiogenic factors, transitioning to a more neurotoxic and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Finally, subretinal transplantation of 7KCh-exposed microglia promoted choroidal neovascularization (CNV) relative to control microglia in a Matrigel-CNV model. The interaction of retinal microglia with 7KCh in the aged retina may thus underlie how outer retinal lipid accumulation in intermediate AMD results in neuroinflammation that ultimately drives progression towards advanced AMD. PMID:25775051

  9. Differential sensitivity of osteoblasts and bacterial pathogens to 405-nm light highlighting potential for decontamination applications in orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Grant, M. Helen

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare associated infections pose a major threat to patients admitted to hospitals and infection rates following orthopedic arthroplasty surgery are as high as 4%. A 405-nm high-intensity narrow spectrum light has been proven to reduce environmental contamination in hospital isolation rooms, and there is potential to develop this technology for application in arthroplasty surgery. Cultured rat osteoblasts were exposed to varying light intensities and it was found that exposures of up to a dose of 36 J/cm2 had no significant effect on cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay], function (alkaline phosphatase activity), and proliferation rate (BrdU cell proliferation assay). High irradiance exposures (54 J/cm2) significantly affected the cell viability indicating that the effects of 405-nm light on osteoblasts are dose dependent. Additionally, exposure of a variety of clinically related bacteria to a dose of 36 J/cm2 resulted in up to 100% kill. These results demonstrating the differential sensitivity of osteoblasts and bacteria to 405-nm light are an essential step toward developing the technique for decontamination in orthopedic surgery.

  10. 7-Ketocholesterol increases retinal microglial migration, activation, and angiogenicity: a potential pathogenic mechanism underlying age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Indaram, Maanasa; Ma, Wenxin; Zhao, Lian; Fariss, Robert N; Rodriguez, Ignacio R; Wong, Wai T

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been associated with both accumulation of lipid and lipid oxidative products, as well as increased neuroinflammatory changes and microglial activation in the outer retina. However, the relationships between these factors are incompletely understood. 7-Ketocholesterol (7KCh) is a cholesterol oxidation product localized to the outer retina with prominent pro-inflammatory effects. To explore the potential relationship between 7KCh and microglial activation, we localized 7KCh and microglia to the outer retina of aged mice and investigated 7KCh effects on retinal microglia in both in vitro and in vivo systems. We found that retinal microglia demonstrated a prominent chemotropism to 7KCh and readily internalized 7KCh. Sublethal concentrations of 7KCh resulted in microglial activation and polarization to a pro-inflammatory M1 state via NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Microglia exposed to 7KCh reduced expression of neurotrophic growth factors but increased expression of angiogenic factors, transitioning to a more neurotoxic and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Finally, subretinal transplantation of 7KCh-exposed microglia promoted choroidal neovascularization (CNV) relative to control microglia in a Matrigel-CNV model. The interaction of retinal microglia with 7KCh in the aged retina may thus underlie how outer retinal lipid accumulation in intermediate AMD results in neuroinflammation that ultimately drives progression towards advanced AMD. PMID:25775051

  11. Globally Mobile Populations and the Spread of Emerging Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Arguin; Nina Marano; David O. Freedman

    2009-01-01

    uring the past decade, the global public health commu- nity has been challenged by the emergence and rapid worldwide spread of novel infl uenza strains, severe acute respiratory syndrome, chikungunya virus, drug-resistant tuberculosis, and other conditions and pathogens. Modern transportation and increased tourism, business travel, and immigration contributed to dissemination of these high-im- pact pathogens. The effectiveness of interventions such

  12. The role of C5a in acute lung injury induced by highly pathogenic viral infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2015-05-01

    The complement system, an important part of innate immunity, plays a critical role in pathogen clearance. Unregulated complement activation is likely to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by highly pathogenic virus including influenza A viruses H5N1, H7N9, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus. In highly pathogenic virus-induced acute lung diseases, high levels of chemotactic and anaphylatoxic C5a were produced as a result of excessive complement activaiton. Overproduced C5a displays powerful biological activities in activation of phagocytic cells, generation of oxidants, and inflammatory sequelae named "cytokine storm", and so on. Blockade of C5a signaling have been implicated in the treatment of ALI induced by highly pathogenic virus. Herein, we review the literature that links C5a and ALI, and review our understanding of the mechanisms by which C5a affects ALI during highly pathogenic viral infection. In particular, we discuss the potential of the blockade of C5a signaling to treat ALI induced by highly pathogenic viruses. PMID:26060601

  13. The role of C5a in acute lung injury induced by highly pathogenic viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2015-01-01

    The complement system, an important part of innate immunity, plays a critical role in pathogen clearance. Unregulated complement activation is likely to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by highly pathogenic virus including influenza A viruses H5N1, H7N9, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus. In highly pathogenic virus-induced acute lung diseases, high levels of chemotactic and anaphylatoxic C5a were produced as a result of excessive complement activaiton. Overproduced C5a displays powerful biological activities in activation of phagocytic cells, generation of oxidants, and inflammatory sequelae named “cytokine storm”, and so on. Blockade of C5a signaling have been implicated in the treatment of ALI induced by highly pathogenic virus. Herein, we review the literature that links C5a and ALI, and review our understanding of the mechanisms by which C5a affects ALI during highly pathogenic viral infection. In particular, we discuss the potential of the blockade of C5a signaling to treat ALI induced by highly pathogenic viruses.

  14. Pathogen intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  15. Pathogen intelligence.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  16. Banana infecting fungus, Fusarium musae, is also an opportunistic human pathogen: are bananas potential carriers and source of fusariosis?

    PubMed

    Triest, David; Stubbe, Dirk; De Cremer, Koen; Piérard, Denis; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    During re-identification of Fusarium strains in the BCCM™/IHEM fungal collection by multilocus sequence-analysis we observed that five strains, previously identified as Fusarium verticillioides, were Fusarium musae, a species described in 2011 from banana fruits. Four strains were isolated from blood samples or biopsies of immune-suppressed patients and one was isolated from the clinical environment, all originating from different hospitals in Belgium or France, 2001-2008. The F. musae identity of our isolates was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using reference sequences of type material. Absence of the gene cluster necessary for fumonisin biosynthesis, characteristic to F. musae, was also the case for our isolates. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing revealed no important differences in their susceptibility compared to clinical F. verticillioides strains and terbinafine was the most effective drug. Additional clinical F. musae strains were searched by performing BLAST queries in GenBank. Eight strains were found, of which six were keratitis cases from the U.S. multistate contact lens-associated outbreak in 2005 and 2006. The two other strains were also from the U.S., causing either a skin infection or sinusitis. This report is the first to describe F. musae as causative agent of superficial and opportunistic, disseminated infections in humans. Imported bananas might act as carriers of F. musae spores and be a potential source of infection with F. musae in humans. An alternative hypothesis is that the natural distribution of F. musae is geographically a lot broader than originally suspected and F. musae is present on different plant hosts. PMID:25361833

  17. Bioterrorism for the respiratory physician.

    PubMed

    Waterer, Grant W; Robertson, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    Terrorist attacks by definition are designed to cause fear and panic. There is no question that a terrorist attack using biological agents would present a grave threat to stability of the society in which they were released. Early recognition of such a bioterrorist attack is crucial to containing the damage they could cause. As many of the most likely bioterrorism agents present with pulmonary disease, respiratory physicians may be crucial in the initial recognition and diagnosis phase, and certainly would be drawn into treatment of affected individuals. This review focuses on the biological agents thought most likely to be used by terrorists that have predominantly respiratory presentations. The primary focus of this review is on anthrax, plague, tularaemia, ricin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and treatment of these agents will be discussed as well as historical examples of their use. Other potential bioterrorism agents with respiratory manifestations will also be discussed briefly. PMID:19144044

  18. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae in companion animals: Nosocomial infections as one reason for the rising prevalence of these potential zoonotic pathogens in clinical samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lothar H. Wieler; Christa Ewers; Sebastian Guenther; Birgit Walther; Antina Lübke-Becker

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing change in the relationship between humans and companion animals is hallmarked by the increasing intensive care provided to companion animals in veterinary medicine, resulting in growing numbers of high-risk animal patients. The emergence of nosocomial infections in small animal clinics is one of the major drawbacks of this development, especially in terms of multidrug-resistance and potentially zoonotic pathogens.

  19. Impact of slurry management strategies on potential leaching of nutrients and pathogens in a sandy soil amended with cattle slurry.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, D; Surgy, S; Napier, V; Menaia, J; Vasconcelos, E; Coutinho, J

    2014-12-15

    For farmers, management of cattle slurry (CS) is now a priority, in order to improve the fertilizer value of the slurry and simultaneously minimize its environmental impact. Several slurry pre-treatments and soil application methods to minimize ammonia emissions are now available to farmers, but the impact of such management strategies on groundwater is still unclear. A laboratory experiment was performed over 24 days in controlled conditions, with undisturbed soil columns (sandy soil) in PVC pipes (30 cm high and 5.7 cm in diameter). The treatments considered (4 replicates) were: a control with no amendment (CTR), injection of whole CS (WSI), and surface application of: whole CS (WSS), acidified (pH 5.5) whole CS (AWSS), the liquid fraction obtained by centrifugation of CS (LFS), and acidified (pH 5.5) liquid fraction (ALFS). An amount of CS equivalent to 240 kg N ha(-1) was applied in all treatments. The first leaching event was performed 72 h after application of the treatments and then leaching events were performed weekly to give a total of four irrigation events (IEs). All the leachates obtained were analyzed for mineral and organic nitrogen, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, total carbon, and phosphorus. Total coliforms and Escherichia coli were also quantified in the leachates obtained in the first IE. The results show that both acidification and separation had significant effects on the composition of the leachates: higher NO3(-) concentrations were observed for the LFS and ALFS relative to all the other treatments, throughout the experiment, and lower NO3(-) concentrations were observed for acidified relative to non-acidified treatments at IE2. Acidification of both the LF and WS led to higher NH4(+) concentrations as well as an increase of EC for treatment ALFS relative to the control, in the first IE, and lower pH values in the AWSS. Furthermore, the E. coli and total coliform concentrations in AWSS, LFS, and ALFS were significantly higher than in WSI or WSS. In conclusion, none of the strategies generally used to minimize ammonia emissions impact positively on leaching potential relative to the traditional surface application of CS. Furthermore, some treatments, such as separation, might increase significantly the risk of leaching. PMID:25173728

  20. Diseases of the respiratory tract of chelonians.

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Jacobson, E R

    2000-05-01

    Diseases of the respiratory tract commonly occur in captive chelonians, and several diseases also have occurred in wild chelonians. Infectious causes include viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Herpesviruses have surfaced as important pathogens of the oral cavity and respiratory tract in Hermann's tortoise (Testudo hermanii), spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca), and other tortoises in Europe and the United States. Herpesvirus-associated respiratory diseases also have been reported in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, in mariculture in the Cayman Islands. Of diseases caused by bacteria, an upper respiratory tract disease caused by Mycoplasma sp has been reported in free-hanging and captive gopher tortoises in the southeastern United States and in desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Mycotic pulmonary disease is commonly reported in captive chelonians, especially in those maintained at suboptimal temperatures. An intranuclear coccidia has been seen in several species of captive tortoises in the United States, and, in one case, a severe proliferative pneumonia was associated with organisms in the lung. The most common noninfectious cause of respiratory disease in chelonians results from trauma to the carapace. Although pulmonary fibromas commonly occur in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis, for the most part, tumors of the respiratory tract are uncommon in chelonians. PMID:11228895

  1. Air pollution and respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan; Jaspers, Ilona

    2007-11-01

    Despite current regulations, which limit the levels of certain air pollutants, there are still a number of adverse health effects that result from exposure to these agents. Numerous epidemiological studies have noted an association between the levels of air pollution and hospital admissions for a variety of different health reasons, including a number of respiratory diseases, as well as increased morbidity and mortality associated with various respiratory conditions and diseases. Because of the large impact respiratory virus infections have on morbidity and even mortality, it is important to understand whether and how exposure to common air pollutants could exacerbate the susceptibility to and severity of respiratory virus infections. This review focuses on current epidemiological and experimental studies, which have examined the association between and effect of air pollutants and respiratory viral infections, as well as potential mechanisms associated with these effects. Examined in this review are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) "criteria" pollutants nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), ozone (O(3)), and particulate matter (PM), as well as indoor pollutants such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and combustion products of biomass fuels. Although a number of studies indicate associations between exposure to air pollutants and increased risk for respiratory virus infections, potential mechanisms mediating these effects are largely unexplored. Therefore, additional studies, both epidemiologic and mechanistic, are necessary to increase our understanding of how exposure to air pollutants could affect respiratory virus infections, especially in populations already at risk of developing significant morbidity/mortality after infections with respiratory viruses. PMID:17987465

  2. Characterization of a novel plant growth-promoting bacteria strain Delftia tsuruhatensis HR4 both as a diazotroph and a potential biocontrol agent against various plant pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jigang Han; Lei Sun; Xiuzhu Dong; Zhengqiu Cai; Xiaolu Sun; Hailian Yang; Yunshan Wang; Wei Song

    2005-01-01

    A novel, plant growth-promoting bacterium Delftia tsuruhatensis, strain HR4, was isolated from the rhizoplane of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. Yueguang) in North China. In vitro antagonistic assay showed this strain could suppress the growth of various plant pathogens effectively, especially the three main rice pathogens (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae Cavara). Treated with strain HR4

  3. Modeling Competing Infectious Pathogens from a Bayesian Perspective: Application to Influenza Studies with Incomplete Laboratory Results

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Daniels, Michael J.; Longini, Ira M.; Burke, Donald S.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2010-01-01

    In seasonal influenza epidemics, pathogens such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) often co-circulate with influenza and cause influenza-like illness (ILI) in human hosts. However, it is often impractical to test for each potential pathogen or to collect specimens for each observed ILI episode, making inference about influenza transmission difficult. In the setting of infectious diseases, missing outcomes impose a particular challenge because of the dependence among individuals. We propose a Bayesian competing-risk model for multiple co-circulating pathogens for inference on transmissibility and intervention efficacies under the assumption that missingness in the biological confirmation of the pathogen is ignorable. Simulation studies indicate a reasonable performance of the proposed model even if the number of potential pathogens is misspecified. They also show that a moderate amount of missing laboratory test results has only a small impact on inference about key parameters in the setting of close contact groups. Using the proposed model, we found that a non-pharmaceutical intervention is marginally protective against transmission of influenza A in a study conducted in elementary schools. PMID:21472041

  4. Avian respiratory system disorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  5. Respiratory Mechanisms of Support

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Alkalosis: pCO2 pH *exaggerated ventilation (example ­ crying, fever) Treatment: reduce ventilation alkalosis (primary or secondary to respiratory acidosis). [7] Respiratory Support Lucile Packard Children

  6. Neopolyploidy and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin P; Nuismer, Scott L

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well-documented historical importance of polyploidy, the mechanisms responsible for the establishment and evolutionary success of novel polyploid lineages remain unresolved. One possibility, which has not been previously evaluated theoretically, is that novel polyploid lineages are initially more resistant to pathogens than the diploid progenitor species. Here, we explore this possibility by developing and analysing mathematical models of interactions between newly formed polyploid lineages and their pathogens. We find that for the genetic mechanisms of pathogen resistance with the best empirical support, newly formed polyploid populations of hosts are expected to be more resistant than their diploid progenitors. This effect can be quite strong and, in the case of perennial species with recurrent polyploid formation, may last indefinitely, potentially providing a general explanation for the successful establishment of novel polyploid lineages. PMID:17686733

  7. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for nonlethal detection of Aeromonas salmonicida in salmonid mucus and its potential for other bacterial fish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert A; Stevenson, Roselynn M W

    2012-05-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA was used to nonlethally detect Aeromonas salmonicida and other bacteria in salmonid skin mucus. Mucus samples from wild spawning coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) with endemic A. salmonicida and from cultured lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were tested by PCR-DGGE and were compared with mucus culture on Coomassie brilliant blue agar and internal organ culture. PCR-DGGE gave a highly reproducible 4-band pattern for 9 strains of typical A. salmonicida, which was different from other Aeromonas spp. Aeromonas salmonicida presence in mucus was evident as a band that comigrated with the bottom band of the A. salmonicida 4-band pattern and was verified by sequencing. PCR-DGGE found 36 of 52 coho salmon positive for A. salmonicida, compared with 31 positive by mucus culture and 16 by organ culture. Numerous other bacteria were detected in salmonid mucus, including Pseudomonas spp., Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila and other aeromonads. However, Yersinia ruckeri was not detected in mucus from 27 lake trout, but 1 fish had a sorbitol-positive Y. ruckeri isolated from organ culture. Yersinia ruckeri seeded into a mucus sample suggested that PCR-DGGE detection of this bacterium from mucus was possible. PCR-DGGE allows nonlethal detection of A. salmonicida in mucus and differentiation of some Aeromonas spp. and has the potential to allow simultaneous detection of other pathogens present in fish mucus. PMID:22506865

  8. Antimicrobial Activities of a Plethora of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Hydrolates against Human Pathogens and Their Potential to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Njimoh, Dieudonné Lemuh; Assob, Jules Clement N.; Mokake, Seraphine Ebenye; Nyhalah, Dinga Jerome; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Sandjon, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections till date remain a scourge of humanity due to lack of vaccine against some infections, emergence of drug resistant phenotypes, and the resurgence of infections amongst others. Continuous quest for novel therapeutic approaches remains imperative. Here we (i) assessed the effects of extracts/hydrolates of some medicinal plants on pathogenic microorganisms and (ii) evaluated the inhibitory potential of the most active ones in combination with antibiotics. Extract E03 had the highest DZI (25?mm). Extracts E05 and E06 were active against all microorganisms tested. The MICs and MBCs of the methanol extracts ranged from 16.667 × 103??g/mL to 2??g/mL and hydrolates from 0.028 to 333333?ppm. Extract E30 had the highest activity especially against S. saprophyticus (MIC of 6?ppm) and E. coli (MIC of 17?ppm). Combination with conventional antibiotics was shown to overcome resistance especially with E30. Analyses of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, steroids, phenols, and saponins. These results justify the use of these plants in traditional medicine and the practice of supplementing decoctions/concoctions with conventional antibiotics. Nauclea pobeguinii (E30), the most active and synergistic of all these extracts, and some hydrolates with antimicrobial activity need further exploration for the development of novel antimicrobials.

  9. A new high-speed droplet-real-time polymerase chain reaction method can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus in less than 10 min.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for diagnosis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Rapid detection of respiratory pathogens of cattle is useful for making therapeutic decisions. Therefore, we developed a new genetic-based method called droplet-real-time PCR, which can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) within 10 min. Our droplet-real-time PCR markedly reduced the reaction time of reverse transcription-PCR while maintaining the same sensitivity as conventional real-time PCR, and it can be used as a rapid assay for detection of BRSV. Furthermore, our method is potentially applicable for rapid diagnosis of almost all infectious diseases, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. PMID:24285011

  10. A New High-Speed Droplet-Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Method Can Detect Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Less than 10 Min

    PubMed Central

    UEHARA, Masayuki; MATSUDA, Kazuyuki; SUGANO, Mitsutoshi; HONDA, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for diagnosis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Rapid detection of respiratory pathogens of cattle is useful for making therapeutic decisions. Therefore, we developed a new genetic-based method called droplet-real-time PCR, which can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) within 10 min. Our droplet-real-time PCR markedly reduced the reaction time of reverse transcription-PCR while maintaining the same sensitivity as conventional real-time PCR, and it can be used as a rapid assay for detection of BRSV. Furthermore, our method is potentially applicable for rapid diagnosis of almost all infectious diseases, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. PMID:24285011

  11. A Legacy of Low-Impact Logging does not Elevate Prevalence of Potentially Pathogenic Protozoa in Free-Ranging Gorillas and Chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo: Logging and Parasitism in African Apes

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, David; Deutsch, J. Charlie; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Salzer, Johanna S.; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Trish; Sanz, Crickette

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have examined the long-term effects of selective logging on the abundance and diversity of free-ranging primates. Logging is known to reduce the abundance of some primate species through associated hunting and the loss of food trees for frugivores; however, the potential role of pathogens in such primate population declines is largely unexplored. Selective logging results in a suite of alterations in host ecology and forest structure that may alter pathogen dynamics in resident wildlife populations. In addition, environmental pollution with human fecal material may present a risk for wildlife infections with zoonotic protozoa, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia. To better understand this interplay, we compared patterns of infection with these potentially pathogenic protozoa in sympatric western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in the undisturbed Goualougo Triangle of Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park and the adjacent previously logged Kabo Concession in northern Republic of Congo. No Cryptosporidium infections were detected in any of the apes examined and prevalence of infection with Giardia was low (3.73% overall) and did not differ between logged and undisturbed forest for chimpanzees or gorillas. These results provide a baseline for prevalence of these protozoa in forest-dwelling African apes and suggest that low-intensity logging may not result in long-term elevated prevalence of potentially pathogenic protozoa. PMID:20238141

  12. The pathogenic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli forms a diverse recombinant species demonstrating some local clustering of related strains and potential for zoonotic spread

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brachyspira pilosicoli is an anaerobic spirochaete that can colonizes the large intestine of many host species. Infection is particularly problematic in pigs and adult poultry, causing colitis and diarrhea, but it is also known to result in clinical problems in human beings. Despite the economic importance of the spirochaete as an animal pathogen, and its potential as a zoonotic agent, it has not received extensive study. Methods A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method based on the scheme used for other Brachyspira species was applied to 131 B. pilosicoli isolates originating from different host species and geographical areas. A variety of phylogenetic trees were constructed and analyzed to help understand the data. Results The isolates were highly diverse, with 127 sequence types and 123 amino acid types being identified. Large numbers (50-112) of alleles were present at each locus, with all loci being highly polymorphic. The results of Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests identified extensive genetic recombination, although the calculated standardized index of association value (0.1568; P <0.0005) suggested the existence of some clonality. Strains from different host species and geographical origins generally were widely distributed throughout the population, although in nine of the ten cases where small clusters of related isolates occurred these were from the same geographical areas or farms/communities, and from the same species of origin. An exception to the latter was a cluster of Australian isolates originating from pigs, chickens and a human being, suggesting the likelihood of relatively recent transmission of members of this clonal group between species. Conclusions The strongly recombinant population structure of B. pilosicoli contrasts to the more highly clonal population structures of the related species Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira intermedia, both of which are specialized enteric pathogens of pigs and poultry. The genomic plasticity of B. pilosicoli may help to explain why it has been able to adapt to colonize the large intestines of a wider range of hosts compared to other Brachyspira species. The identification of a clonal group of isolates that had been recovered from different host species, including a human being, suggests that zoonotic transmission by B. pilosicoli may occur in nature. Evidence for local transmission between the same host species also was obtained. PMID:23957888

  13. Page 1 of 16 Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    E-print Network

    Page 1 of 16 Bloodborne Pathogens Program Revised July, 5 2012 #12;Page 2 of 16 Table of Contents 1 will be potentially exposed to Bloodborne Pathogens. By following these procedures, the safety of the working 4 of 16 2.0 EXPOSURE CONTROL METHODS Bloodborne pathogens (BBP) are present in human blood and can

  14. Genomic islands in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Dobrindt; Bianca Hochhut; Ute Hentschel; Jörg Hacker

    2004-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important mechanism for the evolution of microbial genomes. Pathogenicity islands — mobile genetic elements that contribute to rapid changes in virulence potential — are known to have contributed to genome evolution by horizontal gene transfer in many bacterial pathogens. Increasing evidence indicates that equivalent elements in non-pathogenic species — genomic islands — are important in

  15. Genetic Diversity and Pathogenic Potential of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Strains Recovered from Bovine Feces in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ison, Sarah A; Delannoy, Sabine; Bugarel, Marie; Nightingale, Kendra K; Webb, Hattie E; Renter, David G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Loneragan, Guy H; Fach, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli O26 has been identified as the most common non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serogroup to cause human illnesses in the United States and has been implicated in outbreaks around the world. E. coli has high genomic plasticity, which facilitates the loss or acquisition of virulence genes. Attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) O26 strains have frequently been isolated from bovine feces, and there is a need to better characterize the relatedness of these strains to defined molecular pathotypes and to describe the extent of their genetic diversity. High-throughput real-time PCR was used to screen 178 E. coli O26 isolates from a single U.S. cattle feedlot, collected from May to July 2011, for the presence or absence of 25 O26 serogroup-specific and virulence-associated markers. The selected markers were capable of distinguishing these strains into molecularly defined groups (yielding 18 unique marker combinations). Analysis of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat 1 (CRISPR1) and CRISPR2a loci further discriminated isolates into 24 CRISPR types. The combination of molecular markers and CRISPR typing provided 20.8% diversity. The recent CRISPR PCR target SP_O26-E, which was previously identified only in stx2-positive O26:H11 human clinical strains, was identified in 96.4% (161/167 [95% confidence interval, 99.2 to 93.6%]) of the stx-negative AEEC O26:H11 bovine fecal strains. This supports that these stx-negative strains may have previously contained a prophage carrying stx or could acquire this prophage, thus possibly giving them the potential to become pathogenic to humans. These results show that investigation of specific genetic markers may further elucidate our understanding of the genetic diversity of AEEC O26 strains in bovine feces. PMID:25795673

  16. Satellite Tracking on the Flyways of Brown-Headed Gulls and Their Potential Role in the Spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ratanakorn, Parntep; Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Eiamampai, Krairat; Farmer, Adrian H.; Webster, Robert G.; Chaichoune, Kridsada; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Pothieng, Duangrat; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2012-01-01

    Brown-headed gulls (Larus brunnicephalus), winter visitors of Thailand, were tracked by satellite telemetry during 2008–2011 for investigating their roles in the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus spread. Eight gulls negative for influenza virus infection were marked with solar-powered satellite platform transmitters at Bang Poo study site in Samut Prakarn province, Thailand; their movements were monitored by the Argos satellite tracking system, and locations were mapped. Five gulls completed their migratory cycles, which spanned 7 countries (China, Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam) affected by the HPAI H5N1 virus. Gulls migrated from their breeding grounds in China to stay overwinter in Thailand and Cambodia; while Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, and Vietnam were the places of stopovers during migration. Gulls traveled an average distance of about 2400 km between Thailand and China and spent 1–2 weeks on migration. Although AI surveillance among gulls was conducted at the study site, no AI virus was isolated and no H5N1 viral genome or specific antibody was detected in the 75 gulls tested, but 6.6% of blood samples were positive for pan-influenza A antibody. No AI outbreaks were reported in areas along flyways of gulls in Thailand during the study period. Distance and duration of migration, tolerability of the captive gulls to survive the HPAI H5N1 virus challenge and days at viral shedding after the virus challenging suggested that the Brown-headed gull could be a potential species for AI spread, especially among Southeast Asian countries, the epicenter of H5N1 AI outbreak. PMID:23209623

  17. Simian immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (SIV mnd 1 and 2) have different pathogenic potentials in rhesus macaques upon experimental cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Souquière, Sandrine; Onanga, Richard; Makuwa, Maria; Pandrea, Ivona; Ngari, Paul; Rouquet, Pierre; Bourry, Olivier; Kazanji, Mirdad; Apetrei, Cristian; Simon, François; Roques, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    The mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) is naturally infected by two types of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV): SIVmnd types 1 and 2. Both of these viruses cause long-term, non-progressive infections in their natural host despite high plasma viral loads. This study assessed the susceptibility of rhesus macaques to infection by these two types of SIVmnd and compared the virological and basic immunological characteristics of the resulting infections with those observed in natural infection in mandrills. Whilst both SIVmnd types induced similar levels of virus replication during acute infection in both mandrills and macaques, they produced a more pronounced CD4(+) T-cell depletion in rhesus macaques that persisted longer during the initial stage of infection. Pro-inflammatory cytokine responses were also induced at higher levels in rhesus macaques early in the infection. During the chronic phase of infection in mandrills, which in this case was followed for up to 2 years after infection, high levels of chronic virus replication did not induce significant changes in CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell counts. In rhesus macaques, the overall chronic virus replication level was lower than in mandrills. At the end of the follow-up period, although the viral loads of SIVmnd-1 and SIVmnd-2 were relatively similar in rhesus macaques, only SIVmnd-1-infected rhesus macaques showed significant CD4(+) T-cell depletion, in the context of higher levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell activation, compared with SIVmnd-infected mandrills. The demonstration of the ability of both SIVmnd types to induce persistent infections in rhesus macaques calls for a careful assessment of the potential of these two viruses to emerge as new human pathogens. PMID:19141460

  18. Comprehensive non-clinical respiratory evaluation of promising new drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Dennis J. [Department of Safety Pharmacology, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States)]. E-mail: dennis.j.murphy@GSK.com

    2005-09-01

    The need to evaluate the potential for new drugs to produce adverse effects on respiratory function in non-clinical safety assessment is based on the known effects of drugs from a variety of pharmacological/therapeutic classes on the respiratory system, the life-threatening consequences of respiratory dysfunction, and compliance with world-wide regulatory safety guidelines. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the functional disorders of the respiratory system and to present the strategy and techniques considered to be most appropriate for detecting and characterizing drug-induced respiratory disorders in non-clinical safety studies.

  19. New use of broomcorn millets for production of granular cultures of aphid-pathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis for high sporulation potential and infectivity to Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Hua, Li; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2003-10-24

    Glutinous broomcorn millets from the crop Panicum miliaceum were first used as substrate to produce granular cultures of Pandora neoaphidis, an obligate fungal pathogen specific to aphids. Carrying a water content of 36.5% after being steamed in a regular autoclaving procedure, millet grains of each 15 g (dry weight) in a 100-ml flask were mixed with 3 ml modified Sabouraud dextrose broth containing half a mashed colony of P. neoaphidis grown on egg yolk milk agar and then incubated at 20 degrees C and a light/dark cycle of 12 h/12 h for 21 days. Based on individually monitoring conidial production potential of 20 millet grains sampled from an arbitrarily taken flask at 3-day intervals, the millet cultures incubated for 6-15 days were capable of producing 16.8-23.4 x 10(4) conidia per millet grain with conidial ejection lasting for up to 6 days. The cultured millet grains individually produced significantly more conidia than apterous adults of Myzus persicae killed by P. neoaphidis (8.4 x 10(4) conidia per cadaver) and sporulated twice longer. The modeling of time-dose-mortality data from bioassays on M. persicae apterae exposed to conidial showers from the cultured millet grains and the mycelial mats produced in liquid culture resulted in similar estimates of LC(50) (millets: 21.4, 7.3, and 4.9 conidia mm(-2) on days 5-7 after exposure; mycelial mats: 22.1, 10.6, and 7.7 conidia mm(-2)) although the LT(50) estimated at a given conidial concentration was slightly smaller for the millet cultures than for the mycelial mats. This indicates that the millet grains cultured with P. neoaphidis produced conidia as infective as or slightly more infective to M. persicae than those from the mycelial mats. Based on the sporulation potential, infectivity, and ease and cost of the millet cultures, the method developed in this study highly improved in vitro cultures of P. neoaphidis and may adapt to culturing other entomophthoralean fungi for microbial control of insect pests. PMID:14592724

  20. Filamentous pathogen effector functions: of pathogens, hosts and microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Rovenich, Hanna; Boshoven, Jordi C; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms play essential roles in almost every environment on earth. For instance, microbes decompose organic material, or establish symbiotic relationships that range from pathogenic to mutualistic. Symbiotic relationships have been particularly well studied for microbial plant pathogens and have emphasized the role of effectors; secreted molecules that support host colonization. Most effectors characterized thus far play roles in deregulation of host immunity. Arguably, however, pathogens not only deal with immune responses during host colonization, but also encounter other microbes including competitors, (myco)parasites and even potential co-operators. Thus, part of the effector catalog may target microbiome co-inhabitants rather than host physiology. PMID:24879450

  1. Respiratory Increase and Phosphorus and Nitrogen Metabolism in Sweet Potato infected with Black Rot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Akazawa; Ikuzo Uritani

    1955-01-01

    IN the black rot of sweet potato caused by Ceratostomella fimbriata we found a respiratory increase-a characteristic of plant tissues infected with pathogens. We have investigated the rate of respiratory increase in the sound part next to the infected tissues during a week after the inoculation of the pathogen, the effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol on the respiration and the changes in

  2. Investigation of a potential cotumorigenic effect of the dioxides of nitrogen and sulfur, and of diesel-engine exhaust, on the respiratory tract of Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, U; Mohr, U; Fuhst, R; Brockmeyer, C

    1989-05-01

    Syrian golden hamsters (480 males and 480 females) allocated into 24 groups were exposed 19 hours per day and 5 days per week for 6, 10.5, 15, or 18 months to total diesel exhaust, diesel exhaust without particles, a mixture of nitrogen dioxide (5 parts per million [ppm]2) and sulfur dioxide (10 ppm), or clean air. Two exposure groups from each test atmosphere were also treated by a single subcutaneous injection of either 3 mg or 6 mg of diethylnitrosamine/kg of body weight to evaluate an enhancing effect of diethylnitrosamine on exposure-related changes. Morphological evaluation was done by histopathology. Minor changes of the larynx and trachea were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, which showed a loss of ciliated cells in all exhaust-exposed groups. After exposure to diesel exhaust with or without particles, focal metaplasia and dysplasia of the respiratory epithelium were seen in the oldest animals by scanning electron microscopy. In the same specimens, attached mucous droplets indicated changes in mucous cells and mucous viscosity. Only the exposure to total diesel exhaust significantly increased the tumor rate in the upper respiratory tract of male hamsters treated with 6 mg of diethylnitrosamine per kg of body weight. At the lower diethylnitrosamine dose, no exposure-related effects on the tumor rates could be observed. The results from this study and from our other inhalation experiments appear to be insufficiently conclusive to demonstrate that diesel-engine exhaust should be classified as a cocarcinogen or enhancer for the test system used. PMID:2481467

  3. Investigation of a potential cotumorigenic effect of the dioxides of nitrogen and sulfur, and of diesel-engine exhaust, on the respiratory tract of Syrian golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, U.; Mohr, U.; Fuhst, R.; Brockmeyer, C. (Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Aerosol Research, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-05-01

    Syrian golden hamsters (480 males and 480 females) allocated into 24 groups were exposed 19 hours per day and 5 days per week for 6, 10.5, 15, or 18 months to total diesel exhaust, diesel exhaust without particles, a mixture of nitrogen dioxide (5 parts per million (ppm)2) and sulfur dioxide (10 ppm), or clean air. Two exposure groups from each test atmosphere were also treated by a single subcutaneous injection of either 3 mg or 6 mg of diethylnitrosamine/kg of body weight to evaluate an enhancing effect of diethylnitrosamine on exposure-related changes. Morphological evaluation was done by histopathology. Minor changes of the larynx and trachea were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, which showed a loss of ciliated cells in all exhaust-exposed groups. After exposure to diesel exhaust with or without particles, focal metaplasia and dysplasia of the respiratory epithelium were seen in the oldest animals by scanning electron microscopy. In the same specimens, attached mucous droplets indicated changes in mucous cells and mucous viscosity. Only the exposure to total diesel exhaust significantly increased the tumor rate in the upper respiratory tract of male hamsters treated with 6 mg of diethylnitrosamine per kg of body weight. At the lower diethylnitrosamine dose, no exposure-related effects on the tumor rates could be observed. The results from this study and from our other inhalation experiments appear to be insufficiently conclusive to demonstrate that diesel-engine exhaust should be classified as a cocarcinogen or enhancer for the test system used.

  4. Metagenomic analysis of a sample from a patient with respiratory tract infection reveals the presence of a ?-papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Canuti, Marta; Deijs, Martin; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed M.; Holwerda, Melle; Jebbink, Maarten F.; de Vries, Michel; van Vugt, Saskia; Brugman, Curt; Verheij, Theo; Lammens, Christine; Goossens, Herman; Loens, Katherine; Ieven, Margareta; van der Hoek, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Previously unknown or unexpected pathogens may be responsible for that proportion of respiratory diseases in which a causative agent cannot be identified. The application of broad-spectrum, sequence independent virus discovery techniques may be useful to reduce this proportion and widen our knowledge about respiratory pathogens. Thanks to the availability of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, it became today possible to detect viruses which are present at a very low load, but the clinical relevance of those viruses must be investigated. In this study we used VIDISCA-454, a restriction enzyme based virus discovery method that utilizes Roche 454 HTS system, on a nasal swab collected from a subject with respiratory complaints. A ?-papillomavirus was detected (complete genome: 7142 bp) and its role in disease was investigated. Respiratory samples collected both during the acute phase of the illness and 2 weeks after full recovery contained the virus. The patient presented antibodies directed against the virus but there was no difference between IgG levels in blood samples collected during the acute phase and 2 weeks after full recovery. We therefore concluded that the detected ?-papillomavirus is unlikely to be the causative agent of the respiratory complaints and its presence in the nose of the patient is not related to the disease. Although HTS based virus discovery techniques proved their great potential as a tool to clarify the etiology of some infectious diseases, the obtained information must be subjected to cautious interpretations. This study underlines the crucial importance of performing careful investigations on viruses identified when applying sensitive virus discovery techniques, since the mere identification of a virus and its presence in a clinical sample are not satisfactory proofs to establish a causative link with a disease. PMID:25071755

  5. Identification of Common Biological Pathways and Drug Targets Across Multiple Respiratory Viruses Based on Human Host Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven B.; Dampier, William; Tozeren, Aydin; Brown, James R.; Magid-Slav, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Background Pandemic and seasonal respiratory viruses are a major global health concern. Given the genetic diversity of respiratory viruses and the emergence of drug resistant strains, the targeted disruption of human host-virus interactions is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating multi-viral infections. The availability of large-scale genomic datasets focused on host-pathogen interactions can be used to discover novel drug targets as well as potential opportunities for drug repositioning. Methods/Results In this study, we performed a large-scale analysis of microarray datasets involving host response to infections by influenza A virus, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, SARS-coronavirus, metapneumonia virus, coxsackievirus and cytomegalovirus. Common genes and pathways were found through a rigorous, iterative analysis pipeline where relevant host mRNA expression datasets were identified, analyzed for quality and gene differential expression, then mapped to pathways for enrichment analysis. Possible repurposed drugs targets were found through database and literature searches. A total of 67 common biological pathways were identified among the seven different respiratory viruses analyzed, representing fifteen laboratories, nine different cell types, and seven different array platforms. A large overlap in the general immune response was observed among the top twenty of these 67 pathways, adding validation to our analysis strategy. Of the top five pathways, we found 53 differentially expressed genes affected by at least five of the seven viruses. We suggest five new therapeutic indications for existing small molecules or biological agents targeting proteins encoded by the genes F3, IL1B, TNF, CASP1 and MMP9. Pathway enrichment analysis also identified a potential novel host response, the Parkin-Ubiquitin Proteasomal System (Parkin-UPS) pathway, which is known to be involved in the progression of neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease. Conclusions Our study suggests that multiple and diverse respiratory viruses invoke several common host response pathways. Further analysis of these pathways suggests potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22432004

  6. Evidence from Multiplex Molecular Assays for Complex Multipathogen Interactions in Acute Respiratory Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Brunstein; Christy L. Cline; Steven McKinney; Eva Thomas

    While most diagnostic processes cease with the detection of the first relevant infectious agent, newer multiplexed molecular methods which provide simultaneous analysis of multiple agents may give a more accurate representation of the true pathogen spectrum in these samples. To examine this in the context of respiratory infections, acute-phase respiratory specimens submitted to our clinical diagnostic microbiology\\/ virology laboratory for

  7. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION INDUCED BY RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-stranded RNA virus, is a common viral pathogen for respiratory infection in both children and immunocompromised adults. Early host defense may play a critical role in determining the severity of the infection. To gain further insight ...

  8. Identification of WU polyomavirus from pediatric patients with acute respiratory infections in Beijing, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linqing ZhaoYuan; Yuan Qian; Runan Zhu; Jie Deng; Fang Wang; Yu Sun; Yaxin Ding

    2010-01-01

    A novel polyomavirus (WU virus) has been identified in pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI), but\\u000a its role as a respiratory pathogen has not yet been demonstrated. To investigate if WU virus is related to acute respiratory\\u000a infections in infants and children in Beijing, specimens collected from 674 pediatric patients with ARI from April 2007 to\\u000a May 2008

  9. Plant-pathogen interactions and elevated CO2: morphological changes in favour of pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice Ann Lake; Ruth Nicola Wade

    2009-01-01

    Crop losses caused by pests and weeds have been estimated at 42% worldwide, with plant pathogens responsible for almost $10 billion worth of damage in the USA in 1994 alone. Elevated carbon dioxide (ECO2) and associated climate change have the potential to accelerate plant pathogen evolution, which may, in turn, affect virulence. Plant- pathogen interactions under increasing CO2 concentrations have

  10. Organic barn dust extract exposure impairs porcine macrophage function in vitro: implications for respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Knetter, Susan M; Tuggle, Christopher K; Wannemuehler, Michael J; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E

    2014-01-15

    Respiratory diseases are responsible for a significant amount of animal morbidity and mortality in the swine industry, including the majority of nursery and grower/finisher deaths. Innate immunity, including the maintenance of lung macrophage health and function, is an important defense mechanism against respiratory pathogens and their associated losses. Chronic exposure of swine industry workers to airborne barn dust results in significant predisposition to airway diseases and impairment of alveolar macrophage (AM?) function. Because of their importance in maintaining normal respiratory function, this study was designed to evaluate the impact of barn dust on swine macrophages. As measures of macrophage function, we evaluated the activation of NF-?B, cytokine production, cell surface marker expression and the phagocytic and antibacterial capabilities of porcine macrophages after in vitro exposure to an organic swine barn dust extract (ODE). ODE treatment induced AM? secretion of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting a complex activation profile. Additionally, ODE induced expression of genes (TLR2, NOD2) involved in sensing Gram-positive bacteria, a major component of barn dust. ODE exposure also enhanced the expression of several cell surface markers of activation, including a receptor for the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. Moreover, two key functions of AM?, phagocytosis and bacterial killing, were impaired after exposure to ODE. Treatment with ODE for the first 72 h of differentiation also inhibited the ability of monocyte-derived macrophages to translocate NF-?B to the nucleus following endotoxin stimulation. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that organic dust extract exposure negatively affects pig macrophage activation and function, potentially enhancing host susceptibility to a variety of respiratory infections. PMID:24275039

  11. Ready-to-eat street-vended food as a potential vehicle of bacterial pathogens and antimicrobial resistance: An exploratory study in Porto region, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Campos, Joana; Gil, Joana; Mourão, Joana; Peixe, Luísa; Antunes, Patrícia

    2015-08-01

    The ready-to-eat street vending commerce, as street mobile food vendors, has grown exponentially worldwide, representing in some countries a significant proportion of food consumed by the urban population. However, the microbiological food safety hazards of mobile vending units in industrialized countries are scarcely evaluated. To assess the microbiological quality and safety of this type of food and try to achieve the connection of its contamination with hygienic conditions of food-handlers, we analyzed hotdogs (n=10), hamburgers (n=10) and hands (n=9) from ten street-vending trailers in the Porto region. Food and food-handler samples were tested for Enterobacteriaceae and coliform counts, Escherichia coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci counts/detection and presence of Salmonella. Aerobic mesophilic counts and detection of Listeria monocytogenes (Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis-PFGE and serotyping) were also tested in food samples. E. coli isolates were confirmed by MALDI-TOF and characterized for clonality (phylogenetic groups-PhG, PFGE and Multilocus Sequence Typing), antibiotic resistance (disk diffusion, PCR/sequencing) and intestinal pathogenic virulence factors (PCR/sequencing). All food samples presented poor microbiological quality (100% Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms; 20% E. coli (4 hamburgers, 4 trailers) and 20% (2 hamburgers/2 hotdogs, 3 trailers) were positive for L. monocytogenes (2 PFGE-types belonging to serotype 1/2a and 4b). Salmonella and coagulase-positive staphylococci were not detected. Food-handlers carried Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms (100%), E. coli (11%) and/or coagulase-positive staphylococci (44%). E. coli was detected in 12 samples (n=30-food/food-handlers; phylogenetic groups A0/A1/B1) with 33% resistant to one or more antibiotics. Two multidrug resistant atypical E. coli pathotype strains (astA-ST165(CC165)/food-handler, eaeA-ST327/food) were detected. Three out of eight E. coli clonal lineages [ST409/ST976(CC10)/ST297] and the two L. monocytogenes clones were spread in different samples/trailers, suggesting cross-contamination or a common source of contamination. This exploratory study, in Porto region, showed ready-to-eat street foods from vending trailers as potential vehicles of clinically relevant L. monocytogenes serotypes and/or E. coli carrying clinically relevant virulence/antibiotic resistance features, and food-handlers as a critical risk factor in this expanding food sector. PMID:25910073

  12. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P?pathogen) and were the most common infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. PMID:24980809

  13. Nasal delivery of chitosan–DNA plasmid expressing epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces protective CTL responses in BALB\\/c mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Iqbal; W Lin; I Jabbal-Gill; S. S Davis; M. W Steward; L Illum

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), an important pathogen of the lower respiratory tract, is responsible for severe illness both in new born and young children and in elderly people. Due to complications associated with the use of the early developed vaccines, there is still a need for an effective vaccine against RSV. Most pathogens enter the body via mucosal surfaces and

  14. Temporal activation of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors in human gingival fibroblasts infected with the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis: potential role of bacterial proteases in host signalling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonya Urnowey; Toshihiro Ansai; Vira Bitko; Koji Nakayama; Tadamichi Takehara; Sailen Barik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Porphyromonas gingivalis is the foremost oral pathogen of adult periodontitis in humans. However, the mechanisms of bacterial invasion and the resultant destruction of the gingival tissue remain largely undefined. RESULTS: We report host-P. gingivalis interactions in primary human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells. Quantitative immunostaining revealed the need for a high multiplicity of infection for optimal infection. Early in infection

  15. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus : immunopathology and vaccine evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. G. Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Human and bovine RSVs cause severe disease in humans and in cattle respectively. They have been recognised as important respiratory pathogens in the last five decades, and this has resulted in significant research activities on the pathogenesis and intervention strategies around the world. Physicians and veterinarians have been puzzled by conflicting results from field and experimental observations: for example which

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  17. Cardiovascular & Respiratory Modeling, Analysis & Control

    E-print Network

    Batzel, Jerry

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 1.7.3 Sensitivity analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 2 Respiratory Modeling 45 2Cardiovascular & Respiratory Systems: Modeling, Analysis & Control J. J. Batzel, F. Kappel, D.1 Respiratory Control Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 2.1.1 General features of respiration

  18. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a severe respiratory illness. It causes fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. About 30% of people who have gotten ...

  19. Respiratory Care Therapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of respiratory care therapist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of respiratory care therapist. The following…

  20. Functions of the respiratory burst oxidase in biotic interactions, abiotic stress and development

    E-print Network

    Dangl, Jeff

    intermediates (ROI), the so-called `oxidative burst', is a hallmark of successful recognition of plant pathogensFunctions of the respiratory burst oxidase in biotic interactions, abiotic stress and development) is among the earliest temporal events following pathogen recognition in plants. Initially, ROI were thought

  1. Antiviral effect of cimicifugin from Cimicifuga foetida against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Jung-San; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes serious infection of the lower respiratory tract in children and an effective antiviral therapy against the viral pathogen remains unavailable. We previously demonstrated that the oriental medicinal plant, Cimicifuga foetida L. (C. foetida), possessed inhibitory activity against RSV. Since cimicifugin is a major constituent of C. foetida, we sought to examine in this study its anti-RSV effect on both the human upper (HEp-2) and lower (A549) respiratory tract cell lines. Results revealed that cimicifugin dose-dependently inhibited RSV-induced plaque formation in both HEp-2 and A549 cells (p < 0.0001), with a superior effect in the latter cell type (p < 0.0001). The antiviral activity of cimicifugin was time-dependent (p < 0.0001) and was most effective when cells were treated with the compound before viral inoculation. Additional experiments demonstrated that cimicifugin could inhibit viral attachment (p < 0.0001) and viral internalization (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the drug could potentiate heparin's effect against attachment of RSV, particularly in A549 cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis of antiviral cytokines induction revealed that cimicifugin could also stimulate epithelial cells to secrete IFN-? to counteract viral infection. Taken together, these results indicate that cimicifugin is an efficient antiviral agent against RSV infection. We suggest that cimicifugin might be useful for the management of RSV pathogenesis. PMID:22928833

  2. Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

  3. Evaluation of antifungal potential of Marchantia polymorpha L., Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott and Ephedra foliata Boiss. against phyto fungal pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neelam Mewari; Padma Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Methanol and flavonoid extracts (free and bound) of Marchantia polymorpha L., Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott and Ephedra foliata Boiss. were screened against three fungal plant pathogens: Alternaria solani, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. The extracts from D. filix-mas and E. foliata showed >80% of mycelial inhibition of A. solani whereas M. polymorpha and D. filix-mas (rhizome) completely inhibited the mycelial

  4. Host defence mechanisms of the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, J

    2000-06-01

    From the moment of the first breath at the time of birth, the respiratory system must be protected from numerous insults from the environment. The way in which the airways are prepared for these insults is by an extraordinarily effective defence system. This defence system includes mechanical as well as biochemical processes that work in an integrated way to safeguard the lungs. The airways have an efficient, highly vigilant, non-inflammatory anti-microbial defence system, capable of dealing with a wide spectrum of microbes, and provide lifelong protection of these vital mucosal surfaces. The different aspects of this defence system of the airways are discussed. The effectiveness of the system must be improved, especially in children prone to frequent respiratory infections like cystic fibrosis. Future research must be focused on restoring the defect in the defence mechanism, but also in a more appropriate shield against pathogenic micro-organisms. PMID:12531105

  5. Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Special Issue on Respiratory Biomechanics

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Special Issue on Respiratory Biomechanics Manuscript: Cell,version1-17Dec2008 Author manuscript, published in "Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology / Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 2008;163 (1-3):3-16" DOI : 10.1016/j.resp.2008.04.018 #12;2 ABSTRACT Cell mechanics

  6. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Ayres; B. Forsberg; I. Annesi-Maesano; R. Dey; K. L. Ebi; P. J. Helms; M. Medina-Ramon; M. Windt; F. Forastiere

    2009-01-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following

  7. Prevalence of Chlamydophila pneumoniae among Bangladeshi children under age 5 years with acute respiratory infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuya Matsumoto; Katsumi Matsumura; Kazi Selim Anwar; Abid Hossain Mollah; Hinako Murakami; Intetsu Kobayashi; Kiyotaka Kawagoe; Sadashi Shiga; Toshio Kishimoto; Nazmun Nahar; Kazuhiro Tateda; Keizo Yamaguchi

    2006-01-01

    Despite major improvements in the diagnosis of pathogenic organisms causing acute respiratory infections (ARIs), details of\\u000a infections caused by atypical pathogens are not well understood, particularly in developing countries. This clinical and epidemiological\\u000a research was conducted in Bangladesh to explore the prevalence of atypical pathogens in causing childhood pneumonia. Sixty-four\\u000a children with ARI were studied at the Pediatric Outpatient Department

  8. Respiratory effects of inhalation exposure among workers during the clean-up effort at the World Trade Center disaster site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie B. Herbstman; Robert Frank; Margo Schwab; D’Ann L. Williams; Jonathan M. Samet; Patrick N. Breysse; Alison S. Geyh

    2005-01-01

    During December 2001 we conducted a field study of 183 clean-up and recovery workers at the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site to assess respiratory health effects potentially resulting from their work at the site. On site, we administered a respiratory health questionnaire designed to assess upper respiratory symptoms and lower respiratory symptoms, including cough, phlegm, and wheeze, as well

  9. A Processed Multidomain Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Adhesin Binds Fibronectin, Plasminogen, and Swine Respiratory Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Lisa M.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Kuit, Tracey A.; Falconer, Linda; Minion, F. Chris; Crossett, Ben; Padula, Matthew; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Walker, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia is a chronic respiratory disease that affects swine. The etiological agent of the disease, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, is a bacterium that adheres to cilia of the swine respiratory tract, resulting in loss of cilia and epithelial cell damage. A M. hyopneumoniae protein P116, encoded by mhp108, was investigated as a potential adhesin. Examination of P116 expression using proteomic analyses observed P116 as a full-length protein and also as fragments, ranging from 17 to 70 kDa in size. A variety of pathogenic bacterial species have been shown to bind the extracellular matrix component fibronectin as an adherence mechanism. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to bind fibronectin in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Surface plasmon resonance was used to show that a recombinant C-terminal domain of P116 bound fibronectin at physiologically relevant concentrations (KD 24 ± 6 nm). Plasmin(ogen)-binding proteins are also expressed by many bacterial pathogens, facilitating extracellular matrix degradation. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to also bind plasminogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner; the C-terminal domain of P116 binds to plasminogen (KD 44 ± 5 nm). Plasminogen binding was abolished when the C-terminal lysine of P116 was deleted, implicating this residue as part of the plasminogen binding site. P116 fragments adhere to the PK15 porcine kidney epithelial-like cell line and swine respiratory cilia. Collectively these data suggest that P116 is an important adhesin and virulence factor of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:20813843

  10. Influence of a probiotic Lactobacillus casei strain on the colonisation with potential pathogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus in the nasopharyngeal space of healthy men with a low baseline NK cell activity.

    PubMed

    Franz, Charles M A P; Huch, Melanie; Seifert, Stephanie; Kramlich, Jeannette; Bub, Achim; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Watzl, Bernhard

    2014-11-23

    The effect of a daily intake of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) on the colonisation of pathogens, specifically streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, in the nose and throat of healthy human volunteers with low natural killer cell activity, was investigated in a randomised and controlled intervention study. The study consisted of a 2-week run-in phase, followed by a 4-week intervention phase. The probiotic treatment group received a fermented milk drink with LcS, while the placebo group received an equally composed milk drink without the probiotic additive. To isolate potential pathogenic streptococci and Staph. aureus, samples from the pharynx, as well as of both middle nasal meati, were taken, once after the run-in phase and once at the end of the intervention phase. Isolated bacteria were identified as either Staph. aureus and ?- or ?-haemolytic streptococci in a polyphasic taxonomical approach based on phenotypic tests, amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis genotyping, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representative strains. Salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) was used as marker of protective mucosal immunity to evaluate whether LcS treatment influenced SIgA production. No statistically significant effect could be determined for intervention with LcS on the incidence of Staph. aureus in the nasal space, Staph. aureus in the pharyngeal space or for ?-haemolytic streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the pharyngeal space. Thus, the intervention did not influence the nasopharyngeal colonisation with Gram-positive potential pathogens. Production of salivary SIgA as a potential means of microbiota modulation was also not affected. PMID:25416927

  11. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric A. F. Simoes; Thomas Cherian; Jeffrey Chow; Ramanan Laxminarayan; T. Jacob John

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are classified as upper res- piratory tract infections (URIs) or lower respiratory tract infec- tions (LRIs). The upper respiratory tract consists of the airways from the nostrils to the vocal cords in the larynx, including the paranasal sinuses and the middle ear. The lower respiratory tract covers the continuation of the airways from the trachea and

  12. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: an Emerging Global Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging multidrug-resistant global opportunistic pathogen. The increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired S. maltophilia infections is of particular concern for immunocompromised individuals, as this bacterial pathogen is associated with a significant fatality/case ratio. S. maltophilia is an environmental bacterium found in aqueous habitats, including plant rhizospheres, animals, foods, and water sources. Infections of S. maltophilia can occur in a range of organs and tissues; the organism is commonly found in respiratory tract infections. This review summarizes the current literature and presents S. maltophilia as an organism with various molecular mechanisms used for colonization and infection. S. maltophilia can be recovered from polymicrobial infections, most notably from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients, as a cocolonizer with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Recent evidence of cell-cell communication between these pathogens has implications for the development of novel pharmacological therapies. Animal models of S. maltophilia infection have provided useful information about the type of host immune response induced by this opportunistic pathogen. Current and emerging treatments for patients infected with S. maltophilia are discussed. PMID:22232370

  13. Nanoparticle diffusion in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Benjamin S.; Suk, Jung Soo; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A major role of respiratory mucus is to trap inhaled particles, including pathogens and environmental particulates, to limit body exposure. Despite the tremendous health implications, how particle size and surface chemistry affect mobility in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease is not known. We prepared polymeric nanoparticles densely coated with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) to minimize muco-adhesion, and compared their transport to that of uncoated particles in human respiratory mucus, which we collected from the endotracheal tubes of surgical patients with no respiratory comorbidities. We found that 100 and 200 nm diameter PEG-coated particles rapidly penetrated respiratory mucus, at rates exceeding their uncoated counterparts by approximately 15- and 35-fold, respectively. In contrast, PEG-coated particles ? 500 nm in diameter were sterically immobilized by the mucus mesh. Thus, even though respiratory mucus is a viscoelastic solid at the macroscopic level (as measured using a bulk rheometer), nanoparticles that are sufficiently small and muco-inert can penetrate the mucus as if it were primarily a viscous liquid. These findings help elucidate the barrier properties of respiratory mucus and provide design criteria for therapeutic nanoparticles capable of penetrating mucus to approach the underlying airway epithelium. PMID:23384790

  14. The effect of low shear force on the virulence potential of Yersinia pestis: new aspects that space-like growth conditions and the final frontier can teach us about a formidable pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Manned space exploration has created a need to evaluate the effects of space-like stress (SLS) on pathogenic and opportunistic microbes. Interestingly, several Gram-negative enteric pathogens, e.g., Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, have revealed a transient hyper-virulent phenotype following simulated microgravity (SMG) or actual space flight exposures. We have explored the virulence potential of Yersinia pestis KIM/D27 (YP) following exposure to mechanical low shear forces associated with SMG. Our experimental results demonstrated that SMG-grown YP was decreased in its induced HeLa cell cytotoxicity, suggesting that SMG somehow compromises T3SS functions. This was confirmed by an actual reduced amount of effector protein production and secretion through the T3SS injectisome. Also, SMG-grown YP proliferated less than their NG-grown counterparts did during an 8-h macrophage infection. Presently, we are evaluating the influence of SMG on various KIM/D27 mutant strains to further understanding of our initial phenomenology described above. Taken together, characterizing YP grown under the low shear forces of SMG can provide new insights into its pathogenesis and potentially uncover new targets that could be exploited for the development of novel antimicrobials as well as potential live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:22919696

  15. SURVIVAL AND TRANSMISSION OF PATHOGENS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To provide and apply scientific knowledge regarding the survival and transmission of pathogens in the clinical setting to their potential survival and transmission in the natural environment. Similar to the hospital environment where pathogens reside in organic debris treated wi...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated drinking water is major source of waterborne diseases. EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that contains a number of pathogens that potentially could be regulated in drinking water. Studies indicate that certain viral pathogens (adenov...

  17. Predictive testing for respiratory sensitization in the mouse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Kimber; Jennifer Hilton; David A. Basketter; Rebecca J. Dearman

    1996-01-01

    Attempts to develop predictive test methods for the identification of chemical respiratory allergens have to date focused almost exclusively on the guinea pig. In recent years there has, however, been a growing interest in the mouse as a model for examination of sensitization potential. In this article two alternative approaches to the lexicological investigation of respiratory sensitization are described. Both

  18. Respiratory sensitization and allergy: Current research approaches and needs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darrell R. Boverhof; Richard Billington; B. Bhaskar Gollapudi; John A. Hotchkiss; Shannon M. Krieger; Alan Poole; Connie M. Wiescinski; Michael R. Woolhiser

    2008-01-01

    There are currently no accepted regulatory models for assessing the potential of a substance to cause respiratory sensitization and allergy. In contrast, a number of models exist for the assessment of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Research indicates that respiratory sensitizers may be identified through contact sensitization assays such as the local lymph node assay, although only a

  19. Is public transport a risk factor for acute respiratory infection?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joy Troko; Puja Myles; Jack Gibson; Ahmed Hashim; Joanne Enstone; Susan Kingdon; Christopher Packham; Shahid Amin; Andrew Hayward; Jonathan Nguyen Van-Tam

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between public transport use and acquisition of acute respiratory infection (ARI) is not well understood but potentially important during epidemics and pandemics. METHODS: A case-control study performed during the 2008\\/09 influenza season. Cases (n = 72) consulted a General Practitioner with ARI, and controls with another non-respiratory acute condition (n = 66). Data were obtained on bus

  20. Immunological mechanisms of severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Bont; Jan L. L. Kimpen

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis resulting in respiratory insufficiency is frequently encountered during the winter season in paediatric intensive care units. This review evaluates potential determinants described in severe RSV bronchiolitis with special attention to the role of immaturity of immune responses during infancy. Pre-existent cardiac or pulmonary compromises have been documented as clinical risk factors for severe RSV bronchiolitis.

  1. DNA Detection and Genotypic Identification of Potentially Human-Pathogenic Microsporidia from Asymptomatic Pet Parrots in South Korea as a Risk Factor for Zoonotic Emergence ?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Sung-Seok; Lyoo, Young S.; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-01-01

    We detected and identified genotypes of human-pathogenic microsporidia in fecal samples from 51 asymptomatic captive-bred pet parrots in South Korea. Microsporidia were identified in 8 samples (15.7%); 7 parrots tested positive for Encephalitozoon hellem, and 1 parrot tested positive for both E. hellem and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. In genotypic identifications, E. hellem was present in genotypes 1A and 2B and E. cuniculi was present in genotype II. Pet parrots might be a source of human microsporidian infection. PMID:21965400

  2. Severe respiratory failure associated with influenza B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man who had been diagnosed with type B influenza infection and high fever 4 days previously was admitted to our hospital. He presented with severe respiratory insufficiency; chest computed tomography (CT) revealed extensive ground-glass opacity in lung fields on both sides. Although peramivir and antibiotics were administered, reticular shadows on chest CT worsened and respiratory insufficiency deteriorated. The patient fulfilled the criteria for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite multimodal therapy, including noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion, and methylprednisolone infusion, his general condition gradually deteriorated. He died of respiratory failure on day 129. Pathology findings of the lungs during autopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe respiratory failure after type B influenza infection. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for fatal respiratory failure in cases of type B as well as type A influenza infections.

  3. Severe respiratory failure associated with influenza B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Inui, Naoki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-06-01

    A 72-year-old man who had been diagnosed with type B influenza infection and high fever 4 days previously was admitted to our hospital. He presented with severe respiratory insufficiency; chest computed tomography (CT) revealed extensive ground-glass opacity in lung fields on both sides. Although peramivir and antibiotics were administered, reticular shadows on chest CT worsened and respiratory insufficiency deteriorated. The patient fulfilled the criteria for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite multimodal therapy, including noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion, and methylprednisolone infusion, his general condition gradually deteriorated. He died of respiratory failure on day 129. Pathology findings of the lungs during autopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe respiratory failure after type B influenza infection. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for fatal respiratory failure in cases of type B as well as type A influenza infections. PMID:26090113

  4. Respiratory sensitization: advances in assessing the risk of respiratory inflammation and irritation.

    PubMed

    Vandebriel, Rob; Callant Cransveld, Conchita; Crommelin, Daan; Diamant, Zuzana; Glazenburg, Berend; Joos, Guy; Kuper, Frieke; Natsch, Andreas; Nijkamp, Frans; Noteborn, Hub; Pieters, Raymond; Roberts, David; Roggen, Erwin; Rorije, Emiel; Seed, Martin; Sewald, Katharina; van den Heuvel, Rosette; van Engelen, Jacqueline; Verstraelen, Sandra; van Loveren, Henk

    2011-10-01

    Respiratory sensitization provides a case study for a new approach to chemical safety evaluation, as the prevalence of respiratory sensitization has increased considerably over the last decades, but animal and/or human experimental/predictive models are not currently available. Therefore, the goal of a working group was to design a road map to develop an ASAT approach for respiratory sensitisers. This approach should aim at (i) creating a database on respiratory functional biology and toxicology, (ii) applying data analyses to understand the multi-dimensional sensitization response, and how this predisposes to respiratory inflammation and irritation, and (iii) building a systems model out of these analyses, adding pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict respiratory responses to low levels of sensitisers. To this end, the best way forward would be to follow an integrated testing approach. Experimental research should be targeted to (i) QSAR-type approaches to relate potential as a respiratory sensitizer to its chemical structure, (ii) in vitro models and (iii) in vitro-in vivo extrapolation/validation. PMID:21570460

  5. Cell adhesion as a novel approach to determining the cellular binding motif on the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Chen, Po-Kong; Lin, Guan-Ling; Wang, Chun-Jen; Liao, Chih-Hsien; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Dong, Jing-Hua; Sun, Der-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Emerging life threatening pathogens such as severe acute aspiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), avian-origin influenzas H7N9, and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have caused a high case-fatality rate and psychological effects on society and the economy. Therefore, a simple, rapid, and safe method to investigate a therapeutic approach against these pathogens is required. In this study, a simple, quick, and safe cell adhesion inhibition assay was developed to determine the potential cellular binding site on the SARS-CoV spike protein. Various synthetic peptides covering the potential binding site helped to minimize further the binding motif to 10-25 residues. Following analyses, 2 peptides spanning the 436-445 and 437-461 amino acids of the spike protein were identified as peptide inhibitor or peptide vaccine candidates against SARS-CoV. PMID:24530430

  6. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Involved in Severe Acute Respiratory Disease in Northern Italy during the Pandemic and Postpandemic Period (2009–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Pariani, Elena; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Oude Munnink, Bas B.; Deijs, Martin; Zanetti, Alessandro; van der Hoek, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and the impact of other respiratory viruses during pandemic and postpandemic period (2009–2011) in northern Italy; additionally we searched for unknown viruses in those cases for which diagnosis remained negative. 206 respiratory samples were collected from SARI/ARDS cases and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR/PCR to investigate influenza viruses and other common respiratory pathogens; also, a virus discovery technique (VIDISCA-454) was applied on those samples tested negative to all pathogens. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was detected in 58.3% of specimens, with a case fatality rate of 11.3%. The impact of other respiratory viruses was 19.4%, and the most commonly detected viruses were human rhinovirus/enterovirus and influenza A(H3N2). VIDISCA-454 enabled the identification of one previously undiagnosed measles infection. Nearly 22% of SARI/ARDS cases did not obtain a definite diagnosis. In clinical practice, great efforts should be dedicated to improving the diagnosis of severe respiratory disease; the introduction of innovative molecular technologies, as VIDISCA-454, will certainly help in reducing such “diagnostic gap.” PMID:25013770

  7. PATHOGEN RISK ASSESSMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the practicality of formulating guidelines to assess the risk associated with exposure to pathogens in sludge. Risk assessment may be used to determine the likelihood that an environmental agent may cause human disease (that is, potential to cause human cance...

  8. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    in 1995 was 800, indicating the effectiveness of Standard Precautions, HBV vaccinations, and other Rubock, MPH. Director of Biological Safety Nov 2009 6.0 Outlined "the Standard", "the Policy" and "the 1910.1030 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard ("the Standard") in 1991 to protect workers with potential

  9. Antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Thomas; V. Thomas; C. Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    Cefquinome is known for its use as an antibacterial drug in cattle and pigs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine pathogenic bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cefquinome was determined for a total of 205 strains, which had recently been isolated in Europe from diseased horses (respiratory infection, foal septicaemia).

  10. Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, and virophages as emerging human pathogens causing healthcare-associated infections

    PubMed Central

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.; Brusina, Elena B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: During the last decade it became obvious that viruses belonging to Mimiviridae and Marseilleviridae families (order Megavirales), may be potential causative agents of pneumonia. Thus, we have performed a review of the association of Mimiviridae, Marseilleviridae, and virophages with pneumonia, particularly healthcare-associated pneumonia, and other infections of the respiratory tract. Results and discussion: According to the analysis of the published articles, viruses belonging to Mimiviridae family can be potential agents of both community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia. In particular, these viruses may be associated with poor outcome in patients of intensive care units. The exact mechanism of their pathogenicity, however, still remains unclear. The discrepancies between the results obtained by serological and genomic methods could be explained by the high polymorphism of nucleotide sequences of Mimiviridae family representatives. Further investigations on the Mimiviridae pathogenicity and on the determination of Mimiviridae-caused pneumonia risk groups are required. However, the pathogenicity of the viruses belonging to Marseilleviridae family and virophages is unclear up to now. PMID:25152861

  11. Assessing multiple foodborne, waterborne and environmental exposures of healthy people to potential enteric pathogen sources: effect of age, gender, season, and recall period.

    PubMed

    David, J M; Ravel, A; Nesbitt, A; Pintar, K; Pollari, F

    2014-01-01

    Information is lacking in Canada on the frequency of exposures of healthy people to enteric pathogen sources (i.e. water, food, animal contact) at the community level. This information is critical to develop more robust risk assessments and prioritize control measures. A 12-month-long cross-sectional telephone survey of 1200 healthy individuals in a sentinel community was performed. Survey respondents were divided into three recall period groups (3, 7, 14 days). The occurrence of 46 exposures (including water, animal contact, environmental contact and high-risk foods) was assessed per recall period. Effect of age, gender, and season on exposures was modelled and frequencies of exposure were extrapolated. Thirty-five exposures had similar occurrences across recall periods. Age was significant for 23 exposures, season for 18, and gender for three. Exposures that vary by age and season (i.e. bottled water, swimming, etc.) warrant consideration when investigating and analysing cases of enteric illness. PMID:23731678

  12. The relationship between socioeconomic indices and potentially zoonotic pathogens carried by wild Norway rats: a survey in Rhône, France (2010-2012).

    PubMed

    Ayral, F; Artois, J; Zilber, A-L; Widén, F; Pounder, K C; Aubert, D; Bicout, D J; Artois, M

    2015-02-01

    Leptospira interrogans, hantaviruses (particularly Seoul virus), hepatitis E virus (HEV), and Toxoplasma gondii are rat-associated zoonoses that are responsible for human morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to describe the infection patterns of these four pathogens in wild rats (Rattus norvegicus) across socioeconomic levels in neighbourhoods in Lyon, France. The infection or exposure status was determined using polymerase chain reaction or serology for 178 wild rats captured in 23 locations; additionally, confirmatory culture or mouse inoculation was performed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate whether morphological and socioeconomic data could predict the infection status of the rats. This study revealed that the rat colony's age structure may influence the prevalence of L. interrogans, hantavirus, and HEV. In addition, areas with high human population densities and low incomes may be associated with a greater number of infected rats and an increased risk of disease transmission. PMID:24838220

  13. Animal models to test respiratory allergy of low molecular weight chemicals: A guidance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josje H. E. Arts; C. Frieke Kuper

    2007-01-01

    At present, there are no widely applied or fully validated test methods to identify respiratory LMW allergens, i.e. compounds that are considered capable of inducing allergic asthma. Most tests have been investigated using strong respiratory allergens. Moreover, they are meant to detect the potential of a chemical to induce respiratory sensitisation at relatively high doses. Consequently, the sensitivity of the

  14. Gene expression analysis of potential genes and pathways involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of parvovirus B19 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEI-PING; YANG, HUA; CHEN, HONG; ZHU, HAI-RONG; LEI, QUAN; SONG, YUN-HONG; DAI, ZHONG-MING; SUN, JING-SHAN; JIANG, LI-LI; NIE, ZHAN-GUO

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of parvovirus B19 in human colorectal cancer, plasmids containing the VP1 or VP2 viral capsid proteins or the NS1 non-structural proteins of parvovirus B19 were constructed and transfected into primary human colorectal epithelial cells and LoVo cells. Differential gene expression was detected using a human genome expression array. Functional gene annotation analyses were performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery v6.7 software. Gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that VP1-related functions included the immune response, immune system process, defense response and the response to stimulus, while NS1-associated functions were found to include organelle fission, nuclear division, mitosis, the M-phase of the mitotic cell cycle, the mitotic cell cycle, M-phase, cell cycle phase, cell cycle process and cell division. Pathway expression analysis revealed that VP1-associated pathways included cell adhesion molecules, antigen processing and presentation, cytokines and the inflammatory response. Moreover, NS1-associated pathways included the cell cycle, pathways in cancer, colorectal cancer, the wnt signaling pathway and focal adhesion. Among the differential genes detected in the present study, 12 genes were found to participate in general cancer pathways and six genes were observed to participate in colorectal cancer pathways. NS1 is a key molecule in the pathogenic mechanism of parvovirus B19 in colorectal cancer. Several GO categories, pathways and genes were selected and may be the key targets through which parvovirus B19 participates in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25013465

  15. Age at infection affects the pathogenicity of Asian highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian H5N1 avian influenza (AI) viruses have changed from producing no disease or mild respiratory infections in ducks to some strains causing systemic disease and death. Differences in pathogenicity between four of these viruses as well as the effect of host age on the outcome of infection were...

  16. The role of the local microbial ecosystem in respiratory health and disease.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2015-08-19

    Respiratory tract infections are a major global health concern, accounting for high morbidity and mortality, especially in young children and elderly individuals. Traditionally, highly common bacterial respiratory tract infections, including otitis media and pneumonia, were thought to be caused by a limited number of pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. However, these pathogens are also frequently observed commensal residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) and form-together with harmless commensal bacteria, viruses and fungi-intricate ecological networks, collectively known as the 'microbiome'. Analogous to the gut microbiome, the respiratory microbiome at equilibrium is thought to be beneficial to the host by priming the immune system and providing colonization resistance, while an imbalanced ecosystem might predispose to bacterial overgrowth and development of respiratory infections. We postulate that specific ecological perturbations of the bacterial communities in the URT can occur in response to various lifestyle or environmental effectors, leading to diminished colonization resistance, loss of containment of newly acquired or resident pathogens, preluding bacterial overgrowth, ultimately resulting in local or systemic bacterial infections. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding niche-specific upper respiratory microbiota profiles within human hosts and the changes occurring within these profiles that are associated with respiratory infections. PMID:26150660

  17. Rye grains and the soil derived from under the organic and conventional rye crops as a potential source of biological agents causing respiratory diseases in farmers

    PubMed Central

    Cholewa, Gra?yna; Krasowska, Ewelina; Chmielewska-Badora, Jolanta; Zwoli?ski, Jacek; Sobczak, Pawe?

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Introduction: Due to the specific work environment, farmers are exposed to various biological occupational hazard. Among these factors significant are fungi present in the grain and also in the soil. The fungi may be the cause of human diseases including skin infections, asthma, allergic rhinitis and many others. Aim The aim of this study was to quantify and identify species of fungi colonizing rye grain samples and the soil under cultivation. Material and methods The material consisted of grain and soil samples from two agricultural systems: organic and conventional. To determine the concentration and composition of fungi in collected samples, two media: Malt Agar (MA, Becton, Dickinson and Company) and Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA, Becton, Dickinson and Company) were used. The composition of species in fungal flora was determined using macroscopic and microscopic methods. The isolates of fungi were ranked in the appropriate classes of biosafety BSL. Results The most frequently isolated fungi from organic rye grain, regardless of the media used, were species: Aureobasidium pullulans and Alternaria alternata. In conventional farms, most species isolated from rye grain were: Aureobasidium pullulans, Cladosporium oxysporum, Alternaria alternata and yeast-like fungi. Most often species isolated from the soil was Penicillium citreo-viride. Conclusions All the results of the research demonstrate the potential hazard to the health of people working in agriculture. Significant exposure of this professional group is associated with the presence of harmful biological agents present in the grain and soil from its cultivation. PMID:24494000

  18. Epidemiology of acute respiratory infections in children in Guangzhou: a three-year study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen Kuan; Liu, Qian; Chen, De Hui; Liang, Huan Xi; Chen, Xiao Kai; Chen, Mei Xin; Qiu, Shu Yan; Yang, Zi Yeng; Zhou, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) are some of the most common human diseases worldwide. However, they have a complex and diverse etiology, and the characteristics of the pathogens involved in respiratory infections in developing countries are not well understood. In this work, we analyzed the characteristics of 17 common respiratory pathogens in children (?14 years old) with ARI in Guangzhou, southern China over a 3-year period using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pathogens were identified in 2361/4242 (55.7%) patients, and the positivity rate varied seasonally. Ten of the 17 pathogens investigated showed positivity rates of more than 5%. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (768/2361, 32.5%), influenza A virus (428/2361, 18.1%), enterovirus (138/2361, 13.3%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (267/2361, 11.3%) and adenovirus (213/2361, 9.0%). Co-pathogens were common and found in 503 of 2361 (21.3%) positive samples. When ranked according to frequency of occurrence, the pattern of co-pathogens was similar to that of the primary pathogens, with the exception of human bocavirus, human coronavirus and human metapneumovirus. Significant differences were found in age prevalence in 10 of the 17 pathogens (p?0.009): four basic patterns were observed, A: detection rates increased with age, B: detection rates declined with age, C: the detection rate showed distinct peaks or D: numbers of patients were too low to detect a trend or showed no significant difference among age groups (p>0.05). These data will be useful for planning vaccine research and control strategies and for studies predicting pathogen prevalence. PMID:24797911

  19. Epidemiology of Acute Respiratory Infections in Children in Guangzhou: A Three-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, De Hui; Liang, Huan Xi; Chen, Xiao Kai; Chen, Mei Xin; Qiu, Shu Yan; Yang, Zi Yeng; Zhou, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) are some of the most common human diseases worldwide. However, they have a complex and diverse etiology, and the characteristics of the pathogens involved in respiratory infections in developing countries are not well understood. In this work, we analyzed the characteristics of 17 common respiratory pathogens in children (?14 years old) with ARI in Guangzhou, southern China over a 3-year period using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pathogens were identified in 2361/4242 (55.7%) patients, and the positivity rate varied seasonally. Ten of the 17 pathogens investigated showed positivity rates of more than 5%. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (768/2361, 32.5%), influenza A virus (428/2361, 18.1%), enterovirus (138/2361, 13.3%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (267/2361, 11.3%) and adenovirus (213/2361, 9.0%). Co-pathogens were common and found in 503 of 2361 (21.3%) positive samples. When ranked according to frequency of occurrence, the pattern of co-pathogens was similar to that of the primary pathogens, with the exception of human bocavirus, human coronavirus and human metapneumovirus. Significant differences were found in age prevalence in 10 of the 17 pathogens (p?0.009): four basic patterns were observed, A: detection rates increased with age, B: detection rates declined with age, C: the detection rate showed distinct peaks or D: numbers of patients were too low to detect a trend or showed no significant difference among age groups (p>0.05). These data will be useful for planning vaccine research and control strategies and for studies predicting pathogen prevalence. PMID:24797911

  20. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  1. Model of respiratory sinus arrhythmia in man.

    PubMed

    Negoescu, R M; Csiki, I E

    1989-05-01

    The first section of the model delineates the parasympathetic signal as a function of the interaction between the respiratory and the vagal neurones of the common brainstem network. The second section is a version of Chess and Calaresu's description of the vagus/heart period system in the sympathetically blocked cat. The sympathetic influence is introduced in the third section, taking into account the autonomic effects on the transmembrane potential of the sinoatrial pacemaker as found in the rabbit. The model was implemented on a dedicated analogue computer with an accuracy of 1 per cent. The concordance between the analogue and the breathing/respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) system in humans was studied using simulated respiratory signals. The results confirm the central origin of the RSA as a meaningful modelling premise and indicate the dependence of the RSA amplitude on the operating point of the vagus. PMID:2601447

  2. Respiratory muscle failure.

    PubMed

    Rochester, D F; Arora, N S

    1983-05-01

    The diseases which are commonly complicated by hypercapnic respiratory failure also compromise the respiratory muscles in several ways. Increased work of breathing, mechanical disadvantage, neuromuscular disease, impaired nutritional status, shock, hypoxemia, acidosis, and deficiency of potassium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphorus are the major non-neurologic factors which contribute to respiratory muscle fatigue and failure. Respiratory muscle fatigue has two components. High frequency fatigue occurs rapidly with intense contractile efforts but is usually not severe. It also recovers rapidly with rest. Low frequency fatigue develops more slowly but is severe and requires hours for recovery. Since the spontaneous rate of neural stimulation is predominantly in the low frequency range, this component of fatigue is of particular clinical importance. Fatigue of the inspiratory muscles leads to acute respiratory acidosis, but before carbon dioxide retention occurs, it can be recognized from characteristic symptoms and signs. These include dyspnea which responds to mechanical ventilation, rapid shallow breathing, and asynchronous movements of the chest and abdomen. Inspiratory muscle fatigue must be treated by putting these muscles to rest, by mechanically supporting ventilation. In addition, underlying metabolic nutritional and circulatory abnormalities must be corrected and infection treated. Aminophylline and isoproterenol can restore inspiratory muscle contractility, but controlled clinical trials remain to be done regarding their application in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Inspiratory muscle training improves strength and endurance in patients with obstructive lung disease, cystic fibrosis, and spinal cord injury, but does not always improve physical exercise performance. Again, more work is needed to develop the indications for inspiratory muscle training and to determine the optimum type and duration of the training regimen. PMID:6341727

  3. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because the physician focuses management on physiologic measurements, mechanical ventilator settings, and other technologic nuances of care [40]. Review of the literature suggests that the development of respiratory failure in patients with certain disease processes such as COPD, IPF, and ARDS in elderly patients may lead to worsened outcome but it appears that the disease process itself, rather than the age of the patient, is the major determinant of outcome. Additional studies suggest that other comorbid factors may be more important than age. Only when comorbid processes are taken into account should decisions be made about the efficacy of instituting mechanical ventilation. In addition, because outcome prediction appears to be more accurate for groups of patients rather than for individual patients a well-structured therapeutic trial of instituting mechanical ventilation, even if comorbidities are present, may be indicated in certain patients if appropriately informed patients wish to pursue this course. This approach requires careful and realistic definition of potential outcomes, focus on optimizing treatment of the reversible components of the illness, and continuous communication with the patient and family. Although many clinicians share a nihilistic view regarding the potential usefulness of mechanical ventilation in elderly patients few data warrant this negative prognostication and more outcome studies are needed to delineate the optimum application of this element of supportive care. As with other interventions individualization of the decision must take into account the patient's premorbid status, concomitant conditions, the nature of the precipitating illness and its prospects for improvement, and most important, patient preferences. In this determination pursuing the course most consistent with the patient's wishes is essential and it must be appreciated that caregivers' impressions regarding the vigor of support desired by the patient are often erroneous. The SUPPORT investigators observed that clinicians often underestimated the degree of i

  4. PATHOGENS: VIEWS OF EPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. Pre...

  5. Pharmacological Inhibition of Cochlear Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Induces Secondary Inflammation in the Lateral Wall: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masato; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Shinden, Seiichi; Okano, Hirotaka James; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear lateral wall has recently been reported as a common site of inflammation, yet precise molecular mechanisms of the inflammatory responses remain elucidated. The present study examined the inflammatory responses in the lateral wall following acute mitochondrial dysfunction induced by a mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). Reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR revealed increases in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-6. Immunohistochemistry showed an increase in the number of activated cochlear macrophages in the lateral wall, which were in close proximity to IL-6-expressing cells. A genome-wide DNA microarray analysis of the lateral wall revealed that 35% and 60% of the genes showing >2-fold upregulation at 1 d and 3 d post-3-NP administration, respectively, were inflammatory genes, including CC- and CXC-type chemokine genes. High expression of CCL-1, 2, and 3 at 1 d, and of CCL-1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, CCR-2 and 5, and CX3CR1 at 3 d post-3-NP administration, coupled with no change in the level of CX3CL1 expression suggested that macrophages and monocytes may be involved in the inflammatory response to 3-NP-mediated injury. Quantitative (q)RT-PCR showed a transient induction of IL-1? and IL-6 expression within 24 h of 3-NP-mediated injury, followed by sustained expression of the chemoattractants, CCL-2, 4 and 5, up until 7 d after injury. The expression of CCL-2 and IL-6 was higher in animals showing permanent hearing impairment than in those showing temporary hearing impairment, suggesting that these inflammatory responses may be detrimental to hearing recovery. The present findings suggest that acute mitochondrial dysfunction induces secondary inflammatory responses in the lateral wall of the cochlear and that the IL-6/CCL-2 inflammatory pathway is involved in monocyte activation. Therefore, these secondary inflammatory responses may be a potential post-insult therapeutic target for treatments aimed at preventing the damage caused by acute mitochondrial dysfunction in the cochlear lateral wall. PMID:24614528

  6. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  7. Nonfermenting Gram-negative Bacilli other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter Spp. Causing Respiratory Tract Infections in a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Munim, Frenil C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli have emerged as important healthcare-associated pathogens. It is important to correctly identify all clinically significant nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli considering the intrinsic multidrug resistance exhibited by these bacteria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken to identify the various nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from respiratory samples (n = 9363), to understand their clinical relevance and to analyze their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Results: Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli were isolated from 830 (16.4%) samples showing significant growth. Thirty-three (4%) isolates constituted nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli other than P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (15, 45.5%) was the most common isolate followed by Burkholderia cepacia (4, 12.1%), Sphingomonas paucimobilis (3, 9.1%), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (3, 9.1%). On the basis of clinicomicrobiological correlation, pathogenicity was observed in 69.7% (n = 23) isolates. Timely and correct treatment resulted in clinical improvement in 87.9% cases. Conclusion: Any nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli isolated from respiratory tract infection should not be ignored as mere contaminant, but correlated clinically for its pathogenic potential and identified using standard methods so as to institute appropriate and timely antibiotic coverage. PMID:24672175

  8. Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the major pathogens involved in the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. The seroprevalence to BRSV in Norwegian cattle herds is high, but its role in epidemics of respiratory disease is unclear. The aims of the study were to investigate the etiological role of BRSV and other respiratory viruses in epidemics of BRD and to perform phylogenetic analysis of Norwegian BRSV strains. Results BRSV infection was detected either serologically and/or virologically in 18 (86%) of 21 outbreaks and in most cases as a single viral agent. When serology indicated that bovine coronavirus and/or bovine parainfluenza virus 3 were present, the number of BRSV positive animals in the herd was always higher, supporting the view of BRSV as the main pathogen. Sequencing of the G gene of BRSV positive samples showed that the current circulating Norwegian BRSVs belong to genetic subgroup II, along with other North European isolates. One isolate from an outbreak in Norway in 1976 was also investigated. This strain formed a separate branch in subgroup II, clearly different from the current Scandinavian sequences. The currently circulating BRSV could be divided into two different strains that were present in the same geographical area at the same time. The sequence variations between the two strains were in an antigenic important part of the G protein. Conclusion The results demonstrated that BRSV is the most important etiological agent of epidemics of BRD in Norway and that it often acts as the only viral agent. The phylogenetic analysis of the Norwegian strains of BRSV and several previously published isolates supported the theory of geographical and temporal clustering of BRSV. PMID:24423030

  9. Phylodynamics of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Europe, 2005–2010: Potential for Molecular Surveillance of New Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Alkhamis, Mohammad A.; Moore, Brian R.; Perez, Andres M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous Bayesian phylogeographic studies of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) explored the origin and spread of the epidemic from China into Russia, indicating that HPAIV circulated in Russia prior to its detection there in 2005. In this study, we extend this research to explore the evolution and spread of HPAIV within Europe during the 2005–2010 epidemic, using all available sequences of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene regions that were collected in Europe and Russia during the outbreak. We use discrete-trait phylodynamic models within a Bayesian statistical framework to explore the evolution of HPAIV. Our results indicate that the genetic diversity and effective population size of HPAIV peaked between mid-2005 and early 2006, followed by drastic decline in 2007, which coincides with the end of the epidemic in Europe. Our results also suggest that domestic birds were the most likely source of the spread of the virus from Russia into Europe. Additionally, estimates of viral dispersal routes indicate that Russia, Romania, and Germany were key epicenters of these outbreaks. Our study quantifies the dynamics of a major European HPAIV pandemic and substantiates the ability of phylodynamic models to improve molecular surveillance of novel AIVs. PMID:26110587

  10. Phylodynamics of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Europe, 2005-2010: Potential for Molecular Surveillance of New Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Mohammad A; Moore, Brian R; Perez, Andres M

    2015-01-01

    Previous Bayesian phylogeographic studies of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) explored the origin and spread of the epidemic from China into Russia, indicating that HPAIV circulated in Russia prior to its detection there in 2005. In this study, we extend this research to explore the evolution and spread of HPAIV within Europe during the 2005-2010 epidemic, using all available sequences of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene regions that were collected in Europe and Russia during the outbreak. We use discrete-trait phylodynamic models within a Bayesian statistical framework to explore the evolution of HPAIV. Our results indicate that the genetic diversity and effective population size of HPAIV peaked between mid-2005 and early 2006, followed by drastic decline in 2007, which coincides with the end of the epidemic in Europe. Our results also suggest that domestic birds were the most likely source of the spread of the virus from Russia into Europe. Additionally, estimates of viral dispersal routes indicate that Russia, Romania, and Germany were key epicenters of these outbreaks. Our study quantifies the dynamics of a major European HPAIV pandemic and substantiates the ability of phylodynamic models to improve molecular surveillance of novel AIVs. PMID:26110587

  11. Origin of a New Phytophthora Pathogen through Interspecific Hybridization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Brasier; D. E. L. Cooke; J. M. Duncan

    1999-01-01

    Plant disease epidemics resulting from introductions of exotic fungal plant pathogens are a well known phenomenon. An associated risk--that accelerated pathogen evolution may be occurring as a consequence of genetic exchange between introduced, or introduced and resident, fungal pathogens--is largely unrecognized. This is, in part, because examples of natural, interspecific hybridization in fungi are very rare. Potential evolutionary developments range

  12. Gene-for-Gene Recognition in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian R. Crute

    1994-01-01

    Mediated through specifically matching allele pairs in the host and pathogen (at resistance and avirulence loci respectively), plants have a refined and highly discriminating capability to recognize and differentiate among genetic variants of potential pathogens. Knowledge of pathogen recognition by plants has primarily resulted from research associated with the selective breeding of crop species for disease resistance. The phenomenon is

  13. Haemophilus parainfluenzae infection of respiratory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Middleton, A M; Dowling, R B; Mitchell, J L; Watanabe, S; Rutman, A; Pritchard, K; Tillotson, G; Hill, S L; Wilson, R

    2003-04-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemophilus parainfluenzae (Hpi) in the respiratory tract is unclear, in contrast to the accepted pathogenicity of its close relative non-typable H. influenzae. We have investigated the interaction of two Hpi isolates with the mucosa of adenoid and bronchial tissue organ cultures. The adherence of bacteria to the mucosa of organ cultures, the effect of broth culture filtrates on human nasal epithelium, and interleukin (IL)-8 production by A549 cell cultures was investigated. Hpi 4846 adhered infrequently in clusters of pleomorphic cocco-bacilli to areas of epithelial damage, mucus and unciliated cells in adenoid organ culture experiments at 24 h, but not bronchial mucosa. Hpi 3698 was seen in only one adenoid and no bronchial organ cultures at 24 h. In separate experiments, Hpi 3698 was cleared more rapidly from the centre of the adenoid organ culture and was not cultured at 24 h. Although not adhering to the mucosa at 24 h, Hpi 3698, but not Hpi 4846, caused an increase in the amount of epithelial damage in both types of organ culture. Broth culture filtrates of both strains caused immediate slowing of ciliary beat frequency that progressed, and disrupted epithelial integrity. Dialysed culture filtrates of both strains stimulated IL-8 production by A549 cells, with the culture filtrate of Hpi 3698 being most potent. We conclude that two strains of Hpi varied in their adherence to adenoid tissue, and neither adhered to bronchial tissue. These results lead us to speculate that Hpi is only likely to be a pathogen in the lower respiratory tract when impaired airway defences delay bacterial clearance. PMID:12693797

  14. Improvement of intestinal microflora balance and prevention of digestive and respiratory organ diseases in calves by green tea extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Ishihara; D.-C. Chu; S. Akachi; L. R. Juneja

    2001-01-01

    Green tea extracts (GTE) were evaluated for their effect in inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria isolated from farm animals, their effect on improving intestinal microflora balance, and their effect in preventing digestive and respiratory organ diseases in calves. GTE showed moderate and wide spectrum inhibitory effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria, including seven strains of Staphylococcus spp., seven

  15. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  16. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Guan; K Y Yuen; J S M Peiris

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was caused by a previously unrecognized animal coronavirus that exploited opportunities provided by 'wet markets' in southern China to adapt to become a virus readily transmissible between humans. Hospitals and international travel proved to be 'amplifiers' that permitted a local outbreak to achieve global dimensions. In this review we will discuss the substantial scientific progress

  18. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  19. Acute Exacerbation and Respiratory InfectionS in COPD (AERIS): protocol for a prospective, observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Simon; Cohet, Catherine; Kim, Viktoriya; Barton, Anna; Tuck, Andy; Aris, Emmanuel; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Ballou, W Ripley; Clarke, Stuart; Wilkinson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aetiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains incompletely understood and strategies for treatment and prevention have not altered significantly for many years. Improved understanding of the role of respiratory pathogens in acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is required and the use of molecular microbiological techniques may lead to insights into host–pathogen interactions and the development of more targeted therapeutic approaches. Methods and analyses Acute Exacerbation and Respiratory InfectionS in COPD (AERIS) is a longitudinal epidemiological study to assess how changes in the COPD airway microbiome contribute to the incidence and severity of AECOPD. Patients with COPD aged 40–85 are followed monthly for 2?years, and reviewed within 72?h of onset of symptoms of AECOPD. Exacerbations are detected using daily electronic diary cards. Blood, sputum, nasopharyngeal and urine samples are collected at prespecified timepoints. Molecular diagnostic and typing techniques are used to describe the dynamics of airway infection during AECOPD and stable disease, and associations with clinical outcome. This study aims to refine the case definition of AECOPD to reflect the possible microbiological aetiology. AERIS will assess the impact of AECOPD on health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilisation, and the possible interactions between nutritional status, infection and immune responses. Ethics and dissemination AERIS is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice, and has been approved by the institutional ethics and review board. All participants must provide written informed consent. The results obtained will be disseminated at international medical conferences and in peer-reviewed publications. Discussion Few other studies have addressed the complexity of the microbiological and systemic components of COPD or employed real-time electronic tracking of symptoms to identify AECOPD and potential aetiological triggers. Results Results of AERIS will increase our understanding of the contribution of pathogens to AECOPD, potentially leading to new targeted therapeutic and preventative interventions. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01360398. PMID:24607562

  20. Central mechanisms of respiratory rhythmogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. O. Ayo; N. N. Preobrazhenskii

    1994-01-01

    The organization and role of a respiratory neuronal generator as a part of the medullary respiratory center, including the role of afferent systems in the mechanisms of initiation and regulation of the center cyclic activity, are considered. Intrinsic organization of the respiratory generator and specific features of its functioning are analyzed, and the two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms of

  1. Respiratory failure with hilar mass: Role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Chichra, Astha; Lama, Kimmoi Wong; Koenig, Seth J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man on chronic steroid therapy, who developed a rapidly progressive right upper lobe infiltrate/mass that extended into the right hilum. Respiratory failure necessitated endotracheal intubation. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated without clinical improvement and because of his immunosuppressive therapy opportunistic pathogens were considered. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was performed in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) with rapid onsite evaluation. Specimens obtained from the right hilar mass revealed organisms suspicious for cryptococcal infection, subsequently confirmed via a culture. No complications occurred during the EBUS procedure despite the patient requiring vasopressor support and 100% inspired oxygen. Little data exists regarding the use of EBUS in patients admitted to the MICU with respiratory failure of unknown etiology and mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy. This case illustrates the potential safe use of EBUS-TBNA in patients presenting with respiratory failure, with a mediastinal or hilar mass and suspected infectious etiology. PMID:25814808

  2. Climate change and respiratory disease: European Respiratory Society position statement.

    PubMed

    Ayres, J G; Forsberg, B; Annesi-Maesano, I; Dey, R; Ebi, K L; Helms, P J; Medina-Ramón, M; Windt, M; Forastiere, F

    2009-08-01

    Climate change will affect individuals with pre-existing respiratory disease, but the extent of the effect remains unclear. The present position statement was developed on behalf of the European Respiratory Society in order to identify areas of concern arising from climate change for individuals with respiratory disease, healthcare workers in the respiratory sector and policy makers. The statement was developed following a 2-day workshop held in Leuven (Belgium) in March 2008. Key areas of concern for the respiratory community arising from climate change are discussed and recommendations made to address gaps in knowledge. The most important recommendation was the development of more accurate predictive models for predicting the impact of climate change on respiratory health. Respiratory healthcare workers also have an advocatory role in persuading governments and the European Union to maintain awareness and appropriate actions with respect to climate change, and these areas are also discussed in the position statement. PMID:19251790

  3. Antiviral Activity of Lovastatin against Respiratory Syncytial Virus In Vivo and In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TARA L. GOWER; BARNEY S. GRAHAM

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen that can cause severe and life-threat- ening respiratory infections in infants and immunocompromised adults. We have recently shown that the RSV F glycoprotein, which mediates viral fusion, binds to RhoA. One of the steps in RhoA activation involves isoprenylation at the carboxy terminus of the protein by geranylgeranyltransferase. This modification allows

  4. An Inhibitor of Exported Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Selectively Blocks the Growth of Pathogenic Mycobacteria in Axenic Culture and in Human Monocytes: Extracellular Proteins as Potential Novel Drug Targets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Günter Harth; Marcus A. Horwitz

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria export abundant quantities of pro- teins into their extracellular milieu when growing either axenically or within phagosomes of host cells. One major extracellular protein, the enzyme glutamine synthetase, is of particular in- terest because of its link to pathogenicity. Pathogenic mycobacteria, but not nonpathogenic my- cobacteria, export large amounts of this protein. Interestingly,

  5. Respiratory infections in travelers returning from the tropics.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Lass, Anna; Guzek, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs), beside diarrheas, skin lesions, and fevers of unknown origin, are one of the most common health problems acquired by travelers going to tropical and subtropical countries. Visitors to African, Asian, or South American destinations, typically characterized by harsh environmental conditions and poor sanitation standards, are at risk of exposure to a large number of pathogens causing infectious diseases. The infections are transmitted from contaminated food and water, through the air, direct contact, or by insects. The main modes of RTIs transmission include droplet infection and direct contact. The clinical spectrum of RTIs in travelers is broad, from upper respiratory tract infections, pharyngitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, to influenza-like illness. The spectrum of microbial agents causing respiratory infections include numerous viruses and bacteria, rarely fungi, and parasites. Most travelers complain of mild infections, only a small minority seek medical assistance and report to health care facilities. Because of the risk of importing pathogens into Europe or North America and transferring them onto the local population, it is important to present the scale of the problem in relation to rapid development of tourism industry and an increasing number of intercontinental journeys. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of travel-related respiratory infections among representatives of temperate climate traveling to and returning from the tropics. PMID:25381557

  6. Simultaneous detection of respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory infection using two different multiplex reverse transcription-PCR assays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Wang; Peijun Ren; Jun Sheng; Sek Mardy; Huajie Yan; Jing Zhang; Lili Hou; Astrid Vabret; Philippe Buchy; Francois Freymuth; Vincent Deubel

    2009-01-01

    A 4-tube multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), which showed higher sensitivity over conventional methods, was previously developed for the diagnosis of 14 viral pathogens of the respiratory tract. Herein the mRT-PCR was compared to the commercial Luminex mPCR-microsphere flow cytometry assay (Resplex II) which allows the detection of 12 different viruses. Eleven different viruses were identified in 91 nasopharyngeal swabs of children

  7. Manure UseManure Use lthough manure is a valuable source of nutrients, it is also one of the greatest potential sources of pathogens that can

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in manure slurries or in the soil for three months or more. Human manure, raw or composted, should never be used on food crops because of the increased risk of contamination with harmful microorganisms that cause diseases in humans. The following steps will help you reduce potential contamination from other

  8. Evaluation of the risks of shedding Salmonellae and other potential pathogens by therapy dogs fed raw diets in Ontario and Alberta.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, S L; Reid-Smith, R; Boerlin, P; Weese, J S

    2008-10-01

    Dogs that participate in animal-assisted interventions (AAIs), often called 'therapy dogs', commonly interact with humans whose immune systems are not functioning optimally. The advisability of feeding raw meat (including poultry) to these animals remains a highly contentious issue, in spite of increasing evidence that raw meat is frequently contaminated with Salmonella. We set out to determine if consuming raw meat influences the risk of therapy dogs shedding Salmonella and other pathogens. Two hundred healthy therapy dogs from Ontario and Alberta were enrolled. Between May 2005 and November 2006, fecal specimens were collected from each dog every 2 months for 1 year, along with a log of places visited, antimicrobial use within the home, dog health status and diet. Specimens were cultured for Salmonella, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum cephalosporinase (ESC) Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile. Forty (20%) of the dogs were reported to have been fed raw meat at some point during the year. The incidence rate of Salmonella shedding in the raw meat-fed dogs was 0.61 cases/dog-year, compared with 0.08 cases/dog-year in dogs that were not fed raw meat (P<0.001). Controlling for therapy dog group, the repeated measures, and pig ear consumption and diarrhoea in the 2 months prior to specimen submission, dogs that consumed raw meat were significantly more likely to test positive for Salmonella at least once during the year than dogs that did not eat raw meat [odds ratio (OR) 22.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.1-58.8; P<0.001]. Specific Salmonella serovars were more common among dogs that consumed raw meat versus those that did not include S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg and S. Kentucky. Raw meat consumption was also significantly associated with shedding ESC E. coli (OR 17.2; 95% CI 9.4-32.3). No associations between C. difficile, MRSA or VRE and consumption of raw meat were detected. We recommend that dogs fed raw meat should be excluded from AAI programmes, particularly when the programmes involve interaction with humans at high risk of infection or adverse sequelae attributable to infection. Furthermore, although AAI dogs may not be representative of the general population of dogs, we also recommend that feeding of raw meat to dogs is to be avoided in homes where immunocompromised people live. PMID:18811908

  9. Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

  10. Pathobiological features of a novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Choi, Eun-Ji; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Shim, Woo-Sub; Kim, Si-Wook; Mo, In-Pil; Bae, Yeonji; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2014-01-01

    The endemicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) viruses in Asia has led to the generation of reassortant H5 strains with novel gene constellations. A newly emerged HPAI A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks in the Republic of Korea in 2014. Because newly emerging high-pathogenicity H5 viruses continue to pose public health risks, it is imperative that their pathobiological properties be examined. Here, we characterized A/mallard duck/Korea/W452/2014 (MDk/W452(H5N8)), a representative virus, and evaluated its pathogenic and pandemic potential in various animal models. We found that MDk/W452(H5N8), which originated from the reassortment of wild bird viruses harbored by migratory waterfowl in eastern China, replicated systemically and was lethal in chickens, but appeared to be attenuated, albeit efficiently transmitted, in ducks. Despite predominant attachment to avian-like virus receptors, MDk/W452(H5N8) also exhibited detectable human virus-like receptor binding and replicated in human respiratory tract tissues. In mice, MDk/W452(H5N8) was moderately pathogenic and had limited tissue tropism relative to previous HPAI A(H5N1) viruses. It also induced moderate nasal wash titers in inoculated ferrets; additionally, it was recovered in extrapulmonary tissues and one of three direct-contact ferrets seroconverted without shedding. Moreover, domesticated cats appeared to be more susceptible than dogs to virus infection. With their potential to become established in ducks, continued circulation of A(H5N8) viruses could alter the genetic evolution of pre-existing avian poultry strains. Overall, detailed virological investigation remains a necessity given the capacity of H5 viruses to evolve to cause human illness with few changes in the viral genome. PMID:26038499

  11. Respiratory fluid mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Grotberg, James B.

    2011-01-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from “capillary-elastic instabilities,” as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the “oscillating butter knife;” liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg–Borgas–Gaver shock. PMID:21403768

  12. Potential Role of Diploscapter sp. Strain LKC25, a Bacterivorous Nematode from Soil, as a Vector of Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria to Preharvest Fruits and Vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daunte S. Gibbs; Gary L. Anderson; Larry R. Beuchat; Lynn K. Carta; Phillip L. Williams

    2005-01-01

    Diploscapter, a thermotolerant, free-living soil bacterial-feeding nematode commonly found in compost, sewage, and agricultural soil in the United States, was studied to determine its potential role as a vehicle of Salmonella enterica serotype Poona, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes in contaminating preharvest fruits and vegetables. The ability of Diploscapter sp. strain LKC25 to survive on agar media, in

  13. Potentially pathogenic and biocontrol Ascomycota associated with green wall structures of basket willow ( Salix viminalis L.) revealed by phenotypic characters and ITS phylogeny

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Vujanovic; Michel Labrecque

    2008-01-01

    Ascomycota are among the fungi that cause serious willow diseases in all natural habitats worldwide. This study was conducted\\u000a to determine if basket willow used in green wall structures (GWS) built of willow stems were infected by potentially important\\u000a fungal diseases or their antagonists in urban areas of eastern Canada. In total, 13 different phenotypic genera belonging\\u000a to eight families

  14. Synthetic brominated furanone F202 prevents biofilm formation by potentially human pathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 and Salmonella ser. Agona on abiotic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Vestby, LK; Johannesen, KCS; Witsø, IL; Habimana, O; Scheie, AA; Urdahl, AM; Benneche, T; Langsrud, S; Nesse, LL

    2014-01-01

    Aims Investigate the use of a synthetic brominated furanone (F202) against the establishment of biofilm by Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 under temperature conditions relevant for the food and feed industry as well as under temperature conditions optimum for growth. Methods and Results Effect of F202 on biofilm formation by Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 was evaluated using a microtiter plate assay and confocal microscopy. Effect of F202 on bacterial motility was investigated using swimming and swarming assays. Influence on flagellar synthesis by F202 was examined by flagellar staining. Results showed that F202 inhibited biofilm formation without being bactericidal. F202 was found to affect both swimming and swarming motility without, however, affecting the expression of flagella. Conclusions F202 showed its potential as a biofilm inhibitor of Salmonella ser. Agona and E. coli O103:H2 under temperature conditions relevant for the feed and food industry as well as temperatures optimum for growth. One potential mode of action of F202 was found to be by targeting flagellar function. Significance and Impact of the Study The present study gives valuable new knowledge to the potential use of furanones as a tool in biofilm management in the food and feed industry. PMID:24118802

  15. Dual Role of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein Fragment as a Mucosal Immunogen and Chemotactic Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sol; Joo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jee-Boong; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Cheon, In Su; Jang, Ji-Eun; Song, Ho-Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in infancy and early childhood. Despite its importance as a pathogen, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent RSV infection. The G glycoprotein of RSV, a major attachment protein, is a potentially important target for protective antiviral immune responses and has been shown to exhibit chemotactic activity through CX3C mimicry. Here, we show that sublingual or intranasal immunization of a purified G protein fragment of amino acids from 131 to 230, designated Gcf, induces strong serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses. Interestingly, these antibody responses could be elicited by Gcf even in the absence of any adjuvant, indicating a novel self-adjuvanting property of our vaccine candidate. Gcf exhibited potent chemotactic activity in in vitro cell migration assay and cysteine residues are necessary for chemotactic activity and self-adjuvanticity of Gcf in vivo. Mucosal immunization with Gcf also provides protection against RSV challenge without any significant lung eosinophilia or vaccine-induced weight loss. Together, our data demonstrate that mucosal administration of Gcf vaccine elicits beneficial protective immunity and represents a promising vaccine regimen preventing RSV infection. PMID:22384186

  16. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-01-01

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task. PMID:26021823

  17. Urine antigen tests for the diagnosis of respiratory infections: legionellosis, histoplasmosis, pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Marc Roger; Graf, Erin H; Griffin, Allen T

    2014-06-01

    Urinary antigen testing has grown in popularity for several significant respiratory infections, particularly Legionella pneumophila, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Histoplasma capsulatum. By capitalizing on the concentration of shed antigen from a variety of pathogens in the kidneys for excretion in the urine, urinary antigen testing can be used to obtain rapid test results related to respiratory infection, independent of an invasive collection such as a bronchoalveolar lavage. This article describes the 3 aforementioned organisms, their role in respiratory disease, and the current status of urinary antigen testing in their respective diagnosis. PMID:24856525

  18. Arthropods vector grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moyo, P; Allsopp, E; Roets, F; Mostert, L; Halleen, F

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Arthropod-mediated dispersal of pathogens is known in many cropping systems but has never been demonstrated for grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Arthropods from vineyards were screened for the presence of pathogens associated with Petri disease and esca using cultural and molecular techniques. The ability of the most abundant pathogen-carrying species to inoculate healthy grapevine vascular tissues was also determined. Millipedes and ants were allowed to associate with a DsRed- Express-transformed Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, after which they were exposed to freshly pruned healthy grapevines under controlled conditions and wounds were monitored for subsequent infection. In addition, the possibility of millipede excreta, commonly found on pruning wounds in the field, to act as inoculum source was determined. A diverse arthropod fauna was associated with declining grapevines and many of these carried trunk disease pathogens. However, spiders, the ant Crematogaster peringueyi, and the millipede Ommattoiulus moreleti were the most abundant pathogen carriers. The ant and millipede species fed on pruning wound sap and effectively transmitted trunk disease pathogens. Millipede excreta contained viable spores of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and may serve as an inoculum source. Numerous arthropods, including beneficial predators, are potential vectors of grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Our results highlight the need for an integrated approach, including targeted management of ants and millipedes at the time of pruning, to limit the spread of grapevine trunk diseases. PMID:24624953

  19. Diversity and adaptation of human respiratory syncytial virus genotypes circulating in two distinct communities: public hospital and day care center.

    PubMed

    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo Araujo; Simas, Paulo Vitor Marques; Gomes, Deriane Elias; do Bonfim, Caroline Measso; Nogueira, Felipe Cavassan; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; Carareto, Claudia Márcia Aparecida; Rahal, Paula; de Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2012-11-01

    HRSV is one of the most important pathogens causing acute respiratory tract diseases as bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants. HRSV was isolated from two distinct communities, a public day care center and a public hospital in São José do Rio Preto - SP, Brazil. We obtained partial sequences from G gene that were used on phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis. HRSV accounted for 29% of respiratory infections in hospitalized children and 7.7% in day care center children. On phylogenetic analysis of 60 HRSV strains, 48 (80%) clustered within or adjacent to the GA1 genotype; GA5, NA1, NA2, BA-IV and SAB1 were also observed. SJRP GA1 strains presented variations among deduced amino acids composition and lost the potential O-glycosilation site at amino acid position 295, nevertheless this resulted in an insertion of two potential O-glycosilation sites at positions 296 and 297. Furthermore, a potential O-glycosilation site insertion, at position 293, was only observed for hospital strains. Using SLAC and MEME methods, only amino acid 274 was identified to be under positive selection. This is the first report on HRSV circulation and genotypes classification derived from a day care center community in Brazil. PMID:23202489

  20. Incidence of respiratory viruses among travelers with a febrile syndrome returning from tropical and subtropical areas.

    PubMed

    Camps, M; Vilella, A; Marcos, M A; Letang, E; Muñoz, J; Salvadó, E; González, A; Gascón, J; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Pumarola, T

    2008-04-01

    Fifty million people are estimated to travel from industrial countries to the tropics annually. In spite of exhaustive studies and widely different diagnosis among returned patients, some cases of febrile illnesses remain without an etiological diagnosis, suggesting that these cases could be due to viral respiratory tract infections. From August 2005 to October 2006, 118 febrile patients without a specific diagnosis in their first visit at the Center for International Health of the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona were included. In all of them, in order to study respiratory viruses, a nasopharyngeal swab was collected. Clinical and radiological features and epidemiological data, as well as other samples for microbiologic studies, were also collected during consultation. Based on the physician's judgment at the time of consultation, patients were classified into four groups: respiratory symptoms (62%), febrile syndrome with nonspecific symptoms (24%), digestive symptoms (10%), and patients presenting both respiratory and digestive symptoms (4%). A pathogen microorganism was detected in 61 patients (52%). Respiratory viruses were detected in 44 out of 118 (37%) travelers included in the study, representing 56% of the patients with respiratory symptoms. The most frequently viruses detected were influenza virus (38%), rhinovirus (23%), adenovirus (9%), and respiratory syncytial virus (9%). Respiratory viruses have been shown to play an important role in imported fever. In light of the fact that international tourism is an increasing phenomenon, new strategies to prevent the spread of respiratory viruses should be considered, specially for influenza when a vaccine is available. PMID:18297697

  1. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Carifi, Marco; Napolitano, Domenico; Morandi, Morando; Dall’Olio, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Although recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a benign disease of the upper aerodigestive tract caused by infection with human papillomavirus, the disease process is unpredictable, ranging from mild disease and spontaneous remission to an aggressive disease with pulmonary spread and requirement for frequent surgical debulking procedures. It can present a protracted clinical course and cause potentially life-threatening compromise of the airways. Over recent decades, a number of alternative medical therapies to standard surgical treatment have been investigated, with modest outcomes overall. Currently, some additional therapies are being explored, together with novel surgical instrumentation that can help to avoid inevitable long-term stenotic complications, ultimately affecting quality of life. Hopefully, clinicians might soon be able to significantly improve the quality of treatment and outcomes for patients affected with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, with human papillomavirus vaccination having a potentially important role. PMID:25999724

  2. Pathogenic obesity and nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Conroy, K P; Davidson, I M; Warnock, M

    2011-11-01

    Over a decade of intense research in the field of obesity has led to the knowledge that chronic, excessive adipose tissue expansion leads to an increase in the risk for CVD, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer. This is primarily thought to stem from the low-grade, systemic inflammatory response syndrome that characterises adipose tissue in obesity, and this itself is thought to arise from the complex interplay of factors including metabolic endotoxaemia, increased plasma NEFA, hypertrophic adipocytes and localised hypoxia. Plasma concentrations of vitamins and antioxidants are lower in obese individuals than in the non-obese, which is hypothesised to negatively affect the development of inflammation and disease in obesity. This paper provides a review of the current literature investigating the potential of nutraceuticals to ameliorate the development of oxidative stress and inflammation in obesity, thereby limiting the onset of obesity complications. Research has found nutraceuticals able to positively modulate the activity of adipocyte cell lines and further positive effects have been found in other aspects of pathogenic obesity. While their ability to affect weight loss is still controversial, it is clear that they have a great potential to reverse the development of overweight and obesity-related comorbidities; this, however, still requires much research especially that utilising well-structured randomised controlled trials. PMID:21854698

  3. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  4. Pathogen and host genotype differently affect pathogen fitness through their effects on different life-history stages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation of pathogens to their hosts depends critically on factors affecting pathogen reproductive rate. While pathogen reproduction is the end result of an intricate interaction between host and pathogen, the relative contributions of host and pathogen genotype to variation in pathogen life history within the host are not well understood. Untangling these contributions allows us to identify traits with sufficient genetic variation for selection to act and to identify mechanisms of coevolution between pathogens and their hosts. We investigated the effects of pathogen and host genotype on three life-history components of pathogen fitness; infection efficiency, latent period, and sporulation capacity, in the oat crown rust fungus, Puccinia coronata f.sp. avenae, as it infects oats (Avena sativa). Results We show that both pathogen and host genotype significantly affect total spore production but do so through their effects on different life-history stages. Pathogen genotype has the strongest effect on the early stage of infection efficiency, while host genotype most strongly affects the later life-history stages of latent period and sporulation capacity. In addition, host genotype affected the relationship between pathogen density and the later life-history traits of latent period and sporulation capacity. We did not find evidence of pathogen-by-host genotypic (GxG) interactions. Conclusion Our results illustrate mechanisms by which variation in host populations will affect the evolution of pathogen life history. Results show that different pathogen life-history stages have the potential to respond differently to selection by host or pathogen genotype and suggest mechanisms of antagonistic coevolution. Pathogen populations may adapt to host genotypes through increased infection efficiency while their plant hosts may adapt by limiting the later stages of pathogen growth and spore production within the host. PMID:22857005

  5. Killing of anaerobic pathogens by predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Essche, M; Quirynen, M; Sliepen, I; Loozen, G; Boon, N; Van Eldere, J; Teughels, W

    2011-02-01

    Recently, the predation of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on a periodontal pathogen has been described. The current study explores the potential antimicrobial activity of a range of predatory bacteria against key periodontal pathogens. A number of representatives from the Bdellovibrio, Bacteriovorax and Peredibacter lineages (called 'BALOs') were tested for their activity towards a group of key periodontal pathogens and an optimal multiplicity of infection was established. As the oral cavity contains a wide variety of bacteria that are not preyed upon, it was investigated if they can have an effect on the predation efficiency of BALOs. It was concluded that a number of important variables involved in bacterial predation are found to be compatible with the composition of the oral microbiota. This finding makes the case for continued study of the potential for BALOs to combat periodontal pathogens. PMID:21214872

  6. Killing of anaerobic pathogens by predatory bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Van Essche; M. Quirynen; I. Sliepen; G. Loozen; N. Boon; J. Van Eldere; W. Teughels

    2011-01-01

    PRecently, the predation of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on a periodontal\\u000a pathogen has been described. The current study explores the potential\\u000a antimicrobial activity of a range of predatory bacteria against key\\u000a periodontal pathogens. A number of representatives from the\\u000a Bdellovibrio, Bacteriovorax and Peredibacter lineages (called `BALOs')\\u000a were tested for their activity towards a group of key periodontal\\u000a pathogens and an optimal multiplicity

  7. Differentially-expressed genes in rice infected by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae relative to a flagellin-deficient mutant reveal potential functions of flagellin in host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved a sensitive defense response system that detects and recognizes various pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (e.g. flagellin) and induces immune responses to protect against invasion. Transcriptional responses in rice to PAMPs produced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the bacterial blight pathogen, have not yet been defined. Results We characterized transcriptomic responses in rice inoculated with the wildtype (WT) Xoo and flagellin-deficient mutant ?fliC through RNA-seq analysis. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis based on Solexa/Illumina sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic responses in 30 day-old seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare). 1,680 genes were differentially-expressed (DEGs) in rice inoculated with WT relative to ?fliC; among which 1,159 genes were up-regulated and 521 were down-regulated. Expression patterns of 12 randomly-selected DEGs assayed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) were similar to those detected by DGE analyses, confirming reliability of the DGE data. Functional annotations revealed the up-regulated DEGs are involved in the cell wall, lipid and secondary metabolism, defense response and hormone signaling, whereas the down-regulated ones are associated with photosynthesis. Moreover, 57 and 21 specifically expressed genes were found after WT and ?fliC treatments, respectively. Conclusions DEGs were identified in rice inoculated with WT Xoo relative to ?fliC. These genes were predicted to function in multiple biological processes, including the defense response and photosynthesis in rice. This study provided additional insights into molecular basis of rice response to bacterial infection and revealed potential functions of bacterial flagellin in the rice-Xoo interactions. PMID:25187853

  8. Respiratory syncitial virus in children with acute respiratory infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hemalatha; G. Krishna Swetha; M. Seshacharyulu; K. V. Radhakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Objective  To study the nutritional status of children with Respiratory Syncitial virus infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  One hundred and twenty six children with acute respiratory infection, between the age of 4–24 months, were investigated for\\u000a RSV infection with bronchiolitis, pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infection. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected\\u000a and cytokine responses were determined by ELISA. Upper respiratory tract infections were detected in 16.66%,

  9. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  10. Quantification of mRNA encoding cytokines and chemokines and assessment of ciliary function in canine tracheal epithelium during infection with canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV).

    PubMed

    Priestnall, Simon L; Mitchell, Judy A; Brooks, Harriet W; Brownlie, Joe; Erles, Kerstin

    2009-01-15

    One of the first lines of defence against viral infection is the innate immune response and the induction of antiviral type I interferons (IFNs). However some viruses, including the group 2 coronaviruses, have evolved mechanisms to overcome or circumvent the host antiviral response. Canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) has previously been shown to have a widespread international presence and has been implicated in outbreaks of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD). This study aimed to quantify pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs following infection of canine air-interface tracheal cultures with CRCoV. Within this system, immunohistochemistry identified ciliated epithelial and goblet cells as positive for CRCoV, identical to naturally infected cases, thus the data obtained would be fully transferable to the situation in vivo. An assay of ciliary function was used to assess potential effects of CRCoV on the mucociliary system. CRCoV was shown to reduce the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6 and the chemokine IL-8 during the 72 h post-inoculation. The mechanism for this is unknown, however the suppression of a key antiviral strategy during a period of physiologic and immunological stress, such as on entry to a kennel, could potentially predispose a dog to further pathogenic challenge and the development of respiratory disease. PMID:18977539

  11. Chemical proteomics of host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingyan; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-04-23

    In less than two decades, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) has expanded to become the de facto tool for the study of small molecule-protein interactions in a proteomic environment. In this issue, Na et al. (2015) present another ABPP method, which they called reactive probe-based chemical proteomics, to study host-pathogen interaction and subsequently identify the protein PheA as a potential key effector during the pathogen infection process. PMID:25910239

  12. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Osborn, C.L.; Ryan, J.N.; Cunningham, K.J.; Landkamer, L.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 ??m diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 ??m microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 ??m microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 ??m microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 ??m oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Renken, Robert A.; Osborn, Christina L.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Landkamer, Lee

    2008-08-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 ?m diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 ?m microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 ?m microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 ?m microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 ?m oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account.

  14. Resistance breeding against nonnative pathogens in forest trees — current successes in North America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Sniezko

    2006-01-01

    Nonnative invasive pathogens have decimated North American forests for over 100 years, and additional pathogens continue to arrive. These pathogens are destined to be permanent fixtures in the ecosystem. In many cases, management activities have been unsuccessful in slowing the spread of these pathogens or in restoring forests. Genetic resistance potentially provides an invaluable management tool for restoring these species

  15. [Determination of the antimicrobial capacity of green tea (Camellia sinensis) against the potentially pathogenic microorganisms Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger].

    PubMed

    Mora, Andreína; Pawa, Jonathan; Chaverri, José M; Arias, María Laura

    2013-09-01

    Many studies can be found in scientific literature demonstrating the antimicrobial capacity of different herbs, including green tea. Never-theless, many results are divergent or cannot be compared. Several green tea formulations may be found in market, but there is scarce or non-information about its activity. In this work, the potential antimicrobial effect of 50 samples of dry green tea and in 10% infusion against Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger distributed in the metropolitan area of Costa Rica, was determined. This activity was compared with the effect produced by Chinese origin green tea (Camellia sinensis). Different solvents were evaluated for preparing polyphenol enriched extracts from green tea samples. Total phenols were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu spectrophotometric methodology, using galic acid as reference. Antimicrobial activity of green tea extracts and infusions was evaluated using the microplate methodology described by Breuking (2006). Ethanol was the most efficient solvent used for the polyphenol extractions. There was no antimicrobial effect of the different green tea extracts and infusions against the microorganisms evaluated, except for Listeria monocytogenes, where the extracts of 70% of samples analyzed and the control showed an inhibitory effect in the 10.5 mg/mL and 1.05 mg/L concentrations. None of the infusions tested, including the control, showed any effect against this bacteria. PMID:25362825

  16. Enemies and turncoats: bovine tuberculosis exposes pathogenic potential of Rift Valley fever virus in a common host, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Beechler, B R; Manore, C A; Reininghaus, B; O'Neal, D; Gorsich, E E; Ezenwa, V O; Jolles, A E

    2015-04-22

    The ubiquity and importance of parasite co-infections in populations of free-living animals is beginning to be recognized, but few studies have demonstrated differential fitness effects of single infection versus co-infection in free-living populations. We investigated interactions between the emerging bacterial disease bovine tuberculosis (BTB) and the previously existing viral disease Rift Valley fever (RVF) in a competent reservoir host, African buffalo, combining data from a natural outbreak of RVF in captive buffalo at a buffalo breeding facility in 2008 with data collected from a neighbouring free-living herd of African buffalo in Kruger National Park. RVF infection was twice as likely in individual BTB+ buffalo as in BTB- buffalo, which, according to a mathematical model, may increase RVF outbreak size at the population level. In addition, co-infection was associated with a far higher rate of fetal abortion than other infection states. Immune interactions between BTB and RVF may underlie both of these interactions, since animals with BTB had decreased innate immunity and increased pro-inflammatory immune responses. This study is one of the first to demonstrate how the consequences of emerging infections extend beyond direct effects on host health, potentially altering the dynamics and fitness effects of infectious diseases that had previously existed in the ecosystem on free-ranging wildlife populations. PMID:25788592

  17. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gupta, Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection is gaining importance as an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia due to its characteristic inherent resistance to many broad- spectrum antibiotics. In this study we evaluated the demographic, clinical and microbiological profile of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients diagnosed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lower respiratory tract infections during a period of two years from 2012 - 2013 was done. Results: The predominant predisposing factor observed was mechanical ventilation in 17(51.5%) cases. Fluoroquinolones were the most effective antibiotic (26;78.8%) followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24;72.7%). Among the 19 patients treated with proper antibiotic, 13(68.4%) showed clinical improvement. Among the 14 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection, 8(57.1%) showed improvement. Two (6%) had blood culture positive for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Mortality rate was 21.2%. Conclusion: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with increased risk in patients on mechanical ventilation in ICU. Empiric therapy should include agents active against S.maltophilia such as newer flouroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:25653948

  18. A murine model for low molecular weight chemicals: differentiation of respiratory sensitizers (TMA) from contact sensitizers (DNFB)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise M Sailstad; Marsha D. W Ward; Elizabeth H Boykin; MaryJane K Selgrade

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) chemicals contributes to both dermal and respiratory sensitization and is an important occupational health problem. Our goal was to establish an in vivo murine model for hazard identification of LMW chemicals that have the potential to induce respiratory hypersensitivity (RH). We used a dermal sensitization protocol followed by a respiratory challenge with the evaluation

  19. Host–pathogen interactions and immune evasion strategies in Francisella tularensis pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Don J; Furuya, Yoichi; Metzger, Dennis W

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that causes life-threatening tularemia. Although the prevalence of natural infection is low, F. tularensis remains a tier I priority pathogen due to its extreme virulence and ease of aerosol dissemination. F. tularensis can infect a host through multiple routes, including the intradermal and respiratory routes. Respiratory infection can result from a very small inoculum (ten organisms or fewer) and is the most lethal form of infection. Following infection, F. tularensis employs strategies for immune evasion that delay the immune response, permitting systemic distribution and induction of sepsis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of F. tularensis in an immunological context, with emphasis on the host response and bacterial evasion of that response. PMID:25258544

  20. Genetic characterization of human coxsackievirus A6 variants associated with atypical hand, foot and mouth disease: a potential role of recombination in emergence and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Eleanor; Harvala, Heli; Österback, Riikka; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Thomson, Emma; Waris, Matti; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Human coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) is an enterically transmitted enterovirus. Until recently, CVA6 infections were considered as being of minor clinical significance, and only rarely aetiologically linked with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) associated with other species A enteroviruses (particularly EV71 and CVA16). From 2008 onwards, however, CVA6 infections have been associated with several outbreaks worldwide of atypical HFMD (aHFMD) accompanied by a varicelliform rash. We recently reported CVA6-associated eczema herpeticum occurring predominantly in children and young adults in Edinburgh in January and February 2014. To investigate genetic determinants of novel clinical phenotypes of CVA6, we genetically characterized and analysed CVA6 variants associated with eczema herpeticum in Edinburgh in 2014 and those with aHFMD in CAV isolates collected from 2008. A total of eight recombinant forms (RFs) have circulated worldwide over the past 10 years, with the particularly recent appearance of RF-H associated with eczema herpeticum cases in Edinburgh in 2014. Comparison of phylogenies and divergence of complete genome sequences of CVA6 identified recombination breakpoints in 2A-2C, within VP3, and between 5' untranslated region and VP1. A Bayesian temporal reconstruction of CVA6 evolution since 2004 provided estimates of dates and the actual recombination events that generated more recently appearing recombination groups (RF-E, -F, -G and -H). Associations were observed between recombination groups and clinical presentations of herpangina, aHFMD and eczema herpeticum, but not with VP1 or other structural genes. These observations provided evidence that NS gene regions may potentially contribute to clinical phenotypes and outcomes of CVA6 infection. PMID:25614593

  1. The Exochelins of Pathogenic Mycobacteria: Unique, Highly Potent, Lipid- and Water-Soluble Hexadentate Iron Chelators with Multiple Potential Therapeutic Uses

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Lawrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Exochelins are lipid- and water-soluble siderophores of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with unique properties that endow them with exceptional pharmacologic utility. Exochelins can be utilized as probes to decipher the role of iron in normal and pathological states, and, since they rapidly cross cell membranes and chelate intracellular iron with little or no toxicity, exochelins are potentially useful for the treatment of a number of iron-dependent pathological phenomena. Recent Advances: In animal models, exochelins have been demonstrated to have promise for the treatment of transfusion-related iron overload, restenosis after coronary artery angioplasty, cancer, and oxidative injury associated with acute myocardial infarction and transplantation. Critical Issues: To be clinically effective, iron chelators should be able to rapidly enter cells and chelate iron at key intracellular sites. Desferri-exochelins, and other lipid-soluble chelators, can readily cross cell membranes and remove intracellular free iron; whereas deferoxamine, which is lipid insoluble, cannot do so. Clinical utility also requires that the chelators be nontoxic, which, we hypothesize, includes the capability to prevent iron from catalyzing free radical reactions which produce •OH or other reactive oxygen species. Lipid-soluble iron chelators currently available for clinical application are bidentate (deferiprone) or tridentate (desferasirox) molecules that do not block all six sites on the iron molecule capable of catalyzing free radical reactions. In contrast, desferri-exochelins are hexadentate molecules, and by forming a one-to-one binding relationship with iron, they prevent free radical reactions. Future Directions: Clinical studies are needed to assess the utility of desferri-exochelins in the treatment of iron-dependent pathological disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2246–2261. PMID:24684595

  2. Plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monica Höfte; PAUL DE VOS

    In the current taxonomy, plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are restricted to rRNA group I organisms belonging to the Gamma subclass of Proteobacteria. Currently, about 21 validly described plant pathogenic Pseudomonas species are known. The most important species is P. syringae with more than 50 described pathovars. The pathovar concept is confusing and the taxonomy of P. syringae needs revision. P.

  3. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of new foodborne pathogens is due to a number of factors. An important factor is the globalization of the food supply with the possibility of the introduction of foodborne pathogens from other countries. Animal husbandry, food production, food processing, and food distribution system...

  4. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert V. Tauxe

    2002-01-01

    The broad spectrum of foodborne infections has changed dramatically over time, as well-established pathogens have been controlled or eliminated, and new ones have emerged. The burden of foodborne disease remains substantial: one in four Americans is estimated to have a significant foodborne illness each year. The majority of these illnesses are not accounted for by known pathogens, so more must

  5. Respiratory Therapy and Respiratory Therapy Technician. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of respiratory therapy and respiratory therapy technician programs. An occupational description and program content are presented. The curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content,…

  6. Effects of a new photoactivatable cationic porphyrin on ciliated protozoa and branchiopod crustaceans, potential components of freshwater ecosystems polluted by pathogenic agents and their vectors.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Clara; Soncin, Marina; Jori, Giulio; Habluetzel, Annette; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Sawadogo, Simon; Guidolin, Laura; Coppellotti, Olimpia

    2012-02-01

    The increasing use of photosensitized processes for disinfection of microbiologically polluted waters requires a precise definition of the factors controlling the degree of photosensitivity in target and non-target organisms. In this regard, tests with protozoa and invertebrates which have a natural habitat in such waters may be used as first screening methods for the assessment of possible hazards for the ecosystem. A new cationic porphyrin, namely meso-tri(N-methyl-pyridyl)mono(N-dodecyl-pyridyl)porphine (C12), is tested in this work on the protozoan Ciliophora Colpoda inflata and Tetrahymena thermophila and the Crustacea Branchiopoda Artemia franciscana and Daphnia magna. The protocol involved 1 h incubation with porphyrin doses in the 0.1-10.0 ?M range and subsequent irradiation with visible light at a fluence rate of 10 mW cm(-2). The results indicate that C12 porphyrin has a significant affinity for C. inflata and T. thermophila; this is also shown by fluorescence microscopic analyses. C. inflata cysts were resistant to the phototreatment up to a porphyrin dose of 0.6 ?M. The effects of C12 on cysts have been evaluated at 3 and 24 h after the end of the phototreatment; a delay in the excystment process was observed. T. thermophila was fairly resistant to the phototreatment with C12 porphyrin. The data obtained with the two crustaceans indicated that the effects of dark- and photo-treatment with C12 need to be closely examined for every organism. A. franciscana is more resistant, probably owing to its ability to adapt to extreme conditions, while the high level of photosensitivity displayed by Daphnia magna represents a potential drawback, as this organism is often selected as a reference standard for assessing the environmental safety. Thus, while C12 photosensitisation can represent a useful tool for inducing a microbicidal or larvicidal action on polluted waters, the irradiation protocols must be carefully tailored to the nature of the specific water basin, and in particular to its biotic characteristics. PMID:22011789

  7. Processes for managing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Godfree, Alan; Farrell, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater contains human, animal, and plant pathogens capable of causing viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections. There are several routes whereby sewage pathogens may affect human health, including direct contact, contamination of food crops, zoonoses, and vectors. The range and numbers of pathogens in municipal wastewater vary with the level of endemic disease in the community, discharges from commercial activities, and seasonal factors. Regulations to control pathogen risk in the United States and Europe arising from land application of biosolids are based on the concept of multiple barriers to the prevention of transmission. The barriers are (i) treatment to reduce pathogen content and vector attraction, (ii) restrictions on crops grown on land to which biosolids have been applied, and (iii) minimum intervals following application and grazing or harvesting. Wastewater treatment reduces number of pathogens in the wastewater by concentrating them with the solids in the sludge. Although some treatment processes are designed specifically to inactivate pathogens, many are not, and the actual mechanisms of microbial inactivation are not fully understood for all processes. Vector attraction is reduced by stabilization (reduction of readily biodegradable material) and/or incorporation immediately following application. Concerns about health risks have renewed interest in the effects of treatment (on pathogens) and advanced treatment methods, and work performed in the United States suggests that Class A pathogen reduction can be achieved less expensively than previously thought. Effective pathogen risk management requires control to the complete chain of sludge treatment, biosolids handling and application, and post-application activities. This may be achieved by adherence to quality management systems based on hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) principles. PMID:15647539

  8. Neonatal Sepsis: Staphylococcus aureus as the predominant pathogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Karthikeyan; K. Premkumar

    2001-01-01

    96 consecutive inborn neonates with blood culture proven bacterial sepsis during the period January to June 1997 were studied.\\u000a Lethargy with refusal of feeds (28%), fever (28%) and respiratory distress (31.3%) were the major presenting features. Half\\u000a of them (n=48) were of early onset ( 48 hours). Staphylococcus aureus\\u000a (n=59, 61.5%) was the predominant pathogen and 66% of them were

  9. Identification of a mannheimia haemolytica genetic subtype that causes bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a serious health and economic problem that costs the United States cattle industry over a billion dollars annually. Mannheimia haemolytica is a major bacterial component of BRDC. An opportunistic pathogen, M. haemolytica resides within the upper respira...

  10. Anti-chlamydial IgG Neutralizing Ability in Nonzoonotic Atypical Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Pignanelli, Salvatore; Pulcrano, Giovanna; Iula, Vita Dora; Shurdhi, Alisa

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a pathogenic agent, involved in various types of infection. This study has evaluated the ability of IgG antibodies in outpatient, with acute respiratory tract infections from C. pneumoniae, to neutralize in vitro purified elementary bodies of this bacterium, revealing a good neutralizing performance of IgG antibodies. PMID:26063946

  11. Role of CCL11 in Eosinophilic Lung Disease during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen P. Matthews; John S. Tregoning; Anthony J. Coyle; Tracy Hussell; Peter J. M. Openshaw

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral pathogen of infants and the elderly. Significant morbidity is caused by an overexuberant mixed lung cell infiltrate, which is thought to be driven by chemokines. One of the main chemotactic mediators responsible for the movement of eosinophils is CCL11 (eotaxin). Using a mouse model of eosinophilic bronchiolitis induced by RSV, we show

  12. Respiratory immune responses in the chicken : Towards development of mucosal avian influenza virus vaccines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. D. de Geus

    2012-01-01

    Several important poultry pathogens, including avian influenza virus (AIV), enter the host through the mucosae of the respiratory tract (RT) and subsequently disseminate towards other organs in the body. Therefore, animal health significantly depends on the control of infection in the lung tissue by the RT immune system. There is limited knowledge of the lung-associated immune system in poultry, which

  13. Plant Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs Impinge on Wound Responsiveness and Development in Lycopersicon esculentum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moshe Sagi; Olga Davydov; Saltanat Orazova; Ron Ophir; Johannes W. Stratmann; Robert Fluhrb

    2004-01-01

    Plant respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rboh) are homologs of the human neutrophil pathogen-related gp91phox. Antisense technology was employed to ascertain the biological function of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) Rboh. Lines with diminished Rboh activity showed a reduced level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the leaf, implying a role for Rboh in establishing the cellular redox milieu. Surprisingly, the antisense plants

  14. Novel, host-restricted genotypes of Bordetella bronchiseptica associated with phocine respiratory tract isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a widespread respiratory pathogen in a variety of wild and domesticated animals. During a succession of phocine morbillivirus outbreaks occurring over the past 25 years, it was identified as a frequent secondary invader, often b