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Sample records for potential therapy agent

  1. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract as a Potential Complementary Agent in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains an important cause of mortality nowadays and, therefore, new therapeutic approaches are still needed. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been reported to possess antitumor activities both in vitro and in animal studies. Some of these activities were attributed to its major components, such as carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Initially, the antitumor effects of rosemary were attributed to its antioxidant activity. However, in recent years, a lack of correlation between antioxidant and antitumor effects exerted by rosemary was reported, and different molecular mechanisms were related to its tumor inhibitory properties. Moreover, supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food and Safety Authority, specific compositions of rosemary extract were demonstrated to be safe for human health and used as antioxidant additive in foods, suggesting the potential easy application of this agent as a complementary approach in cancer therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the reported anticancer effects of rosemary, the demonstrated molecular mechanisms related to these effects and the interactions between rosemary and currently used anticancer agents. The possibility of using rosemary extract as a complementary agent in cancer therapy in comparison with its isolated components is discussed. PMID:26452641

  2. Potential of immunomodulatory agents as adjunct host-directed therapies for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Rao, Martin; Dodoo, Ernest; Maeurer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is extremely challenging due to the virulence of the etiologic strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), the aberrant host immune responses and the diminishing treatment options with TB drugs. New treatment regimens incorporating therapeutics targeting both M. tb and host factors are urgently needed to improve the clinical management outcomes of MDR-TB. Host-directed therapies (HDT) could avert destructive tuberculous lung pathology, facilitate eradication of M. tb, improve survival and prevent long-term functional disability. In this review we (1) discuss the use of HDT for cancer and other infections, drawing parallels and the precedent they set for MDR-TB treatment, (2) highlight preclinical studies of pharmacological agents commonly used in clinical practice which have HDT potential, and (3) outline developments in cellular therapy to promote clinically beneficial immunomodulation to improve treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary MDR-TB. The use of HDTs as adjuncts to MDR-TB therapy requires urgent evaluation. PMID:27301245

  3. Triterpenoids as potential agents for the chemoprevention and therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Ahmed, Shamima; Brankov, Nikoleta; Perloff, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. In view of the limited treatment options for patients with advanced breast cancer, preventive and novel therapeutic approaches play an important role in combating this disease. The plant-derived triterpenoids, commonly used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries, posses various pharmacological properties. A large number of triterpenoids are known to exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. Numerous triterpenoids have been synthesized by structural modification of natural compounds. Some of these analogs are considered to be the most potent antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic triterpenoids known. This review examines the potential role of natural triterpenoids and their derivatives in the chemoprevention and treatment of mammary tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related molecular mechanisms are presented. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising compounds in the prevention and therapy of human breast cancer are also identified. PMID:21196213

  4. Biological activity of N(4)-boronated derivatives of 2'-deoxycytidine, potential agents for boron-neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nizioł, Joanna; Uram, Łukasz; Szuster, Magdalena; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary anticancer therapy that requires boron compound for nuclear reaction during which high energy alpha particles and lithium nuclei are formed. Unnatural, boron-containing nucleoside with hydrophobic pinacol moiety was investigated as a potential BNCT boron delivery agent. Biological properties of this compound are presented for the first time and prove that boron nucleoside has low cytotoxicity and that observed apoptotic effects suggest alteration of important functions of cancer cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of DNA from cancer cells proved that boron nucleoside is inserted into nucleic acids as a functional nucleotide derivative. NMR studies present very high degree of similarity of natural dG-dC base pair with dG-boron nucleoside system. PMID:26344594

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with novel hydrophobic and hydrophilic porphyrins as potential agents for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Penon, Oriol; Marín, María J; Amabilino, David B; Russell, David A; Pérez-García, Lluïsa

    2016-01-15

    The preparation of novel porphyrin derivatives and their immobilization onto iron oxide nanoparticles to build up suitable nanotools for potential use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been explored. To achieve this purpose, a zinc porphyrin derivative, ZnPR-COOH, has been synthesized, characterized at the molecular level and immobilized onto previously synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles covered with oleylamine. The novel nanosystem (ZnPR-IONP) has been thoroughly characterized by a variety of techniques such as UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoloectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In order to probe the capability of the photosensitizer for PDT, the singlet oxygen production of both ZnPR-IONP and the free ligand ZnPR-COOH have been quantified by measuring the decay in absorption of the anthracene derivative 9,10-anthracenedipropionic acid (ADPA), showing an important increase on singlet oxygen production when the porphyrin is incorporated onto the IONP (ZnPR-IONP). On the other hand, the porphyrin derivative PR-TRIS3OH, incorporating several polar groups (TRIS), was synthesized and immobilized with the intention of obtaining water soluble nanosystems (PR-TRIS-IONP). When the singlet oxygen production ability was evaluated, the values obtained were similar to ZnPR-COOH/ZnPR-IONP, again much higher in the case of the nanoparticles PR-TRIS-IONP, with more than a twofold increase. The efficient singlet oxygen production of PR-TRIS-IONP together with their water solubility, points to the great promise that these new nanotools represent for PDT. PMID:26454374

  6. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. M.; Jalalian, A.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd3+ ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd2O3 powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist®, Gd2O3 diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd2O3-DEG) fibers show high 1/T1 and 1/T2 proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of 157Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd2O3 fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  7. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  8. Non-carrier-added 186, 188Re labeled 17a-ethynylestradiol : a potential breast cancer imaging and therapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.; Ott, K. C.; Arterburn, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    Receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals constitute potential agents for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of diagnosed cancer in women in the United States, and it accounts for the second highest number of cases of cancer fatalities (1). In Approximately two-thirds of the breast tumors, estrogen and progesterone steroid hormone receptors can be found. Such tumors can often be treated successfully with anti-estrogen hormone therapy (2). Hence, the ability to determine the estrogen receptor (ER) contend of the breast tumor is essential for making the most appropriate choice of treatment for the patient. Along with this diagnostic aspect, steroid-based radiopharmaceuticals with high specific activity offer an encouraging prospect for therapeutic applications: {sup 186,188}Re labeled steroids binding to receptors expressed by cancer cells appear to be potential agents for the irradiation of small to medium-sized tumors. {sup 186}Re has been regarded as an ideal radionuclide for radiotherapy due to its appropriate half-live of 90 h and {beta}-energy of 1.07 MeV. Moreover, the {gamma}-emission of 137 keV that allows in vivo imaging while in therapy is an additional bonus. {sup 188}Re is obtained from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re radionuclide generator system, representing an advantage for availability at radiopharmacy laboratory by daily elution. In addition, {sup 188}Re emits high energy beta particles with an average energy of 769 keV, and the emission of the 155 keV allows simultaneous imaging for biodistribution evaluation in vivo. In order to avoid competitive saturation of the binding sites of the ligand receptor, Re labeled steroids with high specific activity are required, and the removal of all excess unlabeled ligands is mandatory. {sup 188}Re is eluted from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator produced and provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (3). This paper outlines the solid phase-supported preparation of an n

  9. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, A. M. E-mail: grishin@inmatech.com; Jalalian, A.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2015-05-15

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd{sup 3+} ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist{sup ®}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-DEG) fibers show high 1/T{sub 1} and 1/T{sub 2} proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of {sup 157}Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  10. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:12773039

  11. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  12. Radioprotective agents for radiation therapy: future trends.

    PubMed

    Johnke, Roberta M; Sattler, Jennifer A; Allison, Ron R

    2014-12-01

    Only two radioprotective compounds, amifostine and palifermin, currently have the US FDA approval for use in radiation therapy. However, several agents have been reported that show therapeutic promise. Many of these agents are free radical scavengers/antioxidants. Superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase mimetics, nitroxides and dietary antioxidants are all being investigated. Recently, alternative strategies of drug development have been evolving, which focus on targeting the series of cellular insult recognition/repair responses initiated following radiation. These agents, which include cytokines/growth factors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and apoptotic modulators, show promise of having significant impact on the mitigation of radiation injury. Herein, we review current literature on the development of radioprotectors with emphasis on compounds with proven or potential usefulness in radiation therapy. PMID:25525844

  13. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstedt, Jonas; Tran, Thuy A.; Strand, Sven-Erik; Gram, Magnus; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies. PMID:26694383

  14. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M--A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahlstedt, Jonas; Tran, Thuy A; Strand, Sven-Erik; Gram, Magnus; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α₁-microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies. PMID:26694383

  15. Drug therapy reviews: antirheumatic agents.

    PubMed

    Evens, R P

    1979-05-01

    The pathophysiology, symptoms and drug treatment of rheumatic disease are reviewed. Antirheumatic drugs reviewed are salicylates (including aspirin, sodium salicylate, choline salicylate, choline magnesium salicylate, salsalate), phenylpropionic acid derivatives (fenoprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen), indole derivatives (sulindac, tolmetin and indomethacin), pyrazolone derivatives (phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone), gold compounds, penicillamine, antimalarials mefenamic acid, corticosteroids and immunosuppressives. Simple analgesic therapy (acetaminophen, aspirin, propoxyphene) is used in the early stage of the disease. As the disease progresses, aspirin remains the drug of choice for antiinflammatory activity but the phenylpropionic acid or indole derivatives may be preferred in patients unable to tolerate salicylates. If such nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents are not effective, parenteral therapy with gold compounds or oral penicillamine usually is indicated. Indomethacin or phenylbutazone, then antimalarials, are resorted to next. Corticosteroids or immunosuppressives are reserved for patients who are unsuccessfully controlled or who have major side effects with the other drugs. Mefenamic acid occupies a very secondary place in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. PMID:377958

  16. Salicylic acid derivatives as potential anti asthmatic agents using disease responsive drug delivery system for prophylactic therapy of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Raju, Kalidhindi Rama Satyanarayana; Ambhore, Nilesh S; Mulukutla, Shashank; Gupta, Saurabh; Murthy, Vishakantha; Kumar, M N Kiran; Madhunapantula, Subba Rao V; Kuppuswamy, Gowthamarajan; Elango, Kannan

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a multi-factorial and complicated lung disorder of the immune system which has expanded to a wider ambit unveiling its etiology to be omnipresent at both ends of the spectrum involving basic pharmacology and in-depth immunology. As asthma occurs through triggered activation of various immune cells due to different stimuli, it poses a great challenge to uncover specific targets for therapeutic interventions. Recent pharmacotherapeutic approaches for asthma have been focused on molecular targeting of transcription factors and their signaling pathways; mainly nucleus factor kappa B (NFκB) and its associated pathways which orchestrate the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, GM-CSF), chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1a, eotaxin), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1) and inflammatory enzymes (cyclooxygenase-2 and iNOS). 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sodium salicylate are known to suppress NFκB activation by inhibiting inhibitor of kappa B kinase (IKκB). In order to target the transcription factor, a suitable carrier system for delivering the drug to the intracellular space is essential. 5-ASA and sodium salicylate loaded liposomes incorporated into PEG-4-acrylate and CCRGGC microgels (a polymer formed by crosslinking of trypsin sensitive peptide and PEG-4-acrylate) could probably suit the needs for developing a disease responsive drug delivery system which will serve as a prophylactic therapy for asthmatic patients. PMID:26643666

  17. Metal-based phthalocyanines as a potential photosensitizing agent in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of melanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduray, Kaminee; Odhav, B.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging medical treatment that uses photosensitizers (drug) which are activated by laser light for the generation of cytotoxic free radicals and singlet oxygen molecules that cause tumor cell death. In the recent years, there has been a focus on using and improving an industrial colorant termed phthalocyanines as a prospective photosensitizer because of its unique properties. This in vitro study investigated the photodynamic effect of indium (InPcCl) and iron (FePcCl) phthalocyanine chlorides on human skin cancer cells (melanoma). Experimentally, 2 x 104 cells/ml were seeded in 24-well tissue culture plates and allowed to attach overnight, after which cells were treated with different concentrations (2 μg/ml - 100 μg/ml) of InPcCl and FePcCl. After 2 h, cells were irradiated with constant light doses of 2.5 J/cm2, 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 delivered from a diode laser. Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24 h before cell viability was measured using the MTT Assay. At 24 h after PDT, irradiation with a light dose of 2.5 J/cm2 for each photosensitizing concentration of InPcCl and FePcCl produced a significant decrease in cell viability, but when the treatment light dose was further increased to 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 the cell survival was less than 55% for photosensitizing concentrations of InPcCl and FePcCl from 4 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml. This PDT study concludes that low concentrations on InPcCl and FePcCl activated with low level light doses can be used for the effective in vitro killing of melanoma cancer cells.

  18. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  19. [Extravasation of chemotherapeutic agents: prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Jordan, K; Grothe, W; Schmoll, H-J

    2005-01-01

    Based on the potential to cause local tissue injury drugs are classified as vesicant, irritant and non-irritant. The frequency of extravasation is considered to be between 0.6 % and 6 %. More frequently an inflammatory reaction is caused by thrombophlebitis or a local hypersensitivity reaction following chemotherapy administration rather than by an extravasation. A number of factors are known to increase the risk of extravasation. By the consideration of these risk factors preventive guidelines for the safe administration of chemotherapeutic agents have been published. Central venous devices significantly reduce the risk of extravasation. To date there are no generally approved treatment guidelines for the management of extravasations. Treatment is mostly empirical. Nevertheless some general measures are to be recommended: Firstly, aspiration of the extravasated fluids should be attempted. Furthermore local supportive care such as intermittent topical warming or cooling is at least palliative and to a certain degree reduces the extent of the injury. Beside these non pharmacological therapies the beneficial effects of Dimethylsulfoxid (DMSO) -- or Hyaluronidase-administration dependent on the type of paravasation have been proven. The use of sodium bicarbonate, sodium thiosulfate or corticosteroids is no longer recommended. In the case of extravasation rapid and correct management is crucial for the benefit of any treatment. Therefore, written guidelines for both the handling of cytotoxic agents and also the management of an extravasation should be present in all Departments where cytotoxic agents are administered. In addition to these guidelines an extravasation kit including all necessary materials and drugs to treat extravasations should be available. PMID:15619172

  20. Smallpox: a potential agent of bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Richard J

    2003-01-01

    The events of 11 September 2001, in New York City, and subsequent identification of anthrax in the United States Postal System, have generated a new sense of awareness for the potential of biological terrorism, if not warfare. Among those agents identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as 'Class A Bioterrorist Threats', smallpox is among the most dangerous. The ease of transmission of this agent, the lack of immunity in the population at large to this agent, and rapidity of its spread, if released, all generate significant concern for its deployment. A vaccine directed against smallpox is available but it is also associated with significant adverse events-some of which are life-threatening. Further, no antiviral drug has proven efficacious for therapy of human disease, although one licensed drug, cidofovir, does have in vitro activity. Regardless, heightened awareness should lead to the development of a vaccine without significant adverse events and safe and efficacious antiviral drugs. The availability of a vaccine and antiviral drugs that are safe would significantly remove any major threat of smallpox deployment by a terrorist. PMID:12615298

  1. Gadolinium as a Neutron Capture Therapy Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jing-Luen Allen

    The clinical results of treating brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy are very encouraging and researchers around the world are once again making efforts to develop this therapeutic modality. Boron-10 is the agent receiving the most attention for neutron capture therapy but ^{157}Gd is a nuclide that also holds interesting properties of being a neutron capture therapy agent. The objective of this study is to evaluate ^{157}Gd as a neutron capture therapy agent. In this study it is determined that tumor concentrations of about 300 mug ^{157}Gd/g tumor can be achieved in brain tumors with some FDA approved MRI contrast agents such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, and up to 628 mug ^{157 }Gd/g tumor can be established in bone tumors with Gd-EDTMP. Monte Carlo calculations show that with only 250 ppm of ^{157}Gd in tumor, neutron capture therapy can deliver 2,000 cGy to a tumor of 2 cm diameter or larger with 5 times 10^{12} n/cm ^2 fluence at the tumor. Dose measurements which were made with films and TLD's in phantoms verified these calculations. More extended Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that neutron capture therapy with Gd possesses comparable dose distribution to B neutron capture therapy. With 5 times 10^{12 } n/cm^2 thermal neutrons at the tumor, Auger electrons from the Gd produced an optical density enhancement on the films that is similar to the effect caused by about 300 cGy of Gd prompt gamma dose which will further enhance the therapeutic effects. A technique that combines brachytherapy with Gd neutron capture therapy has been evaluated. Monte Carlo calculations show that 5,000 cGy of prompt gamma dose can be delivered to a treatment volume of 40 cm^3 with a 3-plane implant of a total of 9 Gd needles. The tumor to normal tissue advantage of this method is as good as ^{60} Co brachytherapy. Measurements of prompt gamma dose with films and TLD-700's in a lucite phantom verify the Monte Carlo evaluation. A technique which displays the Gd

  2. Tocotrienol as a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ming T; Luk, Sze U; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Khanna, Kum K

    2012-02-01

    Vitamin E is composed of two structurally similar compounds: tocopherols (TPs) and tocotrienols (T3). Despite being overshadowed by TP over the past few decades, T3 is now considered to be a promising anticancer agent due to its potent effects against a wide range of cancers. A growing body of evidence suggests that in addition to its antioxidative and pro-apoptotic functions, T3 possesses a number of anticancer properties that make it superior to TP. These include the inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions, the suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor tumor angiogenic pathway and the induction of antitumor immunity. More recently, T3, but not TP, has been shown to have chemosensitization and anti-cancer stem cell effects, further demonstrating the potential of T3 as an effective anticancer therapeutic agent. With most of the previous clinical studies on TP producing disappointing results, research has now focused on testing T3 as the next generation vitamin E for chemoprevention and cancer treatment. This review will summarize recent developments in the understanding of the anticancer effects of T3. We will also discuss current progress in clinical trials involving T3 as an adjuvant to conventional cancer therapy. PMID:22095072

  3. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin.

    PubMed

    Heck, A M; DeWitt, B A; Lukes, A L

    2000-07-01

    Potential and documented interactions between alternative therapy agents and warfarin are discussed. An estimated one third of adults in the United States use alternative therapies, including herbs. A major safety concern is potential interactions of alternative medicine products with prescription medications. This issue is especially important with respect to drugs with narrow therapeutic indexes, such as warfarin. Herbal products that may potentially increase the risk of bleeding or potentiate the effects of warfarin therapy include angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, bogbean, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, celery, chamomile, clove, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger ginkgo, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, meadowsweet, onion, parsley, passionflower herb, poplar, quassia, red clover, rue, sweet clover, turmeric, and willow bark. Products that have been associated with documented reports of potential interactions with warfarin include coenzyme Q10, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, ginseng, green tea, papain, and vitamin E. Interpretation of the available information on herb-warfarin interactions is difficult because nearly all of it is based on in vitro data, animal studies, or individual case reports. More study is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions. There is evidence that a wide range of alternative therapy products have the potential to interact with warfarin. Pharmacists and other health care professionals should question all patients about use of alternative therapies and report documented interactions to FDA's MedWatch program. PMID:10902065

  4. Quorum Quenching Agents: Resources for Antivirulence Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaihao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is a concern to human health and highlights the urgent need for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Quorum sensing (QS) regulates virulence in many bacterial pathogens, and thus, is a promising target for antivirulence therapy which may inhibit virulence instead of cell growth and division. This means that there is little selective pressure for the evolution of resistance. Many natural quorum quenching (QQ) agents have been identified. Moreover, it has been shown that many microorganisms are capable of producing small molecular QS inhibitors and/or macromolecular QQ enzymes, which could be regarded as a strategy for bacteria to gain benefits in competitive environments. More than 30 species of marine QQ bacteria have been identified thus far, but only a few of them have been intensively studied. Recent studies indicate that an enormous number of QQ microorganisms are undiscovered in the highly diverse marine environments, and these marine microorganism-derived QQ agents may be valuable resources for antivirulence therapy. PMID:24886865

  5. Synthesis of poly(vinyl alcohol)/C(60) and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)/C(60) nanohybrids as potential photodynamic cancer therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Hurtgen, Marie; Debuigne, Antoine; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Jérôme, Robert; Jérôme, Christine; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2010-04-01

    Well-defined poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-co-poly(vinyl acetate) (PNVP-co-PVAc) chains end-capped by Co(acac)(2) (acac=acetylacetonate) and prepared by cobalt-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP) are grafted onto a fullerene. Homolytic Co-C bond cleavage of the polymer chain ends at 30 degrees C releases the polymeric radicals that add onto C(60), thereby leading to the corresponding PVAc/C(60) and PNVP-co-PVAc/C(60) nanohybrids. The [polymer-Co(acac)(2)]/[C(60)] molar ratio was varied to adjust the structure of the nanohybrids, and more particularly the number of grafted arms. Finally, the potential of the hydrosoluble PVOH/C(60) nanohybrids, which result from the methanolysis of the ester groups of PVAc/C(60), and of the PNVP-co-PVAc/C(60) nanohybrids as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT), was approached. First, photobleaching tests demonstrated the ability of these nanohybrids to produce singlet oxygen upon irradiation, which can play a role in cell damage. Second, cell viability assays demonstrated that both types of nanohybrids are deprived of intrinsic cytotoxicity in the dark, whereas they promoted significant cell mortality when subjected to light treatment. The selective response of these materials to irradiation makes them promising compounds for PDT. PMID:20140908

  6. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis). PMID:23432005

  7. Heterocyclic chalcone analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Pradeep

    2013-03-01

    Chalcones, aromatic ketones and enones acting as the precursor for flavonoids such as Quercetin, are known for their anticancer effects. Although, parent chalcones consist of two aromatic rings joined by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system, various synthetic compounds possessing heterocyclic rings like pyrazole, indole etc. are well known and proved to be effective anticancer agents. In addition to their use as anticancer agents in cancer cell lines, heterocyclic analogues are reported to be effective even against resistant cell lines. In this connection, we hereby highlight the potential of various heterocyclic chalcone analogues as anticancer agents with a brief summary about therapeutic potential of chalcones, mechanism of anticancer action of various chalcone analogues, and current and future prospects related to the chalcones-derived anticancer research. Furthermore, some key points regarding chalcone analogues have been reviewed by analyzing their medicinal properties. PMID:22721390

  8. Potential molecular targets for Ewing's sarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Jully, Babu; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. Modern therapy for Ewing's sarcoma combines high-dose chemotherapy for systemic control of disease, with advanced surgical and/or radiation therapeutic approaches for local control. Despite optimal management, the cure rate for localized disease is only approximately 70%, whereas the cure rate for metastatic disease at presentation is less than 30%. Patients who experience long-term disease-free survival are at risk for significant side-effects of therapy, including infertility, limb dysfunction and an increased risk for second malignancies. The identification of new targets for innovative therapeutic approaches is, therefore, strongly needed for its treatment. Many new pharmaceutical agents have been tested in early phases of clinical trials in ES patients who have recurrent disease. While some agents led to partial response or stable disease, the percentages of drugs eliciting responses or causing an overall effect have been minimal. Furthermore, of the new pharmaceuticals being introduced to clinical practice, the most effective agents also have dose-limiting toxicities. Novel approaches are needed to minimize non-specific toxicity, both for patients with recurrence and at diagnosis. This report presents an overview of the potential molecular targets in ES and highlights the possibility that they may serve as therapeutic targets for the disease. Although additional investigations are required before most of these approaches can be assessed in the clinic, they provide a great deal of hope for patients with Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:23580819

  9. Turning on the Radio: Epigenetic Inhibitors as Potential Radiopriming Agents.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Kim, Michelle M; Cabrales, Pedro; Salacz, Michael E; Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Neil; Lybeck, Harry; Lybeck, Michelle; Larson, Christopher; Reid, Tony R; Oronsky, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    First introduced during the late 1800s, radiation therapy is fundamental to the treatment of cancer. In developed countries, approximately 60% of all patients receive radiation therapy (also known as the sixty percenters), which makes radioresistance in cancer an important and, to date, unsolved, clinical problem. Unfortunately, the therapeutic refractoriness of solid tumors is the rule not the exception, and the ubiquity of resistance also extends to standard chemotherapy, molecularly targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Based on extrapolation from recent clinical inroads with epigenetic agents to prime refractory tumors for maximum sensitivity to concurrent or subsequent therapies, the radioresistant phenotype is potentially reversible, since aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are critical contributors to the evolution of resistant subpopulations of malignant cells. Within the framework of a syllogism, this review explores the emerging link between epigenetics and the development of radioresistance and makes the case that a strategy of pre- or co-treatment with epigenetic agents has the potential to, not only derepress inappropriately silenced genes, but also increase reactive oxygen species production, resulting in the restoration of radiosensitivity. PMID:27384589

  10. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  11. Therapeutic potential of chalcones as cardiovascular agents.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death affecting 17.3 million people across the globe and are estimated to affect 23.3 million people by year 2030. In recent years, about 7.3 million people died due to coronary heart disease, 9.4 million deaths due to high blood pressure and 6.2 million due to stroke, where obesity and atherosclerotic progression remain the chief pathological factors. The search for newer and better cardiovascular agents is the foremost need to manage cardiac patient population across the world. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential candidates to inhibit various cardiovascular, hematological and anti-obesity targets like angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), pancreatic lipase (PL), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), calcium (Ca(2+))/potassium (K(+)) channel, COX-1, TXA2 and TXB2. In this review, a comprehensive study of chalcones, their therapeutic targets, structure activity relationships (SARs), mechanisms of actions (MOAs) have been discussed. Chemically diverse chalcone scaffolds, their derivatives including structural manipulation of both aryl rings, replacement with heteroaryl scaffold(s) and hybridization through conjugation with other pharmacologically active scaffold have been highlighted. Chalcones which showed promising activity and have a well-defined MOAs, SARs must be considered as prototype for the design and development of potential anti-hypertensive, anti-anginal, anti-arrhythmic and cardioprotective agents. With the knowledge of these molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective chalcone derivatives as potential cardiovascular agents. PMID:26876916

  12. Potential of immunosuppressive agents in cerebral ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Chauhan, Anjali

    2011-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a disorder involving multiple mechanisms of injury progression including activation of glutamate receptors, release of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO), free oxygen radicals and proteases. Presently, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only drug approved for the management of acute ischaemic stroke. This drug, however, is associated with limitations like narrow therapeutic window and increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage. A large number of therapeutic agents have been tested including N-methly-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, calcium channel blockers and antioxidants for management of stroke, but none has provided significant neuroprotection in clinical trials. Therefore, searching for other potentially effective drugs for ischaemic stroke management becomes important. Immunosuppressive agents with their wide array of mechanisms have potential as neuroprotectants. Corticosteroids, immunophilin ligands, mycophenolate mofetil and minocycline have shown protective effect on neurons by their direct actions or attenuating toxic effects of mediators of inflammation. This review focuses on the current status of corticosteroids, cyclosporine A, FK506, rapamycin, mycophenolate mofetil and minocycline in the experimental models of cerebral ischaemia. PMID:21321416

  13. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control. PMID:23971813

  14. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  15. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  16. [Q fever, a potential biowarfare agent].

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Guihot, Amélie; Bricaire, François

    2003-10-18

    SEVERAL POSSIBLE METHODS OF TRANSFUSION: Q fever is a zoonosis due to Coxiella burnetii. Its interest as a potential biowarfare agent is in its possible transmission by inhalation of sprayed particles. This form of transmission would probably be used: the inhalation of 1 to 10 bacteria could provoke the development of an infection in humans. Another possible method of transmission in the context of a terrorist act would be the intentional introduction of the bacteria into foodstuff. A DISABLING WEAPON: However, C. burnetii has never been used as a biological weapon. The probability that this germ could be used is very low: indeed, the incubation of Q fever is very long, and the majority of the infections is asymptomatic and mortality is low. In fact C. burnetii would more likely be used as a disabling weapon. PMID:14576588

  17. Plants' Metabolites as Potential Antiobesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gooda Sahib, Najla; Saari, Nazamid; Ismail, Amin; Khatib, Alfi; Mahomoodally, Fawzi; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-related complications are on the increase both in the developed and developing world. Since existing pharmaceuticals fail to come up with long-term solutions to address this issue, there is an ever-pressing need to find and develop new drugs and alternatives. Natural products, particularly medicinal plants, are believed to harbor potential antiobesity agents that can act through various mechanisms either by preventing weight gain or promoting weight loss amongst others. The inhibition of key lipid and carbohydrate hydrolyzing and metabolizing enzymes, disruption of adipogenesis, and modulation of its factors or appetite suppression are some of the plethora of targeted approaches to probe the antiobesity potential of medicinal plants. A new technology such as metabolomics, which deals with the study of the whole metabolome, has been identified to be a promising technique to probe the progression of diseases, elucidate their pathologies, and assess the effects of natural health products on certain pathological conditions. This has been applied to drug research, bone health, and to a limited extent to obesity research. This paper thus endeavors to give an overview of those plants, which have been reported to have antiobesity effects and highlight the potential and relevance of metabolomics in obesity research. PMID:22666121

  18. Other potentially useful new injectable anesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Ilkiw, J E

    1992-03-01

    Ultrashort barbiturates are not ideal injectable anesthetic agents, and new agents continue to be released as investigators pursue the goal of finding a more ideal agent. Of the new injectable agents discussed, propofol seems to be the most promising drug. Propofol should find a place in veterinary practice as an outpatient anesthetic agent because it has a rapid, smooth, and complete recovery even after repeated or continuous administration. Midazolam does not induce anesthesia in healthy, small animals and, as such, can only be used in combination with other injectable agents, such as ketamine or the thiobarbiturates. In our practice, Telazol has found a place in the anesthetic management of feral cats and aggressive dogs, where it is used for heavy sedation or to induce anesthesia. The role of flumazenil, as a reversal agent, in veterinary practice remains to be determined; however, the role in small domestic animals is unlikely to be significant. PMID:1585555

  19. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Chiang, Long Y.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposomes, lipoplexes, nanoemulsions, micelles, polymer nanoparticles (degradable and nondegradable), and silica nanoparticles. In some cases (fullerenes and quantum dots), the actual nanoparticle itself is the PS. Targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides can be used to increase specificity. Gold and silver nanoparticles can provide plasmonic enhancement of PDT. Two-photon excitation or optical upconversion can be used instead of one-photon excitation to increase tissue penetration at longer wavelengths. Finally, after sections on in vivo studies and nanotoxicology, we attempt to answer the title question, “can nano-technology potentiate PDT?” PMID:26361572

  20. PEGylated Copper Nanowires as a Novel Photothermal Therapy Agent.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuei-Chang; Chu, Hsun-Chen; Lin, Yow; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2016-05-18

    Metal nanowires are promising for their applications including electrical connectors, transparent conductive electrodes and conductive additives, but the use of metal nanowires as photothermal agents to convert light to heat has yet to be reported. Here we synthesized dispersible polyethylene glycol-coated (PEGylated) copper nanowires (CuNWs) and showed for the first time that PEGylated CuNWs were able to convert near-infrared (NIR, 808 nm) light into heat at a photothermal efficiency of 12.5%. The PEGylated CuNWs exhibited good reusability and enabled rapid temperature rise to >50 °C in 6 min by NIR irradiation. The PEGylated CuNWs were flexible and intertwined around the cancer cells, which, upon NIR irradiation, allowed for direct heat transmission to cells and effectively triggered cancer cell ablation in vitro. Intratumoral injection of PEGylated CuNWs into colon tumor-bearing mice and ensuing NIR irradiation for 6 min significantly raised the local temperature to >50 °C, induced necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. Compared with other NIR light absorbing noble metal-based nanomaterials, PEGylated CuNWs are relatively easy to synthesize in both laboratory and large scales using the low cost copper. This study demonstrated the potential of PEGylated CuNWs as a new cost-effective photothermal agent, and paved a new avenue to using CuNWs for cancer therapy. PMID:27111420

  1. Nigella sativa: A Potential Antiosteoporotic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Mohamed, Norazlina; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Othman, Faizah; Suhaimi, Farihah; Mohd Ramli, Elvy Suhana; Muhammad, Norliza; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana

    2012-01-01

    Nigella sativa seeds (NS) has been used traditionally for various illnesses. The most abundant and active component of NS is thymoquinone (TQ). Animal studies have shown that NS and TQ may be used for the treatment of diabetes-induced osteoporosis and for the promotion of fracture healing. The mechanism involved is unclear, but it was postulated that the antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory activities may play some roles in the treatment of osteoporosis as this bone disease has been linked to oxidative stress and inflammation. This paper highlights studies on the antiosteoporotic effects of NS and TQ, the mechanisms behind these effects and their safety profiles. NS and TQ were shown to inhibit inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and 6 and the transcription factor, nuclear factor κB. NS and TQ were found to be safe at the current dosage for supplementation in human with precautions in children and pregnant women. Both NS and TQ have shown potential as antiosteoporotic agent but more animal and clinical studies are required to further assess their antiosteoporotic efficacies. PMID:22973403

  2. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called “isoprenoids”) are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  3. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-09-27

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called "isoprenoids") are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  4. Anti-arthritic agents: progress and potential.

    PubMed

    Laev, Sergey S; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-07-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are the two most common types of arthritis. Cartilage breakdown is a key feature of both diseases which contributes to the pain and joint deformity experienced by patients. Therefore, anti-arthritis drugs are of great importance. The aim of this review is to present recent progress in studies of various agents against osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The structures and activities of anti-arthritic agents, which used in medical practice or are in development, are presented and discussed. The effects and mechanisms of action of opioids, glucocorticoids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, natural products derived from plants, nutraceuticals, and a number of new and perspective agents are considered. Various perspective targets for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are also discussed. Trials of good quality are needed to draw solid conclusions regarding efficacy of many of the studied agents. Unfortunately, to date, there is no pharmacologic agent proven to prevent the progression of both diseases, and there is an urgent need for further development of better anti-arthritic agents. PMID:26014481

  5. Xenon fluorides show potential as fluorinating agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernick, C. L.; Shieh, T. C.; Yang, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Xenon fluorides permit the controlled addition of fluorine across an olefinic double bond. They provide a series of fluorinating agents that permit ready separation from the product at a high purity. The reactions may be carried out in the vapor phase.

  6. Ultrasound contrast agents and their use in monitoring therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Katherine; Dayton, Paul; Shortencarrier, Michaelann; Kruse, Dustin

    2003-10-01

    The shell of ultrasound contrast agents can be modified to include a molecular targeting ligand, and the properties of the agent with and without molecular targeting can be used to monitor changes produced by a therapy. We have investigated the use of ligands targeted to an integrin expressed in cancer, whose expression correlates with tumor grade. Acoustic studies illustrate a 3- to 20-fold increase in echo amplitude from integrin-expressing cells exposed to the targeted contrast agent, as compared to controls, and depending on cell type, stimulation, and targeting ligand. Changes in integrin expression with therapy may be important in future studies. We have also developed a system to quantify small changes in vascular parameters due to effects of new anti-angiogenic drugs using the intrinsic properties of contrast agents. Regions containing intravascular contrast agents are identified using a strategy that combines subharmonic and phase inversion imaging. As predicted by a Rayleigh-Plesset analysis, this strategy can successfully detect flow over a range of transmission frequencies from 4-6 MHz. We demonstrate that regions of viable tumor as small as 1 mm, as verified by histology, can be detected and show similar morphology to images acquired with computed tomography (CT).

  7. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy: Potential new areas

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Radiation oncology is entering an exciting new era with therapies being delivered in a targeted fashion through an increasing number of novel approaches. External beam radiotherapy now integrates functional and anatomic tumor imaging to guide delivery of conformal radiation to the tumor target. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) adds an important new dimension by making available to Radiation oncologist biologically targeted radiation therapy. Impressive clinical results with antibody-targeted radiotherapy, leading to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of two anti-CD20 radiolabeled antibodies, highlight the potential of STaRT. Optimization strategies will further improve the efficacy of STaRT by improving delivery systems, modifying the tumor microenvironment to increase targeted dose, and maximizing dose effect. Ultimately, the greatest potential for STaRT will not be as monotherapy, but as therapy integrated into established multimodality regimens and used as adjuvant or consolidative therapy in patients with minimal or micrometastatic disease.

  8. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G. |; Partridge, W.P.; Dees, H.C.; Petersen, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type 1 and type 2 photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined.

  9. Beta-blocking agents during electroconvulsive therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Boere, E; Birkenhäger, T K; Groenland, T H N; van den Broek, W W

    2014-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with at least transient episodes of hypertension and tachycardia. Beta-blocking agents may be indicated to prevent cardiovascular complications and may shorten seizure duration. This review evaluates studies that used beta-blocking agents during ECT to determine which agent has the most favourable outcomes on cardiovascular variables and seizure duration. A Medline database search was made using the combined keywords 'adrenergic beta-antagonists' and 'electroconvulsive therapy'. The search was restricted to double-blind randomized controlled trials and yielded 29 original studies. With the use of esmolol, significant attenuating effects were found on cardiovascular parameters in the first 5 min after stimulation; its shortening effects on seizure duration may be dose-related. With the use of labetalol, findings on cardiovascular effects were inconsistent during the first minutes after stimulation but were significant after 5 min and thereafter; seizure duration was scarcely studied. Landiolol attenuates heart rate but with inconsistent findings regarding arterial pressure (AP); seizure duration was mostly unaffected. Esmolol appears to be effective in reducing the cardiovascular response, although seizure duration may be affected with higher dosages. Landiolol can be considered a suitable alternative, but effects on AP need further investigation. Labetalol has been studied to a lesser extent and may have prolonged cardiovascular effects. The included studies varied in design, methodology, and the amount of exact data provided in the publications. Further study of beta-blocking agents in ECT is clearly necessary. PMID:24942714

  10. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Ozlem U.; Sambrook, Sally J.; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E.; Wedge, Stephen R.

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such

  11. The clinical development of molecularly targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy: a pharmaceutical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ataman, Ozlem U; Sambrook, Sally J; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E; Wedge, Stephen R

    2012-11-15

    This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the clinicaltrials.gov Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with clinicaltrials.gov protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such trials are

  12. Rapid screening of novel agents for combination therapy in sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Christopher L; Menth, Jiliana; Dawson, Jana; Martinez, Gary V; Foroutan, Parastou; Morse, David L; Bui, Marilyn M; Letson, G Douglas; Sullivan, Daniel M; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    For patients with sarcoma, metastatic disease remains very difficult to cure, and outcomes remain less than optimal. Treatment options have not largely changed, although some promising gains have been made with single agents in specific subtypes with the use of targeted agents. Here, we developed a system to investigate synergy of combinations of targeted and cytotoxic agents in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. Agents were investigated alone and in combination with varying dose ratios. Dose-response curves were analyzed for synergy using methods derived from Chou and Talalay (1984). A promising combination, dasatinib and triciribine, was explored in a murine model using the A673 cell line, and tumors were evaluated by MRI and histology for therapy effect. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors were synergistic with etoposide, dasatinib, and Akt inhibitors across cell lines. Sorafenib and topotecan demonstrated a mixed response. Our systematic drug screening method allowed us to screen a large number of combinations of sarcoma agents. This method can be easily modified to accommodate other cell line models, and confirmatory assays, such as animal experiments, can provide excellent preclinical data to inform clinical trials for these rare malignancies. PMID:24282374

  13. Rapid Screening of Novel Agents for Combination Therapy in Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cubitt, Christopher L.; Menth, Jiliana; Martinez, Gary V.; Foroutan, Parastou; Morse, David L.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Letson, G. Douglas; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Reed, Damon R.

    2013-01-01

    For patients with sarcoma, metastatic disease remains very difficult to cure, and outcomes remain less than optimal. Treatment options have not largely changed, although some promising gains have been made with single agents in specific subtypes with the use of targeted agents. Here, we developed a system to investigate synergy of combinations of targeted and cytotoxic agents in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. Agents were investigated alone and in combination with varying dose ratios. Dose-response curves were analyzed for synergy using methods derived from Chou and Talalay (1984). A promising combination, dasatinib and triciribine, was explored in a murine model using the A673 cell line, and tumors were evaluated by MRI and histology for therapy effect. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors were synergistic with etoposide, dasatinib, and Akt inhibitors across cell lines. Sorafenib and topotecan demonstrated a mixed response. Our systematic drug screening method allowed us to screen a large number of combinations of sarcoma agents. This method can be easily modified to accommodate other cell line models, and confirmatory assays, such as animal experiments, can provide excellent preclinical data to inform clinical trials for these rare malignancies. PMID:24282374

  14. Radioprotective agents for the prevention of side effects induced by radioiodine-131 therapy.

    PubMed

    Noaparast, Zohreh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2013-08-01

    Radioiodine 131 ((131)I) has been used worldwide for the ablation of remnant thyroidal tissue after surgery or as the first-line treatment for Graves' disease. Although the use of (131)I is becoming increasingly prevalent, there is evidence suggesting that this treatment is associated with side effects such as salivary gland dysfunction and an increased risk of leukemia. This article aims to review the potential use of radioprotective agents and the side effects induced by (131)I therapy. Several synthetic and natural compounds have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. The protective agents reduced the toxicity of (131)I, mainly in the salivary glands, and mitigated the genetic damage through different mechanisms. There are limited clinical studies evaluating the use of radioprotective agents in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy. However, lemon candies, lemon juice and sugarless chewing gum have been proposed to be beneficial for minimizing the side effects of radioiodine within the salivary glands. PMID:23902246

  15. Leukemia after therapy with alkylating agents for childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Meadows, A.T.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Oberlin, O.; Stone, B.J.; Birch, J.; Voute, P.A.; Hoover, R.N.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The risk of leukemia was evaluated in 9,170 2-or-more-year survivors of childhood cancer in the 13 institutions of the Late Effects Study Group. Secondary leukemia occurred in 22 nonreferred individuals compared to 1.52 expected, based on general population rates (relative risk (RR) = 14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 9-22). The influence of therapy for the first cancer on subsequent leukemia risk was determined by a case-control study conducted on 25 cases and 90 matched controls. Treatment with alkylating agents was associated with a significantly elevated risk of leukemia (RR = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-18.9). A strong dose-response relationship was also observed between leukemia risk and total dose of alkylating agents, estimated by an alkylator score. The RR of leukemia reached 23 in the highest dose category. Radiation therapy, however, did not increase risk. Although doxorubicin was also identified as a possible risk factor, the excess risk of leukemia following treatment for childhood cancer appears almost entirely due to alkylating agents.

  16. Efficient synthesis of benzamide riboside, a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bonnac, Laurent F; Gao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Liqiang; Patterson, Steven E; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2007-01-01

    An efficient five step synthesis of benzamide riboside (BR) amenable for a large scale synthesis has been developed. It allows for extensive pre-clinical studies of BR as a potential anticancer agent. PMID:18066762

  17. Beer constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2005-09-01

    Beer is a complex alcoholic beverage made from barley (malt), hop, water and yeast. Phenolic constituents of beer are derived from malt (70-80%) and hop (20-30%). Structural classes include simple phenols, benzoic- and cinnamic acid derivatives, coumarins, catechins, di-, tri- and oligomeric proanthocyanidins, (prenylated) chalcones and flavonoids as well as alpha- and iso-alpha-acids derived from hop. Compounds belonging to different structural classes have distinct profiles of biological activity in in vitro test systems, and in combination might lead to enhanced effects. Scientific evidence has accumulated over the past 10 years pointing to the cancer preventive potential of selected hop-derived beer constituents, i.e., prenylflavonoids including xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol, and hop bitter acids. Chemopreventive activities observed with these compounds relevant to inhibition of carcinogenesis at the initiation, promotion and progression phases, as well as results from in vivo studies on metabolism, bioavailability and efficacy are summarised in this review. PMID:15953717

  18. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey's antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey's clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims. PMID:25386217

  19. Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies.

    PubMed

    Klepser, T B; Klepser, M E

    1999-01-15

    Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies are discussed. The use of herbal therapies is on the rise in the United States, but most pharmacists are not adequately prepared educationally to meet patients' requests for information on herbal products. Pharmacists must also cope with an environment in which there is relatively little regulation of herbal therapies by FDA. Many herbs have been identified as unsafe, including borage, calamus, coltsfoot, comfrey, life root, sassafras, chaparral, germander, licorice, and ma huang. Potentially safe herbs include feverfew, garlic, ginkgo, Asian ginseng, saw palmetto, St. John's wort, and valerian. Clinical trials have been used to evaluate feverfew for migraine prevention and rheumatoid arthritis; garlic for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and infections; ginkgo for circulatory disturbances and dementia; ginseng for fatigue and cancer prevention; and saw palmetto for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Also studied in formal trials have been St. John's wort for depression and valerian for insomnia. The clinical trial results are suggestive of efficacy of some herbal therapies for some conditions. German Commission E, a regulatory body that evaluates the safety and efficacy of herbs on the basis of clinical trials, cases, and other scientific literature, has established indications and dosage recommendations for many herbal therapies. Pharmacists have a responsibility to educate themselves about herbal therapies in order to help patients discern the facts from the fiction, avoid harm, and gain what benefits may be available. PMID:10030529

  20. The role of vasoactive agents in shock therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogburn, P

    1976-05-01

    Vasoactive agents may have vasoconstrictor, vasodilator, cardiac stimulatory, or combined effects on the cardiovascular system. The intensity or degree of therapeutic effect differs with each agent. Table 1 provides a relative ranking of each discussed compound's effect regarding its ability to produce one or more of the listed effects. The effects of vasoconstrictor drugs such as methoxamine, phenylephrine, and norepinephrine have been generally unfavorable in shock because of the inhibition of tissue perfusion which results from their use. Debate still exists, however, and these agents have been shown to provide some benefit in selected cases. The rationale that shock results at least in part because of intense vasoconstriction has led to the usage of vasodilators in therapy. Currently isoproterenol, a beta adrenergic stimulating agent, is being used to elicit vasodilation in lieu of alpha blockage because the alpha blocking drugs phenoxybenzamine and chlorpromazine have longer, more irreversible effects. The merit of isoproterenol has to be evaluated in light light of its cardiac stimulatory effect. With the current antishock drugs, those which possess cardiac stimulatory effects seem to be most effective with the exception of those with alpha stimulatory properties. The importance of cardiac stimulation in treating shock is related to the fact that in many forms of shock a decrease in cardiac function is evident. Drugs which effect increases in cardiac performance will increase cardiac output and tissue perfusion. The increased excitability of the heart caused by many of the drugs is a drawback, but compounds such as dopamine seem to have less excitatory effect than does isoproterenol. It may be that vasoconstriction, vasodilation, and cardiac stimulation are all contributory to the alleviation of shock. However, it is important to remember that the use of vasoactive agents must be reserved for those deteriorating shock states in which primary and secondary

  1. [Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with NSAIDs, antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulant agent].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Following the trends observed for the last 2-3 years, the most significant and recent advances in the area of gastrointestinal lesions associated with anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have focused on adverse effects in the distal intestine and on issues related to the toxicity associated with antiplatelet therapy. New data reinforce evidence that NSAIDs and antiplatelet therapy are associated with an increased risk of serious complications in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, opening up several lines of research in prevention and therapy based on probiotics, antibiotics and mucosal protectants. The interaction between Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAIDs or aspirin remains controversial but a positive interaction between this bacterium and NSAIDs seems to be reinforced. Several systematic reviews confirm that the combination of gastrotoxic drugs significantly increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which should reinforce existing prevention strategies, and that new anticoagulant agents do not appear to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Once gastrointestinal hemorrhage has occurred, several studies have indicated the need to implement simpler prognostic scales than those used today. Notable innovations are the development of a disposable endoscope for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding events and a promising new hemostatic technique, hemospray, applied locally over the bleeding lesion. PMID:23018006

  2. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  3. Therapy for myeloproliferative neoplasms: when, which agent, and how?

    PubMed

    Geyer, Holly L; Mesa, Ruben A

    2014-12-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis (MF) (both primary and secondary), are recognized for their burdensome symptom profiles, life-threatening complications, and risk of progression to acute leukemia. Recent advancements in our ability to diagnose and prognosticate these clonal malignancies have paralleled the development of MPN-targeted therapies that have had a significant impact on disease burden and quality of life. Ruxolitinib has shown success in alleviating the symptomatic burden, reducing splenomegaly and improving quality of life in patients with MF. The role and clinical expectations of JAK2 inhibition continues to expand to a variety of investigational arenas. Clinical trials for patients with MF focus on new JAK inhibitors with potentially less myelosuppression( pacritinib) or even activity for anemia (momelotinib). Further efforts focus on combination trials (including a JAK inhibitor base) or targeting new pathways (ie, telomerase). Similarly, therapy for PV continues to evolve with phase 3 trials investigating optimal frontline therapy (hydroxyurea or IFN) and second-line therapy for hydroxyurea-refractory or intolerant PV with JAK inhibitors. In this chapter, we review the evolving data and role of JAK inhibition (alone or in combination) in the management of patients with MPNs. PMID:25472969

  4. Therapy for myeloproliferative neoplasms: when, which agent, and how?

    PubMed

    Geyer, Holly L; Mesa, Ruben A

    2014-12-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms, including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis (MF) (both primary and secondary), are recognized for their burdensome symptom profiles, life-threatening complications, and risk of progression to acute leukemia. Recent advancements in our ability to diagnose and prognosticate these clonal malignancies have paralleled the development of MPN-targeted therapies that have had a significant impact on disease burden and quality of life. Ruxolitinib has shown success in alleviating the symptomatic burden, reducing splenomegaly and improving quality of life in patients with MF. The role and clinical expectations of JAK2 inhibition continues to expand to a variety of investigational arenas. Clinical trials for patients with MF focus on new JAK inhibitors with potentially less myelosuppression (pacritinib) or even activity for anemia (momelotinib). Further efforts focus on combination trials (including a JAK inhibitor base) or targeting new pathways (ie, telomerase). Similarly, therapy for PV continues to evolve with phase 3 trials investigating optimal frontline therapy (hydroxyurea or IFN) and second-line therapy for hydroxyurea-refractory or intolerant PV with JAK inhibitors. In this chapter, we review the evolving data and role of JAK inhibition (alone or in combination) in the management of patients with MPNs. PMID:25696867

  5. 1,2-Dialkyl-4-pyrazolidinethiols as potential antiradiation agents.

    PubMed

    Kornet, M J; Daniels, R

    1979-10-01

    The reaction between 3-chloropropylene sulfide and the 1,2-dialkylhydrazines was employed to prepare a series of 1,2-dialkyl-4-pyrazolidinethiols. Evidence is presented to support the structure proposed for the product. These mercaptoheterocycles are related to the beta-mercaptoethylamines and were prepared as potential radiation protective agents. No significant activity was observed. PMID:512875

  6. Primary screen for potential sheep scab control agents.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J A; Prickett, J C; Collins, D A; Weaver, R J

    2016-07-15

    The efficacy of potential acaricidal agents were assessed against the sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis using a series of in vitro assays in modified test arenas designed initially to maintain P. ovis off-host. The mortality effects of 45 control agents, including essential oils, detergents, desiccants, growth regulators, lipid synthesis inhibitors, nerve action/energy metabolism disruptors and ecdysteroids were assessed against adults and nymphs. The most effective candidates were the desiccants (diatomaceous earth, nanoclay and sorex), the growth regulators (buprofezin, hexythiazox and teflubenzuron), the lipid synthesis inhibitors (spirodiclofen, spirotetramat and spiromesifen) and the nerve action and energy metabolism inhibitors (fenpyroximate, spinosad, tolfenpyrad, and chlorantraniliprole). PMID:27270393

  7. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suerth, Julia D.; Labenski, Verena; Schambach, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings. PMID:25490763

  8. Polymeric Thioxanthones as Potential Anticancer and Radiotherapy Agents.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Gorkem; Guler, Emine; Barlas, Firat Baris; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Thioxanthone (TX) and its derivatives, which are widely used as photoinitiators in UV curing technology, hold promising research interest in biological applications. In particular, the use of TXs as anticancer agent has recently been manifested as an outstanding additional property of this class of molecules. Incorporation of TX molecules into specially designed polymers widens their practical use in such applications. In this study, two water-soluble, biocompatible, and stable polymers, namely poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(ethylene glycol), possessing TX moieties at the side chains and chain ends, respectively, are prepared and used as anticancer and radiotherapy agents. The findings confirm that both polymers are potential candidates for therapeutic agents as they possess useful features including water-solubility, radiosensitizer effect, and anticancer activity in a polymeric scaffold. PMID:27168378

  9. Targeted therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: novel agents on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Cervello, Melchiorre; McCubrey, James A.; Cusimano, Antonella; Lampiasi, Nadia; Azzolina, Antonina; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer, accounting for 90% of primary liver cancers. In the last decade it has become one of the most frequently occurring tumors worldwide and is also considered to be the most lethal of the cancer systems, accounting for approximately one third of all malignancies. Although the clinical diagnosis and management of early-stage HCC has improved significantly, HCC prognosis is still extremely poor. Furthermore, advanced HCC is a highly aggressive tumor with a poor or no response to common therapies. Therefore, new effective and well-tolerated therapy strategies are urgently needed. Targeted therapies have entered the field of anti-neoplastic treatment and are being used on their own or in combination with conventional chemotherapy drugs. Molecular-targeted therapy holds great promise in the treatment of HCC. A new therapeutic opportunity for advanced HCC is the use of sorafenib (Nexavar). On the basis of the recent large randomized phase III study, the Sorafenib HCC Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP), sorafenib has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC. Sorafenib showed to be able to significantly increase survival in patients with advanced HCC, establishing a new standard of care. Despite this promising breakthrough, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis, as it is currently the major cause of death in cirrhotic patients. Nevertheless, the successful results of the SHARP trial underscore the need for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this devastating disease. In this review we summarize the most important studies on the signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC, as well as the newest emerging drugs and their potential use in HCC management. PMID:22470194

  10. Semimetal nanomaterials of antimony as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    In this study we report semimetal nanomaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm(2) for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm(2) for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, further development of using other semimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT. PMID:25662491

  11. Modified quaternary ammonium salts as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Basilico, Nicoletta; Migotto, Mara; Ilboudo, Denise Patoinewende; Taramelli, Donatella; Stradi, Riccardo; Pini, Elena

    2015-08-01

    A series of new quaternary ammonium salts containing a polyconjugated moiety has been synthesized and characterized; their biological activity as potential antimalarial agents was investigated, as well. All compounds were screened against chloroquine resistant W-2 (CQ-R) and chloroquine sensitive, D-10 (CQ-S) strains of Plasmodium falciparum showing IC50 in the submicromolar range and low toxicity against human endothelial cells. PMID:26081764

  12. Microtubule-stabilizing agents: New drug discovery and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Mu, Xin; Du, Guanhua

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) have been highly successful in the treatment of cancer in the past 20years. To date, three classes of MSAs have entered the clinical trial stage or have been approved for clinical anticancer chemotherapy, and more than 10 classes of novel structural MSAs have been derived from natural resources. The microtubule typically contains two MSA-binding sites: the taxoid site and the laulimalide/peloruside site. All defined MSAs are known to bind at either of these sites, with subtle but significant differences. MSAs with different binding sites may produce a synergistic effect. Although having been extensively applied in the clinical setting, paclitaxel and other approved MSAs still pose many challenges such as multidrug resistance, low bioavailability, poor solubility, high toxicity, and low passage through the blood-brain barrier. A variety of studies focus on the structure-activity relationship in order to improve the pharmaceutical properties of these agents. Here, the mechanisms of action, advancements in pharmacological research, and clinical developments of defined MSAs during the past decade are discussed. The latest discovered MSAs are also briefly introduced in this review. The increasing number of natural MSAs indicates the potential discovery of more novel, natural MSAs with different structural bases, which will further promote the development of anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:26706241

  13. Novel Drug Therapies for Fertility Preservation in Men Undergoing Chemotherapy: Clinical Relevance of Protector Agents.

    PubMed

    Rabaça, A; Sousa, M; Alves, M G; Oliveira, P F; Sá, R

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and adult males in reproductive age. Male reproductive potential is adversely affected by chemotherapeutic drugs and patients are at risk for prolonged infertility. Fertility recovery is related to the chemotherapeutic agent and dosage used, being thus difficult to predict. As a result, there is a strong need to identify a natural or synthetic compound that is able to preserve male fertility without interfering with the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic regimen. New procedures, as well as several drugs, are being investigated to assess their efficiency in protecting male reproductive functions from the chemotherapy side-effects. This review provides an overview of the wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs regularly used in cancer treatment and their detrimental effects on male fertility. In addition, it also assesses the existing protector agents for male fertility and their usefulness in preserving and protecting male reproductive functions exposed to chemotherapeutics. Several protector agents for male fertility are being studied, and results are promising. Nonetheless, further research must be implemented to identify a supplemental therapy that addresses the multiple side effects of chemotherapy on male reproductive function. Until such therapy is discovered, it is fundamental that all fertility preservation options are discussed with patients, before treatment is initiated, to assure parenthood. PMID:26295467

  14. Chalcone derivatives as potential antifungal agents: Synthesis, and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D K

    2015-01-01

    Much research has been carried out with the aim to discover the therapeutic values of chalcone derivatives. Chalcones possess wide range of pharmacological activity such as antibacterial, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antitubercular, anticancer, and antifungal agents etc. The presence of reactive α,β-unsaturated keto group in chalcones is found to be responsible for their biological activity. The rapid developments of resistance to antifungal agents, led to design, and synthesize the new antifungal agents. The derivatives of chalcones were prepared using Claisen-Schmidt condensation scheme with appropriate tetralone and aldehyde derivatives. Ten derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of chalcone showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum. The results so obtained were superior or comparable to ketoconazole. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans nor against fungi Aspergillus niger. Chalcone derivatives showed inhibitory effect against M. gypseum species of fungus. It was found that among the chalcone derivatives so synthesized, two of them, that is, 4-chloro derivative, and unsubstituted derivative of chalcone showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as antifungal agent. PMID:26317075

  15. Comparison of two endogenous delivery agents in cancer therapy: Exosomes and ferritin.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Zhang, Lianbing; Knez, Mato

    2016-08-01

    Exosomes and ferritin: Two biomacromolecules from our human bodies both draw increasing interest for advanced drug delivery due to their endogenous origin and their morphology, the cage-like structures. They possess perfect naturally designed structures for loading and shielding of cargo. Their intrinsic biological functions enable a natural delivery of the load and specific targeting. More and more evidences point towards the evolution of a new era of drug delivery strategies with exosomes and ferritin, even for potential personalized therapy. This review focuses on the advantages as well as limits of exosomes and ferritin as endogenous carriers for cancer therapy. We compare their structure-specific cargo loading and their intrinsic cancer-related biological functions. Remaining challenges and promising perspectives for future development to use these two endogenous agents are discussed. PMID:27157249

  16. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: A contemporary overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos; Tzanetou, Evangelia; Haroutounian, Serkos

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research.

  17. Regulation of microRNAs by natural agents: new strategies in cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Neoh Hun; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA which regulate gene expression by messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation or translation repression. The plethora of published reports in recent years demonstrated that they play fundamental roles in many biological processes, such as carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, programmed cell death, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and differentiation by acting as tumour suppressor or oncogene, and aberrations in their expressions have been linked to onset and progression of various cancers. Furthermore, each miRNA is capable of regulating the expression of many genes, allowing them to simultaneously regulate multiple cellular signalling pathways. Hence, miRNAs have the potential to be used as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. Recent studies have shown that natural agents such as curcumin, resveratrol, genistein, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, indole-3-carbinol, and 3,3'-diindolylmethane exert their antiproliferative and/or proapoptotic effects through the regulation of one or more miRNAs. Therefore, this review will look at the regulation of miRNAs by natural agents as a means to potentially enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy through combinatorial therapies. It is hoped that this would provide new strategies in cancer therapies to improve overall response and survival outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25254214

  18. Regulation of MicroRNAs by Natural Agents: New Strategies in Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA which regulate gene expression by messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation or translation repression. The plethora of published reports in recent years demonstrated that they play fundamental roles in many biological processes, such as carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, programmed cell death, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and differentiation by acting as tumour suppressor or oncogene, and aberrations in their expressions have been linked to onset and progression of various cancers. Furthermore, each miRNA is capable of regulating the expression of many genes, allowing them to simultaneously regulate multiple cellular signalling pathways. Hence, miRNAs have the potential to be used as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. Recent studies have shown that natural agents such as curcumin, resveratrol, genistein, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, indole-3-carbinol, and 3,3′-diindolylmethane exert their antiproliferative and/or proapoptotic effects through the regulation of one or more miRNAs. Therefore, this review will look at the regulation of miRNAs by natural agents as a means to potentially enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy through combinatorial therapies. It is hoped that this would provide new strategies in cancer therapies to improve overall response and survival outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25254214

  19. PD-1 as a potential target in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David F; Atkins, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the host response to tumors has led to the identification of checkpoint signaling pathways involved in limiting the anticancer immune response. One of the most critical checkpoint pathways responsible for mediating tumor-induced immune suppression is the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway, normally involved in promoting tolerance and preventing tissue damage in settings of chronic inflammation. Many human solid tumors express PD ligand 1 (PD-L1), and this is often associated with a worse prognosis. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with cancer typically express PD-1 and have impaired antitumor functionality. Proof-of-concept has come from several preclinical studies in which blockade of PD-1 or PD-L1 enhanced T-cell function and tumor cell lysis. Three monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, and one against PD-L1, have reported phase 1 data. All four agents have shown encouraging preliminary activity, and those that have been evaluated in larger patient populations appear to have encouraging safety profiles. Additional data are eagerly awaited. This review summarizes emerging clinical data and potential of PD-1 pathway–targeted antibodies in development. If subsequent investigations confirm the initial results, it is conceivable that agents blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway will prove valuable additions to the growing armamentarium of targeted immunotherapeutic agents. Next-generation immunotherapy agents that target the PD-1 checkpoint pathway are demonstrating antitumor activity and encouraging safety profiles in early clinical trials. Current and future clinical trials will provide new insights, and the evaluation of biomarkers and rational combination therapies is ongoing. PMID:24403232

  20. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  1. Tumor cell response to bevacizumab single agent therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis represents a highly multi-factorial and multi-cellular complex (patho-) physiologic event involving endothelial cells, tumor cells in malignant conditions, as well as bone marrow derived cells and stromal cells. One main driver is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), which is known to interact with endothelial cells as a survival and mitogenic signal. The role of VEGFA on tumor cells and /or tumor stromal cell interaction is less clear. Condition specific (e.g. hypoxia) or tumor specific expression of VEGFA, VEGF receptors and co-receptors on tumor cells has been reported, in addition to the expression on the endothelium. This suggests a potential paracrine/autocrine loop that could affect changes specific to tumor cells. Methods We used the monoclonal antibody against VEGFA, bevacizumab, in various in vitro experiments using cell lines derived from different tumor entities (non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)) in order to determine if potential VEGFA signaling could be blocked in tumor cells. The experiments were done under hypoxia, a major inducer of VEGFA and angiogenesis, in an attempt to mimic the physiological tumor condition. Known VEGFA induced endothelial biological responses such as proliferation, migration, survival and gene expression changes were evaluated. Results Our study was able to demonstrate expression of VEGF receptors on tumor cells as well as hypoxia regulated angiogenic gene expression. In addition, there was a cell line specific effect in tumor cells by VEGFA blockade with bevacizumab in terms of proliferation; however overall, there was a limited measurable consequence of bevacizumab therapy detected by migration and survival. Conclusion The present study showed in a variety of in vitro experiments with several tumor cell lines from different tumor origins, that by blocking VEGFA with bevacizumab, there was a limited autocrine or cell

  2. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia. PMID:27320243

  3. Ribonucleases as potential modalities in anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ardelt, Wojciech; Ardelt, Barbara; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    Antitumor ribonucleases are small (10–28 kDa) basic proteins. They were found among members of both, ribonuclease A and T1 superfamilies. Their cytotoxic properties are conferred by enzymatic activity, i.e., the ability to catalyze cleavages of phosphodiester bonds in RNA. They bind to negatively charged cell membrane, enter cells by endocytosis and translocate to cytosol where they evade mammalian protein ribonuclease inhibitor and degrade RNA. Here, we discuss structures, functions and mechanisms of antitumor activity of several cytotoxic ribonucleases with particular emphasis to the amphibian Onconase, the only enzyme of this class that reached clinical trials. Onconase is the smallest, very stable, less catalytically efficient and more cytotoxic than most RNase A homologues. Its cytostatic, cytotoxic and anticancer effects were extensively studied. It targets tRNA, rRNA, mRNA as well as the non-coding RNA (microRNAs). Numerous cancer lines are sensitive to Onconase; their treatment with 10 – 100 nM enzyme leads to suppression of cell cycle progression, predominantly through G1, followed by apoptosis or cell senescence. Onconase also has anticancer properties in animal models. Many effects of this enzyme are consistent with the microRNAs, one of its critical targets. Onconase sensitizes cells to a variety of anticancer modalities and this property is of particular interest, suggesting its application as an adjunct to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in treatment of different tumors. Cytotoxic RNases as exemplified by Onconase represent a new class of antitumor agents, with an entirely different mechanism of action than the drugs currently used in the clinic. Further studies on animal models including human tumors grafted on severe combined immunodefficient (SCID) mice and clinical trials are needed to explore clinical potential of cytotoxic RNases. PMID:19825371

  4. A graphene quantum dot photodynamic therapy agent with high singlet oxygen generation

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Niu, Guangle; Huang, Xing; Zhou, Hangyue; Meng, Xiangmin; Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Clinical applications of current photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are often limited by their low singlet oxygen (1O2) quantum yields, as well as by photobleaching and poor biocompatibility. Here we present a new PDT agent based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) that can produce 1O2 via a multistate sensitization process, resulting in a quantum yield of ~1.3, the highest reported for PDT agents. The GQDs also exhibit a broad absorption band spanning the UV region and the entire visible region and a strong deep-red emission. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that GQDs can be used as PDT agents, simultaneously allowing imaging and providing a highly efficient cancer therapy. The present work may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterial PDT agents with overall performance superior to conventional agents in terms of 1O2 quantum yield, water dispersibility, photo- and pH-stability, and biocompatibility. PMID:25105845

  5. A graphene quantum dot photodynamic therapy agent with high singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Niu, Guangle; Huang, Xing; Zhou, Hangyue; Meng, Xiangmin; Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-08-01

    Clinical applications of current photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are often limited by their low singlet oxygen (1O2) quantum yields, as well as by photobleaching and poor biocompatibility. Here we present a new PDT agent based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) that can produce 1O2 via a multistate sensitization process, resulting in a quantum yield of ~1.3, the highest reported for PDT agents. The GQDs also exhibit a broad absorption band spanning the UV region and the entire visible region and a strong deep-red emission. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that GQDs can be used as PDT agents, simultaneously allowing imaging and providing a highly efficient cancer therapy. The present work may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterial PDT agents with overall performance superior to conventional agents in terms of 1O2 quantum yield, water dispersibility, photo- and pH-stability, and biocompatibility.

  6. A graphene quantum dot photodynamic therapy agent with high singlet oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Niu, Guangle; Huang, Xing; Zhou, Hangyue; Meng, Xiangmin; Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Clinical applications of current photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are often limited by their low singlet oxygen ((1)O2) quantum yields, as well as by photobleaching and poor biocompatibility. Here we present a new PDT agent based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) that can produce (1)O2 via a multistate sensitization process, resulting in a quantum yield of ~1.3, the highest reported for PDT agents. The GQDs also exhibit a broad absorption band spanning the UV region and the entire visible region and a strong deep-red emission. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that GQDs can be used as PDT agents, simultaneously allowing imaging and providing a highly efficient cancer therapy. The present work may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterial PDT agents with overall performance superior to conventional agents in terms of (1)O2 quantum yield, water dispersibility, photo- and pH-stability, and biocompatibility. PMID:25105845

  7. Single-Agent Therapies After Standard Combination Regimens.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Saurin; Hochster, Howard S

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly prolonged survival in metastatic colorectal cancer has paralleled the approval of new agents alone and in combination. Most recently, several new agents have sought approval in the heavily pretreated setting, after treatment with standard chemotherapies, alone and in combination, and with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (for patients with RAS wild-type tumors). These agents have included the multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), regorafenib, and the novel antimetabolite combination, TAS-102. Both of these showed improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival compared with placebo controls and were approved in the United States and the rest of the world. Benefits of treatment and toxicities are discussed. Nintedanib, another multitargeted TKI, is already approved by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency for non-small cell lung cancer and has been studied in a similar phase III trial. Results are pending. The risks and benefits of each agent are discussed. PMID:27341600

  8. Potential Use of Phenolic Acids as Anti-Candida Agents: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Guilherme R.; Ellepola, Kassapa; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Y.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a sharp rise in the occurrence of Candida infections and associated mortality over the last few years, due to the growing body of immunocompromised population. Limited number of currently available antifungal agents, undesirable side effects and toxicity, as well as emergence of resistant strains pose a considerable clinical challenge for the treatment of candidiasis. Therefore, molecules that derived from natural sources exhibiting considerable antifungal properties are a promising source for the development of novel anti-candidal therapy. Phenolic compounds isolated from natural sources possess antifungal properties of interest. Particularly, phenolic acids have shown promising in vitro and in vivo activity against Candida species. However, studies on their mechanism of action alone or in synergism with known antifungals are still scarce. This review attempts to discuss the potential use, proposed mechanisms of action and limitations of the phenolic acids in anti-candidal therapy. PMID:26733965

  9. miRNA-based therapies: Strategies and delivery platforms for oligonucleotide and non-oligonucleotide agents

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, V; Winkler, J

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs as important regulatory agents for gene expression has expanded the therapeutic opportunities for oligonucleotides. In contrast to siRNA, miRNA-targeted therapy is able to influence not only a single gene, but entire cellular pathways or processes. It is possible to supplement down regulated or non-functional miRNAs by synthetic oligonucleotides, as well as alleviating effects caused by overexpression of malignant miRNAs through artificial antagonists, either oligonucleotides or small molecules. Chemical oligonucleotide modifications together with an efficient delivery system seem to be mandatory for successful therapeutic application. While miRNA-based therapy benefits from the decades of research spent on other therapeutic oligonucleotides, there are some specific challenges associated with miRNA therapy, mainly caused by the short target sequence. The current status and recent progress of miRNA-targeted therapeutics is described and future challenges and potential applications in treatment of cancer and viral infections are discussed. PMID:25495987

  10. Screening a panel of drugs with diverse mechanisms of action yields potential therapeutic agents against neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Chen, Qing-Rong; Benjamin, Christopher D.; Cheuk, Adam T.; Tsang, Patricia; Chung, Joon-Yong; Metaferia, Belhu B.; Badgett, Thomas C.; Johansson, Peter; Wei, Jun S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Despite current aggressive therapy, the survival rate for high risk NB remains less than 40%. To identify novel effective chemo-agents against NB, we screened a panel of 96 drugs against two NB cell lines, SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y. We found 30 compounds that were active against NB cell lines at ≤ 10 µM concentration. More interestingly, 17 compounds are active at ≤ 1 µM concentration, and they act through a wide spectrum of diverse mechanisms such as mitotic inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition, targeting various biological pathways, and unknown mechanisms. The majority of these active compounds also induced caspase 3/7 by more than 2-fold. Of these 17 active compounds against NB cell lines at sub-micromolar concentration, 11 compounds are not currently used to treat NB. Among them, 9 are FDA approved compounds, and 3 agents are undergoing clinical trials for various malignancies. Furthermore, we identified 4 agents active against these NB cell lines that have not yet been tested in the clinical setting. Finally we demonstrated that Cucurbitacin I inhibits neuroblastoma cell growth through inhibition of STAT3 pathway. These drugs thus represent potential novel therapeutic agents for patients with NB, and further validation studies are needed to translate them to the clinic. PMID:19946221

  11. Curcumin: a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mythri, R B; Bharath, M M Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized as a movement disorder. The motor symptoms in PD arise due to selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain thereby depleting the dopamine levels in the striatum. Most of the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches in PD are aimed at replenishing the striatal dopamine. Although these drugs provide symptomatic relief during early PD, many patients develop motor complications with long-term treatment. Further, PD medications do not effectively tackle tremor, postural instability and cognitive deficits. Most importantly, most of these drugs do not exhibit neuroprotective effects in patients. Consequently, novel therapies involving natural antioxidants and plant products/molecules with neuroprotective properties are being exploited for adjunctive therapy. Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. The current review explores the therapeutic potential of curcumin in PD. PMID:22211691

  12. Potential New Agents for the Management of Hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Packham, David K; Kosiborod, Mikhail

    2016-02-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte disturbance with multiple potential etiologies. It is usually observed in the setting of reduced renal function. Mild to moderate hyperkalemia is usually asymptomatic, but is associated with poor prognosis. When severe, hyperkalemia may cause serious acute cardiac arrhythmias and conduction abnormalities, and may result in sudden death. The rising prevalence of conditions associated with hyperkalemia (heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes) and broad use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs), which improve patient outcomes but increase the risk of hyperkalemia, have led to a significant rise in hyperkalemia-related hospitalizations and deaths. Current non-invasive therapies for hyperkalemia either do not remove excess potassium or have poor efficacy and tolerability. There is a clear need for safer, more effective potassium-lowering therapies suitable for both acute and chronic settings. Patiromer sorbitex calcium and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (ZS-9) are two new potassium-lowering compounds currently in development. Although they have not yet been approved by the US FDA, both have demonstrated efficacy and safety in recent trials. Patiromer sorbitex calcium is a polymer resin and sorbitol complex that binds potassium in exchange for calcium; ZS-9, a non-absorbed, highly selective inorganic cation exchanger, traps potassium in exchange for sodium and hydrogen. This review discusses the merits of both novel drugs and how they may help optimize the future management of patients with hyperkalemia. PMID:26156040

  13. Delivery of gene silencing agents for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference has opened the door for the development of a new class of cancer therapeutics. Small inhibitory RNA oligos are being designed to specifically suppress expression of proteins that are traditionally considered nondruggable, and microRNAs are being evaluated to exert broad control of gene expression for inhibition of tumor growth. Since most naked molecules are not optimized for in vivo applications, the gene silencing agents need to be packaged into delivery vehicles in order to reach the target tissues as their destinations. Thus, the selection of the right delivery vehicles serves as a crucial step in the development of cancer therapeutics. The current review summarizes the status of gene silencing agents in breast cancer and recent development of candidate cancer drugs in clinical trials. Nanotechnology-based delivery vectors for the formulation and packaging of gene silencing agents are also described. PMID:23659575

  14. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  15. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  16. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. PMID:16563357

  17. Evaluation of boronated EGF as a potential delivery agent for BNCT of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weilian; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is often amplified in human glioblastomas, but, reflecting the cellular heterogeneity of these tumors, the frequency of amplification is variable. Since the number of EGFR has been considered as a potential target for the specific delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to brain tumors. Initially, the focus was on using anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies or their fragments, but within the past few years there has been increasing interest in using EGF based bioconjugates as targeting agents. Recently, we have described a method for the boronation of EGF and have characterized the resulting bioconjugates in vitro. In the present study, we have investigated the potential usefulness of boronated EGF as a delivery agent for neutron capture therapy in rats bearing intracerebral implants of the C6 glioma, which has been transfected with the gene encoding EGFR. Our results indicate that following intratumoral injection, boronated EGF selectivity targeted the transfected EGFR positive C6 glioma, and that the amount of delivered to the tumor exceeded by 3-4 orders of magnitude that which could be delivered by intravenous injection.

  18. [MEDICAL THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PRETERM LABOR: IS THERE A FIRST LINE AGENT?].

    PubMed

    Garmi, Gali; Salim, Raed

    2015-10-01

    Preterm birth is defined as delivery before 37 weeks. It is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Spontaneous preterm birth accounts for approximately 70% of all preterm births. Postponing delivery for 48 hours in order to allow administration of corticosteroids, magnesium for neuroprotection and in order to transfer women to a center with neonatal intensive care unit are the goals of tocolytic therapy. The benefits of tocolytic therapy between 24.0 and 34.0 weeks of gestation outweigh the risk of maternal and fetal complications and it should be initiated provided no contraindications exist. Tocolytic agents that have been used are: prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, B-adrenergic agonists, magnesium and oxytocin receptor antagonists. All drugs have demonstrated limited benefit that consists mainly of prolonging the gestational age for 48 hours, without a reduction in the incidence of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Additionally, most available tocolytic agents carry inherent risks of adverse effects. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, there is no clear first line tocolytic drug to manage preterm labor. Other subjects of debate related to the use of tocolytic therapy include: The effectiveness of combination therapy, the use of tocolytic therapy in multiple pregnancies and the use of progesterone as an adjuvant therapy. We will address the efficacy and tolerability of the tocolytic agents available, the issue of maintenance therapy and debates mentioned above, and try to suggest a first line tocolytic agent based on a study performed at our institution. PMID:26742230

  19. Inhaled therapy in cystic fibrosis: agents, devices and regimens

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Key points There have been significant advances in both inhalation medicines and delivery devices with “intelligent nebulisers” and “dry-powder inhalers” becoming commonplace in CF care. Inhaled medicines generate high levels of a drug within the airways with limited systemic effects, offering safe and convenient antibiotic and mucolytic therapy for individuals with CF. Variations in adherence are not unique to CF; however, treatment burden is high and therefore fast inhaled drug delivery devices may assist individuals in completing the prescribed treatment regimes. Prescribers of inhaled medicines have a responsibility to consider, in addition to efficacy, the appropriated drug/device combination for each individual in order to promote adherence and achieve the desired clinical benefit. Summary The recognised mainstay daily treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) focus on inhaled and oral medications, airway clearance and optimised nutrition. This review discusses recent advances in inhaled therapies for the management of CF, including devices such as intelligent nebulisers, drug formulations and supporting evidence for inhaled antibiotics (for the management of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and muco-active drugs. We include practical advice for clinicians regarding the optimisation of inhalation technique and education. The influence of adherence on the use of inhaled therapies in CF is also reviewed. Educational aims To inform readers about the history and progression of inhaled therapies for people with CF with reference to the literature supporting current practice. To highlight the factors that may impact the success of inhaled therapies, including those which are device specific such as drug deposition and those which influence adherence. PMID:26306111

  20. Neutron capture therapy: a comparison between dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rahmani, Faezeh; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs for neutron capture therapy. A (252)Cf source was simulated to obtain its dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and total dose rates. These results were compared with previously published data. Using (252)Cf as a neutron source, the in-tumour dose enhancements in the presence of atomic (10)B, (157)Gd and (33)S agents; (10)B, (157)Gd, (33)S nanoparticles; and Bortezomib and Amifostine chemotherapy drugs were calculated and compared in neutron capture therapy. Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for simulation of the (252)Cf source, a soft tissue phantom, and a tumour containing each capture agent. Dose enhancement for 100, 200 and 500 ppm of the mentioned media was calculated. Calculated dosimetric parameters of the (252)Cf source were in agreement with previously published values. In comparison to other agents, maximum dose enhancement factor was obtained for 500 ppm of atomic (10)B agent and (10)B nanoparticles, equal to 1.06 and 1.08, respectively. Additionally, Bortezomib showed a considerable dose enhancement level. From a dose enhancement point of view, media containing (10)B are the best agents in neutron capture therapy. Bortezomib is a chemotherapy drug containing boron and can be proposed as an agent in boron neutron capture therapy. However, it should be noted that other physical, chemical and medical criteria should be considered in comparing the mentioned agents before their clinical use in neutron capture therapy. PMID:24961208

  1. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E; Fernandez, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  2. Fetal Globin Gene Inducers: Novel Agents & New Potential

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Castaneda, Serguei A.; Chui, David H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Berenson, Ronald J.; Fucharoen, Suthat

    2013-01-01

    Inducing expression of endogenous fetal globin (γ-globin) gene expression to 60-70% of alpha globin synthesis produces β-thalassemia trait globin synthetic ratios and can reduce anemia to a mild level. Several classes of therapeutics have induced γ-globin expression in beta thalassemia patients and subsequently raised total hemoglobin levels, demonstrating proof-of-concept of the approach. Butyrate treatment eliminated transfusion requirements in formerly transfusion-dependent patients with treatment for as long as 7 years. However, prior generations were not readily applicable for widespread use. Currently, a novel oral dual-action therapeutic sodium 2,2-dimethylbutyrate is in clinical trials, an oral decitabine formulation is under development, and agents with complementary mechanisms of action can be applied in combined regimens. Identification of 3 major genetic trait loci which modulate clinical severity provides avenues for developing tailored regimens. These refinements offer renewed potential to apply fetal globin induction as a treatment approach in patient-friendly regimens that can be used world-wide. PMID:20712788

  3. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation. PMID:27293964

  4. Astaxanthin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.

    2011-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin. PMID:21556169

  5. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation. PMID:27293964

  6. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  7. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage. PMID:25395009

  8. Mustard vesicating agent-induced toxicity in the skin tissue and silibinin as a potential countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to the vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) causes severe skin injury with delayed blistering. Depending upon the dose and time of their exposure, edema and erythema develop into blisters, ulceration, necrosis, desquamation, and pigmentation changes, which persist weeks and even years after exposure. Research advances have generated data that have started to explain the probable mechanism of action of vesicant-induced skin toxicity; however, despite these advances, effective and targeted therapies are still deficient. This review highlights studies on two SM analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and NM, and CEES- and NM-induced skin injury mouse models that have substantially added to the knowledge on the complex pathways involved in mustard vesicating agent-induced skin injury. Furthermore, employing these mouse models, studies under the National Institutes of Health Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats program have identified the flavanone silibinin as a novel therapeutic intervention with the potential to be developed as an effective countermeasure against skin injury following exposure to mustard vesicating agents. PMID:27326543

  9. Nucleic Acid Aptamers as Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Ka-To; Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are cancers that arise from white blood cells and usually present as solid tumors. Treatment of lymphoma often involves chemotherapy, and can also include radiotherapy and/or bone marrow transplantation. There is an un-questioned need for more effective therapies and diagnostic tool for lymphoma. Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides whose three-dimensional structures are dictated by their sequences. The immense diversity in function and structure of nucleic acids enable numerous aptamers to be generated through an iterative in vitro selection technique known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX). Aptamers have several biochemical properties that make them attractive tools for use as potential diagnostic and pharmacologic agents. Isolated aptamers may directly inhibit the function of target proteins, or they can also be formulated for use as delivery agents for other therapeutic or imaging cargoes. More complex aptamer identification methods, using whole cancer cells (Cell-SELEX), may identify novel targets and aptamers to affect them. This review focuses on recent advances in the use of nucleic acid aptamers as diagnostic and therapeutic agents and as targeted delivery carriers that are relevant to lymphoma. Some representative examples are also discussed. PMID:25057429

  10. Quantum dot-tetrapyrrole complexes as photodynamic therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Irina; Visheratina, Anastasia; Kuznetsova, Vera; Orlova, Anna; Maslov, Vladimir; Fedorov, Anatoly; Baranov, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Photophysical properties of complexes of semiconductor quantum dots with conventional photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (tetrapyrroles) were investigated. A luminescent study of complexes in aqueous solutions was performed using spectral- and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. It was found that increasing the photosensitizer relative concentration in complexes resulted in sharp drop of the nonradiative energy transfer efficiency and the quantum yield of the photosensitizer photoluminescence. This fact indicates that additional channels of nonradiative energy dissipation may take place in the complexes. Using complexes of Al(OH)-sulphophthalocyanine with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in the aqueous solution as an typical example, we have demonstrated that new channels of the energy dissipation may arise due to aggregation of the photosensitizer molecules upon formation of the complexes with quantum dots. We also demonstrated that use of methods of complex formation preventing aggregation of photosensitizers allows to conserve the high energy transfer efficiency and quantum yield of the acceptor photoluminescence in complexes in wide range of the photosensitizer concentrations. We believe that our study allows obtaining new information about the physical mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in quantum dots-tetrapyrrole complexes perspective for photodynamic therapy.

  11. Therapies for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Approaches and Pharmacologic Agents in Development

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Daniel; Kherani, Saleema; Sepah, Yasir J.; Rajagopalan, Nithya; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Do, Diana V.; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2013-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of blindness, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has remained at the epicenter of clinical research in ophthalmology. During the past decade, focus of researchers has ranged from understanding the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the angiogenic cascades to developing new therapies for retinal vascular diseases. Anti-VEGF agents such as ranibizumab and aflibercept are becoming increasingly well-established therapies and have replaced earlier approaches such as laser photocoagulation or photodynamic therapy. Many other new therapeutic agents, which are in the early phase clinical trials, have shown promising results. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review the available treatment modalities for neovascular AMD and then focus on promising new therapies that are currently in various stages of development. PMID:24319688

  12. Recent Development of Multifunctional Agents as Potential Drug Candidates for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guzior, Natalia; ckowska,, Anna Wię; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β anti-aggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NO-releasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  13. Recent development of multifunctional agents as potential drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Guzior, Natalia; Wieckowska, Anna; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β antiaggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NOreleasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  14. HIV Entry Inhibitors and Their Potential in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting the viral entry process. The three main classes (attachment inhibitors, co-receptor binding inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors) are further broken down by specific mechanism of action and structure. Many of these inhibitors are in advanced clinical trials, including the HIV maturation inhibitor bevirimat, from the authors’ laboratories. In addition, the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has recently been FDA-approved. Possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV therapy, including treatment of virus resistant to current drugs, are also discussed. PMID:18720513

  15. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  16. Disulfiram attenuates osteoclast differentiation in vitro: a potential antiresorptive agent.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hua; Qin, An; Cheng, Tak S; Pavlos, Nathan J; Rea, Sarah; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), a cysteine modifying compound, has long been clinically employed for the treatment of alcohol addiction. Mechanistically, DSF acts as a modulator of MAPK and NF-κB pathways signaling pathways. While these pathways are crucial for osteoclast (OC) differentiation, the potential influence of DSF on OC formation and function has not been directly assessed. Here, we explore the pharmacological effects of DSF on OC differentiation, activity and the modulation of osteoclastogenic signaling cascades. We first analyzed cytotoxicity of DSF on bone marrow monocytes isolated from C57BL/6J mice. Upon the establishment of optimal dosage, we conducted osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption assays in the presence or absence of DSF treatment. Luciferase assays in RAW264.7 cells were used to examine the effects of DSF on major transcription factors activation. Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, intracellular acidification and proton influx assays were employed to further dissect the underlying mechanism. DSF treatment dose-dependently inhibited both mouse and human osteoclastogenesis, especially at early stages of differentiation. This inhibition correlated with a decrease in the expression of key osteoclastic marker genes including CtsK, TRAP, DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2 as well as a reduction in bone resorption in vitro. Suppression of OC differentiation was found to be due, at least in part, to the blockade of several key receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-signaling pathways including ERK, NF-κB and NFATc1. On the other hand, DSF failed to suppress intracellular acidification and proton influx in mouse and human osteoclasts using acridine orange quenching and microsome-based proton transport assays. Our findings indicate that DSF attenuates OC differentiation via the collective suppression of several key RANKL-mediated signaling cascades, thus making it an attractive agent for the treatment of OC

  17. Potential clinical application of interleukin-27 as an antitumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Takayuki; Chiba, Yukino; Furusawa, Jun-Ichi; Xu, Mingli; Tsunoda, Ren; Higuchi, Kaname; Mizoguchi, Izuru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies such as sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab are promising new treatments that harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer and achieve long-lasting remission. Interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 heterodimeric cytokine family, has pleiotropic functions in the regulation of immune responses with both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Evidence obtained using a variety of preclinical mouse models indicates that IL-27 possesses potent antitumor activity against various types of tumors through multiple mechanisms without apparent adverse effects. These mechanisms include those mediated not only by CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells and macrophages, but also by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, antiangiogenesis, direct antiproliferative effects, inhibition of expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2, and suppression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition, depending on the characteristics of individual tumors. However, the endogenous role of IL-27 subunits and one of its receptor subunits, WSX-1, in the susceptibility to tumor development after transplantation of tumor cell lines or endogenously arising tumors seems to be more complicated. IL-27 functions as a double-edged sword: IL-27 increases IL-10 production and the expression of programmed death ligand 1 and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3, and promotes the generation of regulatory T cells, and IL-27 receptor α singling enhances transformation; IL-27 may augment protumor effects as well. Here, we review both facets of IL-27, antitumor effects and protumor effects, and discuss the potential clinical application of IL-27 as an antitumor agent. PMID:26132605

  18. Disulfiram Attenuates Osteoclast Differentiation In Vitro: A Potential Antiresorptive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tak S.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Rea, Sarah; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Ming H.

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), a cysteine modifying compound, has long been clinically employed for the treatment of alcohol addiction. Mechanistically, DSF acts as a modulator of MAPK and NF-κB pathways signaling pathways. While these pathways are crucial for osteoclast (OC) differentiation, the potential influence of DSF on OC formation and function has not been directly assessed. Here, we explore the pharmacological effects of DSF on OC differentiation, activity and the modulation of osteoclastogenic signaling cascades. We first analyzed cytotoxicity of DSF on bone marrow monocytes isolated from C57BL/6J mice. Upon the establishment of optimal dosage, we conducted osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption assays in the presence or absence of DSF treatment. Luciferase assays in RAW264.7 cells were used to examine the effects of DSF on major transcription factors activation. Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, intracellular acidification and proton influx assays were employed to further dissect the underlying mechanism. DSF treatment dose-dependently inhibited both mouse and human osteoclastogenesis, especially at early stages of differentiation. This inhibition correlated with a decrease in the expression of key osteoclastic marker genes including CtsK, TRAP, DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2 as well as a reduction in bone resorption in vitro. Suppression of OC differentiation was found to be due, at least in part, to the blockade of several key receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-signaling pathways including ERK, NF-κB and NFATc1. On the other hand, DSF failed to suppress intracellular acidification and proton influx in mouse and human osteoclasts using acridine orange quenching and microsome-based proton transport assays. Our findings indicate that DSF attenuates OC differentiation via the collective suppression of several key RANKL-mediated signaling cascades, thus making it an attractive agent for the treatment of OC

  19. 188Re-ethylene dicysteine: a novel agent for possible use in endovascular radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, T; Banerjee, S; Samuel, G; Sarma, H D; Ramamoorthy, N; Pillai, M R

    2000-10-01

    Several agents, such as 188ReO4-, 188Re-MAG3 and 188Re-DTPA are currently under investigation as radiation sources in liquid-filled balloons for prevention of restenosis following coronary angioplasty. Bearing in mind the risk factor associated with leakage of radioactivity in the event of balloon rupture, the criteria sought in selecting suitable agents for endovascular radiation therapy (EVRT) are rapid clearance and low dose to vital organs. Since 99Tcm labelled ethylene dicysteine (EC) is a well established agent for renal tubular function imaging, the use of 186Re-ethylene dicysteine as a potential agent for prevention of restenosis after angioplasty has been evaluated previously. Therefore, it was of interest to evaluate the applicability of the more potential isotope of rhenium, 188Re, a high energy beta-emitter (Ebetamax = 2.12 MeV) with a suitable T 1/2 = 16.9 h, obtainable carrier-free from the 188W-188Re generator, as an attractive and alternative radionuclide for labelling with L,L-EC. In this paper, the preparation and pharmacological behaviour of the 188Re complex of ethylene dicysteine are reported. The complex can be prepared in high yields (99.5%) under optimized conditions of pH 2-3, at a ligand concentration of 15 mM, 50 microg (0.18 mM) carrier rhenium and using 2 mg x mL(-1) stannous chloride. On storage at 4 degrees C, the RC purity was more than 97% after 48 h when prepared under optimum conditions. Biodistribution studies in Wistar rats showed the desired characteristics of fast blood clearance and low retention of activity in the vital organs (< 2% in intestine, < 1% in stomach, < 0.5% in liver) with a high renal excretion (90.65+/-0.6%) at 3 h post-injection. These results confirm the advantages of using the 188Re-EC complex compared with perrhenate and other rhenium radiopharmaceuticals currently being used in balloons for EVRT. PMID:11130335

  20. Nanomolar cationic dendrimeric sulfadiazine as potential antitoxoplasmic agent.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M J; Bacigalupe, D; Pardini, O; Amalvy, J I; Venturini, C; Morilla, M J; Romero, E L

    2006-12-01

    The high doses of sulfadiazine (SDZ), used in synergistic combination with pyrimethamine, are mainly responsible for severe side effects and discontinuation of toxoplasmosis treatments. In the search for new strategies that improve the efficacy of treatments with reduced doses of SDZ, we have determined the performance of cationic G4 (DG4) and anionic G4.5 (DG4.5) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to act as SDZ nanocarriers. Both dendrimers could efficiently load SDZ (SDZ-DG4 and SDZ-DG4.5) up to a ratio of 30 molecules SDZ per dendrimer molecule. The MTT assay on Vero and J774 cells showed no cytotoxicity for DG4.5 and its SDZ complex incubated between 0.03 and 33 microM of dendrimer concentration. On the other hand, DG4 and its SDZ complex resulted cytotoxic when incubated at dendrimer concentrations higher than 3.3 microM. Finally, complexes and empty dendrimers were in vitro tested against Vero cells infected with RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii along 4h of treatment. For SDZ-DG4.5 and DG4.5 to cause an infection decrease between 25 and 40%, respectively, a dendrimer concentration of 33 microM was required; however, SDZ-DG4 produced the highest infection decrease of 60% at 0.03 microM. These preliminary results, achieved with nanomolar doses of SDZ-DG4 as unique active principle, point to this complex as a suitable potential candidate for antitoxoplasmic therapy. PMID:16920292

  1. Water-soluble platinum phthalocyanines as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Giuseppina; Lanuti, Paola; D'Ambrosio, Primiano; Tonucci, Lucia; Pierdomenico, Laura; D'Emilio, Carlo; Celli, Nicola; Marchisio, Marco; d'Alessandro, Nicola; Santavenere, Eugenio; Bressan, Mario; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer represents the second cause of death in the European female population. The lack of specific therapies together with its high invasive potential are the major problems associated to such a tumor. In the last three decades platinum-based drugs have been considered essential constituents of many therapeutic strategies, even though with side effects and frequent generation of drug resistance. These drugs have been the guide for the research, in last years, of novel platinum and ruthenium based compounds, able to overcome these limitations. In this work, ruthenium and platinum based phthalocyanines were synthesized through conventional techniques and their antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic actions were tested. Normal mammary gland (MCF10A) and several models of mammarian carcinoma at different degrees of invasiveness (BT474, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) were used. Cells were treated with different concentrations (5-100 μM) of the above reported compounds, to evaluate toxic concentration and to underline possible dose-response effects. The study included growth curves made by trypan blue exclusion test and scratch assay to study cellular motility and its possible negative modulation by phthalocyanine. Moreover, we investigated cell cycle and apoptosis through flow cytometry and AMNIS Image Stream cytometer. Among all the tested drugs, tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine of platinum resulted to be the molecule with the best cytostatic action on neoplastic cell lines at the concentration of 30 μM. Interestingly, platinum tetrasulfophtalocyanine, at low doses, had no antiproliferative effects on normal cells. Therefore, such platinum complex, appears to be a promising drug for mammarian carcinoma treatment. PMID:24699848

  2. Potential to raise the efficiency of neutron and neutron-photon therapy using metal nonradioactive nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    The use of metal nonradioactive nanoparticles (specifically, gold ones) in neutron and neutron-photon cancer therapy is proposed. The minimum therapeutically effective average density of gold within a tumor subjected to neutron irradiation is estimated as a value on the order of 10-5-10-4 g/cm3. Potential benefits of the use of data obtained when using Peteosthor (a drug containing 224Ra and colloidal platinum) and Thorotrast (a radiopaque contrast agent containing thorium oxide nanoparticles) and its analogues in the analysis of safety and efficiency of application of nonradioactive nanoparticles in radiation therapy and diagnostics are discussed.

  3. Radiolabeled Apoptosis Imaging Agents for Early Detection of Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since apoptosis plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis and is associated with responses to therapy, molecular imaging of apoptotic cells could be useful for early detection of therapeutic effects, particularly in oncology. Radiolabeled annexin V compounds are the hallmark in apoptosis imaging in vivo. These compounds are reviewed from the genesis of apoptosis (cell death) imaging agents up to recent years. They have some disadvantages, including slow clearance and immunogenicity, because they are protein-based imaging agents. For this reason, several studies have been conducted in recent years to develop low molecule apoptosis imaging agents. In this review, radiolabeled phosphatidylserine targeted peptides, radiolabeled bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) complex, radiolabeled 5-fluoropentyl-2-methyl-malonic acid (ML-10), caspase-3 activity imaging agents, radiolabeled duramycin, and radiolabeled phosphonium cation are reviewed as promising low-molecular-weight apoptosis imaging agents. PMID:25383382

  4. Honokiol: a novel natural agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Singh, S; Piazza, G A; Contreras, C M; Panyam, J; Singh, A P

    2012-12-01

    Honokiol (3',5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-2,4'-diol) is a bioactive natural product derived from Magnolia spp. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-oxidative and anticancer properties of honokiol in vitro and in preclinical models. Honokiol targets multiple signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), signal transducers and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR), which have great relevance during cancer initiation and progression. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic profile of honokiol has revealed a desirable spectrum of bioavailability after intravenous administration in animal models, thus making it a suitable agent for clinical trials. In this review, we discuss recent data describing the molecular targets of honokiol and its anti-cancer activities against various malignancies in pre-clinical models. Evaluation of honokiol in clinical trials will be the next step towards its possible human applications. PMID:22834827

  5. Theranostic Agents for Photodynamic Therapy of Prostate Cancer by Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinning; Tsui, Brian; Ramamurthy, Gopolakrishnan; Zhang, Ping; Meyers, Joseph; Kenney, Malcolm E; Kiechle, Jonathan; Ponsky, Lee; Basilion, James P

    2016-08-01

    Prostatectomy has been the mainstay treatment for men with localized prostate cancer. Surgery, however, often can result in major side effects, which are caused from damage and removal of nerves and muscles surrounding the prostate. A technology that can help surgeons more precisely identify and remove prostate cancer resulting in a more complete prostatectomy is needed. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a type II membrane antigen highly expressed in prostate cancer, has been an attractive target for imaging and therapy. The objective of this study is to develop low molecular weight PSMA-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents, which would provide image guidance for prostate tumor resection and allow for subsequent PDT to eliminate unresectable or remaining cancer cells. On the basis of our highly negatively charged, urea-based PSMA ligand PSMA-1, we synthesized two PSMA-targeting PDT conjugates named PSMA-1-Pc413 and PSMA-1-IR700. In in vitro cellular uptake experiments and in vivo animal imaging experiments, the two conjugates demonstrated selective and specific uptake in PSMA-positive PC3pip cells/tumors, but not in PSMA-negative PC3flu cells/tumors. Further in vivo photodynamic treatment proved that the two PSMA-1-PDT conjugates can effectively inhibit PC3pip tumor progression. The two PSMA-1-PDT conjugates reported here may have the potential to aid in the detection and resection of prostate cancers. It may also allow for the identification of unresectable cancer tissue and PDT ablation of such tissue after surgical resection with potentially less damage to surrounding tissues. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1834-44. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27297866

  6. Melanoma and IFN alpha: potential adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, U; Clerico, R; Paolino, G; Corsetti, P; Ambrifi, M; Brachini, A; Richetta, A; Nisticò, S; Pranteda, G; Calvieri, S

    2014-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is the most used adjuvant treatment in clinical practice for melanoma (MEL) high-medium risk patients; however, the use of IFNalpha has yielded conflicting data on Overall Survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) rates. Starting from these considerations, we carried out an analysis on our MEL patients who received adjuvant IFNalpha therapy, in order to identify possible predictors for their outcome. A total of 140 patients were included in our analysis. Patients with Breslow thickness ≤2.00 mm presented a significantly longer mean DFS than patients with Breslow ≥2.01 mm (p = 0.01). Using non- parametric Spearman’s Coefficient test we found association between DFS and Breslow thickness (p < 0.001) and between DFS and ulceration (p = 0.03). Performing Multiple Regression test, Breslow thickness (p < 0.001) remained the only statistically significant predictor. From the OS analysis we found that patients with lower Breslow values ≤ 2.00 mm (p < 0.0001), and absence of ulceration (p <0.004) showed a significantly better long-term survival. From the current analysis we found that the use of low dose IFNalpha is justified only for cutaneous melanoma ≤ 4.01 mm that was not ulcerated; patients with Breslow ≥ 4.01 mm, in our opinion, should not carry out adjuvant treatment with low dose IFNalpha, because its side effects could be higher than the its benefits. PMID:25001659

  7. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein as a potential target for cancer therapy: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Jagani, Hitesh; Kasinathan, Narayanan; Meka, Sreenivasa Reddy; Josyula, Venkata Rao

    2016-08-01

    Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, is considered as a potential target in cancer treatment since its oncogenic potential has been proven and is well documented. Antisense technology and RNA interference (RNAi) have been used to reduce the expression of the Bcl-2 gene in many types of cancer cells and are effective as adjuvant therapy along with the chemotherapeutic agents. The lack of appropriate delivery systems is considered to be the main hurdle associated with the RNAi. In this review, we discuss the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, its oncogenic potential, and various approaches utilized to target Bcl-2 including suitable delivery systems employed for successful delivery of siRNA. PMID:25801037

  8. Statin therapy: rationale for a new agent, rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Korlipara, K

    2002-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of death in industrialised societies, and elevated serum lipids are a significant, highly prevalent and undertreated risk factor for this condition. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have revolutionised the treatment of hyperlipidaemia, and results from large-scale, long-term clinical trials have shown that the substantial reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved with these drugs are associated with dramatic decreases in cardiovascular risk. Results from recent comparative clinical trials that have included a new drug in this class, rosuvastatin (Crestor), have demonstrated that it is significantly superior to atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin in reducing total cholesterol, LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). It is also significantly more effective than atorvastatin in increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I). Rosuvastatin was also superior to all these agents in helping patients meet European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) and National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) goals for LDL-C. The results of an increasing number of studies indicate that statins have a wide range of pleiotropic properties that almost certainly contribute to their ability to decrease cardiovascular risk and may also make them valuable for treatment of other diseases. These actions include plaque stabilisation, improvement of endothelial function, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, reduction of expression of adhesion molecules, prevention of cholesterol esterification and accumulation, reduction of secretion of matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages, reduction of platelet activity, reduction of formation of thrombogenic factors, chemoprotection and induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Further exploration of these actions will provide key information about class effects

  9. Targeted Aucore-Agshell nanorods as a dual-functional contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yiwen; Peng, Dong; Wang, Kun; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Tian, Jie; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing contrast enhancement is essential for producing specific signals in biomedical imaging and therapy. The potential of using Aucore-Agshell nanorods (Au@Ag NRs) as a dual-functional theranostic contrast agent is demonstrated for effective cancer imaging and treatments. Due to its strong NIR absorption and high efficiency of photothermal conversion, effects of both photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) are enhanced significantly. The PAT signal grows by 45.3% and 82% in the phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively, when compared to those using Au NRs. In PTT, The maximum increase of tissue temperature treated with Au@Ag NRs is 22.8 °C, twice that with Au NRs. Results of the current study show the feasibility of using Au@Ag NRs for synergetic PAT with PTT. And it will enhance the potential application on real-time PAT guided PTT, which will greatly benefit the customized PTT treatment of cancer. PMID:27231624

  10. Francisella tularensis as a potential agent of bioterrorism?

    PubMed

    Maurin, Max

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A bioterrorism agent. It is the etiological agent of tularemia, a zoonotic disease found throughout the northern hemisphere. The intentional spread of F. tularensis aerosols would probably lead to severe and often fatal pneumonia cases, but also secondary cases from contaminated animals and environments. We are not ready to face such a situation. No vaccine is currently available. A few antibiotics are active against F. tularensis, but strains resistant to these antibiotics could be used in the context of bioterrorism. We need new therapeutic strategies to fight against category A bioterrorism agents, including development of new drugs inhibiting F. tularensis growth and/or virulence, or enhancing the host response to infection by this pathogen. PMID:25413334

  11. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  12. Nanobodies as novel agents for disease diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siontorou, Christina G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring, heavy-chain only antibodies in Camelidae, and their further development into small recombinant nanobodies, presents attractive alternatives in drug delivery and imaging. Easily expressed in microorganisms and amenable to engineering, nanobody derivatives are soluble, stable, versatile, and have unique refolding capacities, reduced aggregation tendencies, and high-target binding capabilities. This review outlines the current state of the art in nanobodies, focusing on their structural features and properties, production, technology, and the potential for modulating immune functions and for targeting tumors, toxins, and microbes. PMID:24204148

  13. Occupational exposures to potentially hazardous agents in the petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Runion, H E

    1988-01-01

    This chapter has been created to acquaint the reader with occupational exposures that are more common in, and somewhat unique to, the petroleum industry. Both highly toxic materials capable of causing acute illness or even death following short-term exposure, and chemical and physical agents that pose risk of chronic and irreversible damage to health during prolonged exposure are addressed. PMID:3043733

  14. Occupational exposures to potentially hazardous agents in the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Runion, H.E.

    1988-07-01

    This chapter has been created to acquaint the reader with occupational exposures that are more common in, and somewhat unique to, the petroleum industry. Both highly toxic materials capable of causing acute illness or even death following short-term exposure, and chemical and physical agents that pose risk of chronic and irreversible damage to health during prolonged exposure are addressed.

  15. Targeted therapy using novel agents in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a poor prognosis and high mortality. The therapeutic improvement caused by the new generation of cytotoxic agents seems to have reached a plateau. The main categories of targeted therapeutics applicable for NSCLC include receptor-targeted therapy, signal transduction or cell-cycle inhibition, angiogenesis inhibitors, gene therapy, and vaccines. Several major classes of agents directed at specific cellular mechanisms exist for the treatment of NSCLC. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) group contains trastuzumab and IMC-C225, monoclonal antibodies against EGFRs that are overexpressed in many cancers. OSI-774 and ZD1839 are inhibitors of EGFR tyrosine kinase, a key enzyme of the signaling pathway. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors, such as SCH66336, and protein kinase C inhibitors, such as ISIS 3521, have also shown antitumor activity. Antiangiogenesis agents that have shown promise include TNP-470, recombinant endostatin, and angiostatin. Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also seem to control tumor progression and may prolong survival. LY317615, an inhibitor of protein kinase Cb, augmented the tumor growth delay produced by cytotoxic drugs. All of these agents are in different phases of clinical testing and have shown encouraging activity as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy drugs. These new agents are more target specific, less toxic, easier to administer, and may lead to enhanced safety and survival for patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:14720353

  16. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  17. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  18. Potential Benefits of Non-Pharmacological Therapies in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Sueiro Blanco, F.; Estévez Schwarz, I.; Ayán, C.; Cancela, JM.; Martín, V.

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is an incurable common syndrome of non-articular origin, and with no effective treatment by now. A great deal of research has sought to assess the efficacy of different therapies, especially non-pharmacological and low-cost ones, in the reduction of the intensity of symptoms. Despite the availability of a wide range of alternative therapies nowadays, there is little scientific evidence of the potential benefits of most of them, with results being contradictories. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the less well known alternative therapies in FM treatment, to describe the more relevant clinical studies published in this matter, and to analyze the potential effects of the main alternative therapies, in order to verify their efficacy. PMID:19088863

  19. Potential Molecular Targets for Narrow-Spectrum Agents to Combat Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Mitchell F.; Distelhorst, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    As Mycoplasma pneumoniae macrolide resistance grows and spreads worldwide, it is becoming more important to develop new drugs to prevent infection or limit disease. Because other mycoplasma species have acquired resistance to other classes of antibiotics, it is reasonable to presume that M. pneumoniae can do the same, so switching to commonly used antibiotics like fluoroquinolones will not result in forms of therapy with long-term utility. Moreover, broad-spectrum antibiotics can have serious consequences for the patient, as these drugs may have severe impacts on the natural microbiota of the individual, compromising the health of the patient either short-term or long-term. Therefore, developing narrow-spectrum antibiotics that effectively target only M. pneumoniae and no more than a small portion of the microbiota is likely to yield impactful, positive results that can be used perhaps indefinitely to combat M. pneumoniae. Development of these agents requires a deep understanding of the basic biology of M. pneumoniae, in many areas deeper than what is currently known. In this review, we discuss potential targets for new, narrow-spectrum agents and both the positive and negative aspects of selecting these targets, which include toxic molecules, metabolic pathways, and attachment and motility. By gathering this information together, we anticipate that it will be easier for researchers to evaluate topics of priority for study of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26941728

  20. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. PMID:24780919

  1. The development of potential antibody-based therapies for myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sherbenou, Daniel W.; Behrens, Christopher R.; Su, Yang; Wolf, Jeffrey L.; Martin, Thomas G.; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    With optimal target antigen selection antibody-based therapeutics can be very effective agents for hematologic malignancies, but none have yet been approved for myeloma. Rituximab and brentuximab vedotin are examples of success for the naked antibody and antibody–drug conjugate classes, respectively. Plasma cell myeloma is an attractive disease for antibody-based targeting due to target cell accessibility and the complementary mechanism of action with approved therapies. Initial antibodies tested in myeloma were disappointing. However, recent results from targeting well-characterized antigens have been more encouraging. In particular, the CD38 and CD138 targeted therapies are showing single-agent activity in early phase clinical trials. Here we will review the development pipeline for naked antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates for myeloma. There is clear clinical need for new treatments, as myeloma inevitably becomes refractory to standard agents. The full impact is yet to be established, but we are optimistic that the first FDA-approved antibody therapeutic(s) for this disease will emerge in the near future. PMID:25294123

  2. ¹¹¹In-DTPA⁰-octreotide (Octreoscan), ¹³¹I-MIBG and other agents for radionuclide therapy of NETs.

    PubMed

    Bomanji, Jamshed B; Papathanasiou, Nikolaos D

    2012-02-01

    This paper is a critical review of the literature on NET radionuclide therapy with (111)In-DTPA(0)-octreotide (Octreoscan) and (131)I-MIBG, focusing on efficacy and toxicity. Some potential future applications and new candidate therapeutic agents are also mentioned. Octreoscan has been a pioneering agent for somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy. It has achieved symptomatic responses and disease stabilization, but it is now outperformed by the corresponding β-emitter agents (177)Lu-DOTATATE and (90)Y-DOTATOC. (131)I-MIBG is the radionuclide therapy of choice for inoperable or metastatic phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas, which avidly concentrate this tracer via the noradrenaline transporter. Symptomatic, biochemical and tumour morphological response rates of 50-89%, 45-74% and 27-47%, respectively, have been reported. (131)I-MIBG is a second-line radiopharmaceutical for treatment of enterochromaffin carcinoids, mainly offering the benefit of amelioration of hormone-induced symptoms. High specific activity, non-carrier-added (131)I-MIBG and meta-astato((211)At)-benzylguanidine (MABG) are tracers with potential for enhanced therapeutic efficacy, yet their integration into clinical practice awaits further exploration. Amongst other promising agents, radiolabelled exendin analogues show potential for imaging and possibly therapy of insulinomas, while preclinical studies are currently evaluating DOTA peptides targeting the CCK-2/gastrin receptors that are overexpressed by medullary thyroid carcinoma cells. PMID:22388626

  3. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 μg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ► Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ► This NM model is a cost effective

  4. Synthesis of alpha-methylenebeutyrolactams as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Kornet, M J

    1979-03-01

    A series of 1-aryl-3-methylene-2-pyrrolidinones was synthesized via a three-step reaction sequence. 1,4-Bis-[N-(3-methylene-2-oxopyrrolidino)]benzene, which can undergo alkylation at two sites, was also prepared. These compounds are related to the known antitumor agents alpha-methylenebutyrolactones. Attempts to prepare bis-alpha-methylenelactams, in which the heterocyclic rings are joined through their nitrogen atoms by an alkylene bridge, were unsuccessful. All of the alpha-methylenelactams were screened in B16 melanocarcinoma and P-388 lymphocytic leukemia tumor systems but failed to show significant activity. PMID:423127

  5. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C.; Naman, C. Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M.; Soejarto, Djaja D.

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  6. Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Potent monocarboxylate transporter 1 inhibitors (MCT1) have been developed based on α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid template. Structure–activity relationship studies demonstrate that the introduction of p-N, N-dialkyl/diaryl, and o-methoxy groups into cyanocinnamic acid has maximal MCT1 inhibitory activity. Systemic toxicity studies in healthy ICR mice with few potent MCT1 inhibitors indicate normal body weight gains in treated animals. In vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in colorectal adenocarcinoma (WiDr cell line) in nude mice xenograft models establish that compound 27 exhibits single agent activity in inhibiting the tumor growth. PMID:26005533

  7. Combination therapy with insulin and oral agents: optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2002-01-01

    The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) showed that tight glycemic control with any of several therapeutic regimens has the potential to significantly reduce the risk for long-term microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes. An important question that remains to be answered is what is the best approach to optimizing glycemic control in patients with this disease. This article reviews results of studies in which insulin was used alone or in combination with oral antidiabetic agents for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. Analysis of comparative studies (13 in insulin-naive and 26 in previously insulin-treated patients) showed that combination therapy involving one to two insulin injections per day plus oral therapy is usually more effective than insulin monotherapy for achieving and maintaining glycemic control. Combination treatment for type 2 diabetes can be significantly improved by newly developed preparations that lack the major limitations of older products. Once-daily administration of isophane insulin (NPH insulin) is limited by a 15-18-h duration of action and a peak effect that occurs about 6 h after injection. Insulin glargine, a new insulin analogue developed using recombinant DNA technology, has a flat pharmacodynamic profile and a 24-h duration of action. Results from a recent comparative study indicate that insulin glargine plus oral therapy may provide better post-dinner glucose control as well as less symptomatic and nocturnal hypoglycemia than oral therapy combined with NPH insulin. The studies reviewed in the present article support the conclusion that combination therapy with insulin glargine combined with one or more oral antidiabetic agents may be the treatment of choice for achieving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:12324990

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Hydrazones as Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Sharma, Neha; Saini, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazones are a special class of organic compounds in the Schiff base family. Hydrazones constitute a versatile compound of organic class having basic structure (R1R2C=NNR3R4). The active centers of hydrazone, that is, carbon and nitrogen, are mainly responsible for the physical and chemical properties of the hydrazones and, due to the reactivity toward electrophiles and nucleophiles, hydrazones are used for the synthesis of organic compound such as heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities. Hydrazones and their derivatives are known to exhibit a wide range of interesting biological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiplatelet, cardioprotective, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antitubercular, trypanocidal, anti-HIV, and so forth. The present review summarizes the efficiency of hydrazones as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25383223

  9. [Chalcones and their heterocyclic analogs as potential antifungal chemotherapeutic agents].

    PubMed

    Opletalová, V; Sedivý, D

    1999-11-01

    Chalcones and their heterocyclic analogues show various biological effects, e.g. anti-inflammatory, antitumour, antibacterial, antituberculous, antiviral, antiprotozoal, gastroprotective, and others. The present review discusses in greater detail the fungistatic and fungicide properties of these compounds and presents also their chemical structures. The mechanism of antifungal effects of chalcones and their analogues has not been investigated in greater detail. Due to the presence of a reactive ketovinyl moiety in the molecule the compounds of this type are able to react with the thiol groups of enzymes. It cannot be excluded that chalcones interfere with the normal function of the membranes of fungi and moulds. Further investigation of chemical, physical, and biological properties of chalcones and their analogues could lead to the elucidation of the mechanism of their action and finding of effective fungicidal and fungistatic agents in this group of organic substances. PMID:10748740

  10. Biomaterials-Potential nucleation agents in blood and possible implications.

    PubMed

    Rohnke, Marcus; Henss, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Blood, simulated body fluids, and many cell culture media are supersaturated solutions with respect to several calcium phosphates. Therefore biomaterials can act as nucleation agents and evoke heterogeneous nucleation of salts on the surface of immersed biomaterials. Depending on the field of application, this can be either beneficial or disadvantageous. Although nucleation from supersaturated solutions is an old and well-known scientific phenomenon it is not standard to test new developed materials with surface analytical methods for their ability to initiate nucleation in vitro. Therefore, this communication aims to review the mineralization effect and to emphasize the possible negative implications, especially to functionalized bone implants. Surface coatings with proteins, growth factors, and, etc., can become ineffective due to deposition of a dense calcium phosphate layer. In the case of drug loaded implants, drug release might be inhibited. PMID:27316221

  11. Screening for potential anti-infective agents towards Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Su Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The established treatment for melioidosis is antibiotic therapy. However, a constant threat to this form of treatment is resistance development of the causative agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, towards antibiotics. One option to circumvent this threat of antibiotic resistance is to search for new alternative anti-infectives which target the host innate immune system and/or bacterial virulence. In this study, 29 synthetic compounds were evaluated for their potential to increase the lifespan of an infected host. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was adopted as the infection model as its innate immune pathways are homologous to humans. Screens were performed in a liquid-based survival assay containing infected worms exposed to individual compounds and survival of untreated and compound-treated worms were compared. A primary screen identified nine synthetic compounds that extended the lifespan of B. pseudomallei-infected worms. Subsequently, a disc diffusion test was performed on these selected compounds to delineate compounds into those that enhanced the survival of worms via antimicrobial activity i.e. reducing the number of infecting bacteria, or into those that did not target pathogen viability. Out of the nine hits selected, two demonstrated antimicrobial effects on B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the findings from this study suggest that the other seven identified compounds are potential anti-infectives which could protect a host against B. pseudomallei infection without developing the risk of drug resistance.

  12. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans. PMID:24102473

  13. Anti-inflammatory agents from plants: progress and potential.

    PubMed

    Recio, M C; Andujar, I; Rios, J L

    2012-01-01

    The identification of substances that can promote the resolution of inflammation in a way that is homeostatic, modulatory, efficient, and well-tolerated by the body is of fundamental importance. Traditional medicines have long provided front-line pharmacotherapy for many millions of people worldwide. Medicinal extracts are a rich source of therapeutic leads for the pharmaceutical industry. The use of medicinal plant therapies to treat chronic illness, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is thus widespread and on the rise.The aim of this review is to present recent progress in clinical anti-inflammatory studies of plant extracts and compound leads such as green tea polyphenols, curcumin, resveratrol, boswellic acid, and cucurbitacins, among others, against chronic inflammatory diseases, mainly RA and IBD. In this context, the present paper also highlights the most promising experimental data on those plant extracts and pure compounds active in animal models of the aforementioned diseases. PMID:22414101

  14. Au@Pt nanostructures: a novel photothermal conversion agent for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jinglong; Jiang, Xiumei; Wang, Liming; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Zhijian; Liu, Ying; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Chunying

    2014-03-01

    Due to aspect ratio dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR), gold nanorods (Au NRs) can be tuned to have a strong absorption in the near infrared region (NIR) and convert light to heat energy, which shows promises in cancer photothermal therapy. In this study, we introduced another more efficient NIR photothermal agent, Au nanorods coated with a shell of Pt nanodots (Au@Pt nanostructures). After surface modification with Pt dots, the Au@Pt nanostructure became a more efficient photothermal therapy agent as verified both in vitro and in vivo. To clarify the mechanism, we assessed the interaction between the MDA-MB-231 cells with Au@Pt or Au NRs. Results showed that the slightly higher uptake and the reduced sensitivity of the longitudinal SPR band on the intracellular aggregate state may contribute to the better photothermal efficiency for Au@Pt NRs. The theoretical studies further confirmed that the Au@Pt nanostructure itself exhibited better photothermal efficiency compared to Au NRs. These advantages make the Au@Pt nanostructure a more attractive and effective agent for cancer photothermal therapy than general Au NRs.

  15. Biological agents with potential for misuse: a historical perspective and defensive measures.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Deepak K; Warheit, David B

    2004-08-15

    Biological and chemical agents capable of producing serious illness or mortality have been used in biowarfare from ancient times. Use of these agents has progressed from crude forms in early and middle ages, when snakes and infected cadavers were used as weapons in battles, to sophisticated preparations for use during and after the second World War. Cults and terrorist organizations have attempted the use of biological agents with an aim to immobilize populations or cause serious harm. The reasons for interest in these agents by individuals and organizations include relative ease of acquisition, potential for causing mass casualty or panic, modest financing requirement, availability of technology, and relative ease of delivery. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified Critical Biological Agents into three major categories. This classification was based on several criteria, which include severity of impact on human health, potential for delivery in a weapon, capacity to cause panic and special needs for development, and stockpiling of medication. Agents that could cause the greatest harm following deliberate use were placed in category A. Category B included agents capable of producing serious harm and significant mortality but of lower magnitude than category A agents. Category C included emerging pathogens that could be developed for mass dispersion in future and their potential as a major health threat. A brief description of the category A bioagents is included and the pathophysiology of two particularly prominent agents, namely anthrax and smallpox, is discussed in detail. The potential danger from biological agents and their ever increasing threat to human populations have created a need for developing technologies for their early detection, for developing treatment strategies, and for refinement of procedures to ensure survival of affected individuals so as to attain the ultimate goal of eliminating the threat from intentional use of

  16. Novel Targeted Agents in Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Natalie S.; Park, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have shown significant promise in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and in the frontline setting. With the development of these new therapies, cytotoxic chemotherapy may be avoided entirely in some clinical settings. This review will present the latest information on these novel treatments in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and will discuss both recently approved agents as well as drugs currently being studied in clinical trials. PMID:26393619

  17. Effectiveness of laser therapy and topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    He, S; Wang, Y; Li, X; Hu, D

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of laser therapy with that of topical desensitising agents in treating dentine hypersensitivity. A secondary objective was to determine the safety of laser application according to the relevant studies. A systematic search was performed in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the National Research Register, the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register database to retrieve all articles that were about randomised controlled trials involving the application of laser desensitising procedures and topical desensitising agents in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. A total of eight trials that met all inclusion criteria involving 234 participants were reviewed. Based upon the 'quality' of evidence, one study was classified as A level, five as B level and two as C level. Owing to the heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. Half of the included studies compared GaALAS laser with topical desensitising agents, but the findings were conflicting. The remaining studies involved Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser and CO2 laser, and all showed that the three types of lasers were superior to topical desensitising agents, but the superiority was slight. A systematic review of the literature indicates the likelihood that laser therapy has a slight clinical advantage over topical medicaments in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity. More large sample-sized, long-term, high-quality randomised controlled clinical trials are needed before definitive conclusions were made. PMID:21223353

  18. Exploring the potential of adjunct therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rayasam, Geetha Vani; Balganesh, Tanjore S

    2015-08-01

    A critical unmet need for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is to find novel therapies that are efficacious, safe, and shorten the duration of treatment. Drug discovery approaches for TB primarily target essential genes of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but novel strategies such as host-directed therapies and nonmicrobicidal targets are necessary to bring about a paradigm shift in treatment. Drugs targeting the host pathways and nonmicrobicidal proteins can be used only in conjunction with existing drugs as adjunct therapies. Significantly, host-directed adjunct therapies have the potential to decrease duration of treatment, as they are less prone to drug resistance, target the immune responses, and act via novel mechanism of action. Recent advances in targeting host-pathogen interactions have implicated pathways such as eicosanoid regulation and angiogenesis. Furthermore, several approved drugs such as metformin and verapamil have been identified that appear suitable for repurposing for the treatment of TB. These findings and the challenges in the area of host- and/or pathogen-directed adjunct therapies and their implications for TB therapy are discussed. PMID:26073420

  19. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies. PMID:23834957

  20. Cardiovascular gene therapy: current status and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, M M; Hynes, S O; Barry, F; O'Brien, T

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential treatment option in patients suffering from a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, vein graft failure and in-stent restenosis. Thus far preclinical studies have shown promise for a wide variety of genes, in particular the delivery of genes encoding growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to treat ischaemic vascular disease both peripherally and in coronary artery disease. VEGF as well as other genes such as TIMPs have been used to target the development of neointimal hyperplasia to successfully prevent vein graft failure and in-stent restenosis in animal models. Subsequent phase I trials to examine safety of these therapies have been successful with low levels of serious adverse effects, and albeit in the absence of a placebo group some suggestion of efficacy. Phase 2 studies, which have incorporated a placebo group, have not confirmed this early promise of efficacy. In the next generation of clinical gene therapy trials for cardiovascular disease, many parameters will need to be adjusted in the search for an effective therapy, including the identification of a suitable vector, appropriate gene or genes and an effective vector delivery system for a specific disease target. Here we review the current status of cardiovascular gene therapy and the potential for this approach to become a viable treatment option. PMID:17558439

  1. Chlorotoxin: Structure, activity, and potential uses in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Paola G; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a disulfide-rich stable peptide from the venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus, which has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of cancer. Its ability to preferentially bind to tumor cells has been harnessed to develop an imaging agent to help visualize tumors during surgical resection. In addition, chlorotoxin has attracted interest as a vehicle to deliver anti-cancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. Given its interesting structural and biological properties, chlorotoxin also has the potential to be used in a variety of other biotechnology and biomedical applications. Here, we review the structure, activity and potential applications of chlorotoxin as a drug design scaffold. PMID:26418522

  2. Potential Role of Garcinol as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Nadia; Gupta, Smiti V.

    2012-01-01

    Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone, is extracted from the rind of the fruit of Garcinia indica, a plant found extensively in tropical regions. Although the fruit has been consumed traditionally over centuries, its biological activities, specifically its anticancer potential is a result of recent scientific investigations. The anticarcinogenic properties of garcinol appear to be moderated via its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic activities. In addition, garcinol displays effective epigenetic influence by inhibiting histone acetyltransferases (HAT 300) and by possible posttranscriptional modulation by mi RNA profiles involved in carcinogenesis. In vitro as well as some in vivo studies have shown the potential of this compound against several cancers types including breast, colon, pancreatic, and leukemia. Although this is a promising molecule in terms of its anticancer properties, investigations in relevant animal models, and subsequent human trials are warranted in order to fully appreciate and confirm its chemopreventative and/or therapeutic potential. PMID:22745638

  3. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment. PMID:25016141

  4. Modified polysaccharides as potential (19)F magnetic resonance contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Minoshima, Masafumi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-06-16

    The introduction of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride into partially oxidized alginic acid, dextran, and polygalacturonic acid (10-100 kDa) by means of the imine formation and a subsequent reduction resulted in water-soluble materials containing 1-14% of fluorine. They showed a single or split (19)F NMR signal in a narrow range of -63 to -63.5 ppm. The observed T1 and T2 were approximately 1 and 0.2 s at 400 or 500 MHz instruments, respectively. The samples showed low toxicity and uptake toward the HeLa cells similar to native polysaccharides and were preferentially localized in lysosomes. A tail intravenous injection of 5 mg of modified dextran containing 1% of fluorine revealed that the probe was not trapped in liver, spleen or kidneys, but was quickly cleared with urine. The proposed materials can be used for imaging of the gastrointestinal tract or the genitourinary system and act as a material for more complex (19)F MRI agent synthesis. PMID:27148998

  5. Lycopene: a review of its potential as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, V; Nagini, S

    2005-11-01

    Dietary chemoprevention has emerged as a cost effective approach to control most prevalent chronic diseases including cancer. In particular, tomato and tomato products are recognised to confer a wide range of health benefits. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that high consumption of tomatoes effectively lowers the risk of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer by improving the antioxidant capacity. Tomatoes are rich sources of lycopene, an antioxidant carotenoid reported to be a more stable and potent singlet oxygen quenching agent compared to other carotenoids. In addition to its antioxidant properties, lycopene shows an array of biological effects including cardioprotective, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities. The anticancer activity of lycopene has been demonstrated both in in vitro and in vivo tumour models. The mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of lycopene on carcinogenesis could involve ROS scavenging, upregulation of detoxification systems, interference with cell proliferation, induction of gap-junctional communication, inhibition of cell cycle progression and modulation of signal transduction pathways. This review outlines the sources, structure, absorption, metabolism, bioavailability and pharmacological properties of lycopene with special reference to its antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects. PMID:16305484

  6. Evaluation of potential biocontrol agent for aflatoxin in Argentinean peanuts.

    PubMed

    Alaniz Zanon, M S; Chiotta, M L; Giaj-Merlera, G; Barros, G; Chulze, S

    2013-04-01

    Biocontrol by competitive exclusion has been developed as the most promising means of controlling aflatoxins in peanuts. A 2-year study was carried out to determine the efficacy of an Aspergillus flavus strain as biocontrol agent to reduce aflatoxin production in peanuts under field conditions in Argentina. The competitive strain used was a nontoxigenic A. flavus (AFCHG2) naturally occurring in peanut from Córdoba, Argentina. The inoculum was produced through solid-state fermentation on long grain rice and applied at rate of 50kg inoculum/ha. The incidence of the released strain within the A. flavus communities in soil and peanuts was determined using the shift in the ratio toxigenic:nontoxigenic and VCG analysis. During the 2009/2010 growing season, treatments produced significant reductions in the incidence of toxigenic isolates of A. flavus/Aspergillus parasiticus in soil and peanuts. However, no preharvest aflatoxin contamination was observed. In the 2010/2011 growing season, plants were exposed to late season drought conditions that were optimal for aflatoxin contamination. Significant reductions in aflatoxin levels averaging 71% were detected in treated plots with different inoculation treatments. The results suggest that using the strategy of competitive exclusion A. flavus AFCHG2 can be applied to reduce aflatoxin contamination in Argentinean peanuts. PMID:23454811

  7. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-08-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment. PMID:25016141

  8. Thymol and eugenol derivatives as potential antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Selene Maia; Vila-Nova, Nadja Soares; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Rondon, Fernanda Cristina; Lobo, Carlos Henrique; de Alencar Araripe Noronha Moura, Arlindo; Sales, Antônia Débora; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro; de Figuereido, José Ricardo; Campello, Claudio Cabral; Wilson, Mary E; de Andrade, Heitor Franco

    2014-11-01

    In Northeastern Brazil visceral leishmaniasis is endemic with lethal cases among humans and dogs. Treatment is toxic and 5-10% of humans die despite treatment. The aim of this work was to survey natural active compounds to find new molecules with high activity and low toxicity against Leishmania infantum chagasi. The compounds thymol and eugenol were chosen to be starting compounds to synthesize acetyl and benzoyl derivatives and to test their antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo against L. i. chagasi. A screening assay using luciferase-expressing promastigotes was used to measure the growth inhibition of promastigotes, and an ELISA in situ was performed to evaluate the growth inhibition of amastigote. For the in vivo assay, thymol and eugenol derivatives were given IP to BALB/c mice at 100mg/kg/day for 30 days. The thymol derivatives demonstrated the greater activity than the eugenol derivatives, and benzoyl-thymol was the best inhibitor (8.67 ± 0.28 μg/mL). All compounds demonstrated similar activity against amastigotes, and acetyl-thymol was more active than thymol and the positive control drug amphotericin B. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of Leishmania amastigote only in the spleen but not the liver of mice treated with acetyl-thymol. Thus, these synthesized derivatives demonstrated anti-leishmanial activity both in vitro and in vivo. These may constitute useful compounds to generate new agents for treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:25281268

  9. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel. PMID:19830975

  10. ZETA-POTENTIAL OF CONCRETE IN PRESENCE OF CHELATING AGENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of concrete surfaces at Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) and reprocessing facilities by radionuclides/heavy metals is a significant and widespread problem throughout the world’s Nuclear Power Industries. The current study of the zeta-potentials (') of concrete particles in the presence of va...

  11. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell based therapy for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burke, John; Hunter, Monte; Kolhe, Ravindra; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease affecting articular cartilage in joints, and it is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Current pharmacological treatment strategies are ineffective to prevent the OA progression; however, cellular therapies have the potential to regenerate the lost cartilage, combat cartilage degeneration, provide pain relief, and improve patient mobility. One of the most promising sources of cellular regenerative medicine is from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs can be isolated from adipose tissue, bone marrow, synovial tissue, and other sources. The aim of this review is to compile recent advancement in cellular based therapy more specifically in relation to MSCs in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27510262

  12. Radioiodinated fenetylline (captagon): A new potential brain imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Biersack, H.J.; Klunenberg, H.; Breuel, H.P.; Reske, S.N.; Reichmann, K.; Winkler, C.

    1984-01-01

    Since about 2 years /sup 123/I-labeled iodamphetamines (IMP) and diamines (HIPDM) have been used for scintigraphic brain investigations. As another possibly useful brain imaging agent we studied radioiodine labeled Fenetylline which is metabolized into amphetamine. Thirty wistar rats were injected 5 ..mu..Ci /sup 125/I-IMP and 2 ..mu..Ci /sup 131/I-Fenetylline each simultaneously. The animals were sacrificed 5,10,15,30,60, and 120 min. p.i. The radioactivity content of tissue specimens (brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, lung, myocardium, muscle) was measured in a well-counter (% dose/g tissue). In 2 dogs sequential cerebral scintigraphy was performed following the injection of 0.5 mCi /sup 131/I-Fenetylline. Three patients underwent brain SPECT after injection of 6.5 mCi /sup 123/I-Fenetylline. The results can be summarized as follows: after 5/10 min. p.i. Fenetylline-uptake in the brain of rats was 1.0/1.3% compared to 1.3/1.9% (IMP). A fast decrease of cerebral Fenetylline concentration was established after 30 (0.2%) and 60 (0.5%) min. The canine and human sequential scintigraphy revealed a rapid cerebral uptake (maximum after 2-10 min.) suggesting that Fenetylline is concentrated in the brain as a function of cerebral blood flow. From the first clinical findings it appears to be likely that the combined use of /sup 123/I labelled IMP and Fenetylline for SPECT may lead to a more differentiated evaluation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

  13. Nanoparticle Delivered Vascular Disrupting Agents (VDAs): Use of TNF-alpha conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Multimodal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Mithun M.; Iltis, Isabelle; Choi, Jeunghwan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Metzger, Gregory J.; Griffin, Robert J.; Bischof, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy remain the mainstay of current cancer therapy. However, treatment failure persists due to the inability to achieve complete local control of the tumor and curtail metastatic spread. Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) are a class of promising systemic agents that are known to synergistically enhance radiation, chemotherapy or thermal treatments of solid tumors. Unfortunately, there is still an unmet need for VDAs with more favorable safety profiles and fewer side effects. Recent work has demonstrated that conjugating VDAs to other molecules (polyethylene glycol, CNGRCG peptide) or nanoparticles (liposomes, gold) can reduce toxicity of one prominent VDA (tumor necrosis factor alpha, TNF-α). In this report, we show the potential of a gold conjugated TNF-α nanoparticle (NP-TNF) to improve multimodal cancer therapies with VDAs. In a dorsal skin fold and hindlimb murine xenograft model of prostate cancer, we found that NP-TNF disrupts endothelial barrier function and induces a significant increase in vascular permeability within the first 1–2 hours followed by a dramatic 80% drop in perfusion 2–6 hours after systemic administration. We also demonstrate that the tumor response to the nanoparticle can be verified using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a technique in clinical use. Additionally, multimodal treatment with thermal therapies at the perfusion nadir in the sub- and supra- physiological temperature regimes increases tumor volumetric destruction by over 60% and leads to significant tumor growth delays compared to thermal therapy alone. Lastly, NP-TNF was found to enhance thermal therapy in the absence of neutrophil recruitment, suggesting that immune/inflammatory regulation is not central to its power as part of a multimodal approach. Our data demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle-conjugated VDAs to significantly improve cancer therapy by preconditioning tumor vasculature to a secondary insult

  14. Therapeutic potential of anticytokine therapy in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Aukrust, Pal; Yndestad, Arne; Damås, Jan K; Gullestad, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammatory cytokines play a pathogenic role in congestive heart failure (CHF) by influencing heart contractility, inducing hypertrophy, and promoting apoptosis or fibrosis, contributing to the continuous myocardial remodeling process. While several stimuli may be operating such as heat-shock protein, microbial antigen, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, shear and oxidative stress, hypoxia and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), it seems that the inflammatory response to these stimuli may represent a common final pathogenic pathway in CHF regardless of the initial event. Traditional cardiovascular drugs seem to have little influence on the overall cytokine network, and immunomudulatory therapy has emerged as a possible new treatment modality in CHF. Several animal studies, and some clinical pilot studies, have suggested that down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines may improve cardiac performance. On the other hand, preliminary results from the placebo-controlled studies suggest no effect, or even adverse effect, of antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy on mortality and hospitalization. Although somewhat disappointing, these negative results do not necessarily argue against the 'cytokine hypothesis'. These studies just underscore the difficulties and the challenges in developing treatment modalities that can modulate the cytokine network in CHF patients resulting in anti-inflammatory and beneficial net effects. Further research in this area will have to more precisely identify the most important actors in the immunopathogenesis of CHF in order to develop more specific immunomodulating agents for this disorder. However, at present the beneficial role of anticytokine therapy in patients with CHF remains unproven. PMID:15134469

  15. New Trial Designs and Potential Therapies for Pulmonary Artery Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Bull, Todd M.; Saggar, Rajeev; Barst, Robyn J.; Elgazayerly, Amany; Fleming, Thomas R.; Grimminger, Friedrich; Rainisio, Maurizio; Stewart, Duncan J.; Stockbridge, Norman; Ventura, Carlo; Ghofrani, Ardeschir H.; Rubin, Lewis J.

    2014-01-01

    A greater understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and pathophysiology of pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) has led to significant advances, but the disease remains fatal. Treatment options are neither universally available nor always effective, underscoring the need for development of novel therapies and therapeutic strategies. Clinical trials to date have provided evidence of efficacy, but were limited in evaluating the scope and duration of treatment effects. Numerous potential targets in varied stages of drug development exist, in addition to novel uses of familiar therapies. The pursuit of gene and cell-based therapy continues, and device use to help acute deterioration and chronic management is emerging. This rapid surge of drug development has led to multicenter pivotal clinical trials and has resulted in novel ethical and global clinical trial concerns. This paper will provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges that await the development of novel treatments for PAH. PMID:24355645

  16. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized. PMID:26097168

  17. 5-Fluorouracil as an enhancer of aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy for skin cancer: New use for a venerable agent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Wilson, Clara; Iyer, Karthik

    2011-02-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was developed in the 1950s as an anticancer drug and is now widely used to treat many cancers, including colon and breast carcinoma. 5-FU causes fluoronucleotide misincorporation into RNA and DNA, inhibits thymidylate synthase, and leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. For skin precancers (actinic keratoses; AK), 5-FU is prescribed as a topical agent and was essentially the only option for treating widespread AK of the skin prior to FDA approval of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 1999. PDT is now gradually replacing 5-FU as a preferred treatment for AK, but neither PDT nor 5-FU are effective for true skin cancers (basal or squamous cell), particularly for tumors >1 mm in depth. In our ongoing work to improve the efficacy of PDT for skin cancer, we previously showed that PDT efficacy can be significantly enhanced by preconditioning tumors with methotrexate (MTX), which leads to increased production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in target cells. However, because MTX must be given orally or intravenously, it is considered unacceptable for widespread human use due to potential toxicity. MTX and 5-FU exert similar effects on the thymidylate synthesis pathway, so we reasoned that topical 5-FU could be a potential alternative to MTX. In this paper, exploratory studies that test 5-FU as a preconditioning agent for PDT are presented. In a cutaneous model of squamous cell carcinoma (chemically-induced papillomatous tumors in mice), 5-FU significantly enhances PpIX accumulation and therefore emerges as a new candidate agent for combination therapy with PDT.

  18. An in situ forming biodegradable hydrogel-based embolic agent for interventional therapies.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lihui; Rostambeigi, Nassir; Zantek, Nicole D; Rostamzadeh, Parinaz; Bravo, Mike; Carey, John; Golzarian, Jafar

    2013-09-01

    We present here the characteristics of an in situ forming hydrogel prepared from carboxymethyl chitosan and oxidized carboxymethyl cellulose for interventional therapies. Gelation, owing to the formation of Schiff bases, occurred both with and without the presence of a radiographic contrast agent. The hydrogel exhibited a highly porous internal structure (pore diameter 17±4 μm), no cytotoxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, hemocompatibility with human blood, and degradability in lysozyme solutions. Drug release from hydrogels loaded with a sclerosant, tetracycline, was measured at pH 7.4, 6 and 2 at 37°C. The results showed that tetracycline was more stable under acidic conditions, with a lower release rate observed at pH 6. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was loaded into the hydrogel and a cumulative release of 30% was observed over 78 h in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C. Injection of the hydrogel precursor through a 5-F catheter into a fusiform aneurysm model was feasible, leading to complete filling of the aneurysmal sac, which was visualized by fluoroscopy. The levels of occlusion by hydrogel precursors (1.8% and 2.1%) and calibrated microspheres (100-300 μm) in a rabbit renal model were compared. Embolization with hydrogel precursors was performed without clogging and the hydrogel achieved effective occlusion in more distal arteries than calibrated microspheres. In conclusion, this hydrogel possesses promising characteristics potentially beneficial for a wide range of vascular intervention procedures that involve embolization and drug delivery. PMID:23791672

  19. Hydroxytyrosol-Derived Compounds: A Basis for the Creation of New Pharmacological Agents for Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Roberta; Gilardini Montani, Maria Saveria; Merendino, Nicolò; Romani, Annalisa; Velotti, Francesca

    2015-12-10

    Hydroxytyrosol [2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol, HTyr] is a phenolic compound found in olive leaves and fruits and extra-virgin olive oil, which has well-known strong antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties. Recently, it has received particular attention for its antiproliferative and apoptotic activities and its anti-inflammatory properties. During the past few years, more efforts have been focused on synthesizing HTyr-derived compounds with enhanced biological activities for their potential use in different chronic degenerative diseases. In this paper, we report a dissertation on the current knowledge of selected synthetic HTyr derivatives and analogues and their potential use in cancer prevention and therapy, which are related to their antioxidant, antiproliferative/apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. On the basis of the perspective of using HTyr-derived compounds as anticancer agents, we have taken into account only studies that were performed in experimental cell-based models. PMID:26225717

  20. New water soluble pyrroloquinoline derivatives as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ferlin, Maria Grazia; Marzano, Christine; Dalla Via, Lisa; Chilin, Adriana; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Guiotto, Adriano; Moro, Stefano

    2005-08-01

    A new class of water soluble 3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinoline derivatives has been synthesized and investigated as potential anticancer drugs. Water solubility profiles have been used to select the most promising derivatives. The novel compound 10, having two (2-diethylamino-ethyl) side chains linked through positions 3N and 9O, presents a suitable water solubility profile, and it was shown to exhibit cell growth inhibitory properties when tested against the in-house panel of cell lines, in particular those obtained from melanoma. PMID:15936202

  1. Potential Effects of Cannabidiol as a Wake-Promoting Agent

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Sarro-Ramírez, Andrea; Sánchez, Daniel; Mijangos-Moreno, Stephanie; Tejeda-Padrón, Alma; Poot-Aké, Alwin; Guzmán, Khalil; Pacheco-Pantoja, Elda; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, the scientific interest in chemistry and pharmacology of cannabinoids has increased. Most attention has focused on ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC) as it is the psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (C. sativa). However, in previous years, the focus of interest in the second plant constituent with non-psychotropic properties, cannabidiol (CBD) has been enhanced. Recently, several groups have investigated the pharmacological properties of CBD with significant findings; furthermore, this compound has raised promising pharmacological properties as a wake-inducing drug. In the current review, we will provide experimental evidence regarding the potential role of CBD as a wake-inducing drug. PMID:24851090

  2. KETAMINE: A POTENTIAL RAPID-ACTING ANTISUICIDAL AGENT?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T; Sanacora, Gerard

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has attracted widespread attention as a potential rapid-acting antidepressant. There is also considerable interest in its use for the rapid treatment of patients deemed at risk for suicide. Here, we review the available evidence (open-label and randomized controlled trials) that examine the effects of ketamine on suicidal ideation (SI). Overall, data suggest that ketamine has a rapid albeit transient effect in reducing SI, though some studies had mixed results at different time points or using different assessments. Weaknesses to the existing literature include the small sample sizes of the studies, the exclusion of patients with significant SI at baseline from many of the studies, and the potential functional unblinding when participants are randomized to saline as placebo. The evidence supporting the clinical use of ketamine for SI is very preliminary. Although ketamine appears to a promising therapeutic option in a context where there is a great unmet need (i.e., patients at imminent risk of suicide), further controlled trials are needed to allow for meaningful clinical recommendations. PMID:27082101

  3. New inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase as potential antidiabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Somsák, L; Czifrák, K; Tóth, M; Bokor, E; Chrysina, E D; Alexacou, K-M; Hayes, J M; Tiraidis, C; Lazoura, E; Leonidas, D D; Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G

    2008-01-01

    The protein glycogen phosphorylase has been linked to type 2 diabetes, indicating the importance of this target to human health. Hence, the search for potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme, which may lead to antihyperglycaemic drugs, has received particular attention. Glycogen phosphorylase is a typical allosteric protein with five different ligand binding sites, thus offering multiple opportunities for modulation of enzyme activity. The present survey is focused on recent new molecules, potential inhibitors of the enzyme. The biological activity can be modified by these molecules through direct binding, allosteric effects or other structural changes. Progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these inhibitors has been made by the determination of high-resolution enzyme inhibitor structures (both muscle and liver). The knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes allows analysis of how the ligands interact with the target and has the potential to facilitate structure-based drug design. In this review, the synthesis, structure determination and computational studies of the most recent inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase at the different binding sites are presented and analyzed. PMID:19075645

  4. Au–Silica Nanowire Nanohybrid as a Hyperthermia Agent for Photothermal Therapy in the Near-Infrared Region

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial-based photothermal therapy has shown great potential for efficient cancer treatment. Here, we report a new hyperthermia agent, Au–silica nanowire nanohybrid (Au-SiNW nanohybrid) with tunable optical properties, for photothermal therapy. The unique feature of the synthetic method is no need of surface modification of SiNWs for the direct deposition of Au seeds, which can avoid complicated synthetic procedures and improve the reproducibility. The Au-SiNW nanohybrid can generate significant amount of heat upon irradiation in the near-infrared (NIR) region for inducing thermal cell death. Moreover, compared to reported hyperthermia nanomaterials, the new nanohybrid requires a much lower laser irradiation density of 0.3 W/cm2 for destroying cancer cells. A549 lung cancer cells were used for in vitro photothermal study. The nanohybrid showed excellent in vitro biocompatibility by using a 96-nonradioactive-cell proliferation assay. Even at a high concentration of 0.500 mg/mL nanohybrid, over 80% cells were alive. In contrast, almost all the cells were killed when NIR irradiation was applied at a concentration of 0.100 mg/mL nanohybrid. The Au-SiNW nanohybrid may become a promising hyperthermia agent. PMID:25029292

  5. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as a Sole Agent Is Not Immunosuppressant in a Highly Immunogenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gassas, Adam; Min, Weixian; Evans, A. Wayne; Carter, Susan; Sándor, George K.; Grunebaum, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    Background. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, which is used for many conditions, may also have immunosuppressive effects and could be used for prevention or treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). If HBO is immunosuppressant, then we hypothesize that HBO therapy will delay the T-cell mediated skin graft rejection. Methods. C57/BL6 black-coated (H2B) mice received skin graft from CBA (H2D) white-coated mice. Mice were treated with either 19 session of 240 kpa oxygen or 29 session of 300 kpa oxygen, for 90 minutes. Mice were housed either 4 per cage or separately, to prevent friction and mechanical factors that may affect graft survival. Skin grafts were assessed daily. Results. There was no difference in length of graft survival between mice that received either regimens of HBO therapy and mice that did not receive HBO therapy. Conclusions. HBO therapy, as a sole agent, did not delay skin graft rejection in a highly immunogenic mouse model. PMID:22046567

  6. Natural products as a source of potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J M; Baird, W M; Chang, C J

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of novel bioactive natural products are reported. This research is directed to the exploration of plants with confirmed activity in bioassays designed to detect potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents. Structural work and chemical studies are reported for several cytotoxic agents from the plants Annona densicoma, Annona reticulata, Claopodium crispifolium, Polytrichum obioense, and Psorospermum febrifugum. Studies are also reported based on development of a mammalian cell culture benzo[a]pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogenic agents from natural products. In this study a number of isoflavonoids and flavonoids with antimutagenic activity have been discovered. PMID:2189947

  7. Choosing Initial Antiretroviral Therapy: Current Recommendations for Initial Therapy and Newer or Investigational Agents.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Roy M

    2015-01-01

    There is general consistency among US and European guidelines regarding the initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals. Recent and ongoing trials comparing regimens may lead to reevaluation of initial treatment choices. The choice of antiretroviral regimen will also likely be affected by development, evaluation, and availability of newer drugs. This article reviews currently recommended regimens and characteristics of selected current investigational drugs, including the nucleotide analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir alafenamide, the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor doravirine, the integrase strand transfer inhibitor cabotegravir, the HIV entry inhibitor BMS-663068, and the HIV maturation inhibitor BMS-955176. This article summarizes a presentation by Roy M. Gulick, MD, MPH, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in New York, New York, in March 2015 and September 2015. PMID:26713502

  8. Potential Antiosteoporotic Agents from Plants: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Nie, Yan; Cao, Da-Peng; Xue, Yun-Yun; Wang, Jie-Si; Zhao, Lu; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health hazard and is a disease of old age; it is a silent epidemic affecting more than 200 million people worldwide in recent years. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research many plants and their compounds have been shown to possess antiosteoporosis activity. This paper reviews the medicinal plants displaying antiosteoporosis properties including their origin, active constituents, and pharmacological data. The plants reported here are the ones which are commonly used in traditional medical systems and have demonstrated clinical effectiveness against osteoporosis. Although many plants have the potential to prevent and treat osteoporosis, so far, only a fraction of these plants have been thoroughly investigated for their physiological and pharmacological properties including their mechanism of action. An attempt should be made to highlight plant species with possible antiosteoporosis properties and they should be investigated further to help with future drug development for treating this disease. PMID:23365596

  9. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  10. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  11. Preparation of Amyloid Immuno-Nanoparticles as Potential MRI Contrast Agents for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhenyu; Yul, Tingting; Xu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia which is caused by accumulation in the brain of plaques made up of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Research on nanosized systems indicated that nanoparticles (NPs) could pass across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and improve the visibility of internal body structures in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which made it possible to aid the early diagnosis of AD. In this research study we synthesized magnetite nanoparticles by high-temperature solution-phase reaction, transferred into water based on a ligand exchange process and coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic (DMSA). Subsequently, the anti-amyloid Abeta immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) were prepared by grafting anti-amyloid antibodies on the surface of the DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was introduced to evaluate the IMNPs activity and conjugation amount of antibodies. The biocompatibility of the IMNPs was tested by colony-forming assay. The results showed that the anti-amyloid Abeta IMNPs were biocompatible and biologically active, as well as effective in enhancing MRI solution, indicating that the IMNPs could be used as potential MRI contrast agents and targeted carriers for AD early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26716196

  12. Potentially Harmful Therapy and Multicultural Counseling: Bridging Two Disciplinary Discourses

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Dennis C.; Gone, Joseph P.; Nagata, Donna K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years psychologists have been increasingly concerned about potentially harmful therapy, yet this recent discourse has not addressed issues that have long been voiced by the multicultural counseling and psychotherapy movement. We aim to begin to bring these seemingly disparate discourses of harm into greater conversation with one another, in the service of placing the discipline on a firmer foothold in its considerations of potentially harmful therapy. After reviewing the two discourses and exploring reasons for their divergence, we argue that they operate according to differing assumptions pertaining to the sources, objects, and scope of harm. We then argue that these differences reveal the discipline’s need to better appreciate that harm is a social construct, that psychotherapy may be inherently ethnocentric, and that strategies for collecting evidence of harm should be integrated with a social justice agenda. PMID:26339075

  13. Optimizing Treatment of Intra-amniotic Infection and Early-Onset Postpartum Endometritis: Advantages of Single-Agent Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stiglich, Norma; Alston, Meredith; vanSwam, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Intra-amniotic infection (IAI) and early-onset postpartum endometritis (PPE) require prompt antibiotic treatment and are generally treated by either of two regimens. A complicated multi-agent regimen is most commonly used, despite a lack of clear evidence that it produces better outcomes than a simpler single-agent regimen. Objective: We compared treatment outcomes between a multi-agent regimen of ampicillin, gentamicin, and clindamycin versus a single-agent regimen of ampicillin/sulbactam for IAI and early-onset PPE. Methods: We conducted an observational retrospective cohort study by collecting data from the records of all patients at Denver Health Medical Center treated for IAI or PPE during two 6-month periods: a baseline period during which a regimen of ampicillin, gentamicin, and clindamycin was used and a subsequent period when ampicillin/sulbactam was used. Primary outcomes were prolonged antibiotic treatment and readmission for endometritis or wound cellulitis. Results: Of potential study participants, 323 women met inclusion criteria; 179 were treated with the multi-agent regimen and 144 were treated with the single-agent regimen. The groups were statistically similar for demographic and intrapartum characteristics, except for a lower rate of premature rupture of membranes in the single-agent treatment group. Twelve patients required prolonged treatment, and 2 were readmitted; these subgroups were combined for statistical analyses. The primary outcomes were significantly associated with cesarean delivery and blood loss >500 mL for vaginal deliveries and >1000 mL for cesarean deliveries; however, there was no significant difference in the incidence of the primary outcomes between the 2 treatment groups when adjusted for these variables. Treatment with ampicillin/sulbactam resulted in fewer antibiotic doses administered to patients with an uncomplicated treatment course. Conclusion: Ampicillin/sulbactam treatment of IAI and early-onset PPE

  14. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges. PMID:24936916

  15. Remineralizing potential of various agents on dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Rani; Jaidka, Shipra; Singh, Deepti Jawa; Arora, Vanika

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP, Tooth Mousse) containing and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF, Tooth Mousse Plus) containing pastes on dental erosion. Materials and methods Thirty permanent non-carious premolars indicated for orthodontic extraction were included in this study and were sectioned in mesiodistal direction vertically. After immersion in the carbonated drink for 14 min, samples were treated with various remineralizing pastes which were CPP-ACP containing paste (Tooth Mousse) and CPP-ACPF containing paste (Tooth Mousse Plus) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Vickers Microhardness was recorded at baseline, after exposure to erosive drink and after treatment with remineralizing pastes. Data obtained was statistically analysed using Student t-test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results CPP-ACP (Tooth Mousse) and CPP-ACP with fluoride (Tooth Mousse Plus) resulted in 30.52% and 38.98% increase in post-erosion microhardness values respectively. The remineralizing potential of CPP-ACP with fluoride containing paste (Tooth Mousse Plus) was significantly better than that of CPP-ACP containing paste (Tooth Mousse) (p < 0.05). Conclusion Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (CPP-ACPF, Tooth Mousse Plus) can be recommended to be used in preventing erosive tooth wear from acidic beverages. PMID:25737926

  16. Characterizing potential heart agents with an isolated perfused heart system

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, D.B.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.; Camin, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used an isolated perfused heart system for characterizing potential myocardial perfusion radiopharamaceuticals. Rabbit or guinea pig (GP) hearts are removed and perfused through the aorta with a blood-free buffer. Heart rate and ventricular pressure are monitored as indices of viability. Tc-99m-MAA is 96-100% retained in these hearts, and Tc-99m human serum albumin shows less than 5% extraction. Tl-201 is 30-40% extracted. It is known that in-vivo, Tc-99m(dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2//sup +/ is taken up by rabbit heart but not by GP or human heart. Analogous results are obtained with the isolated perfused heart model, where the complex is extracted well by the isolated rabbit heart (24%) but not by the GP heart (<5%). Values are unchanged if human, rabbit or GP blood is mixed and co-injected with the complex. Tc-99m)dmpe)/sub 3//sup +/ is also taken up by rabbit but not by GP hearts in-vivo. However, isolated perfused hearts of both species extract this complex well (45-52%). Heart uptake is diminished to <7% if the complex is pre-equilibrated with human blood. GP blood produces a moderate inhibition (in GP hearts only) and rabbit blood has no effect. This suggests that a human or GP blood factor may have a significant effect on heart uptake of this complex. Tc-99m(CN-t-butyl)/sub 6//sup +/ is taken up well by both rabbit and GP hearts in-vivo, and is extracted 100% by both isolated perfused hearts. Heart retention remains high (73-75%) in the presence of human blood.

  17. β-Nitrostyrenes as Potential Anti-leishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Syed; Afrin, Farhat; Islamuddin, Mohammad; Chouhan, Garima; Ali, Intzar; Naaz, Faatima; Sharma, Kalicharan; Zaman, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of new therapeutic approach to treat leishmaniasis has become a priority. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect of β-nitrostyrenes was investigated against in vitro promastigotes and amastigotes. A series of β-nitrostyrenes have been synthesized by using Henry reaction and were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by broth microdilution assay and in vitro antileishmanial activities against Leishmania donovani promastigotes by following standard guidelines. The most active compounds were futher evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activities against intracellular amastigotes. Among the tested β-nitrostyrenes, compounds 7, 8, 9, 12, and 17 exhibited potential activities (MICs range, 0.25–8 μg/mL) against clinically significant human pathogenic fungi. However, the microbactericidal concentrations (MBCs) and the microfungicidal concentrations (MFCs) were found to be either similar or only two-fold greater than the MICs. Anti-leishmanial results demonstrated that compounds 9, 12, 14, and 18 were found to be most active among the tested samples and exhibited 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) by 23.40 ± 0.71, 37.83 ± 3.74, 40.50 ± 1.47, 55.66 ± 2.84 nM against L. donovani promastigotes and 30.5 ± 3.42, 21.46 ± 0.96, 26.43 ± 2.71, and 61.63 ± 8.02 nM respectively against intracellular L. donovani promastigotes amastigotes respectively which are comparable with standard AmB (19.60 ± 1.71 nM against promastigotes and 27.83 ± 3.26 nM against amastigotes). Compounds 9, 12, 14, and 18 were found to have potent in vitro leishmanicidal activity against L. donovani and found to be non-toxic against mammalian macrophages even at a concentration of 25 μM. Nitric oxide (NO) estimation studies reveals that these compounds are moderately inducing NO levels.

  18. Hypochlorous Acid as a Potential Wound Care Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Bassiri, M; Najafi, R; Najafi, K; Yang, J; Khosrovi, B; Hwong, W; Barati, E; Belisle, B; Celeri, C; Robson, MC

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a major inorganic bactericidal compound of innate immunity, is effective against a broad range of microorganisms. Owing to its chemical nature, HOCl has never been used as a pharmaceutical drug for treating infection. In this article, we describe the chemical production, stabilization, and biological activity of a pharmaceutically useful formulation of HOCl. Methods: Stabilized HOCl is in the form of a physiologically balanced solution in 0.9% saline at a pH range of 3.5 to 4.0. Chlorine species distribution in solution is a function of pH. In aqueous solution, HOCl is the predominant species at the pH range of 3 to 6. At pH values less than 3.5, the solution exists as a mixture of chlorine in aqueous phase, chlorine gas, trichloride (Cl3−), and HOCl. At pH greater than 5.5, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) starts to form and becomes the predominant species in the alkaline pH. To maintain HOCl solution in a stable form, maximize its antimicrobial activities, and minimize undesirable side products, the pH must be maintained at 3.5 to 5. Results: Using this stabilized form of HOCl, the potent antimicrobial activities of HOCl are demonstrated against a wide range of microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity profile in L929 cells and the in vivo safety profile of HOCl in various animal models are described. Conclusion: On the basis of the antimicrobial activity and the lack of animal toxicity, it is predicted that stabilized HOCl has potential pharmaceutical applications in the control of soft tissue infection. PMID:17492050

  19. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy alkali metal Cesium (Cs) in host lattice, the nanoplatform can provide a higher resolution X-ray CT imaging than many other reported lanthanide-based CT contrast agents. Furthermore, by using the targeted RGD motif, chemotherapy drug alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), and photothermal coupling agent ICG, this nanoplatform simultaneously provides multifunctional imaging and targeted synergistic therapy. To demonstrate the theranostic performance of this novel nanoplatform in vivo, visual diagnosis in the small animal model was realized by UCL/CT imaging which was further integrated with targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. These results provided evidence for the successful construction of a novel lanthanide-based nanoplatform coupled with multimodal imaging diagnosis and potential application in synergistic cancer theranostics. PMID:27446485

  20. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy alkali metal Cesium (Cs) in host lattice, the nanoplatform can provide a higher resolution X-ray CT imaging than many other reported lanthanide-based CT contrast agents. Furthermore, by using the targeted RGD motif, chemotherapy drug alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), and photothermal coupling agent ICG, this nanoplatform simultaneously provides multifunctional imaging and targeted synergistic therapy. To demonstrate the theranostic performance of this novel nanoplatform in vivo, visual diagnosis in the small animal model was realized by UCL/CT imaging which was further integrated with targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. These results provided evidence for the successful construction of a novel lanthanide-based nanoplatform coupled with multimodal imaging diagnosis and potential application in synergistic cancer theranostics. PMID:27446485

  1. Cationic porphycenes as potential photosensitizers for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ragàs, Xavier; Sánchez-García, David; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Dai, Tianhong; Agut, Montserrat; Hamblin, Michael R.; Nonell, Santi

    2010-01-01

    Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse 3rd degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log10 reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J·cm-2 of red light. PMID:20936792

  2. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and their potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Neale, Joseph H; Pomper, Martin G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-01

    Modulation of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate peptidase activity with small-molecule inhibitors holds promise for a wide variety of diseases that involve glutamatergic transmission, and has implications for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. This new class of compounds, of which at least one has entered clinical trials and proven to be well tolerated, has demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of pain, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and, when appropriately functionalized, can image prostate cancer. Further investigation of these promising drug candidates will be needed to bring them to the marketplace. The recent publication of the X-ray crystal structure for the enzymatic target of these compounds should facilitate the development of other new agents with enhanced activity that could improve both the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:16341066

  3. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Rebeca; Pino, Marc; Hurtado, Begoña; García de Frutos, Pablo; Caballo, Carolina; Escolar, Ginés; Gomis, Ramón; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W), a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitor, has been investigated in this study. Methods Wild-type (WT) and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B−/−) mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed. Results In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC) by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001). Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B−/− mice (5.0±0.3 mg). Treatment of the PTP1B−/− mice with Na2O4W modified only slightly this response. In human blood, a dose-dependent effect was observed. At 200 μM, closure times in the PFA-100 were prolonged. On denuded vessels, %SC and thrombi formation (%T) decreased with Na2O4W. Neither the aggregating response nor the viscoelastic clot properties were affected. Conclusion Na2O4W decreases consistently the hemostatic capacity of platelets, inhibiting their adhesive and cohesive properties under flow conditions in mice and in human blood, resulting in smaller thrombi. Although Na2O4W may be acting on platelet PTP1B, other potential targets should not be disregarded. PMID:26060394

  4. Photo-activated Cancer Therapy: Potential for Treatment of Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry

    The diffuse and infiltrative nature of high grade gliomas, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. The propensity of glioma cells to migrate along white matter tracts suggests that a cure is possible only if these migratory cells can be eradicated. Approximately 80% of GBMs recur within 2 cm of the resection margin, suggesting that a reasonable approach for improving the prognosis of GBM patients would be the development of improved local therapies capable of eradicating glioma cells in the brain-adjacent-to-tumor (BAT). An additional complicating factor for the development of successful therapies is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is highly variable throughout the BAT—it is intact in some regions, while leaky in others. This variance in BBB patency has significant implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents. The results of a number of studies have shown that experimental light-based therapeutic modalities such as photochemical internalization (PCI) and photothermal therapy (PTT) may be useful in the treatment of gliomas. This chapter summarizes recent findings illustrating the potential of: (1) PCI for the delivery of therapeutic macromolecules such as chemotherapeutic agents and tumor suppressor genes, and (2) nanoshell-mediated PTT, including nanoparticle delivery approaches via macrophages.

  5. Small conjugate-based theranostic agents: an encouraging approach for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Shin, Weon Sup; Sunwoo, Kyoung; Kim, Won Young; Koo, Seyoung; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-10-01

    The advances in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics have directed the development of new anticancer agents to reduce drug abuse and increase safe and specific drug treatment. Theranostics, combining therapy and diagnosis, is an appealing approach for chemotherapy in medicine which exhibits improved biodistribution, selective cancer targeting ability, reduced toxicity, masked drug efficacy, and minimum side effects. The role of diagnosis tools in theranostics is to collect the information of the diseased state before and after specific treatment. Magnetic particle-, mesoporous silica-, various carbon allotrope-, and polymer nanoparticle-based theranostic systems are well accepted and clinically significant. Currently, small conjugate-based systems have received much attention for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The structural architecture of these systems is relatively simple, compact, biocompatible, and unidirectional. In this tutorial review, we summarize the latest developments on small conjugate based theranostic agents for tumor treatment and diagnosis using fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:26118960

  6. Synthetic Ni3S2/Ni hybrid architectures as potential contrast agents in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Chen, K.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents mainly include superparamagnetic (SPM) iron oxide nanoparticle as T 2 contrast agent for liver and paramagnetic Gd (III)-chelate as T 1 contrast agent for all organs. In this work, weak ferromagnetic kale-like and SPM cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni hybrid architectures were synthesized and evaluated as potential T 1 MRI contrast agents. Their relatively small r 2/r 1 ratios of 2.59 and 2.38, and high r 1 values of 11.27 and 4.89 mmol‑1 L s‑1 (for the kale-like and cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni, respectively) will shed some light on the development of new-type MRI contrast agents.

  7. Potential Use of Biological Proteins for Liver Failure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Yamasaki, Keishi; Seo, Hakaru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Biological proteins have unlimited potential for use as pharmaceutical products due to their various biological activities, which include non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Recent scientific advances allow for the development of novel innovative protein-based products that draw on the quality of their innate biological activities. Some of them hold promising potential for novel therapeutic agents/devices for addressing hepatic diseases such as hepatitis, fibrosis, and hepatocarcinomas. This review attempts to provide an overview of the development of protein-based products that take advantage of their biological activity for medication, and discusses possibilities for the therapeutic potential of protein-based products produced through different approaches to specifically target the liver (or hepatic cells: hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and Kupffer cells) in the treatment of hepatic diseases. PMID:26404356

  8. Vitamin D: considerations in the continued development as an agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Deeb, Kristin K; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression, and therapy for cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity, and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps, the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci et al, who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among >40,000 individuals in the Health Professionals Study, an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5 ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers, and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately, very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells, as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors, to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to administer large

  9. Vitamin D: Considerations in the Continued Development as an Agent for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Donald L.; Deeb, Kristen; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression and therapy of cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci and colleagues who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among more than 40,000 individuals in the Health professionals Study an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells – as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors - to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Chromobacterium vaccinii, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Vöing, Kristin; Harrison, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium vaccinii has been isolated only from cranberry bogs in Massachusetts. While it is unknown what role these bacteria play in their natural environments, they hold potential as biological control agents against the larvae of insect pests. Potential virulence genes were identified, including the violacein synthesis pathway, siderophores, and chitinases. PMID:25999572

  11. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  12. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  13. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    PubMed Central

    Raffoul, Julian J.; Heydari, Ahmad R.; Hillman, Gilda G.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted. PMID:22997517

  14. Potential of epigenetic therapies in non-cancerous conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Theresa; Yung, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    There has been an explosion of knowledge in the epigenetics field in the past 20 years. The first epigenetic therapies have arrived in the clinic for cancer treatments. In contrast, much of the promise of epigenetic therapies for non-cancerous conditions remains in the laboratories. The current review will focus on the recent progress that has been made in understanding the pathogenic role of epigenetics in immune and inflammatory conditions, and how the knowledge may provide much needed new therapeutic targets for many autoimmune diseases. Dietary factors are increasingly recognized as potential modifiers of epigenetic marks that can influence health and diseases across generations. The current epigenomics revolution will almost certainly complement the explosion of personal genetics medicine to help guide treatment decisions and disease risk stratification. PMID:25566322

  15. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy-A Hypothesis-Driven Review.

    PubMed

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  16. Opportunities and Challenges in the Era of Molecularly Targeted Agents and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first annual workshop for preclinical and clinical development of radiosensitizers took place at the National Cancer Institute on August 8–9, 2012. Radiotherapy is one of the most commonly applied and effective oncologic treatments for solid tumors. It is well recognized that improved clinical efficacy of radiotherapy would make a substantive impact in clinical practice and patient outcomes. Advances in genomic technologies and high-throughput drug discovery platforms have brought a revolution in cancer treatment by providing molecularly targeted agents for various cancers. Development of predictive biomarkers directed toward specific subsets of cancers has ushered in a new era of personalized therapeutics. The field of radiation oncology stands to gain substantial benefit from these advances given the concerted effort to integrate this progress into radiation therapy. This workshop brought together expert clinicians and scientists working in various disease sites to identify the exciting opportunities and expected challenges in the development of molecularly targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:23503600

  17. Local drug delivery agents as adjuncts to endodontic and periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, K; Puri, N

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained/controlled drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. The conventional method for the elimination of subgingival microbial infection includes mechanical debridement, irrigation with antimicrobial agents or surgical access. But, the effectiveness of conventional nonsurgical treatment is limited by lack of accessibility to bacteria in deeper periodontal pockets, and/or does not completely eliminate intracanal microorganisms. Surgical intervention may be beneficial but cannot be done in all cases, medically compromised cases and also in patients not willing to be subjected to surgical therapy. Development of local drug delivery systems provides an answer to all such difficulties. This comprehensive review tries to cover the detailed information about the latest advances in the various local drug delivery systems, their indications, contraindications and their advantages over systemic drug therapy. PMID:24868252

  18. Potentiation of immunomodulatory antibody therapy with oncolytic viruses for treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the immune suppressive mechanisms active within the tumor microenvironment led to development of immunotherapeutic strategies aiming to reverse the immunosuppression and to enhance the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Of those, cancer therapy with antibodies targeting the immune costimulatory and coinhibitory receptors has demonstrated significant promise in the recent years, with multiple antibodies entering clinical testing. The responses to these agents, however, have not been universal and have not been observed in all cancer types, calling for identification of appropriate predictive biomarkers and development of combinatorial strategies. Pre-existing immune infiltration in tumors has been demonstrated to have a strong association with response to immunotherapies, with the type I interferon (IFN) pathway emerging as a key player in tumor innate immune recognition and activation of adaptive immunity. These findings provide a rationale for evaluation of strategies targeting the type I IFN pathway as a means to enhance tumor immune recognition and infiltration, which could potentially make them susceptible to therapeutics targeting the cosignaling receptors. To this end in particular, oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been demonstrated to enhance tumor recognition by the immune system through multiple mechanisms, which include upregulation of major histocompatibility complex and costimulatory molecules on cancer cells, immunogenic cell death and antigen release, and activation of the type I IFN pathway. Evidence is now emerging that combination therapies using OVs and agents targeting immune cosignaling receptors such as 4-1BB, PD-1, and CTLA-4 may work in concert to enhance antitumor immunity and therapeutic efficacy. Our evolving understanding of the interplay between OVs and the immune system demonstrates that the virus-induced antitumor immune responses can be harnessed to drive the efficacy of the agents targeting cosignaling

  19. Insights into neurogenesis and aging: potential therapy for degenerative disease?

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Robert A; Thomas, Rosanne M; Peterson, Daniel A

    2010-01-01

    Neurogenesis is the process by which new neural cells are generated from a small population of multipotent stem cells in the adult CNS. This natural generation of new cells is limited in its regenerative capabilities and also declines with age. The use of stem cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease may hold great potential; however, the age-related incidence of many CNS diseases coincides with reduced neurogenesis. This review concisely summarizes current knowledge related to adult neurogenesis and its alteration with aging and examines the feasibility of using stem cell and gene therapies to combat diseases of the CNS with advancing age. PMID:20806052

  20. Natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis: a potential source for investigational new agents to treat cancer—Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, S.M.; Yance, D.; Wong, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    An integrative approach for managing a patient with cancer should target the multiple biochemical and physiologic pathways that support tumour development and minimize normal-tissue toxicity. Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer. Many natural health products that inhibit angiogenesis also manifest other anticancer activities. The present article focuses on products that have a high degree of anti-angiogenic activity, but it also describes some of the many other actions of these agents that can inhibit tumour progression and reduce the risk of metastasis. Natural health products target molecular pathways other than angiogenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the HER2/neu gene, the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, the nuclear factor kappa-B transcription factor, the protein kinases, the Bcl-2 protein, and coagulation pathways. The herbs that are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and that are anti-angiogenic through multiple interdependent processes (including effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities) include Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (curcumin), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinalis (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens hora (Rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs. Quality assurance of appropriate extracts is essential prior to embarking upon clinical trials. More data are required on dose–response, appropriate combinations, and potential toxicities. Given the multiple effects of these agents, their future use for cancer therapy probably lies in synergistic combinations. During active cancer therapy, they should generally be evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. In this role, they act as modifiers of biologic response or

  1. Anaplerotic diet therapy in inherited metabolic disease: therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Roe, Charles R; Mochel, Fanny

    2006-01-01

    Beginning with phenylketonuria, dietary therapy for inborn errors has focused primarily on the restriction of the precursor to an affected catabolic pathway in an attempt to limit the production of potential toxins. Anaplerotic therapy is based on the concept that there may exist an energy deficit in these diseases that might be improved by providing alternative substrate for both the citric acid cycle (CAC) and the electron transport chain for enhanced ATP production. This article focuses on this basic problem, as it may relate to most catabolic disorders, and provides our current experience involving inherited diseases of mitochondrial fat oxidation, glycogen storage, and pyruvate metabolism using the anaplerotic compound triheptanoin. The observations have led to a realization that 'inter-organ' signalling and 'nutrient sensors' such as adenylate monophosphate mediated-protein kinase (AMPK) and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) appear to play a significant role in the intermediary metabolism of these diseases. Activated AMPK turns on catabolic pathways to augment ATP production while turning off synthetic pathways that consume ATP. Information is provided regarding the inter-organ requirements for more normal metabolic function during crisis and how anaplerotic therapy using triheptanoin, as a direct source of substrate to the CAC for energy production, appears to be a more successful approach to an improved quality of life for these patients. PMID:16763896

  2. Potential organ or tumor imaging agents. 32. A triglyceride ester of p-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid as a potential hepatic imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Schwendner, S W; Weichert, J P; Longino, M A; Gross, M D; Counsell, R E

    1992-08-01

    A triglyceride analog, glycerol-2-palmitoyl-1,3-di-15-(p-iodophenyl)pentadecanoate (DPPG) was synthesized and radiolabeled for evaluation as a potential functional liver scintigraphic agent. Uptake of DPPG was compared in normal, diabetic, tumor-bearing and heparin pretreated rats, revealing differences in uptake and clearance of radioactivity, correlating with hepatic lipase activity of these groups. Similar results were observed by gamma-camera scintigraphy. Comparing the uptake of DPPG with that of its fatty acid component, 15-(p-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA), revealed that the peak uptake of IPPA in the liver was about half that of DPPG. Based upon these findings, DPPG warrants further study as a hepatic radiodiagnostic agent. PMID:1522018

  3. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents: important targeted therapies of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qing-Yang; Wei, Ye; Chen, Jing-Wen; Chang, Wen-Ju; Ye, Le-Chi; Zhu, De-Xiang; Xu, Jian-Min

    2014-04-21

    question because of the inferior prognosis in the COIN trial and the NORDIC-VII trial. Also, bevacizumab plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was questioned because of the NO16966 trial. By the update and further analysis of the COIN trial and the NORDIC-VII trial, cetuximab plus FOLFOX was reported to be reliable again. But bevacizumab plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was still controversial. In addition, some trials have reported that bevacizumab is not suitable for conversion therapy. The results of the FIRE-III trial showed that cetuximab led to a significant advantage over bevacizumab in response rate (72% vs 63%, P = 0.017) for evaluable population. With the balanced allocation of second-line treatment, the FIRE-III trial was expected to provide evidence for selecting following regimens after first-line progression. There is still no strong evidence for the efficacy of targeted therapy as a preoperative treatment for resectable CLM or postoperative treatment for resected CLM, although the combined regimen is often administered based on experience. Combination therapy with more than one targeted agent has been proven to provide no benefit, and even was reported to be harmful as first-line treatment by four large clinical trials. However, recent studies reported positive results of erlotinib plus bevacizumab for maintenance treatment. The mechanism of antagonism between different targeted agents deserves further study, and may also provide greater understanding of the development of resistance to targeted agents. PMID:24764664

  4. Natural and genetically engineered viral agents for oncolysis and gene therapy of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G; Horvath, Joseph C

    2008-12-01

    Based on personal acquaintances and experience dating back to the early 1950s, the senior author reviews the history of viral therapy of cancer. He points out the difficulties encountered in the treatment of human cancers, as opposed by the highly successful viral therapy of experimentally maintained tumors in laboratory animals, especially that of ascites carcinomas in mice. A detailed account of viral therapy of human tumors with naturally oncolytic viruses follows, emphasizing the first clinical trials with viral oncolysates. The discrepancy between the high success rates, culminating in cures, in the treatment of tumors of laboratory animals, and the moderate results, such as stabilizations of disease, partial responses, very rare complete remissions, and frequent relapses with virally treated human tumors is recognized. The preclinical laboratory testing against established human tumor cell lines that were maintained in tissue cultures for decades, and against human tumors extricated from their natural habitat and grown in xenografts, may not yield valid results predictive of the viral therapy applied against human tumors growing in their natural environment, the human host. Since the recent discovery of the oncosuppressive efficacy of bacteriophages, the colon could be regarded as the battlefield, where incipient tumor cells and bacteriophages vie for dominance. The inner environment of the colon will be the teaching ground providing new knowledge on the value of the anti-tumor efficacy of phage-induced innate anti-tumor immune reactions. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses are reviewed next. The molecular biology of viral oncolysis is explained in details. Elaborate efforts are presented to elucidate how gene product proteins of oncolytic viruses switch off the oncogenic cascades of cancer cells. The facts strongly support the conclusion that viral therapy of human cancers will remain in the front lines of modern cancer therapeutics. It may be a

  5. Pharmacological characterization of a novel gastrodin derivative as a potential anti-migraine agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Han; Zhao, Li-Xue; Wan, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Xiao-Na; Long, Fang-Yi; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Chu; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder in the brain. An optimal therapy for migraine has not yet been developed. Gastrodin (Gas), the main effective constitute from Gastrodiae Rhizoma (Tianma in Chinese), has been indicated for migraine treatment and prophylaxis more than 30 years, with demonstrated safety. However, Gas is a phenolic glycoside, with relatively low concentrations and weak efficacy in the central nervous system. To develop more effective anti-migraine agents, we synthesized a novel Gas derivative (Gas-D). In the present study, comparative pharmacodynamic evaluations of Gas and Gas-D were performed in a model of nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine in rats and the hot-plate test in mice. Following behavioral testing in this migraine model, external jugular vein blood and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) were collected to analyze plasma nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and c-Fos expression in the TNC. The acute oral toxicity of Gas and Gas-D was also examined. We found that Gas-D had potent anti-migraine effects, likely attributable to inhibition of both trigeminal nerve activation at central sites and the peripheral release of CGRP following NO scavenging. Additionally, Gas-D exerted significant anti-nociceptive effect in response to thermal pain compared with Gas. Furthermore, a single dose of 2.048 g/kg Gas or Gas-D presented no acute oral toxicity in mice. Altogether, the potent anti-migraine and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Gas-D suggest that it might be a potentially novel drug candidate for migraine treatment or prophylaxis. PMID:26704993

  6. Monascus Pigment Rubropunctatin: A Potential Dual Agent for Cancer Chemotherapy and Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunquan; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Deshan; Chen, Haijun; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Chengzhuo; Guo, Yanghao

    2016-03-30

    The Monascus pigment, rubropunctatin, was extracted and purified from red mold rice (RMR), and its cytotoxic activities against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells were studied under the conditions with or without light irradiation. The IC50 value of rubropunctatin against HeLa cells in the dark was 93.71 ± 1.96 μM (24 h), while the cytotoxic activity was enhanced more than 3 times (IC50 = 24.02 ± 2.17 μM) under light irradiation (halogen lamp, 500 W; wavelength, 597-622 nm; and fluence rate, 15 mW cm(-2), for 30 min). However, the IC50 value of rubropunctatin against the immortalized human cervical epithelial H8 cells was more than 300 μM, even under light irradiation, indicating that rubropunctatin has a favorable selectivity index (SI). Treatment of HeLa cells with rubropunctatin in the dark or under light irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent apoptosis, as validated by the increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization, and the inductive effect on HeLa cell apoptosis was boosted by the light irradiation. In addition, treatment with rubropunctatin alone or under light irradiation was found to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via the mitochondrial pathway, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and increase of the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was suggested that rubropunctatin could be a promising natural dual anticancer agent for photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:26953890

  7. New potential chemotherapy for ovarian cancer - Combined therapy with WP 631 and epothilone B.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Barbara; Rogalska, Aneta; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2016-04-15

    Despite more modern therapeutics approaches and the use of new drugs for chemotherapy, patients with ovarian cancer still have poor prognosis and therefore, new strategies for its cure are highly needed. One of the promising ways is combined therapy, which has many advantages as minimizing drug resistance, enhancing efficacy of treatment, and reducing toxicity. Combined therapy has rich and successful history in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Currently use therapy is usually based on platinum-containing agent (carboplatin or cisplatin) and a member of taxanes (paclitaxel or docetaxel). In the mid-2000s this standard regimen has been expanded with bevacizumab, monoclonal antibody directed to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Another drug combination with promising perspectives is WP 631 given together with epothilone B (Epo B). WP 631 is a bisanthracycline composed of two molecules of daunorubicin linked with a p-xylenyl linker. Epo B is a 16-membered macrolide manifesting similar mechanism of action to taxanes. Their effectiveness against ovarian cancer as single agents is well established. However, the combination of WP 631 and Epo B appeared to act synergistically, meaning that it is much more potent than the single drugs. The mechanism lying under its efficacy includes disturbing essential cell cycle-regulating proteins leading to mitotic slippage and following apoptosis, as well as affecting EpCAM and HMGB1 expression. In this article, we summarized the current state of knowledge regarding combined therapy based on WP 631 and Epo B as a potential way of ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26944437

  8. Physicochemical properties of potential porphyrin photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Marta; Kozub, Patrycja; Kimball, Joseph; Rojkiewicz, Marcin; Kuś, Piotr; Gryczyński, Zugmunt; Ratuszna, Alicja

    2015-07-01

    This research evaluated the suitability of synthetic photosensitizers for their use as potential photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy using steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. Four tetraphenylporphyrin derivatives were studied in ethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide. The spectroscopic properties namely electronic absorption and emission spectra, ability to generate singlet oxygen, lifetimes of the triplet state, as well as their fluorescence quantum yield were determined. Also time-correlated single photon counting method was used to precisely determine fluorescence lifetimes for all four compounds. Tested compounds exhibit high generation of singlet oxygen, low generation of fluorescence and they are chemical stable during irradiation. The studies show that the tested porphyrins satisfy the conditions of a potential drug in terms of physicochemical properties.

  9. Synergistic potentiation of D-fraction with vitamin C as possible alternative approach for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Sensuke

    2009-01-01

    Maitake D-fraction or PDF is the bioactive extract of maitake mushroom (Grifola frondosa) and its active constituent is the protein-bound polysaccharide (proteoglucan), or more specifically known as β-glucan. PDF has been extensively studied and a number of its medicinal potentials/properties have been unveiled and demonstrated. Those include various physiological benefits ranging from immunomodulatory and antitumor activities to treatment for hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, viral infections (hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus), and obesity. Particularly, two major biological activities of PDF, immunomodulatory and antitumor activities, have been the main target for scientific and clinical research. To demonstrate and confirm such biological activities, numerous studies have been performed in vitro and in vivo or in clinical settings. These studies showed that PDF was indeed capable of modulating immunologic and hematologic parameters, inhibiting or regressing the cancer cell growth, and even improving quality of life of cancer patients. Synergistic potentiation of PDF with vitamin C demonstrated in vitro is rather interesting and may have clinical implication, because such combination therapy appears to help improve the efficacy of currently ongoing cancer therapies. Recently, intravenous administration of vitamin C has been often used to increase its physiological concentration and this useful procedure may further make this combination therapy feasible. Therefore, PDF may have great potential, either being used solely or combined with other agents, for cancer therapy. Such relevant and detailed studies will be described and discussed herein with a special focus on the combination of PDF and vitamin C as a viable therapeutic option. PMID:20360893

  10. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of new tetrahydroacridine derivatives as potential multifunctional agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bajda, Marek; Jończyk, Jakub; Malawska, Barbara; Czarnecka, Kamila; Girek, Małgorzata; Olszewska, Paulina; Sikora, Joanna; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta; Skibiński, Robert; Gumieniczek, Anna; Szymański, Paweł

    2015-09-01

    A novel series of 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine derivatives with 4-dimethylaminobenzoic acid moiety was synthesized and tested towards inhibition of cholinesterases and amyloid β aggregation. Target compounds were designed as dual binding site cholinesterase inhibitors able to bind to both the catalytic and the peripheral site of the enzyme and therefore potentially endowed with other properties. The obtained derivatives were very potent inhibitors of both cholinesterases (EeAChE, EqBChE) with IC50 values ranging from sub-nanomolar to nanomolar range, and the inhibitory potency of the most promising agents was higher than that of the reference drugs (rivastigmine and tacrine). The kinetic studies of the most active compound 3a revealed competitive type of AChE inhibition. Moreover, all target compounds were more potent inhibitors of human AChE than tacrine with the most active compound 3b (IC50 = 19 nM). Compound 3a was also tested and displayed inhibitory potency against AChE-induced Aβ 1-42 aggregation (80.6% and 91.3% at 50 μM and 100 μM screening concentration, respectively). Moreover, cytotoxicity assay performed on A549 cells did not indicate toxicity of this agent. Compound 3a is a promising candidate for further development of novel multi-functional agents in the therapy of AD. PMID:26242241

  11. The impact of antioxidant agents complimentary to periodontal therapy on oxidative stress and periodontal outcomes: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Francisco Wilker Mustafa Gomes; Nogueira, Sergiana Barbosa; Mendes, Francisco Lucas Vasconcelos; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Moreira, Maria Mônica Studart Mendes; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Carvalho, Rosimary de Sousa

    2015-09-01

    There is significant evidence linking chronic periodontitis (CP) and oxidative stress (OS). CP is a multifactorial infecto-inflammatory disease caused by the interaction of microbial agents present in the biofilm associated with host susceptibility and environmental factors. OS is a condition that arises when there is an imbalance between the levels of free radicals (FR) and its antioxidant defences. Antioxidants, defined as substances that are able to delay or prevent the oxidation of a substrate, exist in all bodily tissues and fluids, and their function is to protect against FR. This systematic review assessed the effects of the complimentary use of antioxidant agents to periodontal therapy in terms of oxidative stress/antioxidants. Only randomised, controlled, double-blind or blind studies were included. The majority of the included studies were performed in chronic periodontitis patients. Lycopene, vitamin C, vitamin E, capsules with fruits/vegetables/berry and dietary interventions were the antioxidant approaches employed. Only the studies that used lycopene and vitamin E demonstrated statistically significant improvement when compared to a control group in terms of periodontal parameters. However, oxidative stress outcomes did not follow the same pattern throughout the studies. It may be concluded that the use of some antioxidants has the potential to improve periodontal clinical parameters. The role of antioxidant/oxidative stress parameters needs further investigations. PMID:26067357

  12. Aminolevulinic Acid-Photodynamic Therapy Combined with Topically Applied Vascular Disrupting Agent Vadimezan Led to Enhanced Antitumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Allison; Becker, Theresa; Sunar, Ulas; Morgan, Janet; Bellnier, David

    2011-01-01

    The tumor-vascular disrupting agent (VDA) vadimezan (5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, DMXAA) has been shown to potentiate the antitumor activity of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using systemically administered photosensitizers. Here, we characterized the response of subcutaneous syngeneic Colon26 murine colon adenocarcinoma tumors to PDT using the locally applied photosensitizer precursor aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in combination with a topical formulation of vadimezan. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a non-invasive method for monitoring blood flow, was utilized to determine tumor vascular response to treatment. Additionally, correlative CD31-immunohistochemistry to visualize endothelial damage, ELISA assays to measure induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tumor weight measurements were also examined in separate animals. In our previous work, DCS revealed a selective decrease in tumor blood flow over time following topical vadimezan. ALA-PDT treatment also induced a decrease in tumor blood flow. The onset of blood flow reduction was rapid in tumors treated with both ALA-PDT and vadimezan. CD31-immunostaining of tumor sections confirmed vascular damage following topical application of vadimezan. Tumor weight measurements revealed enhanced tumor growth inhibition with combination treatment compared to ALA-PDT or vadimezan treatment alone. In conclusion, vadimezan as a topical agent enhances treatment efficacy when combined with ALA-PDT. This combination could be useful in clinical applications. PMID:21575001

  13. Berberine as a photosensitizing agent for antitumoral photodynamic therapy: Insights into its association to low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Luiza Andreazza, Nathalia; Vevert-Bizet, Christine; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Sureau, Franck; José Salvador, Marcos; Bonneau, Stephanie

    2016-08-20

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in Berberine, a phytochemical with multispectrum therapeutic activities, as anti-tumoral agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this context, low density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of the photosensitizer in tumor cells. We correlate the physicochemical parameters of the berberine association to LDL with the influence of LDL-delivery on its accumulation in a glioma cell line and on its photo-induced activity in view of antitumor PDT. Our results evidence an important binding of 400 berberine molecules per LDL. Changes in berberine and apoprotein fluorescence suggest different fixation types, involving various LDL compartments including the vicinity of the apoprotein. The berberine association to LDL does not affect their recognition by the specific B/E receptors, of which over-expression increases the cellular uptake of LDL-preloaded berberine. Fluorescence microscopy evidences the mitochondrial labeling of the glioma model cells, with no significant modification upon LDL-delivery. Moreover, the cellular delivery of berberine by LDL increases its photocytotoxic effects on such cells. So, this research illustrates the potential of berberine as a photosensitizing agent for PDT, in particular due to their behavior towards LDL as plasma vehicles, and gives insights into its mechanisms of cell uptake. PMID:27282536

  14. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS. PMID:22165665

  15. Novel 1-Phenyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone Derivatives as Multifunctional Agents for the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Rong; Tang, Li; Jiang, Liu; Hong, Lingjuan; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming; Hu, Yongzhou

    2016-01-20

    A series of novel 1-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone derivatives were designed and synthesized as multifunctional agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy through incorporation of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone moiety from deferiprone into the scaffold of H3 receptor antagonists. Most of these new compounds displayed designed quadruple functions, H3 receptor antagonism, Aβ aggregation inhibition, metal ion chelation, and radical scavenging. Especially, the most promising compound 5c displayed nanomolar IC50 values in H3 receptor antagonism with high selectivity, efficient capability to interrupt the formation of Aβ(1-42) fibrils, good copper and iron chelating properties, and more potent 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS(•+)) scavenging activity than Trolox. Further biological evaluation revealed that it did not show obvious cytotoxicity and hERG potassium channel inhibition at micromolar concentration. In addition, compound 5c demonstrated suitable pharmacokinetic properties and acceptable blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo. All these results indicate that compound 5c is a potential multifunctional candidate for AD therapy. PMID:26479744

  16. Methyl jasmonate and its potential in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Michael W; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Lingrui

    2015-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJa) is a naturally occurring hydrophobic oxylipin phytohormone. Early findings obtained from cancer cell lines suggest that MeJa is endowed with anticancer capabilities. It has been recently proposed that MeJa represents a novel agent that exhibits direct and selective actions against tumor cells without affecting normal human cells. In a previous study, I reported that MeJa itself is enough to result in the dysfunction of mitochondria and chloroplasts, as well as to activate cell death program (apoptosis), in the normal protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Indeed, this also holds true for other living plant systems in which senescence, hypersensitive response and oxidative stress have been found under MeJa action. Therefore, in this addendum to my previous article, I would like to stress that much more attention should be paid to the potential effect(s) of MeJa, or its derivatives, on healthy cells and tissues before it is used for clinical anticancer drugs, whether being used alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:26208889

  17. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin. PMID:25858436

  18. Potential therapeutic implications of IL-6/IL-6R/gp130-targeting agents in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Tae-Hwe; Wahler, Joseph; Suh, Nanjoo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with known multiple functions in immune regulation, inflammation, and oncogenesis. Binding of IL-6 to the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) induces homodimerization and recruitment of glycoprotein 130 (gp130), which leads to activation of downstream signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that high levels of IL-6 are correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. IL-6 appears to play a critical role in the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells, renewal of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), and drug resistance of BCSCs, making anti–IL-6/IL-6R/gp130 therapies promising options for the treatment and prevention of breast cancers. However, preclinical and clinical studies of the applications of anti–IL-6/IL-6R/gp130 therapy in breast cancers are limited. In this review, we summarize the structures, preclinical and clinical studies, mechanisms of action of chemical and biological blockers that directly bind to IL-6, IL-6R, or gp130, and the potential clinical applications of these pharmacological agents as breast cancer therapies. PMID:26840088

  19. A potentially artifact-free oral contrast agent for gastrointestinal MRI.

    PubMed

    Liebig, T; Stoupis, C; Ros, P R; Ballinger, J R; Briggs, R W

    1993-11-01

    The combination of diamagnetic barium sulfate and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in one suspension produces a macroscopic cancellation of positive and negative magnetic susceptibility components that can potentially eliminate susceptibility artifacts even with gradient echo pulse sequences. The relaxation properties that make the SPIO suspension a useful negative contrast agent are retained. PMID:8259066

  20. In vitro and In vivo Studies on Stilbene Analogs as Potential Treatment Agents for Colon Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based upon the potential of resveratrol as a cancer chemopreventive agent, 27 stilbenes analogs were synthesized and tested against colon cancer cell line HT-29. Among these compounds, amino derivative (Z)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) aniline (4), (Z)-methyl 4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) benzoate (6) and (Z)-1...

  1. Search for fungi as potential biological control agents of Echinochloa crus-galli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cockspur dace, Echinochloa crus-galli (family Poaceae), is the most widespread and harmful weed in Russian rice production. Heavy infestations of the weed cause rice-crop losses up to 50 percent. With the purpose of discovering pathogenic fungi as potential agents for biological control of E. crus-g...

  2. Antiandrogens and androgen depleting therapies in prostate cancer: novel agents for an established target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Clegg, Nicola J.; Scher, Howard I

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activation of the androgen receptor is critical for prostate cancer growth at all points in the illness. Currently therapies targeting the androgen receptor, including androgen depletion approaches and antiandrogens, do not completely inhibit androgen receptor activity. Prostate cancer cells develop resistance to castration by acquiring changes such as AR overexpression that result in reactivation of the receptor. Based on understanding of these resistance mechanisms and androgen synthesis pathways, novel antiandrogens and androgen depleting agents have been tested. Notably, MDV3100, a novel antiandrogen designed for activity in prostate cancer model systems with overexpressed AR and, abiraterone acetate, a 17-α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase inhibitor that blocks steroid biosynthesis in the adrenal gland and in the tumor, have demonstrated significant activity in early phase trials and are being tested in the phase III setting. PMID:19796750

  3. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed) or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS), to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs) are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events. PMID:25955645

  4. Advances in drug delivery system for platinum agents based combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiang; Xiao, Hai-Hua; Song, Hai-Qin; Jing, Xia-Bin; Yan, Le-San; Qi, Ruo-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer agents are widely used as first-line drugs in cancer chemotherapy for various solid tumors. However, great side effects and occurrence of resistance remain as the major drawbacks for almost all the platinum drugs developed. To conquer these problems, new strategies should be adopted for platinum drug based chemotherapy. Modern nanotechnology has been widely employed in the delivery of various therapeutics and diagnostic. It provides the possibility of targeted delivery of a certain anticancer drug to the tumor site, which could minimize toxicity and optimize the drug efficacy. Here, in this review, we focused on the recent progress in polymer based drug delivery systems for platinum-based combination therapy. PMID:26779373

  5. Cysteamine-related agents could be potential antidepressants through increasing central BDNF levels.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2006-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common mental disease, but with an unknown etiology. Antidepressants are the main biological treatment for MDD. However, current antidepressive agents have a slow onset of effect and a substantial proportion of MDD patients do not clinically improve, despite maximal medication. Thus, the exploration for new antidepressants with novel strategies may help to develop faster and more effective antidepressant agents. Studies in the recent decades have demonstrated that antidepressants increase central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and activating the BDNF-signaling pathway may play an important role in their therapeutic mechanism. Cysteamine is a natural product of cells and constitutes the terminal region of the CoA molecule. Recent work has found that cysteamine and a related agent, cystamine, have neuroprotective effects in Huntington's disease (HD) mice, through enhancing central BDNF levels. Furthermore, cystamine or cysteamine injection could increase serum BDNF levels in wild-type mice as well as HD mice. Since activation of the BDNF-dependent pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of antidepressant therapeutic action, cystamine or its derivatives could have potential antidepressant therapeutic effects. Among these agents, pantethine may be one of the most promising agents. It is a naturally occurring compound which can be administered orally with negligible side effects, and is metabolized to cysteamine. Further evaluation of the therapeutic and toxic effects of these cysteamine-related antidepressant agents in MDD animal models is needed before any clinical application. PMID:16797865

  6. Circular RNAs as potential biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengling; Nazarali, Adil J; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a naturally occurring type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs which unlike linear RNAs, have covalently linked ends. They are usually stable, abundant, conserved RNA molecules and often exhibit tissue/developmental-stage specific expression. Functional circRNAs have been identified to act as microRNA sponges and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sequestering agents as well as transcriptional regulators. These multiple functional roles elicit a great potential for circRNAs in biological applications. Emerging evidence shows that circRNAs play important roles in several diseases, particularly in cancer where they act through regulating protein expression of the pivotal genes that are critical for carcinogenesis. The presence of abundant circRNAs in saliva, exosomes and clinical standard blood samples will make them potential diagnostic or predictive biomarkers for diseases, particularly for cancer development, progression and prognosis. Here, we review the current literature and provide evidence for the impact of circRNAs in cancers and their potential significance in cancer prognosis and clinical treatment. PMID:27429839

  7. Circular RNAs as potential biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengling; Nazarali, Adil J; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a naturally occurring type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs which unlike linear RNAs, have covalently linked ends. They are usually stable, abundant, conserved RNA molecules and often exhibit tissue/developmental-stage specific expression. Functional circRNAs have been identified to act as microRNA sponges and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sequestering agents as well as transcriptional regulators. These multiple functional roles elicit a great potential for circRNAs in biological applications. Emerging evidence shows that circRNAs play important roles in several diseases, particularly in cancer where they act through regulating protein expression of the pivotal genes that are critical for carcinogenesis. The presence of abundant circRNAs in saliva, exosomes and clinical standard blood samples will make them potential diagnostic or predictive biomarkers for diseases, particularly for cancer development, progression and prognosis. Here, we review the current literature and provide evidence for the impact of circRNAs in cancers and their potential significance in cancer prognosis and clinical treatment. PMID:27429839

  8. Potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valdespino, Victor; Valdespino, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and epigenetic origins. The growing field of epigenetics has contributed to our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression, and has allowed the development of novel therapeutic drugs. First-generation epigenetic inhibitor drugs have obtained modest clinical results in two types of hematological malignancy. Second-generation epigenetic inhibitors are in development, and have intrinsically greater selectivity for their molecular targets. Solid tumors are more genetic and epigenetically complex than hematological malignancies, but the transcriptome and epigenome biomarkers have been identified for many of these malignancies. This solid tumor molecular aberration profile may be modified using specific or quasi-specific epidrugs together with conventional and innovative anticancer treatments. In this critical review, we briefly analyze the strategies to select the targeted epigenetic changes, enumerate the second-generation epigenetic inhibitors, and describe the main signs indicating the potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors. We also highlight the work of consortia or academic organizations that support the undertaking of human epigenetic therapeutic projects as well as some examples of transcriptome/epigenome profile determination in clinical assessment of cancer patients treated with epidrugs. There is a good chance that epigenetic therapies will be able to be used in patients with solid tumors in the future. This may happen soon through collaboration of diverse scientific groups, making the selection of targeted epigenetic aberration(s) more rapid, the design and probe of drug candidates, accelerating in vitro and in vivo assays, and undertaking new cancer epigenetic-therapy clinical trails. PMID:26346546

  9. Intelligent Agents and Their Potential for Future Design and Synthesis Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Intelligent Agents and Their Potential for Future Design and Synthesis Environment, held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, September 16-17, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of intelligent agents technology and to identify the potential of software agents for use in future design and synthesis environment. The presentations covered the current status of agent technology and several applications of intelligent software agents. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  10. Molecular effective coverage surface area of optical clearing agents for predicting optical clearing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The improvement of methods for optical clearing agent prediction exerts an important impact on tissue optical clearing technique. The molecular dynamic simulation is one of the most convincing and simplest approaches to predict the optical clearing potential of agents by analyzing the hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type forming between agents and collagen. However, the above analysis methods still suffer from some problem such as analysis of cyclic molecule by reason of molecular conformation. In this study, a molecular effective coverage surface area based on the molecular dynamic simulation was proposed to predict the potential of optical clearing agents. Several typical cyclic molecules, fructose, glucose and chain molecules, sorbitol, xylitol were analyzed by calculating their molecular effective coverage surface area, hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type, respectively. In order to verify this analysis methods, in vitro skin samples optical clearing efficacy were measured after 25 min immersing in the solutions, fructose, glucose, sorbitol and xylitol at concentration of 3.5 M using 1951 USAF resolution test target. The experimental results show accordance with prediction of molecular effective coverage surface area. Further to compare molecular effective coverage surface area with other parameters, it can show that molecular effective coverage surface area has a better performance in predicting OCP of agents.

  11. External Qi therapy to treat symptoms of Agent Orange Sequelae in Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Woo, Won-Hong; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Moon, Sun-Rock

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Qi therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for various symptoms presented by Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War with Agent Orange Sequelae. Nine subjects volunteered to receive 30 minutes of Qi therapy, twice per day for 7 days. There was marked improvement in 89% of the patients with impaired physical activity, 86% of those with psychological disorder, 78% of those with heavy drug use, and 67% of those with fatigue, indigestion and high blood glucose levels. This data suggests that Qi therapy combined with conventional treatment has positive effects in reducing and managing the pain, psychosomatic disorders, and substance abuse in patients with Agent Orange Sequelae. We cannot completely discount the possible influence of the placebo effect, and more objective, clinical measures are needed to study the long-term effects of Qi therapy. PMID:15344429

  12. Eribulin: a new-generation antimicrotubule agent in lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Thara, Eddie; Gitlitz, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Microtubule antagonists are highly active agents for treatment of metastatic lung cancer, but can lead to significant toxicities and tumor resistance. Eribulin mesylate is a novel antimicrotubule agent that binds at a different site of the microtubule chain, and has been shown to be effective against many tumor types in several Phase II trials. Studies revealed many potential mechanisms beyond disruption of microtubule machinery that may be linked to its superior efficacy and less degree of toxicities. To date, only Phase III evidence to support eribulin use is in breast cancer, but the ongoing Phase III trial testing its efficacy in metastatic lung cancer against treatment of physician's choice will prove its merits in this setting. PMID:25386810

  13. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin III is a Potential Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, In-Sung; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu; Jeong, Seung-Hun; Lee, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nari; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Ko, Kyung Soo; Han, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved either directly or indirectly in oncogenesis and the alteration of metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells contain large numbers of abnormal mitochondria and produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of ROS and the antioxidant capacity of the cell. Several cancer therapies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation, disrupt mitochondrial homeostasis and release cytochrome c, leading to apoptosome formation, which activates the intrinsic pathway. This is modulated by the extent of mitochondrial oxidative stress. The peroxiredoxin (Prx) system is a cellular defense system against oxidative stress, and mitochondria in cancer cells are known to contain high levels of Prx III. Here, we review accumulating evidence suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress is involved in cancer, and discuss the role of the mitochondrial Prx III antioxidant system as a potential target for cancer therapy. We hope that this review will provide the basis for new strategic approaches in the development of effective cancer treatments. PMID:22072940

  14. New pathways for evaluating potential acute stroke therapies.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Marc; Cheung, Kenneth; Howard, George; Warach, Steven

    2006-05-01

    Pharmacological therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains limited to one successful, approved treatment: tissue plasminogen activator within 3 h of stroke onset. Many neuroprotective drugs and a few other thrombolytics were evaluated in clinical trials, but none demonstrated unequivocal success and were approved by regulatory agencies. The development paradigm for such therapies needs to provide convincing evidence of efficacy and safety to obtain approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA modernization act of 1997 stated that such evidence could be derived from one large phase III trial with a clinical endpoint and supportive evidence. Drugs being developed for acute ischemic stroke can potentially be approved under this act by coupling a major phase III trial with supportive evidence provided by a phase IIB trial demonstrating an effect on a relevant biomarker such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography assessment of ischemic lesion growth. Statistical approaches have been developed to optimize the design of such an imaging-based phase IIB study, for example approaches that modify randomization probabilities to assign larger proportions of patients to the 'winning' strategy (i.e. 'pick the winner' strategies) with an interim assessment to reduce the sample size requirement. Demonstrating a treatment effect on a relevant imaging-based biomarker should provide supportive evidence for a new drug application, if a subsequent phase III trial with a clinical outcome demonstrates a significant treatment effect. PMID:18706045

  15. Near-infrared Au nanorods in photodynamic therapy, hyperthermia agents, and near-infrared optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Shuo; Chang, Chich-Neng; Chang, Yi-Ting; Yang, Meng-Heng; Chien, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Shean-Jen; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    The development of multifunctional nanomaterials is currently a topic of interest in the field of nanotechnology. Integrated systems that incorporate therapeutics, molecular targeting, and diagnostic imaging capabilities are considered to be the next generation of multifunctional nanomedicine. In this work, we present the first example of using Au nanorods simultaneously serving not only as photodynamic and photothermal agents to destroy A549 malignant cells but also as optical contrast agents simultaneously to monitor cellular image. Au nanorods were successfully conjugated with hydrophilic photosensitizer, indocyanine green (ICG), to achieve photodynamic therapy (PDT) and hyperthermia. With the combination of PDT and hyperthermia proved to be efficiently killing cancer cells as compared to PDT or hyperthermia treatment alone and enhanced the effectiveness of photodestruction. Moreover, Au nanorods conjugated with ICG displayed high chemical stability and simultaneously acted as a promising cellular image probe. As a result, the preparation of Au nanorods conjugated with photosensitizers as well as their use in biomedical applications is valuable developments in multifunctional nanomaterials.

  16. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  17. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-23

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  18. Bone metastases in lung cancer. Potential novel approaches to therapy.

    PubMed

    Vicent, Silvestre; Perurena, Naiara; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Lecanda, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The skeleton is a common site of metastases in lung cancer, an event associated with significant morbidities and poor outcomes. Current antiresorptive therapies provide limited benefit, and novel strategies of prevention and treatment are urgently needed. This review summarizes the latest advances and new perspectives on emerging experimental and clinical approaches to block this deleterious process. Progress propelled by preclinical models has led to a deeper understanding on the complex interplay of tumor cells in the osseous milieu, unveiling potential new targets for drug development. Improvements in early diagnosis through the use of sophisticated imaging techniques with bone serum biomarkers are also discussed in the context of identifying patients at risk and monitoring disease progression during the course of treatment. PMID:26131844

  19. Optimization and Evaluation of 5-Styryl-Oxathiazol-2-one Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome Inhibitors as Potential Antitubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesco; Gising, Johan; Åkerbladh, Linda; Roos, Annette K; Naworyta, Agata; Mowbray, Sherry L; Sokolowski, Anders; Henderson, Ian; Alling, Torey; Bailey, Mai A; Files, Megan; Parish, Tanya; Karlén, Anders; Larhed, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report of 5-styryl-oxathiazol-2-ones as inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteasome. As part of the study, the structure–activity relationship of oxathiazolones as Mtb proteasome inhibitors has been investigated. Furthermore, the prepared compounds displayed a good selectivity profile for Mtb compared to the human proteasome. The 5-styryl-oxathiazol-2-one inhibitors identified showed little activity against replicating Mtb, but were rapidly bactericidal against nonreplicating bacteria. (E)-5-(4-Chlorostyryl)-1,3,4-oxathiazol-2-one) was most effective, reducing the colony-forming units (CFU)/mL below the detection limit in only seven days at all concentrations tested. The results suggest that this new class of Mtb proteasome inhibitors has the potential to be further developed into novel antitubercular agents for synergistic combination therapies with existing drugs. PMID:26246997

  20. Photodynamic therapy potentiates the paracrine endothelial stimulation by colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, María Julia; Florencia Pansa, María; Emanuel Vera, Renzo; Belén Rumie Vittar, Natalia; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence is a major problem and is often the ultimate cause of death. In this context, the tumor microenvironment influences tumor progression and is considered as a new essential feature that clearly impacts on treatment outcome, and must therefore be taken into consideration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), oxygen, light and drug-dependent, is a novel treatment modality when CRC patients are inoperable. Tumor vasculature and parenchyma cells are both potential targets of PDT damage modulating tumor-stroma interactions. In biological activity assessment in photodynamic research, three-dimensional (3D) cultures are essential to integrate biomechanical, biochemical, and biophysical properties that better predict the outcome of oxygen- and drug-dependent medical therapies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of methyl 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT using a light emitting diode for the treatment of CRC cells in a scenario that mimics targeted tissue complexity, providing a potential bridge for the gap between 2D cultures and animal models. Since photodynamic intervention of the tumor microenvironment can effectively modulate the tumor-stroma interaction, it was proposed to characterize the endothelial response to CRC paracrine communication, if one of these two populations is photosensitized. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the dialogue between endothelial and tumor populations when subjected to lethal PDT conditions induces an increase in angiogenic phenotype, and we think that it should be carefully considered for the development of PDT therapeutic protocols.

  1. New 1,4-anthracene-9,10-dione derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zagotto, G; Supino, R; Favini, E; Moro, S; Palumbo, M

    2000-01-01

    The amino-substituted anthracene-9,10-dione (9,10-anthraquinone) derivatives represent one of the most important classes of potential anticancer agents. To better understand the basic rules governing DNA sequence specificity, we have recently synthesized a new class of D- and L-aminoacyl-anthraquinone derivatives. We have tested these new compounds as cytotoxic agents, and we have correlated their activity with the configuration of the chiral aminoacyl moiety. Molecular modeling studies have been performed to compare the test drugs in terms of steric overlapping. PMID:10755224

  2. General guidelines for medically screening mixed population groups potentially exposed to nerve or vesicant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Sidell, F.R.; Leffingwell, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    A number of state and local planners have requested guidance on screening protocols and have expressed interest in sampling body fluids from exposed or potentially exposed individuals as a means of estimating agent dose. These guidelines have been developed to provide a clear statement that could be used by state and local emergency response personnel in the event of a nerve or vesicant agent incident resulting in off-post contamination; maximum protection from harm is the goal. The assumption is that any population group so exposed would be heterogeneous for age, gender, reproductive status, and state of health.

  3. Caspase-3 short hairpin RNAs: a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegeneration of aluminum-exposed animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinli; Li, Na; Jiao, Xia; Qin, Xiujun; Kaur, Ramanjit; Lu, Xiaoting; Song, Jing; Wang, Linping; Wang, Junming; Niu, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence supporting the role of caspases in the development of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, regulating the activity of caspases has been considered as a therapeutic target. However, all the efforts on AD therapy using pan-caspase inhibitors have failed because of uncontrolled adverse effects. Alternatively, the specific knockdown of caspase-3 gene through RNA interference (RNAi) could serve as a future potential therapeutic strategy. The aim of the present study is to down-regulate the expression of caspase-3 gene using lentiviral vector-mediated caspase-3 short hairpin RNA (LV-Caspase-3 shRNA). The effect of LV-Caspase-3 shRNA on apoptosis induced by aluminum (Al) was investigated in primary cultured cortical neurons and validated in C57BL/6J mice. The results indicated an increase in apoptosis and caspase-3 expression in primary cultured neurons and the cortex ofmice exposed to Al, which could be down-regulated by LV-Caspase-3 shRNA. Furthermore, LV-Caspase-3 shRNA reduced neural cell death and improved learning and memory in C57BL/6J mice treated with Al. Our results suggest that LV-caspase-3 shRNA is a potential therapeutic agent to prevent neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction in aluminum- exposed animal models. The findings provide a rational gene therapy strategy for AD. PMID:25387335

  4. Comparison of antimicrobial agents as therapy for experimental endocarditis: caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sacar, Mustafa; Sacar, Suzan; Cevahir, Nural; Onem, Gokhan; Teke, Zafer; Asan, Ali; Turgut, Huseyin; Adali, Fahri; Kaleli, Ilknur; Susam, Ibrahim; Yaylali, Yalin Tolga; Baltalarli, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    We used an experimental rat model to compare the therapeutic efficacy of teicoplanin, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin with that of vancomycin as standard therapy for infective endocarditis.Aortic endocarditis was induced in rats by insertion of a polyethylene catheter into the left ventricle, followed by intravenous inoculation of 106 colony-forming units of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 24 hours later. Forty-eight hours after bacterial challenge, intravenous antibiotic therapies were initiated. There were 6 groups of 8 rats each: uninfected control; infected, untreated control; vancomycin-treated (40 mg/kg twice daily); teicoplanin-treated (20 mg/kg twice daily after a loading dose of 40 mg/kg); linezolid-treated (75 mg/kg 3 times daily for 1 day, then 75 mg/kg twice daily); and quinupristin/dalfopristin-treated (30 mg/kg twice daily and an additional 10 mg/kg dalfopristin infusion over 6 to 12 hr daily). At the end of therapy, the aortic valve vegetations in the drug-treated rats were evaluated microbiologically.Compared with the infected, untreated group, all drug-treated groups had significantly reduced bacterial titers in the vegetations. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin all effectively reduced the quantitative bacterial cultures of aortic valve vegetations. In addition, there was no significant difference in the comparative efficacy of teicoplanin, linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Vancomycin significantly reduced bacterial counts in comparison with linezolid, which was nonetheless also effective.Our experimental model showed that each of the investigated antimicrobial agents was effective in the treatment of infective endocarditis. PMID:20844611

  5. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  6. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  7. Preparation and characterization of an iron oxide-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for potential bone cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sneha, Murugesan; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multifunctional magnetic nanostructures have been found to have potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering. Iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and have distinctive magnetic properties that allow their use in vivo for drug delivery and hyperthermia, and as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Hydroxyapatite is used frequently due to its well-known biocompatibility, bioactivity, and lack of toxicity, so a combination of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite materials could be useful because hydroxyapatite has better bone-bonding ability. In this study, we prepared nanocomposites of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite and analyzed their physicochemical properties. The results suggest that these composites have superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible properties. This type of material architecture would be well suited for bone cancer therapy and other biomedical applications. PMID:26491311

  8. New candidate therapeutic agents for endometrial cancer: potential for clinical practice (review).

    PubMed

    Umene, Kiyoko; Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Nogami, Yuya; Tsuji, Kosuke; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2013-03-01

    Cases of endometrial cancer have increased in recent years, but the prognosis of patients with this disease has also been improved by combined modality therapy with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the development of new therapy is required from the perspectives of conservation of fertility and efficacy for recurrent and intractable cancer. New candidate therapeutic agents for endometrial cancer include fourth-generation progestins for inhibition of growth and differentiation of endometrial glands; metformin for reduction of hTERT expression in the endometrium and inhibition of the mTOR pathway by activation of AMPK, with consequent inhibition of the cell cycle; mTOR inhibitors for supressing growth of cancer cells by G1 cell cycle arrest; microRNAs involved in the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and progression; and HDAC inhibitors that block the growth of cancer cells by transcriptional elevation of tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In this study, we review the background and early clinical evidence for these agents as new therapeutic candidates for endometrial cancer. PMID:23291663

  9. MicroRNAs in mental health: from biological underpinnings to potential therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Joshua G.; Austin, Daniel R.; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric illnesses are disabling disorders with poorly understood underlying pathophysiologies. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these illnesses result from disruptions across whole cellular networks rather than any particular monoamine system. Recent evidence continues to support the hypothesis that these illnesses arise from impairments in cellular plasticity cascades, which lead to aberrant information processing in the circuits that regulate mood, cognition, and neurovegetative functions (sleep, appetite, energy, etc). As a result, many have begun to consider future therapies that would be capable of affecting global changes in cellular plasticity to restore appropriate synaptic function and neuronal connectivity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that can repress the gene translation of hundreds of their targets and are therefore well-positioned to target a multitude of cellular mechanisms. Here, we review some properties of microRNAs and show they are altered by stress, glucocorticoids, mood stabilizers, and in a particular psychiatric disorder, schizophrenia. While this field is still in its infancy, we consider their potential for regulating behavioral phenotypes and targeting key predicted signaling cascades that are implicated in psychiatric illness. Clearly, considerable research is required to better determine any therapeutic potential of targeting microRNAs; however, these agents may provide the next generation of effective therapies for psychiatric illnesses. PMID:19544012

  10. Organ-Specific Cancer Metabolism and Its Potential for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Elia, Ilaria; Schmieder, Roberta; Christen, Stefan; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Targeting cancer metabolism has the potential to lead to major advances in tumor therapy. Numerous promising metabolic drug targets have been identified. Yet, it has emerged that there is no singular metabolism that defines the oncogenic state of the cell. Rather, the metabolism of cancer cells is a function of the requirements of a tumor. Hence, the tissue of origin, the (epi)genetic drivers, the aberrant signaling, and the microenvironment all together define these metabolic requirements. In this chapter we discuss in light of (epi)genetic, signaling, and environmental factors the diversity in cancer metabolism based on triple-negative and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, early- and late-stage prostate cancer, and liver cancer. These types of cancer all display distinct and partially opposing metabolic behaviors (e.g., Warburg versus reverse Warburg metabolism). Yet, for each of the cancers, their distinct metabolism supports the oncogenic phenotype. Finally, we will assess the therapeutic potential of metabolism based on the concepts of metabolic normalization and metabolic depletion. PMID:25912014

  11. Functional Hyperbranched Polylysine as Potential Contrast Agent Probes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zu, Guangyue; Liu, Min; Zhang, Kunchi; Hong, Shanni; Dong, Jingjin; Cao, Yi; Jiang, Bin; Luo, Liqiang; Pei, Renjun

    2016-06-13

    Researchers have never stopped questing contrast agents with high resolution and safety to overcome the drawbacks of small-molecule contrast agents in clinic. Herein, we reported the synthesis of gadolinium-based hyperbranched polylysine (HBPLL-DTPA-Gd), which was prepared by thermal polymerization of l-lysine via one-step polycondensation. After conjugating with folic acid, its potential application as MRI contrast agent was then evaluated. This contrast agent had no obvious cytotoxicity as verified by WST assay and H&E analysis. Compared to Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) (r1 = 4.3 mM(-1) s(-1)), the FA-HBPLL-DTPA-Gd exhibited much higher longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 = 13.44 mM(-1) s(-1)), up to 3 times higher than Gd-DTPA. The FA-HBPLL-DTPA-Gd showed significant signal intensity enhancement in the tumor region at various time points and provided a long time window for MR examination. The results illustrate that FA-HBPLL-DTPA-Gd will be a potential candidate for tumor-targeted MRI. PMID:27187578

  12. Successful use of oral linezolid as a single active agent in endocarditis unresponsive to conventional antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, V; John, J; Kaye, G C; Meigh, R E

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of resistant gram-positive endocarditis is difficult. We report a case of resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis that failed to respond to conventional antibiotic therapy but was treated successfully with an oral regimen of a new antibiotic, linezolid as a single active agent. This case report demonstrates the use of linezolid as an effective alternative to conventional antibiotics in such cases. PMID:12860152

  13. Agent based modeling of the effects of potential treatments over the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Motta, Santo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that involves the destruction of the insulating sheath of axons, causing severe disabilities. Since the etiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, the use of novel techniques that may help to understand the disease, to suggest potential therapies and to test the effects of candidate treatments is highly advisable. To this end we developed an agent based model that demonstrated its ability to reproduce the typical oscillatory behavior observed in the most common form of multiple sclerosis, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The model has then been used to test the potential beneficial effects of vitamin D over the disease. Many scientific studies underlined the importance of the blood-brain barrier and of the mechanisms that influence its permeability on the development of the disease. In the present paper we further extend our previously developed model with a mechanism that mimics the blood-brain barrier behavior. The goal of our work is to suggest the best strategies to follow for developing new potential treatments that intervene in the blood-brain barrier. Results suggest that the best treatments should potentially prevent the opening of the blood-brain barrier, as treatments that help in recovering the blood-brain barrier functionality could be less effective. PMID:26343337

  14. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Wu, Xiaobo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Le; Liang, Shujing; Xu, Yingchun; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015) comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) and pooled risk ratio (RR) were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.96, P=0.002), PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76-0.88, P<0.001), and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34-2.21, P<0.001). Notably, subgroup analysis failed to favor the targeted agent-based combination in terms of OS (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89-1.31, P=0.365), PFS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.88-1.35, P=0.433), and ORR (RR 1.60, 95% CI 0.69-3.71, P=0.278) compared with single agent. In addition, although more hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in the doublet agents group, they were acceptable and manageable. Taken together, when compared with single-agent therapy, doublet agents should be considered a treatment option because of the superior efficacy and the manageable safety profile for the prior anthracycline- and taxane-treated MBC patients. PMID:27445497

  15. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wu, Xiaobo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Le; Liang, Shujing; Xu, Yingchun; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015) comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) and pooled risk ratio (RR) were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002), PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001), and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001). Notably, subgroup analysis failed to favor the targeted agent-based combination in terms of OS (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89–1.31, P=0.365), PFS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.88–1.35, P=0.433), and ORR (RR 1.60, 95% CI 0.69–3.71, P=0.278) compared with single agent. In addition, although more hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in the doublet agents group, they were acceptable and manageable. Taken together, when compared with single-agent therapy, doublet agents should be considered a treatment option because of the superior efficacy and the manageable safety profile for the prior anthracycline- and taxane-treated MBC patients. PMID:27445497

  16. Efficacy of gallium phthalocyanine as a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduray, Kaminee; Odhav, Bharti

    2012-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a revolutionary treatment aimed at treating cancers without surgery or chemotherapy. It is based on the discovery that certain chemicals known as photosensitizing agents (e.g. porphyrins, phthalocyanines, etc.) can kill cancerous cells when exposed to low level laser light at a specific wavelength. The present study investigates the cellular uptake and photodynamic effect of gallium (III) phthalocyanine chloride (GaPcCl) on Caco-2 cancer cells. Caco-2 cells were treated with different concentrations of GaPcCl for 2 h before treatment with a diode laser (λ = 661 nm, laser power = 90 mW) delivering a light dose of 2.5 J/cm2, 4.5 J/cm2 or 8.5 J/cm2. After 24 h, the cell viability of post-irradiated cells was measured using the MTT assay. Cellular uptake studies were performed by photosensitizing cells with GaPcCl for 30 min, 2 h, 10 h, 12 h, 18 h and 24 h before lysing the treated cells into solution to measure the GaPcCl fluorescence emission at an excitation wavelength of 600 nm. Results showed an increase in fluorescence intensity of emission peaks at longer incubation times, indicating a greater cellular uptake of GaPcCl by Caco-2 cells at 24 h in comparison to 30 min. GaPcCl at a concentration of 100 μg/ml activated with a laser light dose of 8.5 J/cm2 reduced the cell viability of Caco-2 cells to 27%. This concludes that GaPcCl activated with low level laser light can be used as a photosensitizing agent for the in vitro PDT treatment of colon cancer.

  17. Use of molecular targeted agents for the diagnosis, staging and therapy of neuroendocrine malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Imaging of neuroendocrine tumours (NET) poses significant challenges because of the heterogeneous biology of the tumours that are represented by this class of neoplasia. NET can range from benign lesions to highly aggressive cancers. Structural imaging techniques have suboptimal sensitivity in most published series and diagnosis is often delayed until metastatic disease is present. Current guidelines emphasise the importance of functional imaging for evaluating the extent of NET. The mainstay of this type of imaging has been somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-octreotide (Octreoscan™). Routine use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and particularly of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) has significantly improved localisation of tumour sites and evaluation of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) expression, which is important for predicting the likelihood of response to somatostatin analogues (SSA). Positron emission tomography (PET) can also now be used for evaluating SSTR expression. There are a number of peptides that have been evaluated but [68Ga]tetraazocyclodecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA)-octreotate (GaTate) PET/CT, which has been shown to be significantly more sensitive for detecting small lesions than Octreoscan™, is now probably the preferred agent because high uptake in known sites of disease provides a diagnostic pair for assessing suitability of patients for [177Lu]DOTA-octreotate (LuTate) peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). A range of other radiolabelled SSA has also been used for PRRT. Lesions without SSTR expression require alternative imaging and therapeutic strategies. Although fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in low-grade NET is not generally increased relative to normal tissues, the loss of differentiation that often accompanies loss of SSTR expression may be associated with a significant increase in glycolytic metabolism and an accompanying improvement in the

  18. Total synthesis of plagiochin G and derivatives as potential cancer chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui-Juan; Zhao, Yu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Yang, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yue-Hu; Shi, Qian; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    A new and efficient total synthesis has been developed to obtain plagiochin G (22), a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl, and four derivatives. The key 16-membered ring containing biphenyl ether and biaryl units was closed via an intramolecular SNAr reaction. All synthesized macrocyclic bisbibenzyls inhibited Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBVEA) activation induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells and, thus, are potential cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:25574060

  19. Potential Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Turrini, Eleonora; Ferruzzi, Lorenzo; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Vegetable and fruit consumption is inversely associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Currently, interest in a number of fruits high in polyphenols has been raised due to their reported chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic potential. Pomegranate has been shown to exert anticancer activity, which is generally attributed to its high content of polyphenols. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of pomegranate polyphenols as future anticancer agents. Pomegranate evokes antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antimetastatic effects, induces apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 proteins, upregulates p21 and p27, and downregulates cyclin-cdk network. Furthermore, pomegranate blocks the activation of inflammatory pathways including, but not limited to, the NF-κB pathway. The strongest evidence for its anticancer activity comes from studies on prostate cancer. Accordingly, some exploratory clinical studies investigating pomegranate found a trend of efficacy in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. However, the genotoxicity reported for pomegranate raised certain concerns over its safety and an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit should be performed before suggesting the use of pomegranate or its polyphenols for cancer-related therapeutic purposes. PMID:26180600

  20. Potential Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Turrini, Eleonora; Ferruzzi, Lorenzo; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Vegetable and fruit consumption is inversely associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Currently, interest in a number of fruits high in polyphenols has been raised due to their reported chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic potential. Pomegranate has been shown to exert anticancer activity, which is generally attributed to its high content of polyphenols. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of pomegranate polyphenols as future anticancer agents. Pomegranate evokes antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antimetastatic effects, induces apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 proteins, upregulates p21 and p27, and downregulates cyclin-cdk network. Furthermore, pomegranate blocks the activation of inflammatory pathways including, but not limited to, the NF-κB pathway. The strongest evidence for its anticancer activity comes from studies on prostate cancer. Accordingly, some exploratory clinical studies investigating pomegranate found a trend of efficacy in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. However, the genotoxicity reported for pomegranate raised certain concerns over its safety and an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit should be performed before suggesting the use of pomegranate or its polyphenols for cancer-related therapeutic purposes. PMID:26180600

  1. Potentiation activity of multiple antibacterial agents by Salvianolate from the Chinese medicine Danshen against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Qing; Han, Jun; Zuo, Guo-Ying; Wang, Gen-Chun; Tang, Hua-Shu

    2016-05-01

    Salvianolate (SAL) is a prescribed medicine from the Chinese herb Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge). It has been widely used in treatment of coronary and other diseases with significant effects. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of SAL against infectious pathogens were assayed and its combined effects on 10 clinical isolates of SCCmec III type methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with ten antibiotics were evaluated. Susceptibility to each agent alone was tested using a broth microdilution method, and the chequerboard and time-kill experiments were used for the combined activities. The results showed MIC was 128-256 mg/L for SAL used alone against MRSA. Significant synergies were observed for SAL/Ampicillin (Fosfomycin, Erythromycin, Piperacillin-tazobactam or Clindamycin) combination against over half of the isolates, with their MICs reduced by times of dilution (TOD) to 4-32 (FICIs 0.375-0.5), respectively. SAL/AMP combination showed the best combined effect of synergy on bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, while SAL/AMK combination reversed the resistance of MRSA to AMK. The results demonstrated that SAL enhanced widely the in vitro anti-MRSA efficacy of the ten antibacterial agents, which had potential for combinatory therapy of patients infected with MRSA and warrants further investigations. PMID:26639445

  2. Secukinumab for rheumatology: development and its potential place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Koenders, Marije I; van den Berg, Wim B

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic disease is not a single disorder, but a group of more than 100 diseases that affect joints, connective tissues, and/or internal organs. Although rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) differ in their pathogenesis and clinical presentation, the treatment of these inflammatory disorders overlaps. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are used to reduce pain and inflammation. Additional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are prescribed to slowdown disease progression, and is in RA more frequently and effectively applied than in AS. Biologicals are a relatively new class of treatments that specifically target cytokines or cells of the immune system, like tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors or B-cell blockers. A new kid on the block is the interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibitor secukinumab, which has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and AS. IL-17 is a proinflammatory cytokine that has an important role in host defense, but its proinflammatory and destructive effects have also been linked to pathogenic processes in autoimmune diseases like RA and psoriasis. Animal models have greatly contributed to further insights in the potential of IL-17 blockade in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, and have resulted in the development of various potential drugs targeting the IL-17 pathway. Secukinumab (AIN457) is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IL-17A and recently entered the market under the brand name Cosentyx(®). By binding to IL-17A, secukinumab prevents it from binding to its receptor and inhibits its ability to trigger inflammatory responses that play a role in the development of various autoimmune diseases. With secukinumab being the first in class to receive Food and Drug Administration approval, this article will further focus on this new biologic agent and review the

  3. Secukinumab for rheumatology: development and its potential place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koenders, Marije I; van den Berg, Wim B

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic disease is not a single disorder, but a group of more than 100 diseases that affect joints, connective tissues, and/or internal organs. Although rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) differ in their pathogenesis and clinical presentation, the treatment of these inflammatory disorders overlaps. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are used to reduce pain and inflammation. Additional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are prescribed to slowdown disease progression, and is in RA more frequently and effectively applied than in AS. Biologicals are a relatively new class of treatments that specifically target cytokines or cells of the immune system, like tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors or B-cell blockers. A new kid on the block is the interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibitor secukinumab, which has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and AS. IL-17 is a proinflammatory cytokine that has an important role in host defense, but its proinflammatory and destructive effects have also been linked to pathogenic processes in autoimmune diseases like RA and psoriasis. Animal models have greatly contributed to further insights in the potential of IL-17 blockade in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, and have resulted in the development of various potential drugs targeting the IL-17 pathway. Secukinumab (AIN457) is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IL-17A and recently entered the market under the brand name Cosentyx®. By binding to IL-17A, secukinumab prevents it from binding to its receptor and inhibits its ability to trigger inflammatory responses that play a role in the development of various autoimmune diseases. With secukinumab being the first in class to receive Food and Drug Administration approval, this article will further focus on this new biologic agent and review the milestones

  4. Single agent nanoparticle for radiotherapy and radio-photothermal therapy in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y; Li, Chun

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [(64)Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of (64)Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC. PMID:25913249

  5. First In Vivo Evaluation of Liposome-encapsulated 223Ra as a Potential Alpha-particle-emitting Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-09-13

    Liposomes carrying chemotherapeutics have had some success in cancer treatment and may be suitable carriers for therapeutic radionuclides. This study was designed to evaluate the biodistribution of and to estimate the radiation doses from the alpha emitter 223Ra loaded into pegylated liposomes in selected tissues. 223Ra was encapsulated in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin by ionophore-mediated loading. The biodistribution of liposomal 223Ra was compared to free cationic 223Ra in Balb/C mice. We showed that liposomal 223 Ra circulated in the blood with an initial half-time in excess of 24 hours, which agreed well with that reported for liposomal doxorubicin in rodents, while the blood half-time of cationic 223Ra was considerably less than one hour. When liposomal 223 Ra was catabolized, the released 223Ra was either excreted or taken up in the skeleton. This skeletal uptake increased up to 14 days after treatment, but did not reach the level seen with free 223Ra. Pre-treatment with non-radioactive liposomal doxorubicin 4 days in advance lessened the liver uptake of liposomal 223 Ra. Dose estimates showed that the spleen, followed by bone surfaces, received the highest absorbed doses. Liposomal 223 Ra was relatively stable in vivo and may have potential for radionuclide therapy and combination therapy with chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Natural Product-Derived Treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Safety, Efficacy, and Therapeutic Potential of Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, James; Ahn, Hyung Seok; Cheong, Jae Hoon; dela Peña, Ike

    2016-01-01

    Typical treatment plans for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) utilize nonpharmacological (behavioral/psychosocial) and/or pharmacological interventions. Limited accessibility to behavioral therapies and concerns over adverse effects of pharmacological treatments prompted research for alternative ADHD therapies such as natural product-derived treatments and nutritional supplements. In this study, we reviewed the herbal preparations and nutritional supplements evaluated in clinical studies as potential ADHD treatments and discussed their performance with regard to safety and efficacy in clinical trials. We also discussed some evidence suggesting that adjunct treatment of these agents (with another botanical agent or pharmacological ADHD treatments) may be a promising approach to treat ADHD. The analysis indicated mixed findings with regard to efficacy of natural product-derived ADHD interventions. Nevertheless, these treatments were considered as a “safer” approach than conventional ADHD medications. More comprehensive and appropriately controlled clinical studies are required to fully ascertain efficacy and safety of natural product-derived ADHD treatments. Studies that replicate encouraging findings on the efficacy of combining botanical agents and nutritional supplements with other natural product-derived therapies and widely used ADHD medications are also warranted. In conclusion, the risk-benefit balance of natural product-derived ADHD treatments should be carefully monitored when used as standalone treatment or when combined with other conventional ADHD treatments. PMID:26966583

  7. The use of marine-derived bioactive compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dileep G; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Al-Musharafi, Salma K

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment may be explored as a rich source for novel drugs. A number of marine-derived compounds have been isolated and identified, and their therapeutic effects and pharmacological profiles are characterized. In the present review, we highlight the recent studies using marine compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents for the treatment of liver fibrotic diseases and discuss the proposed mechanisms of their activities. In addition, we discuss the significance of similar studies in Oman, where the rich marine life provides a potential for the isolation of novel natural, bioactive products that display therapeutic effects on liver diseases. PMID:25500871

  8. A modern literature review of carbon monoxide poisoning theories, therapies, and potential targets for therapy advancement.

    PubMed

    Roderique, Joseph D; Josef, Christopher S; Feldman, Michael J; Spiess, Bruce D

    2015-08-01

    The first descriptions of carbon monoxide (CO) and its toxic nature appeared in the literature over 100 years ago in separate publications by Drs. Douglas and Haldane. Both men ascribed the deleterious effects of this newly discovered gas to its strong interaction with hemoglobin. Since then the adverse sequelae of CO poisoning has been almost universally attributed to hypoxic injury secondary to CO occupation of oxygen binding sites on hemoglobin. Despite a mounting body of literature suggesting other mechanisms of injury, this pathophysiology and its associated oxygen centric therapies persists. This review attempts to elucidate the remarkably complex nature of CO as a gasotransmitter. While CO's affinity for hemoglobin remains undisputed, new research suggests that its role in nitric oxide release, reactive oxygen species formation, and its direct action on ion channels is much more significant. In the course of understanding the multifaceted character of this simple molecule it becomes apparent that current oxygen based therapies meant to displace CO from hemoglobin may be insufficient and possibly harmful. Approaching CO as a complex gasotransmitter will help guide understanding of the complex and poorly understood sequelae and illuminate potentials for new treatment modalities. PMID:25997893

  9. HBO: a possible supplementary therapy for oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Rui; Zhou, Gang

    2014-08-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are chronic inflammatory diseases in which cells suffer hypoxia referring to deprivation of adequate oxygen supply. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO), which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve or cure disorders involving hypoxia. Although the applications of HBO in wound healings, acute ischemic stroke, radiation-induced soft tissue injury and cancers are extensively reported, there are only few studies on their effect in OPMDs. Not only does HBO furnish oxygen-it also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. At the cellular level, HBO can decrease lymphocyte proliferation and promote apoptosis of fibroblasts. At the molecular level, it can decrease expression of HIF, ICAM-1, TNF-α, TGF-β, and IFN-γ, as well as increase vascular VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Thus, we hypothesize that HBO may contribute to treat OPMDs, including oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis both at the cellular level and the molecular level, and that it would be a safe and inexpensive therapeutic strategy. PMID:24908359

  10. Medicinal plants from Peru: a review of plants as potential agents against cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Valerio, Luis G

    2006-09-01

    Natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery and development especially for agents against cancer and infectious disease. An analysis of new and approved drugs for cancer by the United States Food and Drug Administration over the period of 1981-2002 showed that 62% of these cancer drugs were of natural origin. Natural compounds possess highly diverse and complex molecular structures compared to small molecule synthetic drugs and often provide highly specific biological activities likely derived from the rigidity and high number of chiral centers. Ethnotraditional use of plant-derived natural products has been a major source for discovery of potential medicinal agents. A number of native Andean and Amazonian medicines of plant origin are used as traditional medicine in Peru to treat different diseases. Of particular interest in this mini-review are three plant materials endemic to Peru with the common names of Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), Maca (Lepidium meyenii), and Dragon's blood (Croton lechleri) each having been scientifically investigated for a wide range of therapeutic uses including as specific anti-cancer agents as originally discovered from the long history of traditional usage and anecdotal information by local population groups in South America. Against this background, we present an evidence-based analysis of the chemistry, biological properties, and anti-tumor activities for these three plant materials. In addition, this review will discuss areas requiring future study and the inherent limitations in their experimental use as anti-cancer agents. PMID:17017852

  11. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  12. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. NON-TOXIC MELANOMA THERAPY BY A NOVEL TUBULIN-BINDING AGENT

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Ritu; Asress, Seneshaw; Dhiman, Neerupma; Awasthi, Anshumali; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Arora, Sudarshan K.; Zhou, Jun; Glass, Jonathan D.; Joshi, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    (S)-3-((R)-9-bromo-4-methoxy-6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-[1,3]dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquino-lin-5-yl)-6,7-dimethoxyisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (EM011) is a tubulin-binding agent with significant anticancer activity. Here we show that EM011 modulates microtubule dynamics at concentrations that do not alter the total polymer mass of tubulin. In particular, EM011 decreases the transition frequencies between growth and shortening phases and increases the duration microtubules spend in an idle ‘pause’ state. Using B16LS9 murine melanoma cells, we show that EM011 briefly arrests cell-cycle progression at the G2/M phase by formation of multiple aster spindles. An aberrant mitotic exit without cytokinesis then occurs, leading to the accumulation of abnormal multinucleated cells prior to apoptosis. Our pharmacokinetic studies conformed to a linear dose-response relationship upto 150 mg/kg. However, non-linearity was observed at 300 mg/kg. In a syngeneic murine model of subcutaneous melanoma, better antitumor responses were seen at 150 mg/kg compared to 300 mg/kg of EM011. Unlike currently available chemotherapeutics, EM011 is non-toxic to normal tissues and most importantly, does not cause any immunosuppression and neurotoxicity. Our data thus warrant a clinical evaluation of EM011 for melanoma therapy. PMID:19626589

  14. Developing Agentic Learners for 21st Century Practice: A Pedagogic Approach in Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoe C-Y; Flavell, Helen; Parsons, Dave; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to teaching occupational therapy students how to create orthoses, whilst at the same time developing higher-order critical thinking, reflective, and clinical reasoning skills is described. The scaffolded nature of the learning activities, incorporating Kolb's reflective learning cycle, was used to support students' capacity for clinical reasoning and better prepare them for clinical placement. The peer-assessment element was also designed to support the experiential learning by allowing students to test their evaluation of hand orthoses, compare their assessment with an expert's, and identify areas for improvement. Students who demonstrated higher grades for the written reflection assessment showed better agreement with the experts (smaller bias, p<0.01). This study concluded there was a correlation between students' capacity for reflective thinking and the development of clinical reasoning. Furthermore, the reflective writing exercise encouraged students to generalise their skills beyond the classroom. The approach and findings of this study are relevant to a range of allied health professions through providing a process to support the development of higher-order critical thinking, reflection, and reasoning skills. Furthermore, the study provides an evidence base to demonstrate that higher reflective skill capacity and critical thinking are crucial to creating agentic learners. PMID:26937876

  15. Engineering phosphopeptide-decorated magnetic nanoparticles as efficient photothermal agents for solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man; Guo, Qiaoyan; Xu, Feng; Liu, Shujun; Lu, Xuehong; Wang, Jing; Gao, Hongwen; Luo, Ping

    2016-08-15

    Due to the high therapeutic efficiency and minimum damage towards normal tissues, phototherapy has drawn a great deal of attention in recent decades. Herein, we reported the synthesis of novel phosphopeptide-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (peptide-Fe3O4 nanoparticles), and their usages in photothermal therapy against solid tumor. By using a classical coprecipitation method and a facile ligand exchange route, these peptide-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared with inexpensive inhesion. Upon the irradiation of a near-infrared (NIR) light, these nanoagents exhibited great photothermal effect with high photo-stability. In vitro biocompatibility studies of these peptide-Fe3O4 nanoparticles indicated their low cytotoxicity, negligible hemolysis, and no effect on blood coagulation. As expected, 4T1 murine breast cancer cells could be effectively damaged by these light-mediated nanoagents. Significantly, animal experiments demonstrated that these nanoagents held great solid tumor ablation effect with the assistance of a NIR laser irradiation. Additional studies focused on the long-term toxicity of these nanoagents indicated their high bio-compatibility. Thus, these peptide-Fe3O4 nanoparticles could bring more opportunities to a new generation of photothermal agents in the field of biomedicine. PMID:27214146

  16. In vitro efficiency and mechanistic role of indocyanine green as photodynamic therapy agent for human melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoon, A.M.; Miller, L.; Gamal-Eldeen, A. M.; Ruppel, M. E.; Smith, R. J.; Tsang, T.; Miller, L. M.

    2009-05-02

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800 nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway. Human skin melanoma cells (Sk-Mel-28) were incubated with ICG and exposed to a low power Ti:Sapphire laser. Synchrotron-assisted Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to assess the cell damage and changes in lipid, protein, and nucleic acids. The cell death pathway was determined by analysis of cell viability and apoptosis and necrosis markers. In the cell death pathway, {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation evoked rapid multiple consequences that trigger apoptosis after laser exposure for only 15min including the release of cytochrome c, the activation of total caspases, caspase-3, and caspase-9, the inhibition of NF-{Kappa}B P65, and the enhancement of DNA fragmentation, and histone acetylation. ICG/PDT can efficiently and rapidly induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells and it can be considered as a new therapeutic approach for topical treatment of melanoma.

  17. Hybrid graphene/Au activatable theranostic agent for multimodalities imaging guided enhanced photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Guohao; Yang, Kai; Chen, Minglong; Tian, Rui; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has been increasingly investigated. However, there are still challenges in strategies that can further enhance photoconversion efficiency and improve photothermal tumor ablation effect of current nanomaterials. Herein, we developed a fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging guided PTT agent by seeding Gold (Au) nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO). Near infrared dye (Cy5.5) labeled-matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) substrate (CP) was conjugated onto the GO/Au complex (GA) forming tumor targeted theranostic probe (CPGA), whereCy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) capacity from both GO and Au, yet it can boost strong fluorescence signals after degradation by MMP-14. The photothermal effect of GA hybrid was found significantly elevated compared with Au or GO alone. After intravenous administration of CPGA into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.64 ± 0.51 for optical imaging and 2.5 ± 0.27 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and an excellent tumor inhibition was observedwithoutrecurrence. Our studies further encourage applications of the hybrid nanocomposite for image-guided enhanced PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:26691399

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Iridium(III) Complexes as Efficient Photodynamic Therapy Agents via Protein Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jung Seung; Kang, Myeong-Gyun; Kang, Juhye; Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Shin Jung C; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lim, Mi Hee; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk

    2016-08-31

    Protein inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide radical (O2(•-)) is considered to trigger cell death pathways associated with protein dysfunction; however, the detailed mechanisms and direct involvement in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have not been revealed. Herein, we report Ir(III) complexes designed for ROS generation through a rational strategy to investigate protein modifications by ROS. The Ir(III) complexes are effective as PDT agents at low concentrations with low-energy irradiation (≤ 1 J cm(-2)) because of the relatively high (1)O2 quantum yield (> 0.78), even with two-photon activation. Furthermore, two types of protein modifications (protein oxidation and photo-cross-linking) involved in PDT were characterized by mass spectrometry. These modifications were generated primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, producing a significant effect for cancer cell death. Consequently, we present a plausible biologically applicable PDT modality that utilizes rationally designed photoactivatable Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27494510

  19. Focal therapy of neuroblastoma using silk films to deliver kinase and chemotherapeutic agents in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Coburn, Jeannine; Konrad, Ilona; Klebanov, Nikolai; Jones, Gregory T; Blackwood, Brian; Charest, Alain; Kaplan, David L; Chiu, Bill

    2015-07-01

    Current methods for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma patients include surgical intervention, in addition to systemic chemotherapy. However, only limited therapeutic tools are available to pediatric surgeons involved in neuroblastoma care, so the development of intraoperative treatment modalities is highly desirable. This study presents a silk film library generated for focal therapy of neuroblastoma; these films were loaded with either the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin or the targeted drug crizotinib. Drug release kinetics from the silk films were fine-tuned by changing the amount and physical crosslinking of silk; doxorubicin loaded films were further refined by applying a gold nanocoating. Doxorubicin-loaded, physically crosslinked silk films showed the best in vitro activity and superior in vivo activity in orthotopic neuroblastoma studies when compared to the doxorubicin-equivalent dose administered intravenously. Silk films were also suitable for delivery of the targeted drug crizotinib, as crizotinib-loaded silk films showed an extended release profile and an improved response both in vitro and in vivo when compared to freely diffusible crizotinib. These findings, when combined with prior in vivo data on silk, support a viable future for silk-based anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:25861948

  20. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists: a potential add-on therapy in the treatment of asthma?

    PubMed

    Busse, William W; Dahl, Ronald; Jenkins, Christine; Cruz, Alvaro A

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that is a major global burden on both individuals and healthcare systems. Despite guideline-directed treatment, a significant proportion of patients with asthma do not achieve control. This review focuses on the potential use of long-acting anticholinergics as bronchodilators in the treatment of asthma, with results published from clinical trials of glycopyrrolate, umeclidinium and tiotropium. The tiotropium clinical trial programme is the most advanced, with data available from a number of phase II and III studies of tiotropium as an add-on to inhaled corticosteroid maintenance therapy, with or without a long-acting β2-agonist, in patients across asthma severities. Recent studies using the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler have identified 5 µg once daily as the preferred dosing regimen, which has shown promising results in adults, adolescents and children with asthma. Tiotropium Respimat has recently been incorporated into the Global Initiative for Asthma 2015 treatment strategy as a recommended alternative therapy at steps 4 and 5 in adult patients with a history of exacerbations. The increasing availability of evidence from ongoing and future clinical trials will be beneficial in determining where long-acting anticholinergic agents fit in future treatment guidelines across a variety of patient populations and disease severities. PMID:26929422

  1. Xanthones from Mangosteen Extracts as Natural Chemopreventive Agents: Potential Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shan, T.; Ma, Q.; Guo, K.; Liu, J.; Li, W.; Wang, F.; Wu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the treatment and management of malignant tumors still remain a formidable challenge for public health. New strategies for cancer treatment are being developed, and one of the most promising treatment strategies involves the application of chemopreventive agents. The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds. Xanthones, from the pericarp, whole fruit, heartwood, and leaf of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn., GML), are known to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacologic properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral activities. The potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities of xanthones have been demonstrated in different stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression) and are known to control cell division and growth, apoptosis, inflammation, and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that xanthones inhibit proliferation of a wide range of human tumor cell types by modulating various targets and signaling transduction pathways. Here we provide a concise and comprehensive review of preclinical data and assess the observed anticancer effects of xanthones, supporting its remarkable potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:21902651

  2. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  3. Gd(III) complexes intercalated into hydroxy double salts as potential MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Miao; Spillane, Dominic E M; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Williams, Gareth R; Bligh, S W Annie

    2015-12-21

    The ion exchange intercalation of two Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents into hydroxy double salts (HDSs) is reported. The presence of Gd(3+) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and Gd(3+) diethylenetriaminepenta(methylenephosphonate) complexes in the HDS lattice after intercalation was confirmed by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The structural aspects of the HDS-Gd composites were studied by X-ray diffraction, with the intercalates having an interlayer spacing of 14.5-18.6 Å. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of characteristic vibration peaks associated with the Gd(3+) complexes in the intercalation compounds. The proton relaxivities of the Gd(3+) complex-loaded composites were 2 to 5-fold higher in longitudinal relaxivity, and up to 10-fold higher in transverse relaxivity, compared to solutions of the pure complexes. These data demonstrate that the new composites reported here are potentially potent MRI contrast agents. PMID:26568157

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of novel tropane derivatives as potential PET imaging agents for the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hongwen; Zhu, Lin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zha, Zhihao; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of tropane derivatives containing a fluorinated tertiary amino or amide at the 2β position was synthesized, labeled with the positron-emitter fluorine-18 (T1/2 = 109.8 min), and tested as potential in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging agents. The corresponding chlorinated analogs were prepared and employed as precursors for radiolabeling leading to the fluorine-18-labeled derivatives via a one-step nucleophilic aliphatic substitution reaction. In vitro binding results showed that the 2β-amino compounds 6b, 6d and 7b displayed moderately high affinities to DAT (Ki < 10 nM). Biodistribution studies of [18F]6b and [18F]6d showed that the brain uptakes in rats were low. This is likely due to their low lipophilicities. Further structural modifications of these tropane derivatives will be needed to improve their in vivo properties as DAT imaging agents. PMID:22658558

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel acylhydrazone derivatives as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential antitumor agents a series of 2-hydroxybenzylidene derivatives of the N-(2-trifluoromethylpiridyn-4-yl)anthranilic acid hydrazide, and some analogues bearing a (2-trifluoromethyl)piridyn-4-ylamino group in 3- or 4-position of benzohydrazide or 4-position of phenylacetohydrazide. Compounds 12e, 13e, 15e, and 16e, bearing a 4-(diethylamino)salicylidene group exhibited potent cytotoxicity, with averaged GI50 values in sub-micromolar range, and a variety of cell selectivity at nanomolar concentrations. The determination of acute toxicity in athymic nudes mice proved some compounds to be non-toxic, making them good candidates for further study as antitumor agents. PMID:24071449

  6. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 4-dimethylamine flavonoid derivatives as potential multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Wang, Ting; Hong, Chen; Yang, Ya-Chen; Chen, Ying; Cen, Juan; Xie, Song-Qiang; Wang, Chao-Jie

    2016-10-21

    A new series of 4-dimethylamine flavonoid derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents. The inhibition of cholinesterase activity, self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation, and antioxidant activity by these derivatives was investigated. Most of the compounds exhibited potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity. A Lineweaver-Burk plot and molecular modeling study showed that these compounds targeted both the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. The derivatives showed potent self-induced Aβ aggregation inhibition and peroxyl radical absorbance activity. Moreover, compound 6d significantly protected PC12 neurons against H2O2-induced cell death at low concentrations. Thus, these compounds could become multifunctional agents for further development for the treatment of AD. PMID:27343850

  7. Novel C6-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazinones as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yujin; Yun, Hye Jeong; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho Jin; Pham, Phuong Chi; Moon, Jayoung; Kwon, Dah In; Lim, Bumhee; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Jeeyeon; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed in a number of tumors. However, combating resistance is one of the main challenges in the currently available IGF-1R inhibitor-based cancer therapies. Increased Src activation has been reported to confer resistance to anti-IGF-1R therapeutics in various tumor cells. An urgent unmet need for IGF-1R inhibitors is to suppress Src rephosphorylation induced by current anti-IGF-1R regimens. In efforts to develop effective anticancer agents targeting the IGF-1R signaling pathway, we explored 2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazin-5-ones as a novel scaffold that is structurally unrelated to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The compound, LL-2003, exhibited promising antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo; it effectively suppressed IGF-1R and Src and induced apoptosis in various non-small cell lung cancer cells. Further optimizations for enhanced potency in cellular assays need to be followed, but our strategy to identify novel IGF-1R/Src inhibitors may open a new avenue to develop more efficient anticancer agents. PMID:26515601

  8. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  9. Vitamin D compounds: clinical development as cancer therapy and prevention agents.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Muindi, Josephia; Fakih, Marwan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Johnson, Candace S

    2006-01-01

    While 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) is best recognized for its effects on bone and mineral metabolism, epidemiological data indicate that low vitamin D levels may play a role in the genesis and progression of breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer, as well as malignant lymphoma and melanoma. Calcitriol has strong antiproliferative effects in prostate, breast, colorectal, head/neck and lung cancer, as well as lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma model systems. Antiproliferative effects are seen in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these effects are associated with G0/G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis, differentiation and modulation of growth factor-mediated signaling in tumor cells. In addition to the direct effects on tumor cells, recent data strongly support the hypothesis that the stromal effects of vitamin D analogs (e.g., direct effects on tumor vasculature) are also important in the antiproliferative effects. Antitumor effects are seen in a wide variety of tumor types and there are few data to suggest that vitamin D-based approaches are more effective in any one tumor type. Glucocorticoids potentiate the antitumor effect of calcitriol and decrease calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia. In addition, calcitriol potentiates the antitumor effects of many cytotoxic agents. Preclinical data indicate that maximal antitumor effects are seen with pharmacological doses of calcitriol and that such exposure can be safely achieved in animals using a high dose, intermittent schedule of administration. AUC and C(max) calcitriol concentrations of 32 ng.h/ml and 9.2 ng/ml are associated with striking antitumor effects in a murine squamous cell carcinoma model and there is increasing evidence from clinical trials that such exposures can be safely attained in patients. Another approach to maximizing intra-tumoral exposure to vitamin D analogs is to inhibit their catabolism. The data clearly indicate that agents which inhibit the major vitamin D catabolizing enzyme

  10. The potential role of antiplatelet agents in modulating inflammatory markers in atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E T H; Khan, B V

    2006-11-01

    Atherothrombosis is the process that links atherosclerotic lesion development with unpredictable and life-threatening ischemic vascular events such as angina, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, and stroke. Atherothrombosis is triggered when an unstable atherosclerotic lesion is ruptured, leading to platelet activation and thrombus formation. Inflammatory mediators are responsible for lesion instability leading to rupture, and in recent years atherothrombosis and its underlying condition of atherosclerosis have come to be recognized as manifestations of inflammatory disease. Inflammatory mediators may therefore serve as early markers of atherothrombosis. Measurement of early markers may be used to predict future ischemic events and improve risk stratification in patients following diagnosis of atherothrombotic disease. In addition, detection of such markers may help to optimize the use of current therapies to manage atherothrombosis. Molecules that may serve as early markers of atherothrombotic disease include C-reactive protein, CD40 ligand, myeloperoxidase, pregnancy-associated plasma protein and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Early indications are that levels of these markers are influenced by therapies currently in use in the treatment of atherothrombotic conditions, including antiplatelet agents. Ongoing studies will provide further insight into routine assessment of inflammatory markers as a guide to the management of patients with atherothrombosis. PMID:16961584

  11. [Metabolomics has the potential to improve drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Stage, Claus; Jürgens, Gesche; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg

    2014-03-17

    Until now drug therapy has primarily been controlled by dose titration on the basis of effects and side effects. However, a lot of people being treated with a drug experience too little effect or too many side effects. Therefore it will be advantageous to improve drug therapy and make it even more "individualized". In this chase metabolomics is a hot topic. The aim of this paper is to review the concepts of metabolomics and the possible applications in regard to drug development, drug therapy and diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of diseases. PMID:25096206

  12. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  13. Online learning: the potential for occupational therapy education.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Vivien; Madill, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Online learning continues to have a significant impact on higher education. Increasingly students seek a combination of online learning and face-to-face instruction at undergraduate and graduate levels and occupational therapists ask for online continuing professional development opportunities. However, occupational therapy educators have been slow to adopt web-based instructional technology. This paper presents background information on the use of web-based learning in the general sphere of higher education and outlines the current range of usage in occupational therapy education. Research findings are presented to stimulate discussion regarding online learning and occupational therapy professional socialisation, student satisfaction and outcomes. There is a fine line between full and partial online course delivery, so research on technology-enhanced campus-based delivery is also included in the review. Evidence suggests that blending combinations of technologies with computer mediated learning enhances interaction and could address the higher order learning needs of professional programmes such as occupational therapy. PMID:16862957

  14. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  15. Therapeutic potential of new B cell-targeted agents in the treatment of elderly and unfit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rai, Kanti R

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common adult leukemia in the Western world, is primarily a disease of the elderly, with most patients ≥65 years of age and having at least one major comorbidity. Aggressive chemoimmunotherapy regimens recommended to achieve remission and improve survival in young, fit patients are often poorly tolerated in elderly and/or less physiologically fit ("unfit") patients, necessitating alternative treatment options. Although patient age, fitness, and comorbidities are key considerations in the selection of a treatment regimen, historically, clinical trials have been limited to young, fit patients by virtue of the ethical concerns associated with potential end organ toxic effects that could worsen comorbidities. However, the availability of new therapies promises a shift to a research paradigm that encompasses the identification of optimal treatments for elderly and unfit patients. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, which overall has improved response rates and survival in patients with CLL, has only recently been evaluated elderly and unfit patients. B cell-targeted agents such as the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor idelalisib are the first of a new generation of oral agents for CLL. Available clinical data suggest that these therapies have the potential to address the unmet need in elderly and unfit patients with CLL and result in clinical remission, and not merely symptom palliation and improved quality of life, which, by themselves, are also a reasonable goal. PMID:26170206

  16. Simple isoquinoline and benzylisoquinoline alkaloids as potential antimicrobial, antimalarial, cytotoxic, and anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, K; Moriyasu, M; Tachibana, Y; Kim, H S; Wataya, Y; Wiegrebe, W; Bastow, K F; Cosentino, L M; Kozuka, M; Lee, K H

    2001-11-01

    Twenty-six simple isoquinolines and 21 benzylisoquinolines were tested for antimicrobial, antimalarial, cytotoxic, and anti-HIV activities. Some simple isoquinoline alkaloids were significantly active in each assay, and may be useful as lead compounds for developing potential chemotherapeutic agents. These compounds include 13 (antimicrobial), 25, 26, and 42 (antimalarial), 13 and 25 (cytotoxic), and 28 and 29 (anti-HIV). A quaternary nitrogen atom of isoquinolium or dihydroisoquinolinium type may contribute to enhanced potency in the first three types of activities. In contrast, anti-HIV activity was found with tetrahydroisoquinoline and 6,7-dihydroxyisoquinolium salts. PMID:11597468

  17. Molecules that Mimic Apolipoprotein A-I: Potential Agents for Treating Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Luke J.; Maryanoff, Bruce E.; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2013-01-01

    Certain amphipathic α-helical peptides can functionally mimic many of the properties of full-length apolipoproteins, thereby offering an approach to modulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL) for combating atherosclerosis. In this Perspective, we summarize the key findings and advances over the past 25 years in the development of peptides that mimic apolipoproteins, especially apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). This assemblage of information provides a reasonably clear picture of the state of the art in the apolipoprotein mimetic field, an appreciation of the potential for such agents in pharmacotherapy, and a sense of the opportunities for optimizing the functional properties of HDL. PMID:24168751

  18. Synthesis, Antifungal Activities and Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship of Carabrone Hydrazone Derivatives as Potential Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Ze-Yu; Wang, De-Long; Yan, Xiao-Nan; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at developing novel fungicides for relieving the ever-increasing pressure of agricultural production caused by phytopathogenic fungi, 28 new hydrazone derivatives of carabrone, a natural bioactive sesquisterpene, in three types were designed, synthesized and their antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lagenarium were evaluated. The result revealed that all the derivatives synthesized exhibited considerable antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo, which led to the improved activities for carabrone and its analogues and further confirmed their potential as antifungal agents. PMID:24619221

  19. Complex of C60 Fullerene with Doxorubicin as a Promising Agent in Antitumor Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prylutska, Svitlana V.; Skivka, Larysa M.; Didenko, Gennadiy V.; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I.; Evstigneev, Maxim P.; Potebnya, Grygoriy P.; Panchuk, Rostyslav R.; Stoika, Rostyslav S.; Ritter, Uwe; Scharff, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of doxorubicin in complex with C60 fullerene (C60 + Dox) on the growth and metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice and to perform a primary screening of the potential mechanisms of C60 + Dox complex action. We found that volume of tumor from mice treated with the C60 + Dox complex was 1.4 times less than that in control untreated animals. The number of metastatic foci in lungs of animals treated with C60 + Dox complex was two times less than that in control untreated animals. Western blot analysis of tumor lysates revealed a significant decrease in the level of heat-shock protein 70 in animals treated with C60 + Dox complex. Moreover, the treatment of tumor-bearing mice was accompanied by the increase of cytotoxic activity of immune cells. Thus, the potential mechanisms of antitumor effect of C60 + Dox complex include both its direct action on tumor cells by inducing cell death and increasing of stress sensitivity and an immunomodulating effect. The obtained results provide a scientific basis for further application of C60 + Dox nanocomplexes as treatment agents in cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Complex of C60 Fullerene with Doxorubicin as a Promising Agent in Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Prylutska, Svitlana V; Skivka, Larysa M; Didenko, Gennadiy V; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I; Evstigneev, Maxim P; Potebnya, Grygoriy P; Panchuk, Rostyslav R; Stoika, Rostyslav S; Ritter, Uwe; Scharff, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of doxorubicin in complex with C60 fullerene (C60 + Dox) on the growth and metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice and to perform a primary screening of the potential mechanisms of C60 + Dox complex action. We found that volume of tumor from mice treated with the C60 + Dox complex was 1.4 times less than that in control untreated animals. The number of metastatic foci in lungs of animals treated with C60 + Dox complex was two times less than that in control untreated animals. Western blot analysis of tumor lysates revealed a significant decrease in the level of heat-shock protein 70 in animals treated with C60 + Dox complex. Moreover, the treatment of tumor-bearing mice was accompanied by the increase of cytotoxic activity of immune cells. Thus, the potential mechanisms of antitumor effect of C60 + Dox complex include both its direct action on tumor cells by inducing cell death and increasing of stress sensitivity and an immunomodulating effect. The obtained results provide a scientific basis for further application of C60 + Dox nanocomplexes as treatment agents in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26714861

  1. Antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Cameron S; Day, Brian J

    2016-01-15

    The continuing horrors of military conflicts and terrorism often involve the use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Many CWA and TIC exposures are difficult to treat due to the danger they pose to first responders and their rapid onset that can produce death shortly after exposure. While the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity of these agents are diverse, many are associated either directly or indirectly with increased oxidative stress in affected tissues. This has led to the exploration of various antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC exposures. Studies have been performed across a wide array of agents, model organisms, exposure systems, and antioxidants, looking at an almost equally diverse set of endpoints. Attempts at treating CWAs/TICs with antioxidants have met with mixed results, ranging from no effect to nearly complete protection. The aim of this commentary is to summarize the literature in each category for evidence of oxidative stress and antioxidant efficacy against CWAs and TICs. While there is great disparity in the data concerning methods, models, and remedies, the outlook on antioxidants as medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC management appears promising. PMID:26476351

  2. Mesoporous europo-gadolinosilicate nanoparticles as bimodal medical imaging agents and a potential theranostic platform.

    PubMed

    Tse, Nicholas M K; Kennedy, Danielle F; Kirby, Nigel; Moffat, Bradford A; Muir, Benjamin W; Caruso, Rachel A; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-06-01

    The mesoporous structure of sol-gel prepared gadolinium and europium doped silicate nanoparticles has been found to be highly dependent on the formulated composition, with synthesised samples displaying both disordered and hexagonally ordered mesoporous packing symmetry. The degree of pore ordering within the nanoparticles has a strong correlation with the total lanthanide (Gd(3+) and Eu(3+) ) concentration. The gadolinosilicates are excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal (T1 ) agents. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1 ) and transverse (r2 ) relaxivity, a measure of MRI contrast agent efficiency, were up to four times higher than the clinically employed Omniscan (gadodiamide); with r1 up to 20.6 s(-1) mM(-1) and r2 of 66.2 s(-1) mM(-1) compared to 5.53 and 4.64 s(-1) mM(-1) , respectively, for Omniscan. In addition, the europium content of all the samples studied is below the self-quenching limit, which results in a strong luminescence response from the nanoparticles on excitation at 250 nm. The Eu-Gd silicate nanoparticles act as bimodal imaging agents for MRI and luminescence. These mesoporous nanoparticles also have the potential to serve as encapsulation and controlled release matrices for pharmaceuticals. They are therefore a promising multimodal theranostic platform. PMID:23296572

  3. Identification of Aspergillus flavus isolates as potential biocontrol agents of aflatoxin contamination in crops.

    PubMed

    Rosada, L J; Sant'anna, J R; Franco, C C S; Esquissato, G N M; Santos, P A S R; Yajima, J P R S; Ferreira, F D; Machinski, M; Corrêa, B; Castro-Prado, M A A

    2013-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus, a haploid organism found worldwide in a variety of crops, including maize, cottonseed, almond, pistachio, and peanut, causes substantial and recurrent worldwide economic liabilities. This filamentous fungus produces aflatoxins (AFLs) B1 and B2, which are among the most carcinogenic compounds from nature, acutely hepatotoxic and immunosuppressive. Recent efforts to reduce AFL contamination in crops have focused on the use of nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains as biological control agents. Such agents are applied to soil to competitively exclude native AFL strains from crops and thereby reduce AFL contamination. Because the possibility of genetic recombination in A. flavus could influence the stability of biocontrol strains with the production of novel AFL phenotypes, this article assesses the diversity of vegetative compatibility reactions in isolates of A. flavus to identify heterokaryon self-incompatible (HSI) strains among nonaflatoxigenic isolates, which would be used as biological controls of AFL contamination in crops. Nitrate nonutilizing (nit) mutants were recovered from 25 A. flavus isolates, and based on vegetative complementation between nit mutants and on the microscopic examination of the number of hyphal fusions, five nonaflatoxigenic (6, 7, 9 to 11) and two nontoxigenic (8 and 12) isolates of A. flavus were phenotypically characterized as HSI. Because the number of hyphal fusions is reduced in HSI strains, impairing both heterokaryon formation and the genetic exchanges with aflatoxigenic strains, the HSI isolates characterized here, especially isolates 8 and 12, are potential agents for reducing AFL contamination in crops. PMID:23726204

  4. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed. PMID:23170959

  5. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-01

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  6. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-01

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors. PMID:20220227

  7. Targeting CSC-Related miRNAs for Cancer Therapy by Natural Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bao, Ginny; Ali, Shadan; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has provided evidence on fundamental clinical implications because of the involvement of CSCs in cell migration, invasion, metastasis, and treatment resistance, which leads to the poor clinical outcome of cancer patients. Therefore, targeting CSCs will provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and/or prevention of tumors. However, the regulation of CSCs and its signaling pathways during tumorigenesis are not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been proved to act as key regulators of the post-transcriptional regulation of genes, which involve in a wide array of biological processes including tumorigenesis. The altered expressions of miRNAs are associated with poor clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with a variety of tumors. Therefore, emerging evidence strongly suggest that miRMAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Emerging evidence also suggest that miRNAs participate in the regulation of tumor cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis. Moreover, miRNAs such as let-7, miR-21, miR-22, miR-34, miR-101, miR-146a, and miR-200 have been found to be associated with CSC phenotype and function mediated through targeting oncogenic signaling pathways. In this article, we will discuss the role of miRNAs in the regulation of CSC phenotype and function during tumor development and progression. We will also discuss the potential role of naturally occurring agents (nutraceuticals) as potent anti-tumor agents that are believed to function by targeting CSC-related miRNAs. PMID:23140295

  8. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  9. In Vitro Efficacy and Mechanistic Role of Indocyanine Green as a Photodynamic Therapy Agent for Human Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoon, A.; Gamal-Eldeen, A; Ruppel, M; Smith, R; Tsang, T; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway.

  10. Efficacy of potential chemopreventive agents on rat colon aberrant crypt formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Wargovich, M J; Jimenez, A; McKee, K; Steele, V E; Velasco, M; Woods, J; Price, R; Gray, K; Kelloff, G J

    2000-06-01

    We assessed the effects of 78 potential chemopreventive agents in the F344 rat using two assays in which the inhibition of carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon was the measure of efficacy. In both assays ACF were induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in F344 rats by two sequential weekly injections at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last AOM injection, animals were evaluated for the number of aberrant crypts detected in methylene blue stained whole mounts of rat colon. In the initiation phase protocol agents were given during the period of AOM administration, whereas in the post-initiation assay the chemopreventive agent was introduced during the last 4 weeks of an 8 week assay, a time when ACF had progressed to multiple crypt clusters. The agents were derived from a priority listing based on reports of chemopreventive activity in the literature and/or efficacy data from in vitro models of carcinogenesis. During the initiation phase carboxyl amidoimidazole, p-chlorphenylacetate, chlorpheniramine maleate, D609, diclofenac, etoperidone, eicosatetraynoic acid, farnesol, ferulic acid, lycopene, meclizine, methionine, phenylhexylisothiocyanate, phenylbutyrate, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, S-allylcysteine, taurine, tetracycline and verapamil were strong inhibitors of ACF. During the post-initiation phase aspirin, calcium glucarate, ketoprofen, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, retinol and rutin inhibited the outgrowth of ACF into multiple crypt clusters. Based on these data, certain phytochemicals, antihistamines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and retinoids show unique preclinical promise for chemoprevention of colon cancer, with the latter two drug classes particularly effective in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis. PMID:10837003

  11. Sugar-borate esters--potential chemical agents in prostate cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Scorei, Romulus Ion; Popa, Radu

    2013-07-01

    The potential value of sugar-borate esters (SBEs) in the chemo-preventive therapy of prostate cancer has been reviewed. We propose that SBEs act as boron (B) vehicles, increasing the concentration of borate inside cancer cells relative to normal cells. Increased intracellular concentration of borate activates borate transporters, but also leads to growth inhibition and apoptosis. The effects of SBEs on normal cells are less dramatic because SBEs are naturally-occurring biochemicals, common and abundant in some fruits and vegetables, and also because borate dissociated from SBEs in natural diet doses is easily exported from normal cells. Cancer cell lines that over-express sugar transporters or under-express borate export are potential targets for SBE-based therapy. With regard to efficiency against cancer cells and drug preparation requirements, trigonal cis-diol boric monoesters will be one of the most effective class of SBEs. Because negative correlation exists between borate intake and the incidence of prostate cancer, and because most cancer cells overexpress sugar transporters, SBEs are proposed as a potential chemopreventive avenue in the fight against primary and recurrent prostate cancer. PMID:23293883

  12. ASSESSING POTENTIAL OF COLLETOTRICHUM ACUTATUM WILD-TYPE AND AUXOTROPHIC MUTANTS AS BIOLOGICAL FRUIT THINNING AGENTS IN CITRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colletotrichum acutatum, causal agent of postbloom fruit drop of citrus, and two induced C. acutatum mutants (3-3 and 3-2) were tested as potential agents for reducing fruit load on Valencia (Citrus sinensis ) and 'Temple' orange (C.reticulata x C. sinensis). Wild-type C. acutatum (RST) and a C. gl...

  13. Antitumoral, antioxidant, and antimelanogenesis potencies of Hawthorn, a potential natural agent in the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Mokdad-Bzéouich, Imèn; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-06-01

    The lack of an efficient agent that does not have the disadvantage of low activity (kojic acid), high cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity (hydroquinone), poor skin penetration (arbutin), or low stability in formulation (glabridin) led us to continue our research on new antipigmentation/skin-lightening agents. Therefore, research of natural products that can modulate the metabolism of pigmentation is of great interest. Otherwise, malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, with high metastatic potential, and currently, there is no effective chemotherapy against invasive melanoma. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new drugs with potent activity and weak side effects against melanoma. The in-vitro anticancer effect of hawthorn was analyzed against B16F10 melanoma cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The effect of isolated compounds from hawthorn on melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells was investigated by measuring the amounts of melanin and tyrosinase spectrophotometrically at 475 nm. Balb/c mice models inoculated with B16F10 mouse tumor cells were used to evaluate the in-vivo antitumoral potential of hawthorn by assessing its effect on the growth of transplanted tumors. The antioxidant potential of tested samples was evaluated in B16F10 and primary human keratinocyte cells using a cellular antioxidant activity assay. Hawthorn tested samples inhibited effectively the growth of melanoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, it appears that tested samples from hawthorn reduced melanogenesis by inhibiting the tyrosinase activity of B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In-vivo studies showed that hawthorn total oligomer flavonoids extract treatment at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 21 days in implanted tumor mice resulted in significant inhibition of the tumor growth volume and weight. In addition, tested samples showed significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species

  14. Metal chelators coupled with nanoparticles as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neuro-degenerative disorder characterized by the progressive and irreversible loss of memory followed by complete dementia. Despite the disease's high prevalence and great economic and social burden, an explicative etiology or viable cure is not available. Great effort has been made to better understand the disease's pathogenesis, and to develop more effective therapeutic agents. However, success is greatly hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier that limits a large number of potential therapeutics from entering the brain. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is one of the few valuable tools for overcoming this impediment and its application as a potential AD treatment shows promise. In this review, the current studies on nanoparticle delivery of chelation agents as possible therapeutics for AD are discussed because several metals are found excessive in the AD brain and may play a role in the disease development. Specifically, a novel approach involving transport of iron chelation agents into and out of the brain by nanoparticles is highlighted. This approach may provide a safer and more effective means of simultaneously reducing several toxic metals in the AD brain. It may also provide insights into the mechanisms of AD pathophysiology, and prove useful in treating other iron-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome. It is important to note that the use of nanoparticle-mediated transport to facilitate toxicant excretion from diseased sites in the body may advance nanoparticle technology, which is currently focused on targeted drug delivery for disease prevention and treatment. The application of nanoparticle-mediated drug transport in the treatment of AD is at its very early stages of development and, therefore, more studies are warranted. PMID:19936278

  15. Dendrimer-based nanoparticles for potential personalized therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Targeting the BCR-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Franiak-Pietryga, Ida; Maciejewski, Henryk; Ostrowska, Kinga; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte; Misiewicz, Małgorzata; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Bryszewska, Maria; Borowiec, Maciej

    2016-07-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is one of the most prevalent forms of leukemia in western society. Although classic chemoimmune therapy is still the gold standard of care for leukemic patients, effective therapy of CLL is yet to be achieved. The present study examines the influence of poly(propylene)imine (PPI) dendrimers with primary amino surface groups modified with maltotriose residues in approximately 90% (PPI-G4-DS-Mal-III) or 30% (PPI-G4-OS-Mal-III) of cases on CLL cells (MEC-1 cell line with del(17p)), and confirms that the main trigger in this interaction is the induction of the apoptotic mechanism. The efficacy of each dendrimer was compared using fludarabine (FA). Gene expression profiling (GEP) by microarray identified a group of genes in the BCR signaling pathway characterized by different levels of expression directly associated with the tested agent and type of interaction. Network analysis revealed the potential patterns involved in potential personalized therapy of CLL. The expression of most BCR genes decreased under the influence of dendrimers, which might translate into decreased maturation and proliferation of CLL lymphocytes. Moreover, PPI-G4-OS/DS-Mal-III dendrimers affected gene expression and CLL cells in a different way to FA. Thanks to unique properties, dendrimers may be specifically targeted, thus improving the effectiveness of CLL therapy. PMID:26987432

  16. Potential Anti-HPV and Related Cancer Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Guan, Hua-Shi; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the prevention and treatment of human papillomavirus (HPV) which is closely related to the cervical cancer and other genital diseases are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and other bioactive compounds have been shown to possess a variety of anti-HPV and related cancer activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the potential anti-HPV and related cancer agents from marine resources. In particular, it will provide an update on the anti-HPV actions of heparinoid polysaccharides and bioactive compounds present in marine organisms, as well as the therapeutic vaccines relating to marine organisms. In addition, the possible mechanisms of anti-HPV actions of marine bioactive compounds and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:24705500

  17. Avena sativa (Oat), a potential neutraceutical and therapeutic agent: an overview.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; De, Subrata; Belkheir, Asma

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present review article is to summarize the available information related to the availability, production, chemical composition, pharmacological activity, and traditional uses of Avena sativa to highlight its potential to contribute to human health. Oats are now cultivated worldwide and form an important dietary staple for the people in number of countries. Several varieties of oats are available. It is a rich source of protein, contains a number of important minerals, lipids, β-glucan, a mixed-linkage polysaccharide, which forms an important part of oat dietary fiber, and also contains various other phytoconstituents like avenanthramides, an indole alkaloid-gramine, flavonoids, flavonolignans, triterpenoid saponins, sterols, and tocols. Traditionally oats have been in use since long and are considered as stimulant, antispasmodic, antitumor, diuretic, and neurotonic. Oat possesses different pharmacological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, anticholesterolaemic, etc. A wide spectrum of biological activities indicates that oat is a potential therapeutic agent. PMID:23072529

  18. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:24310522

  19. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination. PMID:26371033

  20. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  1. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination. PMID:26371033

  2. Potential use of Folate-appended Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Risako; Motoyama, Keiichi; Okamatsu, Ayaka; Higashi, Taishi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a tumor cell-selectivity of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (M-β-CyD), we newly synthesized folate-appended M-β-CyD (FA-M-β-CyD), and evaluated the potential of FA-M-β-CyD as a novel anticancer agent in vitro and in vivo. Potent antitumor activity and cellular association of FA-M-β-CyD were higher than those of M-β-CyD in KB cells, folate receptor (FR)-positive cells. FA-M-β-CyD drastically inhibited the tumor growth after intratumoral or intravenous injection to FR-positive Colon-26 cells-bearing mice. The antitumor activity of FA-M-β-CyD was comparable and superior to that of doxorubicin after both intratumoral and intravenous administrations, respectively, at the same dose, in the tumor-bearing mice. All of the tumor-bearing mice after an intravenous injection of FA-M-β-CyD survived for at least more than 140 days. Importantly, an intravenous administration of FA-M-β-CyD to tumor-bearing mice did not show any significant change in blood chemistry values. These results strongly suggest that FA-M-β-CyD has the potential as a novel anticancer agent. PMID:23346361

  3. Effect of Hypobaric Hypoxia on Cognitive Functions and Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MUTHURAJU, Sangu; PATI, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000–5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of oxindole linked indolyl-pyrimidine derivatives as potential cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Prajapti, Santosh Kumar; Nagarsenkar, Atulya; Guggilapu, Sravanthi Devi; Gupta, Keshav Kumar; Allakonda, Lingesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Babu, Bathini Nagendra

    2016-07-01

    In our endeavor towards the development of effective cytotoxic agents, a series of oxindole linked indolyl-pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized and characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and Mass spectral analysis. All the newly synthesized target compounds were assessed against PA-1 (ovarian), U-87MG (glioblastoma), LnCaP (prostate), and MCF-7 (Breast) cancer cell lines for their cytotoxic potential, with majority of them showing inhibitory activity at low micro-molar concentrations. Significantly, compound 8e was found to be most potent amongst all the tested compounds with an IC50 value of (2.43±0.29μM) on PA-1 cells. The influence of the most active cytotoxic compound 8e on the cell cycle distribution was assessed on the PA-1 cell line, exhibiting a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and annexin V binding assay confirmed that compound 8e can induce cell apoptosis in PA-1 cells. These preliminary results persuade further investigation on the synthesized compounds aiming to the development of potential cytotoxic agents. PMID:27210438

  5. Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on cognitive functions and potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Muthuraju, Sangu; Pati, Soumya

    2014-12-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000-5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  6. Insights into the use of gadolinium and gadolinium/boron-based agents in imaging-guided neutron capture therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Deagostino, Annamaria; Protti, Nicoletta; Alberti, Diego; Boggio, Paolo; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is currently under development as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. All of the clinical experience to date with NCT is done with (10)B, known as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a binary treatment combining neutron irradiation with the delivery of boron-containing compounds to tumors. Currently, the use of Gd for NCT has been getting more attention because of its highest neutron cross-section. Although Gd-NCT was first proposed many years ago, its development has suffered due to lack of appropriate tumor-selective Gd agents. This review aims to highlight the recent advances for the design, synthesis and biological testing of new Gd- and B-Gd-containing compounds with the task of finding the best systems able to improve the NCT clinical outcome. PMID:27195428

  7. Effect of reducing agents and uncouplers on the electrical potential generated by mitochondrial ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Encío, I; de Miguel, C; López-Moratalla, N; Santiago, E

    1989-12-01

    Beef heart submitochondrial particles bound to phospholipids impregnated filters generated an electrical potential upon the addition of ATP. The magnitude of the electrical potential reached depended on the phospholipid mixture composition used for filter impregnation, phosphatidylethanolamine being the active component for the electrical potential generation. Uncoupler FCCP (p-trifluoromethoxy carbonyl cyanide phenylhydrazone) inhibited the transmembrane electrical potential generation by diminishing the electrical resistance of the system as a result of its protonophoric action. However, uncouplers 2, 4-dinitrophenol and dicoumarol did not provoke large modifications of the electrical resistance under the conditions of pH and concentration used, and their action varied with the time elapsed after the submitochondrial particles purification, favouring the idea of the uncoupler interaction with a specific site on the membrane. Addition of sodium dithionite resulted in a higher plateau value for the electrical potential consistent with the promoted increase in ATPase activity. The effect of this agent was reversed by the 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol added at equivalent concentrations. PMID:2561021

  8. In vitro assays for assessing the potential for copper complexes to function as radiopharmaceutical agents.

    PubMed

    Barnard, P J; Bayly, S R; Holland, J P; Dilworth, J R; Waghorn, P A

    2008-09-01

    A series of chemical in vitro assays are described to provide a rapid initial assessment of the in vivo stability and biological behaviour of potential new copper(II) based radiopharmaceutical agents. Chemical challenges using an excess of cysteine, glutathione (GSH) and histidine, which are models of S- and N-donor molecules found in vivo, are used to provide a measure of the potential for loss of the copper(II) ion from the radiopharmaceutical as a result of ligand dissociation. In addition, thiol containing molecules such as cysteine and GSH provide a redox challenge, whereby the copper(II) complex may be reduced to give a copper(I) species. The stability of the copper(I) species toward oxidation, protonation, and ligand dissociation may be crucial in determining the biodistribution, the biological half-life and excretion mechanisms of a potential radiopharmaceutical. Further evaluation of the redox stability is assessed using the ubiquitous biological reductant ascorbic acid. The relative stability of a complex with respect to ligand dissociation in human serum provides one of the most important experiments assessing the potential of a complex to be used in vivo. Further challenge experiments with serum proteins such as thioredoxin and serum albumin can be used to provide more detailed information on the probable fate of the complex in serum. Evaluation of complex stability and speciation over a range of pH values may also be used to obtain information on potential biodistribution. PMID:18551094

  9. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Two Pseudomonas plecoglossicida Phages, Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Shigenobu, Yuya; Fujiwara, Atushi; Sano, Motohiko; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas plecoglossicida is a lethal pathogen of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) in Japan and is responsible for substantial economic costs to ayu culture. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of phage therapy against P. plecoglossicida infection using two lytic phages (PPpW-3 and PPpW-4) (S. C. Park, I. Shimamura, M. Fukunaga, K. Mori, and T. Nakai, Appl Environ Microbiol 66:1416–1422, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.66.4.1416-1422.2000; S. C. Park and T. Nakai, Dis Aquat Org 53:33–39, 2003, http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao053033). In the present study, the complete genome sequences of these therapeutic P. plecoglossicida phages were determined and analyzed for deleterious factors as therapeutic agents. The genome of PPpW-3 (myovirus) consisted of 43,564 bp with a GC content of 61.1% and 66 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Approximately half of the genes were similar to the genes of the Escherichia coli phage vB_EcoM_ECO1230-10 (myovirus). The genome of PPpW-4 (podovirus) consisted of 41,386 bp with a GC content of 56.8% and 50 predicted ORFs. More than 70% of the genes were similar to the genes of Pseudomonas fluorescens phage ϕIBB-PF7A and Pseudomonas putida phage ϕ15 (podoviruses). The whole-genome analysis revealed that no known virulence genes were present in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. An integrase gene was found in PPpW-3, but other factors used for lysogeny were not confirmed. The PCR detection of phage genes in phage-resistant variants provided no evidence of lysogenic activity in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. We conclude that these two lytic phages qualify as therapeutic agents. PMID:25416766

  10. Complete genome sequence analysis of two Pseudomonas plecoglossicida phages, potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Yasuhiko; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Shigenobu, Yuya; Fujiwara, Atushi; Sano, Motohiko; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas plecoglossicida is a lethal pathogen of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) in Japan and is responsible for substantial economic costs to ayu culture. Previously, we demonstrated the efficacy of phage therapy against P. plecoglossicida infection using two lytic phages (PPpW-3 and PPpW-4) (S. C. Park, I. Shimamura, M. Fukunaga, K. Mori, and T. Nakai, Appl Environ Microbiol 66:1416-1422, 2000, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.66.4.1416-1422.2000; S. C. Park and T. Nakai, Dis Aquat Org 53:33-39, 2003, http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao053033). In the present study, the complete genome sequences of these therapeutic P. plecoglossicida phages were determined and analyzed for deleterious factors as therapeutic agents. The genome of PPpW-3 (myovirus) consisted of 43,564 bp with a GC content of 61.1% and 66 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Approximately half of the genes were similar to the genes of the Escherichia coli phage vB_EcoM_ECO1230-10 (myovirus). The genome of PPpW-4 (podovirus) consisted of 41,386 bp with a GC content of 56.8% and 50 predicted ORFs. More than 70% of the genes were similar to the genes of Pseudomonas fluorescens phage ϕIBB-PF7A and Pseudomonas putida phage ϕ15 (podoviruses). The whole-genome analysis revealed that no known virulence genes were present in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. An integrase gene was found in PPpW-3, but other factors used for lysogeny were not confirmed. The PCR detection of phage genes in phage-resistant variants provided no evidence of lysogenic activity in PPpW-3 and PPpW-4. We conclude that these two lytic phages qualify as therapeutic agents. PMID:25416766

  11. Correction: Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Correction for `Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents' by Roxanne Hachani et al., Nanoscale, 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03867g.

  12. Marathon Group Therapy: Potential for University Counseling Centers and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Thomas; Harris, Rafael S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive analysis of marathon group therapy was conducted, specifying issues of set-up, screening, preparation, start-up, introduction to group process, facilitating therapeutic moments throughout the weekend, termination, and follow-up. Factors and dynamics unique to this modality are outlined for marathon groups in university counseling…

  13. Exosomes as Critical Agents of Cardiac Regeneration Triggered by Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Gamal-Eldin; Cheng, Ke; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CADUCEUS trial of cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) has shown that it may be possible to regenerate injured heart muscle previously thought to be permanently scarred. The mechanisms of benefit are known to be indirect, but the mediators have yet to be identified. Here we pinpoint exosomes secreted by human CDCs as critical agents of regeneration and cardioprotection. CDC exosomes inhibit apoptosis and promote proliferation of cardiomyocytes, while enhancing angiogenesis. Injection of exosomes into injured mouse hearts recapitulates the regenerative and functional effects produced by CDC transplantation, whereas inhibition of exosome production by CDCs blocks those benefits. CDC exosomes contain a distinctive complement of microRNAs, with particular enrichment of miR-146a. Selective administration of a miR-146a mimic reproduces some (but not all) of the benefits of CDC exosomes. The findings identify exosomes as key mediators of CDC-induced regeneration, while highlighting the potential utility of exosomes as cell-free therapeutic candidates. PMID:24936449

  14. siRNA Against KIR3DL1 as a Potential Gene Therapeutic Agent in Controlling HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Feng; Pan, Ji-Cheng; Lin, Nan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Tang, Wei-Ming; Xu, Jin-Shui; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Qiu, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Guo-Hong; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Huan, Xi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the expression of KIR3DL1 receptor on natural killer (NK) cells, in order to promote the ability of NK cells to destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cells and thus prevent failure of siRNA therapy targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus among HIV-1 infected patients in vitro. Methods: A siRNA targeting KIR3DL1 was synthesized and then modified with cholesterol, methylene, and sulfate. The inhibitory action of the siRNAs on primary cultured NK cells was detected. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in NK cells was measured. The intended functions of NK cells in vitro were analyzed by CFSE and PI methods. Results: There were no significant differences in inhibiting the expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells between the modified and unmodified siRNAs, while inhibition by each of them differed significantly from controls. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in the NK cells was abundant due to unsuccessful expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells, which further promoted function of the NK cells. Conclusion: The siRNA against KIR3DL1 could enhance the ability of the NK cells to kill the HIV-1 infected cells in vitro and successfully prevented the failure of siRNA therapy targeting the HIV-1 virus. Therefore, it can act as a potential gene therapeutic agent among HIV-1 infected people. PMID:24834927

  15. Anti-Heparanase Aptamers as Potential Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia M.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Bitu, Carolina C.; Salo, Sirpa; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Nyberg, Pia; Risteli, Juha; deAlmeida, Carlos E. B.; Brenchley, Paul E. C.; Salo, Tuula; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase enzyme present in activated leucocytes, mast cells, placental tissue, neutrophils and macrophages, and is involved in tumour metastasis and tissue invasion. It presents a potential target for cancer therapies and various molecules have been developed in an attempt to inhibit the enzymatic action of heparanase. In an attempt to develop a novel therapeutic with an associated diagnostic assay, we have previously described high affinity aptamers selected against heparanase. In this work, we demonstrated that these anti-heparanase aptamers are capable of inhibiting tissue invasion of tumour cells associated with oral cancer and verified that such inhibition is due to inhibition of the enzyme and not due to other potentially cytotoxic effects of the aptamers. Furthermore, we have identified a short 30 bases aptamer as a potential candidate for further studies, as this showed a higher ability to inhibit tissue invasion than its longer counterpart, as well as a reduced potential for complex formation with other non-specific serum proteins. Finally, the aptamer was found to be stable and therefore suitable for use in human models, as it showed no degradation in the presence of human serum, making it a potential candidate for both diagnostic and therapeutic use. PMID:25295847

  16. Advances in bypassing agent therapy for hemophilia patients with inhibitors to close care gaps and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Amy D; Hedner, Ulla

    2011-10-01

    In the past, patients with hemophilia and inhibitors have had less-than-optimal treatment and have experienced more orthopedic complications than patients without inhibitors. Bypassing agents offer the potential to close treatment gaps between inhibitor and noninhibitor patients by helping the former better attain key treatment goals, including: facilitating early initiation of treatment and hemostatic control in hemarthroses; providing effective treatment in serious hemorrhagic episodes; and performance of major surgery. Effective treatment with a bypassing agent minimizes joint and/or muscle damage and potentially can serve as an effective prophylactic agent to minimize the number of hemarthroses experienced per year, thereby mitigating the development of arthropathy. The reported efficacy of the currently available bypassing agents ranges from approximately 50-80% (50-64% in controlled studies) for plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) and 81-91% (in controlled studies) for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), including use in major orthopedic surgery. Both bypassing agents have undergone key improvements in their formulation and/or properties in recent years. The nanofiltered, vapor-heated formulation of pd-aPCC has diminished the risk of acquiring blood-borne viral infections and the room temperature stable formulation of rFVIIa allows more convenient storage, increased ease to dissolve and inject, and smaller volumes, thereby increasing overall ease of administration. Use of recommended dosing has been demonstrated to provide effective hemostasis with a minimal number of injections for both agents. In this paper, we review the individual characteristics of pd-aPCC and rFVIIa and discuss clinical data from studies conducted in inhibitor patients that demonstrate the potential benefits of these bypassing agents in this difficult-to-treat population, and underscore the potential opportunities to close the gap in care between

  17. Ethanol gastric lesion aggravated by lung injury in rat. Therapy effect of antiulcer agents.

    PubMed

    Stancic-Rokotov, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Slobodnjak, Z; Aralica, J; Aralica, G; Perovic, D; Anic, T; Zoricic, I; Buljat, G; Prkacin, I; Gjurasin, M; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Turkovic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Jagic, V; Staresinic, M; Boban-Blagaic, A

    2001-01-01

    Hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in the stomach in the rat induced by an intragastrical application of 1 ml of 50 or 75% ethanol were aggravated by preceding lung damage provoked by an intratracheal instillation of pyrogen-free saline or HCl (pH 1.75) or 50-h exposure to 100% oxygen. Due to the particular preceding aggravating circumstances, these lesions were taken to be of a special kind, rather than ordinary. So far, it is not known whether and how antiulcer agents may influence these lesions. Rats received an intratracheal (i.t.) HCl instillation [1.5 ml/kg HCl (pH 1.75)] (lung-lesion), and an intragastric instillation of 96% ethanol (gastric lesion; 1 ml/rat, 24 h after i.t. HCl instillation), and were sacrificed 1 h after ethanol. Basically, in lung injured rats, the subsequent ethanol-gastric lesion was markedly aggravated. This aggravation, however, in turn, did not affect the severity of the lung lesions in the further period, at least for a 1-h observation. Taking intratracheal HCl-instillation as time 0, a gastric pentadecapeptide, GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W.1419, coded BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116; 10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg), ranitidine (10 mg), atropine (10 mg), omeprazole (10 mg), were given [/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)] (1) once, only prophylactically [as a pre-treatment (at -1 h), or as a co-treatment (at 0)], or only therapeutically (at +18 h or +24 h); (2) repeatedly, combining prophylactic/therapeutic regimens [(-1 h)+(+24 h) or (0)+(+24 h)], or therapeutic/therapeutic regimens [(+18 h)+(+24 h)]. In general, the antiulcer agents did protect against ethanol gastric lesions regardless of the presence of the severe lung injury, in all of the used regimens. Of note, combining their prophylactic and salutary regimens (at -1 h/+24 h, or at 0/+24 h) may increase the antiulcer potential, and the effect that had been not seen already with single application, became prominent after repeated treatment. PMID:11595452

  18. Use of novel metalloporphyrins as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated phorphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron-capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  19. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2003-05-20

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron- capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  20. ROS-Responsive Activatable Photosensitizing Agent for Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects. PMID:24396511

  1. Clinical potential for vitamin D as a neoadjuvant for photodynamic therapy of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Rollakanti, Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprising basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most common form of human cancer worldwide. Effective therapies include surgical excision, cryotherapy, and ionizing radiation, but all of these cause scarring. ALA-based PDT is a non-scarring modality used routinely for NMSC in Europe but not in the USA, primarily due to lingering uncertainties about efficacy. We have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can be used as neoadjuvants, i.e., can be given as a pretreatment prior to ALA-PDT, to improve the efficacy of tumor killing in mouse models of NMSC. Vitamin D (VD3) is the most recent neoadjuvant on this list. In this presentation we make the case that VD3 may be superior to the other agents to improve results of ALA-PDT skin cancer treatment. The active form of VD3 (calcitriol) is available topically as a pharmaceutical grade cream or ointment (FDA-approved for psoriasis), and works well for boosting ALA-PDT tumor treatment in mouse models. For deep tumors not reachable by a topical route, calcitriol can be given systemically and is very effective, but carries a risk of causing hypercalcemia as a side effect. To circumvent this risk, we have conducted experiments with the natural dietary form of VD3 (cholecalciferol), and showed that this improves ALA-PDT efficacy almost to the same extent as calcitriol. Because cholecalciferol does not increase serum calcium levels, this represents a potentially extremely safe approach. Data in mouse models of BCC and SCC will be presented.

  2. Aptamer-conjugated, fluorescent gold nanorods as potential cancer theradiagnostic agents.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Maria Elena; Zhou, Yu; Johnson, Christopher J; Harris-Birtill, David; Singh, Mohan; Zhao, Hailin; Ma, Daqing; Cass, Tony; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-02-01

    GNRs are emerging as a new class of probes for theradiagnostic applications thanks to their unique optical properties. However, the achievement of proper nanoconstructs requires the synthesis of highly pure GNRs with well-defined aspect ratio (AR), in addition to extensive surface chemistry modification to provide them with active targeting and, possibly, multifunctionality. In this work, we refined the method of the seed mediated growth and developed a robust procedure for the fabrication of GNRs with specific AR. We also revealed and characterized unexplored aging phenomena that follow the synthesis and consistently alter GNRs' final AR. Such advances appreciably improved the feasibility of GNRs fabrication and offered useful insights on the growth mechanism. We next produced fluorescent, biocompatible, aptamer-conjugated GNRs by performing ligand exchange followed by bioconjugation to anti-cancer oligonucleotide AS1411. In vitro studies showed that our nanoconstructs selectively target cancer cells while showing negligible cytotoxicity. As a result, our aptamer-conjugated GNRs constitute ideal cancer-selective multifunctional probes and promising candidates as photothermal therapy agents. PMID:26652380

  3. POTENTIAL FUTURE NEUROPROTECTIVE THERAPIES FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS AND STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Galvin, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying neuronal loss and neurodegeneration have been an area of interest in the last decade. Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) each have distinct clinical symptoms and pathologies, they all share common mechanisms such as protein aggregation, oxidative injury, inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondrial injury that contribute to neuronal loss. Although cerebrovascular disease is due to etiologies quite different from the neurodegenerative disorders, many of the same common disease mechanisms come into play following a stroke. Novel therapies that target each of these mechanisms may be effective in decreasing the risk of disease, abating symptoms or slowing down their progression. While most of these therapies are experimental, and require further investigation, a few seem to offer promise in the near future. PMID:20176298

  4. [Conservative therapy of female urinary incontinence--potential and effect].

    PubMed

    Horcicka, L; Chmel, R; Novácková, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is not as effective as surgical methods but it is very successful in indicated cases. Rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises, vaginal cones, and electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles), drug treatment (alfa-mimetics, tricyclic antidepressives, estrogens, duloxetin), pessarotherapy and uretral obturator devices represent possibilities of conservative therapy of the stress incontinence. Conservative therapy is the method of choice in the treatment of urge incontinence. The most successful are anticholinergic drugs but they have very frequent serious side effects (dryness of the mucous membranes, accommodation disorders, constipation). Spasmolytics, estrogens and tricyclic antidepressives are the other popular used drugs. Life style modification, bladder training and electrostimulation represent very important parts of the conservative treatment. Effectiveness of the non-surgical treatment of both urge and stress urinary incontinence can not reach 100 percent but it helps very much in the quality of life improvement of incontinent women. PMID:15887395

  5. Interleukin-34 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential role in clinical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangze; Ding, Rui; Li, Ping; Ma, Cuili; Song, Ding; Wang, Xuetong; Ma, Tianjiao; Bi, Liqi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate, whether interleukin (IL)-34 can be used as marker for treatment effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Serum samples were collected from 35 healthy participants and 83 patients with RA before as well as 4 weeks and 12 weeks after treatment initiation with the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitor Etanercept. Related clinical data and hand radiograms of the patients were evaluated and serum IL-34, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in addition to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody concentrations were measured by ELISA. Results: Serum concentrations of IL-34, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-3 and anti-CCP antibodies were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls (P<0.001), significantly decreased during treatment and correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and RA disease activity (P<0.05). IL-34 correlated withIL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-3 and anti-CCP antibodies in RA patients at baseline (P<0.01) and also with IL-8, MMP-3, IL-6, and DAS28 changes during therapy. Patients in stage III of hand X-ray RA scores had higher IL-34 serum concentrations than in stage II (P<0.05). IL-34 level decreased significantly (P<0.01) starting from 4 weeks after therapy initiation. Conclusions: IL-34 serum concentrations correlated with inflammatory cytokines before and during therapy and were significantly higher in stage III of hand X-ray score patients than in stage II participants. IL-34 might be used both as a biomarker for RA diagnosis and therapy efficiency. PMID:26221333

  6. Update on Current and Potential Nanoparticle Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Jonathan S.; Plebanek, Michael P.; Tripathy, Sushant; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize the most recent pre-clinical and clinical advancements in therapeutic nano-oncology. Recent findings First generation nanotherapies are well-tolerated in humans and evidence shows that they are efficacious while at the same time reducing the burden of side effects. Most of these therapies are not specifically targeted but take advantage of enhanced passive accumulation within tumors to preferentially deliver chemotherapies that are toxic when systemically administered. Actively targeted nanotherapies are entering the clinical arena and preliminary data are encouraging. Finally, a number of exciting pre-clinical developments in nanotechnology provide clear evidence that nanotherapies will continue to find their way into the clinic and will have a significant impact in oncology. Summary A number of intriguing nanoparticle therapies are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Nanoparticles with increasing molecular sophistication, specific targeting properties, and unique mechanisms-of-action will find their way to the clinic. Certainly, nanoparticle-based therapies will be increasingly represented in drug development pipelines, and will continue to provide efficacious and safe drug options for patients with cancer. PMID:24097107

  7. Nanoparticle and Iron Chelators as a Potential Novel Alzheimer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) such as the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and the latest NMDA receptor inhibitor, Namenda, provide moderate symptomatic delay at various stages of the disease, but do not arrest the disease progression or bring in meaningful remission. New approaches to the disease management are urgently needed. Although the etiology of AD is largely unknown, oxidative damage mediated by metals is likely a significant contributor since metals such as iron, aluminum, zinc, and copper are dysregulated and/or increased in AD brain tissue and create a pro-oxidative environment. This role of metal ion-induced free radical formation in AD makes chelation therapy an attractive means of dampening the oxidative stress burden in neurons. The chelator desferrioxamine, FDA approved for iron overload, has shown some benefit in AD, but like many chelators, it has a host of adverse effects and substantial obstacles for tissue-specific targeting. Other chelators are under development and have shown various strengths and weaknesses. Here, we propose a novel system of chelation therapy through the use of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles conjugated to chelators show unique ability to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), chelate metals, and exit through the BBB with their corresponding complexed metal ions. This method may provide a safer and more effective means of reducing the metal load in neural tissue, thus attenuating the harmful effects of oxidative damage and its sequelae. Experimental procedures are presented in this chapter. PMID:20013176

  8. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Eladio J.; Tran, Lesa A.; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G.; Rusakova, Irene A.; Cheong, Benjamin Y.; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2013-01-01

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking. PMID:24288589

  9. Understanding Virulence in the Brucellae and Francisellae: Towards Efficacious Treatments for Two Potential Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rasley, A; Parsons, D A; El-Etr, S; Roux, C; Tsolis, R

    2009-12-30

    Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Brucellae species are highly infectious pathogens classified as select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the potential for use in bioterrorism attacks. These organisms are known to be facultative intracellular pathogens that preferentially infect human monocytes. As such, understanding how the host responds to infection with these organisms is paramount in detecting and combating human disease. We have compared the ability of fully virulent strains of each pathogen and their non-pathogenic near neighbors to enter and survive inside the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and have quantified the cellular response to infection with the goal of identifying both unique and common host response patterns. We expanded the scope of these studies to include experiments with pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague. Nonpathogenic strains of each organism were impaired in their ability to survive intracellularly compared with their pathogenic counterparts. Furthermore, infection of THP-1 cells with pathogenic strains of Y. pestis and F. tularensis resulted in marked increases in the secretion of the inflammatory chemokines IL-8, RANTES, and MIP-1{beta}. In contrast, B. melitensis infection failed to elicit any significant increases in a panel of cytokines tested. These differences may underscore distinct strategies in pathogenic mechanisms employed by these pathogens.

  10. Pseudopterosin A: Protection of Synaptic Function and Potential as a Neuromodulatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Stacee Lee; Zheng, Bo; Dawson-Scully, Ken; White, Catherine A; West, Lyndon M

    2016-03-01

    Natural products have provided an invaluable source of inspiration in the drug discovery pipeline. The oceans are a vast source of biological and chemical diversity. Recently, this untapped resource has been gaining attention in the search for novel structures and development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Pseudopterosins are group of marine diterpene glycosides that possess an array of potent biological activities in several therapeutic areas. Few studies have examined pseudopterosin effects during cellular stress and, to our knowledge, no studies have explored their ability to protect synaptic function. The present study probes pseudopterosin A (PsA) for its neuromodulatory properties during oxidative stress using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that oxidative stress rapidly reduces neuronal activity, resulting in the loss of neurotransmission at a well-characterized invertebrate synapse. PsA mitigates this effect and promotes functional tolerance during oxidative stress by prolonging synaptic transmission in a mechanism that differs from scavenging activity. Furthermore, the distribution of PsA within mammalian biological tissues following single intravenous injection was investigated using a validated bioanalytical method. Comparable exposure of PsA in the mouse brain and plasma indicated good distribution of PsA in the brain, suggesting its potential as a novel neuromodulatory agent. PMID:26978375

  11. Pseudopterosin A: Protection of Synaptic Function and Potential as a Neuromodulatory Agent

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Stacee Lee; Zheng, Bo; Dawson-Scully, Ken; White, Catherine A.; West, Lyndon M.

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have provided an invaluable source of inspiration in the drug discovery pipeline. The oceans are a vast source of biological and chemical diversity. Recently, this untapped resource has been gaining attention in the search for novel structures and development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Pseudopterosins are group of marine diterpene glycosides that possess an array of potent biological activities in several therapeutic areas. Few studies have examined pseudopterosin effects during cellular stress and, to our knowledge, no studies have explored their ability to protect synaptic function. The present study probes pseudopterosin A (PsA) for its neuromodulatory properties during oxidative stress using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that oxidative stress rapidly reduces neuronal activity, resulting in the loss of neurotransmission at a well-characterized invertebrate synapse. PsA mitigates this effect and promotes functional tolerance during oxidative stress by prolonging synaptic transmission in a mechanism that differs from scavenging activity. Furthermore, the distribution of PsA within mammalian biological tissues following single intravenous injection was investigated using a validated bioanalytical method. Comparable exposure of PsA in the mouse brain and plasma indicated good distribution of PsA in the brain, suggesting its potential as a novel neuromodulatory agent. PMID:26978375

  12. A Novel Potential Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent for Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zih-Rou; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Huang, Ya-Yao; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, 9-(+)-11C-dihydrotetrabenazine (9-(+)-11C-DTBZ) was shown to be a useful positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we described the radiosynthesis and evaluation of the 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ analog, 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ, as a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) imaging agent and compare it with 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ. 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ was obtained by 11C-MeI methylation with its 10 hydroxy precursor in the presence of 5 M NaOH. It had a slightly better average radiochemical yield of 35.3 ± 3.6% (decay-corrected to end of synthesis (EOS)) than did 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ (30.5 ± 2.3%). MicroPET studies showed that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ had a striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 3.74 ± 0.21 at 40 min post-injection, while the ratio of 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ was 2.50 ± 0.33. This indicated that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ has a higher specific uptake in VMAT2-rich brain regions, and 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ may be a potential VMAT2 radioligand. Our experiment is the first study of 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ to include dynamic brain distribution in rat brains. PMID:27612194

  13. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  14. Design of novel dispirooxindolopyrrolidine and dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazole derivatives as potential antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Mhiri, Chourouk; Boudriga, Sarra; Askri, Moheddine; Knorr, Michael; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Nana, Frédéric; Golz, Christopher; Strohmann, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    With the aim to develop new potent antitubercular agents, a series of novel dispirooxindolopyrrolidines and dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazoles have been synthesized via a three-component 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of (Z)-3-arylidenebenzofuran-2-ones, substituted isatin derivatives and α-aminoacids. The stereochemistry of the spiroadducts has been confirmed by an X-ray diffraction analysis. All the target heterocycles were evaluated for in vitro antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain and the most active compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity studies against (RAW 264.7) cell lines. Among them, twelve compounds showed potent anti-tubercular activity with MIC ranging from 1.56 to 6.25 μg/mL. In particular dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazole derivatives 5c and 5f were found to be the most active (MIC of 1.56 μg/mL) with a good safety profile (27.53% and 20.74% at 50 μM, respectively). This is the first report demonstrating the benzofuranone oxindole hybrids as potential antimycobacterial agents. PMID:26271585

  15. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  16. [Exploring an optimal approach to the use of oral hypoglycemic agents based on CGM results: implications for combination therapy with oral hypoglycemic agents].

    PubMed

    Mori, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    In the treatment of type 2 diabetes aimed at prevention of cardiovascular events impacting the prognosis of affected patients, it is critically important not only to lower HbAlc values but to find a way to improve postprandial hyperglycemia without causing hypoglycemia thus minimizing drastic glycemic variations or to maintain favorable glycemic control with daily glycemic variations in mind. In other words, it is no longer adequate to emphasize quantitative reductions in HbAlc as in conventional therapeutic approaches but qualitative glycemic control that takes daily glycemic variations into account is becoming of increasing importance to the management of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the 6 oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) classes currently available for clinical use, i.e., biguanides (BGs), thiazolidinediones (TZDs), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas (SUs), fast-acting insulin secretagogues (glinides) and DPP-4 inhibitors, appear to vary from class to class or even from agent from agent within a class in regard to their impact on daily glycemic variations. In our CMG-based study of their impact on glycemic variations, it was demonstrated that BGs and TZDs improve hyperglycemia during nighttime and before breakfast more effectively than they do postprandial glycemic excursions; that, of the insulin secretagogues, glinides reduce daily glycemic variations as do alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, while SUs do not affect them very much; and that DPP-4 inhibitors lower not only mean glucose levels which are deemed equivalent to HbAlc values but also narrow the range of glycemic variations. Thus, OHAs can be broadly classified into those that primarily reduce 24-hour mean glucose levels as equivalent to HbAlc values and those that primarily narrow the range of glycemic variations. Therefore, with either of these agents as monotherapy, it is next to impossible to achieve reductions in HbAlc with a narrow range of glycemic variations, and combination therapy

  17. An integrated overview on pyrrolizines as potential anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic agents.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ahmed M; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-05-23

    Despite the existence of huge number of NSAIDs, the quest for safer drugs is still in the focus of several drug discovery programs. Pyrrolizine heterocyclic system is among the privileged scaffolds utilized in this regard. At least one of these pyrrolizines, ketorolac, has reached the market. The current review represents a collective effort to highlight the reported pyrrolizines with anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential and categorize them into eight different classes. Furthermore, the various synthetic approaches, structure-activity relationship as well as metabolic pathways have been discussed. Taken together, this review sets a base for researchers to design and synthesize novel pyrrolizine-based libraries for further development into safer and efficient anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. PMID:26994693

  18. Design and evaluation of novel oxadiazole derivatives as potential prostate cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xin; Euynni, Suresh; Sikazwi, Donald; Mateeva, Nelly; Soliman, Karam F.

    2016-01-01

    Various 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have been synthesized and their antiproliferative properties have been studied. The in vitro screening was performed against androgen dependent (LNCaP) and androgen independent (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines. Most of the compounds showed promising activity. Among them, compounds 2d (IC50 = 0.22 and 1.3 μM) and 2a (IC50 = 8.34 and 2,5 μM) have shown significant activities on PC-3 and LNCaP cell lines respectively. To investigate the mechanism of cell death we performed cell apoptosis staining and cell cycle arrest assay on more sensitive PC-3 cell lines on 2d. The results demonstrated that 2d induced apoptosis and shifted the cells to the sub G0/G1 and S phase. Our study evidently identified the potency of compound 2d as potential anti-prostate cancer agent. PMID:27156770

  19. Design and evaluation of novel oxadiazole derivatives as potential prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mochona, Bereket; Qi, Xin; Euynni, Suresh; Sikazwi, Donald; Mateeva, Nelly; Soliman, Karam F

    2016-06-15

    Various 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have been synthesized and their antiproliferative properties have been studied. The in vitro screening was performed against androgen dependent (LNCaP) and androgen independent (PC-3) prostate cancer cell lines. Most of the compounds showed promising activity. Among them, compounds 2d (IC50=0.22 and 1.3μM) and 2a (IC50=8.34 and 2,5μM) have shown significant activities on PC-3 and LNCaP cell lines respectively. To investigate the mechanism of cell death we performed cell apoptosis staining and cell cycle arrest assay on more sensitive PC-3 cell lines on 2d. The results demonstrated that 2d induced apoptosis and shifted the cells to the sub G0/G1 and S phase. Our study evidently identified the potency of compound 2d as potential anti-prostate cancer agent. PMID:27156770

  20. The potential of antiestrogens as centrally-acting antihostility agents: recent animal data.

    PubMed

    Brain, P F; Simon, V; Hasan, S; Martinez, M; Castano, D

    1988-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that motivations for certain forms of masculine behavior including social aggression are mediated by central estrogen receptors. Two studies using antiestrogens in rodent species were performed. Intact male LH rats were given Tamoxifen or vehicle for 4 or 8 days. The three possible pairings were videotaped for 60 min. Intact male OF1 mice were given CI-680 or vehicle over 25 days. Similar pairings were carried out but some CI-680 or vehicle animals were paired with anosmic opponents. Encounters were videotaped for 10 min. In both experiments evidence was obtained that the antiestrogen markedly reduced time allocated to offense. Any variations in defense were a consequence of the level of attack to which animals were subjected. Neither compound greatly influenced the androgen-dependent sex accessory glands. Antiestrogens consequently have potential as antihostility agents in some forms of attack. PMID:3182180

  1. Design and synthesis of novel 4'-demethyl-4-deoxypodophyllotoxin derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiong; Fu, Junjie; Tang, Yan; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Shijin; Guo, Qinglong

    2016-02-15

    A group of podophyllotoxin (PPT) derivatives (7a-j) were synthesized by conjugating aryloxyacetanilide moieties to the 4'-hydroxyl of 4'-demethyl-4-deoxypodophyllotoxin (DDPT), and their anticancer activity was evaluated. It was found that the most potent compound 7d inhibited the proliferation of three cancer cell lines with sub to low micromolar IC50 values. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that 7d induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase in MGC-803 cells, and regulated the expression of cell cycle check point proteins, such as cyclin A, cyclin B, CDK1, cdc25c, and p21. Finally, 4 mg/kg of 7d reduced the weights and volumes of HepG2 xenografts in mice. Our findings suggest that 7d might be a potential anticancer agent. PMID:26804229

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy of N‧-(Adamantan-2-ylidene)thiophene-2-carbohydrazide, a potential antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, Lev L.; Gaponenko, Sergey V.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, Elena V.; Shimko, Anna N.; Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S.; El-Emam, Ali A.

    2014-07-01

    Vibrational states of the newly synthesized molecule N‧-(Adamantan-2-ylidene)thiophene-2-carbohydrazide, a potential antibacterial agent, are examined experimentally for the crystalline phase and analyzed based on quantum chemical modelling of the solitary molecule and of the dimer, and assignment of the observed vibrational frequencies is proposed. Modelling of the title molecule dimer is found to describe better the experimentally observed vibration frequencies for the crystalline phase than calculations performed for a solitary molecule. Contributions from adamantane and thiophene parts within the molecule are identified. Additionally, multiple hydrogen bonds have been revealed both experimentally and computationally, inherent in the crystalline phase contrary to a solitary molecule. The spectroscopic findings correlate with the calculated interatomic distances which were found to change in the dimer versus a single molecule and to correspond better to the X-ray analysis data of the title compound in the crystalline phase.

  3. Microtubule Stabilizing Agents as Potential Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Neurodegenerative Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R.; Huryn, Donna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Smith, Amos B.

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule (MT)-associated protein tau, which is highly expressed in the axons of neurons, is an endogenous MT-stabilizing agent that plays an important role in the axonal transport. Loss of MT-stabilizing tau function, caused by misfolding, hyperphosphorylation and sequestration of tau into insoluble aggregates, leads to axonal transport deficits with neuropathological consequences. Several in vitro and preclinical in vivo studies have shown that MT-stabilizing drugs can be utilized to compensate for the loss of tau function and to maintain/restore an effective axonal transport. These findings indicate that MT-stabilizing compounds hold considerable promise for the treatment of Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. The present article provides a synopsis of the key findings demonstrating the therapeutic potential of MT-stabilizing drugs in the context of neurodegenerative tauopathies, as well as an overview of the different classes of MT-stabilizing compounds. PMID:23020671

  4. Sodium arsenite potentiates the clastogenicity and mutagenicity of DNA cross linking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Lee, K.C.; Tzeng, Y.J.; Huang, R.Y.; Jan, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    To see if sodium arsenite enhances the clastogenicity and the mutagenicity of DNA crosslinking agents, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human skin fibroblasts were exposed to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-Pt(II)) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and then to sodium arsenite. The results indicate that the clastogenicity of cis-Pt(II) and 8-MOP pllus UVA are enhanced by the post-treatment with sodium arsenite. Chromatid breaks and exchanges are predominantly increased in doubly treated cells. Furthermore, the mutagenicity of cis-Pt(II) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is also potentiated by sodium arsenite in CHO cells

  5. Chitosan as a potential stabilizing agent for titania nanoparticle dispersions for preparation of multifunctional cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nidhi; Rastogi, Deepali; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K

    2016-12-10

    Titania (TiO2) nanoparticle dispersions in water were prepared using chitosan (CS) as the stabilizing agent. The dispersion stability was evaluated with respect to storage time, hydrodynamic particle size, and zeta potential. The effect of the molecular weight of CS and presence of non-ionic polymers (poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(ethylene glycol)) as co-dispersants was investigated. Despite the increase in size of dispersed particles, the long-term storage stability of the dispersions improved with increasing concentration and molecular weight of CS. The TiO2/CS dispersions were applied on cotton fabric and characterized. The presence of CS did not seriously affect the photocatalytic self-cleaning activity (SCA) of TiO2; with CS, a SCA of 89% was achieved compared with a value of 96% without CS. In addition, the TiO2/CS-treated cotton fabrics provided UV protection and significant antimicrobial activity. PMID:27577907

  6. 227Th-EDTMP: a potential therapeutic agent for bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Washiyama, Kohshin; Amano, Ryohei; Sasaki, Jun; Kinuya, Seigo; Tonami, Norihisa; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki

    2004-10-01

    The biodistribution of 227Th-EDTMP and retention of its daughter nuclide 223Ra were examined. 227Th-EDTMP was found to show high uptake and long-term retention in bone. The clearance of 227Th-EDTMP from blood and soft tissues was rapid and the femur-to-tissue uptake ratios reached more than 100 within 30 min for all tissues except the kidney. Seven and 14 days after injection of 227Th-EDTMP, the retention index of 223Ra in bone showed high values, and the differences between these time points were not significant. Therefore, 227Th-EDTMP is a potential radiotherapeutic agent for bone metastasis. PMID:15464392

  7. Squalamine as a broad-spectrum systemic antiviral agent with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zasloff, Michael; Adams, A. Paige; Beckerman, Bernard; Campbell, Ann; Han, Ziying; Luijten, Erik; Meza, Isaura; Julander, Justin; Mishra, Abhijit; Qu, Wei; Taylor, John M.; Weaver, Scott C.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral compounds that increase the resistance of host tissues represent an attractive class of therapeutic. Here, we show that squalamine, a compound previously isolated from the tissues of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against human pathogens, which were studied in vitro as well as in vivo. Both RNA- and DNA-enveloped viruses are shown to be susceptible. The proposed mechanism involves the capacity of squalamine, a cationic amphipathic sterol, to neutralize the negative electrostatic surface charge of intracellular membranes in a way that renders the cell less effective in supporting viral replication. Because squalamine can be readily synthesized and has a known safety profile in man, we believe its potential as a broad-spectrum human antiviral agent should be explored. PMID:21930925

  8. Squalamine as a broad-spectrum systemic antiviral agent with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zasloff, Michael; Adams, A Paige; Beckerman, Bernard; Campbell, Ann; Han, Ziying; Luijten, Erik; Meza, Isaura; Julander, Justin; Mishra, Abhijit; Qu, Wei; Taylor, John M; Weaver, Scott C; Wong, Gerard C L

    2011-09-20

    Antiviral compounds that increase the resistance of host tissues represent an attractive class of therapeutic. Here, we show that squalamine, a compound previously isolated from the tissues of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against human pathogens, which were studied in vitro as well as in vivo. Both RNA- and DNA-enveloped viruses are shown to be susceptible. The proposed mechanism involves the capacity of squalamine, a cationic amphipathic sterol, to neutralize the negative electrostatic surface charge of intracellular membranes in a way that renders the cell less effective in supporting viral replication. Because squalamine can be readily synthesized and has a known safety profile in man, we believe its potential as a broad-spectrum human antiviral agent should be explored. PMID:21930925

  9. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1997-01-01

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g. .sup.99m Tc or .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re) or late transition metals (e.g., .sup.105 Rh or .sup.109 Pd). The complexes with these metals .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re, .sup.99m Tc and .sup.109 Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  10. The natural compound magnolol inhibits invasion and exhibits potential in human breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Yong-qiang; Wang, Zhong-yuan; Wu, Yan-ping; Yu, Xian-jun; Zhang, Xu-dong; Ming, Ping-hong; Zhou, Guang-biao; Huang, Laiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the main causes of treatment failure and death in breast cancer. Thus, novel invasion-based therapies such as those involving natural agents are urgently required. In this study, we examined the effects of magnolol (Mag), a compound extracted from medicinal herbs, on breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Highly invasive cancer cells were found to be highly sensitive to treatment. Mag markedly inhibited the activity of highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, Mag significantly downregulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression, an enzyme critical to tumor invasion. Mag also inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity and the DNA binding of NF-κB to MMP-9 promoter. These results indicate that Mag suppresses tumor invasion by inhibiting MMP-9 through the NF-κB pathway. Moreover, Mag overcame the promoting effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings reveal the therapeutic potential and mechanism of Mag against cancer. PMID:24226295

  11. Deconvoluting the relationships between autophagy and metastasis for potential cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dahong; Wang, Peiqi; Zhang, Jin; Fu, Leilei; Ouyang, Liang; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved lysosome-dependent degradation process that may digest some long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. As an essential homeostasis maintaining system in normal cells, autophagy plays a key role in several pathological settings, especially cancer. Metastasis, known as a crucial hallmark of cancer progression, is the primary cause of cancer lethality. The role of autophagy in metastasis is quite complex as supportive evidence has indicated both pro-metastatic and anti-metastatic functions of autophagy. Autophagy can inhibit metastasis by restricting necrosis and mediating autophagic cell death, whereas it may also promote metastasis by enhancing cancer cell fitness in response to stress. Moreover, the function of autophagy is context- and stage-dependent. Specifically, during the early steps of metastasis, autophagy mainly serves as a suppressor, while it plays a pro-metastatic role in the later steps. Here, we focus on highlighting the dual roles of autophagy in metastasis and address the molecular mechanisms involved in this process, which may provide a new insight into cancer biology. While, we also summarize several anti-metastatic agents manipulating autophagy, in the hope of shedding light on exploration of potential novel drugs for future cancer therapy. PMID:27003389

  12. Generation of Small 32P-Labeled Peptides as a Potential Approach to Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, John M.; Cheng, Yulan; Hamilton, James P.; Paun, Bogdan; Jin, Zhe; Agarwal, Rachana; Kan, Takatsugu; David, Stefan; Olaru, Alexandru; Yang, Jian; Ito, Tetsuo; Selaru, Florin M.; Mori, Yuriko; Meltzer, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Cancers have been revealed to be extremely heterogenous in terms of the frequency and types of mutations present in cells from different malignant tumors. Thus, it is likely that uniform clinical treatment is not optimal for all patients, and that the development of individualized therapeutic regimens may be beneficial. We describe the generation of multiple, unique small peptides nine to thirty-four amino acids in length which, when labeled with the radioisotope 32P, bind with vastly differing efficiencies to cell lines derived from different colon adenocarcinomas. In addition, the most effective of these peptides permanently transfers the 32P radioisotope to colorectal cancer cellular proteins within two hours at a rate that is more than 150 times higher than in cell lines derived from other cancers or from the normal tissues tested. Currently, the only two FDA-approved radioimmunotherapeutic agents in use both employ antibodies directed against the B cell marker CD20 for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. By using the method described herein, large numbers of different 32P-labeled peptides can be readily produced and assayed against a broad spectrum of cancer types. This report proposes the development and use of 32P-labeled peptides as potential individualized peptide-binding therapies for the treatment of colon adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:18575578

  13. Novel Penicillin Analogues as Potential Antimicrobial Agents; Design, Synthesis and Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Bais, Abdul; Manir, Md. Maniruzzaman; Niazi, Umar

    2015-01-01

    A number of penicillin derivatives (4a-h) were synthesized by the condensation of 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as antimicrobial agents. In silico docking study of these analogues was performed against Penicillin Binding Protein (PDBID 1CEF) using AutoDock Tools 1.5.6 in order to investigate the antimicrobial data on structural basis. Penicillin binding proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity in bacteria. The excellent antibacterial potential was depicted by compounds 4c and 4e against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidus and Staphylococcus aureus compared to the standard amoxicillin. The most potent penicillin derivative 4e exhibited same activity as standard amoxicillin against S. aureus. In the enzyme inhibitory assay the compound 4e inhibited E. coli MurC with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. The docking scores of these compounds 4c and 4e also verified their greater antibacterial potential. The results verified the importance of side chain functionalities along with the presence of central penam nucleus. The binding affinities calculated from docking results expressed in the form of binding energies ranges from -7.8 to -9.2kcal/mol. The carboxylic group of penam nucleus in all these compounds is responsible for strong binding with receptor protein with the bond length ranges from 3.4 to 4.4 Ǻ. The results of present work ratify that derivatives 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of potent antimicrobial agents. PMID:26267242

  14. Biocompatible nanotemplate-engineered nanoparticles containing gadolinium: stability and relaxivity of a potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua; White, R D; Hardy, Peter A; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Jay, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In this article, we use a nanotemplate engineering approach to prepare biodegradable nanoparticles composed of FDA-approved materials and possessing accessible gadolinium (Gd) atoms and demonstrate their potential as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Nanoparticles containing dimyristoyl phosphoethanolamine diethylene triamine penta acetate (PE-DTPA) were prepared using 3.5 mg of Brij 78, 2.0 mg of emulsifying wax and 0.5 mg of PE-DTPA/ml from a microemulsion precursor. After the addition of GdCl3, the presence of Gd on the surface of nanoparticles was characterized using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The in vitro relaxivities of the PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles in different media were assessed at different field strengths. The conditional stability constant of Gd binding to the nanoparticles was determined using competitive spectrophotometric titration. Transmetallation kinetics of the gadolinium ion from PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles with zinc as the competing ionic was measured using the relaxivity evolution method. Nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 130 nm possessing surface chelating functions were made from GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) materials. STEM demonstrated the uniform distribution of Gd3+ on the surface of the nanoparticles. The thermodynamic binding constant for Gd3+ to the nanoparticles was approximately 10(18) M(-1) and transmetallation studies with Zn2+ yielded kinetic constants K1 and K(-1) of 0.033 and 0.022 1/h, respectively, with an equilibrium constant of 1.5. A payload of approximately 10(5) Gd/nanoparticle was achieved; enhanced relaxivities were observed, including a pH dependence of the transverse relaxivity (r2). Nanoparticles composed of materials that have been demonstrated to be hemocompatible and enzymatically metabolized and possessing accessible Gd ions on their surface induce relaxivities in the bulk water signal that make them

  15. Natural products as potential cancer therapy enhancers: A preclinical update

    PubMed Central

    Agbarya, Abed; Ruimi, Nili; Epelbaum, Ron; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that arises as a consequence of alterations in many physiological processes. Recently, hallmarks of cancer were suggested that include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis, along with two emerging hallmarks including reprogramming energy metabolism and escaping immune destruction. Treating multifactorial diseases, such as cancer with agents targeting a single target, might provide partial treatment and, in many cases, disappointing cure rates. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that the regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Since ancient times, plants, herbs, and other natural products have been used as healing agents. Moreover, the majority of the medicinal substances available today have their origin in natural compounds. Traditionally, pharmaceuticals are used to cure diseases, and nutrition and herbs are used to prevent disease and to provide an optimal balance of macro- and micro-nutrients needed for good health. We explored the combination of natural products, dietary nutrition, and cancer chemotherapeutics for improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutics and negating side effects. PMID:26770737

  16. Targeting Tumors with Salmonella Typhimurium - Potential for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Daniel M.; Srikanth, C.V.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    When one considers the organism Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), one usually thinks of the Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes the severe food borne illness, gastroentertitis. In this context, the idea of Salmonella being exploited as a cancer therapeutic seems pretty remote. However, there has been an escalating interest in the development of tumor-therapeutic bacteria for use in the treatment of a variety of cancers. This strategy takes advantage of the remarkable ability of certain bacteria to preferentially replicate and accumulate within tumors. In the case of S. Typhimurium, this organism infects and selectively grows within implanted tumors, achieving tumor/normal tissue ratios of approximately 1,000:1. Salmonella also has some attractive properties well suited for the design of a chemotherapeutic agent. In particular, this pathogen can easily be manipulated to carry foreign genes, and since this species is a facultative anaerobe, it is able to survival in both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions, implying this organism could colonize both small metastatic lesions as well as larger tumors. These observations are the impetus to a burgeoning field focused on the development of Salmonella as a clinically useful anti-cancer agent. We will discuss three cutting edge technologies employing Salmonella to target tumors. PMID:21321381

  17. Gold nanorods/mesoporous silica-based nanocomposite as theranostic agents for targeting near-infrared imaging and photothermal therapy induced with laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qing; Guan, Guannan; Hu, Wen; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Hu, Haiyang; Liang, Ying; Zhu, Heyun; Chen, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is widely regarded as a promising technology for cancer treatment. Gold nanorods (GNRs), as excellent PTT agent candidates, have shown high-performance photothermal conversion ability under laser irradiation, yet two major obstacles to their clinical application are the lack of selective accumulation in the target site following systemic administration and the greatly reduced photothermal conversion efficiency caused by self-aggregating in aqueous environment. Herein, we demonstrate that tLyp-1 peptide-functionalized, indocyanine green (ICG)-containing mesoporous silica-coated GNRs (I-TMSG) possessed dual-function as tumor cells-targeting near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe and PTT agents. The construction of the nanostructure began with synthesis of GNRs by seed-mediated growth method, followed by the coating of mesoporous silica, the chemical conjugation of PEG and tLyp-1 peptide, and the enclosure of ICG as an NIR imaging agent in the mesoporous. The as-prepared nanoparticles could shield the GNRs against their self-aggregation, improve the stability of ICG, and exhibit negligible dark cytotoxicity. More importantly, such a theranostic nanocomposite could realize the combination of GNRs-based photothermal ablation under NIR illumination, ICG-mediated fluorescent imaging, and tLyp-1-enabled more easy endocytosis into breast cancer cells. All in all, I-TMSG nanoparticles, in our opinion, possessed the strong potential to realize the effective diagnosis and PTT treatment of human mammary cancer. PMID:26251596

  18. Gold nanorods/mesoporous silica-based nanocomposite as theranostic agents for targeting near-infrared imaging and photothermal therapy induced with laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qing; Guan, Guannan; Hu, Wen; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Hu, Haiyang; Liang, Ying; Zhu, Heyun; Chen, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is widely regarded as a promising technology for cancer treatment. Gold nanorods (GNRs), as excellent PTT agent candidates, have shown high-performance photothermal conversion ability under laser irradiation, yet two major obstacles to their clinical application are the lack of selective accumulation in the target site following systemic administration and the greatly reduced photothermal conversion efficiency caused by self-aggregating in aqueous environment. Herein, we demonstrate that tLyp-1 peptide-functionalized, indocyanine green (ICG)-containing mesoporous silica-coated GNRs (I-TMSG) possessed dual-function as tumor cells-targeting near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe and PTT agents. The construction of the nanostructure began with synthesis of GNRs by seed-mediated growth method, followed by the coating of mesoporous silica, the chemical conjugation of PEG and tLyp-1 peptide, and the enclosure of ICG as an NIR imaging agent in the mesoporous. The as-prepared nanoparticles could shield the GNRs against their self-aggregation, improve the stability of ICG, and exhibit negligible dark cytotoxicity. More importantly, such a theranostic nanocomposite could realize the combination of GNRs-based photothermal ablation under NIR illumination, ICG-mediated fluorescent imaging, and tLyp-1-enabled more easy endocytosis into breast cancer cells. All in all, I-TMSG nanoparticles, in our opinion, possessed the strong potential to realize the effective diagnosis and PTT treatment of human mammary cancer. PMID:26251596

  19. Enhancing the efficacy of cytotoxic agents for cancer therapy using photochemical internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Caroline M.; Loizidou, Marilena; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Woodhams, Josephine H.

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for improving cellular delivery of certain bioactive agents which are prone to sequestration within endolysosomes. There is a wide range of agents suitable for PCI‐based delivery including toxins, oligonucleotides, genes and immunoconjugates which demonstrates the versatility of this technique. The basic mechanism of PCI involves triggering release of the agent from endolysosomes within the target cells using a photosensitiser which is selectively retained with the endolysosomal membranes. Excitation of the photosensitiser by visible light leads to disruption of the membranes via photooxidative damage thereby releasing the agent into the cytosol. This treatment enables the drugs to reach their intended subcellular target more efficiently and improves their efficacy. In this review we summarise the applications of this technique with the main emphasis placed on cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25758607

  20. Antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes: current agents and impact on patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Hussam M; Nelson, Adam J; Willoughby, Scott R; Worthley, Matthew I

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherothrombosis and subsequent development of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The understanding of this process has driven a large body of evidence demonstrating the mortality and morbidity benefits of antiplatelet agents in the ACS population. As expected, however, these agents come with an intrinsically increased risk of bleeding which underlies the vast majority of their complications and adverse effects. In today’s setting of compounding comorbidities and broadening indications, finding the balance between thrombosis prevention and bleeding risk remains the challenge for all clinicians considering these medications. This article reviews the current main antiplatelet agents that are available for clinical use and outlines their impact on ACS outcome. We also outline factors which affect the response to these agents and discuss strategies to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:22915965

  1. Enhancing Potentially Plant-Available Lead Concentrations in Contaminated Residential Soils Using a Biodegradable Chelating Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andra, S.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Saminathan, S.

    2007-12-01

    Chelation of heavy metals is an important factor in enhancing metal solubility and, hence, metal availability to plants to promote phytoremediation. In the present study, we compared the effects of application of a biodegradable chelating agent, namely, ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) on enhancing plant available form of lead (Pb) in Pb-based paint contaminated residential soils compared to that of a more commonly used, but non-biodegradable chelate, i.e., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Development of a successful phytoremediation model for metals such as Pb depends on a thorough understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the soil, along with the optimization of a chelate treatment to mobilize Pb from `unavailable' pools to potentially plant available fraction. In this context, we set out to perform batch incubation experiments to investigate the effectiveness of the two aforementioned chelates in enhancing plant available Pb at four different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 mM/kg soil) and three treatment durations (0, 10 and 30 days). We selected 12 contaminated residential soils from two major metropolitan areas (San Antonio, TX and Baltimore, MD) with varying soil physico-chemical properties - the soils from San Antonio were primarily alkaline and those from Baltimore were typically acidic. Total soil Pb concentrations ranged between 256 mg/kg and 4,182 mg/kg. Our results show that both chelates increased the solubility of Pb, otherwise occluded in the complex soil matrix. For both EDTA and EDDS, the exchangeable concentrations of soil Pb also increased with increase in chelate concentration and incubation time. The most effective treatment was 15 mM chelate kg-1 soil incubated for 30 days, which caused many fold increase in potentially plant available Pb (a combination of the soluble and exchangeable fractions) relative to the unamended controls. Step wise multiple linear regression analysis using chelate-extractable Pb and soil

  2. Consolidation and Maintenance Therapies for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in the Era of Novel Agents.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, Nitya; Larsen, Jeremy T; Kapoor, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    Advances in therapy in multiple myeloma have resulted in significant improvements in patient outcomes; however, relapse remains problematic. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), including thalidomide and lenalidomide, are appealing as maintenance therapy given their oral administration; however, the cumulative toxicities of thalidomide have limited its efficacy in maintenance therapy. Maintenance lenalidomide is better tolerated, and multiple studies have demonstrated an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but its impact on overall survival (OS) remains controversial. Additional concerns regarding the risk of second primary malignancies and significant cost of long-term lenalidomide therapy have also been raised. Proteasome inhibitors, particularly, bortezomib have also been incorporated in consolidation and maintenance regimens alone or in combination with an IMiD. Preliminary studies have suggested bortezomib maintenance may benefit patients with adverse cytogenetics, including t(4;14) and deletion 17p. Determination of the optimal consolidation and maintenance regimen and duration of therapy post-transplantation is a focus of several ongoing randomized studies. PMID:26893062

  3. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  4. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  5. Achromatopsia as a Potential Candidate for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy. PMID:20238068

  6. Combination of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 with boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kinash, Yuko; Ono, Koji

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 (N-acetylcochinol-O-phosphate) in the rodent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII carcinoma model, in combination with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Methods and materials: Sodium borocaptate-{sup 10}B (BSH, 125 mg/kg, i.p.) or l-p-boronophenylalanine-{sup 10}B (BPA, 250 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and 15 min later, ZD6126 (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered. Then, the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors and normal tissues were measured by prompt {gamma}-ray spectrometry. On the other hand, for the thermal neutron beam exposure experiment, SCC VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells in the tumors, followed by treatment with a {sup 10}B-carrier and ZD6126 in the same manner as the above-mentioned {sup 10}B pharmacokinetics analyses. To obtain almost similar intratumor {sup 10}B concentrations during neutron exposure, thermal neutron beam irradiation was started from the time point of 30 min after injection of BSH only, 90 min after BSH injection for combination with ZD6126, 120 min after the injection of BPA only, and 180 min after BPA injection for combination with ZD6126. Right after irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (quiescent [Q] cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, the MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. The clonogenic cell survival assay was also performed in mice given no BrdU. Results: Pharmacokinetics analyses showed that combination with ZD6126 greatly increased the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors after 60 min after BSH injection and

  7. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sijing; LU, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  8. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  9. Hydrophilic MoSe2 Nanosheets as Effective Photothermal Therapy Agents and Their Application in Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhouyue; Zhu, Wencheng; Xu, Shengjie; Ding, Jian; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-08-17

    A facile poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-assisted exfoliation method is utilized to simultaneously exfoliate and noncovalently modify MoSe2 nanosheets. The resultant hydrophilic nanosheets are shown to be promising candidates for biocompatible photothermal therapy (PTT) agents, and they could also be encapsulated into a hydrogel matrix for some intelligent devices. This work not only provides novel insights into exfoliation and modification of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanosheets but also might spark more research into engineering multifunctional TMD-related nanocomposites, which is in favor of further exploiting the attractive properties of these emerging layered two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. PMID:27467718

  10. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  11. Monoclonal antibody-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG encapsulating doxorubicin as a potential theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S; Beziere, Nicolas S; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-03-30

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA-approved, strongly photo-absorbent/fluorescent probe that has been incorporated into a clinically-relevant PEGylated liposome as a flexible optoacoustic contrast agent platform. This study describes the engineering of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using the anti-MUC-1 "humanized" monoclonal antibody (MoAb) hCTM01 as a tumour-specific theranostic system. We aimed to visualise non-invasively the tumour accumulation of these MoAb-targeted liposomes over time in tumour-bearing mice using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). Preferential accumulation of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG was studied after intravenous administration in comparison to non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using both fast growing (4T1) and slow growing (HT-29) MUC-1 positive tumour models. Monitoring liposomal ICG in the tumour showed that both targeted and non-targeted liposome-ICG formulations preferentially accumulated into the tumour models studied. Rapid accumulation was observed for targeted liposomes at early time points mainly in the periphery of the tumour volume suggesting binding to available MUC-1 receptors. In contrast, non-targeted PEGylated liposomes showed accumulation at the centre of the tumour at later time points. In an attempt to take this a step further, we successfully encapsulated the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into both targeted and non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG. The engineering of DOX-loaded targeted ICG liposome systems present a novel platform for combined tumour-specific therapy and diagnosis. This can open new possibilities in the design of advanced image-guided cancer therapeutics. PMID:25445515

  12. Visceral Blood Flow Modulation: Potential Therapy for Morbid Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Tyler J.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Jay, Bryan S.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Zafar, Abdul M.

    2013-06-15

    We present this preliminary investigation into the safety and feasibility of endovascular therapy for morbid obesity in a swine model. A flow-limiting, balloon-expandable covered stent was placed in the superior mesenteric artery of three Yorkshire swine after femoral arterial cutdown. The pigs were monitored for between 15 and 51 days after the procedure and then killed, with weights obtained at 2-week increments. In the two pigs in which the stent was flow limiting, a reduced rate of weight gain (0.42 and 0.53 kg/day) was observed relative to the third pig (0.69 kg/day), associated with temporary food aversion and signs of mesenteric ischemia in one pig.

  13. Late radiation toxicity in Hodgkin lymphoma patients: proton therapy's potential.

    PubMed

    Toltz, Allison; Shin, Naomi; Mitrou, Ellis; Laude, Cecile; Freeman, Carolyn R; Seuntjens, Jan; Parker, William; Roberge, David

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, all young patients treated for intrathoracic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) at one of 10 radiotherapy centers in the province of Quebec received 3D conformal photon therapy. These patients may now be at risk for late effects of their treatment, notably secondary malignancies and cardiac toxicity. We hypothesized that more complex radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and possibly IMRT (in the form of helical tomotherapy (HT)), could benefit these patients. With institutional review board approval at 10 institutions, all treatment plans for patients under the age of 30 treated for HL during a six-month consecutive period of 2010 were retrieved. Twenty-six patients were identified, and after excluding patients with extrathoracic radiation or treatment of recurrence, 20 patients were replanned for HT and IMPT. Neutron dose for IMPT plans was estimated from published measurements. The relative seriality model was used to predict excess risk of cardiac mortality. A modified linear quadratic model was used to predict the excess absolute risk for induction of lung cancer and, in female patients, breast cancer. Model parameters were derived from published data. Predicted risk for cardiac mortality was similar among the three treatment techniques (absolute excess risk of cardiac mortality was not reduced for HT or IMPT (p > 0.05, p > 0.05) as compared to 3D CRT). Predicted risks were increased for HT and reduced for IMPT for secondary lung cancer (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) and breast cancers (p< 0.001, p< 0.001) as compared to 3D CRT. PMID:26699298

  14. Identification of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate as a potential agent for blocking infection by grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Weisha; Yu, Fei; Lu, Liqun

    2016-04-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV), the representative strain of the species Aquareovirus C, serves as a model for studying the pathogenesis of aquareoviruses. Previously, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was shown to inhibit orthoreovirus infection. The aim of this study was to test its potential in blocking infection by GCRV. We show that adhesion to the CIK (Ctenopharyngodon idellus kidney) cell surface by GCRV particles is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by EGCG, as well as by a crude extract of green tea. We also evaluated the safety of EGCG and green tea extract using CIK cells, and the results suggest that EGCG is a promising compound that may be developed as a plant-derived small molecular therapeutic agent against grass carp hemorrhagic disease caused by GCRV infection. As the ligand for the 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LamR), EGCG's blocking effect on GCRV attachment was associated with the binding potential of GCRV particles to LamR, which was inferred from a VOPBA assay. PMID:26758731

  15. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations. PMID:25630663

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of new 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives as potential antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Rao, K Bhaskara; Singh, Seema; Modukuri, Ram K; Aruna Teja, G; Chandasana, Hardik; Shukla, Shubha; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2014-10-15

    A series of amine substituted 3-phenyl coumarin derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential antidepressant agents. In preliminary screening, all compounds were evaluated in forced swimming test (FST), a model to screen antidepressant activity in rodents. Among the series, compounds 5c and 6a potentially decreased the immobility time by 73.4% and 79.7% at a low dose of 0.5 mg/kg as compared to standard drug fluoxetine (FXT) which reduced the immobility time by 74% at a dose of 20 mg/kg, ip. Additionally, these active compounds also exhibited significant efficacy in tail suspension test (TST) (another model to screen antidepressant compounds). Interestingly, rotarod and locomotor activity tests confirmed that these two compounds do not have any motor impairment effect and neurotoxicity in mice. Our studies demonstrate that the new 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives may serve as a promising antidepressant lead and hence pave the way for further investigation around this chemical space. PMID:25239852

  17. The Selective PI3K Inhibitor XL147 (SAR245408) Inhibits Tumor Growth and Survival and Potentiates the Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents in Preclinical Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Hsu, Pin P; Qian, Fawn; Du, Xiangnan; Wu, Jianming; Won, Kwang-Ai; Yu, Peiwen; Jaeger, Christopher T; Zhang, Wentao; Marlowe, Charles K; Keast, Paul; Abulafia, Wendy; Chen, Jason; Young, Jenny; Plonowski, Artur; Yakes, F Michael; Chu, Felix; Engell, Kelly; Bentzien, Frauke; Lam, Sanh T; Dale, Stephanie; Yturralde, Olivia; Matthews, David J; Lamb, Peter; Laird, A Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of PI3K/PTEN pathway components, resulting in hyperactivated PI3K signaling, is frequently observed in various cancers and correlates with tumor growth and survival. Resistance to a variety of anticancer therapies, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents, has been attributed to the absence or attenuation of downregulating signals along the PI3K/PTEN pathway. Thus, PI3K inhibitors have therapeutic potential as single agents and in combination with other therapies for a variety of cancer indications. XL147 (SAR245408) is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of class I PI3Ks (α, β, γ, and δ). Moreover, broad kinase selectivity profiling of >130 protein kinases revealed that XL147 is highly selective for class I PI3Ks over other kinases. In cellular assays, XL147 inhibits the formation of PIP3 in the membrane, and inhibits phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 in multiple tumor cell lines with diverse genetic alterations affecting the PI3K pathway. In a panel of tumor cell lines, XL147 inhibits proliferation with a wide range of potencies, with evidence of an impact of genotype on sensitivity. In mouse xenograft models, oral administration of XL147 results in dose-dependent inhibition of phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, and S6 with a duration of action of at least 24 hours. Repeat-dose administration of XL147 results in significant tumor growth inhibition in multiple human xenograft models in nude mice. Administration of XL147 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents results in antitumor activity in xenograft models that is enhanced over that observed with the corresponding single agents. PMID:25637314

  18. Mn-54 DTPA distribution in dogs: Evaluation as a potential NMR contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, R.J.; Frick, M.P.; Levy, R.M.; Sirr, S.A.; Lund, G.; Loken, M.K.

    1985-05-01

    Several paramagnetic ions are currently being evaluated as potential contrast agents for NMR imaging. To date the most successful of these appears to be Gd-DTPA. The authors recently undertook an investigation into the kinetics of biodistribution of Mn-DTPA to determine if this agent showed any tissue specific uptake, and if so, to optimize the time for imaging. In order to obviate the need for repetitive quantitative NMR imaging they have substituted tracer amounts of Mn-54 for the stable ion. Following intravenous injection into three mongrel dogs, samples of blood, bowel, liver, and pancreas were obtained at 3, 15, 30 and 60 minutes and 2, 4 and 6 hours post-injection. Radioactivity, and thus tissue concentration, was then determined in a gamma counter. Urine was also collected throughout the study. At six hours 58.4 +- 7.1% of the injected dose had been excreted in the urine. Peak liver accumulation occurred within 30 minutes (0.503 +- 0.144% injected dose/gm x kg body weight). The pancreas also showed a relatively high accumulation of tracer (0.247 +- 0.039%/gram x kg body weight) by four hours. The pancreas to liver ratios were highest at six hours (.73). The blood concentration fell very rapidly with little tracer remaining in the blood at one hour. The results of these experiments indicate that a significant portion of the injected material was concentrated by liver and pancreas. Unlike MnCl/sub 2/, most of the Mn-DTPA is excreted in the urine. This excretion is expected to reduce the toxicity of the injected material. These results are being used to establish the optimal protocols for NMR imaging with Mn-DTPA.

  19. A Novel Bacteriophage Targeting Cronobacter sakazakii Is a Potential Biocontrol Agent in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Bai, Jaewoo; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Yeran; Park, Bookyung; Heu, Sunggi

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an important pathogen that causes high mortality in infants. Due to its occasional antibiotic resistance, a bacteriophage approach might be an alternative effective method for the control of this pathogen. To develop a novel biocontrol agent using bacteriophages, the C. sakazakii-infecting phage CR5 was newly isolated and characterized. Interestingly, this phage exhibited efficient and relatively durable host lysis activity. In addition, a specific gene knockout study and subsequent complementation experiment revealed that this phage infected the host strain using the bacterial flagella. The complete genome sequence analysis of phage CR5 showed that its genome contains 223,989 bp of DNA, including 231 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and it has a G+C content of 50.06%. The annotated ORFs were classified into six functional groups (structure, packaging, host lysis, DNA manipulation, transcription, and additional functions); no gene was found to be related to virulence or toxin or lysogen formation, but >80% of the predicted ORFs are unknown. In addition, a phage proteomic analysis using SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) revealed that seven phage structural proteins are indeed present, supporting the ORF predictions. To verify the potential of this phage as a biocontrol agent against C. sakazakii, it was added to infant formula milk contaminated with a C. sakazakii clinical isolate or food isolate, revealing complete growth inhibition of the isolates by the addition of phage CR5 when the multiplicity of infection (MOI) was 105. PMID:26497465

  20. A Novel Bacteriophage Targeting Cronobacter sakazakii Is a Potential Biocontrol Agent in Foods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Bai, Jaewoo; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Yeran; Park, Bookyung; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2016-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an important pathogen that causes high mortality in infants. Due to its occasional antibiotic resistance, a bacteriophage approach might be an alternative effective method for the control of this pathogen. To develop a novel biocontrol agent using bacteriophages, the C. sakazakii-infecting phage CR5 was newly isolated and characterized. Interestingly, this phage exhibited efficient and relatively durable host lysis activity. In addition, a specific gene knockout study and subsequent complementation experiment revealed that this phage infected the host strain using the bacterial flagella. The complete genome sequence analysis of phage CR5 showed that its genome contains 223,989 bp of DNA, including 231 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and it has a G+C content of 50.06%. The annotated ORFs were classified into six functional groups (structure, packaging, host lysis, DNA manipulation, transcription, and additional functions); no gene was found to be related to virulence or toxin or lysogen formation, but >80% of the predicted ORFs are unknown. In addition, a phage proteomic analysis using SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) revealed that seven phage structural proteins are indeed present, supporting the ORF predictions. To verify the potential of this phage as a biocontrol agent against C. sakazakii, it was added to infant formula milk contaminated with a C. sakazakii clinical isolate or food isolate, revealing complete growth inhibition of the isolates by the addition of phage CR5 when the multiplicity of infection (MOI) was 10(5). PMID:26497465

  1. A Review on Novel Breast Cancer Therapies: Photodynamic Therapy and Plant Derived Agent Induced Cell Death Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This review article presents an extensive examination of risk factors for breast cancer, treatment strategies with special attention to photodynamic therapy and natural product based treatments. Breast cancer remains the most commonly occurring cancer in women worldwide and the detection, treatment, and prevention are prominent concerns in public health. Background information on current developments in treatment helps to update the approach towards risk assessment. Breast cancer risk is linked to many factors such as hereditary, reproductive and lifestyle factors. Minimally invasive Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used in the management of various cancers; it uses a light sensitive drug (a photosensitizer, PS) and a light of visible wavelength, to destroy targeted cancer cells. State of the art analyses has been carried out to investigate advancement in the search for the cure and control of cancer progression using natural products. Traditional medicinal plants have been used as lead compounds for drug discovery in modern medicine. Both PDT and plant derived drugs induce cell death via different mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and even the regulation of various cell signalling pathways. PMID:26499768

  2. Self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia: A potential cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaria, Hitesh Ghanshyam

    An emerging cancer therapy, self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), is the motivation for this work. In this therapy, cancer is annihilated by heating the tumor to desired therapeutic temperatures (˜45°C) by using magnetic nanoparticles of controlled Curie temperatures (Tc). This work was aimed at preparing and characterizing FePt, NiPd and NiPt nanoparticles for self-regulated MFH because their Tc could be tuned by changing their composition. Based on the excellent colloidal stability, size tunability and toxicity considerations, FePt was an obvious choice for self-regulated MFH. The 3.2 nm Fe61Pt39 particles displayed a Tc of 151°C, which is well below the Tc of bulk Fe61Pt39 (˜327°C). To reach the desired Tc of 45°C the composition of iron needs to be increased. However, a major obstacle was the formation of iron oxide shells with increase in iron composition of the particles. A recent finding that the composition of individual FePt particles deviated significantly from the average value encouraged us to study the mechanism of formation of FePt particles. Our analysis showed that early in the reaction the particles were Pt-rich and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased. It was found that the wide distribution in the composition of individual particles started early in the synthesis, suggesting that the compositional variability may be attributed to the Pt nuclei. The synthesized FePt particles are unsuitable for biological applications because of their hydrophobic surface. Hence, their surface was modified by ligand exchange with mercapto alkanoic acids. After ligand exchange, stable FePt dispersions could be formed in alkaline water. The study revealed that both the carboxylate and thiol groups were required to form stable FePt dispersions. In addition, 15 nm gold particles were successfully conjugated to genetically modified adenoviruses that selectively bind to cancer tumors. We also modeled the thermal transport in tissues during

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  4. Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high saturation magnetization value (84.5 emu g-1). The surface of the IONPs could be tailored post synthesis with two different ligands which provided functionality and stability in water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Their potential as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was confirmed as they exhibited high r1 and r2 relaxivities of 7.95 mM-1 s-1 and 185.58 mM-1 s-1 respectively at 1.4 T. Biocompatibility and viability of IONPs in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied and confirmed.Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high

  5. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential

    PubMed Central

    Running, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75–90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose. PMID:26170887

  6. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75-90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose. PMID:26170887

  7. Engineered, self-assembled near-infrared photothermal agents for combined tumor immunotherapy and chemo-photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu; Ju, Enguo; Liu, Zhen; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-08-01

    New combination therapy strategy, which takes the advantages of co-delivery two or more therapeutic agents in one nanocarrier platform, has been widely used in the clinic and achieved immense popularity in cancer treatment. Here, we have rationally developed a multifunctional platform using a self-assembly strategy to incorporate materials with specific functions of chemotherapeutics, hyperthermia, and especially immunotherapy, which can collectively contribute to the effective cancer treatment. We design the immunomodulatory CpG ODNs based platform that is conjugated with NIR-responsive gold nanorods and doxorubicin for cancer therapy. The gold nanorods can be applied as the nanocarrier to simultaneously address the three kinds of treatments, which lead to a significant benefit relative to the use of each method alone. Both in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that this engineered vehicle exhibits significant antitumor efficacy. Our studies provide strong evidence that the AuNRs-CpG-Dox conjugates can be utilized as efficient antitumor agents. PMID:24818880

  8. Targeted agents in non-small cell lung cancer therapy: What is there on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Villaflor, Victoria M.; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases. There has been much research in lung cancer over the past decade which has advanced our ability to treat these patients with a more personalized approach. The scope of this paper is to review the literature and give a broad understanding of the current molecular targets for which we currently have therapies as well as other targets for which we may soon have therapies. Additionally, we will cover some of the issues of resistance with these targeted therapies. The molecular targets we intend to discuss are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK), KRAS, C-MET/RON, PIK3CA. ROS-1, RET Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Ephrins and their receptors, BRAF, and immunotherapies/vaccines. This manuscript only summarizes the work which has been done to date and in no way is meant to be comprehensive. PMID:23599689

  9. In vivo selective cancer-tracking gadolinium eradicator as new-generation photodynamic therapy agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Law, Ga-Lai; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a modality of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the design of our truly dual-functional—PDT and imaging—gadolinium complex (Gd-N), which can target cancer cells specifically. In the light of our design, the PDT drug can specifically localize on the anionic cell membrane of cancer cells in which its laser-excited photoemission signal can be monitored without triggering the phototoxic generation of reactive oxygen species—singlet oxygen—before due excitation. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies had been conducted for the substantiation of the effectiveness of Gd-N as such a tumor-selective PDT photosensitizer. This treatment modality does initiate a new direction in the development of “precision medicine” in line with stem cell and gene therapies as tools in cancer therapy. PMID:25453097

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Novel Agent-Based Therapies for Multiple Myeloma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Li, Yan; Yan, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) for safety and efficacy using meta-analysis. This meta-analysis identified 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 6742 patients. These RCTs were separated according to the different agent-based regimens and to autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). Complete response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events (AE) were combined. The total weighted risk ratio (RR) of CR was 3.29 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.22–4.88] (P < 0.0001) for the novel agent-based regimens. These novel agent-based regimens showed greater benefit in terms of PFS of all subgroups irrespective of whether the patient received ASCT or not. The hazard ratio (HR) for PFS was 0.64 [95% CI: 0.60–0.69] (P < 0.00001). Improvements of OS could be found only in the bortezomib- and thalidomide-based regimens without ASCT. The pooled HRs were 0.74 [95% CI: 0.65–0.86] (P < 0.0001) and 0.80 [95% CI: 0.70–0.90] (P = 0.0004), respectively. Several AEs were shown more frequently in the novel agent-based regimens compared with controls such as hematologic events (neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal infection, peripheral neuropathy, thrombosis, and embolism events. In conclusion, in spite of the AEs, novel agent-based regimens are safe and effective for the treatment of MM. PMID:26949704

  11. Photosensitive liposomes as potential drug delivery vehicles for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Chowdhary, R. K.

    1991-11-01

    Light-sensitive liposomes incorporating a photochromic phospholipid (Bis-Azo PC) have been developed which exhibit light-activated release of entrapped contents and intervesicular fusion. The trapping and light-induced release of inorganic ions, fluorescent market dyes, and the antitumor drug methotrexate have been demonstrated. These results are discussed together with some of the potential therapeutic applications of light-sensitive liposomes.

  12. Hendra and Nipah Infection: Pathology, Models and Potential Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Lee, Benhur

    2011-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae family comprises of several genera that contain emerging or re-emerging threats for human and animal health with no real specific effective treatment available. Hendra and Nipah virus are members of a newly identified genus of emerging paramyxoviruses, Henipavirus. Since their discovery in the 1990s, henipaviruses outbreaks have been associated with high economic and public health threat potential. When compared to other paramyxoviruses, henipaviruses appear to have unique characteristics. Henipaviruses are zoonotic paramyxoviruses with a broader tropism than most other paramyxoviruses, and can cause severe acute encephalitis with unique features among viral encephalitides. There are currently no approved effective prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for henipavirus infections. Although ribavirin was empirically used and seemed beneficial during the biggest outbreak caused by one of these viruses, the Nipah virus, its efficacy is disputed in light of its lack of efficacy in several animal models of henipavirus infection. Nevertheless, because of its highly pathogenic nature, much effort has been spent in developing anti-henipavirus therapeutics. In this review we describe the unique features of henipavirus infections and the different strategies and animal models that have been developed so far in order to identify and test potential drugs to prevent or treat henipavirus infections. Some of these components have the potential to be broad-spectrum antivirals as they target effectors of viral pathogenecity common to other viruses. We will focus on small molecules or biologics, rather than vaccine strategies, that have been developed as anti-henipaviral therapeutics. PMID:21488828

  13. Skeletal muscle atrophy: Potential therapeutic agents and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Vikas; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dabur, Rajesh; Injeti, Elisha; Mittal, Ashwani

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, new insights into the etiology of skeletal muscle wasting/atrophy under diverse clinical settings including denervation, AIDS, cancer, diabetes, and chronic heart failure have been reported in the literature. However, the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. About nineteen potential drugs that can regulate loss of muscle mass have been reported in the literature. This paper reviews the mechanisms of action of all these drugs by broadly classifying them into six different categories. Mechanistic data of these drugs illustrate that they regulate skeletal muscle loss either by down-regulating myostatin, cyclooxygenase2, pro-inflammatory cytokines mediated catabolic wasting or by up-regulating cyclic AMP, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor1, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/protein kinase B(Akt) mediated anabolic pathways. So far, five major proteolytic systems that regulate loss of muscle mass have been identified, but the majority of these drugs control only two or three proteolytic systems. In addition to their beneficial effect on restoring the muscle loss, many of these drugs show some level of toxicity and unwanted side effects such as dizziness, hypertension, and constipation. Therefore, further research is needed to understand and develop treatment strategies for muscle wasting. For successful management of skeletal muscle wasting either therapeutic agent which regulates all five known proteolytic systems or new molecular targets/proteolytic systems must be identified. PMID:26048279

  14. Plant foods in the management of diabetes mellitus: vegetables as potential hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed

    Platel, K; Srinivasan, K

    1997-04-01

    Vegetables are among the numerous plant adjuncts tried for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. A few vegetables that are commonly consumed in India have been claimed to possess antidiabetic potency. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest to screen such plant food materials, for a possible beneficial use. Considerable amount of work has been carried out in this regard with bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) and ivy gourd (Coccinia indica) both in experimental animals and human diabetic subjects. Majority of these studies have documented the beneficial effect of the fruit of bitter gourd and leaf of ivy gourd when administered orally as a single dose. The hypoglycaemic influence is claimed to be mediated through an insulin secretagogue effect or through an influence on enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. The limited number of studies on other vegetables such as cabbage (Brassica oleracia), green leafy vegetables, beans and tubers have shown the beneficial hypoglycaemic influence in both experimental animals and humans. There is scope for more extensive research in this area, especially to examine the long term beneficial effect of dietary vegetables, to identify the active principle, and to understand the mechanism of action, which is at present unclear. Since diet forms the mainstay in the management of diabetes mellitus, there is scope for exploiting the antidiabetic potency of vegetables to the maximum extent. Such plant food adjuncts possessing hypoglycaemic activity appear to hold promise as potential antidiabetic agents. PMID:9188186

  15. Child as change agent. The potential of children to increase healthy food purchasing.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Katherine; Zachary, Drew A; Fox, Monica; Gittelsohn, Joel; Surkan, Pamela J

    2014-10-01

    Shoppers make many food choices while buying groceries. Children frequently accompany caregivers, giving them the potential to influence these choices. We aimed to understand low-income shoppers' perceptions of how children influence caregivers' purchasing decisions and how the supermarket environment could be manipulated to allow children to serve as change agents for healthy food purchasing in a primarily African-American community. We conducted thirty in-depth interviews, five follow-up interviews, one supermarket walk-through interview, and four focus groups with adult supermarket shoppers who were regular caregivers for children under age 16. We conducted one focus group with supermarket employees and one in-depth interview with a supermarket manager. Qualitative data were analyzed using iterative thematic coding and memo writing. Caregivers approached grocery shopping with efforts to save money, prevent waste and purchase healthy food for their families, but described children as promoting unplanned, unhealthy food purchases. This influence was exacerbated by the supermarket environment, which participants found to promote unhealthy options and provide limited opportunities for children to interact with healthier foods. Caregivers' suggestions for promoting healthy purchasing for shoppers with children included manipulating the placement of healthy and unhealthy foods and offering opportunities for children to taste and interact with healthy options. PMID:24996593

  16. Potential of Submergedly Cultivated Mycelia of Ganoderma spp. as Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Ćilerdžić, Jasmina; Stajic, Mirjana; Vukojevic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the antiradical and antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal) potentials of ethanol mycelial extracts of selected Ganoderma species and strains and to define interand intraspecies diversity among Ganoderma species and strains. Ganoderma lucidum strains were good DPPH• scavengers (neutralizing up to 57.12% radicals), contrary to G. applanatum (20.35%) and G. carnosum (17.04%). High correlations between the activities and contents of total phenols in the extracts showed that these compounds were carriers of the activity. Results obtained by both discdiffusion and microdilution methods indicated that the extract of G. lucidum BEOFB 433 was the most potent antibacterial agent that inhibited growth of almost all bacterial species at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL. Salmonella typhimurium was the most sensitive species to the mycelium extracts. Extracts of G. lucidum BEOFB 431 and BEOFB 434 showed the best antifungal activity since in concentration of 0.5 mg/mL inhibited the growth of Aspergillus glaucus (BEOFB 431) and the growth of A. glaucus and Trichoderma viride (BEOFB 434). Extracts of G. applanatum and G. lucidum BEOFB 431 had the strongest fungicidal effects, with lethal outcomes for A. glaucus and T. viride, respectively, being noted at a concentration of 1.17 mg/mL. Aspergillus niger was proved as the most resistant species. PMID:26420047

  17. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry for distinguishing potential hoax materials from bioterror agents.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Jon G; Rafii, Fatemeh; Sutherland, John B; Rushing, Larry G; Buzatu, Dan A

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PyMS) was investigated as a rapid tool to distinguish potential bioterror hoax materials from samples containing pathogenic bacteria. A pyrolysis time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer equipped with an alternative ionization technique, metastable atom bombardment (MAB), was used to produce sample spectra. These spectra were analyzed by principal component and discriminant analysis for pattern recognition. Materials investigated were two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, one of which produced the tdh toxin, two Salmonella enterica serotypes, a biological mosquito control product containing spores of Bacillus thuringiensis, and several white to off-white powders (which could be used as hoax materials), such as flour, corn starch, methyl cellulose, and xanthan gum. PyMS distinguished bacterial samples from hoax materials. Furthermore, pattern analysis differentiated Vibrios from Salmonellae, Salmonella enterica Anatum from S. enterica Heidelberg, and the two V. parahaemolyticus strains from each other. The B. thuringiensis mixture was distinguished from other bacteria and powders, suggesting that PyMS with pattern recognition may differentiate samples containing pathogens, including Bacillus spp., from nonbiological agents and that it can be a rapid method for detection of bacteria. MS data acquisition took only 7 min for each sample. PMID:16841357

  18. Natural flavonoids as potential multifunctional agents in prevention of diabetic cataract

    PubMed Central

    Stefek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Cataract is one of the earliest secondary complications of diabetes mellitus. The lens is a closed system with limited capability to repair or regenerate itself. Current evidence supports the view that cataractogenesis is a multifactorial process. Mechanisms related to glucose toxicity, namely oxidative stress, processes of non-enzymatic glycation and enhanced polyol pathway significantly contribute to the development of eye lens opacity under conditions of diabetes. There is an urgent need for inexpensive, non-surgical approaches to the treatment of cataract. Recently, considerable attention has been devoted to the search for phytochemical therapeutics. Several pharmacological actions of natural flavonoids may operate in the prevention of cataract since flavonoids are capable of affecting multiple mechanisms or etiological factors responsible for the development of diabetic cataract. In the present paper, natural flavonoids are reviewed as potential agents that could reduce the risk of cataract formation via affecting multiple pathways pertinent to eye lens opacification. In addition, the bioavailability of flavonoids for the lens is considered. PMID:21753902

  19. Diversity-oriented synthesis of α-aminophosphonates: a new class of potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Asish K; Raut, Dnyaneshwar S; Rana, Kalpeshkumar C; Polanki, Innaiah K; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Iram, Sana

    2013-08-01

    A small library of structurally diverse α-aminophosphonates has been synthesized by reacting alkyl/aryl aldehydes, alkyl/aryl amines and alkyl/aryl phosphites in one-pot catalyzed by Amberlite-IR 120 resin (acidic). All the synthesized α-aminophosphonates were assayed for their in vitro cytotoxic activities against a panel of five human cancer cell lines including A-549, NCI-H23 (Lung), Colo 320DM (Colon), MG-63 (Bone marrow) and Jurkat (Blood T lymphocytes). Compound 4n having (R)-1-phenylethanamine was found to be the most active amongst all the synthesized α-aminophosphonates against all the five cancer cell lines, most prominent being against Jurkat cell line with an IC50 value of 4 μM. Surprisingly, compound 4o having (S)-1-phenylethanamine was found to be devoid of any cytotoxicity. Our finding suggests that these chemical entities could further serve as interesting template for the design of potential anticancer agents. PMID:23792352

  20. Animals living in polluted environments are potential source of antimicrobials against infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Simon; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The antimicrobials crisis is a ticking time bomb which could lead to millions of people dying from untreatable infections. With the worsening trends of antimicrobial resistance, we are heading towards a pre-antibiotic era. Thus, there is a need for newer and more powerful antibiotic agents. The search for new antibiotic compounds originating from natural resources is a promising research area. Animals living in germ-infested environments are a potent source of antimicrobials. Under polluted milieus, organisms such as cockroaches encounter different types of bacteria, including superbugs. Such creatures survive the onslaught of superbugs and are able to ward off disease by producing antimicrobial substances which show potent activity in the nervous system. We hope that the discovery of antimicrobial activity in the cockroach brain will stimulate research in finding antimicrobials from unusual sources, and has potential for the development of novel antibiotics. Nevertheless, intensive research in the next few years will be required to approach or realize these expectations. PMID:23265422

  1. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Nian; Wang, Xian-Fu; Li, Ting; Wu, De-Wen; Fu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Ji; Shen, Xing-Can; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Through a structure-based molecular hybridization approach, a series of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives were designed, synthesized, and screened for their in vitro antiproliferative activities against three cancer cell lines (HepG2, MGC-803, and A549). Six compounds (7 g, 7 m, 7 o, 8 e, 8 g, and 8 m) showed stronger activity against a certain cell line compared with the positive reference drugs sorafenib and gefitinib. Among the six compounds, 8 g exhibited the strongest activity. In particular, compound 8 g induced A549 apoptosis, arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. This compound can also effectively regulate the expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related proteins, and influence the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Molecular docking and structure-activity relationship analyses revealed that it can bind well to the active site of the receptor c-Raf, which was consistent with the biological data. Therefore, compound 8 g may be a potent antitumor agent, representing a promising lead for further optimization. PMID:26560049

  2. N-( sup 18 F)fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine: A potential agent for cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, T.; Kubota, K.; Sato, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tada, M.; Iwata, R.; Itoh, M.; Hatazawa, J.; Sato, K.; Fukuda, H. )

    1990-10-01

    Positron labeled substrates such as sugars, amino acids, and nucleosides have been investigated for the in-vivo evaluation of biochemical processes in cancerous tissue. Hexosamines are obligatory structural components of many biologically important macromolecules, including membrane glycoproteins and mucopolysaccharide. We evaluated a new synthesized pharmaceutical, N-({sup 18}F)fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine ({sup 18}F-FAG), which is a structural analog of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. C3H/HeMsNRS mice bearing spontaneous hepatomas were used for the tissue distribution study. At 60 min after injection, high uptakes were found in tumor (5.16, mean value of %dose/g), liver (3.71), and kidney (3.27). The tumor uptake of 18F-FAG showed the highest value in all tissue. In the PET study, VX-2 carcinoma of the rabbit was clearly visualized. Our preliminary results suggest that {sup 18}F-FAG has potential as a new agent for tumor imaging.

  3. Sonorensin: A new bacteriocin with potential of an anti-biofilm agent and a food biopreservative

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Lipsy; Singh, Gurdeep; Kumar Jena, Kautilya; Sahoo, Debendra K.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to exploration of alternative therapeutic agents such as ribosomally synthesized bacterial peptides known as bacteriocins. Biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. Bacteria in biofilm can be upto thousand times more resistant to antibiotics than the same bacteria circulating in a planktonic state. In this study, sonorensin, predicted to belong to the heterocycloanthracin subfamily of bacteriocins, was found to be effectively killing active and non-multiplying cells of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Sonorensin showed marked inhibition activity against biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence and electron microscopy suggested that growth inhibition occurred because of increased membrane permeability. Low density polyethylene film coated with sonorensin was found to effectively control the growth of food spoilage bacteria like Listeria monocytogenes and S. aureus. The biopreservative effect of sonorensin coated film showing growth inhibition of spoilage bacteria in chicken meat and tomato samples demonstrated the potential of sonorensin as an alternative to current antibiotics/ preservatives. PMID:26292786

  4. Phyllanthus wightianus Müll. Arg.: a potential source for natural antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, D; Srinivasan, R; Shivakumar, M S

    2014-01-01

    Phyllanthus wightianus belongs to Euphorbiaceae family having ethnobotanical importance. The present study deals with validating the antimicrobial potential of solvent leaf extracts of P. wightianus. 11 human bacterial pathogens (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Proteus vulgaris, and Serratia marcescens) and 4 fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mucor racemosus, and Aspergillus niger) were also challenged with solvent leaf extracts usingagar well and disc diffusion methods. Further, identification of the active component present in the bioactive extract was done using GC-MS analysis. Results show that all extracts exhibited broad spectrum (6-29 mm) of antibacterial activity on most of the tested organisms. The results highlight the fact that the well in agar method was more effective than disc diffusion method. Significant antimicrobial activity was detected in methanol extract against S. pneumoniae (29 mm) with MIC and MBC values of 15.62 μg/mL. GC-MS analysis revealed that 29 bioactive constituents were present in methanolic extract of P. wightianus, of which 9,12-octadecaenioic acid (peak area 22.82%; RT-23.97) and N-hexadecanoic acid (peak area 21.55% RT-21.796) are the major compounds. The findings of this study show that P. wightianus extracts may be used as an anti-infective agent in folklore medicine. PMID:24883301

  5. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  6. Human recombinant truncated RNASET2, devoid of RNase activity; A potential cancer therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2014-11-30

    Human RNASET2 has been implicated in antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities, independent of its ribonuclease capacities. We constructed a truncated version of human RNASET2, starting at E50 (trT2-50) and devoid of ribonuclease activity. trT2-50 maintained its ability to bind actin and to inhibit angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. trT2-50 binds to cell surface actin and formed a complex with actin in vitro. The antiangiogenic effect of this protein was demonstrated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by its ability to arrest tube formation on Matrigel, induced by angiogenic factors. Immunofluorescence staining of HUVECs showed nuclear and cytosolic RNASET2 protein that was no longer detectable inside the cell following trT2-50 treatment. This effect was associated with disruption of the intracellular actin network. trT2-50 co-localized with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind (or compete) for similar cellular epitopes. Moreover, trT2-50 led to a significant inhibition of tumor development. Histological analysis demonstrated abundant necrotic tissue and a substantial loss of endothelial structure in trT2-50-treated tumors. Collectively, the present results indicate that trT2-50, a molecule engineered to be deficient of its catalytic activity, still maintained its actin binding and anticancer-related biological activities. We therefore suggest that trT2-50 may serve as a potential cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:25426551

  7. Human recombinant truncated RNASET2, devoid of RNase activity; A potential cancer therapeutic agent

    PubMed Central

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Human RNASET2 has been implicated in antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities, independent of its ribonuclease capacities. We constructed a truncated version of human RNASET2, starting at E50 (trT2-50) and devoid of ribonuclease activity. trT2-50 maintained its ability to bind actin and to inhibit angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. trT2-50 binds to cell surface actin and formed a complex with actin in vitro. The antiangiogenic effect of this protein was demonstrated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by its ability to arrest tube formation on Matrigel, induced by angiogenic factors. Immunofluorescence staining of HUVECs showed nuclear and cytosolic RNASET2 protein that was no longer detectable inside the cell following trT2-50 treatment. This effect was associated with disruption of the intracellular actin network. trT2-50 co-localized with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind (or compete) for similar cellular epitopes. Moreover, trT2-50 led to a significant inhibition of tumor development. Histological analysis demonstrated abundant necrotic tissue and a substantial loss of endothelial structure in trT2-50-treated tumors. Collectively, the present results indicate that trT2-50, a molecule engineered to be deficient of its catalytic activity, still maintained its actin binding and anticancer-related biological activities. We therefore suggest that trT2-50 may serve as a potential cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:25426551

  8. Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguyen Thi Kim

    2016-02-14

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high saturation magnetization value (84.5 emu g(-1)). The surface of the IONPs could be tailored post synthesis with two different ligands which provided functionality and stability in water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Their potential as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was confirmed as they exhibited high r1 and r2 relaxivities of 7.95 mM(-1) s(-1) and 185.58 mM(-1) s(-1) respectively at 1.4 T. Biocompatibility and viability of IONPs in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied and confirmed. PMID:26460932

  9. Biorelevant reactions of the potential anti-tumor agent vanadocene dichloride.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Serra, Maria; Ugone, Valeria; Manca, Laura; Pirastru, Monica; Buglyó, Péter; Bíró, Linda; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of the potential anti-tumor agent vanadocene dichloride ([Cp2VCl2] or VDC) with some relevant bioligands of the cytosol such as proteins (Hb), amino acids (glycine and histidine), NADH derivatives (NADH, NADPH, NAD(+) and NADP(+)), reductants (GSH and ascorbic acid), phosphates (HPO4(2-), P2O7(4-), cAMP, AMP, ADP and ATP) and carboxylate derivatives (lactate) and its uptake by red blood cells were studied. The results indicated that [Cp2VCl2] transforms at physiological pH into [Cp2V(OH)2] and that only HPO4(2-), P2O7(4-), lactate, ATP and ADP form mixed species with the [Cp2V](2+) moiety replacing the two hydroxide ions. EPR and electronic absorption spectroscopy, agarose gel electrophoresis and spin trapping measurements allow excluding any direct interaction and/or intercalation with DNA and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fenton-like reactions. Uptake experiments by erythrocytes suggested that VDC crosses the membrane and enters inside the cells, whereas 'bare' V(IV) transforms into V(IV)O species with loss of the two cyclopentadienyl rings. This transformation in the cellular environment could be related to the mechanism of action of VDC. PMID:27121101

  10. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1997-02-11

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds are derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g., {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) or late transition metals (e.g., {sup 105}Rh or {sup 109}Pd). The complexes with these metals {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 109}Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  11. Hydroxychalcone inhibitors of Streptococcus mutans glucosyl transferases and biofilms as potential anticaries agents.

    PubMed

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Casals, Luke; Zheng, Ruowen; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as the major etiological agent in the initiation and the development of dental caries due to its robust capacity to form tenacious biofilms. Ideal therapeutics for this disease will aim to selectively inhibit the biofilm formation process while preserving the natural bacterial flora of the mouth. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacies of flavonols on S. mutans biofilms and have suggested the mechanism of action through their effect on S. mutans glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). These enzymes metabolize sucrose into water insoluble and soluble glucans, which are an integral measure of the dental caries pathogenesis. Numerous studies have shown that flavonols and polyphenols can inhibit Gtf and biofilm formation at millimolar concentrations. We have screened a group of 14 hydroxychalcones, synthetic precursors of flavonols, in an S. mutans biofilm assay. Several of these compounds emerged to be biofilm inhibitors at low micro-molar concentrations. Chalcones that contained a 3-OH group on ring A exhibited selectivity for biofilm inhibition. Moreover, we synthesized 6 additional analogs of the lead compound and evaluated their potential activity and selectivity against S. mutans biofilms. The most active compound identified from these studies had an IC50 value of 44μM against biofilm and MIC50 value of 468μM against growth displaying >10-fold selectivity inhibition towards biofilm. The lead compound displayed a dose dependent inhibition of S. mutans Gtfs. The lead compound also did not affect the growth of two commensal species (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii) at least up to 200μM, indicating that it can selectively inhibit cariogenic biofilms, while leaving commensal and/or beneficial microbes intact. Thus non-toxic compounds have the potential utility in public oral health regimes. PMID:27371109

  12. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    PubMed Central

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  13. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  14. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D; Varadarajan, Adithi R; Ahrens, Christian H; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  15. Patients’ perspectives regarding long-term warfarin therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gebler-Hughes, Elizabeth S.; Kemp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine patients’ perspectives regarding long-term vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban, and to determine if factors such as residential location affect these opinions. Design, setting and participants: Patients on VKA therapy for at least 12 weeks completed a questionnaire specifically designed for the study. They were recruited while attending point-of-care international normalized ratio (INR) testing at six South Australian general practice clinics during the period July–September 2013. Main outcome measures: Opinions of current VKA therapy, level of awareness of NOACs, and ratings of potential benefits and deterrents of transition to NOACs were sought. Results: Data from 290 participants were available for analysis (response rate 95.4%). The majority of the sample (79.5%, 229/288) were either satisfied or very satisfied with current VKA therapy. The mean score for the potential benefits of transition to NOACs was 7.6 (±4.2) out of a possible 20, which was significantly lower than the mean score 10.9 (±4.5) for the perceived deterrents to transition (p < 0.001). Rural patients (82.0%, 82/100) were significantly more likely (p = 0.001) to have not heard of NOACs than metropolitan patients (50.3%, 95/189) and also perceived significant less benefits in a transition to NOACs (p = 0.001). Conclusion: When considering potential transition from VKAs to NOACs it is important for prescribers to consider that some patients, in particular those from a rural location, may not perceive a significant benefit in transitioning or may have particular concerns in this area. PMID:25436104

  16. Hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles as molecular specific agents for MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Timothy A.; Bankson, James; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2007-08-01

    Nanoparticles which consist of a plasmonic layer and an iron oxide moiety could provide a promising platform for development of multimodal imaging and therapy approaches in future medicine. However, the feasibility of this platform has yet to be fully explored. In this study we demonstrated the use of gold-coated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles for combined molecular specific MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. The gold layer exhibits a surface plasmon resonance that provides optical contrast due to light scattering in the visible region and also presents a convenient surface for conjugating targeting moieties, while the iron oxide cores give strong T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) contrast. The strong optical absorption of the plasmonic gold layer also makes these nanoparticles a promising agent for photothermal therapy. We synthesized hybrid nanoparticles which specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a common biomarker for many epithelial cancers. We demonstrated molecular specific MRI and optical imaging in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that receptor-mediated aggregation of anti-EGFR hybrid nanoparticles allows selective destruction of highly proliferative cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 700 nm wavelength, a significant shift from the peak absorbance of isolated hybrid nanoparticles at 532 nm.

  17. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT. PMID:23743325

  18. Antiretroviral therapy for children in resource-limited settings: current regimens and the role of newer agents.

    PubMed

    Eley, Brian S; Meyers, Tammy

    2011-10-01

    WHO antiretroviral treatment guidelines for HIV-infected children have influenced the design of treatment programmes in resource-limited settings. This review analyses the latest WHO first- and second-line regimen recommendations. The recommendation to use lopinavir/ritonavir-containing first-line regimens in young children with prior non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) exposure is based on good quality evidence. Recent research suggests that lopinavir/ritonavir-containing first-line regimens should be extended to all young children, irrespective of prior NNRTI exposure. Strategies for overcoming the adverse metabolic effects of rifampicin-containing anti-tuberculosis therapy on antiretroviral therapy regimens have been under-researched in HIV-infected children, creating uncertainty about global recommendations. Preferred second-line recommendations are largely predictable. The exception is that NNRTI-containing second-line regimens are recommended for children previously exposed to NNRTIs and who subsequently did not respond to lopinavir/ritonavir-containing first-line therapy. In these patients, second-line regimens containing newer protease inhibitors (PIs) such as darunavir and tipranavir, or integrase inhibitors such as raltegravir, should be evaluated. Newer antiretroviral agents including second-generation NNRTIs and PIs, C-C chemokine receptor type 5 inhibitors, and integrase inhibitors may assist in further refinement of existing regimen options. PMID:21888444

  19. Oligonucleotide n3'-->p5' phosphoramidates and thio-phoshoramidates as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2010-03-01

    and thus inhibits its activity. This compound is currently in multiple Phase-I and Phase-I/II clinical trials as potential broad-spectrum anticancer agent. PMID:20232321

  20. Characterization and Functionalization of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Use as Potential Agents for Cancer Thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Nora

    This thesis presents experimental studies of iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, and intracellular hyperthermal effects on murine macrophages as a model in vitro system. Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of particular interest in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH). Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have garnered great interest as economical, biocompatible hyperthermia agents due to their superparamagnetic activity. Here we seek to optimize the synthetic reproducibility and in vitro utilization of IONPs for application in MFH. We compared aqueous synthetic protocols and various protective coating techniques using various analytical techniques and in vitro assays to assess the biocompatibility and feasibility of the various preparations of nanoparticles. Using a co-precipitation of iron salts methodology, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with an average diameter of 6-8nm were synthesized and stabilized with carboxylates. By performing calorimetry measurements in an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) with a frequency of 500 kHz and field strength of 0.008Tesla the superparamagnetic behavior of these particles was confirmed. To further investigate these IONPs in a biological application, citric acid-stabilized particles, in conjunction with heat generated by these IONPs when exposed to an OMF, were assessed to determine their effects on cell viability in a RAW 267.4 murine macrophage model system. Our results show that 91.5-97% of cells that have ingested IONPs die follow exposure to an OMF. Importantly, neither the IONPs (at applicable concentrations) nor the OMF show cytotoxic effects. These particular particles have promising preliminary results as hyperthermic agents in both the current literature and simple, proof-of-concept experiments in our laboratory setting. We present experimental results for the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles in MFH. Our results show that while IONPs have

  1. Entomopathogenic marine actinomycetes as potential and low-cost biocontrol agents against bloodsucking arthropods.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Karthik; Kumar, Gaurav; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Rao, Kokati Venkata Bhaskara; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2013-11-01

    A novel approach to control strategies for integrated blood-feeding parasite management is in high demand, including the use of biological control agents. The present study aims to determine the efficacy of optimized crude extract of actinomycetes strain LK1 as biological control agent against the fourth-instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) and adults of Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae), and Hippobosca maculata (Diptera: Hippoboscidae). Antiparasitic activity was optimized using the Plackett-Burman method, and the design was developed using the software Design-Expert version 8.0.7.1. The production of the optimized crude actinomycetes LK1 strain extract was performed using response surface methodology to optimize the process parameters of protease inhibitor activity of marine actinobacteria for the independent variables like pH, temperature, glucose, casein, and NaCl at two levels (-1 and +1). The potential actinomycetes strain was identified as Saccharomonas spp., and the metamodeling surface simulation procedure was followed. It was studied using a computer-generated experimental design, automatic control of simulation experiments, and sequential optimization of the metamodels fitted to a simulation response surface function. The central composite design (CCD) used for the analysis of treatment showed that a second-order polynomial regression model was in good agreement with the experimental results at R (2) = 0.9829 (p < 0.05). The optimized values of the variables for antioxidant production were pH 6.00, glucose 1.3%, casein 0.09%, temperature 31.23 °C, and NaCl 0.10%. The LK1 strain-optimized crude extract was purified using reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, and the isolated protease inhibitor showed antiparasitic activity. The antiparasitic activity of optimized crude extract of LK1 was tested against larvae of A. stephensi (LC₅₀ = 31.82 ppm

  2. New antimicrobial agents as therapy for resistant gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Lentino, J R; Narita, M; Yu, V L

    2008-01-01

    Vancomycin- and methicillin-resistant gram-positive cocci have emerged as an increasingly problematic cause of hospital-acquired infections. We conducted a literature review of newer antibiotics with activity against vancomycin-resistant and methicillin-resistant gram-positive cocci. Quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline have in vitro activity for methicillin-resistant staphylococci and are superior to vancomycin for vancomycin-resistant isolates. Dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin are new glycopeptides that have superior pharmacodynamic properties compared to vancomycin. We review the antibacterial spectrum, clinical indications and contraindications, pharmacologic properties, and adverse events associated with each of these agents. Daptomycin has rapid bactericidal activity for Staphylococcus aureus and is approved for use in bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis. Linezolid is comparable to vancomycin in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) pneumonia and has pharmacoeconomic advantages given its oral formulation. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is the drug of choice for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium infections but has no activity against Enterococcus faecalis. Tigecycline has activity against both enterococcus species and MRSA; it is also active against Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes which allows for use in intra-abdominal and diabetic foot infections. A review of numerous in vitro and animal model studies shows that interaction between these newer agents and other antistaphylococcal agents for S. aureus are usually indifferent (additive). PMID:17899228

  3. Small Molecule Modulators of Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway as Potential Preventive and Therapeutic Agents$

    PubMed Central

    Magesh, Sadagopan; Chen, Yu; Hu, Longqin

    2012-01-01

    Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway represents one of the most important cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and xenobiotic damage. Activation of Nrf2 signaling induces the transcriptional regulation of ARE-dependent expression of various detoxifying and antioxidant defense enzymes and proteins. Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling has become an attractive target for the prevention and treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases and conditions including cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Over the last few decades, numerous Nrf2 inducers have been developed and some of them are currently undergoing clinical trials. Recently, over-activation of Nrf2 has been implicated in cancer progression as well as in drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Thus, Nrf2 inhibitors could potentially be used to improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Herein, we review the signaling mechanism of Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway, its disease relevance, and currently known classes of small molecule modulators. We also discuss several aspects of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction, Nrf2-based peptide inhibitor design, and the screening assays currently used for the discovery of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction. PMID:22549716

  4. Natural products as anti-glycation agents: possible therapeutic potential for diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Elosta, Abdulhakim; Ghous, Tahseen; Ahmed, Nessar

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterised by hyperglycaemia, lipidaemia and oxidative stress and predisposes affected individuals to long-term complications afflicting the eyes, skin, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. Increased protein glycation and the subsequent build-up of tissue advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) contribute towards the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Protein glycation is accompanied by generation of free radicals through autoxidation of glucose and glycated proteins and via interaction of AGEs with their cell surface receptors (referred to as RAGE). Glycationderived free radicals can damage proteins, lipids and nucleic acids and contribute towards oxidative stress in diabetes. There is interest in compounds with anti-glycation activity as they may offer therapeutic potential in delaying or preventing the onset of diabetic complications. Although many different compounds are under study, only a few have successfully entered clinical trials but none have yet been approved for clinical use. Whilst the search for new synthetic inhibitors of glycation continues, little attention has been paid to anti-glycation compounds from natural sources. In the last few decades the traditional system of medicine has become a topic of global interest. Various studies have indicated that dietary supplementation with combined anti-glycation and antioxidant nutrients may be a safe and simple complement to traditional therapies targeting diabetic complications. Data for forty two plants/constituents studied for anti-glycation activity is presented in this review and some commonly used medicinal plants that possess anti-glycation activity are discussed in detail including their active ingredients, mechanism of action and therapeutic potential. PMID:22268395

  5. Antitumor Agents 250.† Design and Synthesis of New Curcumin Analogs as Potential Anti-Prostate Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Shi, Qian; Nyarko, Alexander K.; Bastow, Kenneth F.; Wu, Chin-Chung; Su, Ching-Yuan; Shih, Charles C.-Y; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    In a continuing study of curcumin analogs as potential drug candidates to treat prostate cancer at both androgen-dependent and androgen-refractory stages, we designed and synthesized over 40 new analogs classified into four series: monophenyl analogs (series A), heterocycle-containing analogs (series B), analogs bearing various substituents on the phenyl rings (series C) and analogs with various linkers (series D). These new compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against two human prostate cancer cell lines, androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3. Antiandrogenic activity was also evaluated in LNCaP cells and PC-3 cells transfected with wild-type androgen receptor. Ten compounds possessed potent cytotoxicity against both LNCaP and PC-3 cells; seven only against LNCaP; and one solely against PC-3. This study established an advanced structure-activity relationship (SAR), and these correlations will guide the further design of new curcumin analogs with better anti-prostate cancer activity. PMID:16789753

  6. Anesthesia-Related Carbon Monoxide Exposure: Toxicity and Potential Therapy.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) during general anesthesia can result from volatile anesthetic degradation by carbon dioxide absorbents and rebreathing of endogenously produced CO. Although adherence to the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation guidelines reduces the risk of CO poisoning, patients may still experience subtoxic CO exposure during low-flow anesthesia. The consequences of such exposures are relatively unknown. In contrast to the widely recognized toxicity of high CO concentrations, the biologic activity of low concentration CO has recently been shown to be cytoprotective. As such, low-dose CO is being explored as a novel treatment for a variety of different diseases. Here, we review the concept of anesthesia-related CO exposure, identify the sources of production, detail the mechanisms of overt CO toxicity, highlight the cellular effects of low-dose CO, and discuss the potential therapeutic role for CO as part of routine anesthetic management. PMID:27537758

  7. G9a inhibition potentiates the anti-tumour activity of DNA double-strand break inducing agents by impairing DNA repair independent of p53 status.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-10-01

    Cancer cells often exhibit altered epigenetic signatures that can misregulate genes involved in processes such as transcription, proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair. As regulation of chromatin structure is crucial for DNA repair processes, and both DNA repair and epigenetic controls are deregulated in many cancers, we speculated that simultaneously targeting both might provide new opportunities for cancer therapy. Here, we describe a focused screen that profiled small-molecule inhibitors targeting epigenetic regulators in combination with DNA double-strand break (DSB) inducing agents. We identify UNC0638, a catalytic inhibitor of histone lysine N-methyl-transferase G9a, as hypersensitising tumour cells to low doses of DSB-inducing agents without affecting the growth of the non-tumorigenic cells tested. Similar effects are also observed with another, structurally distinct, G9a inhibitor A-366. We also show that small-molecule inhibition of G9a or siRNA-mediated G9a depletion induces tumour cell death under low DNA damage conditions by impairing DSB repair in a p53 independent manner. Furthermore, we establish that G9a promotes DNA non-homologous end-joining in response to DSB-inducing genotoxic stress. This study thus highlights the potential for using G9a inhibitors as anti-cancer therapeutic agents in combination with DSB-inducing chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide. PMID:27431310

  8. Activatable hyaluronic acid nanoparticle as a theranostic agent for optical/photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Gao, Shi; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Kai; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2014-12-23

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is an emerging treatment modality that is under intensive preclinical investigations for the treatment of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of targeting function of PTT agents hampers its clinical application. An effective and nontoxic delivery vehicle that can carry PTT agents into tumor areas is still needed urgently. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomposite by loading copper sulfide (CuS) into Cy5.5-conjugated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANP), obtaining an activatable Cy5.5-HANP/CuS (HANPC) nanocomposite. In this system, Cy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by CuS inside the particle until the whole nanocomposite is degraded by hyaluronidase present in tumor, giving strong fluorescence signals delineating the tumor. Importantly, CuS with strong NIR absorbance appears to be an excellent contrast agent for photoacoustic (PA) imaging and an effective PTT agent. After intravenous administration of HANPC into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.25±0.25 for optical imaging and 3.8±0.42 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and a good tumor inhibition rate (89.74% on day 5) was observed. Our studies further encourage application of this HA-based multifunctional nanocomposite for image-guided PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:25402600

  9. Neoadjuvant and conversion treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastasis: the potential role of bevacizumab and other antiangiogenic agents.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Ferrer, Ana; Gil, Silvia; Dueñas, Rosario; Pérez, María Teresa; Molina, Raquel; Capdevila, Jaume; Safont, María José; Castañón, Carmen; Cano, Juana María; Lara, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    More than 50 % of patients with colorectal cancer develop liver metastases. Surgical resection is the only available treatment that improves survival in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). New antiangiogenic targeted therapies, such as bevacizumab, aflibercept, and regorafenib, in combination with neoadjuvant and conversion chemotherapy may lead to improved response rates in this population of patients and increase the proportion of patients eligible for surgical resection. The present review discusses the available data for antiangiogenic targeted agents in this setting. One of these therapies, bevacizumab, which targets the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has demonstrated good results in this setting. In patients with initially unresectable CRLM, the combination of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab has led to high response and resection rates. This combination is also effective for patients with unresectable CRLM. Moreover, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting of liver metastasis has a higher impact on pathological response rate. This drug also has a manageable safety profile, and according to recent data, bevacizumab may protect against the sinusoidal dilation provoked in the liver by certain cytotoxic agents. In phase II trials, antiangiogenic therapy has demonstrated benefits in the presurgical treatment of CRLM and may represent a new treatment pathway for these patients. PMID:25752908

  10. Response Surface Methodology: An Extensive Potential to Optimize in vivo Photodynamic Therapy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tirand, Loraine; Bastogne, Thierry; Bechet, Denise M.Sc.; Linder, Michel; Thomas, Noemie; Frochot, Celine; Guillemin, Francois; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the interaction of a photosensitizing (PS) agent, light, and oxygen. Few new PS agents are being developed to the in vivo stage, partly because of the difficulty in finding the right treatment conditions. Response surface methodology, an empirical modeling approach based on data resulting from a set of designed experiments, was suggested as a rational solution with which to select in vivo PDT conditions by using a new peptide-conjugated PS targeting agent, neuropilin-1. Methods and Materials: A Doehlert experimental design was selected to model effects and interactions of the PS dose, fluence, and fluence rate on the growth of U87 human malignant glioma cell xenografts in nude mice, using a fixed drug-light interval. All experimental results were computed by Nemrod-W software and Matlab. Results: Intrinsic diameter growth rate, a tumor growth parameter independent of the initial volume of the tumor, was selected as the response variable and was compared to tumor growth delay and relative tumor volumes. With only 13 experimental conditions tested, an optimal PDT condition was selected (PS agent dose, 2.80 mg/kg; fluence, 120 J/cm{sup 2}; fluence rate, 85 mW/cm{sup 2}). Treatment of glioma-bearing mice with the peptide-conjugated PS agent, followed by the optimized PDT condition showed a statistically significant improvement in delaying tumor growth compared with animals who received the PDT with the nonconjugated PS agent. Conclusions: Response surface methodology appears to be a useful experimental approach for rapid testing of different treatment conditions and determination of optimal values of PDT factors for any PS agent.

  11. Gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-07-01

    The transverse and longitudinal plasmon resonance in gold nanorods can be exploited to localize the photothermal therapy and influence the fluorescence to monitor the treatment outcome at the same time. While the longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect, the transverse peak can enhance fluorescence. After cells take in PEGylated nanorods through endocytosis, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the mitochondria is enhanced two times, which is a good indicator of the respiratory status of the cell. When cells are illuminated continuously with near infrared laser, the temperature reaches the hyperthermic region within the first four minutes, which demonstrates the efficiency of gold nanorods in photothermal therapy. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity show good correlation indicating the progress of cell death over time.

  12. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  13. Therapy effect of antiulcer agents on new chronic cysteamine colon lesion in rat.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Aralica, G; Perovic, D; Staresinic, M; Anic, T; Gjurasin, M; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Ziger, T; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Jagic, V; Komericki, L; Balen, I; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    After demonstration that cysteamine induced duodenal lesions in gastrectomized rats, while a number of antiulcer drugs mitigated these lesions, it was shown that one single intrarectal (i.r.) cysteamine application produced severe colon lesions in acute studies in rats. Thus, the further focus was on the protracted effect of cysteamine challenge (400 mg/kg b.w. i.r.) and therapy influence in chronic experiments in female rats. Regularly, cysteamine colon lesions were markedly mitigated by ranitidine (10), omeprazole (10), atropine (10), methylprednisolone (1), sulphasalazine (50; mg/kg), pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116; 10 microg or 10 ng/kg). Specifically, after 1 or 3 months following initial challenge (cysteamine 400 mg/kg i.r.) in female rat, the therapy [BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116 (10.0 microg or 10.0 ng/kg; i.g., i.p., i.r.), ranitidine, omeprazole, atropine, methylprednisolone, sulphasalazine (i.p.)] reversed the protracted cysteamine colon injury: the 1 week-regimen (once daily application) started after 1 month post-cysteamine, as well as the 2 weeks-regimen (once daily application), which started after 3 months. The effect on recidive lesion was also tested. These cysteamine lesions may reappear after stopping therapy (after stopping therapy for 3 weeks at the end of 2-weeks regimen started in 3 months-cysteamine female rats) in sulphasalazine group, while this reappearance is markedly antagonized in pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116)-rats (cysteamine-colon lesion still substantially low). PMID:11595451

  14. Potential of Microbispora sp. V2 as biocontrol agent against Sclerotium rolfsii, the causative agent of southern blight of Zea mays L (Baby corn)--in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, N N; Waghmode, M S; Gaikwad, P S; Gajbhiye, M H; Gunjal, A B; Nawani, N N; Kapadnis, B P

    2014-11-01

    The study was undertaken with the aim of exploring novel and beneficial agro activities of rare actinomycetes like Microbispora sp. V2. The antagonistic activity of Microbispora sp. V2 was evaluated as a biocontrol agents against Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne fungal plant pathogen. The methodology performed for evaluation of biocontrol agent was in vitro evaluation assay which comprised of three tests viz., cellophane overlay technique, seed germination test and Thiram (fungicide) tolerance of Microbispora sp. V2. The isolate was found to inhibit the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii to 91.43% in cellophane assay. In seed germination assay, Microbispora sp. V2 treated seeds resulted in 25.75% increased germination efficiency, as compared to seeds infected by Sclerotium rolfsii. The isolate Microbispora sp. V2 could tolerate 1000 microg mL(-1) of Thiram (fungicide). The in vitro assay studies proved that Microbispora sp. V2 can be used as antifungal antagonist and thus posses' great potential as biocontrol agent against southern blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Zea mays L (Baby corn) which causes large economical losses. PMID:25434111

  15. Cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: design, development, and potential place in the therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Ratta, Raffaele; Mennitto, Alessia; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has markedly improved over the last few years with the introduction of several targeted agents in clinical practice. Nevertheless, either primary or secondary resistance to inhibition of VEGF and mTOR pathways has limited the clinical benefit of these systemic treatments. Recently, a better understanding of the involvement of MET and its ligand HGF in many biological processes made this signaling pathway an attractive therapeutic target in oncology, particularly in mRCC. Herein, we review the development of cabozantinib, a recently approved inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, including MET, VEGFRs, and AXL, which has proven to increase progression-free survival and overall survival when compared to everolimus in mRCC patients who had progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Finally, we discuss the potential role of cabozantinib within the current treatment landscape for mRCC. PMID:27462141

  16. Adoptive cell therapy: a highly successful individualized therapy for melanoma with great potential for other malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verdegaal, Els M E

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) by infusion of autologous or redirected tumor-specific T-cells has had a major impact on the treatment of several metastasized malignancies that were until now hardly treatable. Recent findings provide a more profound knowledge on the underlying mechanisms of success and allow the optimization of the ACT protocol with respect to (1) the treatment related side-effects, (2) the quality and specificity of infused T-cells, and (3) the immunosuppressive phenotype of the tumor environment. In this review, the results and insights in the success of ACT as well as the possibilities to improve ACT and its exploitation as treatment option for various metastatic cancer types, will be discussed. PMID:26829458

  17. MATING BIOLOGY OF AUSTROMUSOTIMA CAMPTOZONALE (LEPIDOPTERA: CRAMBIDAE) - A POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENT OF OLD WORLD CLIMBING FERN, LYGODIUM MICROPHYLLUM (SCHIZAEACEAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Austromusotima camptozonale (Hampson) is under investigation as a potential biological control agent of Old World Climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br., which is a serious invasive weed in southern Florida. Studies were conducted to investigate aspects of the mating biology of A. campto...

  18. Potential biological control agents for management of cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica 15 (Cyperales: Poaceae)] in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.) Palisot de Beauvois (Cyperales: Poaceae), is a noxious invasive weed in the southeastern USA. Surveys for potential biological control agents of cogongrass were conducted in Asia and East Africa from 2013 to 2016. Several insect herbivores were found that may hav...

  19. Characterization of Novel Diaryl Oxazole-Based Compounds as Potential Agents to Treat Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Arthur Y.; Henderson, Meredith C.; Flynn, Gary; Samulitis, Betty; Han, Haiyong; Stratton, Steve P.; Chow, H.-H. Sherry; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of diaryl- and fluorenone-based analogs of the lead compound UA-62784 [4-(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-2-yl)-9H-fluoren-9-one] was synthesized with the intention of improving upon the selective cytotoxicity of UA-62784 against human pancreatic cancer cell lines with a deletion of the tumor suppressor gene deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC-4, SMAD-4). Over 80 analogs were synthesized and tested for antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines (the PC series). Despite a structural relationship to UA-62784, which inhibits the mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E), none of the analogs was selective for DPC-4-deleted pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, none of the analogs was a potent or selective inhibitor of four different mitotic kinesins (mitotic kinesin-5, CENP-E, mitotic kinesin-like protein-1, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesin). Therefore, other potential mechanisms of action were evaluated. A diaryl oxazole lead analog from this series, PC-046 [5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(3-(3-methoxyphenyl)pyridin-4-yl) oxazole], was shown to potently inhibit several protein kinases that are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancers, including tyrosine receptor kinase B, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4, and proto-oncogene Pim-1. Cells exposed to PC-046 exhibit a cell cycle block in the S-phase followed by apoptotic death and necrosis. PC-046 effectively reduced MiaPaca-2 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by 80% compared with untreated controls. The plasma half-life was 7.5 h, and cytotoxic drug concentrations of >3 μM were achieved in vivo in mice. The diaryl oxazole series of compounds represent a new chemical class of anticancer agents that inhibit several types of cancer-relevant protein kinases. PMID:19657049

  20. Identification of novel class of falcipain-2 inhibitors as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Chakka, Sai Kumar; Kalamuddin, Mohammad; Sundararaman, Srividhya; Wei, Lianhu; Mundra, Sourabh; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2015-05-01

    Falcipain-2 is a papain family cysteine protease and an emerging antimalarial drug target. A pseudo-tripeptide scaffold I was designed using in silico screening tools and the three dimensional structures of falcipain-2, falcipain-3, and papain. This scaffold was investigated at four positions, T1, T2, T3, and T3', with various targeted substitutions to understand the structure-activity relationships. Inhibitor synthesis was accomplished by first obtaining the appropriate dipeptide precursors with common structural components. The pyrrolidine moiety introduced interesting rotamers in a number of synthesized molecules, which was confirmed using high-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Among the synthesized compounds, 61, 62, and 66 inhibited falcipain-2 activity with inhibition constants (Ki) of 1.8 ± 1.1, 0.2 ± 0.1 and 7.0 ± 2.3 μM, respectively. A group of molecules with a pyrrolidine moiety at the T2 position (68, 70, 71, 72, and 73) also potently inhibited falcipain-2 activity (Ki=0.4 ± 0.1, 2.5 ± 0.5, 3.3 ± 1.1, 7.5 ± 1.9, and 4.6 ± 0.7 μM, respectively). Overall, compound 74 exhibited potent anti-parasitic activity (IC₅₀=0.9 ± 0.1 μM), corresponding with its inhibitory activity against falcipain-2, with a Ki of 1.1 ± 0.1 μM. Compounds 62 and 67 inhibited the growth of the drug resistant parasite Dd2 with better efficacy, and compound 74 exhibited a 7- to 12-fold higher potency against Dd2 and MCamp isolates, than the laboratory strain (3D7). These data suggest that this novel series of compounds should be further investigated as potential antimalarial agents. PMID:25840796

  1. Bioinformatics prediction of siRNAs as potential antiviral agents against dengue viruses

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Rosales, Paula M; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Ortega-Soto, Elizabeth; Barrón, Blanca L

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV 1-4) represents the major emerging arthropod-borne viral infection in the world. Currently, there is neither an available vaccine nor a specific treatment. Hence, there is a need of antiviral drugs for these viral infections; we describe the prediction of short interfering RNA (siRNA) as potential therapeutic agents against the four DENV serotypes. Our strategy was to carry out a series of multiple alignments using ClustalX program to find conserved sequences among the four DENV serotype genomes to obtain a consensus sequence for siRNAs design. A highly conserved sequence among the four DENV serotypes, located in the encoding sequence for NS4B and NS5 proteins was found. A total of 2,893 complete DENV genomes were downloaded from the NCBI, and after a depuration procedure to identify identical sequences, 220 complete DENV genomes were left. They were edited to select the NS4B and NS5 sequences, which were aligned to obtain a consensus sequence. Three different servers were used for siRNA design, and the resulting siRNAs were aligned to identify the most prevalent sequences. Three siRNAs were chosen, one targeted the genome region that codifies for NS4B protein and the other two; the region for NS5 protein. Predicted secondary structure for DENV genomes was used to demonstrate that the siRNAs were able to target the viral genome forming double stranded structures, necessary to activate the RNA silencing machinery. PMID:22829722

  2. Photoactive metal carbonyl complexes as potential agents for targeted CO delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Margarita A; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2014-04-01

    The surprising discovery of carbon monoxide (CO) as a signaling molecule in mammalian physiology has recently raised interest in this toxic gas among researchers in biochemical and pharmaceutical community. CO is endogenously produced mainly from catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) and participates in a myriad of anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and vasoregulatory pathways. In animal models, low doses of CO have exhibited beneficial effects in suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The salutary effects of CO have naturally drawn attention of the pharmaceutical industry for its use as a cytoprotective agent. Safety-related concerns of the use of this noxious gas have prompted research in the area of syntheses of CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) and to date, several metal carbonyls (metal complexes of CO) have been employed as CORMs in promoting prolonged (and safe) delivery of low doses of CO to cellular targets. Because many carbonyl complexes release CO upon illumination, investigators have recently began to explore the possibility of "controlled CO delivery" through the use of light. During the past few years, a number of photoactive CORMs or "photoCORMs" have been synthesized that release CO upon illumination with UV or visible light. The utility of these photoCORMs in CO delivery has also been confirmed. Novel design principles for isolation of photoCORMs have started to appear in recent reports. Scrutiny of the literature reveals the emergence of a new exciting area of drug development in such efforts. The potential of photoCORMs as CO-donating pharmaceuticals along with a brief overview of the physiological roles of CO is presented in this review. PMID:24287103

  3. Vital Pulp Therapy with Three Different Pulpotomy Agents in Immature Molars: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Azadeh; Forghani, Maryam; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This case report describes apexogenesis treatment of three molar teeth of an 8-year-old boy using three different pulpotomy agents. Methods Pulpotomy was performed on decayed immature molar teeth with established irreversible pulpitis and the remaining pulp was capped with either zinc oxide eugenol, ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Teeth were restored with stainless steel crowns. Results Eighteen months clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed successful preservation of pulpal vitality with continued root development in all treated teeth. Conclusion Based on this case report, CEM cement may be an alternative option for pulpotomy treatment of immature permanent molars. PMID:23922578

  4. Gold nanorods as dual photo-sensitizing and imaging agents for two-photon photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingting; Shen, Xiaoqin; Li, Lin; Guan, Zhenping; Gao, Nengyue; Yuan, Peiyan; Yao, Shao Q.; Xu, Qing-Hua; Xu, Guo Qin

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanorods with three different aspect ratios were prepared and their dual capabilities for two-photon imaging and two-photon photodynamic therapy have been demonstrated. These gold nanorods exhibit large two-photon absorption action cross-sections, about two orders of magnitude larger than small organic molecules, which makes them suitable for two-photon imaging. They can also effectively generate singlet oxygen under two-photon excitation, significantly higher than traditional photosensitizers such as Rose Bengal and Indocyanine Green. Such high singlet oxygen generation capability under two-photon excitation was ascribed to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated gold nanorods displayed excellent biocompatibility and high cellular uptake efficiency. The two-photon photodynamic therapy effect and two-photon fluorescence imaging properties of PVP coated gold nanorods have been successfully demonstrated on HeLa cells in vitro using fluorescence microscopy and indirect XTT assay method. These gold nanorods thus hold great promise for imaging guided two-photon photodynamic therapy for the treatment of various malignant tumors.Gold nanorods with three different aspect ratios were prepared and their dual capabilities for two-photon imaging and two-photon photodynamic therapy have been demonstrated. These gold nanorods exhibit large two-photon absorption action cross-sections, about two orders of magnitude larger than small organic molecules, which makes them suitable for two-photon imaging. They can also effectively generate singlet oxygen under two-photon excitation, significantly higher than traditional photosensitizers such as Rose Bengal and Indocyanine Green. Such high singlet oxygen generation capability under two-photon excitation was ascribed to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated gold nanorods displayed excellent biocompatibility and high cellular uptake efficiency

  5. Targeted agents in epithelial ovarian cancer: review on emerging therapies and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Lokadasan, Rajitha; James, Francis V; Narayanan, Geetha; Prabhakaran, Pranab K

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains a clinical challenge and there is a need to optimise the currently available treatment and to urgently develop new therapeutic strategies. Recently, there has been improved understanding of the molecular characteristics and tumour microenvironment of ovarian cancers. This has facilitated the development of various targeted agents used concurrently with chemotherapy or as maintenance. Most of the studies have explored the tumour angiogenesis pathways. In phase-III trials, bevacizumab showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival, although there was no improvement in overall survival in selected high-risk cases. Although several multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors were found to be useful, the toxicity and survival benefit has to be weighed. Poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been another marvellous molecule found to be effective in breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA)-positive ovarian cancers. Several newer molecules targeting Her 2, Wee tyrsine kinases, PIP3/AKT/mTR-signalling pathways, folate receptors are under development and may provide additional opportunities in the future. This article focuses on the targeted agents that have successfully paved the way in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer and the newer molecules that may offer therapeutic opportunities in the future. PMID:27110282

  6. Nanomaterials as Non-viral siRNA Delivery Agents for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has been recently shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment as nanotechnology-based safe and effective delivery methods are developed. Generally, genes are wrapped up in extremely tiny nanoparticles which could be taken up easily by cancer cells, not to their healthy neighboring cells. Several nanoparticle systems have been investigated primarily to address the problems involved in other methods of gene delivery and observed improved anticancer efficacy suggesting that nanomedicine provides novel opportunities to safely deliver genes, thus treat cancer. In this review, various nanoparticle types and related strategies, used in gene delivery for cancer treatment, have been discussed. PMID:23878788

  7. Experimental disseminated trichosporonosis in mice: tissue distribution and therapy with antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Makimura, K; Sudo, T; Shibuya, K; Uchida, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Mice treated with cyclophosphamide were infected intravenously with titrated doses of Trichosporon asahii TIMM3140 or TIMM3144. Mortality and survival time correlated with inoculum size and fungal growth was found in the lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidney and brain. Fluconazole and amphotericin B prolonged survival time and reduced the CFU in the kidney, with fluconazole being superior to amphotericin B. The serum level of (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan was reduced by antifungal therapy and correlated well with the CFU/organ in kidney, but not CFU/ml in blood. PMID:9467108

  8. Novel amphiphilic cationic porphyrin and its Ag(II) complex as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Babayan, Nelli; Poghosyan, David; Margaryan, Kristine; Harutyunyan, Boris; Grigoryan, Rusanna; Sarkisyan, Natalia; Spasojevic, Ivan; Mamyan, Suren; Sahakyan, Lida; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ghazaryan, Robert; Gasparyan, Gennadi

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have synthesized a novel amphiphilic porphyrin and its Ag(II) complex through modification of water-soluble porphyrinic structure in order to increase its lipophilicity and in turn pharmacological potency. New cationic non-symmetrical meso-substituted porphyrins were characterized by UV–visible, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR techniques, lipophilicity (thin-layer chromatographic retention factor, Rf), and elemental analysis. The key toxicological profile (i.e. cytotoxicity and cell line-(cancer type-) specificity; genotoxicity; cell cycle effects) of amphiphilic Ag porphyrin was studied in human normal and cancer cell lines of various tissue origins and compared with its water-soluble analog. Structural modification of the molecule from water-soluble to amphiphilic resulted in a certain increase in the cytotoxicity and a decrease in cell line-specificity. Importantly, Ag(II) porphyrin showed less toxicity to normal cells and greater toxicity to their cancerous counterparts as compared to cisplatin. The amphiphilic complex was also not genotoxic and demonstrated a slight cytostatic effect via the cell cycle delay due to the prolongation of S-phase. As expected, the performed structural modification affected also the photocytotoxic activity of metal-free amphiphilic porphyrin. The ligand tested on cancer cell line revealed a dramatic (more than 70-fold) amplification of its phototoxic activity as compared to its water-soluble tetracationic metal-free analog. The compound combines low dark cytotoxicity with 5 fold stronger phototoxicity relative to Chlorin e6 and could be considered as a potential photosensitizer for further development in photodynamic therapy. PMID:25086237

  9. The potential of methylxanthine-based therapies in pediatric respiratory tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Franco, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most known methylxanthines as they are present in coffee, tea and/or chocolate. In the last decades, a huge experimental effort has been devoted to get insight into the variety of actions that these compounds exert in humans. From such knowledge it is known that methylxanthines have a great potential in prevention, therapy and/or management of a variety of diseases. The benefits of methylxanthine-based therapies in the apnea of prematurity and their translational potential in pediatric affections of the respiratory tract are here presented. PMID:26880379

  10. GNR@mSiO2-TDM1 conjugates as multimodal platform for breast cancer therapy as well as enhanced photoacoustic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Yao, Qian; Wang, Xiuhong

    2016-02-01

    The development of combination of two or more therapies to fight against cancer together has been important research in oncology. Here we rationally designed a novel nanodrug which can incorporate active targeting, antibody therapy, drug therapy and photothermal therapy within one single platform to fight against Her2-positive breast cancer. To this end, a layer of mesoporous SiO2 was encapsulated onto the gold nanorods followed by covalent association of breast cancer drug TDM1 to the silica shell. TDM1 is an antibody drug conjugate consisting of engineered antibody trastuzumab and anti-miotic agent emtansine. Drug therapy followed by photothermal therapy using NIR laser (793nm) specifically ablated Her2-positive breast cancer cells with enhanced efficiency. In addition, the engineered nanodrug has amplified photoacoustic performance allowing sensitive detection of Her2-positive cancer cells.

  11. Photosensitizer decorated iron oxide nanoparticles: bimodal agent for combined hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Keming; Zhang, Bei; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Xixiang; Chang, Chi K.

    2006-02-01

    As the PDT effect may be enhanced by localized hyperthermia (HT), it would be logical to find a single agent that could bring about these two modalities at precisely the target site for synergism. Since highly localized HT can be induced by magnetic field excitation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, we report here the design and synthesis of photosensitizer-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles and their tumoricidal effect. Thus, a porphyrin is covalently anchored on the iron oxide nanoparticle via dihydroxybenzene which binds tightly on the surface of the nanoparticle by M-O bond. The morphology of the resultant nanoparticle was studied to show that the crystallinality is not changed and the nanoparticle remains superparamagnetic at room temperature. The conjugate is also strongly fluorescent indicating that the iron oxide hardly affects the optical properties of the surface bound porphyrin moieties. The conjugate is readily taken by cancer cell (Hela cell line) and is able to trigger apoptosis after excitation by light.

  12. Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, W.O. )

    1992-09-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

  13. Balancing stealth and echogenic properties in an ultrasound contrast agent with drug delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Lauren J; Alfego, David; Andorko, James I; Eisenbrey, John R; Teraphongphom, Nutte; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Contrast agents are currently being modified to combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. For ultrasound (US) imaging with polymeric contrast agents, it is necessary to modify the shell to create "stealth" microbubbles but without these modifications sacrificing the agent's ability to interact with the focused US beam. We hypothesize that addition of the classic immune shielding molecule polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a polylactide (PLA) microbubble shell will affect the acoustic and physical properties of the resulting agents. In an effort to determine the best formulation to achieve a balance between stealth and acoustic activity, we compared two PEGylation techniques; addition of increasing amounts of PEG-PLA copolymer and employing incorporation of a PEG lipid (LipidPEG) into the shell. Loss of acoustic enhancement occurred in a dose-dependent manner for both types of PEGylated agents (loss of signal occurred at >5 wt% PEG-PLA and >1 wt% LipidPEG), while immune activation was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner for the PEG-PLA agents. This study shows that the balance between acoustic behavior and improved immune avoidance was scalable and successful to different degrees with both PEGylation methods, and was best achieved using for PEG-PLA at 5 wt% and for LipidPEG at 1 wt%. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the best method for the targeting and drug delivery capabilities of these agents for applications in cancer treatment. This study represents the basis for understanding the consequences of making modifications to the native polymeric shell. PMID:27388945

  14. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment. PMID:26234690

  15. Adeno-associated virus vectors: potential applications for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; Bowles, Dawn E; van Dyke, Terry; Samulski, Richard Jude