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Sample records for potential tumor marker

  1. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  2. Potential markers of tongue tumor progression selected by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Carinci, F; Lo Muzio, L; Piattelli, A; Rubini, C; Chiesa, F; Ionna, F; Palmieri, A; Maiorano, E; Pastore, A; Laino, G; Dolci, M; Pezzetti, F

    2005-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the most frequent malignant tumor of the oral cavity, generally exhibits a poor prognosis and metastases are the main cause of death. This tumor often arises from pre-malignant lesions. To date, it is difficult to predict if and which pre-malignant lesions may progress into oral SCC using traditional methods. For these reasons, several studies are trying to identify markers useful in the progression of pre-malignant lesions and tumors. To define the genetic expression profile of tongue tumor progression we compared 9 dysplasias (DS), 8 tumors without metastasis (TWM), 11 metastasizing SCCs (MT) of the tongue, and a baseline of 11 normal tissues by using cDNA microarray containing 19.2 K clones. We initially applied hierarchical agglomerative clustering based on information from all 6026 clones. Results were obtained by performing a two steps analysis: a Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) and a Gene Ontology search. One hundred and five clones have statistically significant different expression levels (FDR < 0.01) between DS and TWM, whereas 570 genes have statistically significant difference expression levels between TWM and MT (FDR < 0.01) as detected by SAM. By filtering with FatiGo only 33 genes were differentially expressed in TWN, respect to DS, whereas 155 genes were differentially expressed in MT respect to TWM. We detected some genes which encode for oncogenes, transcription factors and cell cycle regulators as potential markers of DS progression. Examples are BAG4, PAX3 and CCNI, respectively. Among potential markers of metastases are some genes related to cell mobility (TSPAN-2 and SNTA1), intercellular adhesion (integrin alpha 7) or extracellular matrix components (ADAMTS2 and cathepsin O). Additionally, under-expressed genes encoded apoptosis-related proteins (PDCD4 and CASP4). In conclusion, we identified several genes differentially expressed in tumor progression which can potentially help in better classifying

  3. ABCG2 is a potential marker of tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sicchieri, Renata Danielle; da Silveira, Willian Abraham; Mandarano, Larissa Raquel Mouro; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    The existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) within solid tumors has been hypothesized to explain tumor heterogeneity and resistance to cancer therapy. In breast cancer, the expression of CD44 and CD24 and the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) can be used to selectively isolate a cell population enriched in TICs. However, the ideal marker to identify TICs has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of novel potential markers for TIC in breast carcinoma. We prospectively analyzed the expression of CD44, CD24, ABCG2, and CXCR4, and the activity of ALDH1 by using flow cytometry in 48 invasive ductal carcinomas from locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients who were administered primary chemotherapy. A mammosphere assay was employed in 30 samples. The relationship among flow cytometric analyses, ABCG2 gene expression, and clinical and pathological responses to therapy was analyzed. The GSE32646 database was analyzed in silico to identify genes associated with tumors with low and high ABCG2 expression. We observed that the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor was the only marker to predict the formation of mammospheres in vitro (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.029). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed a positive correlation between ABCG2 expression and the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor. The expression of ABCG2 was predictive of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our experiments and in the GSE32646 dataset (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). The in silico analysis demonstrated that ABCG2(Up) breast cancer samples have a slower cell cycle and a higher expression of membrane proteins but a greater potential for chromosomal instability, metastasis, immune evasion, and resistance to hypoxia. Such genetic characteristics are compatible with highly aggressive and resistant tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that the presence of ABCG2

  4. Identification of Apolipoprotein C-I as a Potential Wilms’ Tumor Marker after Excluding Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Fei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Da; Yang, Heying; Yu, Jiekai; Niu, Lili; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Shu; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor is one of the most common malignant tumors observed in children, and its early diagnosis is important for late-stage treatment and prognosis. We previously screened and identified protein markers for Wilms’ tumor; however, these markers lacked specificity, and some were associated with inflammation. In the current study, serum samples from children with Wilms’ tumors were compared with those of healthy controls and patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). After exclusion of factors associated with inflammation, specific protein markers for Wilms’ tumors were identified. After comparing the protein peak values obtained from all three groups, a protein with a m/z of 6438 Da was specified. Purification and identification of the target protein using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-linearion trap mass spectrometry(2D-LC-LTQ-MS) mass spectrometry, respectively, revealed that it was apolipoprotein C-I (APO C-I). Thus, APO C-I is a specific protein marker for Wilms’ tumor. PMID:25222555

  5. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  6. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  7. Plasma protoporphyrin IX following administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid as a potential tumor marker

    PubMed Central

    OTA, URARA; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; ISHIZUKA, MASAHIRO; ABE, FUMINORI; KAWADA, CHIAKI; TAMURA, KENJI; TANAKA, TOHRU; INOUE, KEIJI; OGURA, SHUN-ICHIRO; SHUIN, TARO

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously administered 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized to protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which specifically accumulates in cancer cells and emits red fluorescence by blue light irradiation. These phenomena are applied for the intraoperative diagnosis of cancer. Based on the fact that accumulated PpIX in cancer cells is exported extracellularly via the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2, we hypothesized that the measurement of plasma PpIX concentrations could be applied as a tumor marker for cancer screening. In the present study, the use of plasma samples from bladder cancer patients were evaluated as a tumor marker. ALA, 1.0 g, was orally administered to bladder cancer patients and healthy adults. The plasma concentration of PpIX was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography system. The plasma PpIX concentration following ALA administration was significantly higher in bladder cancer patients than that in the healthy adults, suggesting the effectiveness of plasma PpIX analysis following ALA administration for cancer screening. Additionally, 4 h after ALA administration, plasma PpIX showed high sensitivity (94.4%) and high specificity (80.0%). PMID:26171183

  8. [Tumor markers for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Miyake, Y; Noura, S; Ogawa, M; Yasui, M; Ikenaga, M; Sekimoto, M; Monden, M

    2001-09-01

    CEA and CA19-9 are the two most common tumor markers for colorectal cancer that are currently utilized clinically. The positive rate of CEA is 40-60% and that of CA19-9 is 30-50%. Simultaneous use of the two markers is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect and monitoring the recurrence of advanced colorectal cancer. Surgical specimens may also provide useful information for the appropriate treatment of patients. Using surgically resected lymph nodes, we examined micrometastasis to assess the spread of the cancer cells and the malignant potential of colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis using anti-cytokeratin antibody revealed no significant impact of micrometastasis on patient prognosis, while RT-PCR assay using CEA as a genetic marker suggested a positive value in predicting a rapid recurrence. Among various molecular markers, we found that CDC25B phosphatase was a powerful prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. Diagnosis of the existence and malignant potential of cancer cells, together with serum tumor marker levels, may help to construct a more useful system for the better treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:11579645

  9. Molecular signature of salivary gland tumors: potential use as diagnostic and prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Sena Filho, Marcondes; Altemani, Albina; Speight, Paul M; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions with diverse microscopic appearances and variable clinical behavior. The use of clinical and histological parameters to predict patient prognosis and survival rates has been of limited utility, and the search for new biomarkers that could not only aid in a better understanding of their pathogenesis but also be reliable auxiliaries for prognostic determination and useful diagnostic tools has been performed in the last decades with very exciting results. Hence, gene rearrangements such as CRTC1-MAML2 in mucoepidermoid carcinomas have shown excellent specificity, and more than that, it has been strongly correlated with low-grade tumors and consequently with an increased survival rate and better prognosis of patients affected by neoplasms carrying this translocation. Moreover, MYB-NFIB and EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions were shown to be specifically found in cases of adenoid cystic carcinomas and hyalinizing clear cell carcinomas, respectively, in the context of salivary gland tumors, becoming reliable diagnostic tools for these entities and potential therapeutic targets for future therapeutic protocols. Finally, the identification of ETV6-NTRK3 in cases previously diagnosed as uncommon acinic cell carcinomas, cystadenocarcinomas, and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified led to the characterization of a completely new and now widely accepted entity, including, therefore, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in the list of well-recognized salivary gland carcinomas. Thus, further molecular investigations of salivary gland tumors are warranted, and the recognition of other genetic abnormalities can lead to the acknowledgment of new entities and the acquirement of reliable biomarkers. PMID:25990369

  10. Calpains: markers of tumor aggressiveness?

    PubMed

    Roumes, Hélène; Leloup, Ludovic; Dargelos, Elise; Brustis, Jean-Jacques; Daury, Laetitia; Cottin, Patrick

    2010-05-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are soft-tissue sarcoma commonly encountered in childhood. RMS cells can acquire invasive behavior and form metastases. The metastatic dissemination implicates many proteases among which are mu-calpain and m-calpain. Study of calpain expression and activity underline the deregulation of calpain activity in RMS. Analysis of kinetic characteristics of RMS cells, compared to human myoblasts LHCN-M2 cells, shows an important migration velocity in RMS cells. One of the major results of this study is the positive linear correlation between calpain activity and migration velocity presenting calpains as a marker of tumor aggressiveness. The RMS cytoskeleton is disorganized. Specifying the role of mu- and m-calpain using antisense oligonucleotides led to show that both calpains up-regulate alpha- and beta-actin in ARMS cells. Moreover, the invasive behavior of these cells is higher than that of LHCN-M2 cells. However, it is similar to that of non-treated LHCN-M2 cells, when calpains are inhibited. In summary, calpains may be involved in the anarchic adhesion, migration and invasion of RMS. The direct relationship between calpain activity and migration velocities or invasive behavior indicates that calpains could be considered as markers of tumor aggressiveness and as potential targets for limiting development of RMS tumor as well as their metastatic behavior. PMID:20193680

  11. Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: B2M; B 2 M; β2-Microglobulin; Thymotaxin Formal name: Beta 2 ...

  12. Identification of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prolactin as potential tumor markers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Who-Whong; Ang, Soo Fan; Kumar, Rajneesh; Heah, Charmain; Utama, Andi; Tania, Navessa Padma; Li, Huihua; Tan, Sze Huey; Poo, Desmond; Choo, Su Pin; Chow, Wan Cheng; Tan, Chee Kiat; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellullar carcinoma (HCC) remains a challenge. The current practice of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement is inadequate. Here we utilized a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers for distinguishing HCC patients from non-cancer controls. We profiled the serum proteins in a group of 58 resectable HCC patients and 11 non-HCC chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carrier samples from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) using the RayBio® L-Series 507 Antibody Array and found 113 serum markers that were significantly modulated between HCC and control groups. Selected potential biomarkers from this list were quantified using a multiplex sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array in an expanded SGH cohort (126 resectable HCC patients and 115 non-HCC chronic HBV carriers (NC group)), confirming that serum prolactin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly upregulated in HCC patients. This finding of serum MCP-1 elevation in HCC patients was validated in a separate cohort of serum samples from the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology, Indonesia (98 resectable HCC, 101 chronic hepatitis B patients and 100 asymptomatic HBV/HCV carriers) by sandwich ELISA. MCP-1 and prolactin levels were found to correlate with AFP, while MCP-1 also correlated with disease stage. Subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of AFP, prolactin and MCP-1 in the SGH cohort and comparing their area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated that neither prolactin nor MCP-1 on their own performed better than AFP. However, the combination of AFP+MCP-1 (AUC, 0.974) had significantly superior discriminative ability than AFP alone (AUC, 0.942; p<0.001). In conclusion, prolactin and MCP-1 are overexpressed in HCC and are conveniently quantifiable in patients' sera by ELISA. MCP-1 appears to be a promising complementary biomarker for HCC diagnosis and this MCP-1+AFP model should be further evaluated as potential

  13. Markers of bile duct tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Paladina, Isabella; Rando, Alessandra; Uccello, Mario; Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Carnazzo, Santo; Alessandria, Innocenza; Mazzarino, Clorinda

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas are relatively rare, representing less than 1% of cancers. However, their incidence has increased in Japan and in industrialized countries like the USA. Biliary tract tumors have a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because they are usually detected late in the course of the disease; therapeutic treatment options are often limited and of minimal utility. Recent studies have shown the importance of serum and molecular markers in the diagnosis and follow up of biliary tract tumors. This review aims to introduce the main features of the most important serum and molecular markers of biliary tree tumors. Some considerable tumor markers are cancer antigen 125, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, chromogranin A, mucin 1, mucin 5, alpha-fetoprotein, claudins and cytokeratins. PMID:21528090

  14. Serum levels of hepatocyte growth factor as a potential tumor marker in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Rainer; Muendlein, Axel; Volbeding, Lennart; Drexel, Heinz; Richtig, Erika; Wehkamp, Ulrike; Painsi, Clemes; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Hauschild, Axel; Egberts, Friederike

    2016-08-01

    Serum markers can be important tools for prognostic classification and treatment monitoring in cancer patients. The MAP-kinase pathway, which is upregulated in the majority of melanoma patients, can be activated by hepatocyte-growth factor (HGF) through the proto-oncogene c-MET. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive and prognostic value of circulating HGF in terms of treatment outcome and survival compared with a widely established serum marker, protein S-100B, in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. HGF and S-100B were measured in serum samples of 101 patients with metastatic melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IV) before and after treatment and 50 patients with stage I/II melanoma. HGF and S-100B correlated significantly with the stage of disease (P=0.032 and P<0.001, respectively). In stage IV melanoma patients, baseline serum levels of HGF and S-100B were significantly associated with treatment response (P=0.012 and 0.006, respectively). Furthermore, the Cox regression analysis confirmed that serum levels of HGF and S-100B proved to have a significant prognostic impact on progression-free survival (hazard ratio=1.39 and 1.29, respectively) and overall survival (hazard ratio=1.27 and 1.29, respectively) in advanced metastatic melanoma patients. In melanoma patients, serum levels of HGF and S-100B correlate significantly with the stage of disease. In stage IV melanoma, both markers are prognostic factors and correlate significantly with progression-free survival and overall survival. Measurement of serum HGF levels might be a useful additional tool in the management of melanoma patients. PMID:27206057

  15. Quantum dots based potential-resolution dual-targets electrochemiluminescent immunosensor for subtype of tumor marker and its serological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Jiang, Hui; Fang, Yuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Nianyue; Zang, Guizhen

    2015-09-15

    The identification of subtypes of known tumor markers is of great importance for clinical diagnosis but still a great challenge in novel detection methodologies with simple operation and acceptable sensitivity. This work for the first time reported a quantum dots (QDs) based potential-resolved electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor to realize simultaneous detection of dual targets. Because of different surface microstructures, dimercaptosuccinic acid stabilized CdTe (DMSA-CdTe) QDs and TiO2 nanoparticles-glutathione stabilized CdTe (TiO2-GSH-CdTe) QDs composites showed a large difference of ECL peak potential (∼360 mV), which provided an access for potential-resolution detection. The ECL emission on indium tin oxide electrodes showed consistent strength during the cyclic scan, and intensity data were collected at -0.89 V and -1.25 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for DMSA-CdTe QDs and TiO2-GSH-CdTe QDs composites, respectively. The interface modification procedures of immunosensor construction were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The portion of Lens culinaris lectin affiliated isoform of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3%, in total AFP, is recently a novel criteria showing even higher sensitivity and specificity than AFP at the early stage of cancer. Combined with the enzyme cyclic amplification strategy, linear ranges for AFP-L3 and AFP dual-targets detection were 3.24 pg mL(-1)-32.4 ng mL(-1) and 1.0 pg mL(-1)-20 ng mL(-1), with limits of detection of 3.24 pg mL(-1) and 1.0 pg mL(-1), respectively. Compared with clinical detection data, the calculated portion of AFP-L3% by as-prepared immunosensor showed acceptable accuracy. These results open a new avenue for facile and rapid multiple-components detection based on the nano-ECL technique and provide a new clinical diagnosis platform for HCC. PMID:26291342

  16. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  17. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  18. Colorimetric Immunoassay for Detection of Tumor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongmei; Cao, Ya; Xu, Yuanyuan; Li, Genxi

    2010-01-01

    Tumor markers are substances, usually proteins, produced by the body in response to cancer growth, or by the cancer tissue itself. They can be detected in blood, urine, or tissue samples, and the discovery and detection of tumor markers may provide earlier diagnosis of cancer and improved therapeutic intervention. Colorimetric immunoassays for tumor marker detection have attracted considerable attention, due to their simplicity and high efficiency. The traditionally used colorimetric immunoassays for the detection of tumor markers are based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the great achievement of nanotechnology has further opened opportunities for the development of such kind of immunoassays. This paper will summarize recent advances in the field of colorimetric immunoassays for detecting tumor markers, which is aimed to provide an overview in this field, as well as experimental guidance for the learner. PMID:21614193

  19. Tumor markers in pancreatic cancer: a European Group on Tumor Markers (EGTM) status report.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M J; Sturgeon, C; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Holubec, V L; Klapdor, R; Nicolini, A; Topolcan, O; Heinemann, V

    2010-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most difficult malignancies to diagnose and treat. The aim of this article is to review how tumor markers can aid the diagnosis and management of patients with this malignancy. The most widely used and best validated marker for pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9. Inadequate sensitivity and specificity limit the use of CA 19-9 in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. In non-jaundiced patients, however, CA 19-9 may complement other diagnostic procedures. In patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, presurgical and postresection CA 19-9 levels correlate with overall survival. In advanced disease, elevated pretreatment levels of CA 19-9 are associated with adverse patient outcome and thus may be combined with other factors for risk stratification. Most, but not all, reports indicate that serial levels of CA 19-9 correlate with response to systemic therapy. Use of CA 19-9 kinetics in conjunction with imaging is therefore recommended in monitoring therapy. Although several potential serum and tissue markers for pancreatic cancer are currently undergoing evaluation, none are sufficiently validated for routine clinical use. CA 19-9 thus remains the serum pancreatic cancer marker against which new markers for this malignancy should be judged. PMID:19690057

  20. Serum APE1 Autoantibodies: A Novel Potential Tumor Marker and Predictor of Chemotherapeutic Efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Liao, Ling; Lu, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Shi-Heng; Li, Zheng; Yang, Yu-Xin; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), which has the dual functions of both DNA repair and redox activity, has been reported to be highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and this appears to be a characteristic related to chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we identified serum APE1 autoantibodies (APE1-AAbs) in NSCLC patients and healthy controls by immunoblotting and investigated the expression of APE1-AAbs by indirect ELISA from the serum of 292 NSCLC patients and 300 healthy controls. In addition, serum APE1-AAbs level alterations of 91 patients were monitored before and after chemotherapy. Our results showed that serum APE1-AAbs can be detected in both NSCLC patients and healthy controls. Serum APE1-AAbs were significantly higher than those of healthy controls and closely related to APE1 antigen levels both in tumor tissues and the peripheral blood. Moreover, the change in levels of serum APE1-AAbs in NSCLC is closely associated with the response to chemotherapy. These results suggest that APE1-AAbs is a potential tumor marker and predictor of therapeutic efficacy in NSCLC. PMID:23472128

  1. MR spectroscopy of intracranial tuberculomas: A singlet peak at 3.8 ppm as potential marker to differentiate them from malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, David; Martinot, Carlos; Fayed, Nicolas; Gaskill-Shipley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas is often challenging. Our purpose is to describe the most common metabolic patterns of tuberculomas by MR spectroscopy (MRS) with emphasis on potential specific markers. Methods Single-voxel MRS short echo time was performed in 13 cases of tuberculomas proven by histology and/or response to anti-mycobacterial therapy. For comparison MRS was also performed in 19 biopsy-proven malignant tumors (13 high-grade gliomas and six metastasis). Presence of metabolic peaks was assessed visually and categorical variables between groups were compared using chi-square. Metabolite ratios were compared using Mann-Whitney test and diagnostic accuracy of the metabolite ratios was compared using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. Results Spectroscopic peaks representing lipids and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) as well as a peak at ∼3.8 ppm were well defined in 77% (10/13), 77% (10/13) and 69% (nine of 13) of tuberculomas, respectively. Lipid and Glx peaks were also present in most of the malignant lesions, 79% (15/19) and 74% (14/19) respectively. However, a peak at ∼3.8 ppm was present in only 10% (two of 19) of the tumor cases (p < 0.001). Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios helped discriminate malignant lesions with an area under the ROC curve of 0.86 (SE: 0.078, p < 0.002, CI: 0.7–1) and 0.8 (SE: 0.1, p < 0.009, CI: 0.6–1), respectively. Threshold values between 1.7–1.9 for Cho/Cr and 0.8–0.9 for mI/Cr provided high specificity (91% for both metabolites) and adequate sensitivity (75% and 80%, respectively) for discrimination of malignant lesions. Conclusion A singlet peak at ∼3.8 ppm is present in the majority of tuberculomas and absent in most malignant tumors, potentially a marker to differentiate these lesions. The assignment of the peak is difficult from our analysis; however, guanidinoacetate (Gua) is a possibility. Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios should favor malignant lesions

  2. Molecular tumor markers for asbestos-related mesothelioma: serum diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masahiro; Hino, Okio

    2006-11-01

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from the mesothelium, and is usually associated with previous exposure to asbestos. The incubation period of the tumor may be described as 30-40 years, and the prognosis is dismal. In addition to immunohistochemical markers, recently, serum markers for the diagnosis of mesothelioma have been reported as candidates. In contrast, the expression in renal carcinoma (ERC) gene has been discovered in the Eker rat model (Tsc2 gene mutant), which is a homolog of the human mesothelin/megakaryocyte potentiating factor gene, and a novel ELISA system (N-ERC/mesothelin) has been developed. It has also been found that N-ERC/mesothelin is very stable and plentiful in the blood. In the present paper the potential utility of molecular diagnostic markers is reviewed, including ELISA systems for asbestos-related mesothelioma. PMID:17040286

  3. Tumor endothelial marker 1–specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Facciponte, John G.; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24642465

  4. Potential prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic markers for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer (GC) and its consequent mortality rate severely threaten human health. GC is frequently not diagnosed until a relatively advanced stage. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment. Thus, early screening and diagnosis are critical for improving prognoses in patients with GC. Gastroscopy with biopsy is an appropriate method capable of aiding the diagnosis of specific early GC tumor types; however, the stress caused by this method together with it being excessively expensive makes it difficult to use it as a routine method for screening for GC on a population basis. The currently used tumor marker assays for detecting GC are simple and rapid, but their use is limited by their low sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, several markers have been identified and tested for their clinical relevance in the management of GC. Here, we review the serum-based tumor markers for GC and their clinical significance, focusing on discoveries from microarray/proteomics research. We also review tissue-based GC tumor markers and their clinical application, focusing on discoveries from immunohistochemical research. This review provides a brief description of various tumor markers for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics, and we include markers already in clinical practice and various forthcoming biomarkers. PMID:25320517

  5. Mucins and Cytokeratins as Serum Tumor Markers in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Andrea; Ferrari, Paola; Rossi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Structural and functional characteristics of mucins and cytokeratins are shortly described. Thereafter, those commonly used in breast cancer as serum tumor markers are considered. First CA15.3, MCA, CA549, CA27.29 mucins and CYFRA21.1, TPA, TPS cytokeratins alone or in association have been examined in different stages and conditions. Then their usefulness in monitoring disease-free breast cancer patients is evaluated. The central role of the established cut-off and critical change, the "early" treatment of recurrent disease and the potential benefit in survival are other issues that have been highlighted and discussed. The successive sections and subsections deal with the monitoring of advanced disease. In them, the current recommendations and the principal findings on using the above mentioned mucins and cytokeratins have been reported. A computer program for interpreting consecutive measurements of serum tumor markers also has been illustrated. The final part of the chapter is devoted to mucins and cytokeratins as markers of circulating and disseminated tumor cells and their usefulness for prognosis. PMID:26530368

  6. Tumor markers in prostate cancer I: blood-based markers

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Semjonow, Axel; Lilja, Hans; Savage, Caroline; Vickers, Andrew J.; Bjartell, Anders

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The introduction of total prostate specific antigen (total PSA) testing in blood has revolutionized the detection and management of men with prostate cancer (PCa). The objective of this review was to discuss the challenges of PCa biomarker research, definition of the type of PCa biomarkers, the statistical considerations for biomarker discovery and validation, and to review the literature regarding total PSA velocity and novel blood-based biomarkers. METHODS An English-language literature review of the Medline database (1990 to August 2010) of published data on blood-based biomarkers and PCa was undertaken. RESULTS The inherent biological variability of total PSA levels affects the interpretation of any single result. Men who will eventually develop PCa have increased total PSA levels years or decades before the cancer is diagnosed. Total PSA velocity improves predictiveness of total PSA only marginally, limiting its value for PCa screening and prognostication. The combination of PSA molecular forms and other biomarkers improve PCa detection substantially. Several novel blood-based biomarkers such as human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1); interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its receptor (IL-6R) may help PCa diagnosis, staging, prognostication, and monitoring. Panels of biomarkers that capture the biologic potential of PCa are in the process of being validated for PCa prognostication. CONCLUSIONS PSA is a strong prognostic marker for long-term risk of clinically relevant cancer. However, there is a need for novel biomarkers that aid clinical decision making about biopsy and initial treatment. There is no doubt that progress will continue based on the integrated collaboration of researchers, clinicians and biomedical firms. PMID:21604943

  7. Suprabasin as a novel tumor endothelial cell marker.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad T; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Ohga, Noritaka; Akiyama, Kosuke; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have reported that stromal cells contribute to tumor progression. We previously demonstrated that tumor endothelial cells (TEC) characteristics were different from those of normal endothelial cells (NEC). Furthermore, we performed gene profile analysis in TEC and NEC, revealing that suprabasin (SBSN) was upregulated in TEC compared with NEC. However, its role in TEC is still unknown. Here we showed that SBSN expression was higher in isolated human and mouse TEC than in NEC. SBSN knockdown inhibited the migration and tube formation ability of TEC. We also showed that the AKT pathway was a downstream factor of SBSN. These findings suggest that SBSN is involved in the angiogenic potential of TEC and may be a novel TEC marker. PMID:25283635

  8. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H.; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  9. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  10. The serrated neoplasia pathway of colorectal tumors: Identification of MUC5AC hypomethylation as an early marker of polyps with malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Florence; Mariette, Christophe; Vincent, Audrey; Wacrenier, Agnès; Maunoury, Vincent; Leclerc, Julie; Coppin, Lucie; Crépin, Michel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Buisine, Marie-Pierre

    2016-03-15

    The serrated neoplasia pathway accounts for 20-30% of colorectal cancers (CRC), which are characterized by extensive methylation (CpG island methylation phenotype, CIMP), frequent BRAF mutation and high microsatellite instability (MSI). We recently identified MUC5AC mucin gene hypomethylation as a specific marker of MSI CRC. The early identification of preneoplastic lesions among serrated polyps is currently challenging. Here, we performed a detailed pathological and molecular analysis of a large series of colorectal serrated polyps and evaluated the usefulness of mucin genes MUC2 and MUC5AC to differentiate serrated polyps and to identify lesions with malignant potential. A series of 330 colorectal polyps including 218 serrated polyps [42 goblet cell-rich hyperplastic polyps (GCHP), 68 microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (MVHP), 100 sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and eight traditional serrated adenoma (TSA)] and 112 conventional adenomas was analyzed for BRAF/KRAS mutations, MSI, CIMP, MLH1 and MGMT methylation, and MUC2 and MUC5AC expression and methylation. We show that MUC5AC hypomethylation is an early event in the serrated neoplasia pathway, and specifically detects MVHP and SSA, arguing for a filiation between MVHP, SSA and CIMP-H/MSI CRC, whereas GCHP and TSA arise from a distinct pathway. Moreover, MUC5AC hypomethylation specifically identified serrated lesions with BRAF mutation, CIMP-H or MSI, suggesting that it may be useful to identify serrated neoplasia pathway-related precursor lesions. Our data suggest that MVHP should be recognized among HP and require particular attention. PMID:26476272

  11. Potential markers of preeclampsia – a review

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Simon; Rusterholz, Corinne; Zanetti-Dällenbach, Rosanna; Tercanli, Sevgi; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Hahn, Sinuhe; Lapaire, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal/neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The early identification of patients with an increased risk for preeclampsia is therefore one of the most important goals in obstetrics. The availability of highly sensitive and specific physiologic and biochemical markers would allow not only the detection of patients at risk but also permit a close surveillance, an exact diagnosis, timely intervention (e.g. lung maturation), as well as simplified recruitment for future studies looking at therapeutic medications and additional prospective markers. Today, several markers may offer the potential to be used, most likely in a combinatory analysis, as predictors or diagnostic tools. We present here the current knowledge on the biology of preeclampsia and review several biochemical markers which may be used to monitor preeclampsia in a future, that, we hope, is not to distant from today. PMID:19602262

  12. Somatostatin receptors as markers for endocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reubi, J.C.

    1987-06-19

    Endocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are relatively rare neoplasias that secrete large amounts of peptide hormones such as insulin, glucagon, gastrin, or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These substances are usually responsible for the distinct clinical features observed in patients with such tumors. Although most are relatively slow growing tumors, they may lead in early stages to dramatic symptoms such as hypoglycemia, gastric ulcerations, or watery diarrhea. Unfortunately they are often difficult to localize precisely at that stage. Somatostatin, a tetradecapeptide that inhibits peptide hormone release in various sites such as the pituitary, the pancreas, and the gastrointestinal tract, has been shown recently to have beneficial effects when given chronically in the form of a stable non-degradable octapeptide analogue (SMS 201-995) in such gastrointestinal endocrine tumors. This essay demonstrates with autoradiographic techniques the very high density of somatostatin receptors in one case of human gastrinoma. A hematoxylineosin-stained histologic section reveals a well-defined, 2-mm-long tumor surrounded by normal tissue. After incubation of the section with an iodinated somatostatin analogue (/sup 125/I-(Leu, D-Trp, Tyr)-somatostatin-28), the distribution of somatostatin receptors was visualized on tritium-sensitive films after a one-week exposure of the section in x-ray cassettes.

  13. Comparison of tumor markers using different detection devices

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Tu, Shaohua; Liu, Chong; Yang, Qi; Zhu, Min; Shen, Jiangfan

    2015-01-01

    Background With the development of proteomics, tumor markers have attracted increasing attention for the early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. As biochip technology and nanotechnology continues to grow, rapid and highly sensitive joint detection of multi-tumor markers has become possible. Methods Eighty-six patients with lung cancer and 42 healthy controls were recruited for this study. Based on analysis of the detection results, we plotted four standard tumor marker graphs, and compared the results of the highly sensitive nanogold probe and protein chip detection with the results of electrochemiluminescence immunoassay and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) detection used in the clinic. We then analyzed the relationship between the detection results and our clinical data. Results Four plotted standard protein graphs all had stages with sound linear relationships. It was found in a correlation analysis of the detection results that overall the two methods showed consistency. Conclusion We developed a detection method for ultra-trace protein that can detect four tumor markers, namely carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin-19 fragments, neuron-specific enolase, and DKK1 in a highly sensitive way within 1.5 hours by magnifying the signal of nanogold deposition based on protein chips and nanogold probes. By comparing the results from the different detection devices, we have developed an experimental basis for detection of tumor markers in the clinic. PMID:26056472

  14. Tumor track seeding: A new complication of fiducial marker insertion

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zeal; Retrouvey, Michele; Vingan, Harlan; Williams, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Candidates for tumor ablation using CyberKnife® require fiducial placement in or near the target tumor to achieve precision. Placing these reference points may lead to complications including pneumothorax and/or hemorrhage. We report a new complication: the appearance of metastatic foci along the track of the fiducial marker. Since the marker was inserted by traversing the original primary tumor, we hypothesize that malignant cells were seeded along the track. In light of this new complication, current techniques for the insertion of fiducial markers should consider a peripheral approach when possible to avoid tracking of malignant cells. PMID:27186243

  15. Standardization of tumor markers - priorities identified through external quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Tumor markers are often heterogeneous substances that may be present in elevated concentrations in the serum of cancer patients. Typically measured by immunoassay, they contribute to clinical management, particularly in screening, case-finding, prognostic assessment, and post-treatment monitoring. Data both from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes and clinical studies demonstrate significant variation in tumor marker results obtained for the same specimen using different methods. Between-method between-laboratory coefficients of variation (CV) reported by EQA schemes generally reflect the complexity of the measurand, ranging from <5% for the structurally relatively simple α-fetoprotein (AFP) to >25% for the complex mucinous cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Improving the standardization of tumor marker measurements is particularly important for three reasons. The primary use of tumor markers is in monitoring cancer patients over long periods of time. Clinical interpretation of trends may consequently be affected if results are obtained in different laboratories using different methods or if a laboratory has to change method. Differences in results may have major implications for adoption of area-wide decision cut-offs and make implementation of these difficult. Method-related differences also make it difficult to compare clinical studies. Improving comparability of tumor marker results requires broad international agreement about which molecular forms of the measurand have clinical utility, identifying and adopting pure molecular forms as calibrants, and defining antibody specificities for their optimal detection. These aims have been achieved to varying extents for the most frequently measured serum tumor markers as described in this paper. PMID:27542005

  16. Acute brucellosis with typical hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis accompanying elevated tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiuyun; Li, Yuhang; Zeng, Lijun; Yu, Nong; Song, Shiping; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jiankui; Wang, Jun; Hu, Liangding; Chen, Shuiping

    2014-10-01

    We reported a typical brucellosis, which was diagnosed as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Although some tumor markers (CEA, CYFRA21-1, NSE, CA19-9) in the patient's serum were elevated, carcinomas were excluded by a variety of inspections including bone marrow aspirations, ultrasound examinations, and whole-body PET-CT scans. It was concluded that serum tumor markers are considered medically necessary as a screening test for brucellosis with HLH, however, detailed inspections were needed to make a final diagnosis. Moreover, combination of epidemiology investigations and laboratory inspections were helpful to determine the etiology of HLH and initiate the corresponding treatments. PMID:25305773

  17. Tumor markers of bladder cancer: the schistosomal bladder tumors versus non-schistosomal bladder tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Hafidh, Rand R; Kadhim, Haider S; Abubakar, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying molecular pathways and clinicopathological criteria in schistosomal bladder tumor (SBT) versus non-schistosomal bladder tumor (NSBT). Methods This study explored the role of p53, p16, bcl-2, ki-67, c-myc, Rb and EGFR, by using Immunohistochemistry assay, in 45 SBT and 39 NSBT patients in comparison with 16 schistosomal chronic cystitis (SC), 28 non-schistosomal chronic cystitis (NSC), and 20 normal control (CTL) subjects. The studied markers in SBT and NSBT were correlated with different clinicopathological criteria namely, tumor histopathology, grading, invasiveness, stage, and presentation of the disease. Results SBT was associated with high grade invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) while NSBT was associated with lower grade less invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The expression of p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and EGFR was higher in SBT than in NSBT while Rb was higher in NSBT than in SBT. However, p16 and ki-67 were not different between SBT and NSBT. The profile of molecular markers in SC was similar to NSC except for EGFR which was higher in SC than in NSC. Both SC and NSC showed higher level of p53, bcl-2, ki-67, and EGFR than in CTL group while p16, Rb, and c-myc were not different. p53 was associated with high grade SCC in both SBT and NSBT. Bcl-2 was associated with high grade invasive tumors in SBT and NSBT. P16 was associated with low grade, late stage, and recurrent SBT and high grade, invasive, late stage, and recurrent NSBT. Rb was associated with SCC in SBT, invasive tumors in NSBT, and late stage and recurrent presentation in both SBT and NSBT. C-myc was associated with high grade, invasive, and late stage SBT and SCC, high grade, invasive, and late stage NSBT. EGFR was associated with invasive SCC in SBT and invasive, high grade, and late stage TCC in NSBT. ki-67 was associated with invasive SBT and high grade late stage NSBT. Conclusion SBT and NSBT showed distinct

  18. ReCAP: Serum Tumor Marker Use in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jason D.; Vasan, Sowmya; Neugut, Alfred I.; Tergas, Ana; Hu, Jim C.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: The objective of this study is to evaluate the frequency of tumor marker use in patients with advanced solid tumors. SUMMARY ANSWER: Over a 1-year period, the mean number of any individual test per patient was seven tests, and the maximum number was 35 tests; the mean number of total tests per patient was 12 tests, and the maximum number was 70 tests. In a 1-year time frame, 16.3% of patients had more than 12 individual tests, and 34.3% had more than one individual test in a 1-month span. METHODS: For each patient with a diagnosis of advanced solid tumor who had outpatient visits between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, at Columbia University Medical Center, we recorded the dates of the following tumor marker tests: α-fetoprotein, CA-125, CA 15-3, CA 19-9, CA 27-29, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). BIAS, CONFOUNDING FACTOR(S), DRAWBACKS: This was a 1-year evaluation of tumor marker use at a single institution. As a result, our findings may be skewed by the practice patterns of a few individual providers. Our cancer center is an urban academic tertiary care center; as a result, our experience may not be applicable to the general population. REAL-LIFE IMPLICATIONS: We found a high rate of serum tumor marker testing overuse in patients with advanced solid tumors. There is currently a lack of evidence supporting the effectiveness of frequent tumor marker testing, and additional studies are needed to inform practice. Interventions to reduce overuse could help reduce the financial burden of cancer care. Future research should define the minimal frequency of testing. In the meantime, efforts should be made to limit use of tumor marker testing in patients with advanced solid tumors. FIG 2. Percentage of patients (N = 928) with solid tumors who had excessive tumor marker testing in 1 month (> one test in 1 month). (*) Maximum number of tests over 1-month period. AFP, α-fetoprotein; CEA, carcinoembryonic antigen. PMID:26374862

  19. Tumor markers used in monitoring the tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    BURZ, CLAUDIA; AZIZ, BEN YOUSSEF MOHAMED; BĂLĂCESCU, LOREDANA; LELUŢIU, LUMINIŢA; BUIGA, RAREŞ; SAMASCA, GABRIEL; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; LISENCU, COSMIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) correlated with some tissue molecules as predictive markers for recurrence in colon cancer. Methods A total of 30 patients diagnosed with colon cancer stage II or III who underwent optimal surgery were enrolled in study. Tumor markers CEA and CA 19-9 were determined before surgery. Tumor samples were prepared using tissue microarray kit (TMA) then stained for different cellular markers (Ki 67, HER2, BCL2, CD56, CD4, CD8) and analyzed using Inforatio programme for quantitative determination. All patients received standard adjuvant treatment, which consisted of eight cycles chemotherapy type XELOX. The patients were followed up for 3 years. Results Upon 3 years follow-up, 67% of patients developed tumor relapse, the most common site of metastasis being the liver. No correlations were observed between either serum or tissue tumor markers and the risk of tumor relapse. Conclusion Over 50% of patients with colon cancer who had optimal treatment developed metastasis. No statistically significant predictive value for investigated molecules was found. Future studies are needed to confirm the use of molecular markers in monitoring patients with colorectal cancer PMID:27547057

  20. Tumor-specific diagnostic marker for transmissible facial tumors of Tasmanian devils: immunohistochemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Tovar, C; Obendorf, D; Murchison, E P; Papenfuss, A T; Kreiss, A; Woods, G M

    2011-11-01

    Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is a transmissible neoplasm that is threatening the survival of the Tasmanian devil. Genetic analyses have indicated that the disease is a peripheral nerve sheath neoplasm of Schwann cell origin. DFTD cells express genes characteristic of myelinating Schwann cells, and periaxin, a Schwann cell protein, has been proposed as a marker for the disease. Diagnosis of DFTD is currently based on histopathology, cytogenetics, and clinical appearance of the disease in affected animals. As devils are susceptible to a variety of neoplastic processes, a specific diagnostic test is required to differentiate DFTD from cancers of similar morphological appearance. This study presents a thorough examination of the expression of a set of Schwann cell and other neural crest markers in DFTD tumors and normal devil tissues. Samples from 20 primary DFTD tumors and 10 DFTD metastases were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for the expression of periaxin, S100 protein, peripheral myelin protein 22, nerve growth factor receptor, nestin, neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and myelin basic protein. Of these, periaxin was confirmed as the most sensitive and specific marker, labeling the majority of DFTD cells in 100% of primary DFTD tumors and DFTD metastases. In normal tissues, periaxin showed specificity for Schwann cells in peripheral nerve bundles. This marker was then evaluated in cultured devil Schwann cells, DFTD cell lines, and xenografted DFTD tumors. Periaxin expression was maintained in all these models, validating its utility as a diagnostic marker for the disease. PMID:21383118

  1. Classic tumor markers in gastric cancer. Current standards and limitations.

    PubMed

    Căinap, Călin; Nagy, Viorica; Gherman, Alexandra; Cetean, Sanziana; Laszlo, Istvan; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Căinap, Simona

    2015-01-01

    The progress made in the last few years made available a large amount of information that needs to be integrated and ordered by oncologists. Tumor markers are one of the pieces that physicians need to fit into the bigger puzzle. This article will detail the most frequent etiologies for the surges in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer-related antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4), cancer-related antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) serum levels and their indications. Although tumor markers are an invaluable asset to medical practice, their role in screening, diagnosis and oncologic treatment remains poorly standardized. Ongoing or future clinical trials will shed light on pending problems. PMID:26528057

  2. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  3. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26475217

  4. Tumor Vascular Permeability to a Nanoprobe Correlates to Tumor-Specific Expression Levels of Angiogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Chan, Leslie; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; McNeeley, Kathleen; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 is the major mediator of the mitogenic, angiogenic, and vascular hyperpermeability effects of VEGF on breast tumors. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 is associated with the degree of pathomorphosis of the tumor tissue and unfavorable prognosis. In this study, we demonstrate that non-invasive quantification of the degree of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe correlates with the VEGF and its receptor levels and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an imaging nanoprobe and a methodology to detect the intratumoral deposition of a 100 nm-scale nanoprobe using mammography allowing measurement of the tumor vascular permeability in a rat MAT B III breast tumor model. The tumor vascular permeability varied widely among the animals. Notably, the VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 gene expression of the tumors as measured by qRT-PCR displayed a strong correlation to the imaging-based measurements of vascular permeability to the 100 nm-scale nanoprobe. This is in good agreement with the fact that tumors with high angiogenic activity are expected to have more permeable blood vessels resulting in high intratumoral deposition of a nanoscale agent. In addition, we show that higher intratumoral deposition of the nanoprobe as imaged with mammography correlated to a faster tumor growth rate. This data suggest that vascular permeability scales to the tumor growth and that tumor vascular permeability can be a measure of underlying VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 expression in individual tumors. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that quantitative imaging of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe represents a form of a surrogate, functional biomarker of underlying molecular markers of angiogenesis. PMID:19513111

  5. Identification of novel tumor markers in hepatitis C virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maria W; Yue, Zhaoxia N; Geiss, Gary K; Sadovnikova, Natalya Y; Carter, Victoria S; Boix, Loreto; Lazaro, Catherine A; Rosenberg, Gary B; Bumgarner, Roger E; Fausto, Nelson; Bruix, Jordi; Katze, Michael G

    2003-02-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common primary cancer associated frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis, and to identify potential HCC markers, we performed cDNA microarray analysis on surgical liver samples from 20 HCV-infected patients. RNA from individual tumors was compared with RNA isolated from adjacent nontumor tissue that was cirrhotic in all of the cases. Gene expression changes related to cirrhosis were filtered out using experiments in which pooled RNA from HCV-infected cirrhotic liver without tumors was compared with pooled RNA from normal liver. Expression of approximately 13,600 genes was analyzed using the advanced analysis tools of the Rosetta Resolver System. This analysis revealed a set of 50 potential HCC marker genes, which were up-regulated in the majority of the tumors analyzed, much more widely than common clinical markers such as cell proliferation-related genes. This HCC marker set contained several cancer-related genes, including serine/threonine kinase 15 (STK15), which has been implicated in chromosome segregation abnormalities but which has not been linked previously with liver cancer. In addition, a set of genes encoding secreted or plasma proteins was identified, including plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP) and two secreted phospholipases A2 (PLA2G13 and PLA2G7). These genes may provide potential HCC serological markers because of their strong up-regulation in more than half of the tumors analyzed. Thus, high throughput methods coupled with high-order statistical analyses may result in the development of new diagnostic tools for liver malignancies. PMID:12591738

  6. Evaluation of ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker for tumor growth rate in malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Westin, T; Edström, S; Lundholm, K; Gustafsson, B

    1991-10-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of polyamines. Polyamines regulate DNA synthesis by a mechanism that is not fully understood. High levels of polyamines and ODC activity are associated with rapid cell growth, particularly in tumor tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether ODC activity as a marker for rapid alterations in tumor growth could be used to investigate whether nutritional support in cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Weight-losing head and neck cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice (MCG 101, C57/BL) were studied during different feeding regimens. The ODC activity in tumor tissue was investigated in relation to the following variables: (1) histopathologic differentiation; (2) DNA content; and (3) bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation into DNA. After the animals were starved for 24 hours, a significant reduction of tumor growth was demonstrated in the experimental tumor along with a reduction of ODC activity, an accumulation of cells in the G0G1 phase, and a reduction of cells incorporating BrdUrd into DNA. Refeeding after 24 hours generated a response by all variables. Tumor biopsy specimens from patients with head and neck cancer malignancies demonstrated aneuploidy in the cells of 70% of the patients. High ODC activity in tumor tissue was demonstrated mainly among poorly differentiated tumors, and ODC activity was correlated with the compartment size of aneuploidic cells in the tumor. High ODC activity indicated a poor short-term survival (1 year). It was concluded that experimental tumor growth is highly dependent on host feeding. However, there was no evidence supporting the claim that nutritional support to cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Determination of ODC activity may be used to monitor rapid changes in DNA synthesis and may have prognostic significance for survival. PMID:1951878

  7. Diagnostic Value of Multiple Tumor Markers for Patients with Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhenli; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xueyuan; Xu, Zhiwei; Yu, Qiuyan; Li, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background Various studies assessing the diagnostic value of serum tumor markers in patients with esophageal cancer remain controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively summarize the potential diagnostic value of 5 serum tumour markers in esophageal cancer. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), through February 28, 2013, without language restriction. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy). The positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and symmetric summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves. Results Of 4391 studies initially identified, 44 eligible studies including five tumor markers met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis, while meta-analysis could not be conducted for 12 other tumor markers. Approximately 79.55% (35/44) of the included studies were of relatively high quality (QUADAS score≥7). The summary estimates of the positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for diagnosing EC were as follows: CEA, 5.94/0.76/9.26; Cyfra21-1, 12.110.59/22.27; p53 antibody, 6.71/0.75/9.60; SCC-Ag, 7.66/0.68/12.41; and VEGF-C, 0.74/0.37/8.12. The estimated summary receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the performance of all five tumor markers was reasonable. Conclusions The current evidence suggests that CEA, Cyfra21-1, p53, SCC-Ag and VEGF-C have a potential diagnostic value for esophageal carcinoma. PMID:25693076

  8. A new tumor marker: CA125 for ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Konishi, I.; Fujii, S.; Mori, T.

    1985-05-01

    To evaluate CA125 as a tumor marker for ovarian carcinomas, CA125 concentrations were measured by the simultaneous immunoradiometric assay. The binding of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody to the bead-bound antigen was greatly influenced by many factors, such as the incubation time, pH, IgG concentrations of samples, the sequence of addition of the tracer and samples and so on. By applying the forward two-step assay, diminished binding was observed than in the simultaneous assay, probably due to the relatively low affinity of the antibody. This simultaneous immunoradiometric assay resulted in the ''prozone'' or ''hook'' effect at high CA125 samples and proper dilution was necessary to determine the accurate CA125 values. All 72 normal control subjects had low concentrations of under 35 U/ml. Elevated serum CA125 was observed in 43% (9/21) cases with malignant ovarian tumors, depending on the stage and the histopathological findings. All 4 serous cystadenocarcinomas and 2 of 3 endometrioid carcinomas were positive and the measurement of serum CA125 was useful in the sequential monitoring of these cases. In contrast, 51 benign gynecological diseases, none had elevated serum CA125 except one with follicular cyst. Among 75 cases with non-gynecological benign and malignant diseases, only 1 of 12 gastric carcinomas and 2 of 13 pancreatic carcinomas had elevated CA125 levels. In summary, CA125 is a promising and relatively specific marker for ovarian carcinomas.

  9. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  10. CRX Is a Diagnostic Marker of Retinal and Pineal Lineage Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Maire, Cecile L.; Idbaih, Ahmed; Geffers, Lars; Correll, Mick; Holton, Kristina; Quackenbush, John; Ligon, Keith L.

    2009-01-01

    Background CRX is a homeobox transcription factor whose expression and function is critical to maintain retinal and pineal lineage cells and their progenitors. To determine the biologic and diagnostic potential of CRX in human tumors of the retina and pineal, we examined its expression in multiple settings. Methodology/Principal Findings Using situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we show that Crx RNA and protein expression are exquisitely lineage restricted to retinal and pineal cells during normal mouse and human development. Gene expression profiling analysis of a wide range of human cancers and cancer cell lines also supports that CRX RNA is highly lineage restricted in cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 retinoblastomas and 13 pineal parenchymal tumors demonstrated strong expression of CRX in over 95% of these tumors. Importantly, CRX was not detected in the majority of tumors considered in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumors (n = 78). The notable exception was medulloblastoma, 40% of which exhibited CRX expression in a heterogeneous pattern readily distinguished from that seen in retino-pineal tumors. Conclusions/Significance These findings describe new potential roles for CRX in human cancers and highlight the general utility of lineage restricted transcription factors in cancer biology. They also identify CRX as a sensitive and specific clinical marker and a potential lineage dependent therapeutic target in retinoblastoma and pineoblastoma. PMID:19936203

  11. Chemokines as markers for parasite-induced inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Trakatelli, C; Frydas, S; Hatzistilianou, M; Papadopoulos, E; Simeonidou, I; Founta, A; Paludi, D; Petrarca, C; Castellani, M L; Papaioannou, N; Salini, V; Conti, P; Kempuraj, D; Vecchiet, J

    2005-01-01

    Chemokines are a group of small secreted proteins (8-10 kDa) produced and released by a wide variety of cell types. They were originally described as mediators of leukocyte recruitment, which is essential in acute and chronic inflammation. They also play a critical role in many pathophysiological processes such as allergic responses, infections and autoimmune diseases, tumor growth and hematopoietic development. This review introduces the three supergene families of chemokines (CXC, CC and C) with emphasis on their important role in different states in humans and in animal models with parasitic diseases. The concentration of transcription and translation of the cytokines and chemokines in the parasitic diseases may be an important marker for evaluation of the inflammatory state. PMID:16398400

  12. Electrochemical immunosensors for the simultaneous detection of two tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael S

    2005-03-01

    The microfabrication of electrochemical immunosensors for the simultaneous detection of two protein analytes is described. The sensors consisted of two iridium oxide electrodes (1-mm diameter) patterned on a glass substrate. Capture antibodies were immobilized on the porous iridium oxide electrodes by covalent attachment using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde. The spatial separation of the electrodes (2.5 mm) enabled simultaneous electrochemical immunoassays to be conducted without cross-talk between the electrodes. Proteins were measured using electrochemical ELISA, and detection was achieved by electrochemically oxidizing alkaline phosphatase-generated hydroquinone. Sensors for the simultaneous detection of goat IgG and mouse IgG, and for the tumor markers CEA and AFP, were developed. The sensors had detection limits of 1, 2, 1.2, and 1 ng/mL for goat IgG, mouse IgG, CEA, and AFP, respectively. PMID:15732936

  13. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search. PMID:27416153

  14. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  15. Stability of Markers Used for Real-Time Tumor Tracking After Percutaneous Intrapulmonary Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the stability of markers used for real-time tumor tracking after percutaneous intrapulmonary placement. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with 44 lesions, 111 markers, and {>=}2 repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were studied. The tumor on the repeat CT scans was registered with the tumor on the planning CT scan. Next, the three-dimensional marker coordinates were determined on the planning CT scan and repeat CT scans. Marker stability was analyzed by the displacement of the markers and the displacement of the center of mass (COM) of the marker configurations. In addition, we assessed the reliability of using the intermarker distance as a check for displacements in the COM of the marker configurations. Results: The median marker displacement was 1.3 mm (range, 0.1-53.6). The marker displacement was >5 mm in 12% of the markers and >10 mm in 5% of the markers. The causes of marker displacement >5 mm included marker migration (2 of 13) and target volume changes (5 of 13). Nonsynchronous tumor and marker movement during breathing might have been responsible for the displacements >5 mm in the other 6 of 13 markers. The median displacement in the COM of the marker configurations was 1.0 mm (range, 0.1-23.3). Displacements in the COM of the marker configurations of {>=}2.0 mm were detected by changes in the intermarker distance of >1.5 mm in 96% of the treatment fractions. Conclusion: The median marker displacement was small (1.3 mm). Nevertheless, displacements >5 mm occurred in 12% of the markers. Therefore, we recommend the implantation of multiple markers because multiple markers will enable a quick and reliable check of marker displacement by determining the change in the intermarker distance. A displacement in the COM of the marker configuration of {>=}2.0 mm was almost always detected (96%) by a change in the distance between the markers of >1.5 mm. This enabled the displaced marker to be disabled, such that tumor localization

  16. A SPR biosensor based on signal amplification using antibody-QD conjugates for quantitative determination of multiple tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Jue; Fu, Weiling; Yao, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumor markers is very important in early cancer diagnosis; however, tumor markers are usually present at very low concentrations, especially in the early stages of tumor development. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used to detect biomolecular interactions; it has inherent advantages of being high-throughput, real-time, and label-free technique. However, its sensitivity needs essential improvement for practical applications. In this study, we developed a signal amplification strategy using antibody-quantum dot (QD) conjugates for the sensitive and quantitative detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in clinical samples. The use of a dual signal amplification strategy using AuNP-antibody and antibody-QD conjugates increased the signal amplification by 50-folds. The constructed SPR biosensor showed a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL for AFP, CEA, and CYFRA 21-1. Moreover, the results obtained using this SPR biosensor were consistent with those obtained using the electrochemiluminescence method. Thus, the constructed SPR biosensor provides a highly sensitive and specific approach for the detection of tumor markers. This SPR biosensor can be expected to be readily applied for the detection of other tumor markers and can offer a potentially powerful solution for tumor screening. PMID:27615417

  17. Colorimetric multiplexed immunoassay for sequential detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Ya; Xu, Yuanyuan; Li, Genxi

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, a very simple and easily-operated colorimetric multiplexed immunoassay method for sequential detection of tumor markers has been presented. Magnetic microparticles which are conjugated with biotinylated antibodies are firstly added into the test solution. After fast magnetic collection, these complexes are separated from non-specific proteins. Through different enzymatic reactions of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD) catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase molecules which are loaded on the surfaces of gold nanoparticles, two antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha-fetoprotein can be detected even with naked eyes. The detection limit obtained from the spectrophotometric measurements is as low as 0.02 ng/mL. This proposed method also has high specificity and reproducibility, as well as excellent efficiency of 94 min for the detection of serum samples. So, this new multiplexed immunoassay method might be a promising approach for the diagnosis of cancer and some other diseases in clinical applications. PMID:19726177

  18. Improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal tumors by fuzzy logic-based tumor marker profiles including the tumor M2-PK.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joachim; Bitterlich, Norman; Schulze, Guntram

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers by using fuzzy logic modeling in combination with a tumor marker panel (CEA, CA72-4, CA19-9) including Tumor M2-PK. In this prospective study histologically confirmed colorectal (n=247), esophageal (n=86) and gastric cancer (n=122) patients were investigated and compared to control (n=53) persons without any malignant diseases. Tumor M2-PK was measured in plasma with an ELISA (ScheBoBiotech, Germany); all other markers were measured in sera (Roche, Germany). At 95% specificity, tumor detection was possible by the best single marker in colorectal cancer patients in 48% (Tumor M2-PK), in gastric cancers in 61% (CA72-4) and in esophageal cancers in 56% (Tumor M2-PK). A fuzzy logic rule-based system employing a tumor marker panel increased sensitivity significantly in colorectal cancers (p<0. 001) to 63% (Tumor M2-PK and CEA), in gastric cancers (p<0.001) to 81% (Tumor M2-PK and CA 72-4) and in esophageal cancers (p<0.02) to 74% (Tumor M2-PK and CA72-4). Adding a third marker further improved the sensitivity only marginally. Fuzzy logic analysis has proven to be more powerful than measurement of single markers alone or combinations using multiple logistic regression analysis of the markers. Therefore, with the fuzzy logic method and a tumor marker panel (including Tumor M2-PK), a new diagnostic tool for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers is available. PMID:16033052

  19. Procalcitonin as diagnostic marker of infection in solid tumors patients with fever.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, B; Fioroni, I; Pantano, F; Angeletti, S; Dicuonzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Santini, D; Tonini, G

    2016-01-01

    In oncologic patients fever is a non-specific clinical marker of different clinical settings. Procalcitonin (PCT) seems to be the most promising infection marker. We aimed to define the potential role of PCT as an earlier diagnostic marker in patients with fever and solid tumor. This retrospective study enrolled 431 patients. All of them performed hemoculture (HE) and basal PCT assessment (reference laboratory cut-off: ≤0.5 or >0.5 ng/dL) before starting antibiotic therapy. Gram positive (G+), negative (G-) or Fungi infection were detected. A statistically significant difference in PCT levels between patients with positive and negative HE was observed (P < 0.0001). Moreover comparing PCT values in patients with positive and negative HE, we obtain in the positive HE subpopulation an AUC of 0.7 and a cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL reached high sensitivity (61.6%) and specificity (70.1%). Using this last cut-off, instead of the normal reference value, we achieve a risk reduction to overestimate an infection status of 23.4%. We support the clinic usefulness of serum PCT dosage in febrile advanced solid tumor patients. A PCT cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL could be helpful in the management of the antibiotic therapy preventing delays of oncologic treatments. PMID:27312877

  20. Procalcitonin as diagnostic marker of infection in solid tumors patients with fever

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, B.; Fioroni, I.; Pantano, F.; Angeletti, S.; Dicuonzo, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Santini, D.; Tonini, G.

    2016-01-01

    In oncologic patients fever is a non-specific clinical marker of different clinical settings. Procalcitonin (PCT) seems to be the most promising infection marker. We aimed to define the potential role of PCT as an earlier diagnostic marker in patients with fever and solid tumor. This retrospective study enrolled 431 patients. All of them performed hemoculture (HE) and basal PCT assessment (reference laboratory cut-off: ≤0.5 or >0.5 ng/dL) before starting antibiotic therapy. Gram positive (G+), negative (G−) or Fungi infection were detected. A statistically significant difference in PCT levels between patients with positive and negative HE was observed (P < 0.0001). Moreover comparing PCT values in patients with positive and negative HE, we obtain in the positive HE subpopulation an AUC of 0.7 and a cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL reached high sensitivity (61.6%) and specificity (70.1%). Using this last cut-off, instead of the normal reference value, we achieve a risk reduction to overestimate an infection status of 23.4%. We support the clinic usefulness of serum PCT dosage in febrile advanced solid tumor patients. A PCT cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL could be helpful in the management of the antibiotic therapy preventing delays of oncologic treatments. PMID:27312877

  1. Capillary-wall collagen as a biophysical marker of nanotherapeutic permeability into the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Kojic, Milos; Milosevic, Miljan; Tanei, Tomonori; Ferrari, Mauro; Ziemys, Arturas

    2014-01-01

    The capillary wall is the chief barrier to tissue entry of therapeutic nanoparticles, thereby dictating their efficacy. Collagen fibers are an important component of capillary walls, affecting leakiness in healthy or tumor vasculature. Using a computational model along with in vivo systems, we compared how collagen structure affects the diffusion flux of a 1 nm chemotherapeutic molecule (doxorubicin [DOX]) and an 80 nm chemotherapy-loaded pegylated liposome (DOX-PLD) in tumor vasculature. We found a direct correlation between the collagen content around a tumor vessel to the permeability of that vessel permeability to DOX-PLD, indicating that collagen content may offer a biophysical marker of extravasation potential of liposomal drug formulations. Our results also suggested that while pharmacokinetics determined the delivery of DOX and DOX-PLD to the same tumor phenotype, collagen content determined the extravasation of DOX-PLD to different tumor phenotypes. Transport physics may provide a deeper view into how nanotherapeutics cross biological barriers, possibly helping explain the balance between biological and physical aspects of drug delivery. PMID:24853545

  2. Oct4 is a reliable marker of liver tumor propagating cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Wilson, George; Zhou, Gang; Hebbard, Lionel; George, Jacob; Qiao, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide and the 2nd most common cause of cancer related mortality. The poor prognosis is largely due to the difficulty in early diagnoses and eradication of stem-like cells within HCC, which are termed liver tumor propagating cells (LTPCs). These LTPCs are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis including tumor initiation, progression, and treatment failure. The greatest challenge in understanding these LTPCs is finding effective ways in isolating and characterizing these cells with current methods showing large inter-tumor variability in isolating these cells. Oct4 is a stem cell gene associated with LTPCs and has been shown to be involved in regulating a range of functions in HCC cells associated with LTPC features. In this study we determined the efficacy and reliability in utilizing Oct4 to isolate and characterize LTPCs. We have shown that Oct4 is ubiquitously expressed in all HCC tumors tested whereas other traditional LTPC markers had high intratumor variability in their expression. We then utilized a human Oct4 promoter driving an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter which showed that Oct4+ cells had all the classic features of LTPCs including increased sphere formation in vitro, tumor forming potential in immunocompromised mice, expression of stemness associated genes, and resistance to Sorafenib which is the major drug used to treat advanced HCC. Based on our findings we have identified Oct4 as a reliable marker of LTPCs and discovered a novel way to isolate and characterize LTPCs. PMID:26562475

  3. Prognostic impact of cytological fluid tumor markers in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Arthur; Hur, Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Suh, Young Joo; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Lee, Jae Seok; Shim, Hyo Sup; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-03-01

    The serum tumor markers CYFRA 21-1, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) are useful in diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Cytologic tumor markers obtained during needle aspiration biopsies (NAB) of lung lesions are useful for NSCLC diagnosis. This study investigated the incremental prognostic value of cytologic tumor markers compared to serum tumor markers. This prospective study included 253 patients diagnosed with NSCLC by NAB with cytologic tumor marker analysis. Levels of cytologic CYFRA 21-1, CEA, SCCA, and their serum counterparts were followed up for survival analysis. Optimal cutoff values for each tumor marker were obtained for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) analyses. All patients were followed up for a median of 22.8 months. Using cutoff values of 0.44 ng/ml for C-SCCA, 2.0 ng/ml for S-SCCA, and 3.3 ng/ml for S-CYFRA, a multivariate analysis revealed that high S-SCCA (hazard ratio, HR, 1.84) and high C-SCCA (HR, 1.63) were independent predictive factors of OS. The 3-year overall survival rate was 55 vs. 80 % for high and low C-SCCA, respectively. Cytologic tumor marker level detection is easily obtainable and provides prognostic information for NSCLC. Cytologic tumor markers provide comparable prognostic information relative to serum tumor markers, with C-SCCA acting as a strong prognostic factor of overall survival and PFS. PMID:26432331

  4. Use of the tumor repressor DEDD as a prognostic marker of cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Hua, Fang; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    DEDD, a member of a family of death effector domain-containing proteins, plays crucial roles in mediating apoptosis, regulating cell cycle, and inhibiting cell mitosis. Our recent work demonstrates that DEDD is a novel tumor repressor, which impedes metastasis by reversing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in breast and colon cancers. DEDD expression therefore may represent a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of cancer metastasis. To reveal the anti-metastatic roles of DEDD in these cancer cells, a number of experiments, including immunohistochemistry, the establishment of stably overexpressing or silencing cancer cells, chemoinvasion assay, soft agar assay, protein degradation, and protein-protein interaction were used in our in vitro and in vivo studies. This chapter focuses on the details of these experiments to provide references for the researchers to investigate the function of a gene in the regulation of tumor metastasis. PMID:24839027

  5. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  6. Expression of cancer stem cell markers and their correlation with pathogenesis in vascular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jiaojiao; Huang, Bing; Liu, Ruixue; Ju, Xinxin; Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Shen, Yaoyuan; Li, Feng; Pang, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vascular tumor, which belongs to a kind of complicated lesion in soft tissue tumor, is derived from mesenchymal tissue. Although many studies have been focused on the pathogenesis of vascular tumors in human, the specific mechanism of the vascular tumors was currently unclear. Previous studies have reported an association of cancer stem cells with the development of tumor in many solid tumors. Thus the purpose of this study was to explore whether different expression level of cancer stem cell markers including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1 in vascular tumor may help to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of vascular tumor. In present study, tissues of 9 cases of hemangioma, 22 cases of hemangiosarcoma, 3 cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma, and 5 cases of hemangioendothelioma were immunostained for CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1. Of the 39 vascular tumor cases included in the current study, CD29, CD133 and nestin were positive in most vascular tumor cases. Although CD44 and ALDH1 were observed in vascular tumor cases, the percentage of cells staining for the two markers was less than 2% in all cases of vascular tumor. Capillary hemangiomas exhibited significantly higher expression rate of CD29 and nestin compared with malignant vascular tumors and hemangioendotheliomas (P<0.05, Fisher’s exact test), while CD44, CD133 and ALDH1 exhibited no statistically significant difference between these two groups. Pearson correlation analysis exhibited that CD29 expression and nestin expression in vascular tumor were no statistically significant relationship (C=0.288, P=0.063>0.05). Our findings confirmed that the five cancer stem cells markers, including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1, exhibited different expression levels in vascular tumors and demonstrated that immonhistochemical analysis for cancer stem cells markers may provide useful information for studying the pathogenesis of vascular tumors. PMID:26722452

  7. The discovery of putative urine markers for the specific detection of prostate tumor by integrative mining of public genomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Liang; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yongliang

    2011-01-01

    Urine has emerged as an attractive biofluid for the noninvasive detection of prostate cancer (PCa). There is a strong imperative to discover candidate urinary markers for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of PCa. The rising flood of various omics profiles presents immense opportunities for the identification of prospective biomarkers. Here we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive candidate urine markers for prostate tumor by mining cancer genomic profiles from public databases. Prostate, bladder and kidney are three major tissues from which cellular matters could be released into urine. To identify urinary markers specific for PCa, upregulated entities that might be shed in exosomes of bladder cancer and kidney cancer are first excluded. Through the ontology-based filtering and further assessment, a reduced list of 19 entities encoding urinary proteins was derived as putative PCa markers. Among them, we have found 10 entities closely associated with the process of tumor cell growth and development by pathway enrichment analysis. Further, using the 10 entities as seeds, we have constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetwork and suggested a few urine markers as preferred prognostic markers to monitor the invasion and progression of PCa. Our approach is amenable to discover and prioritize potential markers present in a variety of body fluids for a spectrum of human diseases. PMID:22194848

  8. Dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay for ultra-sensitive detection of tumor marker protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Jiehua; Fan, Qiongxuan; Tao, Yaqin; Li, Genxi

    2016-06-14

    A novel dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay that utilizes manganese dioxide nanosheet-modified gold nanoparticles (MnO2-GNPs) as an activatable nanoprobe has been developed to detect tumor markers down to femtomolar levels. PMID:27247980

  9. Analysis of marker-defined HNSCC subpopulations reveals a dynamic regulation of tumor initiating properties.

    PubMed

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49f(high)/ALDH1A1(high)/H3K4/K27me3(low) subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49f(high)/H3K27me3(low) subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49f(low)/ALDH(low), non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f- cells can "reprogram" and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a "moving target" and their eradication might

  10. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  11. A recurrent marker chromosome involving chromosome 1 in two mammary tumors of the dog.

    PubMed

    Bartnitzke, S; Motzko, H; Caselitz, J; Kornberg, M; Bullerdiek, J; Schloot, W

    1992-01-01

    An apparently identical marker chromosome resulting from a chromosome 1. translocation was found in the mammary carcinomas of two bitches. Although these karyotypic aberrations were the sole clonal aberrations detected, it was not possible to unambiguously identify the material translocated to the chromosome 1 in either animal. Our observations, however, represent the first report of a recurring marker chromosome in mammary tumors of the dog and suggest that these tumors may become an interesting model for human breast cancer. PMID:1319309

  12. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:22483848

  13. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored. PMID:26907957

  14. SALL4 and SF-1 are sensitive and specific markers for distinguishing granulosa cell tumors from yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuting; Wei, Shi; Ziober, Amy; Yao, Yuan; Bing, Zhanyong

    2013-04-01

    Granulosa cell tumors are classified as juvenile and adult types. They may be misinterpreted as a yolk sac tumor when they exhibit a "reticular" growth pattern and contain prominent mitotic activity. In this study, the authors performed immunohistochemical stains for SALL4 and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) on 27 cases of yolk sac tumors and 24 granulosa cell tumors. Nuclear stains for both antibodies were considered as positive and the intensity of staining was graded as negative, weak, moderate, and strong. All the yolk sac tumors were positive for SALL4 (100%) with moderate to strong grade staining and negative for SF-1 (100%). In contrast, all the granulosa cell tumors were positive for SF-1 (85% moderate to strong grade staining and 15% weak staining) and negative for SALL4 (100%). The difference was significant (P < .01, Student's t test). This result indicates that these 2 markers could be used to distinguish these 2 tumors in a difficult situation. PMID:22832114

  15. Predictive Role of Serum Tumor Markers in Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    MA, Jingjing; XIA, Dan; HU, Jing; FU, Rui; XU, Lijun; ZHANG, Ying; ZHANG, Mengying; LI, Benhe; YANG, Jianghua; WEN, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is complicated and time-consuming currently. There was association of PTB with serum tumor markers. In this study we aimed to evaluate the predictive role of serum CA125, CA199 and CEA as diagnostic tools for PTB. Methods: This study was designed as a case-control study with 565 subjects who visited the Yijishan Hospital from Jun to Dec in 2014.This case-control study matched as for age and sex with 113 cases and 452 controls. Serum CA125, CA199 and CEA levels were detected by electrochemiluminescence instrument. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value on PTB. Results: Serum levels of CA125, CA199 and CEA in PTB patients were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.001). There was no significantly different of three tumor markers between initial treatment group and retreatment group. The logistic regression analysis showed that CA125 was an impact factor to PTB. The ROC analysis revealed that AUC of CA125 was 0.966 (95%CI: 0.951–0.981), the sensitivity, specificity in serum and cut-off were 95.6%, 85.0% and 10.30 U/ml, respectively. Conclusion: The serum CA125 has potential good diagnostic performance for PTB. PMID:27252912

  16. Effect of cacao liquor extract on tumor marker enzymes during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, I; Koh, B K; Asmah, R

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cacao liquor extract (CLE) on tumor marker enzymes--alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities--in plasma and/or liver of hepatocarcinogenic rats, which were induced with diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 150-330 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6-8): normal control group (N), normal group + CLE (NE), cancer group (C), and cancer group + CLE (CE). Analysis of variance showed significant differences (P<.05) in the specific activities of ALP, GGT, and GST between the C and N groups. However, GR activity for the C group was not significantly different compared with the N group. In the CE group, the specific activities of ALP, GGT, GST, and GR were significantly lower (P<.05) compared with the C group. The findings showed that CLE could lower the activity of tumor marker enzymes of rats during hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on the results obtained, polyphenol compounds present in the cacao liquor, extracted by using ethanol, have the potential in decreasing the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:15117546

  17. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramires, Félix José Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Albuquerque, Cícero Piva; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% were asymptomatic and prior embolization was often observed (19.8%). The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and histological examination. Results Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. Myxoma was the most common (72.6%), followed by fibromas (6.9%), thrombi (6.4%) and sarcomas (6.4%). Ranging from 0.6cm to 15cm (mean 4.6 ± 2.5cm) 37 (19.8%) patients had prior embolization, stroke 10.2%, coronary 4.8%, peripheral 4.3% 5.4% of hospital death, with a predominance of malignant tumors (40% p < 0.0001). The histological type was a predictor of mortality (rhabdomyomas and sarcomas p = 0.002) and embolic event (sarcoma, lipoma and fibroelastoma p = 0.006), but not recurrence. Tumor size, atrial fibrillation, cavity and valve impairment were not associated with the embolic event. During follow-up (mean 80±63 months), there were 2 deaths (1.1%) and two recurrences 1 and 11 years after the operation, to the same cavity. Conclusion Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. The histological type was predictor of death and preoperative embolic event, while the implantation site carries no relation with mortality or to embolic event. PMID:25029470

  18. Insertion and fixation of fiducial markers for setup and tracking of lung tumors in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Mikado; Yamazaki, Koichi . E-mail: kyamazak@med.hokudai.ac.jp; Shirato, Hiroki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Shimizu, Shinichi; Harada, Toshiyuki; Ogura, Shigeaki; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Internal 1.5-mm fiducial markers were used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer. The fixation rate of the markers using the bronchial insertion technique, reliability of the setup using markers around the target volume, dislocation of the markers after real-time tumor-tracking RT, and long-term toxicity of marker insertion were investigated. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 and April 2004, 154 gold markers were inserted into 57 patients with peripheral lung cancer. The distances between the implanted markers in 198 measurements in 71 setups in 11 patients were measured using two sets of orthogonal diagnostic X-ray images of the real-time tumor-tracking RT system. The distance between the markers and the chest wall was also measured in a transaxial CT image on 186 occasions in 48 patients during treatment planning and during follow-up. The median treatment time was 6 days (range, 4-14 days). Results: In 115 (75%) of the 154 inserted markers, the gold marker was detected throughout the treatment period. In 122 markers detected at CT planning, 115 (94%) were detected until the end of treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was within {+-}2 mm in 95% and {+-}1 mm in 80% during treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was >2 mm in at least one direction in 9% of the setups for which reexamination with a CT scan was indicated. The fixation rate in the left upper lobe was lower than in the other lobes. A statistically significant relationship was found between a shorter distance between the markers and the chest wall and the fixation rate, suggesting that the markers in the smaller bronchial lumens fixed better than those in the larger lumens. A learning curve among the endoscopists was suggested in the fixation rate. The distance between the markers and the chest wall changed significantly within a median of 44 days (range, 16-181 days) after treatment. Conclusion

  19. Novel Molecular Tumor Cell Markers in Regional Lymph Nodes and Blood Samples from Patients Undergoing Surgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Singh, Gurpartap; Solberg, Steinar; Jørgensen, Lars; Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Smaaland, Rune; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent evidence suggests that microscopic lymph node metastases and circulating tumor cells may have clinical importance in lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify new molecular markers for tumor cells in regional lymph nodes (LNs) and peripheral blood (PB) from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Candidate markers were selected based on digital transcript profiling and previous literature. KRT19, CEACAM5, EPCAM, DSG3, SFTPA, SFTPC and SFTPB mRNA levels were initially validated by real-time reverse transcription PCR-based quantification in 16 NSCLC tumors and 22 LNs and 12 PB samples from individuals without known cancer. Five of the candidate markers were selected for secondary validation by quantification in parallel tumor biopsies, regional LNs and PB samples from 55 patients undergoing surgery for NSCLC. LN and PB marker status were compared to clinicopathological patient data. Results All selected markers except DSG3 were present at high levels in the primary tumors and at very low or non-detectable levels in normal LNs and PB in the first round of validation, indicating a potential for detecting tumor cells in NSCLC patients. The expression profiles of KRT19, CEACAM5, DSG3, SFTPA and SFTPC mRNA were confirmed in the larger group during the secondary validation. Using the highest normal LN level of each marker as threshold, 39 (71%) of the 55 patients had elevated levels of at least one marker in regional LNs. Similarly, 26 (47%) patients had elevated levels of at least one marker in PB. A significantly higher number of patients with adenocarcinomas had positive LN status for these markers, compared with other histological types (P = 0.004). Conclusions Several promising molecular tumor cell markers in regional LNs and PB were identified, including the new SFTPA and SFTPC mRNAs. Clinical follow-up in a larger cohort is needed to elucidate their prognostic value. PMID:23671585

  20. Surgically resected human tumors reveal the biological significance of the gastric cancer stem cell markers CD44 and CD26

    PubMed Central

    NISHIKAWA, SHIMPEI; KONNO, MASAMITSU; HAMABE, ATSUSHI; HASEGAWA, SHINICHIRO; KANO, YOSHIHIRO; FUKUSUMI, TAKAHITO; SATOH, TAROH; TAKIGUCHI, SHUJI; MORI, MASAKI; DOKI, YUICHIRO; ISHII, HIDESHI

    2015-01-01

    Cancer tissue is maintained by relatively small populations of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are involved in chemotherapy resistance, recurrence and metastasis. As tumor tissues are comprised of various cells, studies of human clinical samples are important for the characterization of CSCs. In the present study, an expression profiling study was performed in which an anti-cell surface marker antibody-based array platform, a flow cytometry-based cell separation technique and a tumorigenicity analysis in immunodeficient animals were utilized. These approaches revealed that the markers cluster of differentiation (CD)44 and CD26 facilitated the fractionation of surgically resected human gastric cancer (GC) cells into the following subset populations with distinct tumorigenic potentials: Highly tumorigenic CD26+CD44+ cells (6/6 mice formed tumors), moderately tumorigenic CD26+CD44− cells (5/6 mice formed tumors), and weakly or non-tumorigenic CD26−CD44− cells (2/6 mice formed tumors). Furthermore, exposure to 5-fluorouracil significantly increased the proportion of CD26+ cells in vitro. The present study demonstrated that the combined expression of CD26 and CD44 presents a potential marker of human GC stem cells. PMID:26137071

  1. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  2. Chromogranin A - unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Gut, Paweł; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  3. Treatment Outcome and Prognostic Molecular Markers of Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Kyu-Won; Han, Jung Woo; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo; Kim, Jun Won; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify prognostic factors and define the optimal management of patients with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNETs), we investigated treatment outcomes and explored the prognostic value of specific molecular markers. Methods A total of 47 consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed sPNETs between May 1985 and June 2012 were included. Immunohistochemical analysis of LIN28, OLIG2, and Rad51 expression was performed and correlated with clinical outcome. Results With a median follow-up of 70 months, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 55.5% and 40%, respectively, for all patients. Age, surgical extent, and radiotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Patients who received initially planned multimodal treatment without interruption (i.e., radiotherapy and surgery (≥subtotal resection), with or without chemotherapy) showed significantly higher 5-year OS (71.2%) and PFS (63.1%). In 29 patients with available tumor specimens, tumors with high expression of either LIN28 or OLIG2 or elevated level of Rad51 were significantly associated with poorer prognosis. Conclusions We found that multimodal treatment improved outcomes for sPNET patients, especially when radiotherapy and ≥subtotal resection were part of the treatment regimen. Furthermore, we confirmed the prognostic significance of LIN28 and OLIG2 and revealed the potential role of Rad51 in sPNETs. PMID:27074032

  4. Percutaneous fiducial marker placement prior to stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors: an initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Murai, Taro; Nishimura, Junichi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with a gold flexible linear fiducial marker and to evaluate the safety and technical and clinical efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy using this marker for malignant liver tumors. Between July 2012 and February 2015, 18 patients underwent percutaneous fiducial marker placement before stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. We evaluated the technical and clinical success rates of the procedure and the associated complications. Technical success was defined as successful placement of the fiducial marker at the target site, and clinical success was defined as the completion of stereotactic body radiotherapy without the marker dropping out of position. All 18 fiducial markers were placed successfully, so the technical success rate was 100% (18/18). All 18 patients were able to undergo stereotactic body radiotherapy without marker migration. Thus, the clinical success rate was 100% (18/18). Slight pneumothorax occurred as a minor complication in one case. No major complications such as coil migration or bleeding were observed. The examined percutaneous fiducial marker was safely placed in the liver and appeared to be useful for stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. PMID:26826200

  5. Clinical Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Nan; Li, Xue; Liu, Yunde

    2013-01-01

    The detection of serum tumor markers is valuable for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers are frequently used for the management of cancer patients. However, single markers are less efficient but marker combinations increase the cost, which is troublesome for clinics. To find an optimal serum marker combination panel that benefits the patients and the medical management system as well, four routine lung cancer serum markers (SCCA, NSE, CEA, and CYFRA21-1) were evaluated individually and in combination. Meanwhile, the costs and effects of these markers in clinical practice in China were assessed by cost-effectiveness analysis. As expected, combinations of these tumor markers improved their sensitivity for lung cancer and different combination panels had their own usefulness. NSE + CEA + CYFRA21-1 was the optimal combination panel with highest Youden's index (0.64), higher sensitivity (75.76%), and specificity (88.57%), which can aid the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. Nevertheless, the most cost-effective combination was SCCA + CEA, which can be used to screen the high-risk group. PMID:24167812

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer Diagnosis and Monitoring: An Appraisal of Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Galletti, Giuseppe; Portella, Luigi; Tagawa, Scott T.; Kirby, Brian J.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a viable solution to the lack of tumor tissue availability for patients with a variety of solid tumors, including prostate cancer. Different approaches have been used to capture this tumor cell population and several of these techniques have been used to assess the potential role of CTCs as a biological marker to predict treatment efficacy and clinical outcome. CTCs are now considered a strong tool to understand the molecular characteristics of prostate cancer, and to be used and analyzed as a ‘liquid biopsy’ in the attempt to grasp the biological portrait of the disease in the individual patient. PMID:24809501

  7. Salivary markers of kidney function - Potentials and limitations.

    PubMed

    Celec, Peter; Tóthová, Ľubomíra; Šebeková, Katarína; Podracká, Ľudmila; Boor, Peter

    2016-01-30

    Saliva can be collected non-invasively, repeatedly and without trained personnel. It is a promising diagnostic body fluid with clinical use in endocrinology and dentistry. For decades, it is known that saliva contains also urea, creatinine and other markers of renal function. Clinical studies have shown that the salivary concentrations of these markers could be useful for the assessment of kidney function without the need of blood collection. This article summarizes the clinical and experimental data on the use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in nephrology and points out the advantages, pitfalls, technical requirements and future perspective for the use of saliva as a novel potential diagnostic biofluid. PMID:26633856

  8. General Information about Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyan; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Chen, Xuejuan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Jilin

    2016-01-01

    We present an aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor for label-free detection of nucleolin. The sensor cantilevers in the microcantilever array were functionalized with nucleolin aptamer (AS1411) while the reference cantilevers were modified by 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) to eliminate environmental disturbances. The interaction between nucleolin and AS1411 induced surface stress changes, resulting in a differential deflection between sensor and reference cantilevers. The amplitude of differential cantilever deflection had a good linear relationship with the nucleolin concentration ranging from 10 nM to 250 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The detection limit was about 1.0 nM, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The aptamer-based microcantilever sensor demonstrated good selectivity and was facile, rapid, and reagentless. Our results show the potential for the application of microcantilever biosensor system as a powerful tool to detect tumor markers with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26695322

  10. The Tumor-Associated Marker, PVRL4 (Nectin-4), is the Epithelial Receptor for Morbilliviruses

    PubMed Central

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  11. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  12. Optimal surface marker locations for tumor motion estimation in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Using fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to predict the tumor location is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm that automatically identifies a sparse set of locations on the patient’s surface with the optimal prediction power for the tumor motion. In our algorithm, it is assumed that there is a linear relationship between the surface marker motion and the tumor motion. The sparse selection of markers on the external surface and the linear relationship between the marker motion and the internal tumor motion are represented by a prediction matrix. Such a matrix is determined by solving an optimization problem, where the objective function contains a sparsity term that penalizes the number of markers chosen on the patient’s surface. Bregman iteration is used to solve the proposed optimization problem. The performance of our algorithm has been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with ten phases are used for the study. On a reference phase, a grid of points are casted on the patient’s surfaces (except for the patient’s back) and propagated to other phases via deformable image registration of the corresponding CT images. Tumor locations at each phase are also manually delineated. We use nine out of ten phases of the 4DCT images to identify a small group of surface markers that are mostly correlated with the motion of the tumor and find the prediction matrix at the same time. The tenth phase is then used to test the accuracy of the prediction. It is found that on average six to seven surface markers are necessary to predict tumor locations with a 3D error of about 1 mm. It is also found that the selected marker locations lie closely in those areas where surface point motion has a large amplitude and a high correlation with the tumor motion. Our method can automatically select sparse locations on the patient’s external surface and

  13. A Quantitative Perspective on Surface Marker Selection for the Isolation of Functional Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Cahall, Calvin F; Lilly, Jacob L; Hirschowitz, Edward A; Berron, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has gone into developing fluid biopsies of patient peripheral blood for the monitoring of metastatic cancers. One common approach is to isolate and analyze tumor cells in the peripheral blood. Widespread clinical implementation of this approach has been hindered by the current choice of targeting epithelial markers known to be highly variable in primary tumor sites. Here, we review current antigen-based tumor cell isolation strategies and offer biological context for commonly studied cancer surface markers. Expression levels of the most common markers are quantitated for three breast cancer and two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lineage models. These levels are contrasted with that present on healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for comparison to expected background levels in a fluid biopsy setting. A key feature of this work is establishing a metric of markers per square micrometer. This describes an average marker density on the cell membrane surface, which is a critical metric for emerging isolation strategies. These results serve to extend expression of key tumor markers in a sensitive and dynamic manner beyond traditional positive/negative immunohistochemical staining to guide future fluid biopsy targeting strategies. PMID:26309407

  14. A Quantitative Perspective on Surface Marker Selection for the Isolation of Functional Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cahall, Calvin F; Lilly, Jacob L; Hirschowitz, Edward A; Berron, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has gone into developing fluid biopsies of patient peripheral blood for the monitoring of metastatic cancers. One common approach is to isolate and analyze tumor cells in the peripheral blood. Widespread clinical implementation of this approach has been hindered by the current choice of targeting epithelial markers known to be highly variable in primary tumor sites. Here, we review current antigen-based tumor cell isolation strategies and offer biological context for commonly studied cancer surface markers. Expression levels of the most common markers are quantitated for three breast cancer and two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lineage models. These levels are contrasted with that present on healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for comparison to expected background levels in a fluid biopsy setting. A key feature of this work is establishing a metric of markers per square micrometer. This describes an average marker density on the cell membrane surface, which is a critical metric for emerging isolation strategies. These results serve to extend expression of key tumor markers in a sensitive and dynamic manner beyond traditional positive/negative immunohistochemical staining to guide future fluid biopsy targeting strategies. PMID:26309407

  15. Sox10 – A marker for not only Schwannian and melanocytic neoplasms but also myoepithelial cell tumors of soft tissue. A systematic analysis of 5134 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; McCue, Peter A.; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Biernat, Wojciech; Czapiewski, Piotr; Kopczynski, Janusz; Thompson, Lester D.; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zengfeng; Fetsch, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Sox10 transcription factor is expressed in Schwannian and melanocytic lineages and is important in their development and can be used as a marker for corresponding tumors. Additionally, it has been reported in subsets of myoepithelial/basal cell epithelial neoplasms, but its expression remains incompletely characterized. In this study, we examined Sox10 express-ion in 5134 human neoplasms spanning a wide spectrum of neuroectodermal, mesenchymal, lymphoid, and epithelial tumors. A new rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone EP268) and Leica Bond Max automation were used on multitumor block libraries containing 30–70 cases per slide. Sox10 was consistently expressed in benign Schwann cell tumors of soft tissue and the GI-tract and metastatic melanoma, and was variably present in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. In contrast, Sox10 was absent in many potential mimics of nerve sheath tumors such as cellular neurothekeoma, meningioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, PEComa, and a variety of fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors. Sox10 was virtually absent in mesenchymal tumors but occasionally seen in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In epithelial tumors of soft tissue, Sox10 was expressed only in myoepitheliomas, although often absent in malignant variants. Carcinomas, other than basal cell type breast cancers, were only rarely positive but included rare squamous carcinomas of head and neck and pulmonary small cell carcinomas. Furthermore, Sox10 was often focally expressed in embryonal carcinoma reflecting a primitive Sox10-positive phenotype or neuroectodermal differentiation. Expression of Sox10 in entrapped non-neoplastic Schwann cells or melanocytes in various neoplasms has to be considered in diagnosing Sox10-positive tumors. The Sox10 antibody belongs in a modern immunohistochemical panel for the diagnosis of soft tissue and epithelial tumors. PMID:25724000

  16. Clinicopathological prognostic and theranostic markers in pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Raverot, Gérald

    2016-09-01

    More than just the confirmation of an endocrinological diagnosis, the pathological analysis of pituitary endocrine tumors may contribute to bring crucial information in prognosis as well as useful insights in therapeutic management. Taken individually, parameters such as histopathological subtyping, Ki-67-labelling or P53 immunoexpression cannot accurately predict the outcome of patients affected by such tumors. Conversely, "mixed" classification integrating invasion assessment by imaging to histopathological diagnosis may give critical prognostic information and help the clinician in identifying those aggressive tumors that will require a careful follow-up and a more vigorous postoperative treatment. Analysis of theranostic factors such as O6-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase or somatostatin receptor expression may guide the choice of postoperative treatment. PMID:26940458

  17. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Ta; Wang, Po-Jen; Liou, Nia-Jhen; Lin, Pei-Shan; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC) is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC. PMID:26571024

  18. Changes in expression of differentiation markers between normal ovarian cells and derived tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Van Niekerk, C. C.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Hanselaar, A. G.; Aldeweireldt, J.; Poels, L. G.

    1993-01-01

    The marker profile of 18 samples of normal human ovarian tissues and 138 samples of their derived tumors was established using 51 monoclonal antibodies directed against intermediate filaments, ovarian carcinoma-specific antigens, general tumor-associated antigens and MHC-I/II antigens. Our data show that vimentin and keratins 7, 8, 18, and 19 were found in both epithelial and some nonepithelial ovarian tumors. Several tumor samples contained additional keratins 4, 10, 13, and 14, as well as desmin. BW 495/36 and to a lesser extent HMFG-2 were usually found in all ovarian tumors that contained simple epithelial keratins, except the absence of HMFG-2 in gonadal tumors as well as in dysgerminomas. In contrast to the keratin antibodies, these two panepithelial antibodies were negative in normal mesothelial cells and granulosa cells of the ovarian follicles. In general, the marker TAG-72 appeared useful for its discrimination between positively stained mucinous adenomas, the ovarian carcinomas as well as germ cell tumors, and the negatively stained gonadal tumors, serous adenomas, and cystomas. OV632 appeared useful in the distinction between negatively stained serous adenomas and positively stained serous carcinomas. In contrast, the monoclonal antibodies OC 125, OV-TL 3, OV-TL 16, and MOv 18 can be considered as pan-ovarian carcinoma markers, however without the discriminative capability as seen for OV632. These ovarian carcinoma-associated antigens were hardly found expressed in gonadal and germ cell tumors, except in the group of endodermal sinus tumors. HLA-I was found to be expressed in almost all nucleated cells, although loss of HLA-I expression was seen in areas of tumor cells. HLA-DR was negative in normal ovarian tissue, but heterogeneous expression was noticed in most of the epithelial tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7678716

  19. S100P is a useful marker for differentiation of ovarian mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Y; Ito, M; Nakashima, M; Mihara, Y; Naruke, Y; Kurohama, H; Yatsunami, N; Yasuhi, I

    2015-01-01

    The S100P protein stimulates cell proliferation and survival, thereby contributing to tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate S100P expression in the three subtypes of mucinous cystic tumors, cystadenomas, borderline tumors, and adenocarcinomas. The authors examined nuclear S100P expression in 60 mucinous ovarian tumor specimens, including 24 specimens of mucinous cystadenoma, 15 of borderline tumors, and 21 of adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry revealed S100P expression followed one of three patterns: (1) Expressed in most nuclei of mucinous epithelial cells, (2) sporadic (spotted or patchy) expression, or (3) absent or rarely expressed in the nuclei of mucinous epithelial cells. Most adenomas showed the first expression pattern, and borderline tumors often showed a patchy expression pattern. Adenocarcinomas generally demonstrated absence of S100P expression. These data suggest that S100P is a useful histological marker to differentiate between benign, borderline, and malignant mucinous tumors of the ovary. PMID:26050349

  20. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

    PubMed

    Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers. PMID:26820563

  1. Immuno-PET imaging of tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8).

    PubMed

    Kuo, Frank; Histed, Stephanie; Xu, Biying; Bhadrasetty, Veerendra; Szajek, Lawrence P; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen; Wu, Haitao; Lane, Kelly; Coble, Vincent; Vasalatiy, Olga; Griffiths, Gary L; Paik, Chang H; Elbuluk, Osama; Szot, Christopher; Chaudhary, Amit; St Croix, Brad; Choyke, Peter; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2014-11-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is a cell surface receptor that is highly expressed in a variety of human tumors and promotes tumor angiogenesis and cell growth. Antibodies targeting TEM8 block tumor angiogenesis in a manner distinct from the VEGF receptor pathway. Development of a TEM8 imaging agent could aid in patient selection for specific antiangiogenic therapies and for response monitoring. In these studies, L2, a therapeutic anti-TEM8 monoclonal IgG antibody (L2mAb), was labeled with (89)Zr and evaluated in vitro and in vivo in TEM8 expressing cells and mouse xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1) as a potential TEM8 immuno-PET imaging agent. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb was synthesized using a desferioxamine-L2mAb conjugate (df-L2mAb); (125)I-L2mAb was labeled directly. In vitro binding studies were performed using human derived cell lines with high, moderate, and low/undetectable TEM8 expression. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb in vitro autoradiography studies and CD31 IHC staining were performed with cryosections from human tumor xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1, MKN-45, U87-MG, T-47D, and A-431). Confirmatory TEM8 Western blots were performed with the same tumor types and cells. (89)Zr-df-L2mAb biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in NCI-H460 and DLD-1 xenografts in nude mice. (125)I-L2mAb and (89)Zr-df-L2mAb exhibited specific and high affinity binding to TEM8 that was consistent with TEM8 expression levels. In NCI-H460 and DLD-1 mouse xenografts nontarget tissue uptake of (89)Zr-df-L2mAb was similar; the liver and spleen exhibited the highest uptake at all time points. (89)Zr-L2mAb was highly retained in NCI-H460 tumors with <10% losses from day 1 to day 3 with the highest tumor to muscle ratios (T:M) occurring at day 3. DLD-1 tumors exhibited similar pharmacokinetics, but tumor uptake and T:M ratios were reduced ∼2-fold in comparison to NCI-H460 at all time points. NCI-H460 and DLD-1 tumors were easily visualized in PET imaging studies despite low in vitro TEM8 expression

  2. Immuno-PET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is a cell surface receptor that is highly expressed in a variety of human tumors and promotes tumor angiogenesis and cell growth. Antibodies targeting TEM8 block tumor angiogenesis in a manner distinct from the VEGF receptor pathway. Development of a TEM8 imaging agent could aid in patient selection for specific antiangiogenic therapies and for response monitoring. In these studies, L2, a therapeutic anti-TEM8 monoclonal IgG antibody (L2mAb), was labeled with 89Zr and evaluated in vitro and in vivo in TEM8 expressing cells and mouse xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1) as a potential TEM8 immuno-PET imaging agent. 89Zr-df–L2mAb was synthesized using a desferioxamine–L2mAb conjugate (df–L2mAb); 125I-L2mAb was labeled directly. In vitro binding studies were performed using human derived cell lines with high, moderate, and low/undetectable TEM8 expression. 89Zr-df–L2mAb in vitro autoradiography studies and CD31 IHC staining were performed with cryosections from human tumor xenografts (NCI-H460, DLD-1, MKN-45, U87-MG, T-47D, and A-431). Confirmatory TEM8 Western blots were performed with the same tumor types and cells. 89Zr-df–L2mAb biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in NCI-H460 and DLD-1 xenografts in nude mice. 125I-L2mAb and 89Zr-df–L2mAb exhibited specific and high affinity binding to TEM8 that was consistent with TEM8 expression levels. In NCI-H460 and DLD-1 mouse xenografts nontarget tissue uptake of 89Zr-df–L2mAb was similar; the liver and spleen exhibited the highest uptake at all time points. 89Zr-L2mAb was highly retained in NCI-H460 tumors with <10% losses from day 1 to day 3 with the highest tumor to muscle ratios (T:M) occurring at day 3. DLD-1 tumors exhibited similar pharmacokinetics, but tumor uptake and T:M ratios were reduced ∼2-fold in comparison to NCI-H460 at all time points. NCI-H460 and DLD-1 tumors were easily visualized in PET imaging studies despite low in vitro TEM8 expression in

  3. Novel multi-sample scheme for inferring phylogenetic markers from whole genome tumor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Ayshwarya; Shackney, Stanley; Schwartz, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Computational cancer phylogenetics seeks to enumerate the temporal sequences of aberrations in tumor evolution, thereby delineating the evolution of possible tumor progression pathways, molecular subtypes and mechanisms of action. We previously developed a pipeline for constructing phylogenies describing evolution between major recurring cell types computationally inferred from whole-genome tumor profiles. The accuracy and detail of the phylogenies, however, depends on the identification of accurate, high-resolution molecular markers of progression, i.e., reproducible regions of aberration that robustly differentiate different subtypes and stages of progression. Here we present a novel hidden Markov model (HMM) scheme for the problem of inferring such phylogenetically significant markers through joint segmentation and calling of multi-sample tumor data. Our method classifies sets of genome-wide DNA copy number measurements into a partitioning of samples into normal (diploid) or amplified at each probe. It differs from other similar HMM methods in its design specifically for the needs of tumor phylogenetics, by seeking to identify robust markers of progression conserved across a set of copy number profiles. We show an analysis of our method in comparison to other methods on both synthetic and real tumor data, which confirms its effectiveness for tumor phylogeny inference and suggests avenues for future advances. PMID:24407301

  4. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kengo Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru Iwata, Hiromitsu Nishikawa, Hiroko Ogino, Hiroyuki Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  5. Tumor cell differentiation by marker free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Brantsch, Marco; Biller, Philipp; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud

    2011-02-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman spectra, images and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and after activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy. Slight differences are also observed in Raman spectra of these cell lines, in particular at wave numbers around 970 cm-1. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by the method of multivariate data analysis, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  6. Radioimmunoassay of tumor markers in serum of patients with renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoni-Voutsas, M.; Glaubitt, D.; Wagner, W.; Lichtenberg, T.

    1984-01-01

    Having noted an increased serum level of TPA and CEA in patients with renal carcinoma the authors extended these studies by using a larger number of tumor markers. In 15 patients (11 men and 4 women after menopause) aged 33 to 74 years who had renal carcinoma, among them 3 with tumor metastases, the serum concentration of TPA, CA 12-5, CEA, AFP, ferritin, prolactin, ..beta..-HCG, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Monoclonal antibodies were used in the determination of serum CA 12-5 and CEA. In all patients surgical treatment, irradiation, or cytostatic therapy had not been performed. In serum the normal range was exceeded by TPA in 7 patients, CA 12-5 in 3, CEA and AFP in one each, ferritin in 12, prolactin in 2, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in 10 patients. In one man serum prolactin was reduced. Serum ..beta..-HCG was normal in all patients. According to these results serum ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin are of great value as tumor markers in patients with renal carcinoma. In several patients the increase of serum ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin may be ascribed partly to deterioration of renal function. As no consistent patterns of tumor markers in serum were observed it is recommended to determine several tumor markers and not only one of them during the follow-up of patients. Radioimmunoassays for measuring the serum level of tumor markers, especially ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, may considerably assist in the management of patients with renal carcinoma by providing early information about tumor recurrence or metastases.

  7. TRANSGELIN: A POTENTIALLY USEFUL DIAGNOSTIC MARKER DIFFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED IN TRIPLE-NEGATIVE AND NON-TRIPLE NEGATIVE BREAST CANCERS

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepthi; Kimler, Bruce F; Nothnick, Warren B; Davis, Marilyn K; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative (TN) (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR] and Her2 negative) are highly aggressive, rapidly growing, hormone unresponsive tumors diagnosed at later stage that affect younger women with shorter overall survival. The majority of TN tumors are of the basal type. For the remainder identification of target markers for effective treatment strategies remains a challenge. Transgelin (TGLN) is a 22 kDa actin-binding protein of the calponin family. It is one of the earliest markers of smooth muscle differentiation. TGLN has been shown to have important biologic activities including regulating muscle fiber contractility, cell migration and tumor suppression. We examined TGLN expression in the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. TGLN expression was examined as a function of tumor size, grade, histologic type, lymph node (LN) status, patients’ age and overall survival, ER, PR, Her-2, Ki-67 in 101 tumors that included 35 luminal A, 28 luminal B, 4 Her2, and 34 TN types. TGLN positivity (defined as 2+ or 3+) was associated with more aggressive tumors (10% of grade I/II tumors were TGLN+ vs. 53% of grade III tumors, P<0.001), high Ki-67 count and low ER and PR expression (p<0.001), but not with tumor size, age or LN metastasis. TN (n=34) tumors were 7.7 times more likely to be TGLN-positive than non-TN (n=67) tumors (77% vs. 10%, respectively, P<0.001). TGLN may be an excellent diagnostic marker of TN tumors and could be useful in stratification of patients. TGLN may also prove a potential target for future treatment strategies. PMID:25841305

  8. Musashi1 as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yang; Yu, Huina; Linnoila, R Ilona; Li, Laodong; Li, Dangyu; Mo, Biwen; Okano, Hideyuki; Penalva, Luiz O F; Glazer, Robert I

    2013-05-01

    Lung cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide with a 5-year survival rate of less than 20%. One approach to improving survival is the identification of biomarkers to detect early stage disease. In this study, we investigated the potential of the stem cell and progenitor cell marker, Musashi1 (Msi1), as a diagnostic marker and potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. Functional studies in A549 bronchioalveolar carcinoma and NCI-H520 squamous cell carcinoma cells revealed that Msi1 was enriched in spheroid cultures of tumor cells and in the CD133+ cell population. Downregulation of Msi1 by lentivirus-mediated expression of an Msi1 shRNA reduced spheroid colony proliferation. Growth inhibition was associated with reduced nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibition of the processing of intracellular Notch. In primary lung cancer, Msi1 protein expression was elevated in 86% of 202 tissue microarray specimens, and Msi1 mRNA was increased in 80% of 118 bronchoscopic biopsies, including metastatic disease, but was rarely detected in adjacent normal lung tissue and in non-malignant diseased tissue. Msi1 was expressed in a diffuse pattern in most tumor subtypes, except in squamous cell carcinomas, where it appeared in a focal pattern in 50% of specimens. Thus, Msi1 is a sensitive and specific diagnostic marker for all lung cancer subtypes. PMID:23715514

  9. Musashi1 as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, R. Ilona; Li, Laodong; Li, Dangyu; Mo, Biwen; Okano, Hideyuki; Penalva, Luiz O. F.; Glazer, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide with a 5-year survival rate of less than 20%. One approach to improving survival is the identification of biomarkers to detect early stage disease. In this study, we investigated the potential of the stem cell and progenitor cell marker, Musashi1 (Msi1), as a diagnostic marker and potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. Functional studies in A549 bronchioalveolar carcinoma and NCI-H520 squamous cell carcinoma cells revealed that Msi1 was enriched in spheroid cultures of tumor cells and in the CD133+ cell population. Downregulation of Msi1 by lentivirus-mediated expression of an Msi1 shRNA reduced spheroid colony proliferation. Growth inhibition was associated with reduced nuclear localization of β-catenin and inhibition of the processing of intracellular Notch. In primary lung cancer, Msi1 protein expression was elevated in 86% of 202 tissue microarray specimens, and Msi1 mRNA was increased in 80% of 118 bronchoscopic biopsies, including metastatic disease, but was rarely detected in adjacent normal lung tissue and in non-malignant diseased tissue. Msi1 was expressed in a diffuse pattern in most tumor subtypes, except in squamous cell carcinomas, where it appeared in a focal pattern in 50% of specimens. Thus, Msi1 is a sensitive and specific diagnostic marker for all lung cancer subtypes. PMID:23715514

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: molecular markers and genetic subtypes.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christine M; Corless, Christopher L; Heinrich, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Mutation-activated signaling from the KIT and PDGFRA kinases has been successfully targeted in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), with subtle differences between the mutations serving to refine prognosis and more precisely tailor therapy. There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of GISTs lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA, so called wild-type GISTs, further aiding in management decisions. This article provides an overview of all the known molecular subtypes of GIST and provides information about clinical correlates, treatment, and prognosis depending on the subtype. PMID:24093165

  11. Tumor vascular reactivity as a marker to predict tumor response to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Songhyun; Seong, Myeongsu; Jeong, Hyeryun; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers for females. To monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy of breast cancer, medical imaging systems such as X-ray mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography have been used. Currently, it can take up to 3 to 6 weeks to see the tumor response from chemotherapy by monitoring tumor volume changes. In this study, we used near infrared spectroscopy to see if we can predict breast cancer treatment efficacy earlier than tumor volume changes by monitoring tumor vascular reactivity during inhalational gas interventions. The results show the amplitude of oxy-hemoglobin changes (vascular reactivity) during hyperoxic gas inhalation is well correlated with tumor growth, and responded 1 day earlier than tumor volume changes after chemotherapy. In addition, we fitted oxyhemoglobin concentration increase during hyperoxic gas intervention using a double exponential fitting model. From these, we found the change of amplitude 1 value is well matched with tumor growth and regression. Especially, it predicts the chemotherapeutic response of breast tumor better than the amplitude of oxyhemoglobin concentration change during hyperoxic gas intervention. These results may imply that near infrared spectroscopy with respiratory challenges can be useful in early detection of tumor and also in prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy.

  12. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  13. Prognostic Value of Serum Tumor Markers in Medullary Thyroid Cancer Patients Undergoing Vandetanib Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Werner, R.A.; Schmid, J.S.; Muegge, D.O.; Lückerath, K.; Higuchi, T.; Hänscheid, H.; Grelle, I.; Reiners, C.; Herrmann, K.; Buck, A.K.; Lapa, C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as vandetanib have shown clinical effectiveness in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). During TKI treatment, fluctuations in the tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and calcitonin (CTN) are frequently observed. Their role for treatment monitoring and the decision-making process has not been fully elucidated yet. Twenty-one patients (male, 16, female, 5; mean age, 49 ± 13 years) with progressive MTC receiving vandetanib (300 mg orally per day) were considered. Tumor restaging was performed every 3 months including contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Response was assessed according to recent criteria (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, RECIST 1.1). Additionally, CEA and CTN were measured at the day of CT imaging and alterations observed in tumor markers were compared to respective imaging findings (partial response, PR; stable disease, SD; progressive disease, PD). During long-term follow-up (510 ± 350 days [range, 97–1140 days]), CTN and CEA levels initially dropped in 71.4% and 61.9% of the patients followed by fluctuations in serum marker levels. A rise in CTN ≥39.5% between 2 subsequent measurements (defined by ROC analysis) had a sensitivity of 70.6% and a specificity of 83.2% in predicting PD with an accuracy of 82.0% (area under the curve (AUC), 0.76). Oscillations in CEA levels were not predictive for PD. Whereas tumor marker fluctuations in MTC patients undergoing TKI treatment are a frequent phenomenon, a significant rise in CTN ≥40% turns out to as an early indicator of tumor progression. PMID:26559299

  14. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development. PMID:19724681

  15. 53BP1 foci as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Markova, E; Vasilyev, S; Belyaev, I

    2015-01-01

    Predicting tumor radiosensitivity has yet to be routinely integrated into radiotherapy. We analyzed the possibility to assess radiosensitivity of tumor cells based on endogenous and radiation-induced 53BP1 foci which are molecular markers of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In eleven tumor cell lines of different origin, radiosensitivity was assessed by surviving cell fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2). 53BP1 foci were measured at 4 and 12 h post-irradiation by confocal laser microscopy and dedicated software. The correlation of 53BP1 foci and their post-irradiation kinetics with SF2 was assessed using Spearman rank test. The SF2 correlated with both excess of radiation-induced 53BP1 foci per cell at 4 h after irradiation and decay in number of 53BP1 foci from 4 to 12 h post-irradiation. The fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci also correlated with SF2 of tumor cells. We conclude that the radiosensitivity of tumor cells can be predicted by kinetics of formation and decay of 53BP1 foci after irradiation. For the first time we report that the fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci can be used as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity. PMID:26278144

  16. NHERF1/EBP50 and NF2 as diagnostic markers for choroid plexus tumors.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Mobley, Bret C; Orr, Brent A; Shang, Ping; Lehman, Norman L; Zhu, Xiaoping; O'Neill, Thomas J; Rajaram, Veena; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Timmons, Charles F; Raisanen, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na/H exchanger-3 regulatory factor-1) and its associated ezrin-radixin-moesin-merlin/neurofibromin-2 (ERM-NF2) family proteins are required for epithelial morphogenesis and have been implicated in cancer progression. NHERF1 is expressed in ependymal cells and constitutes a highly sensitive diagnostic marker for ependymoma, where it labels membrane polarity structures. Since NHERF1 and ERM-NF2 proteins show polarized expression in choroid plexus (CP) cells, we tested their diagnostic utility in CP neoplasms. NHERF1 immunohistochemistry in 43 adult and pediatric tumors with papillary morphology revealed strong apical plasma membrane staining in CP papilloma (WHO grade I) and cytoplasmic expression in CP carcinoma (WHO grade III). Ezrin and moesin showed similar but less distinctive staining. NHERF1 also labeled papillary tumors of the pineal region in a microlumen and focal apical membrane pattern, suggestive of a transitional morphology between CP papilloma and ependymoma. CP tumors of all grades could be differentiated from metastatic carcinomas with papillary architecture by NF2, which showed polarized membranous staining in CP tumors. NHERF1 and NF2 immunohistochemistry showed enhanced sensitivity and specificity for CP tumors compared to commonly used markers, including cytokeratins and Kir7.1, emerging as reliable diagnostic tools for the differential diagnosis of papillary tumors of the central nervous system. PMID:27229317

  17. Transcriptional repression of cancer stem cell marker CD133 by tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Park, E K; Lee, J C; Park, J W; Bang, S Y; Yi, S A; Kim, B K; Park, J H; Kwon, S H; You, J S; Nam, S W; Cho, E J; Han, J W

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome cancer recurrence, metastasis, and resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are major contributors to the malignant transformation of cells due to their capacity for self-renewal. Although various CSC markers have been identified in several types of tumors, they are primarily used as cancer-prediction markers and for the isolation of CSC populations. CD133, one of the best-characterized CSC markers in distinct solid tumor types, was shown to be correlated with CSC tumor-initiating capacity; however, the regulation of CD133 expression and its function in cancer are poorly understood. Here, we show that CD133 expression is negatively regulated by direct binding of the p53 tumor suppressor protein to a noncanonical p53-binding sequence in the CD133 promoter. Binding of p53 recruits Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) to the CD133 promoter and subsequently suppresses CD133 expression by reducing histone H3 acetylation. Furthermore, CD133 depletion suppresses tumor cell proliferation, colony formation, and the expression of core stemness transcription factors including NANOG, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and c-MYC. Critically, the anti-proliferative effects of p53 are antagonized by rescue of CD133 expression in a p53 overexpressing cell line, indicating that the tumor suppressive activity of p53 might be mediated by CD133 suppression. Taken together, our results suggest that p53-mediated transcriptional regulation of CD133 is a key underlying mechanism for controlling the growth and tumor-initiating capacity of CSCs and provide a novel perspective on targeting CSCs for cancer therapy. PMID:26539911

  18. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, MJ; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs. PMID:23852704

  19. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  20. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  1. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bauer, Andrea S.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissuehigh/seralow-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct epithelial

  2. Chitinase-3-like-1/YKL-40 as marker of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Barbara; Burghuber, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients enabled systematic screening of secreted cytokines. Permanent CTC cultures of different patients shared secretion of chitinase-3-like-1 (CHI3L1)/YKL-40, known to be upregulated in a range of tumor entities and to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival. This protein lacks enzymatic activity and its mechanism of promoting tumor dissemination has not been resolved. Results from SCLC CTC cultures suggest CHI3L1 as marker and important effector of tumor cell dissemination in the peripheral blood. Furthermore, this protein may link chronic inflammation of the lung, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26207216

  3. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  4. Combined Scintigraphy and Tumor Marker Analysis Predicts Unfavorable Histopathology of Neuroblastic Tumors with High Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Wenter, Vera; Thornton, Henriette Ingrid; Ilhan, Harun; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Coppenrath, Eva; Schmid, Irene; Bartenstein, Peter; Pfluger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to improve the prediction of unfavorable histopathology (UH) in neuroblastic tumors through combined imaging and biochemical parameters. Methods 123I-MIBG SPECT and MRI was performed before surgical resection or biopsy in 47 consecutive pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumor. Semi-quantitative tumor-to-liver count-rate ratio (TLCRR), MRI tumor size and margins, urine catecholamine and NSE blood levels of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were recorded. Accuracy of single and combined variables for prediction of UH was tested by ROC analysis with Bonferroni correction. Results 34 of 47 patients had UH based on the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). TLCRR and serum NSE both predicted UH with moderate accuracy. Optimal cut-off for TLCRR was 2.0, resulting in 68% sensitivity and 100% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.86, p < 0.001). Optimal cut-off for NSE was 25.8 ng/ml, resulting in 74% sensitivity and 85% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.81, p = 0.001). Combination of TLCRR/NSE criteria reduced false negative findings from 11/9 to only five, with improved sensitivity and specificity of 85% (AUC-ROC 0.85, p < 0.001). Conclusion Strong 123I-MIBG uptake and high serum level of NSE were each predictive of UH. Combined analysis of both parameters improved the prediction of UH in patients with neuroblastic tumor. MRI parameters and urine catecholamine levels did not predict UH. PMID:26177109

  5. Expression of Wilms tumor gene in high risk neuroblastoma: complementary marker to tyrosine hydroxylase for detection of minimal residual disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Pauline M.; Olszewski, Marie; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Khan, Sana

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma (NB) is an enigmatic tumor that often presents with metastatic disease at diagnosis and it is this aggressive propensity which places it among the deadliest pediatric tumors despite intensive multimodal therapy including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We have previously demonstrated that Wilms tumor 1 gene (WT1) is a surrogate marker of proliferation in leukemia. To determine the potential association between WT1 and a known marker of NB, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in this high risk group of patients. Methods A total of 141 random samples from 34 patients were obtained, at diagnosis (n=27), during therapy (n=95), in clinical remission (n=13), and at the time of relapse (n=6). Quantitative RT-PCR was used for the evaluation of the level of gene expression using specific primers. Results Although similar gene expressions were demonstrated in both controls when evaluating both genes, significant difference was found at each clinical time point. Furthermore, when comparing patient samples from diagnosis to clinical remission and diagnosis to clinical relapse, individual gene expression varied. WT1 demonstrated significance (P=0.0002) and insignificance (P=0.06) whereas TH remained non-significant (P=0.2, P=0.09) respectively. Conclusions WT1 gene is indicative of cellular proliferation in NB and for this reason it can be adjuvant to TH for the detection minimal residual disease (MRD). PMID:26835379

  6. Histopathologic Consideration of Fiducial Gold Markers Inserted for Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy Against Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Mikado; Yamazaki, Koichi; Kubota, Kanako C.; Itoh, Tomoo; Onimaru, Rikiya; Cho, Yasushi; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Onodera, Yuya; Ogura, Shigeaki; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Shirato, Hiroki Nishimura, Masaharu

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Internal fiducial gold markers, safely inserted with bronchoscopy, have been used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy for lung cancer. We investigated the histopathologic findings at several points after the insertion of the gold markers. Methods and Materials: Sixteen gold markers were inserted for preoperative marking in 7 patients who subsequently underwent partial resection of tumors by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery within 7 days. Results: Fibrotic changes and hyperplasia of type 2 pneumocytes around the markers were seen 5 or 7 days after insertion, and fibrin exudation without fibrosis was detected 1 or 2 days after insertion. Conclusions: Because fibroblastic changes start approximately 5 days after gold marker insertion, real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy should be started >5 days after gold marker insertion.

  7. Detection of multiple tumor markers using ultra-long carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Beom Soo; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Buh, Gyoung-Ho; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.; Kong, Jing

    2008-03-01

    For the simultaneous detection of multiple tumor markers, we have fabricated ultra-long carbon nanotube sensors that can detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), simultaneously. Ultra-long carbon nanotubes, several millimeters long, were grown by ethanol CVD, and fabricated as FET sensors by using conventional photolithography. To functionalize each segment of a single ultra-long nanotube device with multiple-tumor markers, we first functionalize the entire device with CDI-Tween 20 linking molecules, and then immobilized CEA and PSA antibodies using the microfluidic channel. The electrical conductance from CEA-antibody functionalized and PSA-antibody functionalized segment of a ultra-long carbon nanotube device was monitored simultaneously with Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a liquid gate. We will discuss the advantages of long-nanotube device in detail.

  8. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes for the detection of tumor markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Ping; Tu, Datao; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-02-01

    Sensitive and specific biodetection of tumor markers is essential for early-stage cancer diagnosis and therapy, and will ultimately increase the patient survival rate. As a new generation of luminescent bioprobes, lanthanide (Ln3+)-doped inorganic luminescent nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest for a variety of biomedical applications due to their superior physicochemical properties. In this feature article, we provide a brief overview of the most recent advances in the development of Ln3+-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes and their promising applications for in vitro detection of tumor markers with an emphasis on the establishment of state-of-the-art assay techniques, such as heterogeneous time-resolved (TR) luminescent bioassay, dissolution-enhanced luminescent bioassay, upconversion (UC) luminescent bioassay, homogeneous TR Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and UC-FRET bioassays. Some future prospects and efforts towards this emerging field are also envisioned.

  9. Synergistic increase of oxidative stress and tumor markers in PAH-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mei-Li; Chen, Lei; Li, Yong-Fei; Xue, Xiao-Chang; Chen, Lan; Wang, Li-Na; Shah, Walayat; Kong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated oxidative stress and tumor marker levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 136 coke oven workers and in 60 control subjects, and evaluated the correlation between oxidative stress and tumor marker levels. Questionnaires on basic demographic information were also administered. Significant differences in employment time and percentages of alcohol drinkers were observed between the control and exposed groups. PAH exposure was assessed using urinary 1-hydroxy-pyrene (1-OHP) levels and was found to be significantly higher in workers than in the controls. Significant differences (P<0.001) of MDA, GST, LDH, NSE, Cyfra21-1, and of SCC and TNF-a (P<0.0001 and P<0.05, P<0.001, respectively) levels were observed among controls and coke-oven workers, except for bottom coke oven workers. Associations between age and risk of increased TNF-a, smoking and increased GST activities, and drinking with increased MDA concentrations, were marginal (P=0.055, P=0.048, P=0.057, respectively). The association between smoking with MDA (P=0.004), NSE (P=0.005), SCC (P=0.004) and TNF-a (P<0.001), and drinking with TNF-a levels was significant (P=0.012). In addition, a significant positive correlation between oxidative stress and tumor markers was found in the present study. These results suggest that a synergistic increase of oxidative stress and tumor markers induced by PAHs may play a role in toxic responses for PAHs in coke oven workers. PMID:25227798

  10. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. PMID:24777963

  11. Rapid chemiluminescent sandwich enzyme immunoassay capable of consecutively quantifying multiple tumor markers in a sample.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julie; Kim, Jennie; Rho, Tae Ho D; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Using the role of p-iodophenol in enzyme assay, enhanced 1,1'-oxalyldiimidazole chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassays (ODI-CLEIAs) were developed to consecutively quantify trace levels of triple tumor markers, such as alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a sample. Due to the high sensitivity of enhanced ODI-CLEIAs, it was possible to fix the incubation times (1) to capture a tumor marker with two antibodies, which are primary antibody immobilized on the surface of polystyrene strip-well and detection antibody-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and (2) to form resorufin with the addition of substrates (e.g., Amplex Red, H2O2) in order to quantify triple markers in human serum. Enhanced ODI-CLEIAs capable of consecutively and rapidly quantifying triple markers with the same incubation time were more sensitive than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) capable of separately and slowly quantifying them with different incubation times. In addition, accuracy, precision, and recovery of enhanced ODI CLEIAs in the presence of p-iodophenol were acceptable within statistical error range. PMID:25127571

  12. Tumor Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.

    2000-04-18

    Veterinary oncology has seen tremendous growth since the first textbook devoted to the subject in the late 1970s. Cancer is usually at the top of the list when owners ask about health concerns for their pets (and it remains the leading cause of death among dogs and cats). The volume, Veterinary Oncology Secrets, joins others in the series by presenting in question and answer format the type of information so important to veterinary students, interns and residents, general practitioners, and specialists in a number of clinical fields.

  13. Rad6 is a Potential Early Marker of Melanoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Karli; Adsule, Shreelekha; Haynes, Brittany; Kirou, Evangelia; Kato, Ikuko; Mehregan, Darius R.; Shekhar, Malathy P.V.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer in industrialized countries. Several melanoma-related biomarkers and signaling pathways have been identified; however, their relevance to melanoma development/progression or to clinical outcome remains to be established. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in various cancers including melanoma. We have previously demonstrated Rad6, an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, as an important mediator of β-catenin stability in breast cancer cells. Similar to breast cancer, β-catenin-activating mutations are rare in melanomas, and since β-catenin signaling is implicated in melanoma, we examined the relationship between β-catenin levels/activity and expression of β-catenin transcriptional targets Rad6 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M (Mitf-M) in melanoma cell models, and expression of Rad6, β-catenin, and Melan-A in nevi and cutaneous melanoma tissue specimens. Our data show that Rad6 is only weakly expressed in normal human melanocytes but is overexpressed in melanoma lines. Unlike Mitf-M, Rad6 overexpression in melanoma lines is positively associated with high molecular weight β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin transcriptional activity. Double-immunofluorescence staining of Rad6 and Melan-A in melanoma tissue microarray showed that histological diagnosis of melanoma is significantly associated with Rad6/Melan-A dual positivity in the melanoma group compared to the nevi group (P = .0029). In contrast to strong β-catenin expression in normal and tumor areas of superficial spreading malignant melanoma (SSMM), Rad6 expression is undetectable in normal areas and Rad6 expression increases coincide with increased Melan-A in the transformed regions of SSMM. These data suggest a role for Rad6 in melanoma pathogenesis and that Rad6 expression status may serve as an early marker for melanoma development. PMID:24831578

  14. Rad6 is a Potential Early Marker of Melanoma Development.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Karli; Adsule, Shreelekha; Haynes, Brittany; Kirou, Evangelia; Kato, Ikuko; Mehregan, Darius R; Shekhar, Malathy P V

    2014-05-12

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer in industrialized countries. Several melanoma-related biomarkers and signaling pathways have been identified; however, their relevance to melanoma development/progression or to clinical outcome remains to be established. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in various cancers including melanoma. We have previously demonstrated Rad6, an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, as an important mediator of β-catenin stability in breast cancer cells. Similar to breast cancer, β-catenin-activating mutations are rare in melanomas, and since β-catenin signaling is implicated in melanoma, we examined the relationship between β-catenin levels/activity and expression of β-catenin transcriptional targets Rad6 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-M (Mitf-M) in melanoma cell models, and expression of Rad6, β-catenin, and Melan-A in nevi and cutaneous melanoma tissue specimens. Our data show that Rad6 is only weakly expressed in normal human melanocytes but is overexpressed in melanoma lines. Unlike Mitf-M, Rad6 overexpression in melanoma lines is positively associated with high molecular weight β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin transcriptional activity. Double-immunofluorescence staining of Rad6 and Melan-A in melanoma tissue microarray showed that histological diagnosis of melanoma is significantly associated with Rad6/Melan-A dual positivity in the melanoma group compared to the nevi group (P=.0029). In contrast to strong β-catenin expression in normal and tumor areas of superficial spreading malignant melanoma (SSMM), Rad6 expression is undetectable in normal areas and Rad6 expression increases coincide with increased Melan-A in the transformed regions of SSMM. These data suggest a role for Rad6 in melanoma pathogenesis and that Rad6 expression status may serve as an early marker for melanoma development. PMID:24831578

  15. VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 2 (VEGFR2) AS A MARKER FOR MALIGNANT VASCULAR TUMORS AND MESOTHELIOMA – IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF 262 VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL AND 1640 NONVASCULAR TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; Rikala, Maarit-Sarlomo; Rysz, Janusz; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zeng-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is a primary responder to vascular endothelial growth factor signal, and thereby regulates endothelial migration and proliferation. This receptor is expressed in endothelial cells and some vascular tumors, but many reports also detail its expression in carcinomas and lymphomas. VEGFR2 is a potential cell type marker, and data on VEGFR2 expression may also have therapeutic significance in view of recent availability of VEGFR2 inhibitors. In this study we immunohistochemically examined 262 vascular endothelial and 1640 non-vascular tumors and selected non-neoplastic tissues with a VEGFR2-specific rabbit monoclonal antibody 55B11. In early human embryo, VEFGR2 was expressed in endothelia of developing capillaries, thoracic duct, great vessels, hepatic sinusoids, epidermis, and mesothelia. In late first trimester fetus peripheral soft tissues, VEGFR2 was restricted to capillary endothelia, chrondrocytes, and superficial portion of the epidermis. In normal adult tissues, it was restricted to endothelia and mesothelia. VEGFR2 was consistently expressed in angiosarcomas, Kaposi sarcomas, and retiform hemangioendotheliomas. It was detected only in half of epithelioid hemangioendotheliomas (15/27), usually focally. VEGFR2 was strongly expressed in most capillary hemangiomas and weakly or focally in cavernous, venous, and spindle cell hemangiomas, and lymphangiomas. Malignant epithelial mesothelioma was found to be a unique epithelial neoplasm with a strong and nearly consistent VEGFR2 expression, including membrane staining (35/38). Approximately 10% of squamous cell carcinomas and 23% of pulmonary adenocarcinomas contained focal positivity. The only non-endothelial mesenchymal tumors found VEGFR2-positive were biphasic synovial sarcoma (focal epithelial expression), and chordoma. All melanomas and lymphomas were negative. VEGFR2 is a promising marker for malignant vascular tumors and malignant epithelioid mesothelioma

  16. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  17. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer: Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Östman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue microarray (TMA) with 186 tumors and 91 matched metastases was subjected to immunohistochemistry double staining with endothelial cell marker CD34 and fibroblast and pericyte markers α-SMA, PDGFβR and desmin. Images were digitally analyzed to yield “metrics” related to vasculature and stroma features. Intra-case analyses showed that PDGFβR in perivascular cells and fibroblasts were strongly correlated. Similar findings were observed concerning α-SMA. Most stroma characteristics showed large variations in intra-case comparisons of primary tumors and metastasis. Large PDGFβR-positive stroma fraction and high PDGFβFR positive perivascular intensity were both significantly associated with shorter survival in uni- and multi-variate analyses (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5; HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8). In conclusion, we found PDGFβR- and α-SMA-expression to be largely independent of each other but concordantly activated in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts within the primary tumor. Stromal characteristics differed between primary tumors and metastases. PDGFβR in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts may be novel prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26918345

  18. Protein-bound acrolein: Potential markers for oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Koji; Kanematsu, Masamichi; Sakai, Kensuke; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyata, Toshio; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Acrolein (CH2=CH—CHO) is known as a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment. Here we show that this notorious aldehyde is not just a pollutant, but also a lipid peroxidation product that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems. Upon incubation with BSA, acrolein was rapidly incorporated into the protein and generated the protein-linked carbonyl derivative, a putative marker of oxidatively modified proteins under oxidative stress. To verify the presence of protein-bound acrolein in vivo, the mAb (mAb5F6) against the acrolein-modified keyhole limpet hemocyanin was raised. It was found that the acrolein-lysine adduct, Nɛ-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine, constitutes an epitope of the antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions from a human aorta demonstrated that antigenic materials recognized by mAb5F6 indeed constituted the lesions, in which intense positivity was associated primarily with macrophage-derived foam cells and the thickening neointima of arterial walls. The observations that (i) oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein with Cu2+ generated the acrolein-low-density lipoprotein adducts and (ii) the iron-catalyzed oxidation of arachidonate in the presence of protein resulted in the formation of antigenic materials suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids are sources of acrolein that cause the production of protein-bound acrolein. These data suggest that the protein-bound acrolein represents potential markers of oxidative stress and long-term damage to protein in aging, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. PMID:9560197

  19. Diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 tumor markers in primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kyoko; Takayama, Koichi; Izumi, Miiru; Harada, Taishi; Furuyama, Kazuto; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is sometimes difficult to differentiate from benign lung diseases expressing nodular shadow in imaging study. We assessed the diagnostic value of two commonly used tumor markers in distinguishing primary lung cancer from benign lung disease. The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1) were retrospectively analyzed in 655 lung cancer patients and 237 patients with benign lung disease. The standard cut-off levels of 3.2 ng/mL CEA and 3.5 ng/mL CYFRA 21-1 and twice these respective levels (6.4 ng/mL and 7.0 ng/mL) were used. CEA and CYFRA 21-1 levels were elevated in 32% and 11% of benign lung disease patients, respectively. CEA sensitivity and specificity for lung cancer diagnosis was 69% and 68% respectively, while that for CYFRA 21-1 was 43% and 89%, respectively. Thus, the combined value for the specificity of the two tumor markers was greater than either alone. Patients were grouped depending on their hospital status, and prevalence rates were determined. The prevalence rate of lung cancer in admitted patients was 51%, the prevalence rate of lung cancer in outpatients was 12%, and the prevalence rate of lung cancer identified during health check-ups was 0.1%. Positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated using Bayes' theorem, and varied with the serum tumor marker and prevalence rate: PPVs of CEA [prevalence rate] were 69.2% [51%], 22.7% [12%], and 0.22% [0.1%], while PPVs of CYFRA 21-1 were 80.3% [51%], 34.8% [12%], and 0.39% [0.1%]. However, PPVs for lung cancer diagnosis at a prevalence rate of 51% were 87.3% or higher when the patient exhibited positive CEA and CYFRA 21-1, or CEA or CYFRA 21-1 levels twice the standard cut-off. Our results indicate that CEA and CYFRA 21-1 are reliable serum tumor markers for the diagnosis of lung cancer in addition to CT scans when combined or used individually at twice the standard cut-off level in high prevalence rate groups. The prevalence rate should

  20. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  1. Anti-tumor angiogenesis effect of genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine beta-defensin 2 and tumor endothelial marker-8 in a CT-26 murine colorectal carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Xie, Ganfeng; Geng, Peiliang; Zheng, Chenhong; Li, Jianjun; Pan, Feng; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) is an endothelial-specific marker that is upregulated during tumor angiogenesis. We previously demonstrated that DNA-based vaccine encoding xenogeneic TEM8 can potentiate anti-angiogenesis immunotherapy of malignancy; nevertheless, it remains to be improved in minimizing immune tolerance. Recently, it has been reported that murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is chemotactic for immature dendritic cells and plays a pivotal role in breaking immune tolerance. Herein, we constructed a genetic fusion vaccine encoding murine TEM8 and MBD2 to investigate whether the novel vaccine preferentially elicits therapeutic antitumor immune responses and suppresses cancerous angiogenesis in mouse models. The anti-angiogenesis effect was determined by microvessel density (MVD) using immunohistochemical staining. The efficacy of the fusion vaccine was primarily assessed by detecting cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity (51Cr-release assay). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay was used to detect TEM8-specific INF-γ production, and the activity of CTL was further verified by a depletion of CD8+ T cells via anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody. Our results showed that the DNA fusion vaccine possessed an enhanced therapeutic antitumor immunity through anti-angiogenesis in BALB/c mice inoculated with CT26 cells, and this effect was generally attributed to stimulation of an antigen specific CD8+ T-cell response against mTEM8. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the fusion vaccine based on mTEM8 and MBD2 induced autoimmunity against endothelial cells, resulting in deceleration of tumor growth, and could be potential therapeutical application in clinic. PMID:26064415

  2. Effect of HPV on tumor expression levels of the most commonly used markers in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Polanska, Hana; Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Svobodova, Marketa; Balvan, Jan; Fojtu, Michaela; Binkova, Hana; Horakova, Zuzana; Kostrica, Rom; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Masarik, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 90 % of head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and the overall 5-year survival rate is not higher than 50 %. There is much evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may influence the expression of commonly studied HNSCC markers. Our study was focused on the possible HPV-specificity of molecular markers that could be key players in important steps of cancerogenesis (MKI67, EGF, EGFR, BCL-2, BAX, FOS, JUN, TP53, MT1A, MT2A, VEGFA, FLT1, MMP2, MMP9, and POU5F). qRT-PCR analysis of these selected genes was performed on 74 biopsy samples of tumors from patients with histologically verified HNSCC (22 HPV-, 52 HPV+). Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to determine the relevance of these selected markers for HNSCC prognosis. In conclusion, our study confirms the impact of HPV infection on commonly studied HNSCC markers MT2A, MMP9, FLT1, VEGFA, and POU5F that were more highly expressed in HPV-negative HNSCC patients and also shows the relevance of studied markers in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC patients. PMID:26666815

  3. Apoptotic and proliferative markers in chordomas: a study of 26 tumors.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Sony; Prayson, Richard A

    2002-08-01

    Few studies have examined the role of cell proliferation and apoptotic markers in chordomas. This study retrospectively reviews the clinicopathologic features of 26 chordomas and examines MIB-1, p53, bcl-2, and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in these neoplasms. Patients ranged in age from 34 to 78 years (mean, 60.7 years) and included 14 females. The most common presentations included lower back pain (N = 15) and headaches (N = 10). Sixteen tumors arose in the lumbosacral region and 10 in the clivus. Initial surgery included biopsy (N = 17), subtotal resection (N = 4), and gross total resection (N = 5). The single highest mitosis count per 10 high power fields ranged from 0 to 6 (mean, 1). Marked nuclear pleomorphism was identified in seven tumors. Marked hypercellularity was seen in two tumors. Focal necrosis was identified in seven tumors. MIB-1 labeling indices (LI) in 22 tumors ranged from 0 to 3.8 (mean, 0.5). Cyclin D1 LI ranged from 0 to 82.4 (mean, 35.6). Seven tumors had positive p53 immunostaining and three demonstrated focal positive staining with bcl-2 antibody. Five tumors locally recurred; two patients developed metastatic disease. Thirteen patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. At last known follow-up, seven patients died with tumor (12 to 132 months follow-up). Five additional patients died, two without tumor at 36 and 72 months follow-up and three patients in whom the tumor status at death was not known. Seven patients were alive with evidence of tumor (1 to 120 months) and five patients were alive without evidence of tumor (12 to 84 months). Clinical follow-up was not available in one patient. In conclusion, the low MIB-1 LIs and the lack of p53 and bcl-2 staining is in keeping with the low-grade nature of most chordomas. High cyclin D1 LIs may be reflective of a tendency to accumulate cyclin D1 protein; however, there appears to be a block in the effect of cyclin D1 on cell proliferation in these tumors. Cyclin D1, MIB-1, p

  4. Down-regulation of tumor endothelial marker 8 suppresses cell proliferation mediated by ERK1/2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuangjie; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Leilei; Bai, Lihong; Wang, Yuefeng; Liang, Yingjie; Dou, Chengyun; Wang, Liantang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) was recently suggested as a putative anti-tumor target in several types of human cancer based on its selective overexpression in tumor versus normal endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to detect the potential functions of TEM8 in osteosarcoma. Overall, TEM8 was mainly located in cytoplasm and was up-regulated in osteosarcoma compared to benign bone lesions and adjacent non tumor tissue (ANT). High TEM8 expression group had a significant lower overall survival rate than that in the low TEM8 expression group. TEM8 knock-down by siRNA or shRNA results in significant reduction of osteosarcoma cell growth and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of TEM8 led to increasing of p21 and p27 and suppression of cyclin D1 mediated by Erk1/2 activity. These findings suggest that down-regulation of TEM8 play an important role in the inhibition of tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma. PMID:26996335

  5. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  6. Glucocorticoid Receptor as a Potential Target to Decrease Aromatase Expression and Inhibit Leydig Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Chemi, Francesca; Rago, Vittoria; Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Gelsomino, Luca; Giordano, Francesca; Andò, Sebastiano; Catalano, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Leydig cell tumors are the most frequent interstitial neoplasms of the testis with increased incidence in recent years. They are hormonally active and are considered one of the steroid-secreting tumors. Although usually benign, the malignant phenotype responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy or radiation, highlighting the need to identify new therapeutic targets for treatment. Here, we identified a novel glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism that controls cell growth in Leydig cell tumors. We found that a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, reduces cell proliferation in rat Leydig tumor cells by decreasing the expression and the enzymatic activity of the estrogen-producing enzyme aromatase. This inhibitory effect relies on the ability of activated glucocorticoid receptor to regulate the aromatase gene transcriptional activity through the recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor protein and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors to a newly identified putative glucocorticoid responsive element within the aromatase promoter II. Our in vivo studies reveal a reduction of tumor growth, after dexamethasone treatment, in animal xenografts. Tumors from dexamethasone-treated mice exhibit a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and the aromatase enzyme. Our data demonstrate that activated glucocorticoid receptor, decreasing aromatase expression, induces Leydig tumor regression both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that glucocorticoid receptor might be a potential target for the therapy of Leydig cell tumors. PMID:26968343

  7. Annexin A2 as a differential diagnostic marker of hepatocellular tumors.

    PubMed

    Longerich, Thomas; Haller, Maria Theresia; Mogler, Carolin; Aulmann, Sebastian; Lohmann, Volker; Schirmacher, Peter; Brand, Karsten

    2011-01-15

    While improved imaging techniques have made it possible to detect focal liver lesions smaller than 1cm in diameter, differentiating benign lesions from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remains a challenge. To address this problem and obtain a definite diagnosis, needle core biopsies are often performed, leading to an increased need for supportive ancillary techniques in the histopathological assessment of highly differentiated hepatocellular tumors. Here we evaluate the diagnostic value of immunohistologically detected Annexin A2 (ANXA2) expression in highly differentiated liver tumors. ANXA2 is a calcium-dependent phospholipid-binding protein that has been linked to malignant transformation and HCC development. Our data show that adding sinusoidal ANXA2 expression to the already established marker panel (GPC3, GS, and HSP70) increases the accuracy for the detection of well-differentiated HCC (74% sensitivity, 100% specificity). In addition, in our series, the combinations ANXA2-GPC3 and ANXA2-GS performed better compared to the other established marker combinations. In conclusion, we suggest that adding ANXA2 to the established diagnostic marker panel increases the reliability and objectivity of HCC diagnosis in liver biopsies. PMID:20971570

  8. Gastric cancer stem cells: evidence, potential markers, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brungs, Daniel; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Vine, Kara L; Becker, Therese M; Carolan, Martin G; Ranson, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant global health problem. It is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide (Torre et al. in CA Cancer J Clin 65(2):87-108, 2015). Despite advances in treatment, overall prognosis remains poor, due to tumour relapse and metastasis. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches to improve clinical outcomes in gastric cancer. The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been proposed to explain the high rate of relapse and subsequent resistance of cancer to current systemic treatments (Vermeulen et al. in Lancet Oncol 13(2):e83-e89, 2012). CSCs have been identified in many solid malignancies, including gastric cancer, and have significant clinical implications, as targeting the CSC population may be essential in preventing the recurrence and spread of a tumour (Dewi et al. in J Gastroenterol 46(10):1145-1157, 2011). This review seeks to summarise the current evidence for CSC in gastric cancer, with an emphasis on candidate CSC markers, clinical implications, and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:26428661

  9. ERG is a novel and reliable marker for endothelial cells in central nervous system tumors

    PubMed Central

    Haber, Matthew A.; Iranmahboob, Amir; Thomas, Cheddhi; Liu, Mengling; Najjar, Amanda; Zagzag, David

    2015-01-01

    ETS-related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that has been linked to angiogenesis. Very little research has been done to assess ERG expression in central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We evaluated 57 CNS tumors, including glioblastomas (GBMs) and hemangioblastomas (HBs), as well as two arteriovenous malformations and four samples of normal brain tissue with immunohistochemistry using a specific ERG rabbit monoclonal antibody. In addition, immunostains for CD31, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were performed on all samples. CD31 demonstrated variable and sometimes weak immunoreactivity for endothelial cells. Furthermore, in 1 case of a GBM, CD34 stained not only endothelial cells, but also tumor cells. In contrast, we observed that ERG was only expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells, for example, in the hyperplastic vascular complexes that comprise the glomeruloid microvascular proliferation seen in GBMs. Conversely, α-SMA immunoreactivity was identified in the abluminal cells of these hyperplastic vessels. Quantitative evaluation with automated methodology and custom Matlab 2008b software was used to calculate percent staining of ERG in each case. We observed significantly higher quantitative expression of ERG in HBs than in other CNS tumors. Our results show that ERG is a novel, reliable, and specific marker for endothelial cells within CNS tumors that can be used to better study the process of neovascularization. PMID:25881913

  10. ERG is a novel and reliable marker for endothelial cells in central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Haber, Matthew A; Iranmahboob, Amir; Thomas, Cheddhi; Liu, Mengling; Najjar, Amanda; Zagzag, David

    2015-01-01

    ETS-related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that has been linked to angiogenesis. Very little research has been done to assess ERG expression in central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We evaluated 57 CNS tumors, including glioblastomas (GBMs) and hemangioblastomas (HBs), as well as two arteriovenous malformations and four samples of normal brain tissue with immunohistochemistry using a specific ERG rabbit monoclonal antibody. In addition, immunostains for CD31, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were performed on all samples. CD31 demonstrated variable and sometimes weak immunoreactivity for endothelial cells. Furthermore, in 1 case of a GBM, CD34 stained not only endothelial cells, but also tumor cells. In contrast, we observed that ERG was only expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells, for example, in the hyperplastic vascular complexes that comprise the glomeruloid microvascular proliferation seen in GBMs. Conversely, α-SMA immunoreactivity was identified in the abluminal cells of these hyperplastic vessels. Quantitative evaluation with automated methodology and custom Matlab 2008b software was used to calculate percent staining of ERG in each case. We observed significantly higher quantitative expression of ERG in HBs than in other CNS tumors. Our results show that ERG is a novel, reliable, and specific marker for endothelial cells within CNS tumors that can be used to better study the process of neovascularization. PMID:25881913

  11. Galectin-3 is a marker of favorable prognosis and a biologically relevant molecule in neuroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Veschi, V; Petroni, M; Bartolazzi, A; Altavista, P; Dominici, C; Capalbo, C; Boldrini, R; Castellano, A; McDowell, H P; Pizer, B; Frati, L; Screpanti, I; Gulino, A; Giannini, G

    2014-01-01

    Childhood neuroblastic tumors are characterized by heterogeneous clinical courses, ranging from benign ganglioneuroma (GN) to highly lethal neuroblastoma (NB). Although a refined prognostic evaluation and risk stratification of each tumor patient is becoming increasingly essential to personalize treatment options, currently only few biomolecular markers (essentially MYCN amplification, chromosome 11q status and DNA ploidy) are validated for this purpose in neuroblastic tumors. Here we report that Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin involved in multiple biological functions that has already acquired diagnostic relevance in specific clinical settings, is variably expressed in most differentiated and less aggressive neuroblastic tumors, such as GN and ganglioneuroblastoma, as well as in a subset of NB cases. Gal-3 expression is associated with the INPC histopathological categorization (P<0.001) and Shimada favorable phenotype (P=0.001), but not with other prognostically relevant features. Importantly, Gal-3 expression was associated with a better 5-year overall survival (P=0.003), and with improved cumulative survival in patient subsets at worse prognosis, such as older age at diagnosis, advanced stages or NB histopathological classification. In vitro, Gal-3 expression and nuclear accumulation accompanied retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation in NB cell lines. Forced Gal-3 overexpression increased phenotypic differentiation and substrate adherence, while inhibiting proliferation. Altogether, these findings suggest that Gal-3 is a biologically relevant player for neuroblastic tumors, whose determination by conventional immunohistochemistry might be used for outcome assessment and patient's risk stratification in the clinical setting. PMID:24603328

  12. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Mashima, Hirosato; Ohno, Hideki; Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  13. A new scoring system using multiple immunohistochemical markers for diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Rosenblat, Yevgenia; Halpern, Marisa; Herbert, M; Hammel, I; Gal, Rivka; Leabu, M; Koren, Rumelia

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle neoplasms by light microscopy is difficult. Multiple classification schemes have been proposed based on mitotic rate, nuclear atypia, and the presence or absence of necrosis. None of these classification systems has been entirely successful. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of selected immunohistochemical and histochemical markers in differentiating these tumors, in addition to accepted morphologic criteria. Ten cases of each of the following: leiomyosarcomas (LMS), atypical leiomyomas (AL), cellular leiomyomas (CL) and usual leiomyomas (UL), were classically evaluated for histological diagnosis and were stained for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2 and p53 using monoclonal antibodies and the avidin-biotin peroxidase method, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNORs). The number of stained cells was counted in the most positively stained region in a 4 mm2 square cover glass mounted on each slide. The mean value was calculated for each group of tumors. The data for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 and AgNOR staining respectively, were significantly higher in LMS by comparison to UL, CL or AL. Because many singular cases had superimposed data being difficult to diagnose, a new scoring system for pathological evaluation was created. The results obtained by this scoring system suggest that immunohistochemical markers Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 together with the AgNOR staining could be useful, by the scoring system, as an adjunct to the current accepted morphologic criteria in differentiating smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. PMID:16563231

  14. Genotyping in the MHC locus: potential for defining predictive markers in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Seitzer, Ulrike; Gerdes, Johannes; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    In sarcoidosis, host genetic factors are discussed as contributing to disease susceptibility and course. Since tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a central mediator of granuloma formation and since elevated TNF-α levels are found during active phases of sarcoidosis, genetic polymorphisms correlating with influences on TNF-α levels are of special interest. The complete sequencing of the MHC region and the increase in the number of identified gene polymorphisms in this locus associated with TNF-α production offer the opportunity of detecting new genes associated with sarcoidosis and perhaps of defining disease-associated haplotypes that bear the potential of serving as predictive markers for this disease. PMID:11806841

  15. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine. PMID:23775009

  16. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  17. Lenalidomide enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of solid tumor cells in vitro: influence of host immune and tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Parton, Anastasia; Lu, Ling; Adams, Mary; Schafer, Peter; Bartlett, J Blake

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of combining lenalidomide with therapeutic antibodies on antibody-dependant cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of solid tumor cells, and the requirement for expression of natural killer (NK) cell-activating receptors and their solid tumor surface ligands. Twenty-three human tumor cell lines (colon, breast, lung, head and neck, ovary, and bone sarcoma) were analyzed. NK effector cells were isolated from healthy donors, pre-treated with and without lenalidomide, and incubated with antibody-coated tumor cells to determine ADCC. In blocking experiments, NK cells were pre-incubated with anti-DNAM-1 or anti-NKG2D antibodies, and target colorectal cells were pre-incubated with anti-CD155 (PVR), anti-MIC-A/B, or anti-ULBP 3 antibodies. Differences between groups were assessed using unpaired and paired Student's t test and one-way ANOVA. Lenalidomide enhanced NK cell-mediated ADCC of trastuzumab- and cetuximab-coated tumor cells. Activity against colorectal cancer cells was dependent on target antigen expression, but independent of KRAS status and FcγRIIIa genotype. The extent of ADCC and its enhancement by lenalidomide correlated with NK cell expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1, and tumor cell expression of PVR and MIC-A. Blocking of NKG2D and, to a lesser extent, DNAM-1 inhibited ADCC. Anti-MIC-A/B monoclonal antibody blocked natural cytotoxicity, but not ADCC. Lenalidomide enhances the ability of IgG1-isotype antibodies to mediate ADCC of solid tumor cells, the extent of which is largely dependent on NKG2D-NKG2D ligand interactions, but appears to be independent of MIC-A/B. This provides a rationale for exploratory clinical studies and an assessment of potential biomarkers predictive of clinical benefit. PMID:20848094

  18. Circulating tumor cells and epithelial, mesenchymal and stemness markers: characterization of cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Pietro; Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco; Zoli, Wainer; Rigaud, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Until now detection and numeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were essentially used as a prognostic factor in cancer progression. To extend the role of these kinds of analysis, it seems necessary to improve analytical methods related to isolation and characterization of CTCs. Discrepancies between published results corroborates this requirement. In this review we suggest a combination of markers able to reach the goal. Moreover to improve the clinical utility of CTC analysis, particularly in the therapeutic follow up of the disease, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) level of a global CTC population should be studied. PMID:25489583

  19. Chromogranin A as Serum Marker for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Single Center Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Kuttner, Axel; Lauseker, Michael; Vogeser, Michael; Haug, Alexander; Herrmann, Karin A.; Hoffmann, Johannes N.; Spitzweg, Christine; Göke, Burkhard; Auernhammer, Christoph J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical sensitivities of the tumor markers chromogranin A (CgA), urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the GastroEnteroPancreatic-(GEP-) system depending on tumor primary location and metastatic spread. In a retrospective single-center series, sensitivities were evaluated in serum samples from 110 patients with midgut (n = 62) and pancreatic (n = 48) NETs. CgA levels were analyzed by a commercially-available immunoradiometric assay (CIS-bio) during routine follow-up in the years 2000–2009. CgA showed a higher sensitivity for midgut (68%) than pancreatic (54%) NETs. A higher CgA sensitivity and significantly higher median CgA values were found in patients with liver metastases than in those without, and in patients with hepatic and additionally extra-hepatic metastases than in those with hepatic and nodal metastases alone, respectively. We found an overall sensitivity for elevated 5HIAA excretion of 69% for midgut NETs and a significant correlation between median CgA and 5-HIAA values. The sensitivity of AP and the correlations of AP/CgA-data-pairs were low in both midgut and pancreatic NETs, although highest for metastatic pancreatic NETs. The sensitivity of CgA measurement depends on the NET primary location and spread of disease. 5-HIAA and CgA showed comparable sensitivity in midgut NETs, while AP does not seem to be useful as a tumor marker in GEP-NETs. PMID:24213232

  20. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  1. A simplified technique for tumor localization using preoperative endoscopic clipping and radio-opaque markers during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Su; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Tumor localization during intracorporeal anastomosis after totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) is challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the simplicity and feasibility of locating tumors in the stomach using radio-opaque markers and preoperative endoscopic clipping. The intra- and postoperative findings of 29 patients who underwent TLDG with intracorporeal anastomosis between January 2012 and March 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative endoscopic clips were applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists, and surgical gauze with an attached radio-opaque marker (3 mm × 60 mm) was prepared. The marker was fixed to either the anterior or posterior of the stomach, above the predicted site of the tumor, using suture ties. Portable abdominal radiography was used during the laparoscopic surgery, and the stomach was resected using guidance by the radiomarker. The radio-opaque marker and the endoscopic clips were clearly visible by intraoperative abdominal radiography. All patients received curative resection. No complications or deaths were encountered. The mean distance between the endoscopic clips and the radiomarker by portable intraoperative radiography was 21.3 ± 18.3 mm, whereas the actual in situ mean distance was 20.7 ± 17.6 mm. This difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). It is imperative that preoperative endoscopic clips are applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists. The use of a radio-opaque marker is a simple and feasible way to locate tumors during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:25513928

  2. Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Beddar, A. Sam . E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer; Briere, Tina Marie; Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Pan Tinsu; Prado, Karl; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael; Krishnan, Sunil

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

  3. Tumor Mesenchymal Stem-Like Cell as a Prognostic Marker in Primary Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon-Jin; Chang, Jong Hee; Moon, Ju Hyung; Roh, Tae-Hoon; Sung, Kyoung Su; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Eui-Hyun; Kim, Sun Ho; Hong, Yong-Kil; Lee, Su-Jae; Huh, Yong-Min; Kang, Seok-Gu

    2016-01-01

    The isolation from brain tumors of tumor mesenchymal stem-like cells (tMSLCs) suggests that these cells play a role in creating a microenvironment for tumor initiation and progression. The clinical characteristics of patients with primary glioblastoma (pGBM) positive for tMSLCs have not been determined. This study analyzed samples from 82 patients with pGBM who had undergone tumor removal, pathological diagnosis, and isolation of tMSLC from April 2009 to October 2014. Survival, extent of resection, molecular markers, and tMSLC culture results were statistically evaluated. Median overall survival was 18.6 months, 15.0 months in tMSLC-positive patients and 29.5 months in tMSLC-negative patients (P = 0.014). Multivariate cox regression model showed isolation of tMSLC (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1~5.6, P = 0.021) showed poor outcome while larger extent of resection (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.2~0.8, P = 0.011) has association with better outcome. The presence of tMSLCs isolated from the specimen of pGBM is associated with the survival of patient. PMID:26981133

  4. Uterine Tumor Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor (UTROSCT) Commonly Exhibits Positivity With Sex Cord Markers FOXL2 and SF-1 but Lacks FOXL2 and DICER1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Croce, Sabrina; de Kock, Leanne; Boshari, Talia; Hostein, Isabelle; Velasco, Valerie; Foulkes, William D; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) is a rare neoplasm which morphologically and immunohistochemically exhibits overlap with an ovarian sex cord tumor. Although many of these neoplasms are positive with markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, staining is often limited and the pathogenesis of UTROSCT is unknown. To further explore the sex cord lineage of UTROSCT, we studied 19 of these neoplasms and examined the expression of 2 recently described markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, FOXL2, and steroidogenic factor-1. We also undertook FOXL2 and DICER1 mutation analysis in these cases; a somatic missense mutation in codon C134W (402C→G) of FOXL2 gene has been demonstrated in the vast majority (>95%) of ovarian adult granulosa cell tumors and somatic DICER1 mutations are found in approximately 60% of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Ten of 19 cases (53%) exhibited nuclear immunoreactivity with FOXL2 and 11 of 19 (58%) exhibited nuclear staining with steroidogenic factor-1. Neither FOXL2 nor DICER1 mutations were identified in any case where there was sufficient tumor tissue for analysis (18 and 9 cases, respectively). Despite exhibiting an immunophenotype characteristic of a sex cord-stromal tumor, mutations in FOXL2 and DICER1, the 2 most common mutations hitherto reported in ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, are not a feature of UTROSCT. PMID:26598979

  5. Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells – Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Lukasz A.; Williams, Hannah; Frankow, Aleksandra; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Haynes, Harry R.; Perks, Claire; Holly, Jeff M. P.; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called “liquid biopsies” carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors. PMID:26322014

  6. Data defining markers of human neural stem cell lineage potential.

    PubMed

    Oikari, Lotta E; Okolicsanyi, Rachel K; Griffiths, Lyn R; Haupt, Larisa M

    2016-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are self-renewing and multipotent cells, however, NPCs are considered to be more lineage-restricted with a reduced self-renewing capacity. We present data comparing the expression of 21 markers encompassing pluripotency, self-renewal (NSC) as well as neuronal and glial (astrocyte and oligodendrocyte) lineage specification and 28 extracellular proteoglycan (PG) genes and their regulatory enzymes between embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived human NSCs (hNSC H9 cells, Thermo Fisher) and human cortex-derived normal human NPCs (nhNPCs, Lonza). The data demonstrates expression differences of multiple lineage and proteoglycan-associated genes between hNSC H9 cells and nhNPCs. Data interpretation of markers and proteoglycans defining NSC and neural cell lineage characterisation can be found in "Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans as novel markers of human neural stem cell fate determination" (Oikari et al. 2015) [1]. PMID:26958640

  7. Data defining markers of human neural stem cell lineage potential

    PubMed Central

    Oikari, Lotta E.; Okolicsanyi, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Haupt, Larisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are self-renewing and multipotent cells, however, NPCs are considered to be more lineage-restricted with a reduced self-renewing capacity. We present data comparing the expression of 21 markers encompassing pluripotency, self-renewal (NSC) as well as neuronal and glial (astrocyte and oligodendrocyte) lineage specification and 28 extracellular proteoglycan (PG) genes and their regulatory enzymes between embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived human NSCs (hNSC H9 cells, Thermo Fisher) and human cortex-derived normal human NPCs (nhNPCs, Lonza). The data demonstrates expression differences of multiple lineage and proteoglycan-associated genes between hNSC H9 cells and nhNPCs. Data interpretation of markers and proteoglycans defining NSC and neural cell lineage characterisation can be found in “Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans as novel markers of human neural stem cell fate determination” (Oikari et al. 2015) [1]. PMID:26958640

  8. Myoglobin expression in prostate cancer is correlated to androgen receptor expression and markers of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Bicker, Anne; Montani, Matteo; Ikenberg, Kristian; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Sailer, Verena; Wild, Peter; Dietrich, Dimo; Uhl, Barbara; Sulser, Tullio; Moch, Holger; Gorr, Thomas A; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Hankeln, Thomas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies identified unexpected expression and transcriptional complexity of the hemoprotein myoglobin (MB) in human breast cancer but its role in prostate cancer is still unclear. Expression of MB was immunohistochemically analyzed in three independent cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens (n = 409, n = 625, and n = 237). MB expression data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and molecular parameters of androgen and hypoxia signaling. Expression levels of novel tumor-associated MB transcript variants and the VEGF gene as a hypoxia marker were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Fifty-three percent of the prostate cancer cases were MB positive and significantly correlated with androgen receptor (AR) expression (p < 0.001). The positive correlation with CAIX (p < 0.001) and FASN (p = 0.008) as well as the paralleled increased expression of the tumor-associated MB transcript variants and VEGF suggest that hypoxia participates in MB expression regulation. Analogous to breast cancer, MB expression in prostate cancer is associated with steroid hormone signaling and markers of hypoxia. Further studies must elucidate the novel functional roles of MB in human carcinomas, which probably extend beyond its classic intramuscular function in oxygen storage. PMID:25172328

  9. Surrogate MRI markers for hyperthermia-induced release of doxorubicin from thermosensitive liposomes in tumors.

    PubMed

    Peller, Michael; Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Dietrich, Olaf; Ingrisch, Michael; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H

    2016-09-10

    The efficacy of systemically applied, classical anti-cancer drugs is limited by insufficient selectivity to the tumor and the applicable dose is limited by side effects. Efficacy could be further improved by targeting of the drug to the tumor. Using thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as a drug carrier, targeting is achieved by control of temperature in the target volume. In such an approach, effective local hyperthermia (40-43°C) (HT) of the tumor is considered essential but technically challenging. Thus, visualization of local heating and drug release using TSL is considered an important tool for further improvement. Visualization and feasibility of chemodosimetry by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been demonstrated using TSL encapsulating both, contrast agent (CA) and doxorubicin (DOX) simultaneously in the same TSL. Dosimetry has been facilitated using T1-relaxation time change as a surrogate marker for DOX deposition in the tumor. To allow higher loading of the TSL and to simplify clinical development of new TSL formulations a new approach using a mixture of TSL either loaded with DOX or MRI-CA is suggested. This was successfully tested using phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) in Brown Norway rats with syngeneic soft tissue sarcomas (BN175) implanted at both hind legs. After intravenous application of DOX-TSL and CA-TSL, heating of one tumor above 40°C for 1h using laser light resulted in highly selective DOX uptake. The DOX-concentration in the heated tumor tissue compared to the non-heated tumor showed an almost 10-fold increase. T1 and additional MRI surrogate parameters such as signal phase change were correlated to intratumoral DOX concentration. Visualization of DOX delivery in the sense of a chemodosimetry was demonstrated. Although phase-based MR-thermometry was affected by CA-TSL, phase information was found suitable for DOX concentration assessment. Local differences of DOX concentration in the tumors indicated the need for

  10. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  11. Evaluation of molecular markers in canine mammary tumors: correlation with histological grading.

    PubMed

    Vinothini, G; Balachandran, C; Nagini, S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate molecular markers involved in mammary tumorigenesis in a canine model that mimics many essential elements of human breast cancer. Thirty mammary gland tumors and control tissues obtained from female dogs were included in the study. We analyzed changes in the expression of markers of hormone and receptor status (estradiol, estrogen receptor; ER and HER-2/neu), hormone metabolism (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1), cell proliferation and survival [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), glutathione S-transferase-P (GST-P), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB-p50, NF-kappaB-p65), phosphorylated-inhibitor of kappaB-alpha (p-IkappaB-alpha) and IkappaB], apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspases, Apaf-1, cytochrome-C, and PARP), invasion [matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 (MMP-2, MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK)], angiogenesis [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], and epigenetics [DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt-1), histone deacetylase (HDAC-1)] by immunohistochemical localization and Western blot analysis and correlated these with histological grade. The present study provides evidence that increased expression of ER, HER-2/neu, estradiol, and its metabolizing enzymes, as well as proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, invasion, and angiogenesis may confer a selective growth advantage to canine mammary tumors. To our knowledge this is the first report on the hallmark capabilities of canine mammary tumors, which lends credence to the view that the dog is a valuable model for human breast cancer studies. PMID:20225757

  12. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  13. Chemometric evaluation of urinary steroid hormone levels as potential biomarkers of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Plenis, Alina; Miękus, Natalia; Olędzka, Ilona; Bączek, Tomasz; Lewczuk, Anna; Woźniak, Zofia; Koszałka, Patrycja; Seroczyńska, Barbara; Skokowski, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are uncommon tumors which can secrete specific hormone products such as peptides, biogenic amines and hormones. So far, the diagnosis of NETs has been difficult because most NET markers are not specific for a given tumor and none of the NET markers can be used to fulfil the criteria of high specificity and high sensitivity for the screening procedure. However, by combining the measurements of different NET markers, they become highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. The aim of the work was to identify whether urinary steroid hormones can be identified as potential new biomarkers of NETs, which could be used as prognostic and clinical course monitoring factors. Thus, a rapid and sensitive reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method (RP-HPLC) with UV detection has been developed for the determination of cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, testosterone, epitestosterone and progesterone in human urine. The method has been validated for accuracy, precision, selectivity, linearity, recovery and stability. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.5 and 1 ng mL-1 for each steroid hormone, respectively. Linearity was confirmed within a range of 1-300 ng mL-1 with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9995 for all analytes. The described method was successfully applied for the quantification of six endogenous steroid levels in human urine. Studies were performed on 20 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with NETs. Next, for better understanding of tumor biology in NETs and for checking whether steroid hormones can be used as potential biomarkers of NETs, a chemometric analysis of urinary steroid hormone levels in both data sets was performed. PMID:24135941

  14. FBXW7 acts as an independent prognostic marker and inhibits tumor growth in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanchun; Xiao, Jie; Hu, Kongzu; Wang, Gang; Li, Maoqiang; Zhang, Jidong; Cheng, Guangqi

    2015-01-01

    F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7) is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS) cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS. PMID:25622249

  15. Selected tumor markers in the routine diagnosis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, Anna M; Budzik, Michał P; Koczkodaj, Paweł; Przybylski, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is one of the most malignant tumors, affecting men more frequently than women and constituting nearly 90% of all kidney tumors. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma has been described as a new histological type of renal cell carcinoma. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma constitutes up to 5% of all cases of kidney cancer. It is characterized by a significant number of deletions in many chromosomes, as well as the loss of entire chromosomes. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma arises from tubular cells or cells of the macula densa. In contrast to other types of kidney cancer, it occurs with equal frequency in men and women, mostly in the sixth decade of life. It is characterized by a relatively good prognosis and exhibits a low degree of malignancy. Histopathologic diagnosis of ChRCC can be a diagnostic challenge because these tumors may resemble oncocytoma or conventional cancer. Research by Mathers et al. proposed the use of cytokeratin 7 as a marker useful in the differentiation of these changes. PMID:27478468

  16. Predicting tumor metastasis in patients with oral cancer by means of the proliferation marker Ki67.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Komiyama, K; Okaue, M; Shimoyama, Y; Iwakami, K; Namaki, S; Tanaka, H; Moro, I; Sato, H

    1999-06-01

    Recent developments of a Ki67 antibody to recombinant parts of the Ki67 nuclear antigen have provided a marker for tumor proliferation. In the present study, biopsy specimens were obtained from 20 patents with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity at various sites, who also received a regional neck dissection. The patients' mean age was 61 years. Normal mucosa obtained from the surgical materials of 10 patients with a non-tumor condition was also examined as a control. The expression of Ki67 was examined immunohistochemically and the labeling index (LI) assessed in the biopsy specimens. The patients were divided into two groups; patient who already had a regional lymph node metastasis at the time of tumor resection and patient without any metastasis. All of the oral carcinoma and normal mucosa specimens were positive for Ki67, while the magnitude of staining showed a wide variation. The median LI of the patients with metastasis and without metastasis was 37.63 +/- 8.30 and 20.40 +/- 4.22 respectively, while the normal mucosa control was 7.62 +/- 1.70. The results of this study suggest that an immunohistochemical examination of the biopsy materials for the Ki67 antigen and assessed LI index should prove useful for the prediction of lymph node metastasis. PMID:10453126

  17. Molecular regulation of vasculogenic mimicry in tumors and potential tumor-target therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue-Zu; Sun, Wei

    2010-01-01

    “Vasculogenic mimicry (VM)”, is a term that describes the unique ability of highly aggressive tumor cells to express a multipotent, stem cell-like phenotype, and form a pattern of vasculogenic-like networks in three-dimensional culture. As an angiogenesis-independent pathway, VM and/or periodic acid-schiff-positive patterns are associated with poor prognosis in tumor patients. Moreover, VM is resistant to angiogenesis inhibitors. Here, we will review the advances in research on biochemical and molecular signaling pathways of VM in tumors and on potential anti-VM therapy strategy. PMID:21160860

  18. Antidepressant fluoxetine and its potential against colon tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stopper, Helga; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Kannen, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide, with increasing incidence in developing countries. Patients treated with fluoxetine (FLX) have a reduced incidence of colon cancer, although there still remains great controversy about the nature of its effects. Here we explore the latest achievements related to FLX treatment and colon cancer. Moreover, we discuss new ideas about the mechanisms of the effects of FLX treatment in colon cancer. This leads to the hypothesis of FLX arresting colon tumor cells at the at G1 cell-cycle phase through a control of the tumor-related energy generation machinery. We believe that the potential of FLX to act against tumor metabolism warrants further investigation. PMID:24578784

  19. Study of Aided Diagnosis of Hepatic Carcinoma Based on Artificial Neural Network Combined with Tumor Marker Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shanjuan; Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yongjun; Wu, Yiming

    To develop a computer-aided diagnostic scheme by using an artificial neural network (ANN) combined with tumor markers for diagnosis of hepatic carcinoma (HCC) as a clinical assistant method. 140 serum samples (50 malignant, 40 benign and 50 normal) were analyzed for α-fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), sialic acid (SA) and calcium (Ca). The five tumor marker values were then used as ANN inputs data. The result of ANN was compared with that of discriminant analysis by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) analysis. The diagnostic accuracy of ANN and discriminant analysis among all samples of the test group was 95.5% and 79.3%, respectively. Analysis of multiple tumor markers based on ANN may be a better choice than the traditional statistical methods for differentiating HCC from benign or normal.

  20. Model-independent evaluation of tumor markers and a logistic-tree approach to diagnostic decision support.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weizeng; Huang, Samuel H; Su, Qiang; Shi, Jinghua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of using individual tumor markers hardly meet the clinical requirement. This challenge gave rise to many efforts, e.g., combing multiple tumor markers and employing machine learning algorithms. However, results from different studies are often inconsistent, which are partially attributed to the use of different evaluation criteria. Also, the wide use of model-dependent validation leads to high possibility of data overfitting when complex models are used for diagnosis. We propose two model-independent criteria, namely, area under the curve (AUC) and Relief to evaluate the diagnostic values of individual and multiple tumor markers, respectively. For diagnostic decision support, we propose the use of logistic-tree which combines decision tree and logistic regression. Application on a colorectal cancer dataset shows that the proposed evaluation criteria produce results that are consistent with current knowledge. Furthermore, the simple and highly interpretable logistic-tree has diagnostic performance that is competitive with other complex models. PMID:25516124

  1. Tumor endothelial markers define novel subsets of cancer-specific circulating endothelial cells associated with antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mehran, Reza; Nilsson, Monique; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Du, Zhiqiang; Cascone, Tina; Wu, Hua Kang; Cortes, Andrea; Xu, Li; Zurita, Amado; Schier, Robert; Riedel, Bernhard; El-Zein, Randa; Heymach, John V

    2014-05-15

    Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are derived from multiple sources, including bone marrow (circulating endothelial progenitors; CEP), and established vasculature (mature CEC). Although CECs have shown promise as a biomarker for patients with cancer, their utility has been limited, in part, by the lack of specificity for tumor vasculature and the different nonmalignant causes that can impact CEC. Tumor endothelial markers (TEM) are antigens enriched in tumor versus nonmalignant endothelia. We hypothesized that TEMs may be detectable on CEC and that these circulating TEM(+) endothelial cells (CTEC) may be a more specific marker for cancer and tumor response than standard CEC. We found that tumor-bearing mice had a relative increase in numbers of circulating CTEC, specifically with increased levels of TEM7 and TEM8 expression. Following treatment with various vascular-targeting agents, we observed a decrease in CTEC that correlated with the reductions in tumor growth. We extended these findings to human clinical samples and observed that CTECs were present in patients with esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (N = 40), and their levels decreased after surgical resection. These results demonstrate that CTECs are detectable in preclinical cancer models and patients with cancer. Furthermore, they suggest that CTECs offer a novel cancer-associated marker that may be useful as a blood-based surrogate for assessing the presence of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic drug activity. PMID:24626092

  2. Immunoassay for tumor markers in human serum based on Si nanoparticles and SiC@Ag SERS-active substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Jun; Feng, Zhao; Wang, Fuyan; Xie, Shushen; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-04-21

    Based on a sandwich structure consisting of nano-Si immune probes and a SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrate, a kind of ultra-sensitive immunoassay protocol is presented to detect tumor markers in human serum. The nano-Si immune probes were prepared by immobilizing the detecting antibodies onto the surfaces of SiO2-coated Si nanoparticles (NPs) which were modified with 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and the SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrates were prepared by immobilizing the captured antibodies on Ag film sputtered on SiC sandpaper. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that Si NPs are directly used as Raman tags in an immunoassay strategy. And, the SiC@Ag SERS-active substrates exhibit excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performances with an enhancement factor of ∼10(5), owing to the plasmonic effect of the Ag film on the rough surface of the SiC sandpaper. In our experiments, the sandwich immunoassay structure has been successfully applied to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in a human serum sample and the limit of detections are as low as 1.79 fg mL(-1), 0.46 fg mL(-1) and 1.3 × 10(-3) U mL(-1), respectively. It reveals that the proposed immunoassay protocol has demonstrated a high sensitivity for tumor markers in human serum and a potential practicability in biosensing and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27003871

  3. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors’ algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.

  4. SOX10 is a novel marker of acinus and intercalated duct differentiation in salivary gland tumors: a clue to the histogenesis for tumor diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Rie; Mori, Taisuke; Shibata, Shinsuke; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko M; Akazawa, Chihiro; Watabe, Yukio; Honda, Kazufumi; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Asai, Masao; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanai, Yae; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-08-01

    Salivary gland tumors are relatively rare and morphologically diverse and heterogeneous tumors; therefore, histogenesis-based tumor markers are sorely needed to aid in diagnosing and determining the cell type of origin. SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) protein is a transcription factor known to be crucial in the specification of the neural crest and maintenance of Schwann cells and melanocytes. In addition, positive expression has also been implicated in the major salivary gland. Here, we examined SOX10 expression in various salivary gland tumors to correlate this expression with myoepithelial markers. Overall, 76 malignant and 14 benign tumors were examined. SOX10 expression clearly delineated two distinct subtypes of human salivary gland tumors; acinic cell carcinomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas, myoepithelial carcinomas, and pleomorphic adenomas, including the pleomorphic adenoma component of carcinoma, were SOX10 positive, while salivary duct carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas, an oncocytic carcinoma, Oncocytomas, and Warthin tumors were SOX10 negative. Also, SOX10 was expressed in solid-type or non-specific morphology salivary gland tumors, but was not expressed in poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. In normal human salivary gland tissue, SOX10 expression was specific to the nuclei of acini and both luminal and abluminal cells of intercalated ducts but not in other sites. Moreover, the murine model suggested that SOX10 continued to be expressed from the developmental stage to adulthood in the acinar and both luminal and abluminal intercalated ducts in the major salivary gland. Thus, SOX10 is a novel marker for diagnosing and understanding the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors. PMID:23558573

  5. [Pulmonary Sequestration Associated with Increased Serum Tumor Markers;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kozo; Ueda, Mamoru; Kusano, Kenji; Sato, Shintaro; Harasawa, Keiji; Ishizu, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman visited our hospital with chief complaints of cough and fever. A chest X-ray detected an abnormal shadow in the right lung field. A chest computed tomography scan showed solid consolidation at S10 of the right lung. A blood test revealed elevated levels of the tumor markers, CEA(12.1 ng/ml), SLX (134 U/ml) and CA19-9 (76.2 U/ml). Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed abnormally increased 18F-FDG uptake with an SUV max of 11.29. Lung cancer was strongly suspected, and the surgery was performed. Abnormal blood vessels were found within the pulmonary ligament. Intraoperative rapid pathology indicated no malignancy, and the final diagnosis was pulmonary sequestration. PMID:27476573

  6. Immunohistochemical Markers of Soft Tissue Tumors: Pathologic Diagnosis, Genetic Contributions, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Parham, David M

    2015-01-01

    After ~30 years of widespread usage, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become a standard method of diagnosis for surgical pathology. Because of the plethora of diagnoses and often subtle nature of diagnostic criteria, IHC finds particular utility in soft tissue tumors. The use of progressively small amounts of tissue for diagnosis highlights the importance of this method. The sensitivity and crispness of IHC stains have progressively improved with the advent of new techniques. Traditionally, IHC detects cell-typic markers that characterize cell phenotypes, such as chromogranin for neuroectodermal tissue, myogenin for skeletal muscle, and cytokeratin for epithelium. However, the advent of genetic discoveries have led to IHC testing for detection of fusion gene products or overexpressed oncogenes associated with deletions and mutations. Proliferation-based markers such as Ki-67 can also be used for prognosis and grading, but more standardization is needed. Development of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals, such as imatinib or crizotinib, holds the promise of tailored anticancer therapy. IHC thus has assumed importance not only for diagnosis but also for guidance of personalized medicine. PMID:26549970

  7. Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Prognostic and Predictive Marker

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Harami, Sayyed Farshid; Wisinski, Kari B.; Beebe, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a marker for disease progression in metastatic cancer is controversial. The current review will serve to summarize the evidence on CTCs as a marker of disease progression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The immunohistochemistry(IHC)-based CellSearch® is the only FDA-approved isolation technique for quantifying CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We searched PubMed and Web of Knowledge for clinical studies that assessed the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs using IHC-based isolation. The patient outcomes reported include median and Cox-proportional hazard ratios for overall-survival (OS) and progression-free-survival (PFS). All studies reported shorter OS for CTC-positive patients versus CTC-negative. A subset of the selected trials reported significant lower median PFS for CTC-positive patients. The reported trials support the utility of CTC enumeration for patient prognosis. But further studies are required to determine the utility of CTC enumeration for guiding patient therapy. There are three clinical trials ongoing to test this hypothesis. These studies, and others, will further establish the role of CTCs in clinical practice. PMID:25914894

  8. Ratiometric electrochemical immunoassay based on internal reference value for reproducible and sensitive detection of tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohui; Weng, Shaohuang; Guo, Rubin; Lin, Liqing; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Zongfu; Huang, Zhengjun; Lin, Xinhua

    2016-07-15

    A ratiometric assay in an electrochemical immunosensor for tumor marker, herein carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was chosen as a model analyte, was developed to improve simplicity and accuracy. The immunosensor was fabricated via the simple expedient way of using Polythionine-gold (PTh-Au) as electrode modified material to be an internal reference signal and K3[Fe(CN)6] in electrolyte as an indicator signal. When the CEA was fixed on the modified electrode via immunoreaction, only the indicator signal sensitively altered; by contrast, the internal reference signal of PTh-Au remained constant at a suitable pH of the electrolyte. The ratio between the alterations of the indicator signal of K3[Fe(CN)6] and the constant internal reference signal can be used to monitor the concentration of CEA reliably, reproducibly, and sensitively. The prepared ratiometric electrochemical immunosensor could detect CEA with good specificity within a wide linear range from 0.005ng/ml to 40ng/ml with a detection limit of 2.2pg/ml. Additionally, experimental results confirm that our proposed method is practical. Thus, this method can expand to recognize and test other protein markers. PMID:26945184

  9. Tumor marker nucleoporin 88 kDa regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nozomi Kilsdonk, Jeroen W.J. van; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Smeets, Ruben; Bruggeman, Sophia W.M.; Alonso, Angel; Loo, Fons van de; Schneider, Matthias; Berg, Wim B. van den; Swart, Guido W.M.

    2008-09-26

    Nucleoporin 88 kDa (Nup88) is a tumor marker, overexpressed in various types of cancer. In Drosophila Nup88 (mbo) was reported to selectively mediate the nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B, an ubiquitous transcription factor involved in immune responses, apoptosis, and cancer. We addressed the function of Nup88 in mammalian cells. Selective depletion of Nup88 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent reporter gene activation and the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B without affecting the upstream activation pathway in NIH3T3 cells. In contrast, nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptor was not reduced by the depletion of Nup88. In metastatic melanoma cells overexpressing Nup88, constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B was found both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Nup88 depletion in these cells reduced TNF-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B subunits. We conclude that Nup88 regulates the activity of NF-{kappa}B at the level of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Overexpression of Nup88 in tumor cells may, thus be involved in the constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation.

  10. Dual signal amplification of surface plasmon resonance imaging for sensitive immunoassay of tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weihua; Chen, Hongming; Shi, Zhuanzhuan; Yu, Ling

    2014-05-15

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an intriguing technique for immunoassay with the inherent advantages of being high throughput, real time, and label free, but its sensitivity needs essential improvement for practical applications. Here, we report a dual signal amplification strategy using functional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) followed by on-chip atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for sensitive SPRi immunoassay of tumor biomarker in human serum. The AuNPs are grafted with an initiator of ATRP as well as a recognition antibody, where the antibody directs the specific binding of functional AuNPs onto the SPRi sensing surface to form immunocomplexes for first signal amplification and the initiator allows for on-chip ATRP of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) from the AuNPs to further enhance the SPRi signal. High sensitivity and broad dynamic range are achieved with this dual signal amplification strategy for detection of a model tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP), in 10% human serum. PMID:24607795

  11. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  12. Comparison of Breast Cancer to Healthy Control Tissue Discovers Novel Markers with Potential for Prognosis and Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Green, Ann; Beatty, J. David; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karlan, Scott; Gross, Jenny; Thornton, Sean; McIntosh, Martin; Urban, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify biomarkers with potential value for the early detection of poor-outcome breast cancer. Two sets of well-characterized tissues were utilized: one from breast cancer patients with favorable vs. poor outcome and the other from healthy women undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Over 46 differentially expressed genes were identified from a large list of potential targets by a) mining publicly available expression data (identifying 134 genes for quantitative PCR) and b) utilizing a commercial PCR array. Three genes show elevated expression in cancers with poor outcome and low expression in all other tissues, warranting further investigation as potential blood markers for early detection of cancers with poor outcome. Twelve genes showed lower expression in cancers with poor outcome than in cancers with favorable outcome but no differential expression between aggressive cancers and most healthy controls. These genes are more likely to be useful as prognostic tissue markers than as serum markers for early detection of aggressive disease. As a secondary finding was that, when histologically normal breast tissue was removed from a distant site in a breast with cancer, 7 of 38 specimens displayed a cancer-like expression profile, while the remaining 31 were genetically similar to the reduction mammaplasty control group. This finding suggests that some regions of ipsilateral histologically ‘normal’ breast tissue are predisposed to becoming malignant and that normal-appearing tissue with malignant signature might warrant treatment to prevent new primary tumors. PMID:20161755

  13. Quality Assessment and Correlation of Microsatellite Instability and Immunohistochemical Markers among Population- and Clinic-Based Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Mine S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Gallinger, Steven; Bapat, Bharati; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Young, Joanne; Buchanan, Daniel; Walsh, Michael D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Burnett, Terrilea; Newcomb, Polly A.; Grady, William M.; Haile, Robert W.; Casey, Graham; Plummer, Sarah J.; Krumroy, Lisa A.; Baron, John A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of defective mismatch repair (MMR), as assessed by the presence of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of MMR protein expression by IHC, has been useful for risk assessment, prognosis, and prediction of treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. We analyzed tumors for the presence of defective MMR from 5927 Colorectal Cancer Family Registry patients recruited at six international consortium sites. We evaluated the appropriate percentage instability cutoff used to distinguish the three MSI phenotypes [ie, stable (MSS), low instability (MSI-L), and high instability (MSI-H)]; the sensitivity, specificity, and performance characteristics of individual markers; and the concordance between MSI and IHC phenotypes. Guided by the results of the IHC testing, our findings indicate that the distinction between an MSI-H phenotype from a low-instability or MSS phenotype can best be accomplished by using a cutoff of 30% or greater of the markers showing instability. The sensitivity and specificity of the mononucleotide markers were higher than those of the dinucleotide markers. Specifically, BAT26 and BAT25 had the highest sensitivity (94%) and specificity (98%), and the use of mononucleotide markers alone identified 97% of the MSI-H cases correctly. As expected, the presence of MSI-H correlated with an older age of diagnosis, the presence of tumor in the proximal colon, and female sex. PMID:21497289

  14. Down's syndrome-associated single minded gene as a novel tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Deyoung, Maurice Phil; Scheurle, Daniela; Damania, Hema; Zylberberg, Claudia; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2002-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) database has thousands of Expressed Sequence Tags encompassing both known and novel genes. Bioinformatics of the CGAP database led to the prediction that Single Minded Gene (sim2) could be specific to colon tumors. The sim2 gene is located in a minimum region of the chromosome 21 often implicated in trisomia called Down's Syndrome Critical Region. To date, the sim proteins have not been shown to be involved in cancer. Intrigued by the possible association of a Down's syndrome-related gene to solid tumors, efforts were undertaken to validate the expression specificity. The sim2 isoform (sim2-short-form, sim2-s) expression was seen in carcinomas of colon, pancreas and prostate, but not in corresponding normal tissues. Stage-specific expression of the sim2-s protein was seen in normal matched paraffin sections of the colon tumors. In a matched set of tissues of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinomas, sim2-s expression was detected in the BPH. The expression specificity of sim2-s in select solid tumors offers both diagnostic and therapeutic potential and warrants additional study. PMID:12530058

  15. Concentration of thymidine kinase 1 in serum (S-TK1) is a more sensitive proliferation marker in human solid tumors than its activity.

    PubMed

    He, Qimin; Zhang, Pinggn; Zou, Li; Li, Hongxun; Wang, Xiuqin; Zhou, Shan; Fornander, Tommy; Skog, Sven

    2005-10-01

    Activity of thymidine kinase 1 in serum (STK) is a useful marker for leukaemia and lymphoma, but not for solid tumors. We investigate thymidine kinase 1 concentration in serum (S-TK1) as a potential tumor marker. S-TK1 concentration and STK activity levels were determined in 9 human malignant diseases (breast, gastric, rectal, colorectal, lung, brain cancer, hepatoma, lymphoma, leukaemia) and in benign and non-cancerous diseases, representing 850 preoperative cases. Healthy volunteers (n=43) were used as positive controls. S-TK1 concentration was determined by ECL dot blot assay and STK activity levels by an RIA assay. S-TK1 concentrations and STK activity levels in preoperative malignant patients were significantly higher than in healthy individuals, in patients with benign tumors and in those with non-cancerous diseases. Significant correlations between concentration and activity level were only found in healthy individuals, in patients with benign tumors, and in some patients with malignancies, i.e. leukaemia, and breast and gastric cancers. About 90-95 percent of the malignant patients showed S-TK1 concentrations above those of the healthy controls. The corresponding value for STK activity was about 75 percent. When sera from malignant patients were diluted with sera from healthy individuals, S-TK1 concentrations and STK activity levels decreased more than expected. This indicates the presence of a compound (or compounds) in the serum of healthy individuals that destabilises S-TK1. We conclude that S-TK1 concentration is a more sensitive tumor marker in solid malignancies than is STK activity. PMID:16142366

  16. Stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers are frequently overexpressed in circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Bahriye; Tewes, Mitra; Fehm, Tanja; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer patients might be associated with stem cell like tumor cells which have been suggested to be the active source of metastatic spread in primary tumors. Furthermore, these cells also may undergo phenotypic changes, known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows them to travel to the site of metastasis formation without getting affected by conventional treatment. Here we evaluated 226 blood samples of 39 metastatic breast cancer patients during a follow-up of palliative chemo-, antibody – or hormonal therapy for the expression of the stem cell marker ALDH1 and markers for EMT and correlated these findings with the presence of CTC and response to therapy. Methods 2 × 5 ml blood was analyzed for CTC with the AdnaTest BreastCancer (AdnaGen AG) for the detection of EpCAM, MUC-1 and HER2 transcripts. The recovered c-DNA was additionally multiplex tested for three EMT markers [Twist1, Akt2, PI3Kα] and separately for the tumor stem-cell markers ALDH1. The identification of EMT markers was considered positive if at least one marker was detected in the sample. Results 97% of 30 healthy donor samples investigated were negative for EMT and 95% for ALDH1 transcripts. CTC were detected in 69/226 (31%) cancer samples. In the CTC (+) group, 62% were positive for at least one of the EMT markers and 69% for ALDH1, respectively. In the CTC (-) group the percentages were 7% and 14%, respectively. In non-responders, EMT and ALDH1 expression was found in 62% and 44% of patients, in responders the rates were 10% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that a major proportion of CTC of metastatic breast cancer patients shows EMT and tumor stem cell characteristics. Further studies are needed to prove whether these markers might serve as an indicator for therapy resistant tumor cell populations and, therefore, an inferior prognosis. PMID:19589136

  17. miRNA profiling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: implication as diagnostic and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Ravegnini, Gloria; Angelini, Sabrina; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of short noncoding RNAs, that play a relevant role in multiple biological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered as a paradigm of molecular biology in solid tumors worldwide, and after the discovery of specific alterations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, they have emerged from anonymity to become a model for targeted therapy. Epigenetics have an emerging and relevant role in different steps of GIST biology such as tumorigenesis, disease progression, prognosis and drug resistance. The aim of the present review was to summarize the current evidence about the role of microRNAs in GIST, including their potential application as well as their limits. PMID:26447534

  18. Evaluation of prognostic markers for canine mast cell tumors treated with vinblastine and prednisone

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Thamm, Douglas H; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Kiupel, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Background Canine cutaneous mast cell tumor (MCT) is a common neoplastic disease associated with a variable biologic behavior. Surgery remains the primary treatment for canine MCT; however, radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy are commonly used to treat aggressive MCT. The goals of this study were to evaluate the prognostic utility of histologic grade, c-KIT mutations, KIT staining patterns, and the proliferation markers Ki67 and AgNORs in dogs postoperatively treated with vinblastine and prednisone +/- RT, and to compare the outcome of dogs treated with post-operative chemotherapy +/- RT to that of a prognostically matched group treated with surgery alone. Associations between prognostic markers and survival were evaluated. Disease-free intervals (DFI) and overall survival times (OS) of dogs with similar pretreatment prognostic indices postoperatively treated with chemotherapy were compared to dogs treated with surgery alone. Results Histologic grade 3 MCTs, MCTs with c-KIT mutations, MCTs with increased cytoplasmic KIT, and MCTs with increased Ki67 and AgNOR values were associated with decreased DFI and OS. Dogs with histologic grade 3 MCT had significantly increased DFI and OS when treated with chemotherapy vs. surgery alone. Although not statistically significant due to small sample sizes, MCTs with c-KIT mutations had increased DFI and OS when treated with chemotherapy vs. surgery alone. Conclusion and clinical importance This study confirms the prognostic value of histologic grade, c-KIT mutations, KIT staining patterns, and proliferation analyses for canine MCT. Additionally, the results of this study further define the benefit of postoperative vinblastine and prednisone for histologic grade 3 MCTs. PMID:18700956

  19. KIAA1114, a full-length protein encoded by the trophinin gene, is a novel surface marker for isolating tumor-initiating cells of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Won; Yang, Hyun Gul; Kang, Moon Cheol; Lee, Seungwon; Namkoong, Hong; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers for tumor-initiating cells (TICs) is of critical importance for developing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancers. Here we identified the role of KIAA1114, a full-length translational product of the trophinin gene, as a distinctive marker for TICs in human liver cancer by developing a DNA vaccine-induced monoclonal antibody targeting the putative extracellular domain of KIAA1114. Compared with other established markers of liver TICs, KIAA1114 was unique in that its expression was detected in both alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and AFP-negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with the expression levels of KIAA1114 being positively correlated to their tumorigenic potentials. Notably, KIAA1114 expression was strongly detected in primary hepatic tumor, but neither in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue from the same patient nor normal liver tissue. KIAA1114high cells isolated from HCC cell lines displayed TIC-like features with superior functional and phenotypic traits compared to their KIAA1114low counterparts, including tumorigenic abilities in xenotransplantation model, in vitro colony- and spheroid-forming capabilities, expression of stemness-associated genes, and migratory capacity. Our findings not only address the value of a novel antigen, KIAA1114, as a potential diagnostic factor of human liver cancer, but also as an independent biomarker for identifying TIC populations that could be broadly applied to the heterogeneous HCC subtypes. PMID:24713374

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of SALL4 in hepatocellular carcinoma, a potential pitfall in the differential diagnosis of yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Katz, Betina; Chaux, Alcides; Sharma, Rajni; Munari, Enrico; Faraj, Sheila F; Illei, Peter B; Torbenson, Michael; Netto, George J

    2013-07-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor that serves as a marker of yolk sac tumor. Yolk sac tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma share histologic, serologic, and immunohistochemical features. Previous studies have shown lack of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting utility in this differential diagnosis. Sixty-nine samples of hepatocellular carcinoma were retrieved from surgical pathology archives and used to construct 9 tissue microarrays. A germ cell tumor tissue microarray containing 10 yolk sac tumors was used for comparison. Extent, intensity, and pattern of nuclear SALL4 expression were assessed in each spot. Mean percentage of expression was calculated for each tumor and used during analysis. Optimal discriminatory extent of expression cutoff was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Other potential discriminatory markers including Hep Par1 were also evaluated. Forty-six percent (32/69) of hepatocellular carcinoma and all yolk sac tumors revealed at least focal expression of SALL4. A unique punctuate/clumped pattern of nuclear staining was present in 94% (30/32) of hepatocellular carcinoma, whereas all yolk sac tumors displayed a diffuse finely granular nuclear staining pattern. A 25% extent of SALL4 expression cutoff was found to be optimal for the distinction of yolk sac tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma yielding a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 92.8%, and a positive predictive value of 66.6% for yolk sac tumor diagnosis. The addition of Hep Par1 increased the specificity (99%) and positive predictive value (90%). This is the first report of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Our finding should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and yolk sac tumor. The unique punctuate/clumped pattern seen in hepatocellular carcinoma cases could be of further discriminatory value. PMID:23347651

  1. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  2. Plasma DCLK1 is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Targeting DCLK1 prevents HCC tumor xenograft growth via a microRNA-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Ali, Naushad; Fazili, Javid; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ding, Kai; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor stem cell marker Doublecortin-like kinase1 (DCLK1) is upregulated in several solid tumors. The role of DCLK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. We immunostained tissues from human livers with HCC, cirrhosis controls (CC), and non-cirrhosis controls (NCC) for DCLK1. Western blot and ELISA analyses for DCLK1 were performed with stored plasma samples. We observed increased immunoreactive DCLK1 in epithelia and stroma in HCC and CCs compared with NCCs, and observed a marked increase in plasma DCLK1 from patients with HCC compared with CC and NCC. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas’ HCC dataset revealed that DCLK1 is overexpressed in HCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues. High DCLK1-expressing cells had more epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Various tumor suppressor miRNAs were also downregulated in HCC tumors. We evaluated the effects of DCLK1 knockdown on Huh7.5-derived tumor xenograft growth. This was associated with growth arrest and a marked downregulation of cMYC, and EMT transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL, and SLUG via let-7a and miR-200 miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-143/145, a corresponding decrease in pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG, KLF4, and LIN28, and a reduction of let-7a, miR-143/145, and miR-200-specific luciferase activity was observed. These findings suggest that the detection of elevated plasma DCLK1 may provide a cost-effective, less invasive tool for confirmation of clinical signs of cirrhosis, and a potential companion diagnostic marker for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Our results support evaluating DCLK1 as a biomarker for detection and as a therapeutic target for eradicating HCC. PMID:26468984

  3. Chemokines as Potential Markers in Pediatric Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, André Barreto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases and obstructive uropathies are the two most frequent causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric renal diseases. Among several putative biomarkers, chemokines emerge as promising molecules since they play relevant roles in the pathophysiology of pediatric renal diseases. The evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help in the management of diverse renal diseases in children and the detection of patients at high risk to develop CKD. The aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of chemokines and the potential link between chemokines and the most common pediatric renal diseases by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24692841

  4. Immunohistochemical evaluation of stem cell markers and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengyan; Qi, Yan; Liu, Ruixue; Lan, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Yang; Ju, Xinxin; Chen, Dongdong; Zou, Hong; Li, Shugang; Hu, Jianming; Zhao, Jin; Shen, Yaoyuan; Sun, Zhenzhu; Pang, Lijuan; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are fibroblastic, ubiquitous mesenchymal tumors. Although several SFT studies have been conducted, the cell of origin of SFT remains controversial and reliable diagnostic markers are needed for SFT identification for proper prognosis and therapeutics. To analyze the immunophenotype of SFT for the identification of specific diagnostic markers and the cell of origin of this tumor, we performed an immunohistochemical study of stem cell markers [aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD29, CD44, CD133, and nestin] and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in 18 cases of SFT. The results demonstrated that ALDH1 was present in 16 cases (16/18), STAT6 in 13 cases (13/18), CD44 in 8 cases (8/18), and CD29 in 1 case (1/18), whereas CD133 and nestin were absent in all cases (0/18). Our results indicate that combination with ALDH1 and STAT6 can improve the diagnostic value of CD34 for SFT. The immunohistochemical findings for stem cell surface markers indicate that SFT may originate from stem cells and that ALDH1 plays an important role in the development of SFT. PMID:26617768

  5. The stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 interacts with vascular endothelial growth factor and potentiates its action.

    PubMed

    Adini, Avner; Adini, Irit; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Benny, Ofra; Pravda, Elke; Hu, Ron; Luyindula, Dema; D'Amato, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1, a pentaspan transmembrane protein, is a unique cell surface marker commonly used to identify stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells and cancer stem cells. However, recent studies have shown that prominin-1 expression is not restricted to stem cells but also occurs in modified forms in many mature adult human cells. Although prominin-1 has been studied extensively as a stem cell marker, its physiological function of the protein has not been elucidated. We investigated prominin-1 function in two cell lines, primary human endothelial cells and B16-F10 melanoma cells, both of which express high levels of prominin-1. We found that prominin-1 directly interacts with the angiogenic and tumor survival factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in both the primary endothelial cells and the melanoma cells. Knocking down prominin-1 in the endothelial cells disrupted capillary formation in vitro and decreased angiogenesis in vivo. Similarly, tumors derived from prominin-1 knockdown melanoma cells had a reduced growth rate in vivo. Further, melanoma cells with knocked down prominin-1 had diminished ability to interact with VEGF, which was associated with decreased bcl-2 protein levels and increased apoptosis. In vitro studies with soluble prominin-1 showed that it stabilized dimer formation of VEGF164, but not VEGF121. Taken together, our findings support the notion that prominin-1 plays an active role in cell growth through its ability to interact and potentiate the anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic activities of VEGF. Additionally, prominin-1 promotes tumor growth by supporting angiogenesis and inhibiting tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:23150059

  6. PD-L1 and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes as Prognostic Markers in Resected NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Ameratunga, Malaka; Asadi, Khashayar; Lin, Xihui; Walkiewicz, Marzena; Murone, Carmel; Knight, Simon; Mitchell, Paul; Boutros, Paul; John, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune checkpoint inhibition has shifted treatment paradigms in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Conflicting results have been reported regarding the immune infiltrate and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) as a prognostic marker. We correlated the immune infiltrate and PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic characteristics in a cohort of resected NSCLC. Methods A tissue microarray was constructed using triplicate cores from consecutive resected NSCLC. Immunohistochemistry was performed for CD8, FOXP3 and PD-L1. Strong PD-L1 expression was predefined as greater than 50% tumor cell positivity. Matched nodal samples were assessed for concordance of PD-L1 expression. Results Of 522 patients, 346 were node-negative (N0), 72 N1 and 109 N2; 265 were adenocarcinomas (AC), 182 squamous cell cancers (SCC) and 75 other. Strong PD-L1 expression was found in 24% cases. In the overall cohort, PD-L1 expression was not associated with survival. In patients with N2 disease, strong PD-L1 expression was associated with significantly improved disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in multivariate analysis (HR 0.49, 95%CI 0.36–0.94, p = 0.031; HR 0.46, 95%CI 0.26–0.80, p = 0.006). In this resected cohort only 5% harboured EGFR mutations, whereas 19% harboured KRAS and 23% other. KRAS mutated tumors were more likely to highly express PD-L1 compared to EGFR (22% vs 3%). A stromal CD8 infiltrate was associated with significantly improved DFS in SCC (HR 0.70, 95%CI 0.50–0.97, p = 0.034), but not AC, whereas FOXP3 was not prognostic. Matched nodal specimens (N = 53) were highly concordant for PD-L1 expression (89%). Conclusion PD-L1 expression was not prognostic in the overall cohort. PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and matched nodal specimens were highly concordant. The observed survival benefit in N2 disease requires confirmation. PMID:27104612

  7. Technical note: gold marker implants and high-frequency jet ventilation for stereotactic, single-dose irradiation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, P; Kraus, H-J; Dölken, W; Mühlnickel, W; Müller-Nolte, F; Hering, W

    2006-02-01

    With reference to radiosurgery of the liver, we describe techniques designed to solve the methodological problem of striking targets subject to respiratory motion with the necessary precision. Implanting a gold marker in the vicinity of the liver tumor was the first step in ensuring the reproducibility of the isocenter's position. An 18-karat gold rod measuring 1.9 x 3 mm was implanted approximately 2 cm from the edge of the tumor as this was displayed in the spiral, thin-slice CT with contrast media. Both the implantation of the marker and the required, CT-controlled biopsy of the liver tumor can be achieved simultaneously with the same puncture needle. The efficiency of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in neutralizing the targeted organ's respiratory motion during stereotactic single-dose irradiation was evaluated. The procedure was carried out on ten patients without any complications. In the time between treatment planning and irradiation (3 days), no significant marker migration was observable. In all cases, the gold marker (volume: 7.5 mm(3)) was readily observable in the treatment beam using portal imaging. HFJV provided reliable immobilization. The liver motion in each anesthetized patient was limited to under 3.0 mm in all directions. Thus, the correct field settings and target reproducibility were able to be analyzed and documented during the irradiation. The combination of marker and HFJV enables the determination of stereotactic coordinates directly related to the liver itself and, in this way, stereotactic radiation treatment of liver tumors is freed from the uncertainties involved in orientation to bony landmarks, in respiratory motion, and in changes of position in the stereotactic body frame. The method is feasible and can improve the accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy. PMID:16417397

  8. Clinical Significance of Serum IL-12 Level in Patients with Early Breast Carcinoma and Its Correlation with Other Tumor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Samar Samir; Mohammad, Manal Moussa; Ezz-El-Arab, Lobna R.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic significance of Interleukin 12 (IL-12) in breast cancer (BC) and its correlation with other tumor markers including cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and MMP9/TIMP1 ratio. METHODS: Serum levels of IL-12, tumor markers, and hormone receptors were measured in 92 BC and 56 benign lesion patients versus 40 healthy subjects. Clinical stage, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, grade, and histological type were recorded. RESULTS: BC patients have lower IL-12, but higher CA 15.3 and CEA than control group. High levels of serum IL-12 were associated with lymph node positivity and progesterone receptor negativity. IL-12 was significant lower in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared to non IDC histological type. IL-12 was higher in patients with higher stage and grade but the difference was not statistically significant. IL-12 correlates negatively with MMP9/TIMP1 ratio. CONCLUSION: IL-12 is less specific than CEA for screening early BC, but its correlation with tumor aggressiveness and progression markers may have a prognostic value.

  9. SOX2 is a cancer-specific regulator of tumor initiating potential in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Jasmin M.; Basin, Alice; Sastre-Perona, Ana; Yonekubo, Yoshiya; Brown, Jessie; Sennett, Rachel; Rendl, Michael; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Carucci, John A.; Schober, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Although the principles that balance stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in normal tissue homeostasis are beginning to emerge, it is still unclear whether cancer cells with tumor initiating potential are similarly governed, or whether they have acquired distinct mechanisms to sustain self-renewal and long-term tumor growth. Here we show that the transcription factor Sox2, which is not expressed in normal skin epithelium and is dispensable for epidermal homeostasis, marks tumor initiating cells (TICs) in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that Sox2 is required for SCC growth in mouse and human, where it enhances Nrp1/Vegf signaling to promote the expansion of TICs along the tumor-stroma interface. Our findings suggest that distinct transcriptional programs govern self-renewal and long-term growth of TICs and normal skin epithelial stem and progenitor cells. These programs present promising diagnostic markers and targets for cancer specific therapies. PMID:25077433

  10. Potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valdespino, Victor; Valdespino, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and epigenetic origins. The growing field of epigenetics has contributed to our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression, and has allowed the development of novel therapeutic drugs. First-generation epigenetic inhibitor drugs have obtained modest clinical results in two types of hematological malignancy. Second-generation epigenetic inhibitors are in development, and have intrinsically greater selectivity for their molecular targets. Solid tumors are more genetic and epigenetically complex than hematological malignancies, but the transcriptome and epigenome biomarkers have been identified for many of these malignancies. This solid tumor molecular aberration profile may be modified using specific or quasi-specific epidrugs together with conventional and innovative anticancer treatments. In this critical review, we briefly analyze the strategies to select the targeted epigenetic changes, enumerate the second-generation epigenetic inhibitors, and describe the main signs indicating the potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors. We also highlight the work of consortia or academic organizations that support the undertaking of human epigenetic therapeutic projects as well as some examples of transcriptome/epigenome profile determination in clinical assessment of cancer patients treated with epidrugs. There is a good chance that epigenetic therapies will be able to be used in patients with solid tumors in the future. This may happen soon through collaboration of diverse scientific groups, making the selection of targeted epigenetic aberration(s) more rapid, the design and probe of drug candidates, accelerating in vitro and in vivo assays, and undertaking new cancer epigenetic-therapy clinical trails. PMID:26346546

  11. Drosophila as a Potential Model for Ocular Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Daimark; Lyulcheva, Ekaterina; Cobbe, Neville

    2015-04-01

    Drosophila has made many contributions to our understanding of cancer genes and mechanisms that have subsequently been validated in mammals. Despite anatomical differences between fly and human eyes, flies offer a tractable genetic model in which to dissect the functional importance of genetic lesions found to be affected in human ocular tumors. Here, we discuss different approaches for using Drosophila as a model for ocular cancer and how studies on ocular cancer genes in flies have begun to reveal potential strategies for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss recent developments in the use of Drosophila for drug discovery, which is coming to the fore as Drosophila models are becoming tailored to study tumor types found in the clinic. PMID:27172095

  12. Proteomics-based identification of α-enolase as a potential prognostic marker in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yonglitthipagon, Ponlapat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajarabhongsa; Mulvenna, Jason; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of expression status of α-enolase (ENO1) and clinicopathological outcomes of CCA patients. Design and methods Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to compare differential expressed protein profiles of four human CCA cell lines and H69, a non-malignant biliary cell line, as a control. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out in tissue-microarray of human CCA tissues (n = 301). Results We identified ENO1 in all CCA cell lines but not H69 by proteomics based. About 75% of patients with CCA showed over-expression of ENO1 in hyperplastic bile duct and the tumors compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue counterparts. Moreover, over-expression of ENO1 is significantly associated with poor prognosis and tumor invasion of CCA patients. Conclusions ENO1 may serve as a prognostic marker to monitor the disease progression of these patients. PMID:22552009

  13. Serum cytokeratin 19 fragment in advanced lung cancer: could we eventually have a serum tumor marker?

    PubMed Central

    Bastawisy, Ahmed El; azzouny, Mahmoud El; Mohammed, Gamal; allah, Ahmad Awad; Behiry, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies; however, no serum marker has been routinely recommended until now. Methods: This is a prospective case control study including two groups of patients: Group I—patients with advanced lung cancer and Group II—patients with benign lung disease as control. Serum cytokeratin 19 (CK19) fragment levels were measured at baseline by real-time polymerase chain reaction before first-line chemotherapy. The CK19 cut-off taken was 15-cycle threshold. The primary end point was the comparison of high CK19 in cases and controls. The secondary end point was the correlation between high CK19 and progressive disease (PD), progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS) in advanced lung cancer patients. Results: A total of 30 patients with advanced lung cancer (16 non-small and 14 small cell lung cancer) and 15 patients with benign lung disease were included and followed up during the period from October 2008 to October 2011 with median follow-up of one and half years. High CK19 was found in 90% of lung cancer cases as compared with 7% in controls (p < 0.001). High CK19 was found in all cases showing PD (p = 0.04). One-year OS in high CK was 61% as compared with 33% in normal CK (p = 0.1). Conclusion: Serum CK19 fragment is a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for advanced lung cancer. PMID:24567753

  14. 2D/4D marker-free tumor tracking using 4D CBCT as the reference image

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengjiao; Rit, Simon; Delmon, Vivien; Wang, Guangzhi

    2014-01-01

    Tumor motion caused by respiration is an important issue in image guided radiotherapy. A 2D/4D matching method between 4D volumes derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2D fluoroscopic images was implemented to track the tumor motion without the use of implanted markers. In this method, firstly, 3DCBCT and phase-rebinned 4DCBCT are reconstructed from cone beam acquisition. Secondly, 4DCBCT volumes and streak free 3DCBCT volume are combined to improve the image quality of the DRRs. Finally, the 2D/4D matching problem is converted into a 2D/2D matching between incoming projections and DRR images from each phase of the 4DCBCT. The diaphragm is used as a target surrogate for matching instead of using the tumor position directly. This relies on the assumption that if a patient has the same breathing phase and diaphragm position as the reference 4DCBCT, then the tumor position is the same. From the matching results, the phase information, diaphragm position and tumor position at the time of each incoming projection acquisition can be derived. The accuracy of this method was verified using 16 candidate datasets, representing lung and liver applications and 1-minute and 2-minute acquisitions. The criteria for the eligibility of datasets were described: 11 eligible datasets were selected to verify the accuracy of diaphragm tracking, and one eligible dataset was chosen to verify the accuracy of tumor tracking. Diaphragm matching accuracy was 1.88±1.35mm in the isocenter plane, the 2D tumor tracking accuracy was 2.13±1.26mm in the isocenter plane. These features make this method feasible for real-time marker-free tumor motion tracking purpose. PMID:24710793

  15. 2D/4D marker-free tumor tracking using 4D CBCT as the reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjiao; Sharp, Gregory C.; Rit, Simon; Delmon, Vivien; Wang, Guangzhi

    2014-05-01

    Tumor motion caused by respiration is an important issue in image-guided radiotherapy. A 2D/4D matching method between 4D volumes derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2D fluoroscopic images was implemented to track the tumor motion without the use of implanted markers. In this method, firstly, 3DCBCT and phase-rebinned 4DCBCT are reconstructed from cone beam acquisition. Secondly, 4DCBCT volumes and a streak-free 3DCBCT volume are combined to improve the image quality of the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Finally, the 2D/4D matching problem is converted into a 2D/2D matching between incoming projections and DRR images from each phase of the 4DCBCT. The diaphragm is used as a target surrogate for matching instead of using the tumor position directly. This relies on the assumption that if a patient has the same breathing phase and diaphragm position as the reference 4DCBCT, then the tumor position is the same. From the matching results, the phase information, diaphragm position and tumor position at the time of each incoming projection acquisition can be derived. The accuracy of this method was verified using 16 candidate datasets, representing lung and liver applications and one-minute and two-minute acquisitions. The criteria for the eligibility of datasets were described: 11 eligible datasets were selected to verify the accuracy of diaphragm tracking, and one eligible dataset was chosen to verify the accuracy of tumor tracking. The diaphragm matching accuracy was 1.88 ± 1.35 mm in the isocenter plane and the 2D tumor tracking accuracy was 2.13 ± 1.26 mm in the isocenter plane. These features make this method feasible for real-time marker-free tumor motion tracking purposes.

  16. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs. PMID:26997437

  17. Disposable immunosensor array for ultrasensitive detection of tumor markers using glucose oxidase-functionalized silica nanosphere tags.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guosong; Wu, Jie; Leng, Chuan; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2011-05-15

    An ultrasensitive multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay method was developed for the detection of tumor markers by combining a newly designed trace tag and a disposable immunosensor array. The array was prepared by immobilizing capture antibodies on gold nanoparticles which were assembled on carbon nanotubes-chitosan modified screen-printed carbon electrodes. The trace tag was prepared by loading signal antibodies and high-content glucose oxidase on amino-functionalized silica nanosphere. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, ultrahigh sensitivity was achieved by the enzymatic signal amplification with ferrocenecarboxylic acid as electron transfer mediator and the accelerated electron transfer by carbon nanotubes. Using carcinoembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein as model analytes, this method showed wide linear ranges with the detection limits down to 3.2 and 4.0 pg/mL, respectively. The proposed immunosensor array exhibited acceptable stability and reproducibility. The assay results of serum samples were in acceptable agreement with the reference values. This method excluded completely the effect of dissolved oxygen and showed potential application for multianalyte determination in clinical diagnostics. PMID:21411307

  18. Visible-light driven biofuel cell based on hierarchically branched titanium dioxide nanorods photoanode for tumor marker detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chaomin; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Yanhu; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a novel sensing platform based on visible light driven biofuel cell (BFC) has been facilely designed for sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with the photo-response bioanode, realizing the dual route energy conversion of light energy and chemical energy to electricity. The hierarchical branched TiO2 nanorods (B-TiO2 NRs) decorated with CdS quantum dots (QDs) act as the substrate to confine glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the visible light driven glucose oxidation at the bioanode. Three dimensional flowers like hierarchical carbon/gold nanoparticles/bilirubin oxidase (3D FCM/AuNPs/BOD) bioconjugate served as biocatalyst for O2 reduction at the biocathode. With an increase in the concentration of PSA, the amount of BOD labels on biocathode increases, thus leading to the higher current output of the as-proposed visible light driven BFC. Based on this, this sensing platform provide great performance in sensitivity and specificity, increasing linear detection range from 0.3pgmL(-1) to 7μgmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.1pgmL(-1). Most importantly, our new sensing strategy provided a simple and inexpensive sensing platform for tumor markers detection, suggesting its wide potential applications for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27135937

  19. Circulating miRNAs as Potential Marker for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chuanyu; Henderson, Heather; Spradley, Christopher; Li, Li; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kumar, Sandeep; Hong, Nayeon; Arroliga, Alejandro C.; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2013-01-01

    MircoRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that govern the gene expression and, play significant role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The detection of miRNAs in circulation of pulmonary hypertensive (PH) human subjects remains elusive. In the current study, we determined the pattern of miRNAs of mild-to-severe human PH subjects and, compared them with the control subjects by miRNA array. Blood was obtained using fluoroscopic and waveform guided catheterization from the distal (pulmonary artery) port of the catheter. A total 40 human subjects were included in the study and, the degree of PH was determined by mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Among several miRNAs in the array, we validated 14 miRNAs and, the data were consistent with the array profile. We identified several novel downregulated miRNAs (miR-451, miR-1246) and upregulated miRNAs (miR-23b, miR-130a and miR-191) in the circulation of PH subjects. Our study showed novel set of miRNAs which are dysregulated in PH and, are directly proportional to the degree of PH. These miRNAs may be considered as potential biomarker for early detection of PH. PMID:23717609

  20. Acne - a potential skin marker of internal disease.

    PubMed

    Pace, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder in adult women. Hyperandrogenism is the crux of the pathogenesis of both acne and hirsutism, the most frequent clinical presentations of the syndrome. The chronic anovulation that may occur, often but not always associated with enlarged cystic ovaries, has long been recognized as an important feature of PCOS. In recent years major changes have occurred with regard to PCOS: Although management of the common cutaneous manifestations, mainly acne, hirsutism, alopecia, and acanthosis nigricans, remains strictly within the realm of daily dermatologic practice, the pendulum is shifting toward greater awareness of the longer-term systemic implications of PCOS, with emphasis on the unique opportunity and privileged position of the dermatologist to diagnose this potentially serious problem at an early stage, when effective long-term treatment can be instituted. Patients need to be advised that PCOS cannot be cured but can be controlled. Management should involve a multidisciplinary team with emphasis on lifestyle change, insulin sensitizing agents, androgen blockers, and attention to specific cutaneous manifestations. PMID:26321405

  1. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  2. Levels of certain tumor markers as differential factors between bilharzial and non-biharzial bladder cancer among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective Bladder cancer is the commonest type of malignant tumors as a result of schistosomaisis which is a major healthy problem in many subtropical developing countries. The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying biochemical tumor markers in schistosomal bladder cancer versus non-schistosomal bladder cancer when compared to normal healthy ones. Methods This work was performed on tissue specimens from total 25 patients and serum samples from total 30 patients versus ten healthy individuals served as control. The investigated parameters in serum are: xanthine oxidase (XO), fructosamine, lactate dehydrogense (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total proteins, essential and non- essential amino acids profile, hydroxyproline, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In addition, the current investigation also extended to study some markers in tumor bladder tissues including, pyruvate kinase enzyme (PK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results Results showed that biharzial bladder cancer patients recored more significant elevation in serum XO, fructosamine, LDH, AST, ALT, hydroxyproline, IgE and TNF-α than in bladder cancer patients when compared to control ones. While, in tissues there were significant increase in PK, LDH, AST & ALT activities of schistosomal bladder cancer than in bladder cancer as compared to control healthy patients. Conclusions It could be concluded that, bilharzial and non-bilharzial bladder cancer showed distinct biochemical profile of tumor development and progression which can be taken into consideration in diagnosis of bladder cancer. PMID:21473769

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using CD68 Marker: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, Neeta; Roy, Souparna; Ganjre, Anjali; Meher, Aishwarya; Singh, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in India. Clear evidence regarding inflammation being an etiological factor of cancer was found only in the last few decades. A major inflammatory component in the tumor tissue is Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs). The CD68 antibody is a marker for staining TAMs. Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the macrophage count in healthy oral mucosa and OSCC and comparing TAMs in different histopathological grades of OSCC immunohistochemically. Materials and Methods Thirty archival specimens of OSCC patients and 10 healthy biopsy samples were collected. Immunohistochemical staining was done using a CD68 marker. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test. Results Comparing CD68 expression in various study groups showed a significant difference (p=0.000). The pair-wise analysis showed different grades of OSCC, which differed significantly for CD68 expression from the normal oral mucosa. Conclusion The most significant cells present in tumor stroma are TAMs, which remain in close proximity to neoplastic cells and interact with them via several chemical mediators, which may serve to increase the invasiveness of the malignant epithelium. Dense infiltration of TAMs adjacent to tumor cells and islands vividly implies their role in tumor progression. PMID:27190959

  4. Identifying Potential Markers of the Sun's Giant Convective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Leamon, Robert J.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2014-04-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are analyzed using a diagnostic known as the magnetic range of influence (MRoI). The MRoI is a measure of the length over which a photospheric magnetogram is balanced and so its application gives the user a sense of the connective length scales in the outer solar atmosphere. The MRoI maps and histograms inferred from the SDO/HMI magnetograms primarily exhibit four scales: a scale of a few megameters that can be associated with granulation, a scale of a few tens of megameters that can be associated with super-granulation, a scale of many hundreds to thousands of megameters that can be associated with coronal holes and active regions, and a hitherto unnoticed scale that ranges from 100 to 250 Mm. We infer that this final scale is an imprint of the (rotationally driven) giant convective scale on photospheric magnetism. This scale appears in MRoI maps as well-defined, spatially distributed concentrations that we have dubbed "g-nodes." Furthermore, using coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO, we see that the vicinity of these g-nodes appears to be a preferred location for the formation of extreme-ultraviolet (and likely X-Ray) brightpoints. These observations and straightforward diagnostics offer the potential of a near real-time mapping of the Sun's largest convective scale, a scale that possibly reaches to the very bottom of the convective zone.

  5. Use of faecal markers in screening for colorectal neoplasia: a European group on tumor markers position paper.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael J; van Rossum, Leo G M; van Turenhout, Sietze T; Malminiemi, Outi; Sturgeon, Catherine; Lamerz, Rolf; Nicolini, Andrea; Haglund, Caj; Holubec, Lubos; Fraser, Callum G; Halloran, Stephen P

    2011-01-01

    Several randomized controlled trials have shown that population-based screening using faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) can reduce mortality from colorectal neoplasia. Based on this evidence, a number of countries have introduced screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) and high-risk adenoma and many others are considering its introduction. The aim of this article is to critically review the current status of faecal markers as population-based screening tests for these neoplasia. Most of the available faecal tests involve the measurement of either occult blood or a panel of DNA markers. Occult blood may be measured using either the guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) or a faecal immunochemical test (iFOBT). Although iFOBT may require a greater initial investment, they have several advantages over gFOBT, including greater analytical sensitivity and specificity. Their use results in improved clinical performance and higher uptake rates. Importantly for population screening, some of the iFOBTs can be automated and provide an adjustable cutoff for faecal haemoglobin concentration. However, samples for iFOBT, may be less stable after collection than for gFOBT. For new centres undertaking FOBT for colorectal neoplasia, the European Group on Tumour Markers recommends use of a quantitative iFOBT with an adjustable cutoff point and high throughput analysis. All participants with positive FOBT results should be offered colonoscopy. The panel recommends further research into increasing the stability of iFOBT and the development of improved and affordable DNA and proteomic-based tests, which reduce current false negative rates, simplify sample transport and enable automated analysis. PMID:20824704

  6. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Nicholas O.; Shepherd, Wes; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy-based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  7. Association of dose escalation of octreotide long-acting release on clinical symptoms and tumor markers and response among patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Al-Efraij, Khalid; Aljama, Mohammed A; Kennecke, Hagen Fritz

    2015-06-01

    Patients with nonresectable metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) experience symptoms of hormone hypersecretion including diarrhea, flushing, and bronchoconstriction, which can interfere with quality of life [Anthony and Vinik (2011) Pancreas, 40:987]. Treatment with a long-acting release formulation of octreotide, a somatostatin analog, can help to alleviate these symptoms. Although high doses of octreotide are often required for adequate symptom control, the relationship between octreotide dose escalation and symptom control in the NET context is not well quantified in the literature. A retrospective chart review was conducted of nonresectable metastatic NET patients who received a dose greater than 30 mg intramuscular octreotide long-acting formulation (O-LAR) at any time between January 2005 and December 2011 at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA). The association between dose escalation of O-LAR, chromogranin A (CGA), 24-h urine 5-hydoxyindoacetate (5-HIAA), symptom control, and radiological progression was explored. Dose escalation of O-LAR was associated with improved symptom control in NET patients who were refractory to the standard dose levels. Reduction of serum CGA & 5-HIAA levels by at least 10% was observed in 31% and 23% respectively. Retrospective review of imaging did not document any reductions in tumor volume. Higher doses of O-LAR are associated with improved symptom control in NET patients. The variability in tumor marker levels in response to O-LAR dose escalation may indicate that tumor marker levels may not be an accurate assessment of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25727756

  8. Folate-homocysteine interrelations: potential new markers of folate status.

    PubMed

    Lucock, M D; Daskalakis, I; Schorah, C J; Lumb, C H; Oliver, M; Devitt, H; Wild, J; Dowell, A C; Levene, M I

    1999-05-01

    We report a transient drop in plasma Hcy and Cys following a single oral dose of PteGlu. The thiol change was concomitant with both the peak plasma 5CH3H4PteGlu1 level (by HPLC) and the maximum plasma Lactobacillus casei activity which reflects absorption of unmodified PteGlu. The significant reciprocal association of Hcy with radioassay RBC folate (r = -0.28, 99% CI -0.48, -0.05, P = 0.0016), serum folate (r = -0.37, 99% CI -0.56, -16, P = 0.0001), and vitamin B12 (r = -0.42, 99% CI -0.59, -21, P = 0.0001) is shown and reflects the long-term nutritional effect of B vitamins on this important, potentially atherogenic thiol. These are now well-established associations. We extend the potential for investigation of folate metabolism in health and disease by evaluating a range of new folate indices which are based on erythrocyte coenzymes. These have been looked at independently and in association with established parameters. Erythrocyte methylfolates (mono- to hexaglutamate-5CH3H4PteGlu1-6), formylfolates (tri- to pentaglutamate-5CHOH4PteGlu3-5),formiminotetrahydrofolate (formiminoH4PteGlu1), unsubstituted tetrahydrofolate (H4PteGlu1), andpara-aminobenzoylglutamate (P-ABG) have been measured by HPLC with fluorescence detection. A positive linear association exists between (i) H4PteGlu1 and radioassay RBC folate (r = 0.50, 99% CI 0. 07, 0.77, P = 0.0036), and (ii) H4PteGlu1 and tetraglutamates of both formyl- and methylfolate (r = 0.52, 99% CI 0.10, 0.78, P = 0. 0022, and r = 0.56, 99% CI 0.15, 0.80, P = 0.0009, respectively). Since, in addition, a reciprocal linear association exists between Hcy and tetraglutamyl formylfolate (r = -0.41, 99% CI -0.73, 0.05, P = 0.0206), erythrocyte tetraglutamates may be a good reflection of the bodies' active coenzyme pools. Pentaglutamyl formylfolate, the longest oligo-gamma-glutamyl chain form of this coenzyme may be a good indicator of folate depletion. The abundance of this coenzyme both increases with increasing Hcy (r = 0

  9. A panel of tumor markers, calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3 in upper tract urothelial carcinoma identified by proteomic and immunological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a tumor with sizable metastases and local recurrence. It has a worse prognosis than bladder cancer. This study was designed to investigate the urinary potential tumor markers of UTUC. Methods Between January 2008 and January 2009, urine was sampled from 13 patients with UTUC and 20 healthy adults. The current study identified biomarkers for UTUC using non-fixed volume stepwise weak anion exchange chromatography for fractionation of urine protein prior to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Results Fifty five differential proteins have been determined by comparing with the 2-DE maps of the urine of UTUC patients and those of healthy people. Western blotting analysis and immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and normal tissues from patients with UTUC were carried out to further verify five possible UTUC biomarkers, including zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, calreticulin, annexin A2, annexin A3 and haptoglobin. The data of western blot and immunohistochemical analysis are consistent with the 2-DE data. Combined the experimental data in the urine and in tumor tissues collected from patients with UTUC, the crucial over-expressed proteins are calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3. Conclusions Calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3 are very likely a panel of biomarkers with potential value for UTUC diagnosis. PMID:24884814

  10. Utility of OCT3/4, TSPY and β-Catenin as Biological Markers for Gonadoblastoma Formation and Malignant Germ Cell Tumor Development in Dysgenetic Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Icela; Garibay, Nayely; Pena-Yolanda, Rocio; Contreras, Alejandra; Raya, Atlantida; Dominguez, Carolina; Romero, Mirna; Aristi, Gerardo; Queipo, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gonadoblastoma (GB) is regarded as an in situ form of germ cell tumor in dysgenetic gonads, and 30% of patients with GB develop a dysgerminoma/seminoma tumor. OBJECTIVE: Determine whether OCT3/4 and β-catenin are expressed in dysgenetic gonads before GB development and whether TSPY participates in the OCT3/4-β-catenin pathways in the malignant invasive behavior. METHODS: dysgenetic gonads of Disorders of sex differentiation (DSD) patients with mixed gonadal dysgenesis were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for comparison with GB and dysgerminoma/seminoma. RESULTS: Our results suggest that the development of GB is secondary to the interaction of OCT3/4 and TSPY, that β-catenin does not participate in this process. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this biological markers detects the potential high risk gonads. PMID:23396295

  11. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers with a rapid and sensitive multicolor quantum dots based immunochromatographic test strip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunying; Hou, Fei; Ma, Yicai

    2015-06-15

    A novel multicolor quantum dots (QDs) based immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) was developed for simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers, by utilizing alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as models. The immunosensor could realize simultaneous quantitative detection of tumor markers with only one test line and one control line on the nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) due to the introduction of multicolor QDs. In this method, a mixture of mouse anti-AFP McAb and mouse anti-CEA McAb was coated on NC membrane as test line and goat anti-mouse IgG antibody was coated as control line. Anti-AFP McAb-QDs546 conjugates and anti-CEA McAb-QDs620 conjugates were mixed and applied to the conjugate pad. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers was achieved by detecting the fluorescence intensity of captured QDs labels on test line and control line using a test strip reader. Under the optimum conditions, AFP and CEA could be detected as low as 3 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL in 15 min with a sample volume of 80 μL, and no obvious cross-reactivity was observed. The immunosensor was validated with 130 clinical samples and in which it exhibited high sensitivity (93% for AFP and 87% for CEA) and specificity (94% for AFP and 97% for CEA). The immunosensor also demonstrated high recoveries (87.5-113% for AFP and 90-97.3% for CEA) and low relative standard deviations (RSDs) (2.8-6.2% for AFP and 4.9-9.6% for CEA) when testing spiked human serum. This novel multicolor QDs based ICTS provides an easy and rapid, simultaneous quantitative detecting strategy for point-of-care testing of tumor markers. PMID:25562743

  12. Decline in Antigenicity of Tumor Markers by Storage Time Using Pathology Sections Cut From Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hamid R.; Dawson, Sarah-J.; Le Quesne, John; Provenzano, Elena; Caldas, Carlos; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2016-01-01

    Sectioning a whole tissue microarrray (TMA block) and storing the sections maximizes the number of sections obtained, but may impair the antigenicity of the stored sections. We have investigated the impact of TMA section storage on antigenicity. First, we reexamined existing TMA data to determine whether antigenicity in stored sections changes over time. Component scores for each marker, based on cellular compartment of staining and score-type, were evaluated separately. Residual components scores adjusted for grade, tumor size, and node positivity, were regressed on the number of days storage to evaluate the effect of storage time. Storage time ranged from 2 to 1897 days, and the mean change in antigenicity per year ranged from −0.88 (95% confidence interval, −1.11 to −0.65) to 0.035 (95% confidence interval, 0.016-0.054). Further analysis showed no significant improvement in the fit of survival models if storage time adjusted scores were included in the models rather than unadjusted scores. We then compared 3 ways of processing TMA sections after cutting—immediate staining, staining after 1 year, and staining after 1 year coated in wax—on the immunohistochemistry results for: progesterone receptor, a routinely used, robust antibody, and MKI67, which is generally considered less robust. The progesterone receptor scores for stored sections were similar to those for unstored sections, whereas the MKI67 scores for stored sections were substantially different to those for unstored sections. Wax coating made little difference to the results. Biomarker antigenicity shows a small decline over time that is unlikely to have an important effect on studies of prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26067143

  13. A multiplexed marker-based algorithm for diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaohai; Dicker, David T.; Holder, Sheldon L.; Lim, Bora; Harouaka, Ramdane; Zheng, Si-Yang; Drabick, Joseph J.; Lamparella, Nicholas E.; Truica, Cristina I.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time, single-cell multiplex immunophenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hypothesized to inform diagnosis of tissue of origin in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP). In 20 to 50% of CUP patients, the primary site remains unidentified, presenting a challenge for clinicians in diagnosis and treatment. We developed a post-CellSearch CTC assay using multiplexed Q-dot or DyLight conjugated antibodies with the goal of detecting multiple markers in single cells within a CTC population. We adapted our approach to size-based CTC enrichment protocols for capturing CTCs and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) using a minimal set of markers to predict the primary sites for common metastatic tumors. The carcinomas are characterized with cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), estrogen receptor (ER) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA. IF has been optimized in cultured tumor cells with individual antibodies, then with conjugated antibodies to form a multiplex antibody set. With IF, we evaluated antibodies specific to these 5 markers in lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer cell lines and blood from metastatic prostate and breast cancer patients. This advanced technology provides a noninvasive, diagnostic blood test as an adjunct to routine tissue biopsy. Its further implementation requires prospective clinical testing. PMID:26695546

  14. Microfluidic, marker-free isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Spuhler, Philipp S; Fachin, Fabio; Lim, Eugene J; Pai, Vincent; Ozkumur, Emre; Martel, Joseph M; Kojic, Nikola; Smith, Kyle; Chen, Pin-i; Yang, Jennifer; Hwang, Henry; Morgan, Bailey; Trautwein, Julie; Barber, Thomas A; Stott, Shannon L; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Kapur, Ravi; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The ability to isolate and analyze rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to further our understanding of cancer metastasis and enhance the care of cancer patients. In this protocol, we describe the procedure for isolating rare CTCs from blood samples by using tumor antigen–independent microfluidic CTC-iChip technology. The CTC-iChip uses deterministic lateral displacement, inertial focusing and magnetophoresis to sort up to 107 cells/s. By using two-stage magnetophoresis and depletion antibodies against leukocytes, we achieve 3.8-log depletion of white blood cells and a 97% yield of rare cells with a sample processing rate of 8 ml of whole blood/h. The CTC-iChip is compatible with standard cytopathological and RNA-based characterization methods. This protocol describes device production, assembly, blood sample preparation, system setup and the CTC isolation process. Sorting 8 ml of blood sample requires 2 h including setup time, and chip production requires 2–5 d. PMID:24577360

  15. Association between serum tumor markers and metabolic tumor volume or total lesion glycolysis in patients with recurrent small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHI, PENGYUE; MENG, XUE; NI, MENGMENG; SUN, XINDONG; XING, LIGANG; YU, JINMING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between serum tumor markers and the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) or total lesion glycolysis (TLG), as determined by fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with recurrent small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Data from 21 patients with recurrent SCLC were collected. The levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 were measured at the time of the 18F-FDG PET/CT examination. The MTV and TLG of all lesions were calculated. Pearson correlation analyses were used to estimate the correlations between NSE level and PET findings. Pearson correlation analyses showed that NSE was the only tumor marker to have a strong correlation with MTV or TLG (r=0.787, P<0.001; r=0.866, P<0.001, respectively). In patients with a normal NSE level, no correlation was found between NSE and MTV or TLG (r=0.018, P=0.958; r=-0.003, P=0.92, respectively), but a significant correlation was found in patients with an abnormal NSE level (r=0.789, P<0.01; r=0.872, P=0.01, respectively). Therefore, TLG and MTV may serve as sensitive markers of tumor burden in patients with recurrent SCLC, with TLG showing greater sensitivity. In patients with an abnormal NSE level, a higher NSE level indicates greater MTV and TLG. PMID:26722299

  16. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Bo Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  17. Multiplexed sandwich immunoassays using flow-injection electrochemiluminescence with designed substrate spatial-resolved technique for detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Weiyan; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Wang, Shaowei; Yu, Jinghua; Li, Nianqiang; Song, Xianrang

    2013-03-15

    Convenient sensor array for simultaneous multi-analyte testing was increasingly needed in clinical diagnosis. A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor array for the sequential detection of multiple tumor markers was developed by site-selectively immobilizing multiple antigens on different electrodes. Disposable indium tin oxide (ITO) glass array was employed as detection platform. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, the amount of carbon dots coated silica (SiO(2)@C-dots) labeled antibodies increased with the increment of antigens in the samples. The ECL signal from different immunosensors was collected in turn by a photomultiplier (PMT) with the aid of a home-made potential transformer equiped with a home-made multiplexed-switch. Using carcino embryonic antigen (CEA), prostate specific antigen (PSA) and α-fetoprotein (α-AFP) as model analytes, the proposed immunoassay exhibited excellent precision and sensitivity. For all three analytes, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six times detection were lower than 7.1% and the detection limits were in the range of 0.003-0.006 ng mL(-1). The results for real sample analysis demonstrated that the newly constructed immunosensor array provided a rapid, simple, simultaneous multi-analyte immunoassay with high throughput, cost-effective and sufficiently low detection limits for clinical applications. Importantly, the novel individually addressable immunosensor array for multi-analyte immunoassay by introducing the ECL readout mechanism with the aid of the home-made potential transformer and multiplexed-switch could be a useful supplement to commercial assay methods in clinical chemistry. PMID:23062558

  18. Understanding the Warburg effect and the prognostic value of stromal caveolin-1 as a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cells show a broad spectrum of bioenergetic states, with some cells using aerobic glycolysis while others rely on oxidative phosphorylation as their main source of energy. In addition, there is mounting evidence that metabolic coupling occurs in aggressive tumors, between epithelial cancer cells and the stromal compartment, and between well-oxygenated and hypoxic compartments. We recently showed that oxidative stress in the tumor stroma, due to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction, is important for cancer cell mutagenesis and tumor progression. More specifically , increased autophagy/mitophagy in the tumor stroma drives a form of parasitic epithelial-stromal metabolic coupling. These findings explain why it is effective to treat tumors with either inducers or inhibitors of autophagy, as both would disrupt this energetic coupling. We also discuss evidence that glutamine addiction in cancer cells produces ammonia via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. Ammonia production in cancer cells, in turn, could then help maintain autophagy in the tumor stromal compartment. In this vicious cycle, the initial glutamine provided to cancer cells would be produced by autophagy in the tumor stroma. Thus, we believe that parasitic epithelial-stromal metabolic coupling has important implications for cancer diagnosis and therapy, for example, in designing novel metabolic imaging techniques and establishing new targeted therapies. In direct support of this notion, we identified a loss of stromal caveolin-1 as a marker of oxidative stress, hypoxia, and autophagy in the tumor microenvironment, explaining its powerful predictive value. Loss of stromal caveolin-1 in breast cancers is associated with early tumor recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance, leading to poor clinical outcome. PMID:21867571

  19. Small renal masses: The molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Pikalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of molecular mechanisms of tumor cell behavior in small renal masses is required to achieve the better cancer survival. The aim of the study is to find molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less. A homogenous group of 20 patients T1N0M0-1 (mean age 57.6 ± 2.2 years) with kidney cancer was selected for the present analysis. The content of transcription and growth factors was determined by ELISA. The levels of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway components were measured by Western blotting analysis. The molecular markers associated with unfavorable outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less were high levels of NF-kB p50, NF-kB p65, HIF-1, HIF-2, VEGF and CAIX. AKT activation with PTEN loss also correlated with the unfavorable outcome of kidney cancer patients with tumor size 7 cm or less. It is observed that the biological features of kidney cancer could predict the outcome of patients.

  20. Identification of NbME MITE families: potential molecular markers in the microsporidia Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshan; Wang, Min; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Fahui; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2010-01-01

    Six novel families of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) were characterized in the microsporidia Nosema bombycis and were named NbMEs. The structural characteristics and the distribution of NbME copies in the N. bombycis genome were investigated, and it was found that portions of NbMEs are associated with gene sections. Potential molecular markers for various N. bombycis strains were identified in this study through utilization of the MITE-AFLP technique. Three distinct pathogenic isolates collected from different areas were distinguished, and polymorphisms were detected using the NbME5 marker, thereby establishing this NbME as a potential marker for studying isolate variation in N. bombycis. PMID:19861130

  1. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) expression decreases with aging, acute liver injuries and tumors in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Terai, Shuji; Hirose, Yoshikazu; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging. {yields} Decreased expression was observed in liver tumors as compared to the surrounding area. {yields} SMP30/RGN is important for liver proliferation and tumorigenesis. -- Abstract: Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) is known to be related to aging, hepatocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, expression and function of non-mammalian SMP30/RGN is poorly understood. We found that zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging, partial hepatectomy and thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury. SMP30/RGN expression was also greatly decreased in a zebrafish liver cell line. In addition, we induced liver tumors in adult zebrafish by administering diethylnitrosamine. Decreased expression was observed in foci, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocellular carcinomas and mixed tumors as compared to the surrounding area. We thus showed the importance of SMP30/RGN in liver proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  2. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van; Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 Multiplication-Sign 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d{sub normal}) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the {sub markers}. In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [{>=}41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed

  3. Integrated analysis of pediatric glioblastoma reveals a subset of biologically favorable tumors with associated molecular prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Andrey; Ryzhova, Marina; Hovestadt, Volker; Bender, Sebastian; Sturm, Dominik; Capper, David; Meyer, Jochen; Schrimpf, Daniel; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Zheludkova, Olga; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Kulozik, Andreas E; Reifenberger, Guido; Jabado, Nada; Perry, Arie; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma (pedGBM) is amongst the most common malignant brain tumors of childhood and carries a dismal prognosis. In contrast to adult GBM, few molecular prognostic markers for the pediatric counterpart have been established. We, therefore, investigated the prognostic significance of genomic and epigenetic alterations through molecular analysis of 202 pedGBM (1-18 years) with comprehensive clinical annotation. Routinely prepared formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples were assessed for genome-wide DNA methylation profiles, with known candidate genes screened for alterations via direct sequencing or FISH. Unexpectedly, a subset of histologically diagnosed GBM (n = 40, 20 %) displayed methylation profiles similar to those of either low-grade gliomas or pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (PXA). These tumors showed a markedly better prognosis, with molecularly PXA-like tumors frequently harboring BRAF V600E mutations and 9p21 (CDKN2A) homozygous deletion. The remaining 162 tumors with pedGBM molecular signatures comprised four subgroups: H3.3 G34-mutant (15 %), H3.3/H3.1 K27-mutant (43 %), IDH1-mutant (6 %), and H3/IDH wild-type (wt) GBM (36 %). These subgroups were associated with specific cytogenetic aberrations, MGMT methylation patterns and clinical outcomes. Analysis of follow-up data identified a set of biomarkers feasible for use in risk stratification: pedGBM with any oncogene amplification and/or K27M mutation (n = 124) represents a particularly unfavorable group, with 3-year overall survival (OS) of 5 %, whereas tumors without these markers (n = 38) define a more favorable group (3-year OS ~70 %).Combined with the lower grade-like lesions, almost 40 % of pedGBM cases had distinct molecular features associated with a more favorable outcome. This refined prognostication method for pedGBM using a molecular risk algorithm may allow for improved therapeutic choices and better planning of clinical trial stratification for this otherwise devastating

  4. GhSEM-1 marker potentially associated with regeneration ability in cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A marker protein for embryogenic potential could be useful in determining if target tissue for Agrobacterium tumefaciens or microprojectile bombardment has the ability to regenerate plants. Certain varieties of cotton, especially Coker 312, are known to form somatic embryos readily, while others are...

  5. Kinesin family member 14: an independent prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Brigitte L; Pajovic, Sanja; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Shaw, Patricia A; Gallie, Brenda L

    2012-04-15

    The novel oncogene KIF14 (kinesin family member 14) shows genomic gain and overexpression in many cancers including OvCa (ovarian cancer). We discovered that expression of the mitotic kinesin KIF14 is predictive of poor outcome in breast and lung cancers. We now determine the prognostic significance of KIF14 expression in primary OvCa tumors, and evaluate KIF14 action on OvCa cell tumorigenicity in vitro. Gene-specific multiplex PCR and real-time QPCR were used to measure KIF14 genomic (109 samples) and mRNA levels (122 samples) in OvCa tumors. Association of KIF14 with clinical variables was studied using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses. Cellular effects of KIF14 overexpression (stable transfection) and inhibition (stable shRNA knockdown) were studied by proliferation (cell counts), survival (Annexin V immunocytochemistry) and colony formation (soft-agar growth). KIF14 genomic gain (>2.6 copies) was present in 30% of serous OvCas, and KIF14 mRNA was elevated in 91% of tumors versus normal epithelium. High KIF14 in tumors independently predicted for worse outcome (p = 0.03) with loss of correlation with proliferation marker expression and increased rates of recurrence. Overexpression of KIF14 in OvCa cell lines increased proliferation and colony formation (p < 0.01), whereas KIF14 knockdown induced apoptosis and dramatically reduced colony formation (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that KIF14 mRNA is an independent prognostic marker in serous OvCa. Dependence of OvCa cells on KIF14 for maintenance of in vitro colony formation suggests a role of KIF14 in promoting a tumorigenic phenotype, beyond its known role in proliferation. PMID:21618518

  6. Structural chromosomal aberrations as potential risk markers in incident cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vodenkova, Sona; Polivkova, Zdenka; Musak, Ludovit; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Zoubkova, Hana; Sytarova, Sylvie; Kavcova, Elena; Halasova, Erika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Jiraskova, Katerina; Svoboda, Miroslav; Ambrus, Miloslav; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological prospective studies have shown that increased chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes may predict cancer risk. Here, we report CAs in newly diagnosed 101 colorectal, 87 lung and 158 breast cancer patients and corresponding healthy controls. Strong differences in distributions of aberrant cells (ACs), CAs, chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs) and chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs) were observed in lung and breast cancer patients as compared to healthy controls. In colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, only CTAs were significantly elevated. Binary logistic regression, adjusted for main confounders, indicates that all the analysed cytogenetic parameters along with smoking were significantly associated with breast and lung cancer risks. Significant differences in terminal deletions between breast cancer patients and corresponding female controls were recorded (0.39 vs. 0.18; P ≤ 0.05). We did not find any association of CAs with TNM (tumor nodus metastasis) stages or histopathological grade in either cancer type. CAs were neither associated with additional tumor characteristics-invasivity, ductal and lobular character, estrogene/progesterone receptors in breast tumors nor with non-small/small cell and bronchogenic/pulmonary types of lung tumors. Our study demonstrates that CAs serve as a predictive marker for breast and lung cancer, whereas only CTAs were elevated in incident CRC patients. PMID:25800034

  7. SOX10 and Olig2 as negative markers for the diagnosis of ependymomas: An immunohistochemical study of 98 glial tumors.

    PubMed

    Švajdler, Marián; Rychlý, Boris; Mezencev, Roman; Fröhlichová, Lucia; Bednárová, Antónia; Pataky, František; Daum, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    SOX10 belongs to the family of transcription factors essential for the development of neural crest, peripheral nervous system and melanocytes. It is presently used in histopathology as a marker of melanocytic differentiation. SOX10 is expressed in normal brain tissue in oligodendrocytes, but the information about SOX10 expression in primary tumors of the central nervous system is quite limited. In this study, we examined the expression of SOX10 and Olig2 by immunohistochemistry in a series of 98 glial tumors and explored their specificity and sensitivity for differential diagnosis of ependymal vs non-ependymal tumors. In addition, we examined the expression of EMA and CD99 in ependymal tumors. SOX10 and Olig2 staining were scored as negative if no positive cells or only a few positive cells (typically up to 1-3%) were found. In all other instances, SOX10 or Olig2 staining was scored as positive. Out of 44 examined ependymal tumors none was found to express SOX10 and 7 specimens showed only a few SOX10-positive cells that likely corresponded to entrapped non-neoplastic oligodendrocytes. In contrast, non-ependymal tumors expressed SOX10 in 26/54 (48%) specimens. Olig2 was positive in 5 out of 44 ependymomas (11%) and 50 out of 54 (93%) non-ependymal tumors (astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas). EMA and CD99 expression was found in 33/44 (75%) and 11/44 (25%) of ependymomas, respectively. SOX10-positivity rules out the diagnosis of ependymoma among other glial tumors with high confidence. PMID:26287936

  8. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  9. Clinical Value of Tumor Markers for Determining Cause of Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Zhai, Kan; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is often challenging to distinguish tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) from malignant pleural effusion (MPE); thoracoscopy is among the techniques with the highest diagnostic ability in this regard. However, such invasive examinations cannot be performed on the elderly, or on those in poor physical condition. The aim of this study was to explore the differential diagnostic value of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) associated antigen in patients with TPE and MPE. Methods: Using electrochemiluminescence, we measured the concentration of tumor markers (TMs) in the pleural effusion and serum of patients with TPE (n = 35) and MPE (n = 95). We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to evaluate the TMs and differentiate between TPE and MPE. Results: The cut-off values for each TM in serum were: CA125, 151.55 U/ml; CA199, 9.88 U/ml; CEA, 3.50 ng/ml; NSE, 13.27 ng/ml; and SCC, 0.85 ng/ml. Those in pleural fluid were: CA125, 644.30 U/ml; CA199, 12.08 U/ml; CEA, 3.35 ng/ml; NSE, 9.71 ng/ml; and SCC, 1.35 ng/ml. The cut-off values for the ratio of pleural fluid concentration to serum concentration (P/S ratio) of each TM were: CA125, 5.93; CA199, 0.80; CEA, 1.47; NSE, 0.76; and SCC, 0.90. The P/S ratio showed the highest specificity in the case of CEA (97.14%). ROC curve analysis revealed that, for all TMs, the area under the curve in pleural fluid (0.95) was significantly different from that in serum (0.85; P < 0.001). Conclusions: TMs in TPE differ significantly from those in MPE, especially when detected in pleural fluid. The combined detection of TMs can improve diagnostic sensitivity. PMID:26831224

  10. Synthetic-fuel plants: potential tumor risks to public health.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, P D; Morris, S C; Fischer, H; Thode, H C; Hamilton, L D

    1985-09-01

    This article quantifies potential public health risks from tumor-producing pollutants emitted from two synthetic-fuel plants (direct liquefaction--Exxon Donor Solvent: and indirect liquefaction--Lurgi Fischer-Tropsch) located at a representative site in the eastern United States. In these analyses gaseous and aqueous waste streams were characterized; exposures via inhalation, terrestrial and aquatic food chains, and drinking water supplies were modeled. Analysis suggested that emissions of "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," "aromatic amines," "neutral N, O, S heterocyclics," "nitriles," and "other trace elements" pose the largest quantifiable risks to public health. Data and analysis for these pollutant categories should be refined to more accurately match compound-specific estimated exposure levels with tumorigenic potency estimates. Before these results are used for regulatory purposes, more detailed analysis for selected pollutant classes are needed, and more sophisticated aquatic exposure models must be developed. Also, differences in geographic scales among the environmental transport models used need to be rectified. PMID:3843682