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Sample records for potentials partial waves

  1. Are Electron Partial Waves Real

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, O.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2005-05-01

    Experiments determining the partial wave content of electrons are uncommon. The standard approach to partial wave expansion of the wavefunction of electrons often ignores their spin. In this non-relativistic approximation the partial waves are labeled by their orbital angular momentum quantum number, e.g. d-waves. As our previous work has shown, this non-relativistic approximation usually fails for photoelectrons. Partial waves should be further specified by their total angular momentum. With d-waves for example, one would need to distinguish between d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves. Although energetically degenerate, fully relativistic d3/2 and d5/2 partial waves of photoelectrons have fundamentally different angular distributions. Using experimental and theoretical methods we have developed, we obtain partial wave probabilities of photoelectrons from polarization measurements of ionic fluorescence. We found that for selected states of the residual ion, there are energy regions where the photoelectron is in a single partial wave with predictable angular distributions.

  2. Two-dimensional stationary Schroedinger equation via the {partial_derivative}-dressing method: New exactly solvable potentials, wave functions, and their physical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovsky, V. G.; Topovsky, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.

    2010-09-15

    The classes of exactly solvable multiline soliton potentials and corresponding wave functions of two-dimensional stationary Schroedinger equation via {partial_derivative}-dressing method are constructed and their physical interpretation is discussed.

  3. Pseudopotential Method for Higher Partial Wave Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso

    2006-01-13

    We present a zero-range pseudopotential applicable for all partial wave interactions between neutral atoms. For p and d waves, we derive effective pseudopotentials, which are useful for problems involving anisotropic external potentials. Finally, we consider two nontrivial applications of the p-wave pseudopotential: we solve analytically the problem of two interacting spin-polarized fermions confined in a harmonic trap, and we analyze the scattering of p-wave interacting particles in a quasi-two-dimensional system.

  4. Partial Wave Dispersion Relations: Application to Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of partial wave dispersion relations (DR's) as the way of solving the long-standing problem of correctly incorporating exchange in a valid DR for electron-atom scattering. In particular a method is given for effectively calculating the contribution of the discontinuity and/or poles of the partial wave amplitude which occur in the negative E plane. The method is successfully tested in three cases: (i) the analytically solvable exponential potential, (ii) the Hartree potential, and (iii) the S-wave exchange approximation for electron-hydrogen scattering.

  5. Partial wave analysis using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus; Beijiang, Liu; Jike, Wang

    2010-04-01

    Partial wave analysis is an important tool for determining resonance properties in hadron spectroscopy. For large data samples however, the un-binned likelihood fits employed are computationally very expensive. At the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) III experiment, an increase in statistics compared to earlier experiments of up to two orders of magnitude is expected. In order to allow for a timely analysis of these datasets, additional computing power with short turnover times has to be made available. It turns out that graphics processing units (GPUs) originally developed for 3D computer games have an architecture of massively parallel single instruction multiple data floating point units that is almost ideally suited for the algorithms employed in partial wave analysis. We have implemented a framework for tensor manipulation and partial wave fits called GPUPWA. The user writes a program in pure C++ whilst the GPUPWA classes handle computations on the GPU, memory transfers, caching and other technical details. In conjunction with a recent graphics processor, the framework provides a speed-up of the partial wave fit by more than two orders of magnitude compared to legacy FORTRAN code.

  6. Numerical method for wave forces acting on partially perforated caisson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng; Tang, Xiao-cheng; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hong-zhou

    2015-04-01

    The perforated caisson is widely applied to practical engineering because of its great advantages in effectively wave energy consumption and cost reduction. The attentions of many scientists were paid to the fluid-structure interaction between wave and perforated caisson studies, but until now, most concerns have been put on theoretical analysis and experimental model set up. In this paper, interaction between the wave and the partial perforated caisson in a 2D numerical wave flume is investigated by means of the renewed SPH algorithm, and the mathematical equations are in the form of SPH numerical approximation based on Navier-Stokes equations. The validity of the SPH mathematical method is examined and the simulated results are compared with the results of theoretical models, meanwhile the complex hydrodynamic characteristics when the water particles flow in or out of a wave absorbing chamber are analyzed and the wave pressure distribution of the perforated caisson is also addressed here. The relationship between the ratio of total horizontal force acting on caisson under regular waves and its influence factors is examined. The data show that the numerical calculation of the ratio of total horizontal force meets the empirical regression equation very well. The simulations of SPH about the wave nonlinearity and breaking are briefly depicted in the paper, suggesting that the advantages and great potentiality of the SPH method is significant compared with traditional methods.

  7. Partial Wave Analysis of Coupled Photonic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Kirk A.; Smith, David D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The very high quality factors sustained by microcavity optical resonators are relevant to applications in wavelength filtering, routing, switching, modulation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing. Increases in the density of photonic elements require that attention be paid to how electromagnetic (EM) coupling modifies their optical properties. This is especially true when cavity resonances are involved, in which case, their characteristics may be fundamentally altered. Understanding the optical properties of microcavities that are near or in contact with photonic elements---such as other microcavities, nanostructures, couplers, and substrates---can be expected to advance our understanding of the roles that these structures may play in VLSI photonics, biosensors and similar device technologies. Wc present results from recent theoretical studies of the effects of inter- and intracavity coupling on optical resonances in compound spherical particles. Concentrically stratified spheres and bispheres constituted from homogeneous and stratified spheres are subjects of this investigation. A new formulation is introduced for the absorption of light in an arbitrary layer of a multilayered sphere, which is based on multiple reflections of the spherical partial waves of the Lorenz-Mie solution for scattering by a sphere. Absorption efficiencies, which can be used to profile cavity resonances and to infer fluorescence yields or the onset of nonlinear optical processes in the microcavities, are presented. Splitting of resonances in these multisphere systems is paid particular attention, and consequences for photonic device development and possible performance enhancements through carefully designed architectures that exploit EM coupling are considered.

  8. Direct Calculation of the Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two new developments in scattering theory are reported. We show, in a practical way, how one can calculate the full scattering amplitude without invoking a partial wave expansion. First, the integral expression for the scattering amplitude f(theta) is simplified by an analytic integration over the azimuthal angle. Second, the full scattering wavefunction which appears in the integral expression for f(theta) is obtained by solving the Schrodinger equation with the finite element method (FEM). As an example, we calculate electron scattering from the Hartree potential. With minimal computational effort, we obtain accurate and stable results for the scattering amplitude.

  9. Seismoelectric wave propagation numerical modelling in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, S.; Garambois, S.; Jouniaux, L.; Brito, D.; Sailhac, P.; Bordes, C.

    2013-09-01

    To better understand and interpret seismoelectric measurements acquired over vadose environments, both the existing theory and the wave propagation modelling programmes, available for saturated materials, should be extended to partial saturation conditions. We propose here an extension of Pride's equations aiming to take into account partially saturated materials, in the case of a water-air mixture. This new set of equations was incorporated into an existing seismoelectric wave propagation modelling code, originally designed for stratified saturated media. This extension concerns both the mechanical part, using a generalization of the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the electromagnetic part, for which dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity were expressed against water saturation. The dynamic seismoelectric coupling was written as a function of the streaming potential coefficient, which depends on saturation, using four different relations derived from recent laboratory or theoretical studies. In a second part, this extended programme was used to synthesize the seismoelectric response for a layered medium consisting of a partially saturated sand overburden on top of a saturated sandstone half-space. Subsequent analysis of the modelled amplitudes suggests that the typically very weak interface response (IR) may be best recovered when the shallow layer exhibits low saturation. We also use our programme to compute the seismoelectric response of a capillary fringe between a vadose sand overburden and a saturated sand half-space. Our first modelling results suggest that the study of the seismoelectric IR may help to detect a sharp saturation contrast better than a smooth saturation transition. In our example, a saturation contrast of 50 per cent between a fully saturated sand half-space and a partially saturated shallow sand layer yields a stronger IR than a stepwise decrease in saturation.

  10. Holographic conformal partial waves as gravitational open Wilson networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Atanu; Raman, Prashanth; Suryanarayana, Nemani V.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to holographically compute the conformal partial waves in any decomposition of correlation functions of primary operators in conformal field theories using open Wilson network operators in the holographic gravitational dual. The Wilson operators are the gravitational ones where gravity is written as a gauge theory in the first order Hilbert-Palatini formalism. We apply this method to compute the global conformal blocks and partial waves in 2d CFTs reproducing many of the known results.

  11. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  12. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  13. Experimental studies on wave interactions of partially perforated wall under obliquely incident waves.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Young-Taek; Shin, Sungwon

    2014-01-01

    This study presents wave height distribution in terms of stem wave evolution phenomena on partially perforated wall structures through three-dimensional laboratory experiments. The plain and partially perforated walls were tested to understand their effects on the stem wave evolution under the monochromatic and random wave cases with the various wave conditions, incident angle (from 10 to 40 degrees), and configurations of front and side walls. The partially perforated wall reduced the relative wave heights more effectively compared to the plain wall structure. Partially perforated walls with side walls showed a better performance in terms of wave height reduction compared to the structure without the side wall. Moreover, the relative wave heights along the wall were relatively small when the relative chamber width is large, within the range of the chamber width in this study. The wave spectra showed a frequency dependency of the wave energy dissipation. In most cases, the existence of side wall is a more important factor than the porosity of the front wall in terms of the wave height reduction even if the partially perforated wall was still effective compared to the plain wall. PMID:25254260

  14. Experimental Studies on Wave Interactions of Partially Perforated Wall under Obliquely Incident Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Young-Taek; Shin, Sungwon

    2014-01-01

    This study presents wave height distribution in terms of stem wave evolution phenomena on partially perforated wall structures through three-dimensional laboratory experiments. The plain and partially perforated walls were tested to understand their effects on the stem wave evolution under the monochromatic and random wave cases with the various wave conditions, incident angle (from 10 to 40 degrees), and configurations of front and side walls. The partially perforated wall reduced the relative wave heights more effectively compared to the plain wall structure. Partially perforated walls with side walls showed a better performance in terms of wave height reduction compared to the structure without the side wall. Moreover, the relative wave heights along the wall were relatively small when the relative chamber width is large, within the range of the chamber width in this study. The wave spectra showed a frequency dependency of the wave energy dissipation. In most cases, the existence of side wall is a more important factor than the porosity of the front wall in terms of the wave height reduction even if the partially perforated wall was still effective compared to the plain wall. PMID:25254260

  15. Correlations of πN partial waves for multireaction analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doring, M.; Revier, J.; Ronchen, D.; Workman, R. L.

    2016-06-15

    In the search for missing baryonic resonances, many analyses include data from a variety of pion- and photon-induced reactions. For elastic πN scattering, however, usually the partial waves of the SAID (Scattering Analysis Interactive Database) or other groups are fitted, instead of data. We provide the partial-wave covariance matrices needed to perform correlated χ2 fits, in which the obtained χ2 equals the actual χ2 up to nonlinear and normalization corrections. For any analysis relying on partial waves extracted from elastic pion scattering, this is a prerequisite to assess the significance of resonance signals and to assign any uncertainty on results.more » Lastly, the influence of systematic errors is also considered.« less

  16. Correlations of π N partial waves for multireaction analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, M.; Revier, J.; Rönchen, D.; Workman, R. L.

    2016-06-01

    In the search for missing baryonic resonances, many analyses include data from a variety of pion- and photon-induced reactions. For elastic π N scattering, however, usually the partial waves of the SAID (Scattering Analysis Interactive Database) or other groups are fitted, instead of data. We provide the partial-wave covariance matrices needed to perform correlated χ2 fits, in which the obtained χ2 equals the actual χ2 up to nonlinear and normalization corrections. For any analysis relying on partial waves extracted from elastic pion scattering, this is a prerequisite to assess the significance of resonance signals and to assign any uncertainty on results. The influence of systematic errors is also considered.

  17. SLAC three-body partial wave analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Lasinski, T.A.; Sinervo, P.K.

    1985-10-01

    We present a heuristic description of the SLAC-LBL three-meson partial wave model, and describe how we have implemented it at SLAC. The discussion details the assumptions of the model and the analysis, and emphasizes the methods we have used to prepare and fit the data. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Kullback relative entropy and characterization of partially polarized optical waves.

    PubMed

    Réfrégier, Philippe; Goudail, François

    2006-03-01

    Different properties of partially polarized light are discussed using the Kullback relative entropy, which provides a physically meaningful measure of proximity between probability density functions (PDFs). For optical waves with a Gaussian PDF, the standard degree of polarization is a simple function of the Kullback relative entropy between the considered optical light and a totally depolarized light of the same intensity. It is shown that the Kullback relative entropies between different PDFs allow one to define other properties such as a degree of anisotropy and a degree of non-Gaussianity. It is also demonstrated that, in dimension three, the Kullback relative entropy between a partially polarized light and a totally depolarized light can lead to natural definitions of two degrees of polarization needed to characterize the polarization state. These analyses enlighten the physical meaning of partial polarization of light waves in terms of a measure of disorder provided by the Shannon entropy. PMID:16539066

  19. A Potential Cost Effective Liquefaction Mitigation Countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Hanbing; Jia Yun; Shahrour, Isam

    2008-07-08

    This work is devoted to illustrate the potential liquefaction mitigation countermeasure: Induced Partial Saturation. Firstly the potential liquefaction mitigation method is briefly introduced. Then the numerical model for partially saturated sandy soil is presented. At last the dynamic responses of liquefiable free filed with different water saturation is given. It shows that the induced partial saturation is efficiency for preventing the liquefaction.

  20. Calculation of the Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Wave Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, Aaron; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two developments in the direct calculation of the angular differential scattering amplitude have been implemented: (a) The integral expansion of the scattering amplitude is simplified by analytically integration over the azimuthal angle. (b) The resulting integral as a function of scattering angle is calculated by using the numerically generated wave function from a finite element method calculation. Results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the static approximation will be shown to be as accurate as a partial wave expansion with as many l's as is necessary for convergence at the incident energy being calculated.

  1. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  2. Partial-wave analysis for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2012-03-15

    A standard partial-wave analysis was performed on the basis of known measurements of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 13}C scattering at energies in the range 250-750 keV. This analysis revealed that, in the energy range being considered, it is sufficient to take into account the {sup 3}S{sub 1} wave alone. A potential for the triplet {sup 3}S{sub 1}-wave state of the p{sup 13}C system in the region of the J{sup p}T = 1{sup -1} resonance at 0.55 MeV was constructed on the basis of the phase shifts obtained from the aforementioned partial-wave analysis.

  3. Wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun

    2016-08-01

    This study gives an analytical solution for wave interaction with a partially reflecting vertical wall protected by a submerged porous bar based on linear potential theory. The whole study domain is divided into multiple sub-regions in relation to the structures. The velocity potential in each sub-region is written as a series solution by the separation of variables. A partially reflecting boundary condition is used to describe the partial reflection of a vertical wall. Unknown expansion coefficients in the series solutions are determined by matching velocity potentials among different sub-regions. The analytical solution is verified by an independently developed multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) solution and experimental data. The wave run-up and wave force on the partially reflecting vertical wall are estimated and examined, which can be effectively reduced by the submerged porous bar. The horizontal space between the vertical wall and the submerged porous bar is a key factor, which affects the sheltering function of the porous bar. The wave resonance between the porous bar and the vertical wall may disappear when the vertical wall has a low reflection coefficient. The present analytical solution may be used to determine the optimum parameters of structures at a preliminary engineering design stage.

  4. Partial siamese twin as potential organ donor

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Maheshwari, Ruchir; Srivastava, Aneesh; Sharma, Raj K.

    2010-01-01

    During evaluation of a partial Siamese twin for removal of nonviable parasitic part in an 8-year-old male child, a fully functional kidney was found. The functional status of the extra kidney was found to be within acceptable limits for the purpose of transplant, which was subsequently done in a 24-year-old patient with end-stage renal disease. The recipient is healthy 19 months after the surgery. The possibility of using organs from a partial Siamese twin makes this a unique case report. PMID:20877612

  5. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Partially Saturated Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jian-Xin; Yang, Ding-Hui; Yang, Hui-Zhu

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the wave dispersion and attenuation in partially water-saturated sandstones based on the improved Biot/squirt (BISQ) model in which the saturation is introduced. Numerical experiments indicate that the phase velocity of the fast P-wave decreases as the saturation increases in the low-frequency range (102-104 Hz), and reaches the minimum at the full-saturation state. The behaviour of the phase velocity varying with the saturation in the high-frequency range (104-106 Hz), however, is opposite to that in the low-frequency range. The peak value of P-wave attenuation increases with increasing saturation, and is the maximum at the fully saturated state. Numerical models and experiments show that the improved BISQ model is better than the traditional Gassmann-Biot model.

  6. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  7. Laboratory monitoring of P-waves in partially saturated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, J.; Bordes, C.; Brito, D.; Sénéchal, P.; Perroud, H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic data depends on a variety of hydrogeological properties of the prospected porous media such as porosity, permeability and fluid saturation. We have performed a laboratory experiment in the kiloHertz range in order to analyze the role of partial saturation on direct propagating P-waves phase velocity and attenuation. The experiment consists of a sand-filled tank 107 cm x 34 cm x 35cm equipped with accelerometers and water capacitance probes. The P-waves seismic propagation is generated by hitting a steel ball on a granite plate on the one lateral side of the container. Several imbibition/drainage cycles are performed between the water residual saturation and the gas residual saturation. The laboratory seismic data are processed by two Continuous Wavelet Transforms using one real mother wavelet (Mexican hat) and one complex (Morlet) to recover velocity and attenuation as a function of frequency. Phase velocity of direct P-wave decreases with an increase of water content and is quite consistent with the low frequency limit of the Biot's theory both for imbibition and drainage. The interpretation of the P-waves attenuation needs to go beyond the macroscopic fluid flow of Biot's theory and to introduce a viscoelastic contribution linked to the grain to grain overall losses which are described by a constant Q-model. A strong hysteresis between imbibition and drainage is observed and explained by introducing an effective permeability depending on water and gas relative permeabilities (Van Genuchten model).

  8. Potential changes of wave steepness and occurrence of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta M.; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Wave steepness is an important characteristic of a sea state. It is also well established that wave steepness is one of the parameter responsible for generation of abnormal waves called also freak or rogue waves. The study investigates changes of wave steepness in the past and future wave climate in the North Atlantic. The fifth assessment report IPCC (2013) uses four scenarios for future greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere called Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). Two of these scenarios RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 have been selected to project future wave conditions in the North Atlantic. RCP 4.5 is believed to achieve the political target of a maximum global mean temperature increase of 2° C while RPC 8.5 is close to 'business as usual' and expected to give a temperature increase of 4° C or more. The analysis includes total sea, wind sea and swell. Potential changes of wave steepness for these wave systems are shown and compared with wave steepness derived from historical data. Three historical data sets with different wave model resolutions are used. The investigations show also changes in the mean wind direction as well as in the relative direction between wind sea and swell. Consequences of wave steepness changes for statistics of surface elevation and generation of rogue waves are demonstrated. Uncertainties associated with wave steepness projections are discussed.

  9. A New Pion-Nucleon Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2006-10-01

    Existing determinations of the masses, widths and decay modes of low-lying excited states of the nucleon, as compiled in the Review of Particle Physics, are determined from energy-independent partial wave analyses of pion-nucleon scattering data. For the N*(1440) and most other resonances under 2 GeV, the analyses cited are the Karlsruhe-Helsinki, Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley and Kent State analyses, the latter of which used the elastic amplitudes from the other two. The data included in these analyses were published before 1980. Other analyses, notably the recent ones from George Washington University and the Pittsburgh-Argonne group, are ``not used for averages, fits, limits, etc.'' Complete sets of measurements (differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation parameters) have been measured in the N*(1440) resonance region since 1980, culminating in the Crystal Ball program at BNL to measure all-neutral final states (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, and inverse photoproduction). A new partial wave analysis of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki type has been started by Abilene Christian University, University of Tuzla, and Rudjer Boskovic Institute. The analysis is constrained by fixed-t and interior hyperbolic dispersion relations. Comparisons of the new analysis to modern experimental data and to previous analyses will be presented.

  10. Scattering of acoustic evanescent waves by circular cylinders: Partial wave series solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.

    2002-05-01

    Evanescent acoustical waves occur in a variety of situations such as when sound is incident on a fluid interface beyond the critical angle and when flexural waves on a plate are subsonic with respect to the surrounding fluid. The scattering by circular cylinders at normal incidence was calculated to give insight into the consequences on the scattering of the evanescence of the incident wave. To analyze the scattering, it is necessary to express the incident wave using a modified expansion involving cylindrical functions. For plane evanescent waves, the expansion becomes a double summation with products of modified and ordinary Bessel functions. The resulting modified series is found for the scattering by a fluid cylinder in an unbounded medium. The perfectly soft and rigid cases are also examined. Unlike the case of an ordinary incident wave, the counterpropagating partial waves of the same angular order have unequal magnitudes when the incident wave is evanescent. This is a consequence of the exponential dependence of the incident wave amplitude on the transverse coordinate. The associated exponential dependence of the scattering on the location of a scatterer was previously demonstrated [T. J. Matula and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 93, 1192-1195 (1993)].

  11. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  12. Search for Higher Flavor Multiplets in Partial Wave Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Yakov Azimov; Richard Arndt; I.I. Strakovsky; Ron Workman; K. Goeke

    2005-04-01

    The possible existence of higher multi-quark flavor multiplets of baryons is investigated. We argue that the S-matrix should have poles with any quantum numbers, including those which are exotic. This argument provides a novel justification for the existence of hadrons with arbitrary exotic structure. Though it does not constitute a proof, there are still no theoretical arguments against exotics. We then consider KN and piN scattering. Conventional and modified partial-wave analyses provide several sets of candidates for correlated pairs (Theta1, Delta), each of which could label a related 27-plet. Properties of the pairs (masses, mass orderings, spin-parity quantum numbers) do not quite correspond to the current theoretical expectations. Decay widths of the candidates are either wider or narrower than expected. Possible reasons for such disagreements are briefly discussed.

  13. Conditions for invariant spectrum of light generated by scattering of partially coherent wave from quasi-homogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2016-02-01

    Within the first-order Born approximation, the spectrum of light generated by the scattering of a partially coherent wave from a quasi-homogeneous (QH) medium is derived. In particular, the partially coherent incident wave is produced by Young's pinholes. It is shown that the spectrum of the scattered field is identical to the spectrum of incident plane waves if the Fourier transform of the normalized correlation coefficient (NCC) of the scattering potential satisfies a certain scaling law. The scaling law is valid when the medium size is sufficiently small compared with the space between Young' pinholes. Furthermore, comparisons are made between our conditions with the previous results.

  14. Potential wells for classical acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Lin, ShuYu; Mo, RunYang; Fu, ZhiQiang

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration theorem of Bloch waves is utilized to construct random potential wells for classical acoustic waves in systems composed of alternating `cavities' and `couplers'. One prominent advantage of this method is these `cavities' and `couplers' are all monolayer structures. It allows forming more compact classical potential wells, which leads to the miniaturization of acoustic devices. We systematically investigate properties of harmonic, tangent, hyperbolic function, and square classical potential wells in quasi-periodic superlattices. Results show these classical potential wells are analogues of quantum potential wells. Thus some technologies and concepts in quantum potential well fields may be generalized to classical acoustic wave fields. In addition, some abnormal cases regarding forming classical potential wells are also found.

  15. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  16. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  17. Applicability of Parallel Computing to Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruger, Justin; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Weygand, Dennis; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Bound states of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) give insights into the nature of confinement, a key element of the strong interaction. States may be identified from weak signals extracted from the analysis of high statistics data from reactions with many final state particles. One of the best tools for the analysis of these reactions is Partial Wave Analysis (PWA). PWA transforms an ensemble of experimental data from a large acceptance detector from free particle eigenstates to angular momentum eigenstates. The PWA program must be fast enough to deal with the large amounts of data available currently, as processing time scales with the number of events. The scope of this research is to study the applicability and scalability of Intel's Xeon Phi using the Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture when applied to the existing PWA code at Jefferson Laboratory. An algorithm was developed for the Xeon Phi and scaled across 240 available threads, giving parallel functionality to the PWA which was originally written serially. This scaling can make the fitting process fifteen times faster. Supported by the US Department of Energy.

  18. Wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmida Mohd Nasir, Nor; Maulud, Khairul Nizam Abdul

    2016-06-01

    Up until today, Malaysia has used renewable energy technology such as biomass, solar and hydro energy for power generation and co-generation in palm oil industries and also for the generation of electricity, yet, we are still far behind other countries which have started to optimize waves for similar production. Wave power is a renewable energy (RE) transported by ocean waves. It is very eco-friendly and is easily reachable. This paper presents an assessment of wave power potential in Malaysian territorial waters including waters of Sabah and Sarawak. In this research, data from Malaysia Meteorology Department (MetMalaysia) is used and is supported by a satellite imaginary obtained from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Malaysia Remote Sensing Agency (ARSM) within the time range of the year 1992 until 2007. There were two types of analyses conducted which were mask analysis and comparative analysis. Mask analysis of a research area is the analysis conducted to filter restricted and sensitive areas. Meanwhile, comparative analysis is an analysis conducted to determine the most potential area for wave power generation. Four comparative analyses which have been carried out were wave power analysis, comparative analysis of wave energy power with the sea topography, hot-spot area analysis and comparative analysis of wave energy with the wind speed. These four analyses underwent clipping processes using Geographic Information System (GIS) to obtain the final result. At the end of this research, the most suitable area to develop a wave energy converter was found, which is in the waters of Terengganu and Sarawak. Besides that, it was concluded that the average potential energy that can be generated in Malaysian territorial waters is between 2.8kW/m to 8.6kW/m.

  19. Universality in s-wave and higher partial wave Feshbach resonances: an illustration with a single atom near two scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shangguo; Tan, Shina

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that cold atoms near s-wave Feshbach resonances have universal properties that are insensitive to the short-range details of the interaction. What is less known is that atoms near higher partial wave Feshbach resonances also have remarkable universal properties. We will illustrate this with a single atom interacting resonantly with two fixed static centers. At a Feshbach resonance point with orbital angular momentum L >= 1 , we find 2 L + 1 shallow bound states whose energies behave like 1 /R 2 L + 1 when the distance R between the two centers is large. This sheds additional light on the fundamental question whether Efimov effect exists for higher partial wave resonances. The effects of nonresonant partial-wave channels and the shape parameters in the effective range expansions enter as correction terms. Near p-wave and higher partial wave resonances, the energies can be described by a simple universal formula in terms of a parameter called ``proximity parameter.'' We will also discuss modifications of the low energy physics due to the long range Van der Waals potential. We gratefully acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1068511 and by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  20. Development of Partial-Charge Potential for GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ram; Oda, Takuji; Weber, William J.

    2006-09-01

    Partial-charged potentials for GaN are systematically developed that describes a wide range of structural properties, where the reference data for fitting the potential parameters are taken from ab initial calculations or experiments. The present potential model provides a good fit to different structural geometries and high pressure phases of GaN. The high-pressure transition from wurtzite to rock-salt structure is correctly described yielding the phase transition pressure of about 55 GPa, and the calculated volume change at the transition is in good agreement with experimental data. The results are compared with those obtained by ab initio simulations.

  1. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  2. Topological States in Partially-PT-Symmetric Azimuthal Potentials.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Torner, Lluis

    2015-11-01

    We introduce partially-parity-time (pPT)-symmetric azimuthal potentials composed from individual PT-symmetric cells located on a ring, where two azimuthal directions are nonequivalent in a sense that in such potential excitations carrying topological dislocations exhibit different dynamics for different directions of energy circulation in the initial field distribution. Such nonconservative ratchetlike structures support rich families of stable vortex solitons in cubic nonlinear media, whose properties depend on the sign of the topological charge due to the nonequivalence of azimuthal directions. In contrast, oppositely charged vortex solitons remain equivalent in similar fully-PT-symmetric potentials. The vortex solitons in the pPT- and PT-symmetric potentials are shown to feature qualitatively different internal current distributions, which are described by different discrete rotation symmetries of the intensity profiles. PMID:26588383

  3. Spin dependence of the coherent scattering lengths of /sup 27/Al and admixture of s- and d-partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mughab, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    A long standing discrepancy between measurements and calculations of the sign of the incoherent scattering length is attributed to two sources: (1) spin dependence of the potential scattering radius and (2) identification of additional s-wave resonances at higher neutron energies. Detailed examination of the reaction /sup 27/Al (n vector,..gamma..) /sup 28/Al induced by thermal neutrons revealed that R/sub +/ - R/sub -/ = 0.32 +- 0.10 fm. Also shape fit analysis of the total cross section showed the presence of s-wave resonances at neutron energies 280, 386, 422, 491, 523, and 615 keV. One interesting outcome is the demonstration of the admixture of s- and d-wave partial waves in these resonances and the presence of a large d-wave neutron strength in the above energy region.

  4. Heating of ions by low-frequency Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chuanfei; Paty, Carol S.

    2011-03-15

    In the solar atmosphere, the chromospheric and coronal plasmas are much hotter than the visible photosphere. The heating of the solar atmosphere, including the partially ionized chromosphere and corona, remains largely unknown. In this letter, we demonstrate that the ions can be substantially heated by Alfven waves with very low frequencies in partially ionized low-beta plasmas. This differs from other Alfven wave related heating mechanisms such as ion-neutral collisional damping of Alfven waves and heating described by previous work on resonant Alfven wave heating. We find that the nonresonant Alfven wave heating is less efficient in partially ionized plasmas than when there are no ion-neutral collisions, and the heating efficiency depends on the ratio of the ion-neutral collision frequency to the ion gyrofrequency.

  5. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  6. Partial reflections of radio waves from the lower ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Tanenbaum, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to partial reflection experiments is discussed, and some advantages of measuring electron density this way are pointed out. The additional information obtained reduces the requirement for an accurate predetermination of collision frequency. Calculations are also made to estimate the errors expected in partial-reflection experiments due to the assumption of Fresnel reflection and to the neglect of coupling between modes. In both cases, the errors are found to be of the same order as known errors in the measurements due to current instrumental limitations.

  7. Weighted-Residual Methods for the Solution of Two-Particle Lippmann-Schwinger Equation Without Partial-Wave Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruoğlu, Zeki C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in computational methods for quantum scattering equations that avoid the traditional decomposition of wave functions and scattering amplitudes into partial waves. The aim of the present work is to show that the weighted-residual approach in combination with local basis functions give rise to convenient computational schemes for the solution of the multi-variable integral equations without the partial wave expansion. The weighted-residual approach provides a unifying framework for various variational and degenerate-kernel methods for integral equations of scattering theory. Using a direct-product basis of localized quadratic interpolation polynomials, Galerkin, collocation and Schwinger variational realizations of the weighted-residual approach have been implemented for a model potential. It is demonstrated that, for a given expansion basis, Schwinger variational method exhibits better convergence with basis size than Galerkin and collocation methods. A novel hybrid-collocation method is implemented with promising results as well.

  8. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Li, Bo-Wen; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Kong, Fan-Rong

    2016-05-01

    Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM) waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  9. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  10. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  11. An algorithm for the calculation of the partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornyak, I.; Kruppa, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The partial wave expansion of the Coulomb-distorted plane wave is determined by the help of the complex generalized hypergeometric function 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) . An algorithm for the calculation of 2F2(a , a ; a + l + 1 , a - l ; z) is created and it is implemented as a FORTRAN-90 code. The code is fast and its accuracy is 14 significant decimal digits.

  12. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  13. Direct Calculation of the Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Wave Decomposition. III; Inclusion of Correlation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    In the first two papers in this series, we developed a method for studying electron-hydrogen scattering that does not use partial wave analysis. We constructed an ansatz for the wave function in both the static and static exchange approximations and calculated the full scattering amplitude. Here we go beyond the static exchange approximation, and include correlation in the wave function via a modified polarized orbital. This correlation function provides a significant improvement over the static exchange approximation: the resultant elastic scattering amplitudes are in very good agreement with fully converged partial wave calculations for electron-hydrogen scattering. A fully variational modification of this approach is discussed in the conclusion of the article Popular summary of Direct calculation of the scattering amplitude without partial wave expansion. III ....." by J. Shertzer and A. Temkin. In this paper we continue the development of In this paper we continue the development of a new approach to the way in which researchers have traditionally used to calculate the scattering cross section of (low-energy) electrons from atoms. The basic mathematical problem is to solve the Schroedinger Equation (SE) corresponding the above physical process. Traditionally it was always the case that the SE was reduced to a sequence of one-dimensional (ordinary) differential equations - called partial waves which were solved and from the solutions "phase shifts" were extracted, from which the scattering cross section was calculated.

  14. Universality in s-wave and higher partial-wave Feshbach resonances: An illustration with a single atom near two scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shangguo; Tan, Shina

    2013-06-01

    It is well-known that cold atoms near s-wave Feshbach resonances have universal properties that are insensitive to the short-range details of the interaction. What is less known is that atoms near higher partial-wave Feshbach resonances also have remarkable universal properties. We illustrate this with a single atom interacting resonantly with two fixed static centers. At a Feshbach resonance point with orbital angular momentum L≥1, we find 2L+1 shallow bound states whose energies behave like 1/R2L+1 when the distance R between the two centers is large. We then compute corrections to the binding energies due to other parameters in the effective range expansions. For completeness we also compute the binding energies near s-wave Feshbach resonances, taking into account the corrections. Afterwards we turn to the bound states at large but finite scattering volumes. For p-wave and higher partial-wave resonances we derive a simple formula for the energies in terms of a parameter called “proximity parameter.” These results are applicable to a free atom interacting resonantly with two atoms that are localized to two lattice sites of an optical lattice, and to one light atom interacting with two heavy ones in free space. Modifications of the low energy physics due to the long range van der Waals potential are also discussed.

  15. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition. 2; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    The development of a practical method of accurately calculating the full scattering amplitude, without making a partial wave decomposition is continued. The method is developed in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, and here exchange is dealt with by considering e-H scattering in the static exchange approximation. The Schroedinger equation in this approximation can be simplified to a set of coupled integro-differential equations. The equations are solved numerically for the full scattering wave function. The scattering amplitude can most accurately be calculated from an integral expression for the amplitude; that integral can be formally simplified, and then evaluated using the numerically determined wave function. The results are essentially identical to converged partial wave results.

  16. Partial denture metal framework may harbor potentially pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Luciano Angelo de Souza; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Silva, Alecsandro Moura

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to characterize and compare bacterial diversity on the removable partial denture (RPD) framework over time. MATERIALS AND METHODS This descriptive pilot study included five women who were rehabilitated with free-end mandibular RPD. The biofilm on T-bar clasps were collected 1 week (t1) and 4 months (t2) after the RPD was inserted (t0). Bacterial 16S rDNA was extracted and PCR amplified. Amplicons were cloned; clones were submitted to cycle sequencing, and sequences were compared with GenBank (98% similarity). RESULTS A total of 180 sequences with more than 499 bp were obtained. Two phylogenetic trees with 84 (t1) and 96 (t2) clones represented the bacteria biofilm at the RPD. About 93% of the obtained phylotypes fell into 25 known species for t1 and 17 for t2, which were grouped in 5 phyla: Firmicutes (t1=82%; t2=60%), Actinobacteria (t1=5%; t2=10%), Bacteroidetes (t1=2%; t2=6%), Proteobacteria (t1=10%; t2=15%) and Fusobacteria (t1=1%; t2=8%). The libraries also include 3 novel phylotypes for t1 and 11 for t2. Library t2 differs from t1 (P=.004); t1 is a subset of the t2 (P=.052). Periodontal pathogens, such as F. nucleatum, were more prevalent in t2. CONCLUSION The biofilm composition of the RPD metal clasps changed along time after RPD wearing. The RPD framework may act as a reservoir for potentially pathogenic bacteria and the RPD wearers may benefit from regular follow-up visits and strategies on prosthesis-related oral health instructions. PMID:26816577

  17. A poroelastic model for ultrasonic wave attenuation in partially frozen brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Jun; Nibe, Takao; Suzuki, Makoto; Kato, Yoshibumi; Rokugawa, Shuichi

    2011-02-01

    Although there are many possible mechanisms for the intrinsic seismic attenuation in composite materials that include fluids, relative motion between solids and fluids during seismic wave propagation is one of the most important attenuation mechanisms. In our previous study, we conducted ultrasonic wave transmission measurements on an ice-brine coexisting system to examine the influence on ultrasonic waves of the unfrozen brine in the pore microstructure of ice. In order to elucidate the physical mechanism responsible for ultrasonic wave attenuation in the frequency range of 350-600kHz, measured at different temperatures in partially frozen brines, we employed a poroelastic model based on the Biot theory to describe the propagation of ultrasonic waves through partially frozen brines. By assuming that the solid phase is ice and the liquid phase is the unfrozen brine, fluid properties measured by a pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance technique were used to calculate porosities at different temperatures. The computed intrinsic attenuation at 500kHz cannot completely predict the measured attenuation results from the experimental study in an ice-brine coexisting system, which suggests that other attenuation mechanisms such as the squirt-flow mechanism and wave scattering effect should be taken into account.

  18. Partial Antisymmetry and Approximate Primitive Wave Functions for Interacting Electronic Groups.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergenz, Robert Allan

    The partial antisymmetry (PA) theorem of W. H. Adams (Chem. Phys. Letters, 68, 511 (1979)) shows that if one can determine an N-electron eigenfunction of a certain non-linear operator, then one can use the eigenfunction, without using full antisymmetry (FA), to calculate an eigenvalue of the Schrodinger Hamiltonian for the system. The operator neither depends on nor commutes with the antisymmetrizer, but involves partial antisymmetrizers. This work provides an initial numerical test of a new approach to calculating approximate interatomic interaction energies based on the PA theorem. Interaction energies were calculated for X ^1Sigma^{+}_ {rm g} Ne_2, Li_2 and Na_2, X^1Sigma^{+} LiNa, X^2Sigma^{+} _{rm g} Li_2 ^{+}, x ^7Sigma ^{+}_{rm u} N_2, x ^3Sigma ^{+}_{rm u} Li_2 and Na_2, x ^3Sigma^{+} LiNa and ionic and covalent configurations of X ^1Sigma^{+} LiF, all at several internuclear distances. Spin-coupled products of single determinants approximated the atomic wave functions, and accurate HF atomic bases were used. Three methods were used: the conventional method based on FA, the PA approach, and a method based on a hybrid set of assumptions. Results were compared with accurate potential curves from the literature. In nine cases of the eleven, including both bonding and repulsive interactions, the PA approximation gave results that were better or roughly the same as those using FA. In these cases there is thus no penalty exacted for the use of PA, though it is shown to be easier to use.

  19. Mixing of partial waves near B*B̄* threshold in e⁺e⁻ annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Voloshin, M. B.

    2013-05-31

    We consider the production of B*B̄* meson pairs in e⁺e⁻ annihilation near the threshold. The rescattering due to pion exchange between the mesons results in a mixing between three partial wave amplitudes: two P-wave amplitudes with the total spin of the meson pair S=0 and S=2 and an F-wave amplitude. The mixing due to pion exchange with a low momentum transfer is calculable up to c.m. energy E≈15–20 MeV above the threshold. We find that the P–F mixing is numerically quite small in this energy range, while the mixing of the two P-wave amplitudes is rapidly changing with energy and can reach of order one at such low energies.

  20. Mixing of partial waves near B*B̄* threshold in e⁺e⁻ annihilation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xin; Voloshin, M. B.

    2013-05-31

    We consider the production of B*B̄* meson pairs in e⁺e⁻ annihilation near the threshold. The rescattering due to pion exchange between the mesons results in a mixing between three partial wave amplitudes: two P-wave amplitudes with the total spin of the meson pair S=0 and S=2 and an F-wave amplitude. The mixing due to pion exchange with a low momentum transfer is calculable up to c.m. energy E≈15–20 MeV above the threshold. We find that the P–F mixing is numerically quite small in this energy range, while the mixing of the two P-wave amplitudes is rapidly changing with energy andmore » can reach of order one at such low energies.« less

  1. Simultaneous observations of gravity waves in auroras and partial reflection radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, Valentin; Cherniakov, Sergey; Roldugin, Aleksey

    2016-07-01

    Some events of wave-like patterns of night sky intensity were revealed from the obtained data of the all-sky camera at the observatory "Lovozero" (67.97 N, 35.02 E). Their wave-lengths were about several tens kilometers and their time periods were about 15-30 minutes. We consider the wave-like structures as manifestation of acoustic-gravity waves. Two cases (28 January 2012 and 26 February 2012) were compared with the data of the partial reflection radar at the observatory "Tumanny" (69.0 N, 35.7 E). At these cases peaks of reflection intensity took place at 80-90 km, and the intensity on these altitudes oscillated with periods which were similar to the luminous ones.

  2. Raman rogue waves in a partially mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Runge, Antoine F J; Aguergaray, Claude; Broderick, Neil G R; Erkintalo, Miro

    2014-01-15

    We report on an experimental study of spectral fluctuations induced by intracavity Raman conversion in a passively partially mode-locked, all-normal dispersion fiber laser. Specifically, we use dispersive Fourier transformation to measure single-shot spectra of Raman-induced noise-like pulses, demonstrating that for low cavity gain values Raman emission is sporadic and follows rogue-wave-like probability distributions, while a saturated regime with Gaussian statistics is obtained for high pump powers. Our experiments further reveal intracavity rogue waves originating from cascaded Raman dynamics. PMID:24562136

  3. Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 Å) arcade loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060 to 760 km s-1 within ˜3-4 minutes. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km s-1, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  4. Trapped internal waves over undular topography in a partially mixed estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, J.; Labeur, R. J.

    The flow of a stratified fluid over small-scale topographic features in an estuary may generate significant internal wave activity. Lee waves and upstream influence generated at isolated topographic features have received considerable attention during the past few decades. Field surveys of a partially mixed estuary, the Rotterdam Waterway, in 1987, also showed a plethora of internal wave activity generated by isolated topography, banks and groynes. Additionally it revealed a spectacular series of resonant internal waves trapped above low-amplitude bed waves. The internal waves reached amplitudes of 3-4 m in an estuary with a mean depth of 16 m. The waves were observed during the decreasing flood tide and are thought to make a significant contribution to turbulence production and mixing. However, while stationary linear and finite amplitude theories can be used to explain the presence of these waves, it is important to further investigate their time-dependent and non-linear behaviour. With the development of advanced non-hydrostatic models it now becomes possible to further investigate these waves through numerical experimentation. This is the focus of the work presented here. The non-hydrostatic finite element numerical model FINEL3D developed by Labeur was used in the experiments presented here. The model has been shown to work well in a number of stratified flow investigations. Here, we first show that the model reproduces the field data and for idealised stationary flow scenarios that the results are in agreement with the resonant response predicted by linear theory. Then we explore the effects of non-linearity and time dependence and consider the importance of resonant internal waves for turbulence production in stratified coastal environments.

  5. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE) can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), and was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation. The resultant equation can be reduced to a pair of coupled pde's, to which the finite element method can still be applied. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, as a function of angle can be calculated for various energies. The results are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  6. Calculation of the Full Scattering Amplitude without Partial Wave Decomposition II: Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine; Temkin, A.

    2003-01-01

    As is well known, the full scattering amplitude can be expressed as an integral involving the complete scattering wave function. We have shown that the integral can be simplified and used in a practical way. Initial application to electron-hydrogen scattering without exchange was highly successful. The Schrodinger equation (SE), which can be reduced to a 2d partial differential equation (pde), was solved using the finite element method. We have now included exchange by solving the resultant SE, in the static exchange approximation, which is reducible to a pair of coupled pde's. The resultant scattering amplitudes, both singlet and triplet, calculated as a function of energy are in excellent agreement with converged partial wave results.

  7. O (p6) extension of the large-NC partial wave dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. H.; Sanz-Cillero, J. J.; Zheng, H. Q.

    2008-04-01

    Continuing our previous work [Z.H. Guo, J.J. Sanz-Cillero, H.Q. Zheng, JHEP 0706 (2007) 030], large-NC techniques and partial wave dispersion relations are used to discuss ππ scattering amplitudes. We get a set of predictions for O (p6) low-energy chiral perturbation theory couplings. They are provided in terms of the masses and decay widths of scalar and vector mesons.

  8. A Rosetta Stone Relating Conventions In Photo-Meson Partial Wave Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Sandorfi, B. Dey, A. Sarantsev, L. Tiator, R. Workman

    2012-04-01

    A new generation of complete experiments in pseudoscalar meson photo-production is being pursued at several laboratories. While new data are emerging, there is some confusion regarding definitions of asymmetries and the conventions used in partial wave analyses (PWA). We present expressions for constructing asymmetries as coordinate-system independent ratios of cross sections, along with the names used for these ratios by different PWA groups.

  9. Non-partial wave treatment of reactive and non-reactive scattering Coupled integral equation formalism.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, E. F.; Kouri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Coupled integral equations are derived for the full scattering amplitudes for both reactive and nonreactive channels. The equations do not involve any partial wave expansion and are obtained using channel operators for reactive and nonreactive collisions. These coupled integral equations are similar in nature to equations derived for purely nonreactive collisions of structureless particles. Using numerical quadrature techniques, these equations may be reduced to simultaneous algebraic equations which may then be solved.

  10. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3D elastic orthorhombic media: An inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-07-01

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multi component sensors, the potential for tradeoff between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22 and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23 and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44 and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  11. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3-D elastic orthorhombic media: an inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-09-01

    Multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multicomponent sensors, the potential for trade-off between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22, and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23, and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44, and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  12. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Partial Pressure of Cerebral Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates 55 intracranial pressure (ICP) plateau waves recorded in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a focus on a moving correlation coefficient between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and ICP, called PRx, which serves as a marker of cerebrovascular reactivity, and a moving correlation coefficient between ABP and cerebral partial pressure of oxygen (pbtO2), called ORx, which serves as a marker for cerebral oxygen reactivity. ICP and ICPamplitude increased significantly during the plateau waves, whereas CPP and pbtO2 decreased significantly. ABP, ABP amplitude, and heart rate remained unchanged. In 73 % of plateau waves PRx increased during the wave. ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, which was not statistically significant. Our data show profound cerebral vasoparalysis on top of the wave and, to a lesser extent, impairment of cerebral oxygen reactivity. The different behavior of the indices may be due to the different latencies of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen level control mechanisms. While cerebrovascular reactivity is a rapidly reacting mechanism, cerebral oxygen reactivity is slower. PMID:27165902

  13. Using a partial-wave method for sound-mean-flow scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Berthet, R; Coste, C

    2003-03-01

    We present a semianalytical method, based on a partial-wave expansion and valid in the short wavelength limit for small Mach number flows, to analyze sound-vortical-flow interactions. It is more powerful than ray-tracing methods because it gives both amplitude and phase of the sound wave, and because it is less restrictive on the smallness of the wavelength. In contrast with the Born approximation approach, this method allows the computation of the sound field in the whole interaction domain (including the near field), and preserves energy conservation. Vortical flows with finite circulation are amenable to our analysis, which gives a satisfactory description of wave front dislocation by vorticity, in good agreement with direct numerical simulations. We extend previous versions of this method to the case of smooth vorticity profiles which are observed in aeroacoustics experiments. PMID:12689176

  14. Heating of the Partially Ionized Solar Chromosphere by Waves in Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyag, S.; Khomenko, E.; de Vicente, A.; Przybylski, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  15. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  16. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  17. Oblique wave-free potentials for water waves in constant finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Rajdeep; Basu, Uma; Mandal, B. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method to construct oblique wave-free potentials in the linearised theory of water waves for water with uniform finite depth is presented in a systematic manner. The water has either a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. For the case of free surface, the effect of surface tension may be neglected or taken into account. Here, the wave-free potentials are singular solutions of the modified Helmholtz equation, having singularity at a point in the fluid region and they satisfy the conditions at the upper surface and the bottom of water region and decay rapidly away from the point of singularity. These are useful in obtaining solutions to oblique water wave problems involving bodies with circular cross-sections such as long horizontal cylinders submerged or half-immersed in water of uniform finite depth with a free surface or an ice-cover modelled as a floating elastic plate. Finally, the forms of the upper surface related to the wave-free potentials constructed here are depicted graphically in a number of figures to visualize the wave motion. The results for non-oblique wave-free potentials and the upper surface wave-free potentials are obtained. The wave-free potentials constructed here will be useful in the mathematical study of water wave problems involving infinitely long horizontal cylinders, either half-immersed or completely immersed in water.

  18. Universal potential-barrier penetration by initially confined wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2007-07-15

    The dynamics of an initially sharp-boundary wave packet in the presence of an arbitrary potential barrier is investigated. It is shown that the penetration through the barrier is universal in the sense that it depends only on the values of the wave function and its derivatives at the boundary. The dependence on the derivatives vanishes at long distances from the barrier, where the dynamics is governed solely by the initial value of the wave function at the boundary.

  19. Electromagnetic waves in dusty magnetoplasmas using two-potential theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zubia, K.; Jamil, M.; Salimullah, M.

    2009-09-15

    The low-frequency long wavelength electromagnetic waves, viz., shear Alfven waves in a cold dusty plasma, have been examined employing two-potential theory and plasma fluid model. The presence of the unmagnetized dust particles and magnetized plasma components gives rise to a new ion-dust lower hybrid cutoff frequency for the electromagnetic shear Alfven wave propagation. The importance and relevance of the present work to the space dusty plasma environments are also pointed out.

  20. ALFVEN SIMPLE WAVES: EULER POTENTIALS AND MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Hu, Q.; Dasgupta, B.; Zank, G. P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2010-12-20

    The magnetic helicity characteristics of fully nonlinear, multi-dimensional Alfven simple waves are investigated, by using relative helicity formulae and also by using an approach involving poloidal and toroidal decomposition of the magnetic field and magnetic vector potential. Different methods to calculate the magnetic vector potential are used, including the homotopy and Biot-Savart formulae. Two basic Alfven modes are identified: (1) the plane one-dimensional Alfven simple wave given in standard texts, in which the Alfven wave propagates along the z-axis with wave phase {psi} = k{sub 0}(z - {lambda}t), where k{sub 0} is the wave number and {lambda} is the group velocity of the wave and (2) the generalized Barnes simple Alfven wave in which the wave normal n moves in a circle in the xy-plane perpendicular to the mean field, which is directed along the z-axis. The plane Alfven wave (1) is analogous to the slab Alfven mode and the generalized Barnes solution (2) is analogous to the two-dimensional mode in Alfvenic, incompressible turbulence. The helicity characteristics of these two basic Alfven modes are distinct. The helicity characteristics of more general multi-dimensional simple Alfven waves are also investigated. Applications to nonlinear Alfvenic fluctuations and structures observed in the solar wind are discussed.

  1. Wave packet motion in harmonic potential and computer visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuru, Hideo; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    Wave packet motions of a single electron in harmonic potentials or a magnetic field are obtained analytically. The phase of the wave function which depends on both time and space is also presented explicitly. The probability density of the electron changes its width and central position periodically. These results are visualized using computer animation techniques.

  2. Partial-wave analysis of all nucleon-nucleon scattering data below 350 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Stoks, V.G.J.; Klomp, R.A.M.; Rentmeester, M.C.M.; de Swart, J.J. )

    1993-08-01

    We present a multienergy partial-wave analysis of all [ital NN] scattering data below [ital T][sub lab]=350 MeV, published in a regular physics journal between 1955 and 1992. After careful examination, our final database consists of 1787 [ital pp] and 2514 [ital np] scattering data. Our fit to these data results in [chi][sup 2]/[ital N][sub df]=1.08, with [ital N][sub df]=3945 the total number of degrees of freedom. All phase shifts and mixing parameters can be determined accurately.

  3. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C.

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  4. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  5. ELSEPA—Dirac partial-wave calculation of elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms, positive ions and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander; Powell, Cedric J.

    2005-01-01

    The FORTRAN 77 code system ELSEPA for the calculation of elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atoms, positive ions and molecules is presented. These codes perform relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave calculations for scattering by a local central interaction potential V(r). For atoms and ions, the static-field approximation is adopted, with the potential set equal to the electrostatic interaction energy between the projectile and the target, plus an approximate local exchange interaction when the projectile is an electron. For projectiles with kinetic energies up to 10 keV, the potential may optionally include a semiempirical correlation-polarization potential to describe the effect of the target charge polarizability. Also, for projectiles with energies less than 1 MeV, an imaginary absorptive potential can be introduced to account for the depletion of the projectile wave function caused by open inelastic channels. Molecular cross sections are calculated by means of a single-scattering independent-atom approximation in which the electron density of a bound atom is approximated by that of the free neutral atom. Elastic scattering by individual atoms in solids is described by means of a muffin-tin model potential. Partial-wave calculations are feasible on modest personal computers for energies up to about 5 MeV. The ELSEPA code also implements approximate factorization methods that allow the fast calculation of elastic cross sections for much higher energies. The interaction model adopted in the calculations is defined by the user by combining the different options offered by the code. The nuclear charge distribution can be selected among four analytical models (point nucleus, uniformly charged sphere, Fermi's distribution and Helm's uniform-uniform distribution). The atomic electron density is handled in numerical form. The distribution package includes data files with electronic densities of neutral atoms of the elements hydrogen to lawrencium ( Z=1

  6. Solution of the Bethe-Goldstone equation without partial wave decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Larz

    Nucleon-nucleon scattering is a most fundamental process in nuclear physics. From the theoretical standpoint, its description in momentum space involves the solution of an integral equation in three dimensions, which is typically accomplished with the help of a partial wave expansion of the scattering amplitude. It is the purpose of this work to present a method for solving the nucleon-nucleon scattering equation without the use of such expansion. After verifying the accuracy of our numerical tools by comparing with existing solutions of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude in free space, we proceed to apply the method to the equation describing scattering of two nucleons in the nuclear medium, known as the Bethe-Goldstone equation. An important feature of this equation is the presence of the so-called "Pauli blocking operator", which prevents scattering of two fermions into occupied states, as required by the Pauli principle. In standard solution methods based on partial wave expansions, it is necessary to apply an approximation to this operator, which involves averaging over angular variables and is therefore known as the "spherical approximation". In our method, this approximation can be avoided. Thus, a focal point of this study is a comparison of Pauli blocking effects calculated in the (angle-dependent) three-dimensional formalism as compared to the usual spherical approximation. We present results for nucleon-nucleon amplitudes and observables and discuss their implications.

  7. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  8. Construction of wave-free potentials and multipoles in a two-layer fluid having free-surface boundary condition with higher-order derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dilip

    2015-07-01

    There is a large class of problems in the field of fluid structure interaction where higher-order boundary conditions arise for a second-order partial differential equation. Various methods are being used to tackle these kind of mixed boundary-value problems associated with the Laplace's equation (or Helmholtz equation) arising in the study of waves propagating through solids or fluids. One of the widely used methods in wave structure interaction is the multipole expansion method. This expansion involves a general combination of a regular wave, a wave source, a wave dipole and a regular wave-free part. The wave-free part can be further expanded in terms of wave-free multipoles which are termed as wave-free potentials. These are singular solutions of Laplace's equation or two-dimensional Helmholz equation. Construction of these wave-free potentials and multipoles are presented here in a systematic manner for a number of situations such as two-dimensional non-oblique and oblique waves, three dimensional waves in two-layer fluid with free surface condition with higher order partial derivative are considered. In particular, these are obtained taking into account of the effect of the presence of surface tension at the free surface and also in the presence of an ice-cover modelled as a thin elastic plate. Also for limiting case, it can be shown that the multipoles and wave-free potential functions go over to the single layer multipoles and wave-free potential.

  9. Two-fluid modeling of magnetosonic wave propagation in the partially ionized solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We perform 2D two-fluid simulations to study the effects of ion-neutral interactions on the propagation of magnetosonic waves in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, where the number density of neutrals significantly exceeds the number density of protons at low heights. Thus modeling the neutral-ion interactions and studying the effect of neutrals on the ambient plasma properties becomes important for better understanding the observed emission lines and the propagation of disturbances from the photosphere to the transition region and the corona. The role of charged particles (electrons and ions) is combined within resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations, allowing for propagation of higher frequency waves neglected by the standard MHD approximation. Separate mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for the neutrals and the interaction between the different fluids is determined by the chemical reactions, such as impact ionization, radiative recombination and charge exchange, provided as additional source terms. To initialize the system we consider an ideal gas equation of state with equal initial temperatures for the electrons, ions and the neutrals and different density profiles. The initial temperature and density profiles are height-dependent and follow VAL C atmospheric model for the solar chromosphere. We have searched for a chemical and collisional equilibrium between the ions and the neutrals to minimize any unphysical outflows and artificial heating induced by initial pressure imbalances. Including different magnetic field profiles brings new source of plasma heating through Ohmic dissipation. The excitation and propagation of the magnetosonic waves depends on the type of the external velocity driver. As the waves propagate through the gravitationally stratified media

  10. Partial-wave decomposition of the finite-range effective tensor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davesne, D.; Becker, P.; Pastore, A.; Navarro, J.

    2016-06-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the properties of the finite-range tensor term associated with the Gogny and M3Y effective interactions. In particular, by using a partial-wave decomposition of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter, we show how we can extract their tensor parameters directly from microscopic results based on bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Furthermore, we show that the zero-range limit of both finite-range interactions has the form of the next-to-next-to-next-leading-order (N3LO) Skyrme pseudopotential, which thus constitutes a reliable approximation in the density range relevant for finite nuclei. Finally, we use Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results to fix the tensor parameters for the three effective interactions.

  11. PyPWA: A partial-wave/amplitude analysis software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The PyPWA project aims to develop a software framework for Partial Wave and Amplitude Analysis of data; providing the user with software tools to identify resonances from multi-particle final states in photoproduction. Most of the code is written in Python. The software is divided into two main branches: one general-shell where amplitude's parameters (or any parametric model) are to be estimated from the data. This branch also includes software to produce simulated data-sets using the fitted amplitudes. A second branch contains a specific realization of the isobar model (with room to include Deck-type and other isobar model extensions) to perform PWA with an interface into the computer resources at Jefferson Lab. We are currently implementing parallelism and vectorization using the Intel's Xeon Phi family of coprocessors.

  12. Partial wave analysis of the reaction gamma p -> p omega$ and the search for nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction gamma p -> p omega has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high precision spin density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of omega-> pi+ pi - pi0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel pi0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F[15](1680) and D[13](1700) near threshold, as well as the G[17](2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J(P)=5/2(+) state around 2 GeV, a "missing" state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  13. X-ray standing wave analysis of nanostructures using partially coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K. Das, Gangadhar; Bedzyk, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    The effect of longitudinal (or temporal) coherence on total reflection assisted x-ray standing wave (TR-XSW) analysis of nanoscale materials is quantitatively demonstrated by showing how the XSW fringe visibility can be strongly damped by decreasing the spectral resolution of the incident x-ray beam. The correction for nonzero wavelength dispersion (δλ ≠ 0) of the incident x-ray wave field is accounted for in the model computations of TR-XSW assisted angle dependent fluorescence yields of the nanostructure coatings on x-ray mirror surfaces. Given examples include 90 nm diameter Au nanospheres deposited on a Si(100) surface and a 3 nm thick Zn layer trapped on top a 100 nm Langmuir-Blodgett film coating on a Au mirror surface. Present method opens up important applications, such as enabling XSW studies of large dimensioned nanostructures using conventional laboratory based partially coherent x-ray sources.

  14. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jordá, José M

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations Ax=b, where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O(NlogN) memory and executing an iteration in O(Nlog(2)N) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps. PMID:26986436

  15. Fast solution of elliptic partial differential equations using linear combinations of plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.

    2016-02-01

    Given an arbitrary elliptic partial differential equation (PDE), a procedure for obtaining its solution is proposed based on the method of Ritz: the solution is written as a linear combination of plane waves and the coefficients are obtained by variational minimization. The PDE to be solved is cast as a system of linear equations A x =b , where the matrix A is not sparse, which prevents the straightforward application of standard iterative methods in order to solve it. This sparseness problem can be circumvented by means of a recursive bisection approach based on the fast Fourier transform, which makes it possible to implement fast versions of some stationary iterative methods (such as Gauss-Seidel) consuming O (N logN ) memory and executing an iteration in O (N log2N ) time, N being the number of plane waves used. In a similar way, fast versions of Krylov subspace methods and multigrid methods can also be implemented. These procedures are tested on Poisson's equation expressed in adaptive coordinates. It is found that the best results are obtained with the GMRES method using a multigrid preconditioner with Gauss-Seidel relaxation steps.

  16. Localization of wave packets in one-dimensional random potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Juan Pablo Ramírez; Wellens, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We study the expansion of an initially strongly confined wave packet in a one-dimensional weak random potential with short correlation length. At long times, the expansion of the wave packet comes to a halt due to destructive interferences leading to Anderson localization. We develop an analytical description for the disorder-averaged localized density profile. For this purpose, we employ the diagrammatic method of Berezinskii which we extend to the case of wave packets, present an analytical expression of the Lyapunov exponent which is valid for small as well as for high energies, and, finally, develop a self-consistent Born approximation in order to analytically calculate the energy distribution of our wave packet. By comparison with numerical simulations, we show that our theory describes well the complete localized density profile, not only in the tails but also in the center.

  17. Are seismic wave velocities and anisotropies reliable proxies for partial melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amicia; Torvela, Taija; Lloyd, Geoffrey; Walker, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Partial melts and their segregation weaken mineral crystallographic alignment, resulting in a decrease in seismic anisotropy (AV). Furthermore, introduction of melt induces a drop in seismic wave velocities, especially for shear (Vs) but also compressional (Vp) waves, although some solid-state processes can also lead to velocity drops. Thus, decreases in AV and/or V are often used to infer the presence and even the amount of melt in both the crust and mantle, for example via the Vp/Vs ratio. However, evidence is accumulating that the relationship between melt fraction and seismic properties is not straight-forward. We consider how varying melt fraction (f) might affect crustal seismic properties. Our modelling approach is based on electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) patterns from granulite facies sheared migmatites. The CPO data are used to model the seismic properties of rocks with different solid/melt proportions. Subsequently, melt was simulated via an isotropic elastic stiffness matrix and combined mathematically with the CPO-derived seismic properties, and seismic properties then recalculated to take into account the presence of melt. These melt models, therefore, predict changes in seismic properties at different f. The models show that low (c. f < 0.15) and high (0.7 < f < 1) values affect seismic properties much more than the 'crystal mush' part (0.1 < f < 0.7): velocities (V) and anisotropies (AV) for both low and high f drop rapidly but 'plateau' at intermediate f. Our results imply that V and, especially, AV may not be reliable proxies for the amount of crustal melt present. Seismic wave behaviour in crystal-supported (0.1 < f < 0.7) material may be controlled by the solid rather than the melt phase.

  18. Relationship between partial wave amplitudes and polarization observables in pp. -->. d. pi. /sup +/ and. pi. d. -->. pi. d

    SciTech Connect

    Blankleider, B.; Afnan, I.R.

    1985-04-01

    The polarization observables of the reactions parrow parrow ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/d, parrowp ..-->.. darrow..pi../sup +/, and ..pi..darrow ..-->.. ..pi..darrow are investigated. Expressions relating these observables directly to (LSJ) partial wave amplitudes are derived and tabulations of the partial wave contributions are given for some of the observables. Examples are given of how such tabulations can be useful for optimizing the connection between theory and experiment and in suggesting possible new experiments. All observables are also calculated numerically using a unitary few-body model of the NN-..pi..NN system to generate the amplitudes. Sensitivity to the choice of P/sub 11/ interaction is investigated.

  19. Diffractive theorems for the wave equation with inverse square potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Randy Zhigang

    This dissertation investigates the phenomenon of diffraction resulting from the addition of an inverse square potential term to the wave operator. In particular, it explicitly establishes the existence of diffraction for the solution to the wave operator with an inverse square potential in 2-dimensional euclidean space and proves a propagation of smoothness result in two more general settings. Chapter 2 establishes diffraction in the fundamental solutions to the wave operator plus inverse square potential with a Dirac Delta initial condition in 2-dimensional euclidean space. Following methods as described by Cheeger and Taylor, we separate variables, apply spectral transforms to each variable, and employ contour deformation techniques to establish an explicit form for diffractive front in the fundamental solution. Chapter 3 proves a propagation of smoothness result for a related wave operator with potential, where instead of a constant, we put a smooth bounded function in the numerator of the potential. Microlocal energy estimates are used following the basic propagation methods of Duistermaat and Hormander, and employing the heavy refinements due to Melrose, Vasy, and Wunsch to handle propagation through the radial point at the origin. The potential term is estimated using Hardy's Inequality. Chapter 4 extends the propagation of smoothness result to conic manifolds with an inverse square potential concentrated at their boundary. We state a product decomposition theorem for the conic metric due to Melrose and Wunsch, then use the resulting coordinates to deploy our argument from Chapter 3. New terms with dependence on distance to the boundary arise, and we show how to bound them.

  20. How close can we get waves to wave functions, including potential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faletič, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    In the following article we show that mechanical waves on a braced string can have the same shapes as important wave functions in introductory quantum mechanics. A braced string is a string with additional transversal springs that serve as external "potential". The aim is not to suggest teaching quantum mechanics with these analogies. Instead, the aim is to provide students with some additional relevant experience in wave mechanics before they are introduced to quantum mechanics. We show how this experience can be used in a constructivist sense as the basis for building quantum concepts. We consider energy transfer along such string and show that penetration of a wave into a region with high "potential" is not unexpected. We also consider energy transfer between two such strings and show that it can appear point-like even though the wave is an extended object. We also suggest that applying quantization of energy transfer to wave phenomena can explain some of the more difficult to accept features of quantum mechanics.

  1. Fully and partially coherent pathways in multiply enhanced odd-order wave-mixing spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Yurs, Lena A; Block, Stephen B; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Kornau, Kathryn M; Sibert, Edwin L; Wright, John C

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy relies on using multiple excitation pulses to create multiple quantum coherences that provide great specificity for chemical measurements. Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) is the optical analogue of NMR. Current CMDS methods use three excitation pulses and phase matching to create zero, single, and double quantum coherences. In order to create higher order multiple quantum coherences, the number of interactions must be increased by raising the excitation intensities high enough to create Rabi frequencies that are comparable to the dephasing rates of vibrational coherences. The higher Rabi frequencies create multiple, odd-order coherence pathways. The coherence pathways that involve intermediate populations are partially coherent and are sensitive to population relaxation effects. Pathways that are fully coherent involve only coherences and measure the direct coupling between excited quantum states. The fully coherent pathways are related to the multiple quantum coherences created in multiple pulse NMR methods such as heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy with the important difference that HMQC NMR methods have a defined number of interactions and avoid dynamic Stark effects whereas the multiply enhanced odd-order wave-mixing pathways do not. The difference arises because CMDS methods use phase matching to define the interactions and at high intensities, multiple pathways obey the same phase matching conditions. The multiple pathways correspond to the pathways created by dynamic Stark effects. This paper uses rhodium dicarbonyl chelate (RDC) as a model to demonstrate the characteristics of multiply enhanced odd-order wave-mixing (MEOW) methods. Dynamic Stark effects excite vibrational ladders on the symmetric and asymmetric CO stretch modes and create a series of multiple quantum coherences and populations using partially and fully coherent pathways. Vibrational quantum states up to v = 6

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Upper-mantle Materials: the Effect of Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Faul, U. H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mechanical behaviour expected of Earth materials at high temperature places a special premium on laboratory measurements of wave speeds and attenuation at seismic frequencies. The symposium in honour of Mervyn Paterson provides a welcome opportunity to acknowledge his vital role in the design of the specialised equipment for this purpose described by Jackson and Paterson (PEPI 45: 349-367, 1987; Pageoph 141: 445-466, 1993). This instrument allows the study of low-strain high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour through the application of torsional forced oscillation/ microcreep techniques within the P-T environment (200 MPa, 1600 K) provided by an internally heated gas apparatus. Application of these techniques to fine-grained synthetic olivine polycrystals is beginning to provide a robust basis for the understanding of seismic wave attenuation (and dispersion) in the upper mantle under sub-solidus conditions. More recently, we have begun to explore the effects of partial melting through the fabrication, characterisation and mechanical testing of a suite of fine-grained olivine polycrystals containing up to 4% basaltic melt. The most striking effect of the added melt is the appearance of a melt-related dissipation peak superimposed upon the dissipation background characteristic of melt-free materials - which varies monotonically with period and temperature. The melt-related dissipation peak is adequately modelled as a Gaussian in log X, where X = To exp(E/RT). The melt-related dissipation peak sweeps across the seismic band from period To > 100 s to To < 1 s as temperature increases across the range 1300 - 1600 K producing pronounced systematic changes in the frequency dependence of 1/Q, that may be seismologically observable. >http://rses.anu.adu.au/petrophysics/PetroHome.html

  3. Potential of shock waves to remove calculus and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Attin, Thomas; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2011-12-01

    Effective calculus and biofilm removal is essential to treat periodontitis. Sonic and ultrasonic technologies are used in several scaler applications. This was the first feasibility study to assess the potential of a shock wave device to remove calculus and biofilms and to kill bacteria. Ten extracted teeth with visible subgingival calculus were treated with either shock waves for 1 min at an energy output of 0.4 mJ/mm(2) at 3 Hz or a magnetostrictive ultrasonic scaler at medium power setting for 1 min, which served as a control. Calculus was determined before and after treatment planimetrically using a custom-made software using a grey scale threshold. In a second experiment, multispecies biofilms were formed on saliva-preconditioned bovine enamel discs during 64.5 h. They were subsequently treated with shock waves or the ultrasonic scaler (N = 6/group) using identical settings. Biofilm detachment and bactericidal effects were then assessed. Limited efficiency of the shock wave therapy in terms of calculus removal was observed: only 5% of the calculus was removed as compared to 100% when ultrasound was used (P ≤ 0.0001). However, shock waves were able to significantly reduce adherent bacteria by three orders of magnitude (P ≤ 0.0001). The extent of biofilm removal by the ultrasonic device was statistically similar. Only limited bactericidal effects were observed using both methods. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, the shock wave device was not able to reliably remove calculus but had the potential to remove biofilms by three log steps. To increase the efficacy, technical improvements are still required. This novel noninvasive intervention, however, merits further investigation. PMID:20821262

  4. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the −6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  5. Partial wave analysis of the Dirac fermions scattered from Schwarzschild black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotăescu, Ion I.; Crucean, Cosmin; Sporea, Ciprian A.

    2016-03-01

    Asymptotic analytic solutions of the Dirac equation, giving the scattering modes (of the continuous energy spectrum, E>mc^2) in Schwarzschild's chart and Cartesian gauge, are used for building the partial wave analysis of Dirac fermions scattered by black holes. In this framework, the analytic expressions of the differential cross section and induced polarization degree are derived in terms of scattering angle, mass of the black hole, and energy and mass of the fermion. Moreover, the closed form of the absorption cross section due to the scattering modes is derived showing that in the high-energy limit this tends to the event horizon area regardless of the fermion mass (including zero). A graphical study presents the differential cross section analyzing the forward/backward scattering (known also as glory scattering) and the polarization degree as functions of scattering angle. The graphical analysis shows the presence of oscillations in scattering intensity around forward/backward directions, phenomena known as spiral scattering. The energy dependence of the differential cross section is also established by using analytical and graphical methods.

  6. Comparison of partial extraction reagents for assessing potential bioavailability of heavy metals in sediments.

    PubMed

    Brady, James P; Kinaev, Irina; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-05-15

    Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in sediments is complex because of the number of partial extraction methods available for the assessment and the general lack of certified reference materials. This study evaluates five different extraction methodologies to ascertain the relative strengths and weaknesses of each method. The results are then compared to previously published work to ascertain the most effective partial extraction technique, which was established to dilute (0.75-1M) nitric acid solutions. These results imply that single reagent; weak acid extractions provide a better assessment of potentially bioavailable metals than the chelating agents used in sequential extraction methods. PMID:27036084

  7. WATERWAVES: wave particles dynamics on a complex triatomic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taioli, Simone; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2006-07-01

    The WATERWAVES program suite performs complex scattering calculations by propagating a wave packet in a complex, full-dimensional potential for non-rotating ( J=0) but vibrating triatomic molecules. Potential energy and decay probability surfaces must be provided. Expectation values of geometric quantities can be calculated, which are useful for following the wave packet motion. The programs use a local complex potential approximation (LCP) for the Hamiltonian and Jacobi coordinates. The bottleneck of the calculation is the application of each term of the Hamiltonian to the wave packet. To solve this problem the programs use a different representation for each term: normalized associated Legendre polynomials PjK(x) as a functional basis for the angular kinetic term and an evenly spaced grid for the radial kinetic term yielding a fully point-wise representation of the wave functions. The potential term is treated using an efficient Discrete Variable Representation (DVR) being diagonal in the coordinate representation. The radial kinetic term uses a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain an operator which is diagonal in the momentum space. To avoid artificial reflection at the boundaries of the grid a complex absorbing potential is included for calculating continuum quantities. Asymptotic analysis is performed to obtain scattering observables such as cross sections and other dynamical properties. Program summaryProgram title: WATERWAVES Catalogue identifier:ADXT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXT_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Freely available from CPC Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer(s) for which the program has been designed: PC Operating system(s) for which the program has been designed: Linux RAM required to execute with typical data: case dependent: test run requires 976 024 kB No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:11

  8. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  9. Resolving Difficulties of a Single-Channel Partial-Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Brian; Manley, D. Mark

    2016-03-01

    The goal of our research is to determine better the properties of nucleon resonances using techniques of a global multichannel partial-wave analysis. Currently, many predicted resonances have not been found, while the properties of several known resonances are relatively uncertain. To resolve these issues, one must analyze many different reactions in a multichannel fit. Other groups generally approach this problem by generating an energy-dependent fit from the start. This is a fit where all channels are analyzed together. The method is powerful, but due to the complex nature of resonances, certain model-dependent assumptions have to be introduced from the start. The current work tries to resolve these issues by first generating single-energy solutions in which experimental data are analyzed in narrow energy bins. The single-energy solutions can then be used to constrain the energy-dependent solution in a comparatively unbiased manner. Our work focuses on adding three new single-energy solutions into the global fit. These reactions are γp --> ηp , γn --> ηn , and γp -->K+ Λ . During this talk, I will discuss the difficulties of this approach, our methods to overcome these difficulties, and a few preliminary results. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Medium Energy Nuclear Physics, under Award Nos. DE-FG02-01ER41194 and DE-SC0014323 and by the Kent State University Department of Physics.

  10. Partial wave spectroscopic microscopy can predict prostate cancer progression and mitigate over-treatment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Graff, Taylor; Crawford, Susan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Thompson, Sebastian; Derbas, Justin R.; Lyengar, Radha; Roy, Hemant K.; Brendler, Charles B.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. While prostate specific antigen (PSA) test has been widely used for screening PC, >60% of the PSA detected cancers are indolent, leading to unnecessary clinical interventions. An alternative approach, active surveillance (AS), also suffer from high expense, discomfort and complications associated with repeat biopsies (every 1-3 years), limiting its acceptance. Hence, a technique that can differentiate indolent from aggressive PC would attenuate the harms from over-treatment. Combining microscopy with spectroscopy, our group has developed partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, which can quantify intracellular nanoscale organizations (e.g. chromatin structures) that are not accessible by conventional microscopy. PWS microscopy has previously been shown to predict the risk of cancer in seven different organs (N ~ 800 patients). Herein we use PWS measurement of label-free histologically-normal prostatic epithelium to distinguish indolent from aggressive PC and predict PC risk. Our results from 38 men with low-grade PC indicated that there is a significant increase in progressors compared to non-progressors (p=0.002, effect size=110%, AUC=0.80, sensitivity=88% and specificity=72%), while the baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different. We further improved the diagnostic power by performing nuclei-specific measurements using an automated system that separates in real-time the cell nuclei from the remaining prostate epithelium. In the long term, we envision that the PWS based prognostication can be coupled with AS without any change to the current procedure to mitigate the harms caused by over-treatment.

  11. Collision-induced Raman scattering from a pair of dissimilar particles: An intriguing mathematical model predicting the suppression of the odd-numbered partial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysos, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Relying on a simple analytic two-atom model in which the anisotropy of the interaction dipole polarizability obeys an inverse power law as a function of separation, we offer mathematical and numerical evidence that, in a monoatomic gas, the free-free Raman spectrum for a collisional pair of two different isotopes, a-a', may vastly differ from that for a-a. This result is obtained even if a and a' are assumed to have the same mass and zero nuclear spin and even if a-a and a-a' are subject to the same interaction polarizability and potential. The mechanism responsible for this effect is inherent in the parity of the partial-wave rotational quantum number J: given that the contribution of each partial wave to the Raman cross section is controlled by a polarizability-transition matrix-element and that each of those matrix-elements has a radial component with a magnitude slightly smaller than that of the preceding partial wave, a deficit which disfavors the odd-numbered waves is accumulated upon summing over J. In the far high-frequency wing, this deficit tends to generate spectral intensities for a-a' about half as great as the a-a ones, a tendency which becomes all the more effective as temperature is decreased. We show for instance that, for the spectral branch ΔJ = 2, the fractional difference between the free-free differential cross sections for a-a and a-a' is /1 2 /( 1 - x2 ) 3 1 + 3 x 4 , with x = √{ E / E ' } (E (E') being the initial (final) state energy of the pair and E' - E = hcν (ν > 0)). Remarkably, this quantity is zero at ν ≈ 0 but goes to /1 2 for ν ≫ 0. For ΔJ = 0, analogous conclusions may be drawn from the expression ( 1 + /ln ( 1+x/1-x ) 2 arctan x ) - 1 .

  12. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  13. Hyperspherical partial-wave theory applied to electron-hydrogen-atom ionization calculation for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2003-04-01

    Hyperspherical partial-wave theory has been applied here in a new way in the calculation of the triple differential cross sections for the ionization of hydrogen atoms by electron impact at low energies for various equal-energy-sharing kinematic conditions. The agreement of the cross section results with the recent absolute measurements of [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A 45, 2951 (2002)] and with the latest theoretical results of the ECS and CCC calculations [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A (to be published)] for different kinematic conditions at 17.6 eV is very encouraging. The other calculated results, for relatively higher energies, are also generally satisfactory, particularly for large {theta}{sub ab} geometries. In view of the present results, together with the fact that it is capable of describing unequal-energy-sharing kinematics [J. N. Das, J. Phys. B 35, 1165 (2002)], it may be said that the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is quite appropriate for the description of ionization events of electron-hydrogen-type systems. It is also clear that the present approach in the implementation of the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is very appropriate.

  14. Reciprocal links among differential parenting, perceived partiality, and self-worth: a three-wave longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Shebloski, Barbara; Conger, Katherine J; Widaman, Keith F

    2005-12-01

    This study examined reciprocal links between parental differential treatment, siblings' perception of partiality, and self-worth with 3 waves of data from 384 adolescent sibling dyads. Results suggest that birth-order status was significantly associated with self-worth and perception of maternal and paternal differential treatment. There was a consistent across-time effect of self-worth on perception of parental partiality for later born siblings, but not earlier born siblings, and a consistent effect of differential treatment on perception of partiality for earlier born but not later born siblings. The results contribute new insight into the associations between perception of differential parenting and adolescents' adjustment and the role of birth order. PMID:16402879

  15. Theory of wave propagation in partially saturated double-porosity rocks: a triple-layer patchy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weitao; Ba, Jing; Carcione, José M.

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced local fluid flow is known as a key mechanism to explain the intrinsic wave dissipation in fluid-saturated rocks. Understanding the relationship between the acoustic properties of rocks and fluid patch distributions is important to interpret the observed seismic wave phenomena. A triple-layer patchy (TLP) model is proposed to describe the P-wave dissipation process in a double-porosity media saturated with two immiscible fluids. The double-porosity rock consists of a solid matrix with unique host porosity and inclusions which contain the second type of pores. Two immiscible fluids are considered in concentric spherical patches, where the inner pocket and the outer sphere are saturated with different fluids. The kinetic and dissipation energy functions of local fluid flow (LFF) in the inner pocket are formulated through oscillations in spherical coordinates. The wave propagation equations of the TLP model are based on Biot's theory and the corresponding Lagrangian equations. The P-wave dispersion and attenuation caused by the Biot friction mechanism and the local fluid flow (related to the pore structure and the fluid distribution) are obtained by a plane-wave analysis from the Christoffel equations. Numerical examples and laboratory measurements indicate that P-wave dispersion and attenuation are significantly influenced by the spatial distributions of both, the solid heterogeneity and the fluid saturation distribution. The TLP model is in reasonably good agreement with White's and Johnson's models. However, differences in phase velocity suggest that the heterogeneities associated with double-porosity and dual-fluid distribution should be taken into account when describing the P-wave dispersion and attenuation in partially saturated rocks.

  16. Potential of surface acoustic wave biosensors for early sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Csete, Marie; Hunt, William D

    2013-08-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis is a difficult problem for intensivists and new biomarkers for early diagnosis have been difficult to come by. Here we discuss the potential of adapting a technology from the electronics industry, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors, for diagnosis of multiple markers of sepsis in real time, using non-invasive assays of exhaled breath condensate. The principles and advantages of the SAW technology are reviewed as well as a proposed plan for adapting this flexible technology to early sepsis detection. PMID:23471596

  17. Temperature dependence of shear wave attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Bagdassarov, Nickolai S.

    2005-12-01

    Torsion oscillatory deformation experiments have been performed at high temperatures (600-1170°C) and over a wide range of low frequencies (20-2.10-3 Hz) on fine-grained gabbronorite samples from the Oman ophiolite in order to determine the shear wave attenuation as a function of temperature and melt fraction. The specimens have a small and uniform grain size (0.25-0.3 mm) and do not contain secondary, hydrated minerals. Measurements of internal friction (Q-1) were performed using a forced oscillatory torsion apparatus at small strains (~10-7), and with increasing small temperature steps to reduce thermal microcracking. The general dependence of Q-1 to frequency is Q-1~ω-α, where ω is the angular velocity of forced oscillations and α is an empirical exponent. Below the melting temperature (~1050°C), α has average values of ~0.15 at low frequency (<=0.5 Hz) and 0.06 at higher frequency. Above the melting temperature, α has average values of ~0.22 at low frequency and -0.02 at higher frequency. This frequency dependence of Q-1 is attributed to a viscoelastic behaviour due to the diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and partially to the squirt flow of the melt-phase wetting grain boundaries. The onset of melting is associated with a markedly higher Q-1 and a stronger dependence of Q-1 on temperature. The melt-related mechanical dissipation process could be a melt squirt flow. The characteristic frequency for the melt squirt flow is ωm~ 0.15-300 Hz when the melt pocket aspect ratio is ~10-3-10-2. Around the melting temperature the internal friction can be approximated by an experimental power law Q-1=A.[ω-1.d-1. exp(-Ea/RT)]α with α~ 0.08, A= 34.72s-αμm-α and Ea~ 873 kJmol-1.

  18. Continuous wave terahertz wave spectrometer based on diode laser pumping: potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Tadao; Ragam, Srinivasa; Oyama, Yutaka

    2009-11-01

    We constructed a high resolution terahertz (THz) spectroscopic system with an automatic scanning control using a continuous wave (cw) THz wave generator based on difference frequency generation method by excitation of phonon-polariton mode in GaP. The pump and signals lasers were compact, tunable external cavity laser, and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, respectively. The generated THz waves were tuned automatically by changing the temperature of the DFB laser using a system control. We present the water vapor transmission characteristics of the THz wave and also absorption spectrum of a white polyethylene in the frequency range of 1.97-2.45 THz. The spectroscopic measurements performed at an output power level of 2 nW, which was obtained with a 15-mm-long GaP crystal at 2 THz. The advantage of this cw THz spectrometer is wide frequency tuning range (0.7-4.42 THz) with an estimated linewidth of full width at quarter maximum <8 MHz and this system has a potential application in high resolution spectroscopy. PMID:19947715

  19. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  20. Transport of waves in disordered waveguides: A potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, P. A.; Yépez, M.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    We study the statistical properties of wave transport in a disordered waveguide. We first derive the properties of a “building block” (BB) of length δL starting from a potential model consisting of thin potential slices. We then find a diffusion equation-in the space of transfer matrices that describe our system-which governs the evolution with the length L of the disordered waveguide of the transport properties of interest. The latter depend only on the mean free paths and on no other property of the slice distribution. The universality that arises demonstrates the existence of a generalized central-limit theorem. We have developed a numerical simulation in which the universal statistical properties of the BB found analytically are first implemented numerically, and then the various BBs are combined to construct the full waveguide. The reported results thus obtained are in good agreement with microscopic calculations, for both bulk and surface disorder.

  1. The Propagation of Slow Wave Potentials in Pea Epicotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Stahlberg, R.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Slow wave potentials are considered to be electric long-distance signals specific for plants, although there are conflicting ideas about a chemical, electrical, or hydraulic mode of propagation. These ideas were tested by comparing the propagation of hydraulic and electric signals in epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L). A hydraulic signal in the form of a defined step increase in xylem pressure (Px) was applied to the root of intact seedlings and propagated nearly instantly through the epicotyl axis while its amplitude decreased with distance from the pressure chamber. This decremental propagation was caused by a leaky xylem and created an axial Px gradient in the epicotyl. Simultaneously along the epicotyl surface, depolarizations appeared with lag times that increased acropetally with distance from the pressure chamber from 5 s to 3 min. When measured at a constant distance, the lag times increased as the size of the applied pressure steps decreased. We conclude that the Px gradient in the epicotyl caused local depolarizations with acropetally increasing lag times, which have the appearance of an electric signal propagating with a rate of 20 to 30 mm min-1. This static description of the slow wave potentials challenges its traditional classification as a propagating electric signal. PMID:12223601

  2. Wave potential and the one-dimensional windkessel as a wave-based paradigm of diastolic arterial hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2014-08-01

    Controversy exists about whether one-dimensional wave theory can explain the "self-canceling" waves that accompany the diastolic pressure decay and discharge of the arterial reservoir. Although it has been proposed that reservoir and wave effects be treated as separate phenomena, thus avoiding the issue of self-canceling waves, we have argued that reservoir effects are a phenomenological and mathematical subset of wave effects. However, a complete wave-based explanation of self-canceling diastolic expansion (pressure-decreasing) waves has not yet been advanced. These waves are present in the forward and backward components of arterial pressure and flow (P ± and Q ±, respectively), which are calculated by integrating incremental pressure and flow changes (dP ± and dQ ±, respectively). While the integration constants for this calculation have previously been considered arbitrary, we showed that physiologically meaningful constants can be obtained by identifying "undisturbed pressure" as mean circulatory pressure. Using a series of numeric experiments, absolute P ± and Q ± values were shown to represent "wave potential," gradients of which produce propagating wavefronts. With the aid of a "one-dimensional windkessel," we showed how wave theory predicts discharge of the arterial reservoir. Simulated data, along with hemodynamic recordings in seven sheep, suggested that self-canceling diastolic waves arise from repeated and diffuse reflection of the late systolic forward expansion wave throughout the arterial system and at the closed aortic valve, along with progressive leakage of wave potential from the conduit arteries. The combination of wave and wave potential concepts leads to a comprehensive one-dimensional (i.e., wave-based) explanation of arterial hemodynamics, including the diastolic pressure decay. PMID:24878775

  3. Catching the right wave: evaluating wave energy resources and potential compatibility with existing marine and coastal uses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D; Ruckelshaus, Marry H; Arkema, Katie K; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A; Bernhardt, Joanna R; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L; Halpern, Benjamin S; Pinsky, Malin L; Beck, Michael W; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M A; Levin, Phil S; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses. PMID:23144824

  4. Catching the Right Wave: Evaluating Wave Energy Resources and Potential Compatibility with Existing Marine and Coastal Uses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E.; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D.; Ruckelshaus, Marry H.; Arkema, Katie K.; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A.; Bernhardt, Joanna R.; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Pinsky, Malin L.; Beck, Michael W.; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M. A.; Levin, Phil S.; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses. PMID:23144824

  5. Uniqueness of the interior transmission problem with partial information on the potential and eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuan-Fu; Buterin, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The inverse spectral problem of determining a spherically symmetric wave speed v is considered in a bounded spherical region of radius b. A uniqueness theorem for the potential q of the derived Sturm-Liouville problem B (q) is presented from the data involving fractions of the eigenvalues of the problem B (q) on a finite interval and knowledge of q over a corresponding fraction of the interval. The methods employed rest on Weyl-function techniques and properties of zeros of a class of entire functions.

  6. Topological Septet Pairing with Spin-3/2 Fermions: High-Partial-Wave Channel Counterpart of the 3He -B Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wang; Li, Yi; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-01

    We systematically generalize the exotic 3He -B phase, which not only exhibits unconventional symmetry but is also isotropic and topologically nontrivial, to arbitrary partial-wave channels with multicomponent fermions. The concrete example with four-component fermions is illustrated including the isotropic f -, p -, and d -wave pairings in the spin septet, triplet, and quintet channels, respectively. The odd partial-wave channel pairings are topologically nontrivial, while pairings in even partial-wave channels are topologically trivial. The topological index reaches the largest value of N2 in the p -wave channel (N is half of the fermion component number). The surface spectra exhibit multiple linear and even high order Dirac cones. Applications to multiorbital condensed matter systems and multicomponent ultracold large spin fermion systems are discussed.

  7. Topological Septet Pairing with Spin-3/2 Fermions: High-Partial-Wave Channel Counterpart of the ^{3}He-B Phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Li, Yi; Wu, Congjun

    2016-08-12

    We systematically generalize the exotic ^{3}He-B phase, which not only exhibits unconventional symmetry but is also isotropic and topologically nontrivial, to arbitrary partial-wave channels with multicomponent fermions. The concrete example with four-component fermions is illustrated including the isotropic f-, p-, and d-wave pairings in the spin septet, triplet, and quintet channels, respectively. The odd partial-wave channel pairings are topologically nontrivial, while pairings in even partial-wave channels are topologically trivial. The topological index reaches the largest value of N^{2} in the p-wave channel (N is half of the fermion component number). The surface spectra exhibit multiple linear and even high order Dirac cones. Applications to multiorbital condensed matter systems and multicomponent ultracold large spin fermion systems are discussed. PMID:27563972

  8. On the transmission of partial information: inferences from movement-related brain potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, A.; Bashore, T. R.; Coles, M. G.; Donchin, E.; Meyer, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from a new paradigm that uses movement-related brain potentials to detect response preparation based on partial information. The paradigm uses a hybrid choice-reaction go/nogo procedure in which decisions about response hand and whether to respond are based on separate stimulus attributes. A lateral asymmetry in the movement-related brain potential was found on nogo trials without overt movement. The direction of this asymmetry depended primarily on the signaled response hand rather than on properties of the stimulus. When the asymmetry first appeared was influenced by the time required to select the signaled hand, and when it began to differ on go and nogo trials was influenced by the time to decide whether to respond. These findings indicate that both stimulus attributes were processed in parallel and that the asymmetry reflected preparation of the response hand that began before the go/nogo decision was completed.

  9. Free films of a partially wetting liquid under the influence of a propagating MHz surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gennady; Manor, Ofer

    2016-07-01

    We use both theory and experiment to study the response of thin and free films of a partially wetting liquid to a MHz vibration, propagating in the solid substrate in the form of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW). We generalise the previous theory for the response of a thin fully wetting liquid film to a SAW by including the presence of a small but finite three phase contact angle between the liquid and the solid. The SAW in the solid invokes a convective drift of mass in the liquid and leaks sound waves. The dynamics of a film that is too thin to support the accumulation of the sound wave leakage is governed by a balance between the drift and capillary stress alone. We use theory to demonstrate that a partially wetting liquid film, supporting a weak capillary stress, will spread along the path of the SAW. A partially wetting film, supporting an appreciable capillary stress, will however undergo a concurrent dynamic wetting and dewetting at the front and the rear, respectively, such that the film will displace, rather than spread, along the path of the SAW. The result of the theory for a weak capillary stress is in agreement with the previous experimental and theoretical studies on the response of thin silicon oil films to a propagating SAW. No corresponding previous results exist for the case of an appreciable capillary stress. We thus complement the large capillary limit of our theory by undertaking an experimental procedure where we explore the response of films of water and a surfactant solutions to a MHz SAW, which is found to be in qualitative agreement with the theory at this limit.

  10. Resolution of quaternary mixtures of cadaverine, histamine, putrescine and tyramine by the square wave voltammetry and partial least squares method.

    PubMed

    Henao-Escobar, W; Domínguez-Renedo, O; Alonso-Lomillo, M A; Arcos-Martínez, M J

    2015-10-01

    This work presents the simultaneous determination of cadaverine, histamine, putrescine and tyramine by square wave voltammetry using a boron-doped diamond electrode. A multivariate calibration method based on partial least square regressions has allowed the resolution of the very high overlapped voltammetric signals obtained for the analyzed biogenic amines. Prediction errors lower than 9% have been obtained when concentration of quaternary mixtures were calculated. The developed procedure has been applied in the analysis of ham samples, which results are in good agreement with those obtained using the standard HPLC method. PMID:26078134

  11. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eiiassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  12. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  13. Lipolytic Potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01: Production, Partial Purification, and Characterisation of an Extracellular Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lívia Tereza Andrade; Oliveira, Jamil S.; dos Santos, Vera L.; Regis, Wiliam C. B.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Resende, Rodrigo R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01 was investigated by describing the catalytic properties and stability of a secreted extracellular lipase. Enzyme production was considered high under room temperature after 4 days using sunflower oil and a combination of casein with sodium nitrate. Lipase was partially purified by 3.9-fold, resulting in a 44.2% yield using ammonium sulphate precipitation (60%) quantified with Superose 12 HR gel filtration chromatography. The activity of the enzyme was maximised at pH 8.5, and the enzyme demonstrated stability under alkaline conditions. The optimum temperature was found to be 45°C, and the enzyme was stable for up to 100 minutes, with more than 80% of initial activity remaining after incubation at this temperature. Partially purified enzyme showed reasonable stability with triton X-100 and was activated in the presence of organic solvents (toluene, hexane, and methanol). Among the tested ions, only Cu2+, Ni2+, and Al3+ showed inhibitory effects. Substrate specificity of the lipase was higher for C14 among various p-nitrophenyl esters assayed. The KM and Vmax values of the purified enzyme for p-nitrophenyl palmitate were 0.13 mM and 12.58 umol/(L·min), respectively. These features render a novel biocatalyst for industrial applications. PMID:25530954

  14. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism: a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greene, Stephen J; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A; Albrecht-Küpper, Barbara E; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of ~50%. The current treatment paradigm for HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF) centers on blocking maladaptive neurohormonal activation and decreasing cardiac workload with therapies that concurrently lower blood pressure and heart rate. Continued development of hemodynamically active medications for stepwise addition to existing therapies carries the risk of limited tolerability and safety. Moreover, this treatment paradigm has thus far failed for HF with preserved EF. Accordingly, development of hemodynamically neutral HF therapies targeting primary cardiac pathologies must be considered. In this context, a partial adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist holds promise as a potentially hemodynamically neutral therapy for HF that could simultaneous improve cardiomyocyte energetics, calcium homeostasis, cardiac structure and function, and long-term clinical outcomes when added to background therapies. In this review, we describe the physiology and pathophysiology of HF as it relates to adenosine agonism, examine the existing body of evidence and biologic rationale for modulation of adenosine A1R activity, and review the current state of drug development of a partial A1R agonist for the treatment of HF. PMID:26701329

  15. On the partial-wave analysis of mesonic resonances decaying to multiparticle final states produced by polarized photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) using photon beams. In particular this report broadens this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  16. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  17. Collision-induced Raman scattering from a pair of dissimilar particles: An intriguing mathematical model predicting the suppression of the odd-numbered partial waves.

    PubMed

    Chrysos, Michael

    2016-03-21

    Relying on a simple analytic two-atom model in which the anisotropy of the interaction dipole polarizability obeys an inverse power law as a function of separation, we offer mathematical and numerical evidence that, in a monoatomic gas, the free-free Raman spectrum for a collisional pair of two different isotopes, a-a', may vastly differ from that for a-a. This result is obtained even if a and a' are assumed to have the same mass and zero nuclear spin and even if a-a and a-a' are subject to the same interaction polarizability and potential. The mechanism responsible for this effect is inherent in the parity of the partial-wave rotational quantum number J: given that the contribution of each partial wave to the Raman cross section is controlled by a polarizability-transition matrix-element and that each of those matrix-elements has a radial component with a magnitude slightly smaller than that of the preceding partial wave, a deficit which disfavors the odd-numbered waves is accumulated upon summing over J. In the far high-frequency wing, this deficit tends to generate spectral intensities for a-a' about half as great as the a-a ones, a tendency which becomes all the more effective as temperature is decreased. We show for instance that, for the spectral branch ΔJ = 2, the fractional difference between the free-free differential cross sections for a-a and a-a' is 12(1-x(2))(3)1+3x(4), with x=√[E/E(')] (E (E') being the initial (final) state energy of the pair and E' - E = hcν (ν > 0)). Remarkably, this quantity is zero at ν ≈ 0 but goes to 12 for ν ≫ 0. For ΔJ = 0, analogous conclusions may be drawn from the expression (1+ln(1+x1-x)2arctanx)(-1). PMID:27004860

  18. Estimation of the propagation characteristics of elastic waves propagating through a partially saturated sand soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, M.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, landslides due to heavy rain and/or earthquakes have been increasing and severe damage occurred in Japan in some cases (e.g., Chigira et al., 2013, Geomorph.). One of the principle factors activating landslides is groundwater. Continuous measurements of moisture in soil and/or pore pressure are performed to investigate the groundwater behavior. However, such measurements give information on only local behavior of the groundwater. To monitor the state of target slope, it is better to measure signals affected by the behavior of groundwater in a widely surrounding region. The elastic waves propagating through the medium under the target slope are one of candidates of such signals. In this study, we measure propagating waves through a sand soil made in laboratory, injecting water into it from the bottom. We investigate the characteristics of the propagating waves. We drop sand particles in a container (750 mm long, 300 mm wide and 400 mm high) freely and made a sand soil. The sand soil consists of two layers. One is made of larger sand particles (0.2-0.4 mm in diameter) and the other is made of smaller sand particles (0.05-0.2 mm in diameter). The dry density of these sand layers is about 1.45 g/cm3. We install a shaker for generating elastic waves, accelerometers and pore pressure gauges in the sand soil. We apply small voltage steps repeatedly, and we continuously measure elastic waves propagating through the sand soil at a sampling rate of 51.2 ksps for a period including the water injection period. We estimate the spatio-temporal variation in the maximum cross-correlation coefficients and the corresponding time lags, using template waveforms recorded in the initial period as references. The coefficient for the waveforms recorded at the accelerometer attached to the tip of the shaker is almost stable in high values with a slight decrease down to 0.94 in the period when the sand particles around the shaker are considered to become wet. On the other hand

  19. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  20. Observation of Nonspreading Wave Packets in an Imaginary Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzle, R.; Goebel, M.C.; Hoerner, Th.; Kierig, E.; Mourachko, I.; Oberthaler, M.K.; Efremov, M.A.; Fedorov, M.V.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Leeuwen, K.A.H. van; Schleich, W.P.

    2005-09-09

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method to prepare a nonspreading atomic wave packet. Our technique relies on a spatially modulated absorption constantly chiseling away from an initially broad de Broglie wave. The resulting contraction is balanced by dispersion due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. This quantum evolution results in the formation of a nonspreading wave packet of Gaussian form with a spatially quadratic phase. Experimentally, we confirm these predictions by observing the evolution of the momentum distribution. Moreover, by employing interferometric techniques, we measure the predicted quadratic phase across the wave packet. Nonspreading wave packets of this kind also exist in two space dimensions and we can control their amplitude and phase using optical elements.

  1. Partial wave analysis of J/ψ-->γ(K+K- π0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BES Collaboration; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Chai, Z. W.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chen, Y. Q.; Cheng, B. S.; Cui, X. Z.; Ding, H. L.; Dong, L. Y.; Du, Z. Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, M. L.; Gao, S. Q.; Gu, J. H.; Gu, S. D.; Gu, W. X.; Gu, Y. F.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Z. J.; Han, S. W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J. T.; He, M.; Hu, G. Y.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. L.; Hu, Q. H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X. Q.; Huang, J. D.; Huang, Y. Z.; Jiang, C. H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z. J.; Lai, Y. F.; Lang, P. F.; Li, C. G.; Li, D.; Li, H. B.; Li, J.; Li, P. Q.; Li, R. B.; Li, W.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. H.; Li, X. N.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. H.; Liu, R. G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, J. Y.; Lu, L. C.; Luo, C. H.; Ma, A. M.; Ma, E. C.; Ma, J. M.; Mao, H. S.; Mao, Z. P.; Meng, X. C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N. D.; Qi, X. R.; Qian, C. D.; Qiu, J. F.; Qu, Y. H.; Que, Y. K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y. Y.; Shen, B. W.; Shen, D. L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, H. Z.; Song, X. F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H. S.; Tang, S. Q.; Tong, G. L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T. J.; Wang, Y. Y.; Wei, C. L.; Wu, Y. G.; Xi, D. M.; Xia, X. M.; Xie, P. P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, W. J.; Xu, C. C.; Xu, G. F.; Xue, S. T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W. G.; Yang, C. M.; Yang, C. Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X. F.; Ye, M. H.; Ye, S. W.; Ye, Y. X.; Yi, K.; Yu, C. S.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, Y. H.; Yu, Z. Q.; Yu, Z. T.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Dehong; Zhang, H. L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, L. S.; Zhang, Q. J.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhao, D. X.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W. R.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, L. S.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhou, G. P.; Zhou, H. S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q. M.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhuang, B. A.; Bugg, D. V.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Zou, B. S.

    1998-11-01

    BES data on J/ψ-->γ(K+K-π0) display a strong peak in the K+K-π0 mass spectrum at 1450 MeV. This peak and a corresponding one in J/ψ-->γ(ηπ+π-) at ~1400 MeV may be fitted well by η(1440) with dominant decays to K*(890)K, using an s-dependent width in the Breit-Wigner amplitude. A broad background is also required in KK0 (where K0 stands for the Kπ S-wave) and also in ηππ, but is probably not resonant in this mass range.

  2. The potential of SAR directional spectra in operational wave forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Gerling, T. W.; Irvine, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Digitally processed Seasat SAR ocean wave imagery, when digitally transformed, smoothed, and corrected for known instrument biases, can accurately track multiple (at least three) wave systems in the open ocean, across major currents, and into shallow water. Furthermore, the relative backscatterer of the digitally processed SAR image, when sampled within a single pass and along a constant range, responds to the local wind through a simple power law relationship. The results indicate that SAR spectra, if obtained from a low altitude satellite, could be an important supplement to global winds and non-directional wave heights obtained through other methods.

  3. On-shell coupled-channel approach to proton-hydrogen collisions without partial-wave expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-01-15

    A fully quantal approach to proton collisions with hydrogen based on the atomic-orbital close-coupling method is presented. The method leads to a system of coupled three-dimensional momentum-space integral equations for the scattering amplitudes. These equations are reduced to two-dimensional ones using an on-shell approximation. Furthermore, by considering the symmetry of the problem, we demonstrate that these can be reduced to just one dimension. The resulting equations are solved without partial-wave expansion. Cross sections for electron transfer in proton collisions with the ground state of atomic hydrogen are calculated and shown to agree well with experiment over a wide energy range.

  4. Improved Two-Dimensional Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Concealed Weapon Detection Through Partial Fourier Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsaei, Amir Ashkan; Mokhtari-Koushyar, Farzad; Javad Seyed-Talebi, Seyed Mohammad; Kavehvash, Zahra; Shabany, Mahdi

    2016-03-01

    Active millimeter-wave imaging based on synthetic aperture focusing offers certain unique and practical advantages in nondestructive testing applications. Traditionally, the imaging for this purpose is performed through a long procedure of raster scanning with a single antenna across a two-dimensional grid, leading to a slow, bulky, and expensive scanning platform. In this paper, an improved bistatic structure based on radial compressive sensing is proposed, where one fixed transmitter antenna and a linear array of receiving antennas are used. The main contributions of this paper are (a) reducing the scanning time, (b) improving the output quality, and (c) designing an inexpensive setup. These improvements are the result of the underlying proposed simpler scanning structure and faster reconstruction process.

  5. Effects of partial liquid/gas saturation on extensional wave attenuation in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.-S.; Batzle, M. L.; Smith, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Extensional wave attenuation measurements on Berea sandstone were made during increasing (imbibition) and decreasing (drainage) brine saturations. Measurements on samples with both open-pore and closed-pore surfaces were made using the resonant-bar technique. The frequency dependence was examined using the forced-deformation method. The attenuation was found to be dependent on saturation history as well as degree of saturation and boundary flow conditions. The sample with open-pore surface had a larger attenuation which peaked at greater brine saturations than the sample with closed-pore surface. During drainage, the attenuation reached a maximum at about 90% brine saturation as opposed to about 97% brine saturation during imbibition. The variation of the size and number of air pockets within the rock can account for this discrepancy. The magnitude of the attenuation peak value decreases substantially with decreasing frequency to the extent that no attenuation peak with saturation was apparent at seismic frequencies, say, below 100 Hz.

  6. Potential effects of translatory waves on estimation of peak flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.; Phillips, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    During the afternoon of August 19, 1971, an intense thunderstorm a few miles southwest of Wikieup, Arizona, produced one of the largest known flood peaks for a 49.2-square-km drainage basin. Initial computations of the peak discharge assumed stable flow conditions and a four-section slope area measurement indicated that discharge was 2,082 m3/s. Recent findings based on free-surface instability characteristics at the site suggest that gravitational forces exceeded boundary retarding forces, and flow in the wide sand channel was unstable. Computations for roll or translatory waves indicate that waves crashed into the highway bridge at velocities of as much as 12.5 m/s. The close agreement of free surface instability results, translatory wave computations, estimates of the steady flow on which the translatory waves traveled, and an eyewitness account of the translatory waves suggest the total peak discharge could have been 2,742 m3/s or 32% greater than the published discharge. The occurrence of translatory waves in natural channels may be more common than previously thought, and instability criteria should be considered for hydraulic analysis of flow in steep smooth channels.

  7. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  8. GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2005-03-22

    This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

  9. Root water potential integrates discrete soil physical properties to influence ABA signalling during partial rootzone drying.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian C; Egea, Gregorio; Watts, Chris W; Whalley, W Richard

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the influence of different growing substrates (two mineral, two organic) on root xylem ABA concentration ([ABA](root)) and the contribution of the drying root system to total sap flow during partial rootzone drying (PRD), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) shoots were grafted onto the root systems of two plants grown in separate pots. Sap flow through each hypocotyl was measured below the graft union when one pot ('wet') was watered and other ('dry') was not. Each substrate gave unique relationships between dry pot matric potential (Psi(soil)), volumetric water content ((v)) or penetrometer resistance (Q) and either the fraction of photoperiod sap flow from roots in drying soil or [ABA](root). However, decreased relative sap flow, and increased [ABA](root), from roots in drying soil varied with root water potential (Psi(root)) more similarly across a range of substrates. The gradient between Psi(soil) and Psi(root) was greater in substrates with high sand or peat proportions, which may have contributed to a more sensitive response of [ABA](root) to Psi(soil) in these substrates. Whole plant transpiration was most closely correlated with the mean Psi(soil) of both pots, and then with detached leaf xylem ABA concentration. Although Psi(root) best predicted decreased relative sap flow, and increased [ABA](root), from roots in drying soil across a range of substrates, the inaccessibility of this variable in field studies requires a better understanding of how measurable soil variables (Psi(soil), (v), Q) affect Psi(root). PMID:20591896

  10. Analysis of partial-reflection data from the solar eclipse of 10 Jul. 1972. [ground-based experiment using vertical incident radio waves partially reflected from D region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, T. A.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    Partial-reflection data collected for the eclipse of July 10, 1972 as well as for July 9 and 11, 1972, are analyzed to determine eclipse effects on D-region electron densities. The partial-reflection experiment was set up to collect data using an on-line PDP-15 computer and DECtape storage. The electron-density profiles show good agreement with results from other eclipses. The partial-reflection programs were changed after the eclipse data collection to improve the operation of the partial-reflection system. These changes were mainly due to expanded computer hardware and have simplified the operations of the system considerably.

  11. Off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like interactions in all partial waves

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, U.; Bhoi, J.

    2013-01-15

    By exploiting the theory of ordinary differential equations, with judicious use of boundary conditions, interacting Green's functions and their integral transforms together with certain properties of higher transcendental functions, useful analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for motion in Coulomb and Coulomb-nuclear potentials are derived in maximal reduced form through different approaches to the problem in the representation space. The exact analytical expressions for the off-shell Jost solutions for Coulomb and Coulomb-like potentials are believed to be useful for the description of the charged particle scattering/reaction processes.

  12. Identification of BRCA1 missense substitutions that confer partial functional activity: potential moderate risk variants?

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Paul K; Spurdle, Amanda B; Mok, Myth TS; Farrugia, Daniel J; Lakhani, Sunil R; Healey, Sue; Arnold, Stephen; Buchanan, Daniel; Investigators, kConFab; Couch, Fergus J; Henderson, Beric R; Goldgar, David E; Tavtigian, Sean V; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Brown, Melissa A

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Many of the DNA sequence variants identified in the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 remain unclassified in terms of their potential pathogenicity. Both multifactorial likelihood analysis and functional approaches have been proposed as a means to elucidate likely clinical significance of such variants, but analysis of the comparative value of these methods for classifying all sequence variants has been limited. Methods We have compared the results from multifactorial likelihood analysis with those from several functional analyses for the four BRCA1 sequence variants A1708E, G1738R, R1699Q, and A1708V. Results Our results show that multifactorial likelihood analysis, which incorporates sequence conservation, co-inheritance, segregation, and tumour immunohistochemical analysis, may improve classification of variants. For A1708E, previously shown to be functionally compromised, analysis of oestrogen receptor, cytokeratin 5/6, and cytokeratin 14 tumour expression data significantly strengthened the prediction of pathogenicity, giving a posterior probability of pathogenicity of 99%. For G1738R, shown to be functionally defective in this study, immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed previous findings of inconsistent 'BRCA1-like' phenotypes for the two tumours studied, and the posterior probability for this variant was 96%. The posterior probabilities of R1699Q and A1708V were 54% and 69%, respectively, only moderately suggestive of increased risk. Interestingly, results from functional analyses suggest that both of these variants have only partial functional activity. R1699Q was defective in foci formation in response to DNA damage and displayed intermediate transcriptional transactivation activity but showed no evidence for centrosome amplification. In contrast, A1708V displayed an intermediate transcriptional transactivation activity and a normal foci formation response in response to DNA damage but induced centrosome amplification. Conclusion

  13. Quantization of wave equations and hermitian structures in partial differential varieties

    PubMed Central

    Paneitz, S. M.; Segal, I. E.

    1980-01-01

    Sufficiently close to 0, the solution variety of a nonlinear relativistic wave equation—e.g., of the form □ϕ + m2ϕ + gϕp = 0—admits a canonical Lorentz-invariant hermitian structure, uniquely determined by the consideration that the action of the differential scattering transformation in each tangent space be unitary. Similar results apply to linear time-dependent equations or to equations in a curved asymptotically flat space-time. A close relation of the Riemannian structure to the determination of vacuum expectation values is developed and illustrated by an explicit determination of a perturbative 2-point function for the case of interaction arising from curvature. The theory underlying these developments is in part a generalization of that of M. G. Krein and collaborators concerning stability of differential equations in Hilbert space and in part a precise relation between the unitarization of given symplectic linear actions and their full probabilistic quantization. The unique causal structure in the infinite symplectic group is instrumental in these developments. PMID:16592923

  14. The potential for very high-frequency gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruise, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    The science case for observing gravitational waves at frequencies in the millihertz-kilohertz range using LIGO, VIRGO, GEO600 or LISA is very strong and the first results are expected at these frequencies. However, as gravitational wave astronomy progresses beyond the first detections, other frequency bands may be worth exploring. Early predictions of gravitational wave emission from discrete sources at very much higher frequencies (megahertz and above) have been published and more recent studies of cosmological signals from inflation, Kaluza-Klein modes from gravitational interactions in brane worlds and plasma instabilities surrounding violent astrophysical events, are all possible sources. This communication examines current observational possibilities and the detector technology required to make meaningful observations at these frequencies.

  15. Effects of dust-charge fluctuations on the potential of an array of projectiles in a partially ionized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Nasim, M. H.; Murtaza, G.

    2003-11-01

    The expressions for the Debye and the wake potential are derived by incorporating dust-charge fluctuations of a single projectile, as well as of an array of dust grain projectiles, propagating through a partially ionized dusty plasma with a constant velocity. Numerically, the effects of the dust-charge fluctuations and the dust-neutral collisions on the electrostatic potential for a single, three, six and ten projectiles are examined. The dust-charge relaxation rate modifies the shape of the Debye as well as the wake potential. For smaller values of the relaxation rates a potential well is formed instead of Debye potential.

  16. Origin of body surface QRS and T wave potentials from epicardial potential distributions in the intact chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Spach, M S; Barr, R C; Lanning, C F; Tucek, P C

    1977-02-01

    Epicardial and body surface QRS-T wave potential distributions were measured during normal and ectopic sequences in intact chimpanzees. Epicardial potential distributions were used because they provide a comprehensive picture of total cardiac electrical activity for relating heart and body surface events during both ventricular activation and repolarization. When the epicardial potential gradients existed over a distance greater than that to the recording points on the body surface, e.g., as occurred during the overlap of terminal ventricular activation and early repolarization, the epicardial events were mirrored well on the anterior chest surface. However, when the recording points were at a distance greater than that over which the epicardial potential gradients existed, the details of the epicardial events disappeared and their effect was to produce distinct changes in the low-level potentials over broad distant areas. The major manifestations on the body surface of selective epicardial events frequently were changes in the distant low-level potential areas while there was no change in the pattern near the maximum or minimum. The ST-T wave body surface distributions were as useful as the QRS patterns for localizing the ventricular ectopic foci presented. A direct experimental basis is provided for explaining T wave notches which occurred during normal and ectopic beats and resembled U waves. It should be possible to achieve as precise an understanding of ST-T waves on the basis of epicardial potential distributions as has thus far been achieved for QRS on the basis of isochrones. PMID:832342

  17. Partial MHC/Neuroantigen Peptide Constructs: A Potential Neuroimmune-Based Treatment for Methamphetamine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Loftis, Jennifer M.; Wilhelm, Clare J.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Huckans, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Relapse rates following current methamphetamine abuse treatments are very high (∼40–60%), and the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, mood disorders) that arise and persist during remission from methamphetamine addiction likely contribute to these high relapse rates. Pharmacotherapeutic development of medications to treat addiction has focused on neurotransmitter systems with only limited success, and there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction. A growing literature shows that methamphetamine alters peripheral and central immune functions and that immune factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules play a role in the development and persistence of methamphetamine induced neuronal injury and neuropsychiatric impairments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy, partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide construct (RTL551; pI-Ab/mMOG-35-55), in treating learning and memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to two different methamphetamine treatment regimens (using repeated doses of 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg, s.c.). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Morris water maze and CNS cytokine levels were measured by multiplex assay. Immunotherapy with RTL551 improved the memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure in both mouse models of chronic methamphetamine addiction. Treatment with RTL551 also attenuated the methamphetamine induced increases in hypothalamic interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Collectively, these initial results indicate that neuroimmune targeted therapies, and specifically RTL551, may have potential as treatments for methamphetamine-induced neuropsychiatric impairments. PMID:23460798

  18. Estimation and Monitoring of Wind/Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Galanis, George; Emmanouil, George; Emmanouil, George; Hayes, Dan; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalogeri, Christina; Kallos, George

    2013-04-01

    Τhe adaptation and use of innovative methodologies for the exploitation of renewable energy marine resources is one of the main issues today for the environmental science community. Within this framework, the exploitation of wind and wave energy potential for coastal and island states seems to be one of the promising solutions and highly interesting from research and technological point of view. In this work, the activities of two projects focusing on the study of wind/wave energy over the area of Eastern Mediterranean Sea are presented. The "Integrated High Resolution System for Monitoring and Quantifying the Wave Energy Potential in the EEZ of Cyprus" (Ewave project) focuses on the estimation, monitoring and forecasting of the wave energy potential over the Levantine Basin with special emphasis to the Exclusive Economical Zone of Cyprus, while the "Development and application of new mathematical and physical models for Monitoring the wind and Sea wave Energy Potential" (MOSEP project) is a platform for developing new mathematical algorithms for the estimation of the wave energy over the Aegean Sea. In both projects, high resolution digital atlases of sea wave/wind climatological characteristics and the distribution of the wind and wave energy potential are developed for the coastal and offshore areas of the East Mediterranean sea . Moreover, new models for the prediction and quantification of wave energy in short and long forecast horizons are proposed. Statistical results concerning the probability density functions of the wind speed, the significant wave height, as well as the energy potential will be presented for selected sea areas in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, while test case studies in certain regions favor to wind/wave renewable energy will be discussed.

  19. Detection and analysis of coherent groups in three-dimensional fully-nonlinear potential wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanina, E. V.; Suslov, S. A.; Chalikov, D.; Babanin, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of coherent groups in three-dimensional fully-nonlinear potential deep water waves whose initial spectrum is assumed to be of the JONSWAP type with directional distribution given by cos nθ, where n is the integer varying from 1 to 16. The analysis is based on the results of long-term wave simulations performed using a numerical solution of a three-dimensional Laplace equation for the velocity potential subject to nonlinear kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions at the free surface. The main characteristics of wave groups such as their average velocity, maximum group wave height, lifetime and length are analysed. The statistics of extreme waves occurring in the detected groups are discussed. Spatial and temporal scale characteristics of wave groups are compared to the previous results.

  20. Pre-Attentive Mental Processing of Music Expectation: Event-Related Potentials of a Partially Violating and Resolving Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chou, Shi-Wei; Wong, Alice M. K.; Tang, Simon F. T.

    2004-01-01

    Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were investigated in an oddball paradigm to verify electrophysiological evidence of music expectation, which is a key component of artistic presentation. The non-target condition consisted of four-chord harmonic chord sequences, while the target condition was manifested by a partially violating third chord…

  1. Converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms in hyperspherical partial wave theory at 6 eV above threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2004-04-01

    Here we report a set of converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms obtained in the hyperspherical partial wave theory for equal energy sharing kinematics at 6 eV energy above threshold. The calculated cross section results are generally in excellent agreement with the absolute measured results of Doerner et al. [Phys. Rev. 57, 1074 (1998)].

  2. Potential hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures in legacy plutonium oxide packages at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.

    2014-07-07

    An approach to estimate the maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures within sealed containers is described and applied to a set of packages containing high-purity plutonium dioxide. The approach uses experimentally determined maximum hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures and scales the experimentally determined pressures to the relevant packaged material properties. The important material properties are the specific wattage and specific surface area (SSA). Important results from the experimental determination of maximum partial pressures are (1) the ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is stoichiometric, and (2) the maximum pressures increase with increasing initial rates of production. The material properties that influence the rates are the material specific wattage and the SSA. The unusual properties of these materials, high specific wattage and high SSA, result in higher predicted maximum pressures than typical plutonium dioxide in storage. The pressures are well within the deflagration range for mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  3. Supergravities with positive definite potentials and AdSpp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerimo, Johannes

    Ten-dimensional superstring theory (or the conjectured nonperturbative M-theory in eleven dimensions) is the most promising candidate for a consistent quantum theory of gravity capable of unifying all known forces of nature. An important question concerning these fundamental theories is how they compactify to lower dimensions and how to obtain a real four dimensional world? In this dissertation we present new avenues for M/string theory to reduce to lower dimensions as well as to four dimensions. For example, we show that by performing a generalized Kaluza-Klein R reduction on the low-energy field theory of the heterotic string, the resulting lower dimensional theory compactifies spontaneously on S3 to give rise to (Minkowski)6 spacetime. Furthermore, a generalized reduction of M-theory on K3 x R compactifies spontaneously on S2 to give rise to a (Minkowski)4 spacetime. The generalized Kaluza-Klein reduction gauges the Cremmer-Julia type global symmetry and the homogeneous rescaling symmetry of the supergravity equations of motion by giving the higher dimensional fields an additional dependence on the circle coordinate. We apply the generalized reduction scheme to half-maximal supergravities which are obtained from the heterotic string (or the NS-NS sector of the type-II string) compactified on a (10 - D)-dimensional torus truncated to the pure supergravity multiplet. This gives rise to new gauged supergravities in diverse dimensions with supersymmetric Minkowski x sphere vacua. Since two large extra dimensions have received much attention recently, we make a detailed study of the gauged D = 6, N = (1,1) supergravity. In particular, we show that this theory allows for a consistent sphere reduction on S2 to give rise to D = 4, N = 2 supergravity coupled to a vector multiplet which can further be truncated to N = 1 supergravity with a chiral multiplet. We also investigate pp-waves in AdS backgrounds, i.e. pp-waves as solutions of gauged supergravities with AdS vacua

  4. Partial wave analysis of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} and the search for nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Dey, B; Dickson, R.; Krahn, Z.; McCracken, M. E.; Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Careccia, S. L.; Dodge, G. E.; Guler, N.; Klein, A.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C. S.; Niroula, M. R.; Seraydaryan, H.; Tkachenko, S.

    2009-12-15

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high-precision spin-density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of {omega}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel {pi}{sup 0} exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F{sub 15}(1680) and D{sub 13}(1700) near threshold, as well as the G{sub 17}(2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J{sup P}=5/2{sup +} state around 2 GeV, a ''missing'' state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  5. Partial wave analysis of the reaction γp→pω and the search for nucleon resonances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2009-12-30

    We performed an event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction γ p -> p ω on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high precision spin density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of omega-> π+ π - π0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel π0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F[15](1680) and D[13](1700) near threshold, as wellmore » as the G[17](2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J(P)=5/2+ state around 2 GeV, a "missing" state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.« less

  6. Partial wave analysis of the reaction γp→pω and the search for nucleon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Krahn, Z.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paris, M.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2009-12-01

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction γp→pω has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world’s first high-precision spin-density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of ω→π+π-π0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel π0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F15(1680) and D13(1700) near threshold, as well as the G17(2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a JP=5/2+ state around 2 GeV, a “missing” state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  7. Estimation and Monitoring of Wind-Wave energy potential over the Greek seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanouil, G.; Galanis, G.; Zodiatis, G.; Kalogeri, C.

    2013-12-01

    The exploitation of renewable energy resources is today on the top of the interest for the environmental and political community. In particular, wind and wave energy seems to be promising solutions with great potential from research and technological point of view. This kind of energy is mostly a matter of coastal and island countries, like Greece. In this work, the first results of a project whose main target is the development of an integrated, high resolution system for quantifying and monitoring the energy potential from wind and sea waves in the region of Eastern Mediterranean Sea, with special emphasis to the Greek area, are presented. More specifically, the models for the estimation of the energy potential, from wind and waves over sea areas, will be discussed. Moreover, atmospheric and sea wave numerical models used for the simulation of the environmental parameters that directly affect the wind-wave energy potential will be evaluated. Based on these tools, high resolution maps for the coastal and offshore areas of Greece will be produced, in which sea wave and wind climatological characteristics as well as the relevant distribution of the wave energy potential will be monitoring.

  8. Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

    2013-06-30

    We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

  9. Partial structure factors from disordered materials diffraction data: An approach using empirical potential structure refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, A. K.

    2005-09-01

    Neutron and x-ray diffraction are widely used to measure the structure of liquids and disordered solids. Using techniques such as isotope substitution or anomalous dispersion or combining neutron and x-ray data, it is sometimes possible to invert the total diffraction patterns from these materials into a set of partial structure factors, which describe the correlations between specific atom types in the material. However, even in situations where the matrix for performing this inversion appears well determined, there are significant uncertainties in the process and it is rarely possible to achieve a unique set of partial structure factors in practice. Based on the much earlier method of F. G. Edwards and J. E. Enderby [J. Phys. C 8, 3483 (1975)] and extending the reverse Monte Carlo method of McGreevy [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, R877 (2001)] and others, a modified approach is developed here that allows possible atomic distribution functions, which are consistent with the measured data to be explored. The basis of the present approach is that any solution to the inversion process must be derivable from a distribution of nonoverlapping atoms or molecules as in the physical system under investigation. Solutions to the problem of inverting the measured differential cross sections to partial structure factors are then extracted assuming different levels of confidence in the data, confidence being represented by a feedback factor on a scale of 0-1. These different solutions serve to identify where ambiguities exist in the derived partial structure factors, particularly when a particular partial structure factor contributes only weakly to the total diffraction pattern. The method is illustrated using some old diffraction data on molten zinc chloride that have significant uncertainties associated with them, but that have been used extensively as the basis for a number of computer simulations of this material.

  10. Discrete potential waves in the photoreceptors of a gastropod mollusc, Hermissenda crassicornis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1982-01-01

    Intracellular recording of dark adapted photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda, Mollusca) revealed the occurrence of depolarizing waves even after blockade of synaptic transmission and postsynaptic potentials by application of low Ca2+ and high Mg2+ solution. Dim illumination increased the frequency of depolarizing waves. These observations show that Hermissenda photoreceptors have discrete waves which have been demonstrated mainly in arthropod photoreceptors. An histogram of intervals between successive discrete waves under continuous dim illumination was exponential, which is characteristic of a Poisson process. Frequency of discrete waves increased linearly depending on numbers of incident photons to the eye. Comparison of probabilities of eliciting a response to brief dim flashes of various intensities to theoretical Poisson sum curves, together with statistical analysis, indicate that the absorption of single photon is sufficient to evoke a discrete wave. PMID:7101766

  11. The sea surface currents as a potential factor in the estimation and monitoring of wave energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Stylianoy, Stavros; Liakatas, Aristotelis

    2015-04-01

    The use of wave energy as an alternative renewable is receiving attention the last years under the shadow of the economic crisis in Europe and in the light of the promising corresponding potential especially for countries with extended coastline. Monitoring and studying the corresponding resources is further supported by a number of critical advantages of wave energy compared to other renewable forms, like the reduced variability and the easier adaptation to the general grid, especially when is jointly approached with wind power. Within the framework, a number of countries worldwide have launched research and development projects and a significant number of corresponding studies have been presented the last decades. However, in most of them the impact of wave-sea surface currents interaction on the wave energy potential has not been taken into account neglecting in this way a factor of potential importance. The present work aims at filling this gap for a sea area with increased scientific and economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Based on a combination of high resolution numerical modeling approach with advanced statistical tools, a detailed analysis is proposed for the quantification of the impact of sea surface currents, which produced from downscaling the MyOcean-FO regional data, to wave energy potential. The results although spatially sensitive, as expected, prove beyond any doubt that the wave- sea surface currents interaction should be taken into account for similar resource analysis and site selection approaches since the percentage of impact to the available wave power may reach or even exceed 20% at selected areas.

  12. A Global Sensitivity Analysis Method on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights to Potential Seismic Source Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Luchuan

    2015-04-01

    A Global Sensitivity Analysis Method on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights to Potential Seismic Source Parameters Luchuan Ren, Jianwei Tian, Mingli Hong Institute of Disaster Prevention, Sanhe, Heibei Province, 065201, P.R. China It is obvious that the uncertainties of the maximum tsunami wave heights in offshore area are partly from uncertainties of the potential seismic tsunami source parameters. A global sensitivity analysis method on the maximum tsunami wave heights to the potential seismic source parameters is put forward in this paper. The tsunami wave heights are calculated by COMCOT ( the Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model), on the assumption that an earthquake with magnitude MW8.0 occurred at the northern fault segment along the Manila Trench and triggered a tsunami in the South China Sea. We select the simulated results of maximum tsunami wave heights at specific sites in offshore area to verify the validity of the method proposed in this paper. For ranking importance order of the uncertainties of potential seismic source parameters (the earthquake's magnitude, the focal depth, the strike angle, dip angle and slip angle etc..) in generating uncertainties of the maximum tsunami wave heights, we chose Morris method to analyze the sensitivity of the maximum tsunami wave heights to the aforementioned parameters, and give several qualitative descriptions of nonlinear or linear effects of them on the maximum tsunami wave heights. We quantitatively analyze the sensitivity of the maximum tsunami wave heights to these parameters and the interaction effects among these parameters on the maximum tsunami wave heights by means of the extended FAST method afterward. The results shows that the maximum tsunami wave heights are very sensitive to the earthquake magnitude, followed successively by the epicenter location, the strike angle and dip angle, the interactions effect between the sensitive parameters are very obvious at specific site in offshore area, and there

  13. Tandem shock waves in medicine and biology: a review of potential applications and successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Fernández, F.; Gutiérrez-Aceves, J.; Fernández, E.; Alvarez, U. M.; Sunka, P.; Loske, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock waves have been established as a safe and effective treatment for a wide range of diseases. Research groups worldwide are working on improving shock wave technology and developing new applications of shock waves to medicine and biology. The passage of a shock wave through soft tissue, fluids, and suspensions containing cells may result in acoustic cavitation i.e., the expansion and violent collapse of microbubbles, which generates secondary shock waves and the emission of microjets of fluid. Cavitation has been recognized as a significant phenomenon that produces both desirable and undesirable biomedical effects. Several studies have shown that cavitation can be controlled by emitting two shock waves that can be delayed by tenths or hundreds of microseconds. These dual-pulse pressure pulses, which are known as tandem shock waves, have been shown to enhance in vitro and in vivo urinary stone fragmentation, cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, delay tumor growth, enhance the bactericidal effect of shock waves and significantly increase the efficiency of genetic transformations in bacteria and fungi. This article provides an overview of the basic physical principles, methodologies, achievements and potential uses of tandem shock waves to improve biomedical applications.

  14. A catalogue of potentially bright close binary gravitational wave sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbink, Ronald F.

    1985-01-01

    This is a current print-out of results of a survey, undertaken in the spring of 1985, to identify those known binary stars which might produce significant gravitational wave amplitudes at earth, either dimensionless strain amplitudes exceeding a threshold h = 10(exp -21), or energy fluxes exceeding F = 10(exp -12) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp -1). All real or putative binaries brighter than a certain limiting magnitude (calculated as a function of primary spectral type, orbital period, orbital eccentricity, and bandpass) are included. All double degenerate binaries and Wolf-Rayet binaries with known or suspected orbital periods have also been included. The catalog consists of two parts: a listing of objects in ascending order of Right Ascension (Equinox B1950), followed by an index, listing of objects by identification number according to all major stellar catalogs. The object listing is a print-out of the spreadsheets on which the catalog is currently maintained. It should be noted that the use of this spreadsheet program imposes some limitations on the display of entries. Text entries which exceed the cell size may appear in truncated form, or may run into adjacent columns. Greek characters are not available; they are represented here by the first two or three letters of their Roman names, the first letter appearing as a capital or lower-case letter according to whether the capital or lower-case Greek character is represented. Neither superscripts nor subscripts are available; they appear here in normal position and type-face. The index provides the Right Ascension and Declination of objects sorted by catalogue number.

  15. Partial synthesis and biological evaluation of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids derivatives: potential modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Sun, Hua; Jian, Xi-Xian; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Liu, Geng-Tao; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-01-01

    A series of new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids was partially synthesized from tetrandrine and fangchinoline and evaluated for their ability to reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. All the test compounds increased the intracellular accumulation rate of rhodamine 123 in MDR cells (Bel7402 and HCT8), and most exhibited more potent MDR-reversing activity relative to the reference compound verapamil. Compounds 8, 10, 13, and 14 enhanced intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in Bel7402 and HCT8 cells. PMID:22587798

  16. Acoustic Solitary Waves and Sagdeev Potential Triple Roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hellberg, M. A.; Baluku, T. K.; Verheest, F.

    2010-12-14

    Both KdV theory and the standard pseudopotential theory require that solitons and double layers be explicitly super-acoustic, with the pseudopotential {psi}({phi},M) having a maximum at the origin. Recent studies of a variety of different three-component plasmas have shown that they may support finite amplitude solitons at the true acoustic speed of the plasma configuration, M{sub s}. These are associated with triple roots of the Sagdeev potential, and the usual soliton condition is replaced by {psi}''(0,M){<=}0. Sagdeev potentials for speeds marginally greater than M{sub s} then represent solitons of both polarities, one whose amplitude vanishes at M{sub s}(KdV-like), while the other is necessarily finite at M{sub s}('nonKdV-like'). Such coexistence regions have been observed to be linked to a critical plasma compositional parameter value for which {psi}'''(0,M{sub s}) = 0.

  17. Experiments with BECs in a Painted Potential: Atom SQUID, Matter Wave Bessel Beams, and Matter Wave Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshier, Malcolm; Ryu, Changhyun; Blackburn, Paul; Blinova, Alina; Henderson, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The painted potential is a time-averaged optical dipole potential which is able to create arbitrary and dynamic two dimensional potentials for Bose Einstein condensates (BECs). This poster reports three recent experiments using this technique. First, we have realized the dc atom SQUID geometry of a BEC in a toroidal trap with two Josephson junctions. We observe Josephson effects, measure the critical current of the junctions, and find dynamic behavior that is in good agreement with the simple Josephson equations for a tunnel junction with the ideal sinusoidal current-phase relation expected for the parameters of the experiment. Second, we have used free expansion of a rotating toroidal BEC to create matter wave Bessel beams, which are of interest because perfect Bessel beams (plane waves with amplitude profiles described by Bessel functions) propagate without diffraction. Third, we have realized the basic circuit elements necessary to create complex matter wave circuits. We launch BECs at arbitrary velocity along straight waveguides, propagate them around curved waveguides and stadium-shaped waveguide traps, and split them coherently at y-junctions that can also act as switches. Supported by LANL/LDRD.

  18. Exploring Classically Chaotic Potentials with a Matter Wave Quantum Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, G. L.; Couvert, A.; Georgeot, B.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2011-12-16

    We study an experimental setup in which a quantum probe, provided by a quasimonomode guided atom laser, interacts with a static localized attractive potential whose characteristic parameters are tunable. In this system, classical mechanics predicts a transition from regular to chaotic behavior as a result of the coupling between the different degrees of freedom. Our experimental results display a clear signature of this transition. On the basis of extensive numerical simulations, we discuss the quantum versus classical physics predictions in this context. This system opens new possibilities for investigating quantum scattering, provides a new testing ground for classical and quantum chaos, and enables us to revisit the quantum-classical correspondence.

  19. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  20. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  1. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  2. Matter-wave solitons in radially periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Baizakov, Bakhtiyor B; Malomed, Boris A; Salerno, Mario

    2006-12-01

    We investigate two-dimensional (2D) states in Bose-Einstein condensates with self-attraction or self-repulsion, trapped in an axially symmetric optical-lattice potential periodic along the radius. The states trapped both in the central potential well and in remote circular troughs are studied. In the repulsive mode, a new soliton species is found, in the form of radial gap solitons. The latter solitons are completely stable if they carry zero vorticity (l=0) , while with l not equal 0 they develop a weak azimuthal modulation, which makes them rotating patterns, that persist indefinitely long. In addition, annular gap solitons may support stable azimuthal dark-soliton pairs on their crests. In remote troughs of the attractive model, stable localized states may assume a ringlike shape with weak azimuthal modulation, or shrink into solitons strongly localized in the azimuthal direction, which is explained in the framework of an averaged 1D equation with the cyclic azimuthal coordinate. Numerical simulations of the attractive model also reveal stable necklacelike patterns, built of several strongly localized peaks. Dynamics of strongly localized solitons circulating in the troughs is studied too. While the solitons with sufficiently small velocities are completely stable, fast solitons gradually decay, due to the leakage of matter into the adjacent trough, under the action of the centrifugal force. Investigation of head-on collisions between strongly localized solitons traveling in circular troughs shows that collisions between in-phase solitons in a common trough lead to collapse, while pi-out-of-phase solitons bounce many times, but eventually merge into a single one, without collapsing. In-phase solitons colliding in adjacent circular troughs also tend to merge into a single soliton. PMID:17280170

  3. Electromagnetic wave emitting products and "Kikoh" potentiate human leukocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Y; Iizawa, O; Ishimoto, K; Jiang, X; Kanoh, T

    1993-09-01

    Tourmaline (electric stone, a type of granite stone), common granite stone, ceramic disks, hot spring water and human palmar energy (called "Kikoh" in Japan and China), all which emit electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared region (wavelength 4-14 microns). These materials were thus examined for effects on human leukocyte activity and on lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. It was revealed that these materials significantly increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, phagocytosis, and generation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils, and the blastogenetic response of lymphocytes to mitogens. Chemotactic activity by neutrophils was also enhanced by exposure to tourmaline and the palm of "Kikohshi" i.e., a person who heals professionally by the laying on of hands. Despite the increase in reactive oxygen species generated by neutrophils, lipid peroxidation from unsaturated fatty acid was markedly inhibited by these four materials. The results suggest that materials emitting electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared range, which are widely used in Japan for cosmetic, therapeutic, and preservative purposes, appear capable of potentiating leukocyte functions without promoting oxidative injury. PMID:8406976

  4. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  5. Quantifying BTEX in aqueous solutions with potentially interfering hydrocarbons using a partially selective sensor array.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J S; Kiiveri, H; Hubble, L J; Chow, E; Webster, M S; Müller, K-H; Sosa-Pintos, A; Bendavid, A; Raguse, B; Wieczorek, L

    2015-05-01

    Partially selective gold nanoparticle sensors have the sensitivity and selectivity to discriminate and quantify benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene and naphthalene (BTEXN) at concentrations relevant to the US Environmental Protection Agency. In this paper we demonstrate that gold nanoparticle chemiresistors can do so in the presence of 16 other hydrocarbons and that they did not reduce the discriminating power of the array. A two-level full factorial designed experiment was performed on unary, binary, ternary, quaternary, quinary combinations of BTEXN analytes with and without the possibly interfering hydrocarbons. The nominal component concentration of the mixtures was 100 μg L(-1), equivalent to approximately 100 parts per billion (ppb). Concentrations predicted with the random forests method had an average root mean square error of 10-20% of the component concentrations. This level of accuracy was achieved regardless of whether or not the 16 possibly interfering hydrocarbons were present. This work shows that the sensitivity and selectivity of gold nanoparticles chemiresistor sensors towards BTEXN analytes are not unduly affected by the other hydrocarbons that are expected to be present at a petroleum remediation site. PMID:25768651

  6. Some Exact Results for the Schroedinger Wave Equation with a Time Dependent Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation with a time dependent delta function potential is solved exactly for many special cases. In all other cases the problem can be reduced to an integral equation of the Volterra type. It is shown that by knowing the wave function at the origin, one may derive the wave function everywhere. Thus, the problem is reduced from a PDE in two variables to an integral equation in one. These results are used to compare adiabatic versus sudden changes in the potential. It is shown that adiabatic changes in the p otential lead to conservation of the normalization of the probability density.

  7. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  8. Potential of using cerium oxide nanoparticles for protecting healthy tissue during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Zi; Mainali, Madan Kumar; Sinha, Neeharika; Strack, Guinevere; Altundal, Yucel; Hao, Yao; Winningham, Thomas Andrew; Sajo, Erno; Celli, Jonathan; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using cerium oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) as radical scavengers during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) to protect normal tissue. We hypothesize that CONPs can be slowly released from the routinely used APBI balloon applicators—via a degradable coating—and protect the normal tissue on the border of the lumpectomy cavity over the duration of APBI. To assess the feasibility of this approach, we analytically calculated the initial concentration of CONPs required to protect normal breast tissue from reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the time required for the particles to diffuse to various distances from the lumpectomy wall. Given that cerium has a high atomic number, we took into account the possible inadvertent dose enhancement that could occur due to the photoelectric interactions with radiotherapy photons. To protect against a typical MammoSite treatment fraction of 3.4 Gy, 5 ng-g−1 of CONPs is required to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Using 2 nm sized NPs, with an initial concentration of 1 mg-g−1, we found that 2–10 days of diffusion is required to obtain desired concentrations of CONPs in regions 1–2 cm away from the lumpectomy wall. The resultant dose enhancement factor (DEF) is less than 1.01 under such conditions. Our results predict that CONPs can be employed for radioprotection during APBI using a new design in which balloon applicators are coated with the NPs for sustained/controlled in-situ release from within the lumpectomy cavity. PMID:27053452

  9. Potential of using cerium oxide nanoparticles for protecting healthy tissue during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI).

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zi; Mainali, Madan Kumar; Sinha, Neeharika; Strack, Guinevere; Altundal, Yucel; Hao, Yao; Winningham, Thomas Andrew; Sajo, Erno; Celli, Jonathan; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using cerium oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) as radical scavengers during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) to protect normal tissue. We hypothesize that CONPs can be slowly released from the routinely used APBI balloon applicators-via a degradable coating-and protect the normal tissue on the border of the lumpectomy cavity over the duration of APBI. To assess the feasibility of this approach, we analytically calculated the initial concentration of CONPs required to protect normal breast tissue from reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the time required for the particles to diffuse to various distances from the lumpectomy wall. Given that cerium has a high atomic number, we took into account the possible inadvertent dose enhancement that could occur due to the photoelectric interactions with radiotherapy photons. To protect against a typical MammoSite treatment fraction of 3.4Gy, 5ng·g(-1) of CONPs is required to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Using 2nm sized NPs, with an initial concentration of 1mg·g(-1), we found that 2-10days of diffusion is required to obtain desired concentrations of CONPs in regions 1-2cm away from the lumpectomy wall. The resultant dose enhancement factor (DEF) is less than 1.01 under such conditions. Our results predict that CONPs can be employed for radioprotection during APBI using a new design in which balloon applicators are coated with the NPs for sustained/controlled in-situ release from within the lumpectomy cavity. PMID:27053452

  10. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; von Klitzing, Wolf

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers.

  11. Time-averaged adiabatic potentials: versatile matter-wave guides and atom traps.

    PubMed

    Lesanovsky, Igor; von Klitzing, Wolf

    2007-08-24

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers. PMID:17930945

  12. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Klitzing, Wolf von

    2007-08-24

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers.

  13. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Lisa M; Hyde, Andrew S; MacGregor, Barbara J; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis - previously developed based on (14)C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  14. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  15. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  16. Sporothrix schenckii: purification and partial biochemical characterization of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase, a potential antifungal target.

    PubMed

    González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Milewski, Sławomir; Villagómez-Castro, Julio C; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; López-Romero, Everardo

    2010-02-01

    The first committed step of the biosynthetic pathway leading to uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is catalyzed by glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlcN-6-P synthase), an enzyme proposed as a potential antifungal chemotherapy target. Here, we describe the purification and biochemical characterization of the native enzyme from the dimorphic pathogenic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. The availability of the pure protein facilitated its biochemical characterization. The enzyme exhibited subunit and native molecular masses of 79 and 350+/-5 kDa, respectively, suggesting a homotetrameric structure. Isoelectric point was 6.26 and K(m) values for fructose-6-phosphate and L-glutamine were 1.12+/-0.3 and 2.2+/-0.7 mM, respectively. Inhibition of activity by UDP-GlcNAc was enhanced by Glc-6-P and phosphorylation stimulated GlcN-6-P synthase activity without affecting the enzyme sensitivity to the aminosugar. A glutamine analogue, FMDP [N(3)-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid] was a more potent inhibitor of activity than ADMP (2-Amino-2-deoxy-D-mannitol-6-phosphate) but the latter was a stronger inhibitor of growth in two culture media. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the purification and biochemical characterization of a non-recombinant GlcN-6-P synthase from a true dimorphic fungus. Inhibition of enzyme activity and fungal growth by specific inhibitors of GlcN-6-P synthase strongly reinforces the role of this enzyme as a potential target for antifungal chemotherapy. PMID:19353425

  17. Four-wave mixing microscopy: a high potential nonlinear imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Tobias; Knebl, Andreas; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present non-resonant four-wave mixing microscopy as an additional contrast mechanism in nonlinear microscopy. The setup for this technique was based on a commercially available multiphoton microscope setup equipped with a titanium:sapphire-laser and an optical parametric oscillator as light sources. Fundamental system characteristics with respect to the spatio-temporal pulse overlap and the influence of aberrations on the process are presented. Experiments regarding the directionality of the four-wave mixing signal performed on fresh porcine meat showed an average ratio of the backward to forward signal mean intensity of 0.16 +/- 0.01. Nevertheless, structural information is comparable for both detection modalities. This highlights the potential of four-wave mixing microscopy for in vivo applications. Furthermore, results on porcine meat show the additional contrast generated by four-wave mixing. In summary, the results show a great potential of non-resonant four-wave mixing microscopy as label-free imaging modality in the biomedical sciences.

  18. Quantum mechanics of lattice gas automata: One-particle plane waves and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Classical lattice gas automata effectively simulate physical processes, such as diffusion and fluid flow (in certain parameter regimes), despite their simplicity at the microscale. Motivated by current interest in quantum computation we recently defined {ital quantum} lattice gas automata; in this paper we initiate a project to analyze which physical processes these models can effectively simulate. Studying the single particle sector of a one-dimensional quantum lattice gas we find discrete analogs of plane waves and wave packets, and then investigate their behavior in the presence of inhomogeneous potentials. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Kato Smoothing and Strichartz Estimates for Wave Equations with Magnetic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ancona, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Let H be a selfadjoint operator and A a closed operator on a Hilbert space . If A is H-(super)smooth in the sense of Kato-Yajima, we prove that is -(super)smooth. This allows us to include wave and Klein-Gordon equations in the abstract theory at the same level of generality as Schrödinger equations. We give a few applications and in particular, based on the resolvent estimates of Erdogan, Goldberg and Schlag (Forum Mathematicum 21:687-722, 2009), we prove Strichartz estimates for wave equations perturbed with large magnetic potentials on , n ≥ 3.

  20. Selection of the divergence waves on a model viscoelastic coating under a potential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. P.; Rybushkina, G. V.

    2008-09-01

    The paper is concerned with the established regimes of generation of the divergence (quasistatic) waves on a model viscoelastic coating under a potential flow of an incompressible liquid. Parameters of the effective coating that consists of a strongly damped flexible plate supported by an extended spring foundation are evaluated using the condition of modeling the deformation of the viscoelastic layer of a rubberlike material in the available experiments. The local nonlinearity due to the dependence of a stiffness coefficient of the spring foundation on surface displacement is taken into account together with the generalized Karman nonlinearity. The system of equations and boundary conditions of the problem are simplified and reduced to the dimensionless form in the limit of large losses in the plate. The perturbed potential flow is found to be quasistationary. A system of coupled equations describing the resonant and nonresonant (energetic) interactions of multiple harmonics of the surface displacement is derived for weak bending of the surface and small perturbation of flow velocity potential. Conditions for the selection of the period of the established waves are elucidated in this approximation. For the description of large amplitude divergence waves observed experimentally, the numerical procedure is elaborated based on the usage of an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system following the surface bending. The onset of the essentially nonsinusoidal large amplitude divergence waves and the selection of their period are simulated numerically.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainty in gravity wave potential energy calculations through GPS radio occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, D.; Alexander, P.; de la Torre, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) method to the atmosphere enables the determination of height profiles of temperature, among other variables. From these measurements, gravity wave activity is usually quantified by calculating the potential energy through the integration of the ratio of perturbation and background temperatures between two given altitudes in each profile. The uncertainty in the estimation of wave activity depends on the systematic biases and random errors of the measured temperature, but also on additional factors like the selected vertical integration layer and the separation method between background and perturbation temperatures. In this study, the contributions of different parameters and variables to the uncertainty in the calculation of gravity wave potential energy in the lower stratosphere are investigated and quantified. In particular, a Monte Carlo method is used to evaluate the uncertainty that results from different GPS RO temperature error distributions. In addition, our analysis shows that RO data above 30 km height becomes dubious for gravity waves potential energy calculations.

  2. Two-centre partial-wave calculations for the multiply differential cross section of the simple ionization of diatomic lithium Li2 by fast electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elboudali, F.; Joulakian, B.

    2001-12-01

    The (e, 2e) ionization of diatomic lithium Li2 by fast electrons is studied by applying, for the slow ejected electron, an asymptotically exact partial-wave description, which takes into account the diatomic nature of the problem. The ionization is considered as a vertical transition from the lowest vibrational and rotational level of the fundamental electronic state 1Σg+ of Li2 to the fundamental 2Σg+ state of Li2+. After verification of the procedure on the (e, 2e) ionization of diatomic hydrogen H2 for which experimental and theoretical results exist we present the particularities and favourable directions for Li2 targets.

  3. Influence of the stratospheric potential vorticity distribution on planetary wave breaking and the Brewer-Dobson circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Propagation of planetary-scale Rossby waves within the stratosphere, and hence the location of wave-induced zonal mean momentum forcing and the resulting Brewer-Dobson circulation, is dynamically determined by the distribution of zonal mean potential vorticity. Steep potential vorticity gradients at the vortex edge act both as a wave-guide for upward propagating waves, as well as increasing the resilience of the vortex edge to wave breaking. Further, the potential vorticity distribution imposes a dynamical constraint on the possible latitudinal extent of wavebreaking, and suggests the importance of breaking planetary-scale waves in the stratospheric surf zone for the driving of tropical upwelling in the lowermost stratosphere. Using simple numerical experiments we examine the effect of the potential vorticity distribution on planetary wave propagation and breaking. In these experiments, the potential vorticity distribution may either be varied directly or implicitly through the effect of finite horizontal resolution, which acts to limit the extent to which wave breaking may steepen potential vorticity gradients at the vortex edge. Details of individual wave breaking events and the secondary circulations they induce are highly sensitive to the potential vorticity distribution, and, in particular, to horizontal resolution. However, in long, forced-dissipative integrations, bulk quantities such as the total time-average tropical upwelling in the lowermost stratosphere appear relatively insensitive to horizontal resolution.

  4. [The cervical somatosensory evoked potential and its relation to F-wave activity].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-06-01

    In 6 healthy volunteers aged 18-25 years cervical somatosensory evoked potentials (CEPs) were recorded following stimulation of the right median nerve at the wrist. At the same time the antidromically elicited individual F-waves evoked by any single impulse were recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. By means of selective averaging of the neck responses it could be shown that there was a close relationship between an F-wave-activity of 120-150 microV/stimulus or more during the trial and the appearance or the enhancement of a negative peak occurring 0.5-1.4 ms after the main CEP component N13. An F-wave-activity of more than 224 microV/stimulus regularly resulted in a total change of the CEP configuration. PMID:2503360

  5. Matter-wave solitons with the minimum number of particles in two-dimensional quasiperiodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Gennadiy; Malomed, Boris A.

    2012-05-01

    We report results of systematic numerical studies of two-dimensional matter-wave soliton families supported by an external potential, in a vicinity of the junction between stable and unstable branches of the families, where the norm of the solution attains a minimum, facilitating the creation of the soliton. The model is based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the self-attractive condensate loaded into a quasiperiodic (QP) optical lattice (OL). The same model applies to spatial optical solitons in QP photonic crystals. Dynamical properties and stability of the solitons are analyzed with respect to variations of the depth and wave number of the OL. In particular, it is found that the single-peak solitons are stable or not in exact accordance with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) criterion, while double-peak solitons, which are found if the OL wave number is small enough, are always unstable against splitting.

  6. Bent waveguides for matter-waves: supersymmetric potentials and reflectionless geometries

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Adolfo del; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-01-01

    Non-zero curvature in a waveguide leads to the appearance of an attractive quantum potential which crucially affects the dynamics in matter-wave circuits. Using methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, pairs of bent waveguides are found whose geometry-induced potentials share the same scattering properties. As a result, reflectionless waveguides, dual to the straight waveguide, are identified. Strictly isospectral waveguides are also found by modulating the depth of the trapping potential. Numerical simulations are used to demonstrate the efficiency of these approaches in tailoring and controlling curvature-induced quantum-mechanical effects. PMID:24919423

  7. Emergence of extreme events in fiber-based parametric processes driven by a partially incoherent pump wave.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamal; Finot, Christophe; Millot, Guy

    2009-04-15

    We present experimental and theoretical results showing efficient emergence of rogue wavelike extreme intensity spikes during the fiber-based induced-modulational instability process driven by a partially incoherent pump. In particular, we show that the rogue event probability can be easily controlled by adjusting the pump-signal detuning. PMID:19370096

  8. ENSO-Related Variability in Wave Climate Drives Greater Erosion Potential on Central Pacific Atolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, J. F.; Ashton, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modulates atmospheric circulation across the equatorial Pacific over a periodic time scale of 2-7 years. Despite the importance of this climate mode in forcing storm generation and trade wind variability, its impact on the wave climate incident on central Pacific atolls has not been addressed. We used the NOAA Wavewatch III CFSR reanalysis hindcasts (1979-2007) to examine the influence of ENSO on sediment mobility and transport at Kwajalein Atoll (8.8°N, 167.7°E). We found that during El Nino event years, easterly trade winds incident on the atoll weakened by 4% compared to normal years and 17% relative to La Nina event years. Despite this decrease in wind strength, significant wave heights incident on the atoll were 3-4% greater during El Nino event years. Using machine learning to partition these waves revealed that the greater El Nino wave heights originated mainly from greater storm winds near the atoll. The southeastern shift in tropical cyclone genesis location during El Nino years forced these storm winds and contributed to the 7% and 16% increases in annual wave energy relative to normal and La Nina years, respectively. Using nested SWAN and XBeach models we determined that the additional wave energy during El Nino event years significantly increased potential sediment mobility at Kwajalein Atoll and led to greater net offshore transport on its most populous island. The larger storm waves likely deplete ocean-facing beaches and reef flats of sediment, but increase the supply of sediment to the atoll lagoon across open reef platforms that are not supporting islands. We discuss further explicit modelling of storms passing over the atoll to elucidate the confounding role of storm surge on the net erosional/depositional effects of these waves. Extrapolating our results to recent Wavewatch III forecasts leads us to conclude that climate change-linked increases in wave height and storm wave energy will increase erosion on

  9. A mechanical wave system to show waveforms similar to quantum mechanical wavefunctions in a potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faletič, Sergej

    2015-05-01

    Interviews with students suggest that even though they understand the formalism and the formal nature of quantum theory, they still often desire a mental picture of what the equations describe and some tangible experience with the wavefunctions. Here we discuss a mechanical wave system capable of reproducing correctly a mechanical equivalent of a quantum system in a potential, and the resulting waveforms in principle of any form. We have successfully reproduced the finite potential well, the potential barrier and the parabolic potential. We believe that these mechanical waveforms can provide a valuable experience base for introductory students to start from. We aim to show that mechanical systems that are described with the same mathematics as quantum mechanical, indeed behave in the same way. We believe that even if treated purely as a wave phenomenon, the system provides much insight into wave mechanics. This can be especially useful for physics teachers and others who often need to resort to concepts and experience rather than mathematics when explaining physical phenomena.

  10. The role of internal waves in larval fish interactions with potential predators and prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Adam T.; Cowen, Robert K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Hare, Jonathan A.; Tang, Dorothy

    2014-09-01

    Tidally driven internal wave packets in coastal environments have the potential to influence patchiness of larval fishes, prey, and gelatinous predators. We used the In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) to synoptically sample larval fishes, copepods, and planktonic predators (ctenophores, hydromedusae, chaetognaths, and polychaetes) across these predictable features in the summer near Stellwagen Bank, Massachusetts, USA. Full water column profiles and fixed depth transects (∼10 m depth) were used to quantify vertical and horizontal components of the fish and invertebrate distributions during stable and vertically mixed conditions associated with tidally generated internal waves. Larval fishes, consisting mostly of Urophycis spp., Merluccius bilinearis, and Labridae, were concentrated near the surface, with larger sizes generally occupying greater depths. During stable water column conditions, copepods formed a near surface thin layer several meters above the chlorophyll-a maximum that was absent when internal waves were propagating. In contrast, ctenophores and other predators were much more abundant at depth, but concentrations near 10 m increased immediately after the internal hydraulic jump mixed the water column. During the propagation of internal waves, the fine-scale abundance of larval fishes was more correlated with the abundance of gelatinous predators and less correlated with copepods compared to the stable conditions. Vertical oscillations caused by the internal hydraulic jump can disperse patches of zooplankton and force surface dwelling larval fishes into deeper water where probability of predator contact is increased, creating conditions potentially less favorable for larval fish growth and survival on short time scales.

  11. Transmission and Reflection of Wave Packets by Asymmetric Semi-Harmonic Potential Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes-Nájera, A.

    2016-03-01

    We study the scattering of a particle by a square barrier potential that has a parabolic hole in between. The barrier is parameterized in such a form that the hole can be partially or completely removed. This can be also chosen to be symmetric or asymmetric with respect to the hole. Some expressions for the phase time are given and the time spent by the particle in the interaction zone of the barrier is calculated. It is shown that the related time delay depends on the symmetry operations that one can do on the potential.

  12. Simple model potential and model wave functions for (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. H.; Tang, K. T.

    2000-07-01

    A simple model potential is proposed to describe the interaction of a valence electron with the alkali core, which incorporates the correct asymptotic behavior in terms of dipolar polarizabilities, and the short-range exchange effects in terms of a hard core adjusted to give the correct energy for the valence electron. Based on this potential, simple wave functions are developed to describe the (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions. These wave functions exhibit some important structures of the ions, and provide a universal description of the properties of all (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions, in particular, the equilibrium separations of the nuclei and the corresponding dissociation energies. They also allow us to calculate the dipolar polarizabilities of Li2+, Na2+, K2+, Rb2+, and Cs2+.

  13. Full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities patterned on anisotropic substrates using potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toncich, S. S.; Collin, R. E.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for a full wave characterization of microstrip open end discontinuities fabricated on uniaxial anisotropic substrates using potential theory is presented. The substrate to be analyzed is enclosed in a cutoff waveguide, with the anisotropic axis aligned perpendicular to the air-dielectric interface. A full description of the sources on the microstrip line is included with edge conditions built in. Extention to other discontinuities is discussed.

  14. Conditioning effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation evoking motor-evoked potential on V-wave response.

    PubMed

    Grosprêtre, Sidney; Martin, Alain

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the collision responsible for the volitional V-wave evoked by supramaximal electrical stimulation of the motor nerve during voluntary contraction. V-wave was conditioned by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex at several inter-stimuli intervals (ISI) during weak voluntary plantar flexions (n = 10) and at rest for flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR; n = 6). Conditioning stimulations were induced by TMS with intensity eliciting maximal motor-evoked potential (MEPmax). ISIs used were ranging from -20 to +20 msec depending on muscles tested. The results showed that, for triceps surae muscles, conditioning TMS increased the V-wave amplitude (~ +250%) and the associated mechanical response (~ +30%) during weak voluntary plantar flexion (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction -MVC) for ISIs ranging from +6 to +18 msec. Similar effect was observed at rest for the FCR with ISI ranging from +6 to +12 msec. When the level of force was increased from 10 to 50% MVC or the conditioning TMS intensity was reduced to elicit responses of 50% of MEPmax, a significant decrease in the conditioned V-wave amplitude was observed for the triceps surae muscles, linearly correlated to the changes in MEP amplitude. The slope of this correlation, as well as the electro-mechanical efficiency, was closed to the identity line, indicating that V-wave impact at muscle level seems to be similar to the impact of cortical stimulation. All these results suggest that change in V-wave amplitude is a great index to reflect changes in cortical neural drive addressed to spinal motoneurons. PMID:25501438

  15. External and internal waves in stream-potential pressure-coordinate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirk, Marko; Rõõm, Rein

    2014-05-01

    In stream-potential dynamics pressure coordinate velocity -→v = {dx/dt,dy/dt,dp/dt} = {vx,vy,vp} = {u,v,ω } is presented in terms of 4D stream-potential {ψ0,ψx,ψy,ψp} -→v = downtriangleψ0 + downtriangle× -→ψ leftrightarrow vi = Giαδαψ0 + ɛαβγδβψγ, with diagonal metric tensor with main elements G11 = G22 = 1, G33 = p2/H2 (H = RT/g is the height scale). Vector potential -→ ψ is further expressed via horizontal curl and divergence of the stream function ω = δxψy - δyψx ≠¡ dp/dt, Ξ = δxψx + δyψy. The wave-vector components in linearized stream-potential dynamics are the scalar flow potential ψ0, surface pressure fluctuation p's, horizontal divergence Ξ and curl ω of the fluctuative part -→ψ' of complete vector potential -→ψ = -→ψ + -→ψ' . Equations for ψ0 and p's form the external wave subsystem δp' δ« ps dξ0 - -→- p2 δ2 -s+ downtriangle2 ψ0dp = 0, -+gH downtriangle2(p's/ps) = A0(ψ ,ω,Ξ), L0ψ0 = ξ0, L0 =-2 -2+downtriangle2, δt 0 dt H δp (1) while the equations for Ξ, ω and temperature fluctuation T' form the internal wave subsystem d-→ξ -→ -→- dT ' Tiω ( ) ( p2 δ2 ) p2 -dt = A (ψ,ω,Ξ), -dt = -p-+Q, L0Ξ = δp p2ξp/H2 , H2- δp2 + downtriangle2 ω = H2-(δyξx - δxξy) (2) with Ti = (R/cp)T - pδpT. In these equations 0 -→ α -→ -→ i iαβ ξ = downtriangle · v = δαv , ξ = downtriangle ×v leftrightarrow ξ = ɛ δαvβ are the 3D divergence and curl of velocity. In the presentation equation systems (1) and (2) are solved both analytically and numerically. Interaction of external waves with stationary internal orographic waves is investigated.

  16. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi, Cari, Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto

    2014-09-01

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analitically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of diferential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  17. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Deta, U. A.; Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  18. A model for strong attenuation and dispersion of seismic P-waves in a partially saturated fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajanovski, Miroslav; Müller, Tobias M.; Parra, Jorge O.

    2010-08-01

    In this work we interpret the data showing unusually strong velocity dispersion of P-waves (up to 30%) and attenuation in a relatively narrow frequency range. The cross-hole and VSP data were measured in a reservoir, which is in the porous zone of the Silurian Kankakee Limestone Formation formed by vertical fractures within a porous matrix saturated by oil, and gas patches. Such a medium exhibits significant attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow across the interfaces between different types of inclusions (fractures, fluid patches) and background. Other models of intrinsic attenuation (in particular squirt flow models) cannot explain the amount of observed dispersion when using realistic rock properties. In order to interpret data in a satisfactory way we develop a superposition model for fractured porous rocks accounting also for the patchy saturation effect.

  19. The syndrome of delayed posthemiplegic hemidystonia, hemiatrophy, and partial seizure: clinical, neuroimaging, and motor-evoked potential studies.

    PubMed

    Thajeb, P

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic motor-evoked potential (MEP) study of patients with the syndrome of delayed posthemiplegic hemidystonia, hemiatrophy, and partial or hemi-seizures ('4-hemi' syndrome) has not been described. Among 35 patients investigated for posthemiplegic movement disorders from February 1988 to January 1995, seven showed '4-hemi' syndrome. Clinical work-up, magnetic resonance images (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) were performed in all. Transcranial MEP studies were done in five patients. The remote causes of '4-hemi' syndrome were neonatal stroke, trauma, and encephalitis in infancy. The dystonia may occur as long as a decade after the initial insult. MRI or CT showed destructive lesion in the contralateral putamen (five patients), caudate (four), thalamus (five), and atrophy of the contralateral hemisphere (five). Other associations were porencephalic cyst. Wallerian degeneration, and asymmetric compensatory ventriculomegaly. MEP showed abnormalities in the affected upper limbs in four of five patients. The abnormalities were reduced amplitude of the compound muscle action potential following cortical stimulations with or without temporal dispersion, and with or without prolongation of its latency. The peripheral motor conductions following cervical stimulations were normal. MEP abnormalities may not be related to the hemiatrophy and the size of brain lesion per se. The hemidystonia is static after the second decade of life, and it is often difficult to treat. PMID:8884090

  20. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Lisa M.; Hyde, Andrew S.; MacGregor, Barbara J.; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines – that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  1. Potentially clinically relevant prostate cancer is found more frequently after complete than after partial histopathological processing of radical cystoprostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, H M; Aziz, A; Eder, F; Otto, W; Denzinger, S; Wieland, W F; May, M; Hofstädter, F; Hartmann, A; Burger, M

    2012-12-01

    Incidental prostate cancer is often found in cystoprostatectomy specimens. The presence of a clinically significant tumour has an impact on follow-up strategies. In prostatectomy specimen for prostate cancer, whole-mount sections improve diagnostic accuracy. The present study compares detection of incidental prostate cancer in complete to routine processing. We included 295 consecutive patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy. Between 01/1995 and 12/2003 (period I), specimens of 129 patients were partially processed, whereas between 01/2004 and 03/2009 (period II), specimens of 166 patients were completely processed. Incidental prostate cancer was detected overall in 91 (30.8 %) patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 24 (18.6 %) patients in period 1 and in 67 (40.4 %) patients in period 2 (p < 0.001). Potentially clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 12 (9.2 %) and 29 (17.5 %) patients, respectively (p = 0.044). Complete embedding and processing of cystoprostatectomy specimen yield significantly more potentially clinically relevant prostate cancers. The present data suggest that notably in younger men the specimens should be completely processed. PMID:23052374

  2. Paramagnetic spin splitting of the conductances for tunnel junctions between partially gapped metals with charge density waves and normal metals or ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, A. M.; Li, Mai Suan; Pekala, M.; Szymczak, H.; Voitenko, A. I.

    2005-03-01

    We consider tunnelling between a metal partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWM) and an ordinary metal (M) or a ferromagnet (FM) separated by an insulator (I) in an external magnetic field H. Zeeman paramagnetic splitting is assumed to dominate in the CDWM over orbital magnetic effects. The quasiparticle tunnel current J and relevant differential conductance G are calculated as functions of the bias voltage V. The peaks of G(V), originating from the electron density of states singularities near the charge density wave gap edges, were shown to be split in the magnetic field, each peak having a predominant spin polarization. This effect is analogous to the H-induced splitting of G(V) peaks obtained by Tedrow and Meservey for junctions between normal metals and superconductors (S). Thus, it is possible to electrically measure the polarization of current carriers in such a set-up, although the behaviours of G(V) in the two cases are substantially different. The use of M-I-CDWM junctions instead of M-I-S ones has certain advantages. The absence of the Meissner effect, which weakens the constraints upon the junction geometry and electrode materials, comprises the main benefit. The other advantage is the larger energy range of the charge density wave gaps in comparison to that for superconductors' gaps, so that larger Hs may be applied.

  3. Perceptrons with Hebbian Learning Based on Wave Ensembles in Spatially Patterned Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Ortega, T.; Liew, T. C. H.

    2015-03-01

    A general scheme to realize a perceptron for hardware neural networks is presented, where multiple interconnections are achieved by a superposition of Schrödinger waves. Spatially patterned potentials process information by coupling different points of reciprocal space. The necessary potential shape is obtained from the Hebbian learning rule, either through exact calculation or construction from a superposition of known optical inputs. This allows implementation in a wide range of compact optical systems, including (1) any nonlinear optical system, (2) optical systems patterned by optical lithography, and (3) exciton-polariton systems with phonon or nuclear spin interactions.

  4. Perceptrons with Hebbian learning based on wave ensembles in spatially patterned potentials.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Ortega, T; Liew, T C H

    2015-03-20

    A general scheme to realize a perceptron for hardware neural networks is presented, where multiple interconnections are achieved by a superposition of Schrödinger waves. Spatially patterned potentials process information by coupling different points of reciprocal space. The necessary potential shape is obtained from the Hebbian learning rule, either through exact calculation or construction from a superposition of known optical inputs. This allows implementation in a wide range of compact optical systems, including (1) any nonlinear optical system, (2) optical systems patterned by optical lithography, and (3) exciton-polariton systems with phonon or nuclear spin interactions. PMID:25839313

  5. Efficient calculation of potential energy surfaces for the generation of vibrational wave functions.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Guntram

    2004-11-15

    An automatic procedure for the generation of potential energy surfaces based on high level ab initio calculations is described. It allows us to determine the vibrational wave functions for molecules of up to ten atoms. Speedups in computer time of about four orders of magnitude in comparison to standard implementations were achieved. Effects due to introduced approximations--within the computation of the potential--on fundamental modes obtained from vibrational self-consistent field and vibrational configuration interaction calculations are discussed. Benchmark calculations are provided for formaldehyde and 1,2,5-oxadiazole (furazan). PMID:15538851

  6. Laboratory study of spiky potential structures associated with multi-harmonic shear-driven EIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlino, Robert; Ganguli, Guru; Kim, Su-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    A ubiquitous feature of electric fields observed in the Earth's auroral region is their spiky, repetitive nature, and appearance as either unipolar or bipolar pulses. They have been observed on a number of satellites including S3-3, Polar, Viking, and FAST. These spiky structures have been associated with regions of upward ion flows with transverse shear, and multi-harmonic electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves. The occurrence of these spiky structures has been attributed to various nonlinear processes, e.g., solitary waves. We will present results of a laboratory experiment performed in a double-ended Q machine, in which spiky potential waveforms were observed in association with coherent multi-harmonic EIC waves in a current-less plasma having a region of parallel ion flow with transverse shear. The spiky waveforms are shown to result from the linear superposition of phase-coherent EIC waves. Work at UI supported by NSF and DOE, work at NRL supported by ONR.

  7. NON-WKB MODELS OF THE FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL EFFECT: THE ROLE OF SLOW MODE WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Laming, J. Martin

    2012-01-10

    A model for element abundance fractionation between the solar chromosphere and corona is further developed. The ponderomotive force due to Alfven waves propagating through or reflecting from the chromosphere in solar conditions generally accelerates chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, into the corona. This gives rise to what has become known as the first ionization potential effect. We incorporate new physical processes into the model. The chromospheric ionization balance is improved and the effect of different approximations is discussed. We also treat the parametric generation of slow mode waves by the parallel propagating Alfven waves. This is also an effect of the ponderomotive force, arising from the periodic variation of the magnetic pressure driving an acoustic mode, which adds to the background longitudinal pressure. This can have subtle effects on the fractionation, rendering it quasi-mass independent in the lower regions of the chromosphere. We also briefly discuss the change in the fractionation with Alfven wave frequency, relative to the frequency of the overlying coronal loop resonance.

  8. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Gasparini, Sara; Citraro, Rita; Labate, Angelo; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gambardella, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10–30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV), is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca2+ channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged). The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to central nervous system and include fatigue, dizziness, and somnolence; these apparently disappear during treatment. In this review, we analyzed BRV, focusing on the current evidences from experimental animal models to clinical studies with particular interest on potential use in clinical

  9. Shear wave velocity profiling and evaluation of liquefaction potential in northeast Arkansas using simplified equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, A.; Haran, S.

    2010-03-01

    Soil liquefaction in Northeast Arkansas (NEA) is expected to result in substantial damage during seismic events. Insitu shear wave velocity (Vs) profile of the subsurface, to a depth of at least 30-meters (according to the International Building Code or IBC), is necessary for determining the "Site Class", which is subsequently used in the structural analysis of buildings, and can be used as a screening tool to evaluate the depth and thickness of potentially liquefiable soil layers. Shear wave velocity profiles at 3 sites in Craighead County, AR were determined utilizing simplified equipment by means of a non-invasive technique. The results indicated good agreement with previous work performed by other researchers. These profiles were used to evaluate the liquefaction resistance at these sites using the simplified procedure by Seed and Idriss (Vs approach). The liquefaction resistance was also evaluated using the Standard Penetration Test (SPT approach) results from the geotechnical investigations that were conducted by others. The equipment and procedure should allow governmental agencies and engineering professional to determine the shear wave velocity profiles of the upper soil zones at relatively low cost. These profiles can aid different agencies in mapping areas of interest and assessing seismic hazard potential during planning future development or evaluating current facilities.

  10. Evolution and Instability of Galactic Gas Disks inresponse to A Spiral Density-wave Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chi; Yen, D. C.; Wang, H. H.

    2006-12-01

    We revisit the classic problem of the response of the gas in a galactic disk to an imposed spiral density-wave potential of stellar origin. The results show the distinct difference between waves generated by resonance excitation and forced oscillation. To avoid the confusion of mixing these two types of waves, we systematically reduce the strength of the spiral potential or the force near the primary Lindblad resonances. So we can study the original problem of shock formation and star formation problem formulated by Roberts (1969). For the cases without self-gravitation of the gas disk, in addition to the primary doubly periodic shocks, the presence of the branch-like structures which correspond to the ultra-harmonic resonances is pronounced. On the other hand, once the self-gravitation is included, unlike the work of Chakrabarti et al. (2003), the sub-structures associated with the ultra-harmonics are not necessarily enhanced by the self-gravity. Their growth may be deteriorated by the growth of the primary shocks. Sub-structures other than those identified with the ultra-harmonics may result from shear instability of Rayleigh's kind or gravitational instability of Toomre's kind. They are responsible for the branches, feathers or chaotic sub-structures observed in nearby galaxies in far infra-red. The work is in parts supported by a grant from National Science Council, Taiwan NSC95-2752-M-001-009-PAE.

  11. Potential Hazards of Tsunami Waves along the Chinese coast in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Sevre, E. O.; Shi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In the next 100 years the Chinese coast faces potentially non-negligible danger from tsunamogenic earthquakes originating at the neighboring subducting plate boundaries in the Phillipines and the Ryukyu Islands. There are significant differences in the bottom bathymetry between the South China Sea bordering the southern province of Guangdong and the East China Sea and Yellow Sea adjacent to the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shandong. We have found that the linear shallow-water equations can be used to predict with good enough accuracy the travel time of tsunami waves in the South China Sea, but the nonlinear shallow-water equations must be used for the shallower seas next to the northern Chinese provinces. There are some differences in the travel time predictions between the linear and nonlinear theories for the Yellow Sea region. This difference is enough to make a difference in terms of warning. We will use our newly developed probability method, called the probabilistic forecast of tsunami hazards ( PFTH ) for predicting the danger of tsunami waves with a certain height of around 2 meters to impinge on the cities along the Chinese coast in the next century.We have used the Gutenberg-Richter relationship applied locally to each locale for evaluating the probability of the seismic risk for large earthquakes, greater than magnitude 7. We have only included the frequency of shallow large earthquakes to take place . For the southern cities of Hong Kong and Macau, we found that the probability of a 2 meter wave to hit these ports is around 10 % in the next century. Cities in Taiwan are less vulnerable than the large coastal cities on the Chinese mainland. The probability results for the northern cities of Shanghai and Qingdao are around a few per cent for smaller wave heights like one meter or so. But even these smaller waves can be damaging --

  12. Kato Smoothing and Strichartz Estimates for Wave Equations with Magnetic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ancona, Piero

    2014-09-01

    Let H be a selfadjoint operator and A a closed operator on a Hilbert space {{H}} . If A is H-(super)smooth in the sense of Kato-Yajima, we prove that {AH^{-1/4}} is {√{H}} -(super)smooth. This allows us to include wave and Klein-Gordon equations in the abstract theory at the same level of generality as Schrödinger equations. We give a few applications and in particular, based on the resolvent estimates of Erdogan, Goldberg and Schlag (Forum Mathematicum 21:687-722, 2009), we prove Strichartz estimates for wave equations perturbed with large magnetic potentials on {{R}n} , n ≥ 3.

  13. Estimating the failure potential of a partially saturated slope from combined continuum and limit equilibrium modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, R. I.; White, J. A.; Liu, X.; Wu, W.

    2010-12-01

    Rainfall weakens an earth slope and triggers mass movement. Relevant triggering mechanisms are complex and include reduction of capillary pressure due to increased saturation and frictional drag on the sediment induced by fluid flow. Physics-based continuum models utilizing modern computational tools are useful for understanding the mechanisms of deformation in partially saturated slopes; however, they do not provide a scalar indicator called "factor of safety" that measures the potential of a given slope for mass movement. In the present work we employ sequential calculations consisting of a physics-based finite element modeling that couples solid deformation with fluid flow to quantify the stress and deformation fields in a steep hillside slope subjected to rainfall infiltration. This is followed by a limit equilibrium calculation based on the method of slices that evaluates the desired factor of safety. The field condition investigated is similar to the steep experimental catchment CB1 near Coos Bay, Oregon, which failed as a large debris flow from heavy rainfall. We find the pore pressure variation to be a strong link between the continuum and limit-equilibrium solutions: for the same pore pressure variation within the slope, the continuum and limit-equilibrium solutions consistently predicted the same scarp zone for a given slope. Material parameters such as the effective cohesion and friction angle of the sediment tend to influence the timing of failure, but not the failure mechanism itself. Slope topography and rainfall history impact the slope failure mechanism to a great extent.

  14. Nitrous oxide reduction genetic potential from the microbial community of an intermittently aerated partial nitritation SBR treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Gabarró, J; Hernández-Del Amo, E; Gich, F; Ruscalleda, M; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates the microbial community dynamics in an intermittently aerated partial nitritation (PN) SBR treating landfill leachate, with emphasis to the nosZ encoding gene. PN was successfully achieved and high effluent stability and suitability for a later anammox reactor was ensured. Anoxic feedings allowed denitrifying activity in the reactor. The influent composition influenced the mixed liquor suspended solids concentration leading to variations of specific operational rates. The bacterial community was low diverse due to the stringent conditions in the reactor, and was mostly enriched by members of Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes as determined by 16S rRNA sequencing from excised DGGE melting types. The qPCR analysis for nitrogen cycle-related enzymes (amoA, nirS, nirK and nosZ) demonstrated high amoA enrichment but being nirS the most relatively abundant gene. nosZ was also enriched from the seed sludge. Linear correlation was found mostly between nirS and the organic specific rates. Finally, Bacteroidetes sequenced in this study by 16S rRNA DGGE were not sequenced for nosZ DGGE, indicating that not all denitrifiers deal with complete denitrification. However, nosZ encoding gene bacteria was found during the whole experiment indicating the genetic potential to reduce N2O. PMID:24183561

  15. Fear extinction memory consolidation requires potentiation of pontine-wave activity during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W

    2013-03-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  16. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  17. Polarization, transverse shifts, and angular momentum conservation laws in partial reflection and refraction of an electromagnetic wave packet.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, K Yu; Bliokh, Yu P

    2007-06-01

    We present a solution to the problem of partial reflection and refraction of a polarized paraxial Gaussian beam at the interface between two transparent media. The Fedorov-Imbert transverse shifts of the centers of gravity of the reflected and refracted beams are calculated. Our results differ in the general case from those derived previously by other authors. In particular, they obey general conservation law for the beams' total angular momentum but do not obey one-particle conservation laws for individual photons, which have been proposed by [Onoda Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083901 (2004)]. We ascertain that these circumstances relate to the artificial model accepted in the literature for the polarized beam; this model does not fit to real beams. The present paper resolves the recent controversy and confirms the results of our previous paper [Bliokh Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 073903 (2006)]. In addition, a diffraction effect of angular transverse shifts of the reflected and refracted beams is described. PMID:17677378

  18. Partial Reversal of Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance Owing to Anti-Inflammatory Immunomodulatory Potential of Flaxseed Oil.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Samina; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Farah

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the potential of supplementation of diet with Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum, L.) oil (FXO), on obesity-related inflammation and reversal of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Swiss Albino mice, C57bl/6 mice and co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes - RAW 264.7 macrophages to mimick obese adipose tissue environment were used for the study. Oral gavage of FXO at concentrations of 4, 8 or 16 mg/kg body weight (bwt) for 4 weeks or high-fat diet (HFD, 60% energy as fat) supplemented with dietary FXO (4, 8 or 16 mg/kg bwt) was given to the mice. FXO was characterised using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. FXO supplemented HFD-fed mice (4 mg/kg bwt exhibited reduced adiposity index, serum glucose levels and triglycerides (8 and 16 mg/kg bwt) and improvement in insulin sensitisation (4, 8 and 16 mg/kg bwt) when compared with HFD mice. The co-culture showed a dose-dependent shift in cytokines towards anti-inflammatory (IL-4) state, with a decrease in pro-inflammatory TNF-α (p < 0.05). For immunomodulatory studies a dose-dependent increase (p < 0.05) was observed in antigen-specific levels of Th2 (IL-4) cytokine, serum anti-ova IgG1 and IgE levels. Suppression in anti-ova IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 and antigen-specific Th1 cytokines like TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly (p < 0.05) was observed at 16 mg/kg bwt dosage. The results indicate that FXO exhibits an anti-inflammatory immunomodulatory potential and may partially relieve symptoms of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:26107745

  19. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential.

    PubMed

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit. PMID:26274249

  20. Quantum reflection of bright solitary matter waves from a narrow attractive potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, A. L.; Billam, T. P.; Yu, M. M. H.; Rakonjac, A.; Helm, J. L.; Polo, J.; Weiss, C.; Gardiner, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.

    2016-02-01

    We report the observation of quantum reflection from a narrow attractive potential using bright solitary matter waves formed from a 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. We create the attractive potential using a tightly focused, red-detuned laser beam, and observe reflection of up to 25% of the atoms, along with the confinement of atoms at the position of the beam. We show that the observed reflected fraction is much larger than theoretical predictions for a simple Gaussian potential well. A more detailed model of bright soliton propagation, accounting for the generic presence of small subsidiary intensity maxima in the red-detuned beam, suggests that these small intensity maxima are the cause of this enhanced reflection.

  1. Signal reconstruction of the slow wave and spike potential from electrogastrogram.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shujia; Ding, Wei; Miao, Lei; Xi, Ning; Li, Hongyi; Yang, Chunmin

    2015-01-01

    The gastric slow wave and the spike potential can correspondingly represent the rhythm and the intensity of stomach motility. Because of the filtering effect of biological tissue, electrogastrogram (EGG) cannot measure the spike potential on the abdominal surface in the time domain. Thus, currently the parameters of EGG adopted by clinical applications are only the characteristics of the slow wave, such as the dominant frequency, the dominant power and the instability coefficients. The limitation of excluding the spike potential analyses hinders EGG from being a diagnosis to comprehensively reveal the motility status of the stomach. To overcome this defect, this paper a) presents an EGG reconstruction method utilizing the specified signal components decomposed by the discrete wavelet packet transform, and b) obtains a frequency band for the human gastric spike potential through fasting and postprandial cutaneous EGG experiments for twenty-five human volunteers. The results indicate the lower bound of the human gastric spike potential frequency is 0.96±0.20 Hz (58±12 cpm), and the upper bound is 1.17±0.23 Hz (70±14 cpm), both of which have not been reported before to the best of our knowledge. As an auxiliary validation of the proposed method, synchronous serosa-surface EGG acquisitions are carried out for two dogs. The frequency band results for the gastric spike potential of the two dogs are respectively 0.83-0.90 Hz (50-54 cpm) and 1.05-1.32 Hz (63-79 cpm). They lie in the reference range 50-80 cpm proposed in previous literature, showing the feasibility of the reconstruction method in this paper. PMID:26405915

  2. Bloch-like waves in random-walk potentials based on supersymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Hong, Jiho; Park, Namkyoo

    2015-01-01

    Bloch's theorem was a major milestone that established the principle of bandgaps in crystals. Although it was once believed that bandgaps could form only under conditions of periodicity and long-range correlations for Bloch's theorem, this restriction was disproven by the discoveries of amorphous media and quasicrystals. While network and liquid models have been suggested for the interpretation of Bloch-like waves in disordered media, these approaches based on searching for random networks with bandgaps have failed in the deterministic creation of bandgaps. Here we reveal a deterministic pathway to bandgaps in random-walk potentials by applying the notion of supersymmetry to the wave equation. Inspired by isospectrality, we follow a methodology in contrast to previous methods: we transform order into disorder while preserving bandgaps. Our approach enables the formation of bandgaps in extremely disordered potentials analogous to Brownian motion, and also allows the tuning of correlations while maintaining identical bandgaps, thereby creating a family of potentials with ‘Bloch-like eigenstates'. PMID:26373616

  3. Lamina-specific contribution of glutamatergic and GABAergic potentials to hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Jan; Draguhn, Andreas; Both, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian hippocampus expresses highly organized patterns of neuronal activity which form a neuronal correlate of spatial memories. These memory-encoding neuronal ensembles form on top of different network oscillations which entrain neurons in a state- and experience-dependent manner. The mechanisms underlying activation, timing and selection of participating neurons are incompletely understood. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms underlying one prominent network pattern called sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R) which are involved in memory consolidation during sleep. We recorded SPW-R with extracellular electrodes along the different layers of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Contribution of glutamatergic excitation and GABAergic inhibition, respectively, was probed by local application of receptor antagonists into s. radiatum, pyramidale and oriens. Laminar profiles of field potentials show that GABAergic potentials contribute substantially to sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations in s. pyramidale. Inhibitory inputs to s. pyramidale and s. oriens are crucial for action potential timing by ripple oscillations, as revealed by multiunit-recordings in the pyramidal cell layer. Glutamatergic afferents, on the other hand, contribute to sharp waves in s. radiatum where they also evoke a fast oscillation at ~200 Hz. Surprisingly, field ripples in s. radiatum are slightly slower than ripples in s. pyramidale, resulting in a systematic shift between dendritic and somatic oscillations. This complex interplay between dendritic excitation and perisomatic inhibition may be responsible for the precise timing of discharge probability during the time course of SPW-R. Together, our data illustrate a complementary role of spatially confined excitatory and inhibitory transmission during highly ordered network patterns in the hippocampus. PMID:25202239

  4. Efficient calculation of potential energy surfaces for the generation of vibrational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauhut, Guntram

    2004-11-01

    An automatic procedure for the generation of potential energy surfaces based on high level ab initio calculations is described. It allows us to determine the vibrational wave functions for molecules of up to ten atoms. Speedups in computer time of about four orders of magnitude in comparison to standard implementations were achieved. Effects due to introduced approximations—within the computation of the potential—on fundamental modes obtained from vibrational self-consistent field and vibrational configuration interaction calculations are discussed. Benchmark calculations are provided for formaldehyde and 1,2,5-oxadiazole (furazan).

  5. Networks of triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting water wave energy: a potential approach toward blue energy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Jin; Li, Zhaoling; Fan, Xing; Zi, Yunlong; Jing, Qingshen; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Pradel, Ken C; Niu, Simiao; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-24

    With 70% of the earth's surface covered with water, wave energy is abundant and has the potential to be one of the most environmentally benign forms of electric energy. However, owing to lack of effective technology, water wave energy harvesting is almost unexplored as an energy source. Here, we report a network design made of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) for large-scale harvesting of kinetic water energy. Relying on surface charging effect between the conventional polymers and very thin layer of metal as electrodes for each TENG, the TENG networks (TENG-NW) that naturally float on the water surface convert the slow, random, and high-force oscillatory wave energy into electricity. On the basis of the measured output of a single TENG, the TENG-NW is expected to give an average power output of 1.15 MW from 1 km(2) surface area. Given the compelling features, such as being lightweight, extremely cost-effective, environmentally friendly, easily implemented, and capable of floating on the water surface, the TENG-NW renders an innovative and effective approach toward large-scale blue energy harvesting from the ocean. PMID:25719956

  6. Variety of the Wave Change in Compound Muscle Action Potential in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Muramoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Animal study. Purpose To review the present warning point criteria of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and investigate new criteria for spinal surgery safety using an animal model. Overview of Literature Little is known about correlation palesis and amplitude of spinal cord monitoring. Methods After laminectomy of the tenth thoracic spinal lamina, 2-140 g force was delivered to the spinal cord with a tension gage to create a bilateral contusion injury. The study morphology change of the CMAP wave and locomotor scale were evaluated for one month. Results Four different types of wave morphology changes were observed: no change, amplitude decrease only, morphology change only, and amplitude and morphology change. Amplitude and morphology changed simultaneously and significantly as the injury force increased (p<0.05) Locomotor scale in the amplitude and morphology group worsened more than the other groups. Conclusions Amplitude and morphology change of the CMAP wave exists and could be the key of the alarm point in CMAP. PMID:26713129

  7. Analysis of synoptic scale controlling factors in the distribution of gravity wave potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shih-Sian; Pan, C. J.; Das, Uma; Lai, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the past years, global morphology and climatology of gravity waves have been widely studied and the effects of topography and convection systems have been evaluated, but the complete gravity wave distribution could not be explained by these effects. To find the missing controlling factors, a series of synoptic scale analyses is performed in the present study to investigate relationships between synoptic scale factors and potential energy (Ep) associated with gravity waves. Global distribution of Ep during a 12-year period from 2002 to 2013 is derived using temperature profiles retrieved from observations of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. Synoptic scale factors obtained from ECMWF Interim reanalysis data are employed to investigate the correlation between synoptic systems and Ep. It is found that Ep values are high around extratropical cyclones over mid-latitudes (30-60°) and around the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over low-latitudes (10-30°). Ep values are low around subtropical highs over both mid- and low-latitudes. This is the first time that a synoptic scale analysis of Ep distribution is performed, and the influence of synoptic scale factors on Ep confirmed.

  8. Polarization, transverse shifts, and angular momentum conservation laws in partial reflection and refraction of an electromagnetic wave packet

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, K. Yu.; Bliokh, Yu. P.

    2007-06-15

    We present a solution to the problem of partial reflection and refraction of a polarized paraxial Gaussian beam at the interface between two transparent media. The Fedorov-Imbert transverse shifts of the centers of gravity of the reflected and refracted beams are calculated. Our results differ in the general case from those derived previously by other authors. In particular, they obey general conservation law for the beams' total angular momentum but do not obey one-particle conservation laws for individual photons, which have been proposed by [Onoda et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083901 (2004)]. We ascertain that these circumstances relate to the artificial model accepted in the literature for the polarized beam; this model does not fit to real beams. The present paper resolves the recent controversy and confirms the results of our previous paper [Bliokh et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 073903 (2006)]. In addition, a diffraction effect of angular transverse shifts of the reflected and refracted beams is described.

  9. Energies and wave functions for a soft-core Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Richard L.; Saad, Nasser; Sen, K. D.; Ciftci, Hakan

    2009-09-01

    For the family of model soft-core Coulomb potentials represented by V(r)=-[Z/(rq+βq)1/q] , with the parameters Z>0,β>0,q≥1 , it is shown analytically that the potentials and eigenvalues, Eνℓ , are monotonic in each parameter. The potential envelope method is applied to obtain approximate analytic estimates in terms of the known exact spectra for pure power potentials. For the case q=1 , the asymptotic iteration method is used to find exact analytic results for the eigenvalues Eνℓ and corresponding wave functions, expressed in terms of Z and β . A proof is presented establishing the general concavity of the scaled electron density near the nucleus resulting from the truncated potentials for all q . Based on an analysis of extensive numerical calculations, it is conjectured that the crossing between the pair of states [(ν,ℓ),(ν',ℓ')] is given by the conditions ν'≥(ν+1) and ℓ'≥(ℓ+3) . The significance of these results for the interaction of intense laser field with an atom is pointed out. Differences in the observed level-crossing effects between the soft-core potentials and the hydrogen atom confined inside an impenetrable sphere are discussed.

  10. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-11-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to 30723 grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex- to wave-dominated dynamics occurs at a wave number k R which does not depend on the Reynolds number, suggesting that the partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that k R is comparable to the wave number at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, k R varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistently with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.