Sample records for poverty health management

  1. Poverty and health sector inequalities.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Poverty and ill-health are intertwined. Poor countries tend to have worse health outcomes than better-off countries. Within countries, poor people have worse health outcomes than better-off people. This association reflects causality running in both directions: poverty breeds ill-health, and ill-health keeps poor people poor. The evidence on inequalities in health between the poor and non-poor and on the consequences for impoverishment and income inequality associated with health care expenses is discussed in this article. An outline is given of what is known about the causes of inequalities and about the effectiveness of policies intended to combat them. It is argued that too little is known about the impacts of such policies, notwithstanding a wealth of measurement techniques and considerable evidence on the extent and causes of inequalities. PMID:11953787

  2. Poverty and Health: A Sociological Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosa, John, Ed.; And Others

    This book is a joint venture by 13 scholars, and is a systematic and exhaustive study of a crucial problem. The nature of poverty and the social aspects of health and illness place health and welfare in a sociological framework. In this book the many ramifications of the poverty-health complex are examined and analyzed. Two chapters assess current…

  3. Poverty, equity, human rights and health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Braveman; Sofia Gruskin

    2003-01-01

    Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally

  4. Poverty, equity, human rights and health.

    PubMed Central

    Braveman, Paula; Gruskin, Sofia

    2003-01-01

    Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally and that each provides valuable, unique guidance for health institutions' work. Equity and human rights perspectives can contribute concretely to health institutions' efforts to tackle poverty and health, and focusing on poverty is essential to operationalizing those commitments. Both equity and human rights principles dictate the necessity to strive for equal opportunity for health for groups of people who have suffered marginalization or discrimination. Health institutions can deal with poverty and health within a framework encompassing equity and human rights concerns in five general ways: (1) institutionalizing the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; (2) strengthening and extending the public health functions, other than health care, that create the conditions necessary for health; (3) implementing equitable health care financing, which should help reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; (4) ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disadvantaged; and (5) monitoring, advocating and taking action to address the potential health equity and human rights implications of policies in all sectors affecting health, not only the health sector. PMID:12973647

  5. A Health Plan to Reduce Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Noting that the failures of the U.S. health care system are compounding the problems faced by low-income Americans, Alan Weil argues that any strategy to reduce poverty must provide access to health care for all low-income families. Although nearly all children in families with incomes under 200 percent of poverty are eligible for either Medicaid…

  6. Poverty and Health: Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Clare

    This book is concerned with the impact of poverty on health, focusing on families with young children in the United Kingdom. It draws together information from a wide range of disciplines to provide workers in the health and welfare fields with a better understanding of the complex interconnections between living conditions, lifestyles, and health

  7. Poverty & health: criticality of public financing.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Ravi

    2007-10-01

    Countries with universal or near universal access to healthcare have health financing mechanisms which are single-payer systems in which either a single autonomous public agency or a few coordinated agencies pool resources to finance healthcare. This contributes to both equity in healthcare as well as to low levels of poverty in these countries. It is only in countries like India and a number of developing countries, which still rely mostly on out-of-pocket payments, where universal access to healthcare is elusive. In such countries those who have the capacity to buy healthcare from the market most often get healthcare without having to pay for it directly because they are either covered by social insurance or buy private insurance. In contrast, a large majority of the population, who suffers a hand-to-mouth existence, is forced to make direct payments, often with a heavy burden of debt, to access healthcare from the market because public provision is grossly inadequate or non existent. Thus, the absence of adequate public health investment not only results in poor health outcomes but it also leads to escalation of poverty. This article critically reviews the linkages of poverty with healthcare financing using evidence from national surveys and concludes that public financing is critical to good access to healthcare for the poor and its inadequacy is closely associated with poverty levels in the country. PMID:18032806

  8. A Poverty Simulation to Inform Public Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Sheryl; Smith, Megan O.; Pendrick Denney, Danielle; Jackson, Matt C.; Buckmaster, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poverty is a pervasive condition linked to a myriad of health conditions and severe health outcomes. Public health professionals are at the forefront of addressing poverty-related issues and require education that enhances their understanding and cultural competence. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate the impacts of…

  9. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    PubMed

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes. PMID:17462803

  10. Early-childhood poverty and adult attainment, behavior, and health.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Greg J; Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M; Kalil, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses the consequences of poverty between a child's prenatal year and 5th birthday for several adult achievement, health, and behavior outcomes, measured as late as age 37. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1,589) and controlling for economic conditions in middle childhood and adolescence, as well as demographic conditions at the time of the birth, findings indicate statistically significant and, in some cases, quantitatively large detrimental effects of early poverty on a number of attainment-related outcomes (adult earnings and work hours). Early-childhood poverty was not associated with such behavioral measures as out-of-wedlock childbearing and arrests. Most of the adult earnings effects appear to operate through early poverty's association with adult work hours. PMID:20331669

  11. Globalization, poverty and women's health: mapping the connections.

    PubMed

    Sicchia, Suzanne R; Maclean, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Poverty and other forms of inequity undermine individual and population health and retard development. Although absolute poverty has reportedly declined in recent years, research suggests that relative poverty or the gap between the rich and poor within and between countries has been exacerbated over this same period. There is growing concern about the feminization of poverty, and the impact globalization is having on this important social problem. Gender inequality persists in all regions, and women and girls continue to be over-represented among the world's poor. This suggests that women are not consistently benefitting from the economic, political and social gains globalization can offer. Instead, it appears that poor women and girls, particularly those living in developing countries, are disproportionately burdened by the costs of these swift changes to the detriment of their personal health and well-being. Immediate action is needed to correct these disparities and ensure that globalization supports both national and international commitments to poverty reduction, and the, promotion of women's health and human rights. PMID:16512333

  12. Do race, neglect, and childhood poverty predict physical health in adulthood? A multilevel prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikulina, Valentina; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2014-03-01

    Childhood neglect and poverty often co-occur and both have been linked to poor physical health outcomes. In addition, Blacks have higher rates of childhood poverty and tend to have worse health than Whites. This paper examines the unique and interacting effects of childhood neglect, race, and family and neighborhood poverty on adult physical health outcomes. This prospective cohort design study uses a sample (N=675) of court-substantiated cases of childhood neglect and matched controls followed into adulthood (M(age)=41). Health indicators (C-Reactive Protein [CRP], hypertension, and pulmonary functioning) were assessed through blood collection and measurements by a registered nurse. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear models to control for clustering of participants in childhood neighborhoods. Main effects showed that growing up Black predicted CRP and hypertension elevations, despite controlling for neglect and childhood family and neighborhood poverty and their interactions. Multivariate results showed that race and childhood adversities interacted to predict adult health outcomes. Childhood family poverty predicted increased risk for hypertension for Blacks, not Whites. In contrast, among Whites, childhood neglect predicted elevated CRP. Childhood neighborhood poverty interacted with childhood family poverty to predict pulmonary functioning in adulthood. Gender differences in health indicators were also observed. The effects of childhood neglect, childhood poverty, and growing up Black in the United States are manifest in physical health outcomes assessed 30 years later. Implications are discussed. PMID:24189205

  13. Do race, neglect, and childhood poverty predict physical health in adulthood? A multilevel prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikulina, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Childhood neglect and poverty often co-occur and both have been linked to poor physical health outcomes. In addition, Blacks have higher rates of childhood poverty and tend to have worse health than Whites. This paper examines the unique and interacting effects of childhood neglect, race, and family and neighborhood poverty on adult physical health outcomes. This prospective cohort design study uses a sample (N = 675) of court-substantiated cases of childhood neglect and matched controls followed into adulthood (Mage = 41). Health indicators (C-Reactive Protein [CRP], hypertension, and pulmonary functioning) were assessed through blood collection and measurements by a registered nurse. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear models to control for clustering of participants in childhood neighborhoods. Main effects showed that growing up Black predicted CRP and hypertension elevations, despite controlling for neglect and childhood family and neighborhood poverty and their interactions. Multivariate results showed that race and childhood adversities interacted to predict adult health outcomes. Childhood family poverty predicted increased risk for hypertension for Blacks, not Whites. In contrast, among Whites, childhood neglect predicted elevated CRP. Childhood neighborhood poverty interacted with childhood family poverty to predict pulmonary functioning in adulthood. Gender differences in health indicators were also observed. The effects of childhood neglect, childhood poverty, and growing up Black in the United States are manifest in physical health outcomes assessed 30 years later. Implications are discussed. PMID:24189205

  14. Stakeholder perceptions of mental health stigma and poverty in Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua Ssebunnya; Fred Kigozi; Crick Lund; Dorothy Kizza; Elialilia Okello

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: World wide, there is plentiful evidence regarding the role of stigma in mental illness, as well as the association between poverty and mental illness. The experiences of stigma catalyzed by poverty revolve around experiences of devaluation, exclusion, and disadvantage. Although the relationship between poverty, stigma and mental illness has been documented in high income countries, little has been written

  15. Health, Education and Poverty Reduction. OECD Development Centre Policy Brief No. 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrisson, Christian

    2002-01-01

    It is generally agreed that spending on education and health is key to poverty reduction, but simply allocating more resources to these sectors does not ensure that poverty actually declines. On the basis of four in-depth case studies (on Indonesia, Madagascar, Peru and Tanzania) and three Technical Papers on malnutrition and primary education in…

  16. Creating Nurturing Environments: A Science-Based Framework for Promoting Child Health and Development within High-Poverty Neighborhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komro, Kelli A.; Flay, Brian R.; Biglan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Living in poverty and living in areas of concentrated poverty pose multiple risks for child development and for overall health and wellbeing. Poverty is a major risk factor for several mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, as well as for other developmental challenges and physical health problems. In this paper, the Promise Neighborhoods…

  17. Struggling to Survive: Sexual Assault, Poverty, and Mental Health Outcomes of African American women

    PubMed Central

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ullman, Sarah E.; Tsong, Yuying; Tillman, Shaquita; Smith, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of research documents the mental health consequences of sexual assault including, but not limited to, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use, and suicidality. Far less attention has been given to the mental health effects of sexual assault for ethnic minority women or women living in poverty. Given African American women’s increased risk for sexual assault and increased risk for persistent poverty, the current study explores the relationship between income and mental health effects within a sample of 413 African American sexual assault survivors. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that after controlling for childhood sexual abuse there were positive relationships between poverty and mental health outcomes of depression, PTSD, and illicit drug use. There was no significant relationship between poverty and suicidal ideation. Counseling and research implications are discussed. PMID:20397989

  18. A Commentary on "Piercing the Bubble": Should Management Education "Confront" Poverty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dart, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    This commentary contrasts "Piercing the Bubble" by proposing "pull" (rather than "push") strategies as a way for business schools to more meaningfully engage poverty and social exclusion. By reframing poverty issues in such a manner that they connect with core business student interests of career opportunities, current management practices, and…

  19. The Effects of Poverty on the Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Health of Children and Youth: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Aber, J. Lawrence; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the implications for prevention science of recent advances in research on family poverty and children's mental, emotional, and behavioral health. First, we describe definitions of poverty and the conceptual and empirical challenges to estimating the causal effects of poverty on children's mental, emotional, and behavioral…

  20. Comprehensive Poverty Reduction Strategies in

    E-print Network

    Peak, Derek

    .f. Health Disparity in Saskatoon) Income is the single greatest determinant of health among low income determinants of health Poverty is a foremost determinant #12;What is poverty? Poverty is different from and other Canadian provinces, using MBM #12;Poverty and health Poverty is terrible for people's health (c

  1. Urban air pollution, poverty, violence and health - Neurological and immunological aspects as mediating factors.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, Marianne; Sörman, Karolina; Tekwe, Carmen; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2015-07-01

    Rapid rural-urban migration has created overcrowded areas characterized by concentrated poverty and increases in indoor and outdoor air pollutants. These "hotspots" constitute an increased risk of violence and disease outbreaks. We hypothesize that the effects of poverty and associated air pollution-related stress on impaired cognitive skills are mediated by inflammatory cytokines. A research framework is proposed, encompassing (i) an epidemiological investigation of associations between poverty, high concentrations of air pollutants, violence and health, (ii) a longitudinal follow-up of working memory capacities and inflammatory markers, and (iii) intervention programs aiming to strengthen employability and decreased exposures to toxic air pollutants. PMID:26005121

  2. Fostering food security in areas of extreme poverty through Integrated Farm Management: the case of Burundi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Aad; van Duivenbooden, Niek; van Beek, Christy

    2014-05-01

    Extreme poverty in Burundi's rural area and tensions between families with limited access to arable land hinder development towards a more stable and peaceful society. Due to these tensions and a rapid population growth, agricultural land is currently subject to increased degradation and low agricultural productivity. A whole range of other limiting factors contributes to this, such as: poor seed quality, poor nutrient management combined with low soil fertility, inadequate agronomic practices, pests and crop diseases, poorly developed supply chains, health problems, difficult access to credit, and insecurity. Solving one of these problems will not solve the chain that eventually leads to low food production; it will simply move the emphasis to the next constraining factor. An integrated rural development approach is therefore required to break this vicious circle. The project Fanning the Spark, a Public-Private-Partnership between Achmea Foundation, Alterra of Wageningen University and Research Centre, and HealthNet-TPO in Burundi started in September 2013 with an intervention in several rural villages in Gitega. The project's objective is to increase food production at village level, by means of investments in crop production, a family (income) insurance package that protects rural families against the financial consequences of catastrophic events (natural and health) and making micro-credits available. This will enhance farmers' workability and generate income from agricultural activities in order to break the poverty cycle and enhance food security. The insurance package comprises agricultural and health insurances, and will be jointly implemented with the sustainable agriculture component. The latter component focuses on Integrated Farm Management and the use of innovative soil management practices. Farmer-to-farmer training and scaling-up are crucial components, and in the first phase of the project "innovative farmer groups" have a central role in the project. Each innovative farmer formulates and implements an Integrated Farm Management plan. This is a tool for farmers to plan, reflect and learn about sustainable land management, and particularly about the integration of all farm activities and how these contribute together to enhanced food security. Activities considered in these Integrated Farm Management plans are related to agriculture, livestock, infrastructure, agroforestry, soil conservation and training. The first results of the acceptance and impact of the strategy are now available, and in the next phase all innovative farmers will implement their plans and train fellow farmers to start planning their own Integrated Farm Management.

  3. The impact of poverty on mental health and well-being and the necessity for integrated social policies in Romania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carmen Beatrice Pauna; Raluca Sfetcu; Marioara Iordan

    2011-01-01

    On almost every account people with mental health problems are among the most excluded groups in society and they consistently identify stigmatisation, discrimination and exclusion as major barriers to health, welfare and quality of life. The links between poverty and ill health are well known. Poverty and illness together make people much more vulnerable and needy at all stages of

  4. Struggling to survive: Sexual assault, poverty, and mental health outcomes of African American women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thema Bryant-Davis; Sarah E. Ullman; Yuying Tsong; Shaquita Tillman; Kimberly Smith

    2010-01-01

    A substantial body of research documents the mental health consequences of sexual assault including, but not limited to, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, substance use, and suicidality. Far less attention has been given to the mental health effects of sexual assault for ethnic minority women or women living in poverty. Given African American women?s increased risk for sexual assault and increased

  5. Can Economic Deprivation Protect Health? Paradoxical Multilevel Effects of Poverty on Hispanic Children’s Wheezing

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Timothy W.; Kim, Young-an; Grineski, Sara E.; Clark-Reyna, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Prior research suggests that economic deprivation has a generally negative influence on residents’ health. We employ hierarchical logistic regression modeling to test if economic deprivation presents respiratory health risks or benefits to Hispanic children living in the City of El Paso (Texas, USA) at neighborhood- and individual-levels, and whether individual-level health effects of economic deprivation vary based on neighborhood-level economic deprivation. Data come from the US Census Bureau and a population-based survey of El Paso schoolchildren. The dependent variable is children’s current wheezing, an established respiratory morbidity measure, which is appropriate for use with economically-deprived children with an increased likelihood of not receiving a doctor’s asthma diagnosis. Results reveal that economic deprivation (measured based on poverty status) at both neighborhood- and individual-levels is associated with reduced odds of wheezing for Hispanic children. A sensitivity analysis revealed similar significant effects of individual- and neighborhood-level poverty on the odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Neighborhood-level poverty did not significantly modify the observed association between individual-level poverty and Hispanic children’s wheezing; however, greater neighborhood poverty tends to be more protective for poor (as opposed to non-poor) Hispanic children. These findings support a novel, multilevel understanding of seemingly paradoxical effects of economic deprivation on Hispanic health. PMID:25101769

  6. Relative Deprivation, Poverty, and Subjective Health: JAGES Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masashige; Kondo, Katsunori; Kondo, Naoki; Abe, Aya; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between relative deprivation (lacking daily necessities) and subjective health in older Japanese adults, we performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES). The data were obtained from functionally independent residents aged ?65 years from 24 municipalities in Japan (n?=?24,742). Thirteen items in three dimensions were used to evaluate relative deprivation of material conditions. Approximately 28% of older Japanese people indicated that they lacked some daily necessities (non-monetary poverty). A two-level Poisson regression analysis revealed that relative deprivation was associated with poor self-rated health (PR?=?1.3–1.5) and depressive symptoms (PR?=?1.5–1.8) in both men and women, and these relationships were stronger than those observed in people living in relative poverty (monetary poverty). The interaction effect between relative deprivation and relative poverty was not associated with poor health. As a dimension of the social determinants of health, poverty should be evaluated from a multidimensional approach, capturing not only monetary conditions but also material-based, non-monetary conditions. PMID:25350284

  7. Piercing the Bubble: How Management Students Can Confront Poverty in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Al; Cortes, Juan Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the current relationship between management education in Colombia and the efforts of the management program at Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana (UPB) in Medellin to reduce local poverty. The article uses the metaphor of "the bubble" to illustrate how social class, family socialization, and the current UPB management

  8. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    Released in August 2005 by the U.S. Census Bureau, this timely 85-page report examines recent changes within the demographic profile of the real median household income of US residents, along with material on the nation's official poverty rate and those persons without health insurance coverage. The data in the report is based on information from 2003 and 2004, and notes that the nation's official poverty rate rose from 12.5 percent in 2003 to 12.7 percent in 2004. The report also notes that the number of persons without health insurance coverage increased by approximately 800,000 to 45.8 million. The report itself is divided into six chapters, and also includes four appendices which details such crucial research questions as how the Bureau measures income and poverty. For persons with a keen interest in this subject (such as policy makers or scholars) this report will be a valued research tool.

  9. [Poverty and Health: The Living Standard Approach as a Supplementary Concept to Measure Relative Poverty. Results from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP 2011).

    PubMed

    Pförtner, T-K

    2014-11-12

    Background: A common indicator of the measurement of relative poverty is the disposable income of a household. Current research introduces the living standard approach as an alternative concept for describing and measuring relative poverty. This study compares both approaches with regard to subjective health status of the German population, and provides theoretical implications for the utilisation of the income and living standard approach in health research. Methods: Analyses are based on the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) from the year 2011 that includes 12?290 private households and 21106 survey members. Self-rated health was based on a subjective assessment of general health status. Income poverty is based on the equalised disposable income and is applied to a threshold of 60% of the median-based average income. A person will be denoted as deprived (inadequate living standard) if 3 or more out of 11 living standard items are lacking due to financial reasons. To calculate the discriminate power of both poverty indicators, descriptive analyses and stepwise logistic regression models were applied separately for men and women adjusted for age, residence, nationality, educational level, occupational status and marital status. Results: The results of the stepwise regression revealed a stronger poverty-health relationship for the living standard indicator. After adjusting for all control variables and the respective poverty indicator, income poverty was statistically not significantly associated with a poor subjective health status among men (OR Men: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.00-1.77) and women (OR Women: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.78-1.22). In contrast, the association between deprivation and subjective health status was statistically significant for men (OR Men: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.57-2.52) and women (OR Women: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.76-2.64). Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that the income and standard of living approach measure different dimensions of poverty. In comparison to the income approach, the living standard approach measures stronger shortages of wealth and is relatively robust towards gender differences. This study expands the current debate about complementary research on the association between poverty and health. PMID:25390878

  10. Managing and Leveraging Poverty: Implications for Teaching International Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Abhijit; Roy, Mousumi

    2010-01-01

    Over half of the world's population lives on less than $2 a day, and yet international business education to date has continued to ignore the not so well-off customers. We propose a holistic pedagogical approach to studying this market by considering the historical background of the growth of inequality and poverty in different regions of the…

  11. Managing and Leveraging Poverty: Implications for Teaching International Business

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhijit Roy; Mousumi Roy

    2010-01-01

    Over half of the world's population lives on less than $2 a day, and yet international business education to date has continued to ignore the not so well-off customers. We propose a holistic pedagogical approach to studying this market by considering the historical background of the growth of inequality and poverty in different regions of the world, as well as

  12. Poverty, Education and Health in Indonesia: Who Benefits from Public Spending? Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanjouw, Peter; Pradhan, Menno; Saadah, Fadia; Sayed, Haneen; Sparrow, Robert

    This paper focuses on two important dimensions of Indonesia's development record: education and health. The paper investigates the extent to which the poor benefit from public and private provisioning of these services. Multiple rounds of annual household surveys document a reversal in the rate of decline in poverty and a slowdown in improvements…

  13. Linking Mental Health and After School Systems for Children in Urban Poverty: Preventing Problems, Promoting Possibilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacy L. Frazier; Elise Cappella; Marc S. Atkins

    2007-01-01

    The current mental health system is failing to meet the extensive needs of children living in urban poverty. After school\\u000a programs, whose mission includes children’s socialization, peer relations, and adaptive functioning, are uniquely positioned\\u000a to support and promote children’s healthy development. We propose that public sector mental health resources can be reallocated\\u000a to support after school settings, and we offer

  14. Integrated Soil Fertility Management and Poverty Traps in Western Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Ndufa; G. Cadisch; C. Poulton; Q. Noordin; B. Vanlauwe

    Based on agro-climatic conditions, the highland districts around Lake Victoria in western Kenya should be a food surplus area.\\u000a In practice, they are heavily dependent on food imports, whilst national poverty surveys consistently show them to be amongst\\u000a the poorest in the country. At the root of this problem are high population densities and, therefore, small land holdings,\\u000a and limited

  15. Making a technological choice for disaster management and poverty alleviation in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2009-03-01

    The right mix of policy, institutional arrangements and use of technology provides the framework for a country's approach to disaster mitigation. Worldwide, there has been a shift away from a strictly 'top-down' approach relying on government alone, to a combination of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches. The aim is to enhance the indigenous coping mechanisms of vulnerable communities; draw on their cooperative spirit and energy; and empower them through appropriate information and contextual knowledge to mitigate natural disasters. In light of this, the paper examines India's use of space technology in its disaster management efforts. Poverty alleviation and disaster management are almost inseparable in many parts of the country, as vulnerability to natural disasters is closely aligned with poverty. Addressing these issues together requires integrated knowledge systems. The paper examines how knowledge inputs from space technology have strengthened the national resolve to combat natural disasters in conjunction with alleviating rural poverty. PMID:18498370

  16. Beyond Patient Health Escalating populations, expanding urban environments, poverty,

    E-print Network

    Denham, Graham

    of Science, held by Charles Trick, an expert on ocean and freshwater ecosystems · The Chair's role and health, including in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Ecosystem Health Program #12; and globalization adversely affect the world's ecosystems and bring new diseases and new health challenges

  17. Neighborhoods and Mental Health: Exploring Ethnic Density, Poverty, and Social Cohesion among Asian Americans and Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seunghye; Zhang, Wei; Walton, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the associations of neighborhood ethnic density and poverty with social cohesion and self-rated mental health among Asian Americans and Latinos. Path analysis is employed to analyze data from the 2002–2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and the 2000 U.S. Census (N=2095 Asian Americans living in N=259 neighborhoods; N=2554 Latinos living in N=317 neighborhoods). Findings reveal that neighborhood ethnic density relates to poor mental health in both groups. Social cohesion partially mediates that structural relationship, but is positively related to ethnic density among Latinos and negatively related to ethnic density among Asian Americans. Although higher neighborhood poverty is negatively associated with mental health for both groups, the relationship does not hold in the path models after accounting for social cohesion and covariates. Furthermore, social cohesion fully mediates the association between neighborhood poverty and mental health among Latinos. This study highlights the necessity of reconceptualizing existing theories of social relationships to reflect complex and nuanced mechanisms linking neighborhood structure and mental health for diverse racial and ethnic groups. PMID:24769491

  18. How are individual-level social capital and poverty associated with health equity? A study from two Chinese cities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaojie Sun; Clas Rehnberg; Qingyue Meng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of literature has demonstrated that higher social capital is associated with improved health conditions. However, some research indicated that the association between social capital and health was substantially attenuated after adjustment for material deprivation. Studies exploring the association between poverty, social capital and health still have some serious limitations. In China, health equity studies focusing on

  19. Geographic variation in health care and the affluence-poverty nexus.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Almost 50 years ago, John F. Kennedy told Yale's graduating class that "what is needed today is a new, difficult but essential confrontation with reality, for the great enemy of truth is very often not the lie-deliberate, contrived and dishonest-but the myth-persistent, persuasive and unrealistic." Today's myth is the belief that 30% of health care spending is due to supplier-induced demand and that this amount could be saved if high-spending regions could more closely resemble low-spending regions. The reality is that, while quality and efficiency remain important goals, the major factors driving geographic differences are related to income inequality. Yet, following the road map of the Dartmouth Atlas, the Affordable Care Act includes penalties for hospitals with excess preventable readmissions (which are mainly of the poor), incentive payments for providers in counties that have the lowest Medicare expenditures (where there tends to be less poverty), incentives for physicians and hospitals that attain new "efficiency standards" (ie, costs similar to the lowest), and a call for the Institute of Medicine to recommend additional incentive strategies based on geographic variation. This scenario iscoupled with a growing bureaucracy, following the blueprint laid out by Brennan and Berwick in the 1990s, but with no tangible measures to increase physician supply. Meaningful health care reform means accepting the reality that poverty and its cultural extensions are the major cause of geographic variation in health care utilization and a major source of escalating health care spending. And it means acknowledging Bertrand Russell's admonition that a high degree of income inequality is not compatible with political democracy, nor is it compatible with health care that this nation can afford. As solutions are sought both within and outside of the health care system, misunderstandings of how and why health care varies geographically cannot be allowed to deter these efforts, and the pervasive impact of poverty cannot be ignored. PMID:21954679

  20. The Impact of Relative Poverty on Norwegian Adolescents’ Subjective Health: A Causal Analysis with Propensity Score Matching

    PubMed Central

    Elstad, Jon Ivar; Pedersen, Axel West

    2012-01-01

    Studies have revealed that relative poverty is associated with ill health, but the interpretations of this correlation vary. This article asks whether relative poverty among Norwegian adolescents is causally related to poor subjective health, i.e., self-reported somatic and mental symptoms. Data consist of interview responses from a sample of adolescents (N = 510) and their parents, combined with register data on the family’s economic situation. Relatively poor adolescents had significantly worse subjective health than non-poor adolescents. Relatively poor adolescents also experienced many other social disadvantages, such as parental unemployment and parental ill health. Comparisons between the relatively poor and the non-poor adolescents, using propensity score matching, indicated a negative impact of relative poverty on the subjective health among those adolescents who lived in families with relatively few economic resources. The results suggest that there is a causal component in the association between relative poverty and the symptom burden of disadvantaged adolescents. Relative poverty is only one of many determinants of adolescents’ subjective health, but its role should be acknowledged when policies for promoting adolescent health are designed. PMID:23249858

  1. Fish Health Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For commercial success, a recirculating aquaculture operation must maintain fish at densities far greater than normally found in nature. At the same time, the producer must maintain an environment that supports good fish health. This chapter discusses various aspects of fish health management, inclu...

  2. Poverty, Socio-Economic Position, Social Capital and the Health of Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities in Britain: A Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, E.; Hatton, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: When compared with their nonintellectually disabled peers, people with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have poorer health and are more likely to be exposed to poverty during childhood. Given that exposure to child poverty has been linked to poorer health outcomes, we attempted to estimate the extent to which the health inequalities…

  3. Paying attention to gender and poverty in health research: content and process issues.

    PubMed Central

    Ostlin, Piroska; Sen, Gita; George, Asha

    2004-01-01

    Despite the magnitude of the problem of health inequity within and between countries, little systematic research has been done on the social causes of ill-health. Health researchers have overwhelmingly focused on biomedical research at the level of individuals. Investigations into the health of groups and the determinants of health inequities that lie outside the control of the individual have received a much smaller share of research resources. Ignoring factors such as socioeconomic class, race and gender leads to biases in both the content and process of research. We use two such factors--poverty and gender--to illustrate how this occurs. There is a systematic imbalance in medical journals: research into diseases that predominate in the poorest regions of the world is less likely to be published. In addition, the slow recognition of women's health problems, misdirected and partial approaches to understanding women's and men's health, and the dearth of information on how gender interacts with other social determinants continue to limit the content of health research. In the research community these imbalances in content are linked to biases against researchers from poorer regions and women. Researchers from high-income countries benefit from better funding and infrastructure. Their publications dominate journals and citations, and these researchers also dominate advisory boards. The way to move forward is to correct biases against poverty and gender in research content and processes and provide increased funding and better career incentives to support equity-linked research. Journals need to address equity concerns in their published content and in the publishing process. Efforts to broaden access to research information need to be well resourced, publicized and expanded. PMID:15643794

  4. A Developing Theology of Poverty and Health Applied to Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Pamela M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout history, the issue of poverty has been a problem in society. In this article, examination of Hebrew and Greek words related to poverty throughout the Bible revealed descriptions of the various types and causes of poverty. Historical research uncovered writings on poverty by several early Church Fathers and influential Christian scholars…

  5. How are individual-level social capital and poverty associated with health equity? A study from two Chinese cities

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojie; Rehnberg, Clas; Meng, Qingyue

    2009-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature has demonstrated that higher social capital is associated with improved health conditions. However, some research indicated that the association between social capital and health was substantially attenuated after adjustment for material deprivation. Studies exploring the association between poverty, social capital and health still have some serious limitations. In China, health equity studies focusing on urban poor are scarce. The purpose of this study is therefore to examine how poverty and individual-level social capital in urban China are associated with health equity. Methods Our study is based on a household study sample consisting of 1605 participants in two Chinese cities. For all participants, data on personal characteristics, health status, health care utilisation and social capital were collected. Factor analysis was performed to extract social capital factors. Dichotomised social capital factors were used for logistic regression models. A synergy index (if it is above 1, we can know the existence of the co-operative effect) was computed to examine the interaction effect between lack of social capital and poverty. Results Results indicated the poor had an obviously higher probability of belonging to the low individual-level social capital group in all the five dimensions, with the adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.42 to 2.12. When the other variables were controlled for in the total sample, neighbourhood cohesion (NC), and reciprocity and social support (RSS) were statistically associated with poor self-rated health (NC: OR = 1.40; RSS: OR = 1.34). However, for the non-poor sub-sample, no social capital variable was a statistically significant predictor. The synergy index between low individual-level NC and poverty, and between low individual-level RSS and poverty were 1.22 and 1.28, respectively, indicating an aggravating effect between them. Conclusion In this study, we have shown that the interaction effect between poverty and lack of social capital (NC and RSS) was a good predictor of poor SRH in urban China. Improving NC and RSS may be helpful in reducing health inequity; however, poverty reduction is more important and therefore should be implemented at the same time. Policies that attempt to improve health equity via social capital, but neglect poverty intervention, would be counter-productive. PMID:19216800

  6. Connecting the Dots Between Health, Poverty and Place in Accra, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John R.; Getis, Arthur; Stow, Douglas A.; Hill, Allan G.; Rain, David; Engstrom, Ryan; Stoler, Justin; Lippitt, Christopher; Jankowska, Marta; Lopez-Carr, Anna Carla; Coulter, Lloyd; Ofiesh, Caetlin

    2013-01-01

    West Africa has a rapidly growing population, an increasing fraction of which lives in urban informal settlements characterized by inadequate infrastructure and relatively high health risks. Little is known, however, about the spatial or health characteristics of cities in this region or about the spatial inequalities in health within them. In this article we show how we have been creating a data-rich field laboratory in Accra, Ghana, to connect the dots between health, poverty, and place in a large city in West Africa. Our overarching goal is to test the hypothesis that satellite imagery, in combination with census and limited survey data, such as that found in demographic and health surveys (DHSs), can provide clues to the spatial distribution of health inequalities in cities where fewer data exist than those we have collected for Accra. To this end, we have created the first digital boundary file of the city, obtained high spatial resolution satellite imagery for two dates, collected data from a longitudinal panel of 3,200 women spatially distributed throughout Accra, and obtained microlevel data from the census. We have also acquired water, sewerage, and elevation layers and then coupled all of these data with extensive field research on the neighborhood structure of Accra. We show that the proportional abundance of vegetation in a neighborhood serves as a key indicator of local levels of health and well-being and that local perceptions of health risk are not always consistent with objective measures. PMID:24532846

  7. Dimensions of Poverty and Health Outcomes Among People Living with HIV Infection: Limited Resources and Competing Needs.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Hernandez, Dominica; Kegler, Christopher; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Grebler, Tamar

    2015-08-01

    HIV infection is concentrated in populations living in poverty. We examined the overlapping and independent effects of multiple poverty indicators on HIV-related health status. Because substance use can create competing survival needs when resources are limited, we also sought to objectively measure expenditures on food relative to alcohol and tobacco products. To achieve these aims, 459 men and 212 women living with HIV infection in Atlanta, GA completed measures of socio-demographic and heath characteristics as well as multiple indicators of poverty including housing stability, transportation, food insecurity, and substance use. Participants were given a $30 grocery gift card for their participation and we collected receipts which were coded for alcohol (beer, wine, liquors) and tobacco purchases. Results showed that participants with unsuppressed HIV replication were significantly more likely to experience multiple indicators of poverty. In addition, one in four participants purchased alcohol or tobacco products with their gift cards, with as much as one-fourth of money spent on these products. A multivariable logistic regression model showed that food insecurity was independently associated with unsuppressed HIV, and purchasing alcohol or tobacco products did not moderate this association. Results confirm previous research to show the primacy of food insecurity in relation to HIV-related health outcomes. Competing survival needs, including addictive substances, should be addressed in programs that aim to alleviate poverty to enhance the health and well-being of people with HIV infection. PMID:25572901

  8. Prognostics in Battery Health Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai Goebel; Bhaskar Saha; Abhinav Saxena; Jose R. Celaya; Jon P. Christophersen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we examine prognostics and health management (PHM) issues using battery health management of Gen 2 cells, an 18650-size lithium-ion cell, as a test case. We will show where advanced regression, classification, and state estimation algorithms have an important role in the solution of the problem and in the data collection scheme for battery health management that we

  9. The Perceptions of Principals and Teachers Regarding Mental Health Providers' Impact on Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of principals and teachers regarding mental health provider's impact on student achievement and behavior in high poverty schools using descriptive statistics, t-test, and two-way ANOVA. Respondents in this study shared similar views concerning principal and teacher satisfaction and levels of support for the…

  10. Animal Health Equipment Management.

    PubMed

    Rethorst, David N

    2015-07-01

    Proper health equipment management requires significant attention to detail. Establishing and following protocols during processing (eg, cleaning and disinfecting equipment at the end of the work day) is required to ensure a safe product that is free of defects and residues. Overall cleanliness of equipment and facilities is important not only from a food safety standpoint but many view these as an overall indicator of attention to detail in the entire production system. Ensuring that needles are changed, implant guns are managed properly, vaccine is handled in an acceptable manner, and that proper chute operation occurs is essential. PMID:26139191

  11. The topography of poverty in the United States: a spatial analysis using county-level data from the Community Health Status Indicators project.

    PubMed

    Holt, James B

    2007-10-01

    Socioeconomic and health-related data at the county level are now available through the Community Health Status Indicators (CHSI) database. These data are useful for assessing the health of communities and regions. Users of the CHSI data can access online reports and an online mapping application for visualizing patterns in various community-related measures. It also is possible to download these data to conduct local analyses. This paper describes a spatial analysis of poverty in the United States at the county level for 2000. Spatial statistical techniques in a geographic information system were used to quantify significant spatial patterns, such as concentrated poverty rates and spatial outliers. The analysis revealed significant and stark patterns of poverty. A distinctive north-south demarcation of low versus high poverty concentrations was found, along with isolated pockets of high and low poverty within areas in which the predominant poverty rates were opposite. This pattern can be described as following a continental poverty divide. These insights can be useful in explicating the underlying processes involved in forming such spatial patterns that result in concentrated wealth and poverty. The spatial analytic techniques are broadly applicable to socioeconomic and health-related data and can provide important information about the spatial structure of datasets, which is important for choosing appropriate analysis methods. PMID:17875255

  12. The impact of poverty, chronic illnesses, and health insurance status on out-of-pocket health care expenditures in later life.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine poverty, chronic illnesses, health insurance, and health care expenditures, within the context of a political economy of aging perspective. Subsamples of 1,773 older adults from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were selected for analyses. The results showed that chronic illnesses influenced out-of-pocket health care costs. Older persons with more than one health insurance spent less on out-of-pocket health care costs. The results have implications for health care social workers concerned with the growing costs of chronic illnesses, implementing integrated care, and advocating for extending public health insurance coverage especially for our most impoverished older adults. PMID:25397347

  13. Participatory assessment of animal health and husbandry practices in smallholder pig production systems in three high poverty districts in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Dione, Michel M; Ouma, Emily A; Roesel, Kristina; Kungu, Joseph; Lule, Peter; Pezo, Danilo

    2014-12-01

    While animal health constraints have been identified as a major limiting factor in smallholder pig production in Uganda, researchers and policy makers lack information on the relative incidence of diseases and their impacts on pig production. This study aimed to assess animal health and management practices, constraints and opportunities for intervention in smallholder pig value chains in three high poverty districts of Uganda. Semi-qualitative interview checklists through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were administered to 340 pig farmers in 35 villages in Masaka, Kamuli and Mukono districts. Quantitative data was obtained during the exercise through group consensus. Results of FGDs were further triangulated with secondary data and information obtained from key informant interviews. Findings show that pig keeping systems are dominated by tethering and scavenging in rural areas. In peri-urban and urban areas, intensive production systems are more practiced, with pigs confined in pens. The main constraints identified by farmers include high disease burden such as African swine fever (ASF) and parasites, poor housing and feeding practices, poor veterinary services, ineffective drugs and a general lack of knowledge on piggery management. According to farmers, ASF is the primary cause of pig mortality with epidemics occurring mainly during the dry season. Worms and ectoparasites namely; mange, lice and flies are endemic leading to stunted growth which reduces the market value of pigs. Diarrhoea and malnutrition are common in piglets. Ninety-three percent of farmers say they practice deworming, 37% practice ectoparasite spraying and 77% castrate their boars. Indigenous curative treatments include the application of human urine and concoctions of local herbs for ASF control and use of old engine oil or tobacco extracts to control ectoparasites. There is a need for better technical services to assist farmers with these problems. PMID:25458705

  14. Leadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    , Influence and Leadership in Complex Organizations (5 credits) Epidemiology and Population Health ManagementLeadership in Health Care Systems: Health Care Organization Management and Leadership Track: ­ Health Care Organization, Management and Leadership ­ Clinical Research Coordinator ­ Clinical Nurse

  15. Is Violent Radicalisation Associated with Poverty, Migration, Poor Self-Reported Health and Common Mental Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Bhui, Kamaldeep; Warfa, Nasir; Jones, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Background Doctors, lawyers and criminal justice agencies need methods to assess vulnerability to violent radicalization. In synergy, public health interventions aim to prevent the emergence of risk behaviours as well as prevent and treat new illness events. This paper describes a new method of assessing vulnerability to violent radicalization, and then investigates the role of previously reported causes, including poor self-reported health, anxiety and depression, adverse life events, poverty, and migration and socio-political factors. The aim is to identify foci for preventive intervention. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a representative population sample of men and women aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage and recruited by quota sampling by age, gender, working status, in two English cities. The main outcomes include self-reported health, symptoms of anxiety and depression (common mental disorders), and vulnerability to violent radicalization assessed by sympathies for violent protest and terrorist acts. Results 2.4% of people showed some sympathy for violent protest and terrorist acts. Sympathy was more likely to be articulated by the under 20s, those in full time education rather than employment, those born in the UK, those speaking English at home, and high earners (>£75,000 a year). People with poor self-reported health were less likely to show sympathies for violent protest and terrorism. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, adverse life events and socio-political attitudes showed no associations. Conclusions Sympathies for violent protest and terrorism were uncommon among men and women, aged 18–45, of Muslim heritage living in two English cities. Youth, wealth, and being in education rather than employment were risk factors. PMID:24599058

  16. The War on Poverty’s Experiment in Public Medicine: Community Health Centers and the Mortality of Older Americans†

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Martha J.; Goodman-Bacon, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses the rollout of the first Community Health Centers (CHCs) to study the longer-term health effects of increasing access to primary care. Within ten years, CHCs are associated with a reduction in age-adjusted mortality rates of 2 percent among those 50 and older. The implied 7 to 13 percent decrease in one-year mortality risk among beneficiaries amounts to 20 to 40 percent of the 1966 poor/non-poor mortality gap for this age group. Large effects for those 65 and older suggest that increased access to primary care has longer-term benefits, even for populations with near universal health insurance. (JEL H75, I12, I13, I18, I32, I38, J14) PMID:25999599

  17. Poverty Matters: The Cost of Child Poverty in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Arloc

    The poverty affecting 14.5 million U.S. children living below the poverty line poses long-term effects, including risks to health, educational achievement, family stability, and employment prospects. This report provides compelling evidence of the substantial costs of poverty among children to our nation's economic well-being, and shows that…

  18. Do Community Health Centers Improve Health? Evidence from the War on Poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha Bailey; Andrew Goodman-Bacon

    2010-01-01

    Policy changes in the late 1960’s greatly reshaped the involvement of the U.S. federal government in health care. In addition to establishing more well-known programs like Medicare and Medicaid, the federal government began funding “Community Health Centers” (CHCs). Political support for CHCs has varied over time, but recently both Republicans and Democrats have supported their expansion as a key component

  19. Deer Management and Forest Health

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Deer Management and Forest Health An Upper Valley Focus Monday, September 8, 2014 Howe Library, 13 South St, Hanover NH Oh, deer! Too many deer? How can we tell? What to do about them? Many questions / browse indicators · Points of View: deer management objectives · Cornell Plantations Deer Management

  20. Poverty, Violence, and Health: The Impact of Domestic Violence during Pregnancy on Newborn Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aizer, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Two percent of women in the United States suffer from intimate partner violence annually, with poor and minority women disproportionately affected. I provide evidence of an important negative externality associated with domestic violence by estimating a negative and causal relationship between violence during pregnancy and newborn health,…

  1. Multidimentional Poverty in Bhutan: Estimates and Policy Implications

    E-print Network

    Santos, Maria Emma; Ura, Karma

    2008-01-01

    approach’, there is now an increasing consensus that poverty is an intrinsically multidimensional phenomenon. This has led scholars to propose different multidimensional poverty measures. However, some of the proposed measures seem to have incorporated... development through consecutive five-years-plans. In particular, the country has made significant progress in extending the access to safe drinking water and sanitation, protecting and managing the country’s natural resources, providing basic health care...

  2. The 1998 HHS Federal Poverty Guidelines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has recently released the 1998 federal poverty measures. There are two slightly different versions of the federal poverty measure: poverty thresholds and poverty guidelines. Data for both versions are available at this site. Separate data are listed for the 48 states, Alaska, and Hawaii.

  3. Causal Relationships between Poverty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Daniel C.; Strauser, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Although research suggests why disability may cause poverty, it is not well understood why poverty may cause disability. This article presents the Poverty Disability Model, which includes four groups of factors that increase the risk that poverty will cause disability and chronic health problems. Rehabilitation interventions and counselor…

  4. Food Insecurity and Other Poverty Indicators among People Living with HIV/AIDS: Effects on Treatment and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Hernandez, Dominica; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O.; Grebler, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) as well as the demands of long-term medication adherence have meant the full benefits of HIV treatment are often not realized. In particular, food insecurity has emerged as a robust predictor of ART non-adherence. However, research is limited in determining whether food insecurity uniquely impedes HIV treatment or if food insecurity is merely a marker for poverty that interferes more broadly with treatment. This study examined indicators of poverty at multiple levels in a sample of 364 men and 157 women living with HIV recruited through an offering of a free holiday food basket. Results showed that 61% (N = 321) of participants had experienced at least one indicator of food insecurity in the previous month. Multivariate analyses showed that food insecurity was closely tied to lack of transportation. In addition, food insecurity was associated with lacking access to ART and poor ART adherence after adjusting for neighbourhood poverty, living in an area without a supermarket (food desert), education, stable housing, and reliable transportation. Results therefore affirm previous research that has suggested food insecurity is uniquely associated with poor ART adherence and calls for structural interventions that address basic survival needs among people living with HIV, especially food security. PMID:24705680

  5. Food insecurity and other poverty indicators among people living with HIV/AIDS: effects on treatment and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Hernandez, Dominica; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    Health disparities in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) as well as the demands of long-term medication adherence have meant the full benefits of HIV treatment are often not realized. In particular, food insecurity has emerged as a robust predictor of ART non-adherence. However, research is limited in determining whether food insecurity uniquely impedes HIV treatment or if food insecurity is merely a marker for poverty that interferes more broadly with treatment. This study examined indicators of poverty at multiple levels in a sample of 364 men and 157 women living with HIV recruited through an offering of a free holiday food basket. Results showed that 61 % (N = 321) of participants had experienced at least one indicator of food insecurity in the previous month. Multivariate analyses showed that food insecurity was closely tied to lack of transportation. In addition, food insecurity was associated with lacking access to ART and poor ART adherence after adjusting for neighbourhood poverty, living in an area without a supermarket (food desert), education, stable housing, and reliable transportation. Results therefore affirm previous research that has suggested food insecurity is uniquely associated with poor ART adherence and calls for structural interventions that address basic survival needs among people living with HIV, especially food security. PMID:24705680

  6. Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    medicine," publishes his first book on occupational diseases, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases diseases. 1994 The University of Edinburgh commenced a health surveillance compliance based occupational20/02/2014 1 Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager RGN BSc RSCPHN(OH) 1556 1700 Bauer 1494

  7. Poverty, food security and universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a call for cross-movement advocacy against neoliberal globalisation.

    PubMed

    Sundari Ravindran, T K

    2014-05-01

    Universal access to sexual and reproductive health services is one of the goals of the International Conference on Population and Development of 1994. The Millennium Development Goals were intended above all to end poverty. Universal access to health and health services are among the goals being considered for the post-2015 agenda, replacing or augmenting the MDGs. Yet we are not only far from reaching any of these goals but also appear to have lost our way somewhere along the line. Poverty and lack of food security have, through their multiple linkages to health and access to health care, deterred progress towards universal access to health services, including for sexual and reproductive health needs. A more insidious influence is neoliberal globalisation. This paper describes neoliberal globalisation and the economic policies it has engendered, the ways in which it influences poverty and food security, and the often unequal impact it has had on women as compared to men. It explores the effects of neoliberal economic policies on health, health systems, and universal access to health care services, and the implications for access to sexual and reproductive health. To be an advocate for universal access to health and health care is to become an advocate against neoliberal globalisation. PMID:24908453

  8. Gamification and geospatial health management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortley, David

    2014-06-01

    Sensor and Measurement technologies are rapidly developing for many consumer applications which have the potential to make a major impact on business and society. One of the most important areas for building a sustainable future is in health management. This opportunity arises because of the growing popularity of lifestyle monitoring devices such as the Jawbone UP bracelet, Nike Fuelband and Samsung Galaxy GEAR. These devices measure physical activity and calorie consumption and, when visualised on mobile and portable devices, enable users to take more responsibility for their personal health. This presentation looks at how the process of gamification can be applied to develop important geospatial health management applications that could not only improve the health of nations but also significantly address some of the issues in global health such as the ageing society and obesity.

  9. National poverty reduction strategies and HIV/AIDS governance in Malawi: a preliminary study of shared health governance.

    PubMed

    Wachira, Catherine; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2011-06-01

    The public health and development communities understand clearly the need to integrate anti-poverty efforts with HIV/AIDS programs. This article reports findings about the impact of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) process on Malawi's National HIV/AIDS Strategic Framework (NSF). In this article we ask, how does the PRSP process support NSF accountability, participation, access to information, funding, resource planning and allocation, monitoring, and evaluation? In 2007, we developed and conducted a survey of Malawian government ministries, United Nations agencies, members of the Country Coordination Mechanism, the Malawi National AIDS Commission (NAC), and NAC grantees (N = 125, 90% response rate), seeking survey respondents' retrospective perceptions of NSF resource levels, participation, inclusion, and governance before, during, and after Malawi's PRSP process (2000-2004). We also assessed principle health sector and economic indicators and budget allocations for HIV/AIDS. These indicators are part of a new conceptual framework called shared health governance (SHG), which seeks congruence among the values and goals of different groups and actors to reflect a common purpose. Under this framework, global health policy should encompass: (i) consensus among global, national, and sub-national actors on goals and measurable outcomes; (ii) mutual collective accountability; and (iii) enhancement of individual and group health agency. Indicators to assess these elements included: (i) goal alignment; (ii) adequate resource levels; (iii) agreement on key outcomes and indicators for evaluating those outcomes; (iv) meaningful inclusion and participation of groups and institutions; (v) special efforts to ensure participation of vulnerable groups; and (vi) effectiveness and efficiency measures. Results suggest that the PRSP process supported accountability for NSF resources. However, the process may have marginalized key stakeholders, potentially undercutting the implementation of HIV/AIDS Action Plans. PMID:20675024

  10. Why Epidemiologists Cannot Afford to Ignore Poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Krieger

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiologists cannot afford to ignore poverty. To do so would, first, wrongly obscure the devastating impact of poverty on population health, and, second, undercut our commitment to scien- tific rigor. At issue is doing correct science, not \\

  11. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  12. Managing Oil Rent for Sustainable Development and Poverty Reduction in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Afeikhena Jerome

    Despite the potential for social and economic development provided by oil generated wealth, the lack of accountability and transparency in revenues has exacerbated poor governance, conflict and poverty in the majority of oil dependent countries in Africa. Against the background of the new oil boom and the poor state of public institutions, a major development challenge at the turn of

  13. Health Coaching as an Intervention in Health Management Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan W. Butterworth; Ariel Linden; Wende McClay

    2007-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle behaviors can prevent the onset of chronic illness and help manage existing conditions. Health coaching interventions are increasingly being incorporated into health management programs, which are implemented in a variety of settings, from physician practices to the broader population level (e.g. throughout health plans, employer groups). To date, motivational interviewing-based health coaching is the only technique to have

  14. Support for agriculture during economic transformation: Impacts on poverty and undernutrition

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Patrick; Block, Steven

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores trends in poverty and nutrition during economic transformation and especially the impacts linked to government support for agriculture during the process. Analysis of multiyear data for 29 developing countries confirms that structural transformation raises total income and that poverty falls faster with strong support for agriculture. In turn, poverty reduction supports improved nutrition, especially in rural areas. However, transformation brings problems through health risks associated with rising obesity in rural as well as urban areas. Thus, the transition process must be managed better, through targeted support for smallholder agriculture and health interventions, if the negative consequences of obesity and chronic disease are to be mitigated. PMID:21173245

  15. X-33/RLV System Health Management/Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouyos, William; Wangu, Srimal

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations costs, Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) must include highly reliable robust subsystems which are designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure, and which incorporate expedited decision-making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) RLV system used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM incorporates Vehicle Health Management (VHM), ground processing associated with the vehicle fleet (GVHM), and Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The primary objective of SHM is to provide an automated and paperless health decision, maintenance, and logistics system. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, is leading the design, development, and integration of the SHM system for RLV and for X-33 (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). Many critical technologies are necessary to make SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable, and cost effective. This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for the RLV SHM, and it will discuss applications of advanced technologies to future RLVs. In addition, this paper will describe a Virtual Design Environment (VDE) which is being developed for RLV. This VDE will allow for system design engineering, as well as program management teams, to accurately and efficiently evaluate system designs, analyze the behavior of current systems, and predict the feasibility of making smooth and cost-efficient transitions from older technologies to newer ones. The RLV SHM design methodology will reduce program costs, decrease total program life-cycle time, and ultimately increase mission success.

  16. Poverty Reduction Begins with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This report describes how children bear the brunt of poverty and explains why they are central to poverty reduction in developing nations. The report also illustrates UNICEF's support for the process of improving access to, and quality of, health care, education, water and sanitation, and child protection. It describes how the participation of the…

  17. Health & Safety Management System Queen's University

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    Health & Safety Management System Queen's University December 2003 #12;Queen's University Health & Safety Management System 2 1. Introduction Under Provincial Health and Safety legislation, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, (the OH&S Act), places the onus for compliance with the legislation

  18. Agent-based health care management An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management

    E-print Network

    Mascardi, Viviana

    Agent-based health care management 1 An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management Jun Huang1, London WC2A 3PX, UK. Abbreviated title: Agent-based health care management Complete Mailing Address. London E1 4NS UK #12;Agent-based health care management 2 Abstract The provision of medical care

  19. Reading Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick

    The central purpose of this book is to challenge current social constructions of poverty, reading education, and the putative relationship between the two. It explores how official and popular representations of poverty are bound to specific historical, social, and economic conditions of their own production. The book offers four stances of…

  20. Integrated Airplane Health Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge; McDermott, William J.; Follen, Gregory J.; Blaser, Tammy M.; Pavlik, William R.; Zhang, Desheng; Liu, Xian-You

    2000-01-01

    The National Air Space System-Wide Simulation (NAS Sim) program advances the development and implementation of a comprehensive, integrated health management system contributing to safety and modeling of the national aviation system. This program integrates different disciplines to develop an accurate and insightful method for real-time modeling of the local integrated airplane risk exposure and monitoring of operations of the global national air space.

  1. Beware the Managed Health-Care Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, John; Smith, Gary

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses implications of the movement toward managed health care models for long-term health care services for people with disabilities, especially people with developmental disabilities. It notes possible advantages of managed care but raises issues concerning consumer choice, management and financial capacity of managed care…

  2. Towards an evidence based health care management.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, R

    1998-01-01

    Inspired by the development of Evidence Based Medicine, this article introduces a new approach for health care management called Evidence Based Management. This approach promises to improve the practice of health care management, at the same time as it may stimulate research on the organization and management of health care. Evidence Based Management means that health care managers should learn to search for and critically appraise evidence from management research as a basis for their practice. This will require some new managerial skills that should be included in the education and training of health care managers. It will also require a new orientation for research on health care management. There will be a demand for more applied research, and also for research with a more positivist orientation. PMID:10346052

  3. Fundamental Mechanisms of Managed Behavioral Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Mihalik; Michael Scherer

    1998-01-01

    Making sense of managed behavioral health care organizations (MBHOs) is difficult as they rapidly evolve in response to payer, member, legislative, and market demands. This article describes the basic mechanisms involved in managed behavioral health care's evolution, including the nature of carve-out organizations, carved-in services, the array of payment mechanisms between payer and MBHO, and between MBHO and mental health

  4. Who leaves managed behavioral health care?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Roan Gresenz; Roland Sturm

    1999-01-01

    The growth of managed care and the possibility of biased enrollment and disenrollment rates have raised concerns about cost shifting. This article analyzes the duration of continuous enrollment in a managed behavioral health organization among members with and without behavioral health care utilization and among members with different mental health conditions. Eleven large employers with more than 250,000 members who

  5. Health Management and Policy Student Handbook

    E-print Network

    Management and Policy Track at PSU Table of Contents I. The Mission of Public Health p. 1 II. The Oregon MPH. Health Management and Policy Track A. Track Competencies p. 4 B. Program Setting p. 4 C. Core Curriculum is it held? 9. What is the NBPHE Certification in Public Health Exam? 10. What is the OMPH listserv and how

  6. Education and Health: Evaluating Theories and Evidence. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #06-19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, David M.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    There is a well known large and persistent association between education and health. This relationship has been observed in many countries and time periods, and for a wide variety of health measures. The differences between the more and the less educated are significant: in 1999, the age-adjusted mortality rate of high school dropouts ages 25 to…

  7. Access to mental health services: The struggle of poverty affected urban children of color

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manny John González; Manny J. Gonz

    2005-01-01

    It is estimated that, in the United States, one in ten children and adolescents suffer from illness severe enough to cause\\u000a some level of psychosocial dysfunction. Urban children, and in particular low-income children of color, are at greater risk\\u000a of developing mental health problems, and are less likely to receive effective child mental health services. Prompt and effective\\u000a access to

  8. Access to Mental Health Services: The Struggle of Poverty Affected Urban Children of Color

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manny John González

    2005-01-01

    It is estimated that, in the United States, one in ten children and adolescents suffer from illness severe enough to cause\\u000a some level of psychosocial dysfunction. Urban children, and in particular low-income children of color, are at greater risk\\u000a of developing mental health problems, and are less likely to receive effective child mental health services. Prompt and effective\\u000a access to

  9. Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventions

    PubMed Central

    Casapia, Martin; Joseph, Serene A; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2007-01-01

    Background Communities of extreme poverty suffer disproportionately from a wide range of adverse outcomes, but are often neglected or underserved by organized services and research attention. In order to target the first Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty, thereby reducing health inequalities, participatory research in these communities is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the priority problems and respective potential cost-effective interventions in Belen, a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon, using a multidisciplinary and participatory focus. Methods Two multidisciplinary and participatory workshops were conducted with important stakeholders from government, non-government and community organizations, national institutes and academic institutions. In Workshop 1, participants prioritized the main health and health-related problems in the community of Belen. Problem trees were developed to show perceived causes and effects for the top six problems. In Workshop 2, following presentations describing data from recently completed field research in school and household populations of Belen, participants listed potential interventions for the priority problems, including associated barriers, enabling factors, costs and benefits. Results The top ten priority problems in Belen were identified as: 1) infant malnutrition; 2) adolescent pregnancy; 3) diarrhoea; 4) anaemia; 5) parasites; 6) lack of basic sanitation; 7) low level of education; 8) sexually transmitted diseases; 9) domestic violence; and 10) delayed school entry. Causes and effects for the top six problems, proposed interventions, and factors relating to the implementation of interventions were multidisciplinary in nature and included health, nutrition, education, social and environmental issues. Conclusion The two workshops provided valuable insight into the main health and health-related problems facing the community of Belen. The participatory focus of the workshops ensured the active involvement of important stakeholders from Belen. Based on the results of the workshops, effective and essential interventions are now being planned which will contribute to reducing health inequalities in the community. PMID:17623093

  10. Personal Health Record: Managing Personal Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charlotte Weaver; Rita Zielstorff

    \\u000a This chapter presents the work of the TIGER Collaborative on Consumer Empowerment and the Personal Health Record (PHR). The\\u000a entire body of work for the TIGER Collaborative Team #9 is available at http:\\/\\/tigerphr.pbworks.com\\/ The first part of this\\u000a chapter will review the state of the science on the potential of health consumerism as seen through the lens of health literacy

  11. Spirulina in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management. PMID:18855693

  12. Rising Poverty, Declining Health: The Nutritional Status of the Rural Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Voice for Food and Health Policy, Washington, DC.

    Using five key indicators of nutritional status (dietary intake, biochemical tests for circulating levels of nutrients or their metabolites, anthropometric measures, low birth weight and infant mortality rates, and food, health, and income assistance program participation rates and benefit levels), this 1-year research project identified national,…

  13. INVESTING IN HEALTH FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND POVERTY REDUCTION: New perspectives and opportunities

    E-print Network

    Klein, Ophir

    to approximately $30-$40 per person per year by 2015 if international health targets are to be met. Two new global in January 2000; and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, with pledges of approximately Director Designate, Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Sigrun MØGEDAL Senior Adviser

  14. The poverty of theory: class configurations in the discourse of Physical Education and Health (PEH)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Evans; Brian Davies

    2008-01-01

    Background: At the heart of this polemic1 lies the view that contemporary research in PE and Health (PEH) has largely overlooked one of the key determinants of social behaviour, social class and its expression in and outside schools; an omission that has quite serious consequences for how we (researchers and teachers) think about and conceptualise the purposes of PE in

  15. Effects of anti-poverty programs on electoral behavior : evidence from the Mexican Education, Health, and Nutrition Program

    E-print Network

    De La O Torres, Ana Lorena

    2007-01-01

    Ever since Latin American economies collapsed in the 1980s and early 1990s, traditional redistributive programs began to coexist with new anti-poverty programs that usually took the form of conditional cash transfers (CCT). ...

  16. Gender, aging, poverty and health: Survival strategies of older men and women in Nairobi slums

    PubMed Central

    Mudege, Netsayi N.; Ezeh, Alex C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based on data from focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews carried out in two slum areas, Korogocho and Viwandani in Nairobi, Kenya. It discusses how the division between domestic sphere and public sphere impacts on survival during, and adaptation to old age. Although this paper adopts some of the tenets of the life course approach, it posits that women's participation in the domestic sphere may sometimes give them a ‘gender advantage’ over men in terms of health and adaptation to old age. The paper also discusses the impact of gender roles on the cultivation of social networks and how these networks in turn impact on health and social adjustment as people grow older. It investigates how older people are adjusting and coping with the new challenges they face as a result of high morbidity and mortality among adults in the reproductive age groups. PMID:19907648

  17. Feeder and Stocker Health and Management Practices

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Feeder and Stocker Health and Management Practices W. Dee Whittier, Extension Specialist of disease loss. Goals for herd health management in a stocker setting should be centered around in its cause. The first is stress which decreases the animal's ability to fight disease invasion

  18. 75 FR 3734 - 2009 HHS Poverty Guidelines Extended Until March 1, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ...SERVICES Office of the Secretary 2009 HHS Poverty Guidelines Extended Until March 1, 2010...Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines will remain in effect until updated 2010 poverty guidelines are published, which...

  19. Poverty determinants of acute respiratory infections among Mapuche indigenous peoples in Chile's Ninth Region of Araucania, using GIS and spatial statistics to identify health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Flavio

    2007-01-01

    Background This research concerns Araucanía, often called the Ninth Region, the poorest region of Chile where inequalities are most extreme. Araucanía hasn't enjoyed the economic success Chile achieved when the country returned to democracy in 1990. The Ninth Region also has the largest ethnic Mapuche population, located in rural areas and attached to small agricultural properties. Written and oral histories of diseases have been the most frequently used methods to explore the links between an ancestral population's perception of health conditions and their deprived environments. With census data and hospital records, it is now possible to incorporate statistical data about the links between poverty and disease among ethnic communities and compare results with non-Mapuche population. Data sources Hospital discharge records from Health Services North N = 24,126 patients, year 2003, and 7 hospitals), Health Services South (N = 81,780 patients and 25 hospitals); CAS-2/Family records (N = 527,539 individuals, 439 neighborhoods, 32 Comunas). Methods Given the over-dispersion of data and the clustered nature of observations, we used the global Moran's I and General G Gettis-Ord procedures to test spatial dependence. These tests confirmed the clusters of disease and the need to use spatial regression within a General Linear Mixed Model perspective. Results Health outcomes indicate significantly higher morbidity rates for the Mapuche compared to non-Mapuche in both age groups < 5 and 15–44, respectively; for the groups 70–79 and 80 + years of age, this trend is reversed. Mortality rates, however, are higher among Mapuches than non-Mapuches for the entire Ninth Region and for all age groups. Mortality caused by respiratory infections is higher among Mapuches than non-Mapuches in all age-groups. A major finding is the link between poverty and respiratory infections. Conclusion Poverty is significantly associated with respiratory infections in the population of Chile's Ninth Region. High deprivation areas are associated with poverty, and poverty is a predictor of respiratory infections. Mapuches are at higher risk of deaths caused by respiratory infections in all age groups. Exponential and spherical spatial correlation models were tested to estimate the previous association and were compared with non-spatial Poisson, concluding that significant spatial variability was present in the data. PMID:17605804

  20. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    HLTHST 332 Managing Clinical Classification Systems HLTHST 333 Reimbursement Methodologies HLTHST 350 Systems HLTHST 420 Strategic Planning and Project Management HLTHST 427 Health Information Management Clinical Practice HLTHST 431 Quality Issues in Health Care HLTHST 437 Health Information Management

  1. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    HLTHST 332 Managing Clinical Classification Systems HLTHST 333 Reimbursement Methodologies HLTHST 350 Systems HLTHST 420 Strategic Planning and Project Management HLTHST 427 Health Information Management Clinical Practice HLTHST 431 Quality Issues in Health Care HLTHST 437 Health Information Management

  2. Rural Poverty Report 2001: The Challenge of Ending Rural Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The International Fund for Agricultural Development's 2001 report on rural poverty argues that to reduce poverty, international efforts must focus on "legally secure entitlements to assets (especially land and water); technology (above all for increasing the output and yield of food staples); access to markets; opportunities to participate in decentralized resource management; and access to microfinance." The extensive document is posted in .pdf format with the above address linking to its table of contents.

  3. Project management in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * the concept of project management and its role in modern management * the generic project lifecycle process * processes used in developing a plan for the management of resources - time, cost, physical resources and people * the concept of managing risk in projects * communication processes and practices that are important to the management of projects. PMID:20407175

  4. Joining together to combat poverty.

    PubMed

    Heath, I; Haines, A; Malenica, Z; Oulton, J A; Leopando, Z; Kaseje, D; Addington, W W; Giscard D'Estaing, O; Tumwine, J K; Koivusalo, M; Biscoe, G; Nickson, P; Marusi?, M; Vuk Pavlovi?, S

    2000-03-01

    The International Poverty and Health Network (IPHN) was created in December 1997 following a series of conferences organized by the World Health Organization, with the aim of integrating health into plans to eradicate poverty. Around 1.3 billion people live on less than US$1 per day. Of the 4.4 billion people in developing countries nearly 60% lack access to sanitation, 30% do not have clean water, 20% have no health care, and 20% do not have enough dietary energy and protein. Even among rich nations there are gross socioeconomic inequalities. Many children are robbed of their physical and mental potential through poverty. Expressed in constant 1963 US dollars, an average Croatian family needed the annual income of US$894 to meet the poverty line in 1960 and US$9,027 in 1995. Accordingly, 9-25% of Croatian households were below the poverty line between 1960 and 1995. The increase in the poverty rate after 1991 was compounded by the war that destroyed almost a third of industrial capacity and infrastructure. Dissipation of the communist economy and inadequate privatization have contributed to the increase in unemployment rate, corruption, and other social ills. IPHN invited Croatian Medical Journal to publish this editorial to help push the issue of poverty up political and medical agendas on a global level. We argue that a factor contributing to the failure of most large-scale programs against poverty to date is the excessive emphasis on material and infrastructure assistance at the expense of spiritual, moral, and intellectual development. PMID:10810165

  5. Population, health, and nutrition : fiscal 1991 sector review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Vaillancourt; Janet Nassim; Stacye Brown

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this year's annual sector review blends two special topics: poverty alleviation and the development of management and institutional capacity. Based on a review of project experience, both within and outside of the population, health and nutrition (PHN) sector, this report distills lessons that should assist task managers in the design and implementation of interventions to develop poverty-sensitive

  6. A guide to performance management for the Health Information Manager

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra G Leggat

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of human resource management practices that have been identifi ed as being associated with better outcomes in performance management. In general, essential practices include transformational leadership and a coherent program of goal setting, performance monitoring and feedback. Some Health Information Managers may feel they require training assistance to develop the necessary skills in the establishment

  7. Double Indemnity: The Poverty and Mythology of Affirmative Action in the Health Professional Schools. A Health/PAC Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnick, Hal; Younge, Richard

    Despite increasing interest on the part of minority undergraduates and a potentially expanded applicant pool, minority admissions to most health professional schools have remained static or fallen since 1974-75. Although women are being admitted to medical schools in increasing numbers, they still constitute less than thirty percent of the student…

  8. Managing diversity in health services organizations.

    PubMed

    Muller, H J; Haase, B E

    1994-01-01

    The changing ethnic, racial, and gender workforce characteristics require innovations in management philosophy and practice. Valuing employees' differences is believed to be a competitive advantage in many modern corporations. This article offers recommendations to health care managers for rethinking and improving the management of their heterogeneous workforces. A conceptual framework and evaluative criteria are developed in an attempt to better understand the factors that influence effective diversity management. The experiences of health services institutions in the Southwest (already a multicultural region) are studied to illustrate various approaches to diversity management. Leader philosophy and support, organizational policies and programs, workforce composition, structural integration, and organizational type constitute the main elements in this study. As the nation debates restructuring the health industry, it should also take the opportunity to integrate a management philosophy that values diversity and its practice. PMID:10138715

  9. Future developments in health care performance management

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  10. Concept Development for Software Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

  11. The Role of Optimizing Agricultural Water Resource Management to livelihood Poverty abolition in Rural Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fatemeh Panahi; Iraj Malekmohammadim; Mohammad Chizari

    2009-01-01

    Most of the projected i ncrease i n g lobal population wi ll take place in third worl d count ries that already suffer from wa ter, food, and health problems. As a vital agricultural resource, irrigation water is important for the productivity of a society and the livelihood of its members. With a common belief in the important role

  12. Medical and Health Services Managers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resources administration, strategic planning, law and ethics, health economics, and health information systems. Some programs allow students ... All Occupations includes all occupations in the U.S. Economy. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment ...

  13. Are public health physicians fading out of management?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty J. Pettersen; Dag Hofoss

    2007-01-01

    Background: Recent developments in health services in the local arena in Norway have challenged the theoretical and applied scientific basis for both public health medicine and management. During the 1990s although public health physicians in Norway increased in number, they worked less with public health, as well as public health management. The effects of these developments on public health management

  14. Why epidemiologists cannot afford to ignore poverty.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologists cannot afford to ignore poverty. To do so would, first, wrongly obscure the devastating impact of poverty on population health, and, second, undercut our commitment to scientific rigor. At issue is doing correct science, not "politically correct" science. Blot poverty and inequity from view, and not only will we contribute to making suffering invisible but our understanding of disease etiology and distribution will be marred. To make this case, I address current debates about the causal relationships between poverty and health, and provide examples of how failing to consider the impact of socioeconomic position has biased epidemiologic knowledge and harmed the public's health. By definition, the people we study are simultaneously social beings and biologic organisms-and we cannot study the latter without taking into account the former. It is the responsibility of all epidemiologists, and not only social epidemiologists, to keep in mind the connections between poverty and health. PMID:18049180

  15. Managing Health and Safety in Science Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Discusses strategies for managing health and safety within science departments. Emphasizes the importance of risk assessment for both pupil activities and those carried out by technicians. Stresses the role of training and the need for security. (MM)

  16. Good managers for good health services.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, J M

    1988-01-01

    This article outlines progress in the preparation of nurses, doctors and other professionals for managerial roles in the health services of several Caribbean countries. It is expected that there will be solid gains in effectiveness and efficiency during the next few years as the new managers' influence is felt and that the prospects for primary care and health for all will consequently be enhanced. The difficulties of running the health services of the Caribbean vary from country to country. In Jamaica, financing the health sector is a major problem. Inadequate funds mean that there are shortages of drugs and other medical supplies in the public hospitals and that up-to-date equipment is scarce or unavailable. These problems are compounded by the steady exodus from the sector of doctors, registered nurses and other health professionals. In 1978 at the Caribbean Health Ministers' Conference, management problems were identified as the principal health issue for all categories of health workers and lack of training in effective and efficient management was blamed. During the 1960s, short courses for health staff aimed at improving administration were conducted under the auspices of the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Extramural Department of the University of the West Indies. Advanced nursing education was established in 1966, and a program for middle and senior managers in the Department of Management Studies was begun. Since 1977 the Administrative Staff College of Jamaica has been preenting general management and project management programs for health workers. In 1984 the University of the West Indies began a program for health workers in an integrated format leading to The Diploma in Health Management. It can be taken on a full-time basis for 1 year or part-time for 2 years. Members of the Faculties of Medical Sciences and Social Sciences participate in teaching. Unusual features of the coursework are student workshops; modular division of the 5 main courses; utilization of lecturers from other institutions; participation of experienced health managers; and a 3-week field placement. PMID:3252834

  17. Research collaboration in health management research communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study uses scientometrics methodology to reveal the status quo and emerging issues of collaboration in health management. Methods We searched all the articles with the keyword “health management” in the period 1999–2011 in Web of Knowledge, then 3067 articles were found. Methods such as Social network analysis (SNA), co-authorship, co-word analysis were used in this study. Results Analysis of the past 13 years of research in the field of health management indicates that, whether the production of scientific research, or authors, institutions and scientific research collaboration at the national level, collaboration behavior has been growing steadily across all collaboration types. However, the international scientific research cooperation about health management study between countries needs to be further encouraged. 17 researchers can be seen as the academic leaders in this field. 37 research institutions play a vital role in the information dissemination and resources control in health management. The component analysis found that 22 research groups can be regarded as the backbone in this field. The 8 institution groups consisting of 33 institutions form the core of this field. USA, UK and Australia lie in the center by cohesive subgroup analysis; Based on keywords analysis, 44 keywords with high frequency such as care, disease, system and model were involved in the health management field. Conclusions This study demonstrates that although it is growing steadily, collaboration behavior about health management study needs to be enhanced, especially between different institutions or countries/regions, which would promote the progress and internationalization of health management. Besides, researchers should pay attention to the cooperation of representative scholars and institutions, as well as the hot areas of research, because their experience would help us promote the research development of our nation. PMID:23617236

  18. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  19. Applying business management models in health care.

    PubMed

    Trisolini, Michael G

    2002-01-01

    Most health care management training programmes and textbooks focus on only one or two models or conceptual frameworks, but the increasing complexity of health care organizations and their environments worldwide means that a broader perspective is needed. This paper reviews five management models developed for business organizations and analyses issues related to their application in health care. Three older, more 'traditional' models are first presented. These include the functional areas model, the tasks model and the roles model. Each is shown to provide a valuable perspective, but to have limitations if used in isolation. Two newer, more 'innovative' models are next discussed. These include total quality management (TQM) and reengineering. They have shown potential for enabling dramatic improvements in quality and cost, but have also been found to be more difficult to implement. A series of 'lessons learned' are presented to illustrate key success factors for applying them in health care organizations. In sum, each of the five models is shown to provide a useful perspective for health care management. Health care managers should gain experience and training with a broader set of business management models. PMID:12476639

  20. Crisis management teams in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Canyon, Deon V

    2012-01-01

    Crisis management teams (CMT) are necessary to ensure adequate and appropriate crisis management planning and response to unforeseen, adverse events. This study investigated the existence of CMTs, the membership of CMTs, and the degree of training received by CMTs in Australian health and allied health organisations. This cross-sectional study draws on data provided by executive decision makers in a broad selection of health and allied health organisations. Crisis management teams were found in 44.2 per cent of the health-related organisations surveyed, which is ten per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. Membership of these CMTs was not ideal and did not conform to standard CMT membership profiles. Similarly, the extent of crisis management training in health-related organisations is 20 per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. If organisations do not become pro-active in their crisis management practices, the onus is on government to improve the situation through regulation and the provision of more physical, monetary and skill resources to ensure that the health services of Australia are sufficiently prepared to respond to adverse events. PMID:22576140

  1. Health Services Management in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Bener, Abdulbari; Al Mazroei, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Aim To assess health care delivery system in the State of Qatar and audit it according to the Joint Commission International (JCI) standard. Methods The data for this retrospective descriptive study were taken from the Annual Health Report of the National Health Authority and Hamad Medical Corporation and various additional sources like World Health Organization reports, Annual Report of Saudi Arabia, and Compendium of Health Statistics, UK. Population per physician, per general practitioner, and per hospital bed, and nurses per physician ratio were calculated. Results In 2008, the population per physician in Qatar was 444; the population per general practitioner (GP) was 949; the population per hospital bed was 716; and nurses per physician ratio was 2.6. During the last decade, the population of Qatar has more than doubled, which has resulted in a similar increase in the number of health care providers; moreover, many initiatives launched in cooperation with internationally recognized institutions have greatly improved the quality of the health service. The weighted mean number of visits for 100 population was calculated for the UK and Qatar, taking into consideration the difference in age and sex structure. After comparison with the UK data, population/GP ratio for Qatar should be 1193. Conclusion The Qatar health system has improved in the last decade, but there is still the need for more medical workers in primary health care. PMID:20162749

  2. Home Health Management Aide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincemoyer, Betty Jane

    The report describes a demonstration project to provide a course of study at the senior high level in home health management for the academically handicapped. The course consisted of practice in nursing skills, home management and laboratory work in food preparation techniques, the family, and child care. Activities included field trips,…

  3. Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient facilities that provide health services to the

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    that are mandated by the state board of nursing to obtain licensure. As a result of this education and training of nurse managed centers were established by nursing schools using federal grants in the 1970s and 1980sOverview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient

  4. Ninez y Pobreza (Childhood and Poverty).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didonet, Vital

    1992-01-01

    Reviews data on child poverty worldwide, providing statistics on 20 poverty-related problems. Examines effects of economic factors (i.e., unemployment, wage stagnation, inflation, and internal migration) and political policies (i.e., military spending over health and education) on child well-being, arguing that families and children themselves…

  5. Adolescent Coping with Poverty-Related Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Martha E.; Wolff, Brian; Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Moran, Erica G.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents living in poverty face numerous stressors that are toxic for their mental health and well-being. There are effective strategies for coping with poverty-related stress that have been shown to reduce psychological symptoms in the face of this stress. However, stress itself weakens an adolescent's ability to use these cognitively…

  6. Health management as global challenge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Meyer; Tienush Rassaf; Patrick Schauerte; Thomas Schimpf; Malte Kelm; Eberhard Goepel

    2008-01-01

    Background  A hopeful journey into health was celebrated during the 19th World Conference of the International Union of Health Promotion\\u000a and Education (IUHPE) initiated together with the Canadian Consortium for Health Promotion Research (CCHPR) from 10 to 15\\u000a June 2007 in Vancouver, Canada.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims  One of the main goals of this conference was to assess and determine the relevance of the Ottawa

  7. American Health Information Management Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Forward AHIMA’s primary goal is to provide the knowledge, resources and tools to advance health information professional ... and timely information you need. HIM Body of Knowledge™ Searchable articles, briefs, statements and more Engage Communities ...

  8. Managing the quality of health care.

    PubMed

    Larson, James S; Muller, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews quality of health care initiatives beginning with the quality assessment/quality assurance movement of the 1970s. Conceptually, modern quality of care management is rooted in the intellectual work of Avedis Donabedian who defined quality of care as a combination of structure, process, and outcome. Donabedian's model is presented and some limitations are pointed out. In the late 1980s and 1990s. the health care industry adopted total quality management (TQM). More recently, the pursuit of health care quality has led to substantial performance measurement initiatives such as ORYX by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and MEDIS by the National Commission of Quality Assurance. The importance of CONQUEST, a freely available performance measurement database developed at the Harvard School of Public Health, is noted and discussed. The article concludes with a list of challenges facing public and private parties interests in health care quality improvement. PMID:15188996

  9. 75 FR 54804 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...its Safety and Health Program Management Guidelines; The American...Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems; The International Standards...ISO's) ISO 9001:2008 (E), Quality management systems--Requirements; and...

  10. Managed occupational health care in an HMO.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, A; Marino, G

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the efforts of an HMO to improve its delivery of occupational health services. Customer needs identification, occupational health structure, data systems, case management, clinical guidelines, and quality management are outlined. Our experience suggests that high-quality occupational health services can be integrated into managed care systems thereby offering cost-effective care to large numbers of workers. Comparing 1991 to 1995, physician authorization of total disability days was reduced 17.9% per disability case (p < .0001). Based on July 1994 to June 1995 Oregon State Accident Insurance Fund (SAIF Corporation) data, HMO average total claim cost was $916/claim representing respectively, a 21% and a 20% reduced cost compared to two PPO model programs (MCO 00 and MCO 01). Patient satisfaction data indicated that 90% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the physician they saw. The savings appear to be due to cost-effective treatment and rapid return to work. PMID:10176517

  11. Urban-Rural Differences in Excess Mortality among High-Poverty Populations: Evidence from the Harlem Household Survey and the Pitt County, North Carolina Study of African American Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arline T. Geronimus; Cynthia G. Colen; Tara Shochet; Lori Barer Ingber; Sherman A. James

    2006-01-01

    Black youth residing in high-poverty areas have dramatically lower probabilities of surviving to age 65 if they are urban than if they are rural. Chronic disease deaths contribute heavily. We begin to probe the reasons using the Harlem Household Survey (HHS) and the Pitt County, North Carolina Study of African American Health (PCS). We compare HHS and PCS respondents on

  12. Child poverty. Ways forward for the paediatrician: A comprehensive overview of poverty reduction strategies requiring paediatric support.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suparna; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The harmful effects of child poverty are well documented. Despite this, progress in poverty reduction in Canada has been slow. A significant gap exists between what is known about eradicating poverty and its implementation. Paediatricians can play an important role in bridging this gap by understanding and advancing child poverty reduction. Establishment of a comprehensive national poverty reduction plan is essential to improving progress. The present review identifies the key components of an effective poverty reduction strategy. These elements include effective poverty screening, promoting healthy child development and readiness to learn, ensuring food and housing security, providing extended health care coverage for the uninsured and using place-based solutions and team-level interventions. Specific economic interventions are also reviewed. Addressing the social determinants of health in these ways is crucial to narrowing disparities in wealth and health so that all children in Canada reach their full potential. PMID:26038640

  13. A DISTRIBUTED PROGNOSTIC HEALTH MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhaskar Saha; Sankalita Saha; Kai Goebel

    This paper introduces a generic distributed prognostic health management (PHM) architecture with specific application to the electrical power systems domain. Current state-of-the-art PHM systems are mostly centralized in nature, where all the processing is reliant on a single processor. This can lead to loss of functionality in case of a crash of the central processor or monitor. Furthermore, with increases

  14. BERNARDO RAMIREZ, M.D., M.B.A. Department of Health Management and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    ). Courses Developed: International Healthcare Systems; Strategic Management; Health Ethics, Managed Care Study Abroad; Health Care Quality Management; Health Informatics Applications in Health Care Management for Health Systems Performance and Quality Improvement. COHPA Research Fellows 2010-11. Peered Reviewed

  15. Smart health management technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    As a simple observation of the world, it is composed of human beings, artifacts, and natural environment. As all of their healths are issues like expansion of healthy aging, low maintenance cost, and low energy consumption the notion of health management can be extended to be applicable to all the entities. In this article, health management technology is proposed as a general solution framework. Its important aspect is cyclic evolution based on causality which illustrates conditions of target systems. The causality can be used as problem-solving knowledge, which is composed of feature attributes extracted from sensory data and intermediate characteristics. The causality should evolve to be updated according to sophistication of sensing and control mechanisms. It also provides the important nature of transparency to humans and machines bidirectionally, which enhances human-machine collaboration. Besides the idea of health management technology, the applications of human health, manufacturing, and energy consumption are also introduced and discussed. All applications were realized by multiple sensory networking to require multivariate time series analysis. Some experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed method.

  16. Managed Care, School Health Programs, and Adolescent Health Services: Opportunities for Health Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelli, John; Vernon, Mary; Lowry, Richard; Osorio, Jenny; DuShaw, Martha; Lancaster, Mary Sue; Pham, Ngoc; Song, Elisa; Ginn, Elizabeth; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    1998-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) and school health programs share some common goals and some competing, conflicting priorities. Partnerships between the two are important for the effective coordination and delivery of comprehensive adolescent health services. This paper discusses adolescent clinical preventive services, school health services,…

  17. The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented.…

  18. Software Health Management with Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengshoel, Ole; Schumann, JOhann

    2011-01-01

    Most modern aircraft as well as other complex machinery is equipped with diagnostics systems for its major subsystems. During operation, sensors provide important information about the subsystem (e.g., the engine) and that information is used to detect and diagnose faults. Most of these systems focus on the monitoring of a mechanical, hydraulic, or electromechanical subsystem of the vehicle or machinery. Only recently, health management systems that monitor software have been developed. In this paper, we will discuss our approach of using Bayesian networks for Software Health Management (SWHM). We will discuss SWHM requirements, which make advanced reasoning capabilities for the detection and diagnosis important. Then we will present our approach to using Bayesian networks for the construction of health models that dynamically monitor a software system and is capable of detecting and diagnosing faults.

  19. Using rangeland health assessment to inform successional management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland health assessment provides qualitative information on ecosystem attributes. Successional management is a conceptual framework that allows managers to link information gathered in rangeland health assessment to ecological processes that need to be repaired to allow vegetation to change in ...

  20. Poverty, user fees and ability to pay for health care for children with suspected dengue in rural Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sokrin Khun; Lenore Manderson

    2008-01-01

    User fees were introduced in public health facilities in Cambodia in 1997 in order to inject funds into the health system to enhance the quality of services. Because of inadequate health insurance, a social safety net scheme was introduced to ensure that all people were able to attend the health facilities. However, continuing high rates of hospitalization and mortality from

  1. Second discipline in Health Management and Policy HMP 401, US Health Care Systems

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Second discipline in Health Management and Policy Required: HMP 401, US Health Care Systems HMP 501 Research I [Health Management track], or HMP 702, Quantitative Methods in Epidemiology [Public Health track health policy issues. HMP 501 - Epidemiology and Community Medicine Credits: 4.00 The distribution

  2. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maye Omar; Nancy Gerein; Ehsanullah Tarin; Christopher Butcher; Stephen Pearson; Gholamreza Heidari

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers

  3. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gai Ruoyan; Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang; Shirayama Yoshihisa; Tang Wei; Kuroiwa Chushi

    2010-01-01

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff

  4. FAILSAFE Health Management for Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Gregory A.; Wagner, David A.; Wen, Hui Ying; Barry, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The FAILSAFE project is developing concepts and prototype implementations for software health management in mission- critical, real-time embedded systems. The project unites features of the industry-standard ARINC 653 Avionics Application Software Standard Interface and JPL s Mission Data System (MDS) technology (see figure). The ARINC 653 standard establishes requirements for the services provided by partitioned, real-time operating systems. The MDS technology provides a state analysis method, canonical architecture, and software framework that facilitates the design and implementation of software-intensive complex systems. The MDS technology has been used to provide the health management function for an ARINC 653 application implementation. In particular, the focus is on showing how this combination enables reasoning about, and recovering from, application software problems.

  5. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  6. NSW PUBLIC HEALTH BULLETIN Influencing population health performance: feedback from managers, population health staff and clinicians on the NSW Population Health Standards for Area Health Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeannine L. M. LiddleA; Thérèse C. JonesA; Margaret S. Lesjak; Andrew J. Milat; David M. LyleA; Emma L. Webster

    The NSW Population Health Standards for Area Health Services have recently been introduced in NSW to assist area health services assess and improve performance in population health. Greater Western Area Health Service was the pilot site for trialling the Standards as a self-assessment tool. Following self- assessment, managers, population health staff and cli- nicians were asked for feedback. Staff were

  7. [Population trends and poverty].

    PubMed

    Olmedo, C

    1998-04-01

    Implications of population growth in Ecuador for the quality of life of the poor population are analyzed. It is argued that if the gross national product (GNP) were to grow at a sustained annual rate of 5% or more, demographic trends would not present a significant obstacle to reducing poverty. National economic projections are for growth of only 2.5-3.5% annually. The continuing rapid growth of the poor population despite general slowing of demographic growth, the young age structure, the need for increased formal education to enable the poor to overcome their poverty, and the effect of unemployment on the dependency ratio will tend to hamper improvements in average productivity and per capita GNP. The need for spending on education, health, basic services, and housing will divert funds away from productive investment, generating a direct negative impact on economic growth. Over half of Ecuadorian children suffer from some degree of malnutrition, indicating that food production is inadequate to meet demand. The export-oriented agricultural policy and poor weather have led to a chronic shortage of basic foods. Progressive increase and diversification of agricultural production, along with maintenance of low prices and substantial increases in income levels and agricultural productivity, will be required if the entire population is to be fed adequately. Intense efforts will be needed from all sectors to bring demographic growth into balance with economic and development needs. PMID:12178231

  8. Rural Poverty and Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural Housing Alliance, Washington, DC.

    Today poverty in rural America remains pervasive and persistent. A decade ago, 14 million rural Americans were classified as "officially" poor. In 1973, nearly 9.2 million were classified poor. The decline in rural poverty over the years has been minimal. This paper briefly documents the poverty statistics according to the living standards used by…

  9. Reducing Poverty among Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Population Reports, 1985

    1985-01-01

    In response to the highest poverty rate among children since the 1960s, this report examines existing Federal policies to assist poor families with children and analyzes over 40 policy alternatives. Chapter 1 discusses how poverty is measured, recent trends and current patterns of childhood poverty as officially measured, and the effects of using…

  10. Adolescents and Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wight, Vanessa R.

    2011-01-01

    More youth live in poverty and poor youth comprise a larger share of the youth population than was the case a decade ago. This article first provides a descriptive analysis of children in poverty; examining the incidence of poverty among children by selected demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic characteristics with a particular focus on…

  11. Pathways from Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Barbara, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue are based on presentations at the Pathways from Poverty Workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on May 18-25, 1995. The event aimed to foster development of a network to address rural poverty issues in the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) region. Articles report on outcomes from the Pathways from Poverty

  12. Child poverty and regional disparities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eryurt, Mehmet Ali; Koç, Ismet

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) defines child poverty as the inability of the child to realize their existing potential due to their inability to access resources across different dimensions of life (income, health, nutrition, education, environment, etc.). On the basis of this definition, an attempt has been made in this study to put forth the disadvantaged positions children have in different dimensions of their lives, specifically by taking regional disparities into account. As the data source, the Turkey Demographic and Health Survey 2008 is used, a survey that consists of detailed information about the different dimensions of child poverty. In this study, in order to measure poverty in four different dimensions (education and work, health and nutrition, family environment, and domestic environment), a total of 25 variables were used and descriptive and multivariate analyses were made in order to highlight the regional disparities in child poverty. Principle components analysis conducted through the use of a deficit approach reveals that the variables closely related with education and health and nutrition were the critical dimensions behind child poverty in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that 22.4% of children in Turkey are poor when various dimensions of life are taken into account; the region with the highest child poverty is Central East Anatolia, at 34.9%, while the region with the lowest rate is East Marmara, at 15.6%. PMID:24192673

  13. Vaccines against poverty

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  14. An Assessment of Integrated Health Management Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Lybeck, Nancy; Coble, Jamie B.; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-05-18

    In order to meet the ever increasing demand for energy, the United States nuclear industry is turning to life extension of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs). Economically ensuring the safe, secure, and reliable operation of aging NPPs presents many challenges. The 2009 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop identified online monitoring of active and structural components as essential to better understanding and management of the challenges posed by aging NPPs. Additionally, there is increasing adoption of condition-based maintenance (CBM) for active components in NPPs. These techniques provide a foundation upon which a variety of advanced online surveillance, diagnostic, and prognostic techniques can be deployed to continuously monitor and assess the health of NPP systems and components. The next step in the development of advanced online monitoring is to move beyond CBM to estimating the remaining useful life of active components using prognostic tools. Deployment of prognostic health management (PHM) on the scale of an NPP requires the use of an integrated health management (IHM) framework - a software product (or suite of products) used to manage the necessary elements needed for a complete implementation of online monitoring and prognostics. This paper provides a thoughtful look at the desirable functions and features of IHM architectures. A full PHM system involves several modules, including data acquisition, system modeling, fault detection, fault diagnostics, system prognostics, and advisory generation (operations and maintenance planning). The standards applicable to PHM applications are indentified and summarized. A list of evaluation criteria for PHM software products, developed to ensure scalability of the toolset to an environment with the complexity of an NPP, is presented. Fourteen commercially available PHM software products are identified and classified into four groups: research tools, PHM system development tools, deployable architectures, and peripheral tools.

  15. The social costs of the International Monetary Fund's adjustment programs for poverty: the case of health care development in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Anyinam, C A

    1989-01-01

    A primary health care (PHC) strategy was adopted in Ghana in 1978, but the civilian government at the time failed to implement the program designed to achieve health for all Ghanaians. In 1982, the revolutionary military government under Rawlings indicated its commitment to the full implementation of the PHC program. In this article, the author seeks to examine the extent to which the Economic Recovery Program initiated by the Rawlings' regime, its policy of decentralization and mobilization of the masses, and its promise to institute some fundamental organizational and structural changes in the health care delivery system, are contributing to the process of achieving "health for all" Ghanaians. PMID:2753581

  16. Total quality management strategies in mental health systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William V. Rago; William H. Reid

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of total quality management (TQM) to top managers of mental health systems. While TQM is\\u000a a philosophy of management at the cutting edge of U.S. business, it has only recently entered the vocabulary of health care\\u000a managers. To our knowledge, TQM has yet to be systematically applied to the state mental health service delivery system.

  17. Building Poverty Reduction Strategies

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This World Bank site considers a new framework for reducing poverty worldwide. The three steps of this outline are highlighted. "Understanding the nature and locus of poverty" considers the demographics of the world's poor. The second step, "Choosing public actions that have the highest poverty impact," examines the factors necessary for choosing public actions that will merit the highest impact on poverty. Finally, the provisions for monitoring the chosen poverty outcome indicators are explained in "Selecting and tracking outcome indicators." This site's rich resources include information and data on poverty such as regional and social indicators, household surveys, and country data sets, and an extensive list of related links. An online library holds reports, working papers, speeches, and other materials from the World Bank as well as from other resources. Interested users may also subscribe to PovertyNet, a bimonthly e-newsletter.

  18. Aid allocation and poverty reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Collier; David Dollar

    2002-01-01

    This paper derives a poverty-efficient allocation of aid and compares it with actual aid allocations. The allocation of aid that has the maximum effect on poverty depends on the level of poverty and the quality of policies. Using the headcount, poverty-gap, and squared poverty gap measures of poverty, alternatively, all yield similar poverty-efficient allocations. Finally, we find that the actual

  19. Integrated electronic health records management system.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, P; Ricci, Fabrizio L; Bocchi, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    Computer systems and communication technologies are making a strong and influential presence in the different fields of medicine. The cornerstone of a functional medical information system represents the electronic health records management system. Due to a very sensitive nature of medical information, such systems are faced with a number of stringent requirements, like security and confidentiality of patients' related data, different media type's management, diversity of medical data that need to be processed etc. At present most clinical software systems are closed with little or no operability between them, and the medical information are locked in a variety of different incompatible databases. As the result of these facts, it is very hard for the developers to provide the solution for an integrated health computing environment, which would considerably improve the quality of medical care in general. This paper presents the framework for a functional EHR management system that meets these demands, but also follows the initiative taken by the Next Generation Network (NGN) approach, which includes user mobility, service transparency and common communication platform for transferring and serving different types of information, services and media. PMID:17095822

  20. Trauma, poverty and mental health among Somali and Rwandese refugees living in an African refugee settlement – an epidemiological study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lamaro P Onyut; Frank Neuner; Verena Ertl; Elisabeth Schauer; Michael Odenwald; Thomas Elbert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among Rwandese and Somali refugees resident in a Ugandan refugee settlement, as a measure of the mental health consequences of armed conflict, as well as to inform a subsequent mental health outreach program. The study population comprised a sample from 14400 (n

  1. Mental health case management: Characteristics, job function, and occupational stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph G. Hromco; John S. Lyons; Robert E. Nikkel

    1995-01-01

    Although case management is an important component of treatment for persons with major mental illnesses, little is known about who works in case management, what functions are performed and how much occupational stress case managers experience. Mental health case managers (CM's) throughout the state of Oregon (N=216) completed an inventory of case management functions and the job dissatisfaction and occupational

  2. Sensor Systems for Prognostics and Health Management

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shunfeng; Azarian, Michael H.; Pecht, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Prognostics and health management (PHM) is an enabling discipline consisting of technologies and methods to assess the reliability of a product in its actual life cycle conditions to determine the advent of failure and mitigate system risk. Sensor systems are needed for PHM to monitor environmental, operational, and performance-related characteristics. The gathered data can be analyzed to assess product health and predict remaining life. In this paper, the considerations for sensor system selection for PHM applications, including the parameters to be measured, the performance needs, the electrical and physical attributes, reliability, and cost of the sensor system, are discussed. The state-of-the-art sensor systems for PHM and the emerging trends in technologies of sensor systems for PHM are presented. PMID:22219686

  3. Managed Behavioral Health Care and Supply-Side Economics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard M. Scheffler

    Background: Within the past decade, the mental health care system in the United States has undergone a significant transformation in terms of delivery, financing and work force configuration. Con- tracting between managed care organizations (MCOs) and providers has become increasingly prevalent, paralleling the trend in health care in general. These managed care carve-outs in behavioral health depend on networks of

  4. Strategies for effective management participation in community health partnerships.

    PubMed

    Weiner, B J; Alexander, J A; Zuckerman, H S

    2000-01-01

    This article develops guidelines for effective health services management participation in community health partnerships. Drawing on our study of Community Care Network (CCN) Demonstration, the strategic alliance literature, and other research, we describe six challenges that health services managers are likely to face as partnership participants and discuss the strategies that they might use to deal with them. PMID:10937337

  5. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  6. [Justification to health managers: cost-benefit of osteoporosis management].

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, César

    2011-09-01

    Medicines are strictly regulated and controlled until they reach the patients. Once in the market, the mechanisms governing their use are very complex due to the large number of actors playing different roles. It is necessary to extend an evaluation culture among all involved and to make economic analysis a structured part of decisions made by physicians and health managers. Since physicians occupy a central place in this market of medicines, it is necessary that they assume their responsibility by actively participating in this evaluation. PMID:21924214

  7. GARS Directorate Environment, Safety, & Health Records/Documents Management

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . Occupational Health & Safety (OHSAS 18001) Management System Description (Manual) The written OSH program Office Files B179B. 2. Environment, Safety & Health (OHSAS 18001/ISO14001) Management Plans Annual list Manager Location: GARS RO web site. Signed copies in RO Office Files B179B. 3. OSH 18001 Support and Risk

  8. Trauma, poverty and mental health among Somali and Rwandese refugees living in an African refugee settlement – an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Onyut, Lamaro P; Neuner, Frank; Ertl, Verena; Schauer, Elisabeth; Odenwald, Michael; Elbert, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among Rwandese and Somali refugees resident in a Ugandan refugee settlement, as a measure of the mental health consequences of armed conflict, as well as to inform a subsequent mental health outreach program. The study population comprised a sample from 14400 (n = 519 Somali and n = 906 Rwandese) refugees resident in Nakivale refugee settlement in South Western Uganda during the year 2003. Methods The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 25 were used to screen for posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Results Thirty two percent of the Rwandese and 48.1% of the Somali refugees were found to suffer from PTSD. The Somalis refugees had a mean of 11.95 (SD = 6.17) separate traumatic event types while the Rwandese had 8.86 (SD = 5.05). The Somalis scored a mean sum score of 21.17 (SD = 16.19) on the PDS while the Rwandese had a mean sum score of 10.05 (SD = 9.7). Conclusion Mental health consequences of conflict remain long after the events are over, and therefore mental health intervention is as urgent for post-conflict migrant populations as physical health and other emergency interventions. A mental health outreach program was initiated based on this study. PMID:19470171

  9. ‘My health is not a job’: a qualitative exploration of personal health management and imperatives of the ‘new public health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an increasing push in Western healthcare for people to ‘manage’ their health, a key aspect of what has been called the ‘new public health’. It has been argued that this ‘personal health management’ – informal work done to monitor, inform, or influence one’s health – may be a burden, with potential to contribute to poor health outcomes. However, there is little research actually examining perceptions of personal health management and the ‘burden’ of these activities, particularly for generally healthy individuals. Methods We conducted exploratory qualitative interviews with 30 generally healthy men and women about their perceptions and experiences of personal health management. Questions focused on health behaviours (e.g., information seeking), as well as feelings about these behaviours and perceptions of the time dedicated to health. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively using NVivo 10. Where appropriate, quantitative codes were applied and descriptive statistics are reported alongside qualitative findings. Results Participants were generally satisfied with the amount of time spent on their health and few perceived personal health management as a burden. Many participants took issue with the concept of ‘work’ being associated with health and stressed the importance of taking personal responsibility for health. Conclusions Our findings suggest that generally healthy people have internalised the notion of the ‘new public health’ and accepted the imperative of personal health responsibility. On the one hand, this bodes well for healthy individuals; their positive attitude may lead to better health outcomes, and the manageable amount of time spent suggests personal health management is unlikely to cause negative health consequences associated with stress. On the other hand, our findings may indicate that other factors, such as social determinants of health, are ignored in health promotion efforts and that those who cannot manage their own health may fall further behind. Future research should continue to explore the time people spend ‘working’ for their health, and how they perceive and respond to ‘new public health’ imperatives. PMID:25030501

  10. Child Poverty and Child Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the evidence on the prevalence of child poverty in Britain including: (1) how child poverty has changed over the last 20 years; (2) how child poverty in Britain compares with that in other countries; (3) characteristics of poor children; (4) impact of poverty on child well-being; and (5) government attempts to abolish child poverty. (SD)

  11. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank – Palestinian Territory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Issam A. Al-Khatib; Chikashi Sato

    2009-01-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank – Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7m3

  12. An Open eHealth Platform for Health Management Using Adaptable Service Profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Chronaki; P. Lelis; F. Chiarugia; K. Moumourisa Trypakis; H. Stavrakis; G. Kavlentakis; N. Stathiakis

    An open eHealth platform for health management using adaptable service profiles for different medical specialties is currently being validated in the regional health information network of South Aegean in Greece. The core of the installation is an electronic health record (EHR), customized for primary care, that has been extended with advanced eHealth services. Users of the EHR can create an

  13. An open eHealth platform for health management using adaptable service profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine E. Chronaki; P. Lelis; Franco Chiarugi; D. Trypakis; K. Moumouris; H. Stavrakis; G. Kavlentakis; N. Stathiakis; Manolis Tsiknakis; Stelios C. Orphanoudakis

    2004-01-01

    An open eHealth platform for health management using adaptable service profiles for different medical specialties is currently being validated in the regional health information network (RHIN) of South Aegean in Greece. The core of the installation is an electronic health record (EHR), customized for primary care, that has been extended with advanced eHealth services. Users of the EHR can create

  14. HELICOPTER HEALTH MONITORING AND FAILURE PREVENTION THROUGH VIBRATION MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 HELICOPTER HEALTH MONITORING AND FAILURE PREVENTION THROUGH VIBRATION MANAGEMENT ENHANCEMENT, and increase safety through in- flight vibrations monitoring, on-line data processing and artificial the next period is briefly discussed. Key Words: Vibration Monitoring, Damage Detection; Health Monitoring

  15. Health Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery

    E-print Network

    As with most games, Health Advisor players compete to achieve the highest score. They can employ various health benefit functions in enterprises to student education in medical, nursing, public healthHealth Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery Tennenbaum Institute Georgia

  16. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

  17. Using TQM to improve management of home health aides.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Brannon, D

    1996-12-01

    Home health aides are at the front line of the home health industry, raising quality of care issues and human resource (HR) management challenges. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework to help meet those challenges. The authors investigated the relationship between TQM and HR effectiveness in home health agencies. Results suggest that TQM practices are related to HR effectiveness. Suggestions are offered to make human resource management consistent with a TQM culture. PMID:8968324

  18. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  19. Cyanobacterial toxins: risk management for health protection.

    PubMed

    Codd, Geoffrey A; Morrison, Louise F; Metcalf, James S

    2005-03-15

    This paper reviews the occurrence and properties of cyanobacterial toxins, with reference to the recognition and management of the human health risks which they may present. Mass populations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria in natural and controlled waterbodies include blooms and scums of planktonic species, and mats and biofilms of benthic species. Toxic cyanobacterial populations have been reported in freshwaters in over 45 countries, and in numerous brackish, coastal, and marine environments. The principal toxigenic genera are listed. Known sources of the families of cyanobacterial toxins (hepato-, neuro-, and cytotoxins, irritants, and gastrointestinal toxins) are briefly discussed. Key procedures in the risk management of cyanobacterial toxins and cells are reviewed, including derivations (where sufficient data are available) of tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) and guideline values (GVs) with reference to the toxins in drinking water, and guideline levels for toxigenic cyanobacteria in bathing waters. Uncertainties and some gaps in knowledge are also discussed, including the importance of exposure media (animal and plant foods), in addition to potable and recreational waters. Finally, we present an outline of steps to develop and implement risk management strategies for cyanobacterial cells and toxins in waterbodies, with recent applications and the integration of Hazard Assessment Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles. PMID:15737680

  20. The learning, physical, and emotional environment of the home in the context of poverty: The infant health and development program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne Brooks-Gunn; Pamela Kato Klebanov; Fong-ruey Liaw

    1995-01-01

    The impact of individual environmental and biological risks and the number of risks on the home environment of 3-year-olds is examined in a sample of low birth weight, premature infants enrolled in the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP). The IHDP is a large clinical trial designed to test the efficacy of early intervention services. The effects of 13 risk

  1. Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

  2. Effectiveness of health management departments of universities that train health managers in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karagoz, Sevgul; Balci, Ali

    2007-01-01

    This research has [corrected] aimed to examine the effectiveness of the health management departments of universities which [corrected] train health managers in Turkey. The study compares - for lecturers and students - nine variables of organisational effectiveness [corrected] These nine dimensions are derived from Cameron (1978; 1981; 1986) [corrected] Factor analysis was used to validate [corrected] the scale developed by the researcher. For internal consistency and reliability, the [corrected] Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient and item total correlation were applied. A questionnaire was administered to a [corrected] total of [corrected] 207 people [corrected] in health management departments in [corrected]Turkey. In analysis of the data, [corrected] descriptive statistics and the [corrected] t-test were [corrected]used. According to our [corrected] research findings, at individual [corrected] university level, lecturers found their departments more effective than did [corrected] their students. The highest effectiveness was perceived at Baskent University, a private university [corrected] The best outcome was achieved for 'organisational health', and 'the [corrected] ability to acquire resources' achieved [corrected] the lowest outcome [corrected] Effectiveness overall [corrected] was found to be moderate [corrected] PMID:17624875

  3. Information management in health visitors' public health and community development activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Bacigalupo; Nick Fox; Philippa Levy

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to identify UK health visitors’ management of information, with particular reference to their public health and community development activities. Widely recognized concepts, such as information audit to assess information need and process models of information management, were applied at operational level to represent health visitors’ information environment. The naturalistic methodology included interviews and observation, the use

  4. The changing roles of health care personnel in health and health care management.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D J

    1996-09-01

    Health care reform has become a global phenomenon. Countries are experiencing similar problems with their health care systems and are reaching for similar solutions. Management is seen as crucial in many countries as the principal means of securing supply-side reforms. Many of these centre on establishing a new relationship between professionals, notably the medical profession, and the state. The aim has been to exercise greater influence over how professionals practice and use resources. The application of new public management principles based on industrial sector practices and concepts of management has created tensions within professional groups who feel themselves, and their craft, to be under attack. But the new managerialism has to be seen within a context of rapid social and economic change. It is not possible to predict what the impact of such change is likely to be on health services in the future or on those who provide them. The paper offers an overview of health care reforms and assesses how it is shaping, or re-shaping, the roles and tasks of health care personnel. One conclusion is the mismatch between the management style favoured by policy-makers and reformers and the necessary flexibility required in skill mix and organization of work. High-trust relations lie at the heart of professional forms of organisation whereas the new managerialism appears to be based on the expectation of low-trust relations. The paper concludes with a brief look at the implications of all these developments for training and education and finds that there is still a long way to go before there is any real prospect of providing and equipping health care personnel with the requisite skills to enable them to meet the complex challenges that are a common characteristic of health care systems. PMID:8870145

  5. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  6. World Health Organization's Management of Substance Abuse

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of the larger World Health Organization's (WHO) site this section on the management of substance abuse has a variety of useful information for students, teachers and those practicing in the field. Some of the most useful are several resources related to terminology and classifications including the WHO lexicon of alcohol and drug terms. The lexicon, developed in 1994, supplies clinicians, researchers and other users with a set of definitions of terms related to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Also available is a Facts and Figures section which provides users with basic information about the use and misuse of alcohol and other drugs worldwide. The Activities pages allow users to get a glimpse into the research that WHO is currently undertaking that is related to substance abuse. Sections on publications, research tools, and other links round out this very useful site.

  7. Poverty, food insecurity, and nutritional outcomes in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Currie, Janet; Haider, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examine the relationship between nutritional status, poverty, and food insecurity for household members of various ages. Our most striking result is that, while poverty is predictive of poor nutrition among preschool children, food insecurity does not provide any additional predictive power for this age group. Among school age children, neither poverty nor food insecurity is associated with nutritional outcomes, while among adults and the elderly, both food insecurity and poverty are predictive. These results suggest that researchers should be cautious about assuming connections between food insecurity and nutritional outcomes, particularly among children. PMID:15587700

  8. Strengthening health management: experience of district teams in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Conn, C P; Jenkins, P; Touray, S O

    1996-03-01

    The lack of basic management skills of district-level health teams is often described as a major constraint to implementation of primary health care in developing countries. To improve district-level management in The Gambia, a 'management strengthening' project was implemented in two out of the three health regions. Against a background of health sector decentralization policy the project had two main objectives: to improve health team management skills and to improve resources management under specially-trained administrators. The project used a problem-solving and participatory strategy for planning and implementing activities. The project resulted in some improvements in the management of district-level health services, particularly in the quality of team planning and coordination, and the management of the limited available resources. However, the project demonstrated that though health teams had better management skills and systems, their effectiveness was often limited by the policy and practice of the national level government and donor agencies. In particular, they were limited by the degree to which decision making was centralized on issues of staffing, budgeting, and planning, and by the extent to which national level managers have lacked skills and motivation for management change. They were also limited by the extent to which donor-supported programmes were still based on standardized models which did not allow for varying and complex environments at district level. These are common problems despite growing advocacy for more devolution of decision making to the local level. PMID:10155879

  9. Integrated Systems Health Management for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uckun, Serdar

    2005-01-01

    Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a system engineering discipline that addresses the design, development, operation, and lifecycle management of components, subsystems, vehicles, and other operational systems with the purpose of maintaining nominal system behavior and function and assuring mission safety and effectiveness under off-nominal conditions. NASA missions are often conducted in extreme, unfamiliar environments of space, using unique experimental spacecraft. In these environments, off-nominal conditions can develop with the potential to rapidly escalate into mission- or life-threatening situations. Further, the high visibility of NASA missions means they are always characterized by extraordinary attention to safety. ISHM is a critical element of risk mitigation, mission safety, and mission assurance for exploration. ISHM enables: In-space maintenance and repair; a) Autonomous (and automated) launch abort and crew escape capability; b) Efficient testing and checkout of ground and flight systems; c) Monitoring and trending of ground and flight system operations and performance; d) Enhanced situational awareness and control for ground personnel and crew; e) Vehicle autonomy (self-sufficiency) in responding to off-nominal conditions during long-duration and distant exploration missions; f) In-space maintenance and repair; and g) Efficient ground processing of reusable systems. ISHM concepts and technologies may be applied to any complex engineered system such as transportation systems, orbital or planetary habitats, observatories, command and control systems, life support systems, safety-critical software, and even the health of flight crews. As an overarching design and operational principle implemented at the system-of-systems level, ISHM holds substantial promise in terms of affordability, safety, reliability, and effectiveness of space exploration missions.

  10. Relationships between Poverty and Psychopathology. Data Trends #97

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" asks: Does the stress and adversity associated with poverty cause mental illness or is poverty the result of downward social mobility of persons with mental illness? This is the…

  11. Fiscal Consequences of Concentrated Poverty in a Metropolitan Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascale M. Joassart-Marcelli; Juliet A. Musso; Jennifer R. Wolch

    2005-01-01

    Poverty concentration has a significant negative effect on the fiscal health of cities in that it increases spending on antipoverty programs and also raises the cost of providing more general public services such as police and fire protection. Spending patterns among Southern California cities over the last two decades show that poverty strongly influences local public expenditures after controlling for

  12. Information Management in Health Administration College of Public Health and Health Professions

    E-print Network

    Kane, Andrew S.

    is to give students interested in the administration of health care organizations a basis in the fundamental. The fundamentals of the management of information systems, including systems analysis and design, databases, networking, security, and systems architecture. 2. Basic information requirements of healthcare organizations

  13. Poverty. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    How many people reading this brief believes they could financially survive in a household of four people on $19,784 a year? Yet, this was the official poverty threshold as determined by the federal government for 2005. During this same year, 17% of children under 18 lived below the poverty line, of which 14% were white, 11% Asian, 28% Hispanic and…

  14. Chronic and Transient Poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aubrey D. Tabuga; Christian D. Mina; Celia M. Reyes; Ronina D. Asis; Maria Blesila G. Datu

    2010-01-01

    The Philippines has been posting progress in terms of poverty reduction since the early 1990s. However, reversal in the trend was observed in 2006. Further worsening of the poverty situation is expected given the various economic and natural shocks (i.e., food and fuel price hikes; global financial and economic crisis; typhoons Milenyo, Reming, Frank, Ondoy, Pepeng; and the recent El

  15. Measuring Vulnerability and Poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raghav Gaiha; Katsushi Imai

    2008-01-01

    This paper measures the vulnerability of households in rural India, based upon the ICRISAT panel survey. We employ both ex ante and ex post measures of vulnerability. The latter are decomposed into aggregate and idiosyncratic risks and poverty components. Our decomposition shows that idiosyncratic risks account for the largest share, followed by poverty and aggregate risks. Despite some degree of

  16. Poverty Action Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many laboratories focus their attention on topics like Alzheimer's research, but this laboratory at MIT focuses on poverty. The objective of their work at the Poverty Action Lab is "to improve the effectiveness of poverty programs by providing policy makers with clear scientific results that help shape successful polices to combat poverty." The Lab was started in June 2003 by a group of professors at MIT and their collaborators. Visitors to the site will note that the materials here are divided into sections that include "Research", "People", "News", and "Courses". The "Research" section is a great place to start as policy makers and others can look over their completed projects (such as "Discrimination in the Job Market") and their publications. Moving on, visitors can click on the "People" section to learn more about their staff and directors. Finally, those who are curious about the reach of the Poverty Lab's work will want to look at their media features in the "News" section.

  17. Managing Evaluation in a Federal Public Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooley, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    The author, a federal manager who leads development and maintenance of evaluation for specific public health programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tells the story of developing an evaluation unit in the Office on Smoking and Health. Lessons about managing evaluation, including his practices and related principles, are…

  18. Application and Evaluation of Personal Health Information Management System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eung-Hun Kim; Maisie Wang; Christopher Lau; Yongmin Kim

    2004-01-01

    A web-based patient-centered personal health record (PHR), called the Personal Health Information Management System (PHIMS), has been developed and its usability has been evaluated in conjunction with a referral system, called the Facilitated Accurate Referral Management System (FARMS). To estimate the system requirements of PHIMS for wider clinical use, we have also studied PHIMS usage by analyzing server log files.

  19. Application of Prognostic Health Management in Digital Electronic Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick W. Kalgren; Mark Baybutt; A. Ginart; C. Minnella; M. J. Roemer; T. Dabney

    2007-01-01

    Development of robust prognostics for digital electronic system health management will improve device reliability and maintainability for many industries with products ranging from enterprise network servers to military aircraft. Techniques from a variety of disciplines is required to develop an effective, robust, and technically sound health management system for digital electronics. The presented technical approach integrates collaborative diagnostic and prognostic

  20. Professional Certificate in Environmental Management UCD School of Public Health,

    E-print Network

    Professional Certificate in Environmental Management UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy in environmental management, including planners, architects, engineers, Occupational Safety and Health (OSH and Population Science www.ucd.ie/cshw/ GRADUATE For the most up to date information relevant to this year

  1. Investigating health management practices of individuals with diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lena Mamykina; Elizabeth D. Mynatt; David R. Kaufman

    2006-01-01

    Chronic diseases, endemic in the rapidly aging population, are stretching the capacity of healthcare resources. Increasingly, individuals need to adopt proactive health attitudes and contribute to the management of their own health. We investigate existing diabetes self-management practices and ways in which reflection on prior actions impacts future lifestyle choices. The findings suggest that individuals generate and evaluate hypotheses regarding

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURAL HEALTH MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR AEROSPACE VEHICLES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Prosser

    As part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems for aerospace vehicles, NASA has focused considerable resources on the development of technologies for Structural Health Management (SHM). The motivations for these efforts are to increase the safety and reliability of aerospace structural systems, while at the same time decreasing operating and maintenance costs. Research and

  3. Approach for measuring health-related quality management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yvonne Lagrosen; Ingela Bäckström; Håkan Wiklund

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach to measuring health-related quality management based on earlier research on the connection between quality management and employee health. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A questionnaire was developed and a research study was carried out at a manufacturing company. The constructs were tested for internal reliability using Cronbach's alpha tests. The dimensions’

  4. Needs Assessment for Health Care Management Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rekhter, Natalia; Togunov, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: For more than 70 years, health care management in the Soviet Union reflected a centralized directive style familiar to the Soviet political system. Market-oriented reform in post-Soviet Russia is pushing practicing physicians and physician-executives to acquire new information and skills regarding health care management. To assist…

  5. Common Elements of High Performing, High Poverty Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined over 3 years high-achieving high-poverty middle schools to determine school practices and policies associated with higher student achievement. Found that high-poverty middle schools that are high performing acquire grants and manage money well, use a variety of teaming configurations, and use data-based goals to improve student…

  6. Health Project Management. A Manual of Procedures for Formulating and Implementing Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, J.; Sapirie, S.

    The manual presents 16 main steps for health project management, from project formulation through termination. The manual defines a health project as a temporary intensive effort to set up and put into operation a new or revised service that will result in the reduction of specific health or health-related problems. (Typical examples include the…

  7. Official Master's of Public Health Health Policy & Management Program of Study Form

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Official Master's of Public Health ­ Health Policy & Management Program of Study Form Student REQUIRED PROGRAM CONCENTRATION COURSES ­ 18 credits HSPM 7133 PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY AND ETHICS 3 HSPM enrollment is restricted to graduate students. REQUIRED PUBLIC HEALTH CORE COURSES ­ 18 credits Dept

  8. Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Taylor, Lauren A.; Cuellar, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a renewed focus in the field of global health on strengthening health systems, inadequate attention has been directed to a key ingredient of high-performing health systems: management. We aimed to develop the argument that management – defined here as the process of achieving predetermined objectives through human, financial, and technical resources – is a cross-cutting function necessary for success in all World Health Organization (WHO) building blocks of health systems strengthening. Management within health systems is particularly critical in low-income settings where the efficient use of scarce resources is paramount to attaining health goals. More generally, investments in management capacity may be viewed as a key leverage point in grand strategy, as strong management enables the achievement of large ends with limited means. We also sought to delineate a set of core competencies and identify key roles to be targeted for management capacity building efforts. Several effective examples of management interventions have been described in the research literature. Together, the existing evidence underscores the importance of country ownership of management capacity building efforts, which often challenge the status quo and thus need country leadership to sustain despite inevitable friction. The literature also recognizes that management capacity efforts, as a key ingredient of effective systems change, take time to embed, as new protocols and ways of working become habitual and integrated as standard operating procedures. Despite these challenges, the field of health management as part of global health system strengthening efforts holds promise as a fundamental leverage point for achieving health system performance goals with existing human, technical, and financial resources. The evidence base consistently supports the role of management in performance improvement but would benefit from additional research with improved methodological rigor and longer-time horizon investigations. Meanwhile, greater emphasis on management as a critical element of global health efforts may open new and sustainable avenues for advancing health systems performance.

  9. Cassia fistula Linn: Potential candidate in the health management.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Arshad H

    2015-01-01

    Cassia fistula Linn is known as Golden shower has therapeutics importance in health care since ancient times. Research findings over the last two decade have confirmed the therapeutics consequence of C. fistula in the health management via modulation of biological activities due to the rich source of antioxidant. Several findings based on the animal model have confirmed the pharmacologically safety and efficacy and have opened a new window for human health management. This review reveals additional information about C. fistula in the health management via in vivo and in vitro study which will be beneficial toward diseases control. PMID:26130932

  10. Cassia fistula Linn: Potential candidate in the health management

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H.

    2015-01-01

    Cassia fistula Linn is known as Golden shower has therapeutics importance in health care since ancient times. Research findings over the last two decade have confirmed the therapeutics consequence of C. fistula in the health management via modulation of biological activities due to the rich source of antioxidant. Several findings based on the animal model have confirmed the pharmacologically safety and efficacy and have opened a new window for human health management. This review reveals additional information about C. fistula in the health management via in vivo and in vitro study which will be beneficial toward diseases control.

  11. Simulation: A Complementary Method for Teaching Health Services Strategic Management

    PubMed Central

    Reddick, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    Rapid change in the health care environment mandates a more comprehensive approach to the education of future health administrators. The area of consideration in this study is that of health care strategic management. A comprehensive literature review suggests microcomputer-based simulation as an appropriate vehicle for addressing the needs of both educators and students. Seven strategic management software packages are reviewed and rated with an instrument adapted from the Infoworld review format. The author concludes that a primary concern is the paucity of health care specific strategic management simulations.

  12. Health Shocks and Natural Resource Management: Evidence from Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Maria; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Thirumurthy, Harsha

    2014-01-01

    Poverty and altered planning horizons brought on by the HIV/AIDS epidemic can change individual discount rates, altering incentives to conserve natural resources. Using longitudinal household survey data from western Kenya, we estimate the effects of health status on investments in soil quality, as indicated by households’ agricultural land fallowing decisions. We first show that this effect is theoretically ambiguous: while health improvements lower discount rates and thus increase incentives to conserve natural resources, they also increase labor productivity and make it more likely that households can engage in labor-intensive resource extraction activities. We find that household size and composition are predictors of whether the effect of health improvements on discount rates dominates the productivity effect, or vice-versa. Since households with more and younger members are better able to reallocate labor to cope with productivity shocks, the discount rate effect dominates for these households and health improvements lead to greater levels of conservation. In smaller families with less substitutable labor, the productivity effect dominates and health improvements lead to greater environmental degradation PMID:25558117

  13. [Essential competences for the management of health care networks].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Marcos; Bisama, Ligia; Moncada, Patricio

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that in order to fulfill the health needs of the majority of the Chilean population, which is beneficiary of the public health system, essential organizational skills should be developed for network administration among Self-administered Hospitals, Network Manager and Primary Health Care facilities. Self-administered Hospitals should be competent in managing service options according to their strategy for development, reference and counter-reference mechanisms and waiting lists, to optimize queuing. The Network Manager should be competent in demand management that is regulated, investments management that determines future development in terms of population needs and stakeholders' management, which is a political viability type of management. Finally, the Primary Health Care manager should be competent in demand management as a strategic partner of the Network Manager, community participation and management of interlinked areas, articulating social networks and sanitary impact management. At each level and within levels, there are crossroads that promote synergies. Based on the development of essential skills, a practice with strategic intentions, organization managers will develop team work skills. PMID:23677235

  14. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care at home after they have been in the hospital ... dolls to help you practice different procedures. Home Health Care Assistance The hospital social worker can help families ...

  15. The health management information system of Pakistan under devolution: health managers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Muhammad Suleman; Ali, Moazzam; Kuroiwa, Chushi

    2008-04-01

    Devolution implies that use of data for decision making starts at the level of data generation. However under a newly decentralized system, managers may face different hurdles in utilizing the preexisting Health Management Information System (HMIS). This qualitative research explores the perceptions of health managers regarding HMIS under the devolution reforms enacted in 2001 in Pakistan. The study was carried out by interviewing 26 managers at various levels in seven selected districts in all provinces. There was general dissatisfaction and confusion over roles and responsibility: respondents reported that the overall atmosphere was characterized by the reluctance of provincial managers to release data under their authority, the absence of prerequisite human resources, and conflicts of interests between political and administrative leadership. The devolution didn't bring immediate good effects for the HMIS. Treated as a least priority area, staff was distributed from provincial HMIS cells, causing overburdening of remaining staff and jeopardizing data analysis. Reporting regularity from the districts was also compromised secondary to political interference and loss of provincial control. The present HMIS is in need of redesigning so that it may keep pace with the devolved system. The HMIS reforms are needed to improve information systems at the district level, capacity building of district managers, political commitment, and administrative ownership of the system and to earmark and make available resource and promote evidence-based decision making. Change in the public administration culture towards encouraging initiative taking at lower levels, introduction of performance incentives, inculcating work ethics, encouraging local accountability, and good governance are all essential. PMID:20103905

  16. Design of Computer Integrated Safety and Health Management System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hunszu Liu

    2007-01-01

    Diverse safety and health operation data collected and stored in different departments have not been fully integrated and\\u000a utilized by managers due to poor design of safety and health information system. The safety and health management system can\\u000a be depicted, conceptually, as an organic system with circulation of information flow which carries required data and information\\u000a to specified workers and

  17. Application Challenges: System Health Management for Complex Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George D. Hadden; Peter Bergstrom; Tariq Samad; Bonnie Holte Bennett; George J. Vachtsevanos; Joe Van Dyke

    2000-01-01

    System Health Management (SHM) is an example of the types of challenging applications facing embedding high-performance computing environments. SHM systems monitor real-time sensors to determine system health and performance. Performance, economics, and safety are all at stake in SHM, and the emphasis on health management technology is motivated by all these considerations. This paper describes a project focusing on condition-based

  18. Role of GIS in Public Health Management in Pakistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mubushar Hussain; Mudassar Hassan Arsalan; Mohammed Raza Mehdi

    2006-01-01

    Important objects in health database are patients, doctors, infrastructural facilities and health services. Nevertheless, all these objects have spatial dimensions and mutual interaction in their inheritance. The understanding of these dimensions and interactions are the key for health planning and management. For instance, these interactions may provide excellent means of analyzing epidemiological attributes, revealing spatial trends, dependencies and inter-relationships that

  19. Role of GIS in public health management in Pakistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mubushar Hussain; Mudassar Hassan Arsalan; Mohammed Raza Mehdi

    2008-01-01

    Important objects in health databases are patients, doctors, infrastructural facilities, and health services. Nevertheless, all these objects have spatial dimensions and mutual interaction in their inheritance. The understanding of these dimensions and interactions are the key for health planning and management. For instance, these interactions may provide an excellent means of analyzing epidemiological attributes, revealing spatial trends, dependencies, and inter-relationships

  20. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  1. Climate Change and the Health Implications of Managed Relocation

    E-print Network

    Smith, Kate

    91 Climate Change and the Health Implications of Managed Relocation Jessica Fields '14 and Tram Bui `14 Other modules in the Climate Change and Health unit that best complement the one presented here include The Science of Climate Change, Climate Change and Health: Lessons from the Past

  2. Management Support and Worksite Health Promotion Program Effectiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Dejoy; Heather M. Bowen; Kristin M. Baker; Bethany H. Bynum; Mark G. Wilson; Ron Z. Goetzel; Rod K. Dishman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and use of management support measures in two worksite health promotion\\u000a intervention trials. Results from the two intervention trials suggest that management support for health promotion can be\\u000a assessed and tracked over time using both perceptual and observational measures. These results also provide initial evidence\\u000a that an increase in management

  3. Pathways to breaking the poverty trap in Ethiopia: Investments in agricultural water, education, and markets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Munir A. Hanjra; Tadele Ferede; Debel Gemechu Gutta

    2009-01-01

    Investments in agricultural water management should complement or strengthen the livelihood and coping systems of the rural poor, and should thus be instrumental for breaking the poverty trap in Ethiopia. Underdeveloped water resources constrain progress towards poverty reduction. We examine linkages and complementarities between agricultural water, education, markets and rural poverty through an empirical study using household level data from

  4. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    , Seattle, WA Abstract Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more

  5. Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    , CUNY has had an internal audit and control department with risk management responsibilities; a publicURMIA Understanding Risk Management through an Environmental Health and Safety Template 2008 URMIA Journal Reprint Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D. The City University of New York University Risk Management

  6. [Managing health risks of workers in business trip].

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, E V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents data of prospective observation over the risk management system concerning health of international oil and gas company workers in business trips. The management system included training and screening of workers under risk, specific prophylaxis and other measures. The authors described problems of the risk management system implementation, suggested recommendations to control risks connected with business trips. PMID:25881395

  7. AMUSE: Autonomic Management of Ubiquitous e-Health Systems

    E-print Network

    Sventek, Joe

    . The Amuse project is developing autonomic management techniques for self-configuring and self-managingAMUSE: Autonomic Management of Ubiquitous e-Health Systems N. Dulay1 , S. Heeps2 , E. Lupu1 , R. Mathur1 , O. Sharma2 , M. Sloman1 , J. Sventek2 1 Department of Computing, Imperial College London 2

  8. College of Health Sciences HSM Health Services Management

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    , medical/moral problems, malpractice, tax laws, contracts, labor law, regulation and institutional,andtheimpactofsocial,political,economic,regulatory,andtechnological forces. Also includes a discussion of major health problems and related health care programs. (Same to health care settings. Topics to be considered include governance, patient rights, informed consent

  9. Recent research in public health surveillance and health management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. Tsui; D. Goldsman; W. Jiang; S. Y. Wong

    2010-01-01

    While the challenges of the next pandemic outbreak are overwhelming, either from swine flu, other infectious disease, bioterrorism, timely detection of disease outbreaks is most important for public health surveillance and society safety and stability. In public health surveillance, the objective is to systematically collect, analyze, and interpret public health data (chronic or infectious diseases) in order to understand trends,

  10. News from the Health Services Administration Alumni Chapter Fall 2008 Department of Health Management and Informatics College of Health and Public Affairs

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    in the College of Health and Public Affairs for health services administration graduate students. ScholarshipsNews from the Health Services Administration Alumni Chapter · Fall 2008 Department of Health Management and Informatics · College of Health and Public Affairs

  11. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  12. Managing CHAMPUS mental health care with public-private partnerships.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J F

    1996-01-01

    When faced with skyrocketing costs and utilization of mental health and substance abuse services covered by the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS), the Department of Defense (DoD) turned to a managed care approach to seek improvements. This article provides brief background information on CHAMPUS and its experience in the area of mental health services, describes DoD's partnerships with private sector mental health care firms, and highlights the most successful features of each. PMID:10172558

  13. DUAL MBA/MS Nonprofit Management and International Health Policy and Management

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    mobilization and allocation- including issues of equity, cost effectiveness and efficiency, building public) Management of Healthcare Organizations (4) International Health Financing (2) Electives (2) Cost (4) Corporate Finance (4) Social Justice & Management (2) Team Consulting Project (6) Fall Two Spring

  14. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. PMID:24070747

  15. Infant feeding, poverty and human development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Beasley; Lisa H Amir

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between poverty and human development touches on a central aim of the International Breastfeeding Journal's editorial policy which is to support and protect the health and wellbeing of all infants through the promotion of breastfeeding. It is proposed that exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding to 12 months, could prevent 1,301,000 deaths or 13% of

  16. No health for all without better trained management.

    PubMed

    White, D K

    1997-01-01

    This article notes that existing health professionals and managers constitute the first 'generation' working in a world where Health for All is a practical possibility because, if founded on community-based public and primary health care with hospitals in support and good intersectoral help, we now have the appropriate technology, access to finance and adequate numbers of health workers. What we still lack are sufficient health professionals, at all levels, with the managerial skills and experience to apply the technology, generate the funding and motivate the staff; making full use of community involvement, the co-operation of other sectors and good relationships with local and central government. Management can be learned both at the workplace and in the training room, and from the managers a few of them will emerge as leaders, with the vision to secure the willing support of others in reaching worthwhile health goals. A very useful publication is the Training Manual on Management of Human Resources for Health, WHO/EDUC/93.201 from World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. The paper closes with examples illustrating four principles for health management development: finding key points of entry; reaching large numbers; accelerating national self-sufficiency; and international. PMID:10169451

  17. 45 CFR 284.50 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each Territory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each Territory...PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES METHODOLOGY...IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT...

  18. Stop Child Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A number of international organizations are committed to helping end child poverty, and one of the best known of their number is the Global Volunteer Network. Through their advocacy work and the Stop Child Poverty campaign, they are dedicated to the proposition that child poverty can be completed eradicated. Through sections titled "Learn It", "Live It", and "Pass it On", visitors to this site will learn about the "big picture" of child poverty and how they can become directly involved in any number of volunteer projects. The "Pass It On" area is quite fine in this regard, as visitors can look over a message board where they can discuss the campaign, and then use a zip-code search engine to find volunteer opportunities in their area.

  19. West Coast Poverty Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Based at the University of Washington, the West Coast Poverty Center "serves as a hub for research, education, and policy analysis leading to greater understanding of the causes and consequences of poverty and effective approaches to reducing it in the west coast states." The Center was created in the fall of 2005, and it represents a collaborative venture between the UW School of Social Work, the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs, and the College of Arts and Sciences. Scholars and others will find the site quite useful, and they may wish to start at the "Poverty Basics" section. This area includes helpful overviews like "How Many People Are Poor in the United States?" and interactive maps and charts that document the state of poverty levels on the West Coast. Moving on, the "Research" area contains links to papers, research briefs, and information about upcoming events sponsored by the Center.

  20. Global Distribution of Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    For policymakers and academics alike, having access to information about the global distribution of poverty is crucial. Based at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, The Poverty Mapping Project at The Center for International Earth Science Information Network is a very fine resource for anyone interested in this subject. Understandably, the site provides access to dozens of maps which document the geographic and biophysical conditions of where the poor live. Visitors can look over 300 poverty maps offered at a number of spatial scales. Persons looking for data for their own research will want to consider downloading the subnational and national poverty data sets that are made available here. Overall, it's a well-designed site and one which can be used in a variety of settings.

  1. Sensor Technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Management of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Brown, T. L.; Woodard, S. E.; Fleming, G. A.; Cooper, E. G.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is focusing considerable efforts on technology development for Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems. The research in this area is targeted toward increasing aerospace vehicle safety and reliability, while reducing vehicle operating and maintenance costs. Onboard, real-time sensing technologies that can provide detailed information on structural integrity are central to such a health management system. This paper describes a number of sensor technologies currently under development for integrated vehicle health management. The capabilities, current limitations, and future research needs of these technologies are addressed.

  2. Pesticides and public health: integrated methods of mosquito management.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management. We assess the future use of mosquito control pesticides in view of niche markets, incentives for new product development, Environmental Protection Agency registration, the Food Quality Protection Act, and improved pest management strategies for mosquito control. PMID:11266290

  3. Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura A Rowe; Sister Barbara Brillant; Emily Cleveland; Bernice T Dahn; Shoba Ramanadhan; Mae Podesta; Elizabeth H Bradley

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and

  4. Financial coping strategies of mental health consumers: managing social benefits.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Mary Ager

    2014-05-01

    Mental health consumers depend on social benefits in the forms of supplemental security income and social security disability insurance for their livelihood. Although these programs pay meager benefits, little research has been undertaken into how this population makes ends meet. Using a qualitative approach, this study asks what are the financial coping strategies of mental health consumers? Seven approaches were identified: subsidies, cost-effective shopping, budgeting, prioritizing, technology, debt management, and saving money. Results illustrate the resourcefulness of mental health consumers in managing meager social benefits and highlight the need to strengthen community mental health efforts with financial capabilities education. PMID:24346222

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA 348 Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015 Health Informatics and Information Management -

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    hrs) HIM 3006 Foundations of Health Information Management (HIM) 3 hrs HIM 4508C Quality Management 3 hrs HIM 4656C Health Information Management Systems 3 hrs HSC 3537 Medical Terminology 3 hrs HIM 4226C and Information Management - Minor College of Health and Public Affairs Department of Health Management

  6. Associations Between Socioeconomic Status and Allostatic Load: Effects of Neighborhood Poverty and Tests of Mediating Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Graciela; Lachance, Laurie; Johnson, Jonetta; Gaines, Causandra; Israel, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined relationships between neighborhood poverty and allostatic load in a low- to moderate-income multiracial urban community. We tested the hypothesis that neighborhood poverty is associated with allostatic load, controlling for household poverty. We also examined the hypotheses that this association was mediated by psychosocial stress and health-related behaviors. Methods. We conducted multilevel analyses using cross-sectional data from a probability sample survey in Detroit, Michigan (n?=?919) and the 2000 US Census. The outcome measure was allostatic load. Independent variables included neighborhood and household poverty, psychosocial stress, and health-related behaviors. Covariates included neighborhood and individual demographic characteristics. Results. Neighborhood poverty was positively associated with allostatic load (P?poverty and controlling for potential confounders. Relationships between neighborhood poverty were mediated by self-reported neighborhood environment stress but not by health-related behaviors. Conclusions. Neighborhood poverty is associated with wear and tear on physiological systems, and this relationship is mediated through psychosocial stress. These relationships are evident after accounting for household poverty levels. Efforts to promote health equity should focus on neighborhood poverty, associated stressful environmental conditions, and household poverty. PMID:22873478

  7. 'We don't want to manage poverty': community groups politicise food insecurity and charitable food donations.

    PubMed

    Rock, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    Charitable assistance is a common response to food insecurity in many affluent countries. The coalition featured in this case study is explicitly concerned with social justice, mitigating the potential for charitable assistance to mask the extent of food insecurity, its root causes and its long-term consequences. The coalition structure has assisted community workers in transcending day-to-day routines, so as to reflect on the politics of food insecurity and institutionalised responses to this problem. Coalition members have defined food security as an objective whose achievement will entail comprehensive reform. One noteworthy outcome has been to recommend that member groups not redistribute a number of foodstuffs commonly donated by individuals and corporations. In grappling with a tension between responding to immediate needs for food and addressing the root causes of these needs, community workers have paid attention to public health. PMID:16970003

  8. Status of occupational health elements in occupational safety and health management systems in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koji Mori; Takashi Kameda; Yuichi Kobayashi

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the status of occupational health elements in occupational safety and health management systems (OSHMSs) in Japan, and the reasons why they are often conducted outside OSHMSs, a questionnaire was sent to all listed company sites that had been certified as following the guidelines on OSHMS of either Japanese Ministry of Health and Labor by Japanese Industrial

  9. Exploring the Promise of Population Health Management Programs to Improve Health. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Tricia Higgins

    2011-01-01

    Population health management programs—programs targeted to a defined population that use a variety of individual, organizational, and societal interventions to improve health outcomes—are increasingly being looked on by large employers as a promising practice for improving health and outcomes and \\

  10. Risk management frameworks for human health and environmental risks.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Cindy; Hrudey, Steve; Shortreed, John; Craig, Lorraine; Krewski, Daniel; Furgal, Chris; McColl, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical review of the risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication approaches currently being undertaken by key national, provincial/state, territorial, and international agencies was conducted. The information acquired for review was used to identify the differences, commonalities, strengths, and weaknesses among the various approaches, and to identify elements that should be included in an effective, current, and comprehensive approach applicable to environmental, human health and occupational health risks. More than 80 agencies, organizations, and advisory councils, encompassing more than 100 risk documents, were examined during the period from February 2000 until November 2002. An overview was made of the most important general frameworks for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication for human health and ecological risk, and for occupational health risk. In addition, frameworks for specific applications were reviewed and summarized, including those for (1)contaminated sites; (2) northern contaminants; (3) priority substances; (4) standards development; (5) food safety; (6) medical devices; (7) prescription drug use; (8) emergency response; (9) transportation; (10) risk communication. Twelve frameworks were selected for more extensive review on the basis of representation of the areas of human health, ecological, and occupational health risk; relevance to Canadian risk management needs; representation of comprehensive and well-defined approaches; generalizability with their risk areas; representation of "state of the art" in Canada, the United States, and/or internationally; and extent of usage of potential usage within Canada. These 12 frameworks were: 1. Framework for Environmental Health Risk Management (US Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, 1997). 2. Health Risk Determination: The Challenge of Health Protection (Health and Welfare Canada, 1990). 3. Health Canada Decision-Making Framework for Identifying, Assessing and Managing Health Risks (Health Canada, 2000). 4. Canadian Environmental Protection Act: Human Health Risk Assessment of Priority Substances(Health Canada, 1994). 5. CSA-Q8550 Risk Management: Guidelines for Decision-Makers (Canada Standards Association, 1997). 6. Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process (US National Research Council, 1983). 7. Understanding Risk: Informing Decisions in a Democratic Society (US National Research Council, 1996). 8. Environmental Health Risk Assessment (enHealth Council of Australia, 2002). 9. A Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment (CCME, 1996). 10. Ecological Risk Assessments of Priority Substances Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (Environment Canada, 1996).11. Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (US EPA, 1998b). 12. Proposed Model for Occupational Health Risk Assessment and Management (Rampal & Sadhra, 1999). Based on the extensive review of these frameworks, seven key elements that should be included in a comprehensive framework for human health, ecological, and occupational risk assessment and management were identified: 1. Problem formulation stage. 2. Stakeholder involvement. 3. Communication. 4. Quantitative risk assessment components. 5. Iteration and evaluation. 6. Informed decision making. 7. Flexibility. On the basis of this overarching approach to risk management, the following "checklist" to ensure a good risk management decision is proposed: - Make sure you're solving the right problem. - Consider the problem and the risk within the full context of the situation, using a broad perspective. - Acknowledge, incorporate, and balance the multiple dimensions of risk. - Ensure the highest degree of reliability for all components of the risk management process. - Involve interested and effected parties from the outset of the process. - Commit to honest and open communication between all parties. - Employ continuous evaluation throughout the process (formative, process, and outcome evaluation), and be prepared t

  11. Aircraft health management network: A user interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Thanthry; R. Pendse

    2009-01-01

    Network management is one of the most discussed topics in the networking fraternity. The efficiency of the network management suit is measured by the number of parameters\\/components handled by the application while making decisions. In the case of Internet-enabled aircrafts, along with network security, even aircraft safety needs to be considered as a factor while designing the network management suit.

  12. Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Leatt, P

    1994-01-01

    Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgement. To improve their management skills physicians can benefit from management education programs such as those offered by the Physician-Manager Institute and several Canadian universities. To manage in the future environment they must increase their knowledge and skills in policy and political processes, financial strategies and management, human resources management, systems and program quality improvement and organizational design. PMID:8287339

  13. The Adoption of Mobile Health Management Services: An Empirical Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Chien Hung; Wen-Yuan Jen

    As their populations age, many countries are facing the increasing economic pressure of providing healthcare to their people.\\u000a In Taiwan, this problem is exacerbated by an increasing rate of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Encouraging the adoption\\u000a of personal health management services is one way to maintain current levels of personal health and to efficiently manage\\u000a the distribution of healthcare resources.

  14. A computer-assisted health care cost management system.

    PubMed

    Burton, W N; Hoy, D A; Stephens, M

    1991-03-01

    To our knowledge, First Chicago has developed and implemented the first operational integrated health data computer system that includes the traditional occupational medicine data base together with medical claims and health risk appraisal data. OMNIS has combined medical claims, personnel, disability, employee assistance program, wellness program participation, administrative functions, laboratory, periodic health evaluation data, and health risk appraisal data in a single system. OMNIS provides data that are being used to more accurately predict health care and disability costs and design intervention strategies. Clearly, the integrated health data computer system provides information to manage increasingly complex issues of health care quality and cost. For companies concerned about the quality as well as the cost of health care, an integrated health data computer system (OMNIS) may be a valuable tool to objectively assess quality of care. For example, a company could evaluate how effectively various providers (eg, health maintenance organizations, preferred provider organizations, indemnity plan) control medical conditions such as hypertension. Integrated health data management systems have the potential to assist in the selection of the highest quality and most cost-effective health care plans. PMID:2030422

  15. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior. PMID:21045586

  16. Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

  17. Using information to guide managed behavioral health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Tompkins; Jennifer Perloff

    2004-01-01

    This evaluation of substance abuse and mental health treatment services in Arizona discusses and illustrates the use of data already collected by the State to manage and monitor the public behavioral health sector. The authors utilize a framework that focuses on rate-setting and financial incentives; provider profiling and education; and monitoring of data quality and system-wide performance. Information and analysis

  18. Who Do I Call? --Environmental Health Safety or Facilities Management

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Earthquake preparation X Electrical equipment repair or replacement X Electrical safety/Lock out tag outWho Do I Call? -- Environmental Health Safety or Facilities Management ISSUE EH&S FACILITIES/or electrical fuse blown X Confined space entry and signage X Construction projects - health impacts X

  19. BRAND GUIDELINES Management of the UC Health Brand

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    is to ensure that the UC Health brand is consistently portrayed in all of our various touchpoints, from the wayBRAND GUIDELINES Management of the UC Health Brand February 2012 #12;The purpose of the document;SECTION 1: BRAND STRATEGY 1.1 Essence & Attributes 1.2 POPs & PODs 1.3 Positioning SECTION 2: BRANDMARK 2

  20. BRAND GUIDELINES Management of the UC Health Brand

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    is to ensure that the UC Health brand is consistently portrayed in all of our various touchpoints, from the wayBRAND GUIDELINES Management of the UC Health Brand April 2014 #12;The purpose of the document;3 SECTION 1: BRAND STRATEGY 1.1 Essence & Attributes 1.2 POPs & PODs 1.3 Positioning SECTION 2: BRANDMARK 2

  1. Implication of Ecosystem Health Assessment for Urban Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meirong Su; Bin Chen; Zhifeng Yang

    2010-01-01

    In order to implementing theoretical urban ecosystem health assessment into practical urban management more effectively, it is necessary to find out the relationship between the urban ecosystem health status based on the internal metabolism characteristics and the external performance of the urban ecosystem. Eleven indicators are selected to describe the performance of the urban ecosystem from aspects of resources condition,

  2. Analysis of EHRs for research, quality management and health politics.

    PubMed

    Gall, Walter; Grossmann, Wilfried; Duftschmid, Georg; Wrba, Thomas; Dorda, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Lifelong electronic health records can supply valuable information for research, quality management and health politics in addition to supporting treatment of patients. Based on experiences with scientific data analysis in a university hospital environment, requirements on cross-institutional analysis of electronic health records in a healthcare system are discussed. The concept of archetypes can play a key role in this context. Archetypes can be utilized in data analysis for visualization, semantic linkage and finally for standardized data transfer. PMID:18487768

  3. Activity-based cost management in health care - another fad?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Aird

    1996-01-01

    By providing improved information for strategic planning purposes, activity-based cost management (ABM) systems can help hospitals and other health care providers improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, control costs and manage their resources better. The NHS is starting to evaluate the ABM approach. Describes a research project in one specialist hospital in Sheffield, UK, which found

  4. Job satisfaction and subjective health among sales managers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loreta Gustainien?; Auks? Endriulaitien?

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this study is to examine gender and age correlates of job satisfaction and to test the relationship between job satisfaction and subjective mental and physical health in a sample of sales managers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Survey of 200 employees holding the managers' positions (105 men and 95 women) in sales' organizations across the biggest Lithuania's cities

  5. Preparing for Managed Behavioral Health Care in Children's Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Cynthia G.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how managed health care is becoming the preferred way of doing the business of human services, particularly as it relates to children's services. Author argues that social workers need to prepare for this new environment by becoming proficient in outcomes measurement. Provides suggestions for learning about outcomes management. (GCP)

  6. Planning By Objectives, Cost Accountability Help Manage Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipolla, John J.

    1974-01-01

    This report describes Oregon's use of the system of Management By Objectives (M.B.O.) to improve the decision-making process and allow better utilization of available resources in the management of public health programs. Included is th Program P.O.M.E., the Daily Activity Report, the Monthly Accomplishments and M.B.O. objectives. (MLB)

  7. Application of the Microcomputer to Occupational Health Data Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GREGORIE M. RAWLS; GEORGE A. DWIGGINS; CHARLES E. FEIGLEY

    1983-01-01

    The use of the microcomputer offers a simple, inexpensive solution to the numerous problems associated with data management in an occupational health program. A system has been developed which uses commercially available data management software supplemented by optional programs tailored to the specific application. The system is capable of maintaining files of personal and area monitoring data, material toxicity and

  8. Can Earth Sciences Help Alleviate Global Poverty?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Poverty is not properly described solely in terms of economics. Certainly the billion people living on less than a dollar a day are the extreme poor and the two billion people who are living today on two dollars a day or less are poor also. One third of all humans live in poverty today. But poverty concerns deprivation - of good health, adequate nutrition, adequate education, properly paid employment, clean water, adequate housing and good sanitation. It is a fundamental denial of opportunity and a violation of basic human rights. Despite its prevalence and persistence of poverty and the attention given it by many scholars, the causes of poverty are not well understood and hence interventions to bring poor societies out of their condition often fail. One commonly missed component in the search for solutions to poverty is the fundamental co-dependence between the state of the Earth and the state of human well-being. These relationships, are compelling but often indirect and non-linear and sometimes deeply nuanced. They are also largely empirical in nature, lacking theory or models that describe the nature of the relationships. So while it is quite apparent that the poorest people are much more vulnerable than the rich to the Earths excesses and even to relatively small natural variations in places where the base conditions are poor, we do not presently know whether the recognized vulnerability is both an outcome of poverty and a contributing cause. Are societies poor, or held from development out of poverty because of their particular relationship to Earth's natural systems? Does how we live depend on where we live? Providing answers to these questions is one of the most fundamental research challenges of our time. That research lies in a domain squarely at the boundary between the natural and social sciences and cannot be answered by studies in either domain alone. What is clear even now, is that an understanding of the Earth gained from the natural sciences is essential and could hold the key to making gains toward alleviating the burden of global poverty.

  9. What passes and fails as health policy and management.

    PubMed

    Chinitz, David; Rodwin, Victor G

    2014-10-01

    The field of health policy and management (HPAM) faces a gap between theory, policy, and practice. Despite decades of efforts at reforming health policy and health care systems, prominent analysts state that the health system is "stuck" and that models for change remain "aspirational." We discuss four reasons for the failure of current ideas and models for redesigning health care: (1) the dominance of microeconomic thinking; (2) the lack of comparative studies of health care organizations and the limits of health management theory in recognizing the importance of local contexts; (3) the separation of HPAM from the rank and file of health care, particularly physicians; and (4) the failure to expose medical students to issues of HPAM. We conclude with suggestions for rethinking how the field of HPAM might generate more-promising policies for health care providers and managers by abandoning the illusion of context-free theories and, instead, seeking to facilitate the processes by which organizations can learn to improve their own performance. PMID:25037829

  10. Windows on Urban Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jargowsky, Paul A.

    The spatial dimension and geographic variation of poverty has been the subject of great scholarly debate among policy-makers and academics for numerous decades. Some have commented that dense concentrations of underclass persons create a "culture of poverty," while others lay the blame on architects, urban planners, and a host of others. This engaging and useful site is a product of the Bruton Center at the University of Texas at Dallas under the direction of Professor Paul Jargowsky. The Windows on Urban Poverty project Web site contains a research paper on the changes in the concentration of poverty between 1990 and 2000 (also released as a publication through the Brookings Institution) and a mapping tool that lets visitors view the relative concentrations of poverty in cities around the United States. There is a small section that introduces users to the process of using the mapping tool, which will be quite helpful to those unfamiliar with utilizing maps in this fashion (Users should note that the interactive mapping tool on the site is only supported by Internet Explorer).

  11. Secure e-Health: managing risks to patient health data.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W

    2007-01-01

    e-Health, as an inter-jurisdictional enterprise, presents risks to patient health data that involve not only technology and professional protocols but also laws, regulations and professional security cultures. The USA Patriot Act is one example of how national laws can shape these concerns. Secure e-Health therefore requires not only national standardization of professional education and protocols but also global interoperability of regulations and laws. Some progress in this regard has been made in the European context; however, even here developments are incomplete, and nothing similar has been accomplished on a global scale. Professional health information organizations must take the lead in developing appropriate high-level principles for professional certification and security protocols and in harmonizing these on a global basis, so that they can provide a firm and consistent foundation for international treaties. Such developments should occur in concert with other health professions, so that coordinated requirements are integrated into revisions of the relevant codes of ethics. This presentation identifies and addresses some of the ethical and legal issues and proposes a series of recommendations. PMID:17084665

  12. ADVANCES IN PLANT HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. James Cook

    2000-01-01

    ? Abstract Plant health management,is the science and practice of understand- ing and overcoming,the succession of biotic and abiotic factors that limit plants from achieving their full genetic potential as crops, ornamentals, timber trees, or other uses. Although practiced as long as agriculture itself, as a science-based concept, plant heath management is even younger than integrated pest management (IPM), and

  13. The link between infertility and poverty: evidence from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Papreen

    2012-03-01

    The link between high fertility and poverty is well established. However, this paper shows how infertility may also generate poverty among childless families in Bangladesh. An ethnographic study was conducted, involving various qualitative research methods that revealed economic consequences to be one of the crucial sequelae of childlessness in Bangladesh. This paper details how the poverty/fertility relationship is dependent on social and institutional characteristics, including patriarchal values, education, urban-rural location and health services. Empirical data show that childlessness generates poverty in various ways, including the deprivation of children's earnings, decline in women's mobility, demoralisation of men to earn an income, marriage devaluation by the husband, disbursements for treatment and denial of microcredit (very small loans to those in poverty, which support them to become self-employed to generate income). The current study shows that the infertility/poverty relationship is mostly contingent upon class and gender. It is therefore the rural poor childless women who are most badly affected economically in Bangladesh rather than the urban middle class childless women. In other words, this study reveal that along with gender, class plays a dominant role in terms of the economic consequences of childlessness in Bangladesh. It sheds light on a different and unusual aspect of poverty and aims to contribute to the gender discussion of livelihood and poverty. PMID:22313219

  14. Scientific American: Rapid Victories Against Extreme Poverty http://www.sciam.com/print_version.cfm?articleID=5B978D32-E7F2-... 1 of 2 4/24/2007 11:39 AM

    E-print Network

    Scientific American: Rapid Victories Against Extreme Poverty http://www.sciam.com/print adequate food, basic health services, safe drinking water and connectivity with the wider world (via roads. Their low yields reflect a lack of fertilizers, high-yield seeds and small-scale water management

  15. Managing interorganizational dependencies in the new health care marketplace.

    PubMed

    Pointer, D D; Begun, J W; Luke, R D

    1988-01-01

    To survive, let alone thrive, in an increasingly competitive and threatening environment, health care organizations must skillfully manage their dependencies. Such dependencies traditionally have been managed through marketplace exchanges (buying and selling) and ownership relationships (acquisition, merger, and business development). An alternative strategy for designing and managing interorganizational relationships, the quasi-firm, is introduced. The quasi-firm is a hybrid market/ownership arrangement that allows participating organizations to pursue strategically important purposes while simultaneously preserving a high degree of functional and legal autonomy. We suggest that this distinctive interorganizational form is particularly well suited to the features of the new health care marketplace. PMID:10302491

  16. Managed Behavioral Health Care Provider Practice Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Keefe; Michael L. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Managed care is a dominating issue on the public policy agenda. Difficulties in defining and operationalizing it continue to have ramifications for the nation. It is often assumed that the care being reimbursed by managed care organizations is for clients whose psychiatric conditions have been appropriately diagnosed and treated. Based on the responses of a randomly-selected group from the major

  17. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoyan, Gai [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang [Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Yoshihisa, Shirayama [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Tang Wei [Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China); University of Tokyo Hospital, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Chushi, Kuroiwa, E-mail: ckuroiw@m.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China)

    2010-02-15

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  18. Engineers Against Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-01-01

    Engineers Against Poverty (EAP) is a non-governmental organization that works in the field of engineering and international development. EAP works to harness members' combined skills to alleviate poverty throughout the world and work on the challenges involved with sustainable development along the way. The materials on the site are divided into five sections, including Major Initiatives, Key Issues, Publications, and EAP's Programme. A good place to start is the Major Initiatives area. Here users can learn about some of the key issues and challenges in the domain of engineering, poverty reduction, and more. The EAP's Programme area has information and working papers on the organization's work in transforming extractive industries and infrastructure projects. Finally, the Publications area contains works like "Employment Intensive Road Construction" and "Climate Compatible Development in the Infrastructure Sector Overview."

  19. Governance in managing public health resources in Brazilian municipalities.

    PubMed

    Avelino, George; Barberia, Lorena G; Biderman, Ciro

    2014-09-01

    This study contributes to the health governance discussion by presenting a new data set that allows for comparisons of the management of health resources among Brazilian municipalities. Research on Brazil is particularly important as the provision of health services was decentralized in 1988 and since then municipalities have been given greater responsibilities for the management of fiscal resources for public health service provision. Based on detailed information on corruption practices (such as over-invoicing, illegal procurement and fake receipts) from audit reports of health programmes in 980 randomly selected Brazilian municipalities, this study deepens understanding of the relationship between health governance institutions and the incidence of corruption at the local level by exploring the extent to which horizontal and vertical accountabilities contribute to reducing the propensity of municipal government officials to divert public health resources for private gain. The results of our multiple regression analysis suggest that the experience of health municipal councils is correlated with reductions in the incidence of corruption in public health programmes. This impact is significant over time, with each additional year of health council experience reducing corruption incidence levels by 2.1% from baseline values. The findings reported in this study do not rely on the subjectivity of corruption measures which usually conflate the actual incidence of corruption with its perception by informants. Based on our results, we provide recommendations that can assist policy makers to reduce corruption. PMID:23411119

  20. Forests and Poverty Reduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    "Close to 1.6 billion people - more than 25% of the world's population - rely on forest resources for their livelihoods and most of them (1.2 billion) use trees on farms to generate food and cash." Despite these figures, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations explains that data on these vital forest resources is "sketchy or not available." On the left hand side of the page visitors will find several interesting links including the FAO website which addresses the topic of forests and poverty reduction, the FAO forestry site which includes recent events and news topics, "Publications", information on "Workshops", and "Forestry and Poverty Reduction Strategies".

  1. World Bank PovertyNet

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PovertyNet, an important resource center for researchers and activists working to understand and alleviate poverty, contains several other, though more general, topic sections; a library of research papers and reports; occasional special features; datasets; a newsletter; and a Web Guide on Poverty.

  2. Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

    2005-01-01

    ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

  3. Texas camelid health and management survey

    E-print Network

    Jacklitsch, Brenda Louise

    2009-06-02

    A web-based and mail-out survey instrument was created to gather information on camelids in Texas. Information on management, nutrition, diseases, and reproductive problems was collected. The objectives of this research study were: (1) to establish...

  4. Texas camelid health and management survey 

    E-print Network

    Jacklitsch, Brenda Louise

    2009-06-02

    A web-based and mail-out survey instrument was created to gather information on camelids in Texas. Information on management, nutrition, diseases, and reproductive problems was collected. The objectives of this research ...

  5. Veterinary dairy herd health management in Europe: constraints and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cannas da Silva, J; Noordhuizen, J P T M; Vagneur, M; Bexiga, R; Gelfert, C C; Baumgartner, W

    2006-03-01

    The nature of veterinary work in dairy health management in Europe has changed over the past years and will change even more dramatically in the near future. The consumers and the media show increasing concern about animal welfare, safety of products of animal origin and traceability of animal products. Farmers in Europe have to produce under strict, often expensive and laborious regulations, while still commercially competing with farmers outside the EU and not subject to the same rules. Veterinarians should adapt their knowledge and skills to the new challenges and developments of the dairy sector. Dairy farmers nowadays ask for support in areas that go beyond clinical activities: environmental protection, welfare, nutrition, grassland management, economics and business management. Bovine practitioners should be able to advise in many different areas and subjects--that is the challenge to our profession. Veterinary education with regards to cattle health management should start with individual animal clinical work, which constitutes the basis of herd health advisory programmes. The bovine practitioner should then look beyond that and regard the herd as the unit. Each diseased cow or group of cows should be detected early enough to avoid financial losses or such losses should be prevented altogether by detecting and managing risk factors contributing to disease occurrence. Herd health and production management programmes represent the first level to optimise dairy farm performance. Expansions to that should further be considered, comprising both animal health and welfare issues, as well as food safety and public health issues. The latter could be addressed by quality risk management programmes following the HACCP-principles. Cattle veterinarians should follow recent developments and invest in new skills and knowledge in order to maintain their usefulness to the modern dairy farmer. Finally we are convinced that the cattle practitioner should evolve into this direction, otherwise the veterinarian as we know him will miss the train in the next years. PMID:16605158

  6. Community noise: health effects and management.

    PubMed

    King, Ronald P; Davis, Jeffrey R

    2003-03-01

    This commentary will reemphasize the importance of urban noise as a health problem and provide a practical approach toward implementing legislative controls. References and a short discussion of accepted ways to measure noise are included. Furthermore, a brief review of relationships between noise and the development of disease is discussed. Finally, a six-part noise control ordinance framework designed to help public health and community leaders start the process of urban and community noise reduction is detailed. The implementation of such enforceable and reasonable noise control ordinances will be good public health policy and will greatly impact the quality, and possibly quantity, of life of both the individual and the community. PMID:12708234

  7. Reusable Rocket Engine Turbopump Health Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surko, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    A health monitoring expert system software architecture has been developed to support condition-based health monitoring of rocket engines. Its first application is in the diagnosis decisions relating to the health of the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The post test diagnostic system runs off-line, using as input the data recorded from hundreds of sensors, each running typically at rates of 25, 50, or .1 Hz. The system is invoked after a test has been completed, and produces an analysis and an organized graphical presentation of the data with important effects highlighted. The overall expert system architecture has been developed and documented so that expert modules analyzing other line replaceable units may easily be added. The architecture emphasizes modularity, reusability, and open system interfaces so that it may be used to analyze other engines as well.

  8. [Analysis of rulings by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and reflections on national health policy management].

    PubMed

    Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria

    2007-03-01

    Ministry of Health rulings and provisions are important policy regulation tools that aim to orient the enforcement of health-related laws passed by the Legislative Branch, under the terms of the 1988 Federal Constitution. Such provisions have played a major role in the health sector, due not only to the number of documents submitted since the late 1990s, but mainly because of this tool's persuasive power in defining health sector policy. The current article aims to foster reflection on both national health policy management in Brazil and the main obstacles to the implementation of health reform operational aspects. The article classified and analyzed Ministry of Health rulings issued from 1990 to 2002. The study highlights the Ministry's centralizing approach and the use of financial and political persuasion tools that subject State and Municipal governments to the system's rules without creating a negotiated and sustained health policy that the country's institutional realities ratify and support. PMID:17334575

  9. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anand Krishnan; Baridalyne Nongkynrih; Kapil Yadav; Satyavir Singh; Vivek Gupta

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a

  10. Health Services Management in the Health Administration Curriculum. Report by the Curriculum Task Force on Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    Critical decisions that need to be made by faculties of health administration education programs when developing and assessing the health services management portion of the curriculum are identified. Decisions should draw from the information available concerning professional target roles of graduates, graduate behavior expected, resources for…

  11. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  12. Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increase sustainability and

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increase sustainability and productivity. 10/30/14 Contact: Clain Jones (406) 994-6076 or clainj@montana.edu To: News-dailies, News-weeklies, AgMedia, News-local, News-tv, News-radio, MSU-All-News, News-internal, Nat

  13. Halving Global Poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Besley; Robin Burgess

    2003-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals--global targets that the world's leaders set at the Millennium Summit in September 2000--are an ambitious agenda for reducing poverty. As a central plank, these goals include halving the proportion of people living below a dollar a day from around 30 percent of the developing world's population in 1990 to 15 percent by 2015--a reduction in the

  14. Food poverty: Rowntree revisited.

    PubMed

    Stitt, S; Grant, D

    1994-01-01

    A pilot exercise preceding a major study of the effects of poverty on adequacy of diet is reported on. The inability of many low income households to afford a healthy diet is serious in nature and widespread in extent. PMID:8065665

  15. Children in Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Congressional Research Service.

    This study was requested (by Representatives Charles B. Rangel and Harold Ford) in August 1984, to explore the factors which influence the poverty rate among children. Researchers were asked to examine demographic trends, economic factors, government policies, and other phenomena which could help explain why, despite increased government…

  16. Poverty, Work and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Kotze, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    This contribution suggests that if we are serious about adult education in the context of poverty eradication we require some shifts away from neo-liberal assumptions and values. Women and/in the informal economy should become the central focus, and livelihood studies would better allow us to understand the complex daily struggle for food and the…

  17. Poverty in School Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Kealy, William A.

    2013-01-01

    What are acute poverty challenges for culturally disadvantaged school communities across the United States? How do practicing teacher-researchers, pursuing advanced degrees, view this issue and the 21st century skills and dispositions classroom teachers need to foster change? Curious about this topic from the viewpoints of teachers who are…

  18. Poverty in the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joan Spade, SUNY- Brockport

    In addition to a quantitative analysis that involves univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis, this module reinforces research terms introduced in Intro to Sociology (independent, dependent and control variables and includes the opportunity to discuss sample vs. population (in the comparison of national poverty data vs. the poverty rate in the sample) and value vs. variable (poverty as a value and a variable and the recoding of the values in the household data). The module also uses the Census website to define the concept "poverty threshold" and look at trends in poverty.

  19. An Intelligent Content Discovery Technique for Health Portal Content Management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous content management of health information portals is a feature vital for its sustainability and widespread acceptance. Knowledge and experience of a domain expert is essential for content management in the health domain. The rate of generation of online health resources is exponential and thereby manual examination for relevance to a specific topic and audience is a formidable challenge for domain experts. Intelligent content discovery for effective content management is a less researched topic. An existing expert-endorsed content repository can provide the necessary leverage to automatically identify relevant resources and evaluate qualitative metrics. Objective This paper reports on the design research towards an intelligent technique for automated content discovery and ranking for health information portals. The proposed technique aims to improve efficiency of the current mostly manual process of portal content management by utilising an existing expert-endorsed content repository as a supporting base and a benchmark to evaluate the suitability of new content Methods A model for content management was established based on a field study of potential users. The proposed technique is integral to this content management model and executes in several phases (ie, query construction, content search, text analytics and fuzzy multi-criteria ranking). The construction of multi-dimensional search queries with input from Wordnet, the use of multi-word and single-word terms as representative semantics for text analytics and the use of fuzzy multi-criteria ranking for subjective evaluation of quality metrics are original contributions reported in this paper. Results The feasibility of the proposed technique was examined with experiments conducted on an actual health information portal, the BCKOnline portal. Both intermediary and final results generated by the technique are presented in the paper and these help to establish benefits of the technique and its contribution towards effective content management. Conclusions The prevalence of large numbers of online health resources is a key obstacle for domain experts involved in content management of health information portals and websites. The proposed technique has proven successful at search and identification of resources and the measurement of their relevance. It can be used to support the domain expert in content management and thereby ensure the health portal is up-to-date and current. PMID:25654440

  20. Pervasive Health Management: New Challenges for Health Informatics J.UCS Special Issue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Augusto; H. G. McAllister; P. J. McCullagh; C. D. Nugent

    This special issue addresses the area of Pervasive Health Management, which is beginning to challenge the twentieth century model of delivery, in which healthcare was organised in specialist locations and administered to patients by healthcare professionals. Thus primary care provides the initial contact, large hospitals administer specialist intervention and disease management, and long term hospital or rest-home care is provided

  1. Managing Academic Health Centers: Meeting the Challenges of the New Health Care World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report focuses on strategies documented by the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers (AHCs) concerning AHCs' management of patient care and research missions. Whatever challenges AHCs face in the future, their ability to respond effectively will be determined by the quality of their governance and management. To improve…

  2. Web Application for Managing Electronic Health Records

    Cancer.gov

    Technology to empower clinical staff in requesting and designing order sets can be transformative for hospitals and other health care organizations. This software is proving itself vital in building greater order set development efficiencies and in communication among key stakeholders responsible for certain aspects of an order set within an organization.

  3. Diabetes in pregnancy: health risks and management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Ali; Anne Dornhorst

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is increasing and therefore it is important to raise awareness of the associated health risks to the mother, the growing fetus, and the future child. Perinatal mortality and morbidity is increased in diabetic pregnancies through increased stillbirths and congenital malformation rates. These are mainly the result of early fetal exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia. In the mother, pregnancy

  4. Factors affecting usage of a personal health record (PHR) to manage health.

    PubMed

    Taha, Jessica; Czaja, Sara J; Sharit, Joseph; Morrow, Daniel G

    2013-12-01

    As the health care industry shifts into the digital age, patients are increasingly being provided with access to electronic personal health records (PHRs) that are tethered to their provider-maintained electronic health records. This unprecedented access to personal health information can enable patients to more effectively manage their health, but little is actually known about patients' ability to successfully use a PHR to perform health management tasks or the individual factors that influence task performance. This study evaluated the ability of 56 middle-aged adults (40-59 years) and 51 older adults (60-85 years) to use a simulated PHR to perform 15 common health management tasks encompassing medication management, review/interpretation of lab/test results, and health maintenance activities. Results indicated that participants in both age groups experienced significant difficulties in using the PHR to complete routine health management tasks. Data also showed that older adults, particularly those with lower numeracy and technology experience, encountered greater problems using the system. Furthermore, data revealed that the cognitive abilities predicting one's task performance varied according to the complexity of the task. Results from this study identify important factors to consider in the design of PHRs so that they meet the needs of middle-aged and older adults. As deployment of PHRs is on the rise, knowledge of the individual factors that impact effective PHR use is critical to preventing an increase in health care disparities between those who are able to use a PHR and those who are not. PMID:24364414

  5. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  6. Alternative futures for health economics: implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Mannion, Russell; Small, Neil; Thompson, Carl

    2005-09-01

    As nursing has been subject to successive waves of 'managerialism' there has been a drive on the part of government and elements within the profession to enhance the science base and promote cost-effective health care interventions. This has generated new interest in the 'economics of nursing' as efficiency and 'value for money' are viewed as necessary precondition for the provision of a high quality nursing service. As an academic subject health economics has brought an elegant set of theories to bear on the topic of health and health care. However, mainstream health economics is premised on a series of simplifying assumptions that, if applied uncritically, can induce a range of unintended and adverse consequences. This paper asks how ideas developed in one sphere (health economics) can be become influential in another (nursing management and practice) and it seeks explanations in the theories of Michel Foucault, specifically in his exploration of the reciprocal relationship between power and knowledge. How are our assumptions about what is possible and desirable shaped, how far do mechanisms of surveillance and self-subjugation extend? A range of alternative economic approaches have been developed which challenge many mainstream health economics assumptions. Some of these are better suited to the complex social environment present within health care. Nurses, nurse managers and researchers should question the assumptions of dominant economic models and explore a range of economic frameworks when planning services and evaluating their practice. PMID:16108775

  7. Poverty, Problem Behavior, and Promise: Differential Susceptibility Among Infants Reared in Poverty

    PubMed Central

    Conradt, Elisabeth; Measelle, Jeffrey; Ablow, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Do infants reared in poverty exhibit certain physiological traits that make them susceptible to the positive and negative features of their caregiving environment? Guided by theories of differential susceptibility and biological sensitivity to context, we evaluated whether high baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) operates as a susceptibility factor among infants reared in poverty (N = 73). Baseline RSA at 5 months, the quality of the attachment relationship at 17 months, and the interaction of these two factors were included in our models as predictors of problem behavior at 17 months. Consistent with theory, results showed no significant differences in problem behavior among infants with low baseline RSA; however, infants with high baseline RSA exhibited the lowest levels of problem behavior if reared in an environment that fostered security, and they exhibited the highest levels of problem behavior if reared in an environment that fostered disorganization. These results have important implications for the psychological health of infants living in poverty. PMID:23361232

  8. Prognostics and Health Management of Electronic Packaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pradeep Lall; Mohd Nokibul Islam; M. Kaysar Rahim; Jeffrey C. Suhling

    2006-01-01

    The current state of the art in managing system reliability is geared toward the development of predictive models for unaged pristine materials. The current state of art allows the prediction of time-to-failure for a pristine material under known loading conditions based on relationships such as the Paris' power law , , the Coffin-Manson relationship [2], [13], [23], [24], and the

  9. Pharmacy Management and Health Economics Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The following summaries highlight some of the key posters presented at the 26th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP), April 1–4, 2014, in Tampa, FL, focusing on areas of interest for payers, employers, drug manufacturers, providers, and other healthcare stakeholders. PMID:25126375

  10. Personal health information management system and its application in referral management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maisie Wang; Christopher Lau; Frederick A. Matsen III; Yongmin Kim

    2004-01-01

    Abstract, We developed a web-based personal health record (PHR) that can be used by patients to collect and manage their health information (e. g., medical history, past surgeries, medi-cations, and allergies), to request self-referrals, and to store a record of their consultations. The PHR also includes a messaging system that can be structured into the workflow of referral man-agement as

  11. A Public Health Knowledge Management Repository that Includes Grey Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra Revere; Paul F. Bugni; Sherrilynne Fuller

    2007-01-01

    Problem  Public health professionals rely heavily on resources that are often only available in grey literature format. However, while\\u000a grey literature may contain comprehensive, concrete, and up-to-date information, the fugitive nature of this material makes\\u000a access problematic. The public health community needs a knowledge management repository of grey literature and tools for easy\\u000a and rapid access, so time spent searching across

  12. A Hierarchical Model-based approach to Systems Health Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gautam Biswas; Sankaran Mahadevan

    2007-01-01

    Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) provides the ability to maintain system health and performance over the life of a system. For safety-critical systems, ISHM must maintain safe operations while increasing availability by preserving functionality and minimizing downtime. This paper discusses a model-based approach to ISHM that combines fault detection, isolation and identification, fault-adaptive control, and prognosis into a common framework.

  13. Health Management Technology as a General Solution Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshifumi; Tasaki, Hiroshi; Iwami, Taro; Tsuchiya, Naoki

    Health maintenance and improvement of humans, artifacts, and nature are pressing requirements considering the problems human beings have faced. In this article, the health management technology is proposed by centering cause-effect structure. The important aspect of the technology is evolvement through human-machine collaboration in response to changes of target systems. One of the reasons why the cause-effect structure is centered in the technology is its feature of transparency to humans by instinct point of view. The notion has been spreaded over wide application areas such as quality control, energy management, and healthcare. Some experiments were conducted to prove effectiveness of the technology in the article.

  14. The effect of integrated health management model on the health of older adults with diabetes in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jianqian; Yang, Liang; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qing; Jiang, Lili; Zong, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of integrated health management model on the health of older adults with diabetes. The 100 older adults with diabetes who gave informed consent were randomly allocated 1:1 into management and control groups. The integrated health management model was applied in the former while the latter was only given usual care. This model included the following components: health record establishment, health evaluation and health management (such as: diet advice, psychological aspects of health, education/skills training on health self-management, regular blood glucose monitoring, long-term diabetes drug monitoring, etc.). After 18 months, differences in three categories of variables (subjective grading items, objective measurement health indices and health service utilization) between the two groups before and after the intervention were assessed with t-test, ?(2)-test and mixed model analysis. The management group demonstrated improvement on the following variables: health knowledge score, self-evaluated psychological conditions, overall self-evaluated health conditions, diet score, physical activity duration per week, regular blood sugar monitoring, waist-to-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure and fasting blood sugar, the days of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months. Mixed model analysis showed that gender, age, self-evaluated health status, self-evaluated psychological status, education level and resident status were important factors affecting health indices. This study demonstrated that integrated health management model was effectiveness in improving the health of older adults with diabetes. PMID:25456892

  15. Dual-eligible reform: a step toward population health management.

    PubMed

    Eggbeer, Bill; Bowers, Krista; Morris, Dudley

    2013-04-01

    Improved care coordination for dual eligibles has the potential to reduce hospitalizations and eliminate duplicative services. Finding common ground on program design for dual eligibles has proved difficult, and for some programs to date, the cost of care management has balanced out savings achieved. Partnering with an experienced Medicaid managed care plan could be the best strategy for market entry for all but the most experienced integrated delivery systems and health systems. PMID:23596837

  16. Embedding Health Management into Mission Tasking for UAV Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mario Valenti; Brett Bethke; Daniela Pucci de Farias; John Vian

    2007-01-01

    Coordinated multi-vehicle autonomous systems can provide incredible functionality, but off-nominal conditions and degraded system components can render this capability ineffective. This paper presents techniques to improve mission-level functional reliability through better system self-awareness and adaptive mission planning. In particular, we extend the traditional definition of health management, which has historically referred to the process of actively monitoring and managing vehicle

  17. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health

  18. Continuous Case Management of a German Statutory Health Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Hecke, Torsten L.; Erzberger, Melanie

    2005-01-01

    To support insured patients, especially those with chronic illnesses or disabilities, the German statutory health insurance Techniker Krankenkasse (TK) offers continuous case management (CCM) under a rehabilitation advisory program serving more than 150,000 insurees each year. Rehabilitation advisors provide individual counseling, generally by telephone. They inform patients about treatment and rehabilitation options, about health care providers, and about other TK services. In a key feature, the model coordinates care across different health care sectors. Through the CCM approach, TK not only assures the best possible care for its insurees, but also safeguards its long-term financial sustainability PMID:17288078

  19. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations. PMID:21069770

  20. An automated contingency management simulation environment for integrated health management and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianhua Ge; Michael I. Roemer; George Vachtsevanos

    2004-01-01

    This work presents an automated contingency management (ACM) software simulation test bed developed in Simulink that can be applied to various unmanned platforms for developing; testing and verifying automated fault accommodation strategies. Specifically, this paper introduces the required software components and integrated health management and control architecture for performing these tasks and applies it to the unmanned combat armed rotorcraft

  1. IWater Processing and Waste Management SystemsIntegrated System Health Management 2007 Phase II

    E-print Network

    SBIR SBIR 44 45 IWater Processing and Waste Management SystemsIntegrated System Health Management drying prototype to for the recovery and recycle of water from concentrated waste water recovery system is transformed into a dry solid and clean water. The dry solids powder is easy to transfer and does not foul

  2. Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). System/Functional Manager's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    This guide is intended to provide the necessary guidance to successfully manage the NAVMED Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) at NAVMED sites and the NAVSEA Occupational Safety and Health Record Keeping System (OSHRKS) at NAVSEA sites. Outlines procedures to manage system operations, procedures to resolve hardware, software and communications problems, and procedures outside the realm of system operations that are required for a successful system. This guide is intended for the System and Functional Managers use. The System Manager is the individual designated to provide overall ADP management to the entire local configuration. Usually responsible for file backup, daily operations of the CPU, security, supplies, equipment, operating software and technical ADP guidance to the local functional users.

  3. The metamorphosis of managed care: implications for health reform internationally.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2010-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that managed care's brief life is over and we are now in a post-managed care era. In fact, managed care has a long history and continues to thrive. Writers also often assume that managed care is a fixed thing. They overlook that managed care has evolved and neglect to examine the role that it plays in the health system. Furthermore, private actors and the state have used managed care tools to promote diverse goals. These include the following: increasing access to medical care; restricting physician entrepreneurialism; challenging professional control over the medical economy; curbing medical spending; managing medical practice and markets; furthering the growth of medical markets and private insurance; promoting for-profit medical facilities and insurers; earning bounties for reducing medical expenditures: and reducing governmental responsibility for, and oversight of, medical care. Struggles over these competing goals spurred the metamorphosis of managed care. This article explores how managed care transformed physicians' conflicts of interests and responses to them. It also examines how managed care altered the opportunities for patients/medical consumers to use exit and voice to spur change. PMID:20579232

  4. Can action research strengthen district health management and improve health workforce performance? A research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mshelia, C; Huss, R; Mirzoev, T; Elsey, H; Baine, S O; Aikins, M; Kamuzora, P; Bosch-Capblanch, X; Raven, J; Wyss, K; Green, A; Martineau, T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The single biggest barrier for countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to scale up the necessary health services for addressing the three health-related Millennium Development Goals and achieving Universal Health Coverage is the lack of an adequate and well-performing health workforce. This deficit needs to be addressed both by training more new health personnel and by improving the performance of the existing and future health workforce. However, efforts have mostly been focused on training new staff and less on improving the performance of the existing health workforce. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the protocol for the PERFORM project and reflect on the key challenges encountered during the development of this methodology and how they are being overcome. Methods The overall aim of the PERFORM project is to identify ways of strengthening district management in order to address health workforce inadequacies by improving health workforce performance in SSA. The study will take place in three districts each in Ghana, Tanzania and Uganda using an action research approach. With the support of the country research teams, the district health management teams (DHMTs) will lead on planning, implementation, observation, reflection and redefinition of the activities in the study. Taking into account the national and local human resource (HR) and health systems (HS) policies and practices already in place, ‘bundles’ of HR/HS strategies that are feasible within the context and affordable within the districts’ budget will be developed by the DHMTs to strengthen priority areas of health workforce performance. A comparative analysis of the findings from the three districts in each country will add new knowledge on the effects of these HR/HS bundles on DHMT management and workforce performance and the impact of an action research approach on improving the effectiveness of the DHMTs in implementing these interventions. Discussion Different challenges were faced during the development of the methodology. These include the changing context in the study districts, competing with other projects and duties for the time of district managers, complexity of the study design, maintaining the anonymity and confidentiality of study participants as well as how to record the processes during the study. We also discuss how these challenges are being addressed. The dissemination of this research protocol is intended to generate interest in the PERFORM project and also stimulate discussion on the use of action research in complex studies such as this on strengthening district health management to improve health workforce performance. PMID:23996825

  5. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt with training and leadership. Participants reported little difficulty in applying learning deemed "useful", and had applied it often. In general, a learning area was used less when it was found difficult to apply, with a few exceptions, such as problem-solving. Four fifths of respondents claimed they could perform their jobs better because of new skills and more in-depth understanding of health systems, and one third had been asked to train their colleagues, indicating a potential for impact on their organization. Interviews with key informants indicated that job performance of trainees had improved. Conclusion The health management training programmes in Iran, and the external university involved in capacity building, benefited from following basic principles of good training practice, which incorporated needs assessment, selection of participants and definition of appropriate learning outcomes, course content and methods, along with focused evaluation. Contracts for external assistance should include specific mention of capacity building, and allow for the collaborative development of courses and of evaluation plans, in order to build capacity of local partners throughout the training cycle. This would also help to develop training content that uses material from local health management situations to demonstrate key theories and develop locally required skills. Training evaluations should as a minimum assess participants' reactions and learning for every course. Communication of evaluation results should be designed to ensure that data informs training activities, as well as the health and human resources managers who are investing in the development of their staff. PMID:19265528

  6. Occupational health and safety management in polish enterprises implementing total quality management systems.

    PubMed

    Podgórski, D

    2000-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as the management approach of the organization aimed at long-term success through client satisfaction, and which benefits all members of the organization and society (ISO 8402; International Organization for Standardization, 1994a). The objective of the study was to evaluate management methods applied to improve working conditions in Polish enterprises implementing TQM. The investigation was conducted in the form of interviews, which covered relevant connections between the TQM concept and occupational health and safety (OHS) systematic management rules. The results revealed that the criteria adopted in investigated enterprises for OHS management systems, as well as the implemented management methods and tools, can be evaluated positively. However, many require significant improvement in order to ensure better compliance with the existing law provisions. Elements of OHS management systems also require better integration with the overall management system of the enterprise. PMID:10828155

  7. Confronting Suburban Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-01-01

    The Brookings Institution doesn't shy away from the tough topics, in fact, they often embrace them. This recent book by two of their distinguished scholars, Elizabeth Kneebone and Alan Berube, looks at the growing problem of suburban poverty. As they note, "suburbia is now home to more poor residents than central cities." This site, created to promote the book, has great resources for policy analysts, scholars, journalists, and the interested public. The accompanying blog is a great way for visitors to read thoughtful commentaries on the metropolitan geography of low wage work or an anti-poverty policy that works for working families. The Communities section is another great feature, providing background information on the seven areas profiled in the book, including south Cook County, Illinois and Tukwila outside of Seattle.

  8. Mining Medical Specialist Billing Patterns for Health Service Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yin Shan; David Jeacocke; D. Wayne Murray; Alison Sutinen

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an application of association rule mining in compliance in the context of health service management. There are approximately 500 million transactions processed by Medicare Australia each year. Among these transactions, there exist a small proportion of suspicious claims. This study applied association rule mining to examine billing patterns within a particular specialist group to detect these suspicious

  9. Teaching Classroom Management-- A Potential Public Health Intervention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Ruth; Hansford, Lorraine; Edwards, Vanessa; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Norman, Shelley; Ingarfield, Sara; Sharkey, Siobhan; Logan, Stuart; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of a classroom management course as a public health intervention. Improved socio-emotional skills may boost children's developmental and academic trajectory, while the costs of behaviour problems are enormous for schools with considerable impact on others' well-being.…

  10. The application of risk analysis in aquatic animal health management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Peeler; A. G. Murray; A. Thebault; E. Brun; A. Giovaninni; M. A. Thrush

    2007-01-01

    Risk analysis has only been regularly used in the management of aquatic animal health in recent years. The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary measures (SPS) stimulated the application of risk analysis to investigate disease risks associated with international trade (import risk analysis—IRA). A majority (9 of 17) of the risk analyses reviewed were IRA. The other major

  11. Overview Of Publicly Funded Managed Behavioral Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mardia A. Coleman; William Schnapp; Debra Hurwitz; Sabine Hedberg; Linda M. Cabral; Aniko Laszlo; Jay S. Himmelstein

    2005-01-01

    Using MEDLINE and other Internet sources, the authors perform a systematic review of published literature. A total of 109 articles and reports are identified and reviewed that address the development, implementation, outcomes, and trends related to Managed behavioral health care (MBHC). MBHC remains a work in progress. States have implemented their MBHC programs in a number of ways, making interstate

  12. Concepts for integrated electronic health records management system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miroslav Kon

    Computer systems and communication technologies are making a strong and influential presence in the different fields of medicine. The cornerstone of a functional medical information system represents the electronic health records management system. Due to a very sensitive nature of medical information, such systems are faced with a number of stringent requirements, like security and confidentiality of patients' related data,

  13. Distributed prognostic health management with gaussian process regression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sankalita Saha; Bhaskar Saha; Abhinav Saxena; Kai Goebel

    2010-01-01

    Distributed prognostics architecture design is an enabling step for efficient implementation of health management systems. 12A major challenge encountered in such design is formulation of optimal distributed prognostics algorithms. In this paper, we present a distributed GPR based prognostics algorithm whose target platform is a wireless sensor network. In addition to challenges encountered in a distributed implementation, a wireless network

  14. Avionics health management: searching for the prognostics grail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry V. Kirkland; T. Pombo; K. Nelson; F. Berghout

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to present the advances, benefits and challenges in measuring, monitoring and managing the health of aircraft avionics systems as well as the support equipment used to test these systems. Most people are skeptical when avionics and prognostics are used in the same sentence. For the purpose of this discussion, we will grant that most

  15. Lifestyle Management Program: Promoting Cardiovascular Health: in Community College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; Jichaku, Patrick

    The Lifestyle Management Project is a health promotion project and research study conducted in the spring of 1984 at five Los Angeles junior college campuses. Its goal was to increase knowledge of cardiovascular disease (CHD) risk factors among 400 to 2000 junior college students in each campus. This was done via five risk factor activities: blood…

  16. Enhanced smart sensor for integrated system health management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald Nickles; David Rauth; John Schmalzel

    2006-01-01

    Using the IEEE 1451 Smart Sensor Standard helps reconcile issues of proliferation and interoperability of systems and sensors. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) uses IEEE 1451 to provide homogeneity and expandability to increasingly complex sensor networks. Sensor conformance allows a large part of system commissioning, data processing, and network upgrades to be handled automatically. While IEEE 1451 supports this end,

  17. Leadership Succession Management in a University Health Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Anne M.; Henly, Debra; Chaboyer, Wendy; Clapton, Jayne; Lizzio, Alf; Teml, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We report on a succession planning pilot project in an Australian university health faculty. The programme aimed to enhance organisational stability and develop leadership capacity in middle level academics. Six monthly sessions addressed university and general leadership topics, communication, decision-making, working with change, self-management

  18. RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS TO IMPROVING MANAGED HEALTH CARE OUTCOMES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LARRY E. BEUTLER; EVE DAVISON; EUN JEONG KIM; MITCH KARNO; DANIEL FISHER

    1996-01-01

    Managed Health Care programs are beginning to look to findings from psychotherapy outcome research to help set policy. This fact introduces the need to consider outcomes research from the standpoint of usability or utility. It also provides a unique opportunity to integrate science and practice. From a different perspective, considering and applying outcomes in this context requires selfless cooperation between

  19. Robust ground-based Diagnostics, Prognostics and Health Management information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Karchnak; Robert L. Shipman

    2009-01-01

    A decade ago, (1998, 1999), Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) F-100 engine seeded fault testing was conducted at Pratt & Whitney, Florida, in support of Diagnostics, Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) system design. Multiple sensor approaches were invited to monitor the seeded fault testing, including an Independent Research and Development (IR&D) system termed the robust laser interferometer (RLI). The \\

  20. A Prognostic Framework for Health Management of Coupled Systems

    E-print Network

    Wang, Bing

    the potential to be applicable to a wide variety of systems, ranging from automobiles to aerospace systemsA Prognostic Framework for Health Management of Coupled Systems Chaitanya Sankavaram, Anuradha Staff, Qualtech Systems, Inc., 99 East River Drive, East Hatford, CT 06108, USA Satnam Singh Senior

  1. Chemical-management policy: prioritizing children's health.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that chemical-management policy in the United States be revised to protect children and pregnant women and to better protect other populations. The Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) was passed in 1976. It is widely recognized to have been ineffective in protecting children, pregnant women, and the general population from hazardous chemicals in the marketplace. It does not take into account the special vulnerabilities of children in attempting to protect the population from chemical hazards. Its processes are so cumbersome that in its more than 30 years of existence, the TSCA has been used to regulate only 5 chemicals or chemical classes of the tens of thousands of chemicals that are in commerce. Under the TSCA, chemical companies have no responsibility to perform premarket testing or postmarket follow-up of the products that they produce; in fact, the TSCA contains disincentives for the companies to produce such data. Voluntary programs have been inadequate in resolving problems. Therefore, chemical-management policy needs to be rewritten in the United States. Manufacturers must be responsible for developing information about chemicals before marketing. The US Environmental Protection Agency must have the authority to demand additional safety data about a chemical and to limit or stop the marketing of a chemical when there is a high degree of suspicion that the chemical might be harmful to children, pregnant women, or other populations. PMID:21518722

  2. Investigating Children in Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rowell, Kathy

    This module, created by Kathy Rowell of Sinclair Community College, provides an activity were students will attempt to explain how each of the following variables is related to child poverty within the United States: race, age, family type, family size, and immigrant status. The resource is a solid lesson plan for a statistics classroom. It focuses on many things such as hypotheses testing, distribution theory, independent and dependent variables.

  3. Disability and Poverty: A Conceptual Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Palmer

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of disability to poverty is of increasing interest to policy makers as persons with disabilities are being mainstreamed into national poverty reduction programs. However, previous reviews on disability and poverty have not systematically addressed the concept of poverty. This article examines the conceptual and empirical links of three definitions of poverty to disability: basic needs, capability, and economic

  4. Critical systems for public health management of floods, North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Wiedrich, Tim W; Sickler, Juli L; Vossler, Brenda L; Pickard, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Availability of emergency preparedness funding between 2002 and 2009 allowed the North Dakota Department of Health to build public health response capabilities. Five of the 15 public health preparedness capability areas identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2011 have been thoroughly tested by responses to flooding in North Dakota in 2009, 2010, and 2011; those capability areas are information sharing, emergency operations coordination, medical surge, material management and distribution, and volunteer management. Increasing response effectiveness has depended on planning, implementation of new information technology, changes to command and control procedures, containerized response materials, and rapid contract procedures. Continued improvement in response and maintenance of response capabilities is dependent on ongoing funding. PMID:23348522

  5. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  6. Attitudes toward Poverty of Upper Midwestern Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is widespread and its consequence of poorer health increases the likelihood that nurses will provide care for poor clients and their families in many health care settings. Although the importance of understanding attitudes toward the poor is recognized, there have been few studies of attitudes of nursing students. The purpose of this…

  7. Application of the microcomputer to occupational health data management.

    PubMed

    Rawls, G M; Dwiggins, G A; Feigley, C E

    1983-04-01

    The use of the microcomputer offers a simple, inexpensive solution to the numerous problems associated with data management in an occupational health program. A system has been developed which uses commercially available data management software supplemented by optional programs tailored to the specific application. The system is capable of maintaining files of personal and area monitoring data, material toxicity and safety information, noise level data, audiograms, OSHA forms 101 and 200, and employee information relevant to the industrial hygienist's needs. The cost is less than $4000.00, which is well below that of most alternative systems. Its flexibility and economy should make this innovative use of the microcomputer an attractive method of occupational health data management. PMID:6687976

  8. Poverty and Language Development: Roles of Parenting and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Suzanne C.; Finegood, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic status affects a variety of mental and physical health outcomes, such as language development. Indeed, with poverty, disparities in the development of language processing are arguably among the most consistently found— with decreases in vocabulary, phonological awareness, and syntax at many different developmental stages. In this review, after considering basic brain systems affected by low socioeconomic status that are important for language development and related peripartum issues, we focus on two theoretical models that link poverty with the brain systems affected in language problems. The family stress model connects poverty with parental emotional distress that affects parenting, whereas the parental investment model involves a focus on basic needs that affects children’s language. Understanding the mechanisms through which poverty affects the brain, parenting behaviors and language development may have implications for identification and treatment of individuals as well as social policy. PMID:23696954

  9. ELEMENTARY LEVEL -LESSON PLAN AND ACTIVITIES A New Face on Poverty--Lesson Plan on Poverty

    E-print Network

    POVERTY ELEMENTARY LEVEL - LESSON PLAN AND ACTIVITIES A New Face on Poverty--Lesson Plan on Poverty #12;2 2 2 POVERTY 2 www.freethechildren.com A NEW FACE ON POVERTY Lesson plan on Poverty Grade Level. This lesson develops the concept from an individual understanding within local context to a global perspective

  10. Organizing and managing care in a changing health system.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, L T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine ways in which the management and organization of medical care is changing in response to the shifting incentives created by managed care. DATA SOURCES: Site visits conducted in 12 randomly selected communities in 1996/ 1997. STUDY DESIGN: Approximately 35-60 interviews were conducted per site with key informants in healthcare and community organizations; about half were with providers. DATA COLLECTION: A standardized interview protocol was implemented across all sites, enabling cross-site comparisons. Multiple respondents were interviewed on each issue. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A great deal of experimentation and apparent duplication exist in efforts to develop programs to influence physician practice patterns. Responsibility for managing care is being contested by health plans, medical groups and hospitals, as each seeks to accrue the savings that can result from the more efficient delivery of care. To manage the financial and clinical risk, providers are aggressively consolidating and reorganizing. Most significant was the rapid formation of intermediary organizations, such as independent practice arrangements (IPAs), physician-hospital organizations (PHOs), or management services organizations (MSOs), for contracting with managed care organizations. CONCLUSIONS: Managed care appears to have only a modest effect on how healthcare organizations deliver medical care, despite the profound effect that managed care has on how providers are organized. Rather than improving the efficiency of healthcare organizations, provider efforts to build large systems and become indispensable to health plans are exacerbating problems of excess capacity. It is not clear if new organizational arrangements will help providers manage the changing incentives they face, or if their intent is to blunt the effects of the incentives by forming larger organizations to improve their bargaining power and resist change. PMID:10778823

  11. The Changing Health Services Environment and Its Impact on Quality Management in Behavioral Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warwick G. Troy; Sharon A. Shueman

    \\u000a Almost a decade has passed since the first edition of this handbook appeared. For those of us involved in health services,\\u000a this decade truly has been a professional lifetime. The climate of rapid and pervasive change in health services prevailing\\u000a during this period has been no less revolutionary in those aspects of service delivery related to quality management. Indeed,\\u000a it

  12. Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

  13. Case-Mix Adjustment of Consumer Reports about Managed Behavioral Health Care and Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Eselius, Laura L; Cleary, Paul D; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Huskamp, Haiden A; Busch, Susan H

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop a model for adjusting patients' reports of behavioral health care experiences on the Experience of Care and Health Outcomes (ECHO™) survey to allow for fair comparisons across health plans. Data Source Survey responses from 4,068 individuals enrolled in 21 managed behavioral health plans who received behavioral health care within the previous year (response rate=48 percent). Study Design Potential case-mix adjustors were evaluated by combining information about their predictive power and the amount of within- and between-plan variability. Changes in plan scores and rankings due to case-mix adjustment were quantified. Principal Findings The final case-mix adjustment model included self-reported mental health status, self-reported general health status, alcohol/drug treatment, age, education, and race/ethnicity. The impact of adjustment on plan report scores was modest, but large enough to change some plan rankings. Conclusions Adjusting plan report scores on the ECHO survey for differences in patient characteristics had modest effects, but still may be important to maintain the credibility of patient reports as a quality metric. Differences between those with self-reported fair/poor health compared with those in excellent/very good health varied by plan, suggesting quality differences associated with health status and underscoring the importance of collecting quality information. PMID:18783456

  14. Management of Transient Loss of Consciousness: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Guideline

    MedlinePLUS

    Management of Transient Loss of Consciousness: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Guideline Summaries for Patients ... Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Guideline for Management of Transient Loss of Consciousness.” It is in ...

  15. Poverty and household food insecurity in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Chimeddulam, Dalaijamts; Dalaijamts, Guushir; Bardos, Helga; Tsevegdorj, Tserendorj

    2008-10-01

    This study was designed to review the food security of the country and to study the household food insecurity of poor households in relation to the poverty level. Cross-sectional survey design was used to assess the perceptions of socio-economic changes, food insecurity in national and household levels, and their health impact. A total of 731 poor households were involved in our study. One third of the total households were in a status of severe food insecurity with hunger. Analysis on the risk factors of household food insecurity showed that the household income was significantly inversely associated with household food insecurity (RR = -0.489; 95% CI -0.540, -0.398; P < .001). Food insecurity with hunger in the households is significantly related to poverty of the households. PMID:19533861

  16. 24 CFR 597.103 - Poverty rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Poverty rate. 597.103 Section 597.103 Housing...DESIGNATIONS Area Requirements § 597.103 Poverty rate. (a) General. The poverty rate shall be established in accordance...

  17. 24 CFR 597.103 - Poverty rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poverty rate. 597.103 Section 597.103 Housing...DESIGNATIONS Area Requirements § 597.103 Poverty rate. (a) General. The poverty rate shall be established in accordance...

  18. The Literature of Poverty, the Poverty of Literature Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on the possibilities--and the limits--of undergraduate courses on the literature of poverty. He describes an undergraduate course he has taught on U.S. literature about poverty, but he also expresses doubt that such courses can help produce major social change. He argues that something about the literature of…

  19. 237Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty and Human

    E-print Network

    Dresden, Gregory

    237Poverty and Human Capability Studies Poverty and Human CaPability StudieS (Pov) Core Fa and Human Capability offers a cur- ricular and cocurricular program of study that enriches any major to establish a decent minimum of human development for all people. Students complet- ing designated

  20. Poverty Among Working Families: Findings From Experimental Poverty Measures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report from the US Census Bureau explores poverty among working families. The report uses experimental measures based on recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences Panel of Poverty and Family Assistance, including the following elements: noncash government benefits, job-related expenses, child care costs, social security taxes, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.

  1. The health plan choices of retirees under managed competition.

    PubMed Central

    Buchmueller, T C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of price on the health insurance decisions of Medicare-eligible retirees in a managed competition setting. DATA SOURCE: The study is based on four years of administrative data from the University of California (UC) Retiree Health Benefits Program, which closely resembles the managed competition model upon which several leading Medicare reform proposals are based. STUDY DESIGN: A change in UC's premium contribution policy between 1993 and 1994 created a unique natural experiment for investigating the effect of price on retirees' health insurance decisions. This study consists of two related analyses. First, I estimate the effect of changes in out-of-pocket premiums between 1993 and 1994 on the decision to switch plans during open enrollment. Second, using data from 1993 to 1996, I examine the extent to which rising premiums for fee-for-service Medigap coverage increased HMO enrollment among Medicare-eligible UC retirees. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Price is a significant factor affecting the health plan decisions of Medicare-eligible UC retirees. However, these retirees are substantially less price sensitive than active UC employees and the non-elderly in other similar programs. This result is likely attributable to higher nonpecuniary switching costs facing older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Although it is not clear exactly how price sensitive enrollees must be in order to generate price competition among health plans, the behavioral differences between retirees and active employees suggest that caution should be taken in extrapolating from research on the non-elderly to the Medicare program. PMID:11130806

  2. Risk management assessment of Health Maintenance Organisations participating in the National Health Insurance Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Princess Christina; Korie, Patrick Chukwuemeka; Nnaji, Feziechukwu Collins

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), operated majorly in Nigeria by health maintenance organisations (HMOs), took off formally in June 2005. In view of the inherent risks in the operation of any social health insurance, it is necessary to efficiently manage these risks for sustainability of the scheme. Consequently the risk-management strategies deployed by HMOs need regular assessment. This study assessed the risk management in the Nigeria social health insurance scheme among HMOs. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 33 HMOs participating in the NHIS. Results: Utilisation of standard risk-management strategies by the HMOs was 11 (52.6%). The other risk-management strategies not utilised in the NHIS 10 (47.4%) were risk equalisation and reinsurance. As high as 11 (52.4%) of participating HMOs had a weak enrollee base (less than 30,000 and poor monthly premium and these impacted negatively on the HMOs such that a large percentage 12 (54.1%) were unable to meet up with their financial obligations. Most of the HMOs 15 (71.4%) participated in the Millennium development goal (MDG) maternal and child health insurance programme. Conclusions: Weak enrollee base and poor monthly premium predisposed the HMOs to financial risk which impacted negatively on the overall performance in service delivery in the NHIS, further worsened by the non-utilisation of risk equalisation and reinsurance as risk-management strategies in the NHIS. There is need to make the scheme compulsory and introduce risk equalisation and reinsurance. PMID:25298605

  3. Managed competition in health care and the unfinished agenda

    PubMed Central

    Enthoven, Alain C.

    1986-01-01

    A market made up of health care financing and delivery plans and individual consumers, without a carefully drawn set of rules to mitigate market failures, and without mediation by collective action on the demand side, cannot produce efficiency and equity. The concept of competition that can achieve these goals, at least to a satisfactory approximation, is managed competition, with intelligent active agents on the demand side, called sponsors, that contract with the competing health care plans and continuously structure and adjust the market to overcome its tendencies to failure. A great deal remains to be done to achieve the goals envisioned by the “procompetition reformers.” PMID:10311922

  4. Health Policy and Management: in praise of political science

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Health systems have entered a third era embracing whole systems thinking and posing complex policy and management challenges. Understanding how such systems work and agreeing what needs to be put in place to enable them to undergo effective and sustainable change are more pressing issues than ever for policy-makers. The theory-policy-practice-gap and its four dimensions, as articulated by Chinitz and Rodwin, is acknowledged. It is suggested that insights derived from political science can both enrich our understanding of the gap and suggest what changes are needed to tackle the complex challenges facing health systems. PMID:26029899

  5. Health care waste management in Cameroon: A case study from the Southwestern Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veronica E. Manga; Osric Tening Forton; Linus A. Mofor; Ryan Woodard

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare waste streams are persistent waste streams and which are consistently increasing in volume and complexity in developed and developing countries. When poorly managed, through inappropriate health care waste management systems, they can cause adverse effects to human health and the environment.This paper presents an evaluation of health care waste management systems in Cameroon, based on a survey of five

  6. Progress on quality management in the German health system – a long and winding road

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juergen Breckenkamp; Christiane Wiskow; Ulrich Laaser

    2007-01-01

    The interest in quality management in health care has increased in the last decades as the financial crises in most health systems generated the need for solutions to contain costs while maintaining quality of care. In Germany the development of quality management procedures has been closely linked with health care reforms. Starting in the early nineties quality management issues gained

  7. Quality Management in Health Systems of Developed and Developing Countries: Which Approaches and Models are Appropriate?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamidi Y

    Background: Quality Management is one of the most effective strategies for improving the health sys- tems performance in developed and developing countries. The main goal of this study was identifying the most important aspects of quality management and preparing an appropriate model for health system. Method: This research was a comparative study on quality management models in the health systems

  8. Texting to engage patients on their own terms A new paradigm for population health management

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Texting to engage patients on their own terms A new paradigm for population health management White, the focus of healthcare systems and accountable care organizations is moving to population health management Meanwhile, health plans are becoming more involved in care management. Some insurers send reminders

  9. HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL AND MEDIUM

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    99-57 HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM : A METHOD FOR RANKING IMPACTS IN SMALL : safety management System, ranking, health, safety, environment ABSTRACT ELF ATOCHEM and INERIS have worked together on a management System conceming at the same time health, safety and environment

  10. Rural poverty dynamics: development policy implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher B. Barrett

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the useful distinction between chronic and transitory poverty in understanding rural welfare dynamics, highlighting the possibility of poverty traps and their implications for \\

  11. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  12. Study Protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    Background The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. Conclusions The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy and birth survey. This long-term large-scale epidemiologic study is expected to provide valuable data in the investigation of the health effects of low-dose radiation and disaster-related stress. PMID:22955043

  13. HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Safety Regulations and Policies for Offices

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Safety Regulations and Policies for Offices #12 Table of Contents University of Saskatchewan Policies Relating to Health, Safety and Environment) ............................................................ 15 The Saskatchewan Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations............................ 17

  14. Poverty and Young Adults

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joan Morris

    This exercise was developed for use in a general sociology course. Students will hypothesize about relationships between race, education, geographic area, and poverty and analyze data sets to determine draw conclusions about variable relationships. This activity uses a customized data set made from the 1990 Census and guides students through data manipulation using WebCHIP software found at DataCounts!. To open WebCHIP with the dataset for the activity, please see instructions and links in the exercise documents under teaching materials. For more information on how to use WebCHIP, see the How To section on DataCounts!

  15. Poverty reduction in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Poverty in Africa has been rising for the last quarter-century, while it has been falling in the rest of the developing world. Africa's distinctive problem is that its economies have not been growing. This article attempts to synthesize a range of recent research to account for this failure of the growth process. I argue that the reasons lie not in African peculiarities but rather in geographic features that globally cause problems but that are disproportionately pronounced in Africa. These features interact to create three distinct challenges that are likely to require international interventions beyond the conventional reliance on aid. PMID:17942702

  16. Health care waste management: a neglected and growing public health problem worldwide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael O. Harhay; Scott D. Halpern; Jason S. Harhay; Piero L. Olliaro

    2009-01-01

    health care waste management practices and challenges in 40 low and middle income countries worldwide amassed through a multi-language systematic review. Herein, we discuss the major gaps, failures, and frequently reported themes by geographic region. Following this we outline a proposed research agenda moving forward, and conclude that greater research and attention towards these unintended consequences of technologic progress in

  17. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefane M. Kabene; Carole Orchard; John M. Howard; Mark A. Soriano; Raymond Leduc

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. METHODS: We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. RESULTS: Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management.

  18. Poverty, Inequality, and Discrimination as Sources of Depression among U.S. Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle, Deborah; Doucet, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Poverty, inequality, and discrimination endanger women's well-being. Poverty is a consistent predictor of depression in women. Economic inequalities relate to reduced life expectancy and various negative physical health consequences. Discrimination maintains inequalities, lessens economic security, and exposes women to unmerited contempt.…

  19. Poverty and Awakening Cortisol in Adolescence: The Importance of Timing in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Michael J.; Hayward, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of poverty on mental and physical health are routinely argued to operate, at least in part, via dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, although empirical examinations connecting poverty with HPA axis functioning are rare. Research on the effects of timing of poverty is a particularly neglected aspect of this relationship. This study uses 15 years of prospective data from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to assess how exposure to poverty during infancy, childhood, and adolescence is related to awakening cortisol (n = 826), a marker of HPA axis functioning. Among female participants, poverty exposure in infancy and adolescence, but not childhood, was negatively associated with awakening cortisol. Poverty exposure was unrelated to cortisol among male participants. The importance of timing and gender differences are discussed along with directions for future research.

  20. Topics at a Glance: Poverty

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roper Center at the University of Connecticut

    A series of polls on public opinion regarding poverty and appropriate responses. Shows a (perhaps naive) confidence that hard work will lead to prosperity, as well as somewhat ambiguous views on appropriate government responses to poverty (for instance increased aid to the poor enjoys overwhelming support while increased "welfare" is widely opposed.

  1. Poverty in the Nonmetropolitan South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, George; Stewart, Merrilee

    The unknowns about nonmetropolitan Southern poverty are systematically addressed by this monograph. The methodology employed isolates and gives equal treatment to 5 causal explanations. The 5 are genetic, culture of poverty, opportunity, maldistribution, and scarce resource explanations. Comprehensive materials are then organized around these…

  2. China's (uneven) progress against poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Ravallion; Shaohua Chen

    2007-01-01

    While the incidence of extreme poverty fell dramatically in China over 1980–2001, progress was uneven over time and across provinces. Rural areas accounted for the bulk of the gains to the poor, though migration to urban areas helped. Rural economic growth was far more important to national poverty reduction than urban economic growth; agriculture played a far more important role

  3. Remittances and Poverty in Guatemala

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard H. Adams Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Adams uses a large, nationally representative household survey to analyze the impact of internal remittances (from Guatemala) and international remittances (from the United States) on poverty in Guatemala. With only one exception, he finds that both internal and international remittances reduce the level, depth, and severity of poverty in Guatemala. However, he finds that remittances have a greater impact on

  4. District health managers’ perceptions of supervision in Malawi and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mid-level cadres are being used to address human resource shortages in many African contexts, but insufficient and ineffective human resource management is compromising their performance. Supervision plays a key role in performance and motivation, but is frequently characterised by periodic inspection and control, rather than support and feedback to improve performance. This paper explores the perceptions of district health management teams in Tanzania and Malawi on their role as supervisors and on the challenges to effective supervision at the district level. Methods This qualitative study took place as part of a broader project, “Health Systems Strengthening for Equity: The Power and Potential of Mid-Level Providers”. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 district health management team personnel in Malawi and 37 council health team members in Tanzania. The interviews covered a range of human resource management issues, including supervision and performance assessment, staff job descriptions and roles, motivation and working conditions. Results Participants displayed varying attitudes to the nature and purpose of the supervision process. Much of the discourse in Malawi centred on inspection and control, while interviewees in Tanzania were more likely to articulate a paradigm characterised by support and improvement. In both countries, facility level performance metrics dominated. The lack of competency-based indicators or clear standards to assess individual health worker performance were considered problematic. Shortages of staff, at both district and facility level, were described as a major impediment to carrying out regular supervisory visits. Other challenges included conflicting and multiple responsibilities of district health team staff and financial constraints. Conclusion Supervision is a central component of effective human resource management. Policy level attention is crucial to ensure a systematic, structured process that is based on common understandings of the role and purpose of supervision. This is particularly important in a context where the majority of staff are mid-level cadres for whom regulation and guidelines may not be as formalised or well-developed as for traditional cadres, such as registered nurses and medical doctors. Supervision needs to be adequately resourced and supported in order to improve performance and retention at the district level. PMID:24007354

  5. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teresa J. Sakraida; Jessica D'Amico; Erica Thibault

    2010-01-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98–108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and

  6. Vehicle health management for guidance, navigation and control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen Radke; Ron Frazzini; Paul Bursch; Jerry Wald; Don Brown

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the program was to architect a vehicle health management (VHM) system for space systems avionics that assures system readiness for launch vehicles and for space-based dormant vehicles. The platforms which were studied and considered for application of VHM for guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) included the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS), the Horizontal Landing-20\\/Personnel Launch System (HL-20\\/PLS),

  7. Using Social Marketing to Manage Population Health Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Rothschild

    2010-01-01

    Population health can be affected by implementing pay-for-performance measures with key players. From a social marketing perspective, people (both consumers and managers) have choices and will do what they perceive enhances their own self-interest. The bottom-up focus of social marketing begins with an understanding of the people whose behaviors are targeted. Desired behavior results when people perceive that they will

  8. Integrated Management of System Health in Space Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Reichard; E. Crow; T. Bair

    2007-01-01

    Integrated system health management (ISHM) technologies have been developed to address safety, replace time-based maintenance with condition-based maintenance, and to reduce life cycle costs. Traditional space system designs have focused on safety to minimize the risk to crew and to protect the public, astronauts and pilots, the NASA workforce, and high-value equipment and property. Systems have relied on high reliability

  9. Examining the Role of Anxiety and Apathy in Health Consumers' Intentions to Use Patient Health Portals for Personal Health Information Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated college students' attitudes toward and intentions to use personal health portals (PHPs) for managing their personal health information using a survey method. The study also aimed to examine the roles electronic Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) anxiety and apathy play in influencing students' attitudes toward…

  10. Factors Influencing Students to Enroll in Health Information Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Safian, Shelley C.

    2012-01-01

    This nonexperimental quantitative descriptive-correlative research study was performed to describe the sources with the greatest influence on the participants’ decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management. Participants were asked, “Which sources have the greatest influence on an individual's decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management (HIM)?” The study population was composed of matriculated students enrolled in accredited postsecondary schools offering an undergraduate medical billing and coding program at a brick-and-mortar campus in a two-county area of a South Atlantic state. The study found that an environmental source, specifically career job opportunities, was statistically significant as the greatest source of influence for these participants. This research aims to support efforts to provide the health information management subsector of the healthcare industry with a sufficient number of trained professionals to fill the identified need for trained HIM professionals, particularly medical coding specialists. PMID:22783152

  11. Childhood poverty, early motherhood and adult social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Hobcraft, J; Kiernan, K

    2001-09-01

    Childhood poverty and early parenthood are both high on the current political agenda. The key new issue that this research addresses is the relative importance of childhood poverty and of early motherhood as correlates of outcomes later in life. How far are the 'effects' of early motherhood on later outcomes due to childhood precursors, especially experience of childhood poverty? Subsidiary questions relate to the magnitude of these associations, the particular levels of childhood poverty that prove most critical, and whether, as often assumed, only teenage mothers are subsequently disadvantaged, or are those who have their first birth in their early twenties similarly disadvantaged? The source of data for this study is the National Child Development Study. We examine outcomes at age 33 for several domains of adult social exclusion: welfare, socio-economic, physical health, emotional well-being and demographic behaviour. We control for a wide range of childhood factors: poverty; social class of origin and of father; mother's and father's school leaving age; family structure; housing tenure; mother's and father's interest in education; personality attributes; performance on educational tests; and contact with the police by age 16. There are clear associations for the adult outcomes with age at first birth, even after controlling for childhood poverty and the other childhood background factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the widest gulf in adult outcomes occurs for those who enter motherhood early (before age 23), though further reinforced by teenage motherhood for most adult outcomes. We also show that any experience of childhood poverty is clearly associated with adverse outcomes in adulthood, with reinforcement for higher levels of childhood poverty for a few outcomes. PMID:11578006

  12. Emergency planning and management in health care: priority research topics

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alan; Chambers, Naomi; French, Simon; Shaw, Duncan; King, Russell; Whitehead, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Many major incidents have significant impacts on people's health, placing additional demands on health-care organisations. The main aim of this paper is to suggest a prioritised agenda for organisational and management research on emergency planning and management relevant to U.K. health care, based on a scoping study. A secondary aim is to enhance knowledge and understanding of health-care emergency planning among the wider research community, by highlighting key issues and perspectives on the subject and presenting a conceptual model. The study findings have much in common with those of previous U.S.-focused scoping reviews, and with a recent U.K.-based review, confirming the relative paucity of U.K.-based research. No individual research topic scored highly on all of the key measures identified, with communities and organisations appearing to differ about which topics are the most important. Four broad research priorities are suggested: the affected public; inter- and intra-organisational collaboration; preparing responders and their organisations; and prioritisation and decision making. PMID:25013721

  13. Poverty and biodiversity trade-offs in rural development: A case study for Pujiang county, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huib Hengsdijk; Wang Guanghuo; Marrit M. Van den Berg; Wang Jiangdi; Joost Wolf; Lu Changhe; Reimund P. Roetter; Herman Van Keulen

    2007-01-01

    Both, poverty reduction and preservation of biodiversity are high on the global agenda on sustainable development. The relationships between poverty, biodiversity of agro-ecosystems and agricultural development are complex and poorly understood. In this paper, we present an integrated framework for analysis of agricultural development and natural resource management options at agro-ecosystem level, using Pujiang county, in Zhejiang province, China as

  14. Poverty Reduction for Profit? A Critical Examination of Business Opportunities at the Bottom of the Pyramid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Louis Warnholz

    Leading management thinker C.K. Prahalad argues that selling consumer goods to four billion poor people at the bottom of the economic pyramid (BoP) both generates sizeable profits for large businesses and eliminates poverty. A welcome, innovative and influential perspective, but an opportunity missed, I argue here. First, selling to the poor may do little to eradicate poverty, but potentially hurts

  15. Poverty Measurement in the U.S., Europe, and Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Kenneth A.; Pirog, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    In December of 2009, many within the American community of analysts, policymakers, and program managers are looking expectantly at the possibility of change in the basic measure used to gauge poverty in the United States. A broad consensus has emerged that the current official measure of poverty in the United States is deeply flawed, in the income…

  16. Management of Frontotemporal Dementia in Mental Health and Multidisciplinary Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Mary Anne; Shnall, Adriana; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Huey, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the mental health setting and issues pertaining to longitudinal care of this population in a specialty clinic are reviewed. FTD is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, most commonly as a mood disorder. FTD has features that overlap with those of major depression, mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. We describe these features and how to differentiate FTD from these psychiatric disorders. This paper also describes practical issues in the management of FTD, specifically the issues that clinicians, patients and their families face in managing this disease. Areas of clinical care along the continuum are explored; FTD care involves collaborative management of symptoms and disability, and assisting patients and families in adapting to the disease. PMID:23611352

  17. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. PMID:20200865

  18. Policy Management Standards Enabling Trustworthy pHealth.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd; Davis, Mike; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Current paradigm changes for improving safety, quality and efficiency of care processes under massive deployment of information and communication technologies (ICT) place high requirements on privacy and security. These mainly focus on privilege management and access control harmonized in international standards and their further evolution. NIST and ISO, but especially HL7 play a prominent role in this context. Starting with classic role-based access control (RBAC) foundations to new specifications for security and privacy labeling of segmented health information, HL7 security is presented as a scalable intermediate solution on the way to comprehensive privilege management and access control by explicit, ontology-based, formal and therefore machine-processable policies. The successfully balloted HL7 labeling specification supports context-sensitive communication and cooperation between different stakeholders and processes with different purposes of use, based on meta-data of information, actors and processes involved. Basics of policy management and practical solutions are discussed. PMID:24851957

  19. Draugen HSE-case - occupational health risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Glas, J.J.P.; Kjaer, E.

    1996-12-31

    The Draugen HSE-Case serves as a risk management tool. Originally, risk management included only major safety hazards to personnel, environment and assets. Work Environment risks such as ergonomics, psycho-social factors and exposure to chemicals and noise, was not given the same attention. The Draugen HSE-Case addresses this weakness and extends all work environment risks. In order to promote line responsibility and commitment, relevant personnel is involved in the Case development. {open_quotes}THESIS{degrees}, a software application, is used to systematize input and to generate reports. The Draugen HSE-case encompasses: HSE risk analyses related to specific activities; Control of risk related to work environment; Established tolerability criteria; Risk reducing measures; Emergency contingency measures; and Requirements for Competence and Follow-up. The development of Draugen HSE-Case is a continuous process. It will serve to minimize the potential of occupational illnesses, raise general awareness, and make occupational health management more cost-effective.

  20. Poverty, race, and hospitalization for childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Wissow, L S; Gittelsohn, A M; Szklo, M; Starfield, B; Mussman, M

    1988-01-01

    This study uses Maryland hospital discharge data for the period 1979-82 to determine whether Black children are more likely to be hospitalized for asthma and whether this difference persists after adjustment for poverty. The average annual asthma discharge rate was 1.95/1000 children aged 1-19; 3.75/1000 for Black children, and 1.25/1000 for White. Medicaid-enrolled children of both races had increased discharge rates for asthma compared to those whose care was paid for by other sources: 5.68/1000 vs 2.99/1000 for Blacks, and 3.10/1000 vs 1.11/1000 for Whites. When ecologic analyses were performed, populations of Black and White children had nearly equal asthma discharge rates after adjustment for poverty. The statewide adjusted rate was 2.70/1000 (95% CL = 1.93, 3.78) for Black children and 2.10/1000 (1.66, 2.66) for White children. Among Maryland counties and health planning districts, variation in asthma discharge rates was not associated with the supply of hospital beds or the population to primary-care physician ratio. We conclude that Black children are at increased risk of hospitalization for asthma, but that some or all of this increase is related to poverty rather than to race. PMID:3381951

  1. Combating infectious diseases of poverty: a year on

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Infectious Diseases of Poverty journal, launched a year ago, is a platform to engage outside the traditional disciplinary boundaries, and disseminate high quality science towards the improvement of health. This paper reviews the milestone achievements during its first year of operation. The journal has filled an important niche, addressing some of the main priorities in the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty. Highlights include the publication of three thematic issues on health systems, surveillance and response systems, as well as co-infection and syndemics. The thematic issues have foregrounded the importance and innovation that can be achieved through transdisciplinary research. The journal has been indexed by PubMed since April 2013, with the publication of a total of 38 articles. Finally, the journal is delivering to wider range readers both in developing and developed countries with sustained efforts with a focus on relevant and strategic information towards elimination of infectious diseases of poverty. PMID:24246007

  2. Gender, equity: new approaches for effective management of communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Sally; Tolhurst, Rachel; Squire, S Bertel

    2006-04-01

    This editorial article examines what is meant by sex, gender and equity and argues that these are critical concepts to address in the effective management of communicable disease. Drawing on examples from the three major diseases of poverty (HIV, tuberculosis [TB] and malaria), the article explores how, for women and men, gender and poverty can lead to differences in vulnerability to illness; access to quality preventive and curative measures; and experience of the impact of ill health. This exploration sets the context for the three companion papers which outline how gender and poverty shape responses to the three key diseases of poverty in different geographical settings: HIV/AIDS in Kenya; TB in India; and malaria in Ghana. PMID:16430933

  3. [Effectiveness of mental health training including active listening for managers].

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Kazunori; Tagawa, Yoshimasa; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori; Nagata, Shoji

    2008-07-01

    We carried out mental health training with Active Listening for managers of A company, which was the electronics manufacturing company with 1,900 employees. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect on managers and employees in the workplace on the training. The subjects were all persons who managed regular employees directly in A company. We performed the investigation from May 2006 to February 2007 and carried out the training from September to November in 2006. The contents of the training were from the chapter on "The education and training of managers" in the "The guideline for maintenance and promotion of mental health for workers" issued by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan in 2006. We divided the contents and implemented them in two sessions. "Responding to worker consultation" was one of the contents of Active Listening. In the first session, we explained about Active Listening, and in the second session we ran a practical involving Inventive Experiential Listening. One month later, we distributed material summarizing the training to all the participants. To evaluate the effect of the training, we conducted surveys of the participants using the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS), prior to and after the training, and distributed questionnaires, post-training about the contents of the training and changes of consciousness and action. Furthermore, we performed surveys pre- and post-training using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ) 12 items version, distributed to all employees. We evaluated the effect of the training on 124 managers and 908 workers by the investigation. The score of each subscale was analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no significant differences in the scores of both the "Listening attitude" and "Listening skill" subscales of ALAS between pre-training and post-training, but the mean scores post-training were higher than those pre-training on both subscales. There were significant increases post-training in "Job demands", "Worksite support by supervisor" and "Worksite support by co-worker", subscales of the BJSQ 12 items version. Particularly, the "Worksite support by supervisor" subscale increased significantly in 8 of the 47 sections in a comparison among sections. In this present study, we investigated the effectiveness of mental health training including Active Listening for managers, and suggest that to train Active Listening and use it at the worksite possibly strengthens "Worksite support by supervisor". PMID:18552457

  4. The global distribution of risk factors by poverty level.

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Tony; Hales, Simon; Kieft, Charlotte; Wilson, Nick; Woodward, Alistair

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the individual-level association of income poverty with being underweight, using tobacco, drinking alcohol, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, being exposed to indoor air pollution and being obese. METHODS: Using survey data for as many countries as possible, we estimated the relative risk association between income or assets and risk factors at the individual level within 11 medium- and low-income subregions of WHO. WHO and The World Bank data on the prevalence of risk factors and income poverty (defined as living on < US$ 1.00 per day, US$ 1-2.00 per day and > US$ 2.00 per day) were analysed to impute the association between poverty and risk factors for each subregion. The possible effect of poverty reduction on the prevalence of risk factors was estimated using population-attributable risk percentages. FINDINGS: There were strong associations between poverty and malnutrition among children, having access only to unsafe water and sanitation, and being exposed to indoor air pollution within each subregion (relative risks were twofold to threefold greater for those living on < US$ 1.00 per day compared with those living on > US$ 2.00 per day). Associations between poverty and obesity, tobacco use and alcohol use varied across subregions. If everyone living on < US$ 2.00 per day had the risk factor profile of those living on > US$ 2.00 per day, 51% of exposures to unimproved water and sanitation could be avoided as could 37% of malnutrition among children and 38% of exposure to indoor air pollution. The more realistic, but still challenging, Millennium Development Goal of halving the number of people living on < US$ 1.00 per day would achieve much smaller reductions. CONCLUSION: To achieve large gains in global health requires both poverty eradication and public health action. The methods used in this study may be useful for monitoring pro-equity progress towards Millennium Development Goals. PMID:15744404

  5. Rethinking health: ICT-enabled services to empower people to manage their health.

    PubMed

    Honka, Anita; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Hietala, Henri; Saranummi, Niilo

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle is a key determinant in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. If we would exercise regularly, eat healthy, control our weight, sleep enough, manage stress, not smoke and use alcohol only moderately, 90% of type II diabetes, 80% of coronary heart disease, and 70% of stroke could be prevented. Health statistics show that lifestyle related diseases are increasing at an alarming rate. Public health promotion campaigns and healthcare together are not effective enough to stop this "tsunami". The solution that is offered is to empower people to manage their health with the assistance of ICT-enabled services. A lot of R&D and engineering effort is being invested in Personal Health Systems. Although some progress has been made, the market for such systems has not yet emerged. The aim of this critical review is to identify the barriers which are holding back the growth of the market. It looks into the theoretical foundations of behavior change support, the maturity of the technologies for behavior change support, and the business context in which behavior change support systems are used. PMID:22273795

  6. Confidentiality measures in mental health delivery settings: report of US health information managers.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel P

    2004-01-01

    Health and human service organizations are becoming increasingly liable for violations of patient privacy as a result of recent federal mandates at both state and federal levels of government. Under such conditions it would seem likely that managers would act to quickly implement such guidelines and mandates, especially in sensitive specialty areas such as mental health. This study sought to examine the degree and type of patient information confidentiality measures adopted in mental health delivery settings, through a national survey of accredited US health information managers. Results suggest that significant nonadoption of basic confidentiality measures continues to exist, despite federal mandates to the contrary. Further examined was the degree to which confidentiality management varies across adoption levels of computerized patient records. Significant variation was found in adoption of patient confidentiality measures between highly computerized and paper-based medical record functions. Similar levels of variation in adoption across practice settings was also discovered. Ramifications for national policy and patient information protection are discussed. PMID:15255227

  7. Personal health information management system and its application in referral management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maisie; Lau, Christopher; Matsen, Frederick A; Kim, Yongmin

    2004-09-01

    We developed a web-based personal health record (PHR) that can be used by patients to collect and manage their health information (e.g., medical history, past surgeries, medications, and allergies), to request self-referrals, and to store a record of their consultations. The PHR also includes a messaging system that can be structured into the workflow of referral management as well as allowing more general communications. A preliminary study was conducted with 61 patients. Thirty-two patients completed a survey in which 85% of respondents were satisfied with the usability and 94% were satisfied with the overall online referral process. The consulting physicians were satisfied with the content of subjects' personal health information and referral problem descriptions and found the information detailed enough to triage all requested referrals. Patients, physicians, and patient care coordinators reported that their communications were enhanced by the system and found the messaging component convenient to use. PMID:15484434

  8. By: Latarsha Chisholm, MSW, Ph.D. Department of Health Management & Informatics

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    By: Latarsha Chisholm, MSW, Ph.D. Department of Health Management & Informatics University of Central Florida #12;Health Disparities Health disparities refers to population-specific differences in the presence of disease (www.ncsl.org) Health disparities is a particular type of health difference

  9. Part of the Wisconsin Poverty Project's Fourth Annual Report Series Wisconsin Poverty Report

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Part of the Wisconsin Poverty Project's Fourth Annual Report Series Wisconsin Poverty Report, and Katherine A. Thornton Institute for Research on Poverty University of Wisconsin­Madison May 2012 #12;ABOUT THE WISCONSIN POVERTY PROJECT The Wisconsin Poverty Project came into being in late 2008, when a group

  10. The Fourth Annual Report of the Wisconsin Poverty Project Wisconsin Poverty Report

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    The Fourth Annual Report of the Wisconsin Poverty Project Wisconsin Poverty Report: How the Safety, and Katherine A. Thornton Institute for Research on Poverty University of Wisconsin­Madison April 2012 #12;ABOUT THE WISCONSIN POVERTY PROJECT The Wisconsin Poverty Project came into being in late 2008, when a group

  11. Children in Poverty: The Fundamental Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Wayne; Busby, Fran

    1996-01-01

    Documents the plight of children in poverty, examines the secondary effects of poverty upon the person and community, analyzes why the current subsidy approach has been ineffective, and seeks a holistic explanation for poverty. A universal, revenue-neutral approach to reducing poverty based on "supplementation" and "empowerment" is proposed. (GR)

  12. Child and Family Poverty Saskatchewan Profile 2008

    E-print Network

    Argerami, Martin

    Child and Family Poverty Saskatchewan Profile 2008 Summary 19.9% of Saskatchewan's children under Saskatchewan's child poverty rate is the second· highest in the country, following only British Columbia· one of seven (13.5%) children from poverty. Little Change in Child Poverty Rates In 1989, when

  13. Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

  14. On opulence driven poverty traps.

    PubMed

    Van Marrewijk, C; Verbeek, J

    1993-01-01

    "We opt in this study to endogenize the growth rate of the population in such a way that it stresses the empirically supported negative relation between fertility and per capita income. Fertility declines as per capita income rises." The authors conclude that "the less developed economy can get stuck in a variant of the 'Malthusian trap', also called the poverty trap. The only way out of the poverty trap is through an injection of capital (a large transfer) from abroad. Our model therefore, supports...[the] view that aid from the developed countries to the less developed countries has to be increased dramatically...to overcome the poverty trap...." PMID:12285976

  15. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    PubMed

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles presented here are necessary as a complete recipe. Leaders of health systems moving toward integration are cautioned to apply the recipe in full. This article ends with two questions. First, if not an integrated model of health care, what's the alternative? Since it seems clear that many of the existing community-based models are excessively fragmented and inefficient, especially in a reforming U.S. health care marketplace, is there a new model that is superior to the integrated models and, if so, what is it and what are its functional principles? The second question: Is there more than one functional form of integration? This article argues for the most integrated form. Others would argue that clinical integration is sufficient,'s and full integration isn't required. The stability, durability and adaptability of the fully integrated models have, arguably, been tested. The lesser integrated models remain to be proven in an unstable health care marketplace seeking higher levels of economic efficiency. PMID:23888674

  16. Innovative requirements and technologies for future RLVs health management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltecca, L.; Miccichè, L.; Russo, G.; Sellitto, M.

    2002-07-01

    The Italian aerospace research program PRORA (PROgramma nazionale di Ricerche Aerospaziali), which has been conceived and managed by CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Center), is focused on the development of innovative technologies, also based on experience from flying test beds. One family of these test beds, designated USV (Unmanned Space Vehicle) will be dedicated to acquire the knowledge about future RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) technologies. Major strategic technologies identified are reusability, hypersonic flight and atmospheric re-entry. The Phase-A study has been concluded and recently approved. Laben (a Finmeccanica Company) has contributed to identify requirements for the next generations of on board Vehicle Health Management System (VHMS) and to investigate possible innovative architectures. This new generation VHMS will be able to manage in a real-time mode the health of the vehicle (structure, propulsion, avionics, etc.). The proposed approach is based on a set of decentralised computers linked via an advanced high-speed interconnect system. This paper will describe preliminary requirements analysis and trade-off's mainly in terms of HW (e.g. use of general purpose CPUs versus DSPs, interconnects and topologies).

  17. Caries management pathways preserve dental tissues and promote oral health.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amid I; Tellez, Marisol; Pitts, Nigel B; Ekstrand, Kim R; Ricketts, David; Longbottom, Christopher; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn; Deery, Christopher; Fisher, Julian; Young, Douglas A; Featherstone, John D B; Evans, Wendell; Zeller, Gregory G; Zero, Domenick; Martignon, Stefania; Fontana, Margherita; Zandona, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    In May 2012, cariologists, dentists, representatives of dental organizations, manufacturers, and third party payers from several countries, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to define a common mission; goals and strategic approaches for caries management in the 21th century. The workshop started with an address by Mr. Stanley Bergman, CEO of Henry Schein Inc. which focused on the imperative for change in academia, clinical practice, and public health. For decades, new scientific evidence on caries and how it should be managed have been discussed among experts in the field. However, there has been some limited change, except in some Scandinavian countries, in the models of caries management and reimbursement which have been heavily skewed toward 'drilling and filling'. There is no overall agreement on a caries' case definition or on when to surgically intervene. The participants in the workshop defined a new mission for all caries management approaches, both conventional and new. The mission of each system should be to preserve the tooth structure, and restore only when necessary. This mission marks a pivotal line for judging when to surgically intervene and when to arrest or remineralize early noncavitated lesions. Even when restorative care is necessary, the removal of hard tissues should be lesion-focused and aim to preserve, as much as possible, sound tooth structure. Continuing management of the etiological factors of caries and the use of science-based preventive regimens also will be required to prevent recurrence and re-restoration. These changes have been debated for over a decade. The Caries Management Pathways includes all systems and philosophies, conventional and new, of caries management that can be used or modified to achieve the new mission. The choice of which system to use to achieve the mission of caries management is left to the users and should be based on the science supporting each approach or philosophy, experience, utility, and ease of use. This document also presents a new 'Caries Management Cycle' that should be followed regardless of which approach is adopted for caries prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment. To aid success in the adoption of the new mission, a new reimbursement system that third party payers may utilize is proposed (for use by countries other than Scandinavian countries or other countries where such systems already exist). The new reimbursement/incentive model focuses on the mission of preservation of tooth structure and outcomes of caries management. Also described, is a research agenda to revitalize research on the most important and prevalent world-wide human disease. The alliance of major dental organizations and experts that started in Philadelphia will hopefully propel over the next months and years, a change in how caries is managed by dentists all over the world. A new mission has been defined and it is time for all oral health professionals to focus on the promotion of oral health and preservation of sound teeth rather than counting the number of surgical restorative procedures provided. PMID:24916676

  18. Health management education in Europe and in the United States: a comparative review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    In Europe and in the United States, health management education and the role of health managers are patterned and consistent with how the country's healthcare system is organized, managed, and financed. In the United States, the fee-for-service, entrepreneurial dominated approach, resulting in health being one of the few remaining growth industries, has created a huge demand for additional health management education programs and managers. Therefore, universities finding themselves in an economic slump are attracted to establish health services administration programs (a North American term) since they require limited capital, continue to attract enrollment, and contribute to the "social good." In contrast, the European countries' healthcare systems provide universal access to care and strict, governmental fiscal control on healthcare expenditures. As a result, the American masters-level health manager model has not thrived there--although not willingly conceded is the fact that in Europe physicians continue to dominate the management ranks. After outlining a number of the current problems facing US health management education, this article focuses on: (1) a projected shuttering of the weaker American health management programs and the market for health managers being overly saturated (such as for lawyers now), because the US gross domestic product expenditures for health will decrease over the next two decades from the current level of 17.6% to be somewhat comparable to the 11.5% in Canada, France, and Germany; and (2) a projected increase in the enrollment among European health management programs for several reasons: (a) a huge spike in the demand for additional clinically oriented, health managers who can trade off concerns of cost versus quality; and (b) the constraints of most countries' statutory health insurance plans will become increasingly more evident so that privatization of healthcare services will become an option for those with above average incomes and, thereby, generate a demand for newly minted health managers similar to the US masters-level graduate. PMID:25595004

  19. Technology management: case study of an integrated health system.

    PubMed

    Dahl, D H; McFarlan, T K

    1994-12-01

    Technology management has assumed a role of vital importance in today's health care environment. Capital reserves and operating income have been stretched by pervasive and expensive technologies, while overall reimbursement has been reduced. It is imperative for hospitals to develop and consistently use technology management processes that begin prior to a technology's introduction in the hospital and continue throughout its life cycle. At Samaritan Health System (SHS), an integrated health care delivery system based in Phoenix, technology management provides tools to improve decision making and assist in the system's integration strategy as well as control expenses. SHS uses a systemwide technology-specific plan to guide acquisition and/or funding decisions. This plan describes how particular technologies can help achieve SHS' organizational goals such as promoting system integration and/or improving patient outcomes while providing good economic value. After technologies are targeted in this systemwide plan they are prioritized using a two-stage capital prioritization process. The first stage of the capital prioritization process considers the quantitative and qualitative factors critical for equitable capital distribution across the system. The second stage develops a sense of ownership among the parties that affect and are affected by the allocation at a facility level. This process promotes an efficient, effective, equitable, and defensible approach to resource allocation and technology decision making. Minimizing equipment maintenance expenditures is also an integral part of technology management at SHS. The keys to reducing maintenance expenditures are having a process in place that supports a routine fiscal evaluation of maintenance coverage options and ensuring that manufacturers are obligated to provide critical maintenance resources at the time of equipment purchase. Maintenance service options under consideration in this report include full-service contracts with the manufacturer, insurance coverage, time and materials, and independent service vendors/in-house support. Careful consideration of all the ramifications of each option is warranted because there are substantial cost differences among these methods. At SHS, technology management efforts resulted in equipment purchases and maintenance negotiations representing savings of more than $1.5 million in a single year. SHS undertakes an intensive review of purchases and maintenance expenditures, using the techniques described in this report, with the objective of reducing expenses by 10% per year. This report describes the technology management methods that SHS uses to achieve these results. PMID:10139509

  20. INTEGRATION OF SAFETY, HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT AND QUALITY (SHEQ) MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CONSTRUCTION: A REVIEW

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdul Rahim; Abdul Hamid; Bachan Singh; Wan Zulkifli Wan

    There are several standard of management systems such as ISO 9001 for Quality Management System, ISO 14001 for Environmental Management System, and OHSAS 18001 for Safety and Health Management System. These management systems are often treated as independent functions within organizations. However, many professionals belief that it is possible to harmonise ISO 9001 QMS, ISO 14001 EMS and OHSAS 18001

  1. Poverty Comparisons Over Time and Across Countries in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Sahn; David C. Stifel

    2000-01-01

    We use Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to compare “poverty” at two or more points in time within and between African countries. Our welfare measure is an index resulting from a factor analysis of various household characteristics, durables, and household heads’ education. An advantage of this measure is that for intertemporal and intraregional comparisons, we need not rely on suspect

  2. Improving the Effectiveness of Health Care Innovation Implementation: Middle Managers as Change Agents

    PubMed Central

    Birken, Sarah A.; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Weiner, Bryan J.; Chin, Marshall H.; Schaefer, Cynthia T.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of successful health care innovation implementation is dismal. Middle managers have a potentially important yet poorly understood role in health care innovation implementation. This study used self-administered surveys and interviews of middle managers in health centers that implemented an innovation to reduce health disparities to address the questions: Does middle managers’ commitment to health care innovation implementation influence implementation effectiveness? If so, in what ways does their commitment influence implementation effectiveness? Although quantitative survey data analysis results suggest a weak relationship, qualitative interview data analysis results indicate that middle managers’ commitment influences implementation effectiveness when middle managers are proactive. Scholars should account for middle managers’ influence in implementation research, and health care executives may promote implementation effectiveness by hiring proactive middle managers and creating climates in which proactivity is rewarded, supported, and expected. PMID:22930312

  3. A study for safety and health management problem of semiconductor industry in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chin-Jung; Wang, Hui-Ming; Feng, Wen-Yang; Tseng, Feng-Yi

    2008-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to discuss and explore the safety and health management in semiconductor industry. The researcher practically investigates and interviews the input, process and output of the safety and health management of semiconductor industry by using the questionnaires and the interview method which is developed according to the framework of the OHSAS 18001. The result shows that there are six important factors for the safety and health management in Taiwan semiconductor industry. 1. The company should make employee clearly understand the safety and health laws and standards. 2. The company should make the safety and health management policy known to the public. 3. The company should put emphasis on the pursuance of the safety and health management laws. 4. The company should prevent the accidents. 5. The safety and health message should be communicated sufficiently. 6. The company should consider safety and health norm completely. PMID:19088409

  4. Challenging Hydrological Panaceas: Water poverty governance accounting for spatial scale in the Niger River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, John; Kaczan, David

    2014-11-01

    Water poverty in the Niger River Basin is a function of physical constraints affecting access and supply, and institutional arrangements affecting the ability to utilise the water resource. This distinction reflects the complexity of water poverty and points to the need to look beyond technical and financial means alone to reduce its prevalence and severity. Policy decisions affecting water resources are generally made at a state or national level. Hydrological and socio-economic evaluations at these levels, or at the basin level, cannot be presumed to be concordant with the differentiation of poverty or livelihood vulnerability at more local levels. We focus on three objectives: first, the initial mapping of observed poverty, using two health metrics and a household assets metric; second, the estimation of factors which potentially influence the observed poverty patterns; and third, a consideration of spatial non-stationarity, which identifies spatial correlates of poverty in the places where their effects appear most severe. We quantify the extent to which different levels of analysis influence these results. Comparative analysis of correlates of poverty at basin, national and local levels shows limited congruence. Variation in water quantity, and the presence of irrigation and dams had either limited or no significant correlation with observed variation in poverty measures across levels. Education and access to improved water quality were the only variables consistently significant and spatially stable across the entire basin. At all levels, education is the most consistent non-water correlate of poverty while access to protected water sources is the strongest water related correlate. The analysis indicates that landscape and scale matter for understanding water-poverty linkages and for devising policy concerned with alleviating water poverty. Interactions between environmental, social and institutional factors are complex and consequently a comprehensive understanding of poverty and its causes requires analysis at multiple spatial resolutions.

  5. Health Vlogs as Social Support for Chronic Illness Management

    PubMed Central

    HUH, JINA; LIU, LESLIE S.; NEOGI, TINA; INKPEN, KORI; PRATT, WANDA

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown positive impact of video blogs (vlogs) on patient education. However, we know little on how patient-initiated vlogs shape the relationships among vloggers and viewers. We qualitatively analyzed 72 vlogs on YouTube by users diagnosed with HIV, diabetes, or cancer and 1,274 comments posted to the vlogs to understand viewers’ perspectives on the vlogs. We found that the unique video medium allowed intense and enriched personal and contextual disclosure to the viewers, leading to strong community-building activities and social support among vloggers and commenters, both informationally and emotionally. Furthermore, the unique communication structure of the vlogs allowed ad hoc small groups to form, which showed different group behavior than typical text-based social media, such as online communities. We provide implications to the Health Care Industry (HCI) community on how future technologies for health vlogs could be designed to further support chronic illness management. PMID:26146474

  6. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. PMID:25542194

  7. Assurance of Learning Assessment Matrix -MS Health Care Management Learning Goals Learning Objectives Assessment/Assignment

    E-print Network

    Niebur, Ernst

    Assurance of Learning Assessment Matrix - MS Health Care Management Learning Goals Learning Objectives Assessment/Assignment Understand and master core concepts and methods in the health care concepts and tools in the health care management discipline to develop integrated and innovative strategies

  8. Harnessing social support in health-related behaviour management systems: an investigation into current

    E-print Network

    Miller, Alice

    Harnessing social support in health-related behaviour management systems: an investigation that can improve a population's health and wellness. The group studies the integration of pervasive. Considering HB in relation to a subset of three health domains: cardiac rehabilitation, weight-management, a

  9. Empowering primary care workers to improve health services: results from Mozambique's leadership and management development program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cary Perry

    2008-01-01

    This article is the third article in the Human Resources for Health journal's feature on the theme of leadership and management in public health. The series of six articles has been contributed by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and will be published article-by-article over the next few weeks. The third article presents a successful application in Mozambique of a leadership

  10. Use of information systems as management tools in health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Fidel

    1995-10-01

    Information systems that can be used as effective management tools in healthcare do not exist. This is because current information systems do not accurately reflect reality and because they do not provide information to important end-users, i.e., clinicians. To reflect reality, healthcare information systems must assess total health care costs. These not only include the direct economic costs (dollars paid) but also the indirect economic costs (dollars lost, spent, or saved) from having a person ill. These systems must also accurately assess the adjusted, qualitative costs of human life and human pain and suffering resulting from the illness and healthcare provided. Once information systems reflect reality, they can be used to manage healthcare by profiling utilization, projecting need, modeling programs, assessing quality of care and establishing guidelines.

  11. Future Prospects of Health Management Systems Using Cellular Phones

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Hwang, Yunji; Lee, Jae-Ho; Oh, Hye Young; Kim, Yi-Jun; Kwon, Hyeon Yoon; Kang, Hyoseung; Kim, Hyunah; Park, Rae Woong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cellular phones enable communication between healthcare providers and patients for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases. However, few studies have examined the user-friendliness or effectiveness of cellular phone-based medical informatics (CPBMI) for healthcare. Materials and Methods: This study investigated the use of CPBMI to identify its current status within the medical field, advantages and disadvantages, practicability, clinical effectiveness, costs, and cost-saving potential. Results: CPBMI was validated in terms of practicality and provision of medical benefits. It is critical to use CPBMI in accordance with the different features of each disease and condition. Use of CPBMI is expected to be especially useful for patients with chronic disease. Conclusions: We discussed the current status of the clinical use, benefits, and risks of CPBMI. CPBMI and information technology–based health management tools are anticipated to become useful and effective components of healthcare management in the future. PMID:24693986

  12. Vehicle health management for guidance, navigation and control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Kathleen; Frazzini, Ron; Bursch, Paul; Wald, Jerry; Brown, Don

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the program was to architect a vehicle health management (VHM) system for space systems avionics that assures system readiness for launch vehicles and for space-based dormant vehicles. The platforms which were studied and considered for application of VHM for guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) included the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS), the Horizontal Landing-20/Personnel Launch System (HL-20/PLS), the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) and the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO). This set was selected because dormancy and/or availability requirements are driving the designs of these future systems.

  13. GIS-based bridge structural health monitoring and management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenzhong; Cheng, P. G.; Ko, Jan Ming; Liu, C.

    2002-06-01

    For monitoring and evaluating structural health for the three long-span cable-supported bridges, namely, Tsing Ma Bridge, Kap Shui Mun Bridge and Ting Kua Bridge in Hong Kong, Wind And Structural Health Monitoring System (WASHMS) has been established by the Highway Department of the local Government in Hong Kong. To investigate the possibilities of further enhancing the functions of the existing system in storage, retrieve and distribute huge amount of monitoring data for the WASHMS, a study of developing GIS-based bridge structural health monitoring and management system is carried out and presented in this paper. This system is developed by integrating GIS, large database and network techniques. The system is able to run on a Local Area Network or Internet. GIS is applied to manage spatial information on location of bridges on a regional map and position of sensors on a 3D bridge model. It also provides users with interactive interface between user and the system. Large database system, such as SQL Sever or Oracle, is used to manage huge amount of dataset captured from the sensors. In the Sever-Side, by using the data input and database maintain module, the raw data come from WASHMS and the analyzed results can be imported into the central database in real time, and is backup from time to time. For those data that are not changed or changed infrequently, such as regional map for bridges, location information and attributes about sensors, a static database is established to store them. In the Client-Side, user can not only access the raw data from various sensors from the central database at any time, but also visualize or even further process the data. Based on above designed prototype of GIS-based bridge structural health monitoring and management system. It is demonstrated by the prototype that the developed system is feasible. Furthermore, the implementation issues including system design, technique solutions, database structure design and function design are also presented in this paper.

  14. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    E-print Network

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  15. Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality

    E-print Network

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty trends in poverty, inequality, and mobility among Hispanics in the United States. This grant competition is funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

  16. Animal health surveillance applications: The interaction of science and management.

    PubMed

    Willeberg, Preben

    2012-08-01

    Animal health surveillance is an ever-evolving activity, since health- and risk-related policy and management decisions need to be backed by the best available scientific evidence and methodology. International organizations, trade partners, politicians, media and the public expect fast, understandable, up-to-date presentation and valid interpretation of animal disease data to support and document proper animal health management - in crises as well as in routine control applications. The delivery and application of surveillance information need to be further developed and optimized, and epidemiologists, risk managers, administrators and policy makers need to work together in order to secure progress. Promising new developments in areas such as risk-based surveillance, spatial presentation and analysis, and genomic epidemiology will be mentioned. Limitations and areas in need of further progress will be underlined, such as the general lack of a wide and open exchange of international animal disease surveillance data. During my more than 30 year career as a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology I had the good fortune of working in challenging environments with different eminent colleagues in different countries on a variety of animal health surveillance issues. My career change from professor to Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) - "from science to application" - was caused by my desire to see for myself if and how well epidemiology would actually work to solve real-life problems as I had been telling my students for years that it would. Fortunately it worked for me! The job of a CVO is not that different from that of a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology; the underlying professional principles are the same. Every day I had to work from science, and base decisions and discussions on documented evidence - although sometimes the evidence was incomplete or data were simply lacking. A basic understanding of surveillance methodology is very useful for a CVO, since it provides a sound working platform not only for dealing with immediate questions when new or emerging disease situations arise, but also for more long-term activities, such as policy development, contingency planning and trade negotiations. Animal health issues, which emerged during my eight years as a CVO in Denmark from 1999 to 2007, will be used as examples, including BSE, FMD, HPAI and Trichinella testing. Emphasis will be placed on how science-based surveillance methodology and tools were developed, applied and documented. PMID:22305878

  17. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

  18. Cost Analysis in Primary Health Care. A Training Manual for Programme Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creese, Andrew, Ed.; Parker, David, Ed.

    This manual is designed to provide primary health care program managers with guidance on how to use cost analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis as tools to achieve better understanding and management of resource flows. Although it has been prepared primarily for program managers at national, regional, and district levels, other health

  19. Inventory of Federal Data Bases Related to the Measurement of Poverty. The Measure of Poverty, Technical Paper IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citro, Connie; And Others

    This technical paper provides an inventory of Federal data bases that are related to the definition and measurement of poverty. An attempt was made to make the inventory as complete as possible. The report is in two parts: Part A covers the Departments of Agriculture; Health, Education, and Welfare; Housing and Urban Development; Labor; and…

  20. Poverty Induced Forest Degradation in JFM Regime: Evidence from India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amarendra Das

    2007-01-01

    Around 28% of the total forest area in India has been brought under Joint Forest Management (JFM) and rest 72% remains virtually open access to local communities. In such a scenario, communities actively participating in JFM are also engaged in degrading de facto open access forests to meet their basic livelihood necessities. This reveals that, the poverty induced forest degradation

  1. 77 FR 41986 - Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ...HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Division of Nursing, Public Health Nursing Community Based Model of PHN Case Management Services...OCPS), Community Based Model of Public Health Nursing Case Management Services. This program is...

  2. Environmental health risk assessment and management for global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, P.

    2014-12-01

    This environmental health risk assessment and management approach for atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution is based almost entirely on IPCC AR5 (2014) content, but the IPCC does not make recommendations. Large climate model uncertainties may be large environmental health risks. In accordance with environmental health risk management, we use the standard (IPCC-endorsed) formula of risk as the product of magnitude times probability, with an extremely high standard of precaution. Atmospheric GHG pollution, causing global warming, climate change and ocean acidification, is increasing as fast as ever. Time is of the essence to inform and make recommendations to governments and the public. While the 2ºC target is the only formally agreed-upon policy limit, for the most vulnerable nations, a 1.5ºC limit is being considered by the UNFCCC Secretariat. The Climate Action Network International (2014), representing civil society, recommends that the 1.5ºC limit be kept open and that emissions decline from 2015. James Hansen et al (2013) have argued that 1ºC is the danger limit. Taking into account committed global warming, its millennial duration, multiple large sources of amplifying climate feedbacks and multiple adverse impacts of global warming and climate change on crops, and population health impacts, all the IPCC AR5 scenarios carry extreme environmental health risks to large human populations and to the future of humanity as a whole. Our risk consideration finds that 2ºC carries high risks of many catastrophic impacts, that 1.5ºC carries high risks of many disastrous impacts, and that 1ºC is the danger limit. IPCC AR4 (2007) showed that emissions must be reversed by 2015 for a 2ºC warming limit. For the IPCC AR5 only the best-case scenario RCP2.6, is projected to stay under 2ºC by 2100 but the upper range is just above 2ºC. It calls for emissions to decline by 2020. We recommend that for catastrophic environmental health risk aversion, emissions decline from 2015 (CAN International 2014), and if policy makers are limited to the IPCC AR5 we recommend RCP2.6, with emissions declining by 2020.

  3. A ride in the time machine: information management capabilities health departments will need.

    PubMed

    Foldy, Seth; Grannis, Shaun; Ross, David; Smith, Torney

    2014-09-01

    We have proposed needed information management capabilities for future US health departments predicated on trends in health care reform and health information technology. Regardless of whether health departments provide direct clinical services (and many will), they will manage unprecedented quantities of sensitive information for the public health core functions of assurance and assessment, including population-level health surveillance and metrics. Absent improved capabilities, health departments risk vestigial status, with consequences for vulnerable populations. Developments in electronic health records, interoperability and information exchange, public information sharing, decision support, and cloud technologies can support information management if health departments have appropriate capabilities. The need for national engagement in and consensus on these capabilities and their importance to health department sustainability make them appropriate for consideration in the context of accreditation. PMID:25033122

  4. The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context

    PubMed Central

    Kabene, Stefane M; Orchard, Carole; Howard, John M; Soriano, Mark A; Leduc, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. Methods We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. Results Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management. This paper will reveal how human resources management is essential to any health care system and how it can improve health care models. Challenges in the health care systems in Canada, the United States of America and various developing countries are examined, with suggestions for ways to overcome these problems through the proper implementation of human resources management practices. Comparing and contrasting selected countries allowed a deeper understanding of the practical and crucial role of human resources management in health care. Conclusion Proper management of human resources is critical in providing a high quality of health care. A refocus on human resources management in health care and more research are needed to develop new policies. Effective human resources management strategies are greatly needed to achieve better outcomes from and access to health care around the world. PMID:16872531

  5. Rocket Engine Health Management: Early Definition of Critical Flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, Rick L.; Nelson, Michael A.; Butas, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA led Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has established key requirements related to safety, reliability, launch availability and operations cost to be met by the next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Key to meeting these requirements will be an integrated vehicle health management ( M) system that includes sensors, harnesses, software, memory, and processors. Such a system must be integrated across all the vehicle subsystems and meet component, subsystem, and system requirements relative to fault detection, fault isolation, and false alarm rate. The purpose of this activity is to evolve techniques for defining critical flight engine system measurements-early within the definition of an engine health management system (EHMS). Two approaches, performance-based and failure mode-based, are integrated to provide a proposed set of measurements to be collected. This integrated approach is applied to MSFC s MC-1 engine. Early identification of measurements supports early identification of candidate sensor systems whose design and impacts to the engine components must be considered in engine design.

  6. Managing waterway health in the Goulburn Broken Catchment, Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Tennant, W; Sheed, J

    2001-01-01

    Historically within most catchments, resource management programs have been planned and implemented in isolation of one another. This was once the case in the Goulburn Broken Catchment, a major catchment of the Murray Darling Basin, Australia. Although only 2% of the Murray Darling Basin's land area, the catchment generates 11% of the basin's water resources. Learning from the past, a cooperative and collaborative approach to natural resource programs has developed. This approach is the envy of many other catchment communities and agencies. Through a combination of "Partnership Programs", "Operational Initiatives" and community involvement, significant programs have been implemented within the catchment, which will benefit not only the local community but communities further afield. The outcomes of the waterway health program highlight the benefits provided through the establishment of cooperative and partnership resource improvement programs. These programs were founded on the ability of the community to recognise the need for integration, base management decisions on best available science and an ability to work together. Their effective delivery has been provided through the resources provided, to the local community, by the Natural Heritage Trust with matching and State and local allocations. While programs have shown success, challenges still face the community. These challenges include verification and implementation of environmental flows, storage of the catchment's vital water resources, and maintaining community involvement and participation in on-going works programs. The Goulburn Broken Catchment community, with the support of Federal, State and Local Governments, is looking at opportunities for continued improvements in waterway health. PMID:11419136

  7. Development of Structural Health Management Technology for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems for aerospace vehicles, NASA has focused considerable resources on the development of technologies for Structural Health Management (SHM). The motivations for these efforts are to increase the safety and reliability of aerospace structural systems, while at the same time decreasing operating and maintenance costs. Research and development of SHM technologies has been supported under a variety of programs for both aircraft and spacecraft including the Space Launch Initiative, X-33, Next Generation Launch Technology, and Aviation Safety Program. The major focus of much of the research to date has been on the development and testing of sensor technologies. A wide range of sensor technologies are under consideration including fiber-optic sensors, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, most notably being extremely light weight, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and have received considerable attention.

  8. Escaping the box: preparing allied health practitioners for management positions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Denise G

    2005-01-01

    Career ladders designed for health care practitioners are not always long enough to reach beyond the top rungs of clinical practice. Limited upward mobility can result in dissatisfaction and potential loss of experienced staff members. The same skills that allow practitioners to function successfully in patient care can be tapped into to prepare clinicians to move upward in administrative positions. This has already occurred successfully in the nursing profession. Managers should take advantage of the yearly performance evaluation to identify those health professionals who are interested in advancement. Using a strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats analysis, the manager and clinician can work together to develop a developmental plan that will build on existing strengths while developing the less prepared areas. Managerial skill enhancement should be combined with mentoring from persons already filling administrative roles to enable the clinician to develop a network of contacts. A planned approach should enable interested clinicians to successfully transition from hands-on practice into managerial positions. PMID:16284521

  9. The poverty effects of a 'fat-tax' in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Madden, David

    2015-01-01

    To combat growing levels of obesity, health-related taxes have been suggested with taxes on foods high in fat or sugar. Such taxes have been criticised on the basis of their regressivity and potentially adverse impact upon poverty. This paper analyses the effect of such taxes on a range of poverty measures and also examines the effect of a revenue-neutral tax subsidy mixed with a tax on unhealthy food combined with a subsidy on more healthy food. Using Irish expenditure data, the results indicate that taxes on high fat/sugar goods on their own will be regressive but that a tax-subsidy combination can be broadly neutral with respect to poverty. PMID:24132985

  10. [The conceptual bases for an entrepreneurial management of local health systems].

    PubMed

    Yepes, F J; Durán-Arenas, L

    1994-01-01

    Health management has become a fashion and it is now common to talk about strategic or service management, or of total quality management applied to health systems. However, all these elements of business management are being translated to health systems without a previous analysis on the implicit health model and the rationality of the prevalent production functions, which can lead to a higher level of efficiency but with an inadequate use of resources. This paper suggests the importance of integrating the advances in management and health sciences and proposes what are considered to be the conceptual basis for the design of a management tool geared to conduct local health systems with effectiveness, efficiency, quality and equity. PMID:8073335

  11. Management Knowledge and Skills Required in the Health Care System of the Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Slipicevic, Osman; Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Extremely complex health care organizations, by their structure and organization, operate in a constantly changing business environment, and such situation implies and requires complex and demanding health management. Therefore, in order to manage health organizations in a competent manner, health managers must possess various managerial skills and be familiar with problems in health care. Research, identification, analysis, and assessment of health management education and training needs are basic preconditions for the development and implementation of adequate programs to meet those needs. Along with other specific activities, this research helped to determine the nature, profile, and level of top-priority needs for education. The need for knowledge of certain areas in health management, as well as the need for mastering concrete managerial competencies has been recognized as top-priorities requiring additional improvement and upgrading. PMID:23922519

  12. Behavioral and Socioemotional Outcomes Through Age 5 Years of the Legacy for Children Public Health Approach to Improving Developmental Outcomes Among Children Born Into Poverty

    PubMed Central

    Perou, Ruth; Visser, Susanna N.; Scott, Keith G.; Beckwith, Leila; Howard, Judy; Smith, D. Camille; Danielson, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated Legacy for Children, a public health strategy to improve child health and development among low-income families. Methods. Mothers were recruited prenatally or at the birth of a child to participate in Legacy parenting groups for 3 to 5 years. A set of 2 randomized trials in Miami, Florida, and Los Angeles, California, between 2001 and 2009 assessed 574 mother-child pairs when the children were 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months old. Intent-to-treat analyses from 12 to 60 months compared groups on child behavioral and socioemotional outcomes. Results. Children of mothers in the intervention group were at lower risk for behavioral concerns at 24 months and socioemotional problems at 48 months in Miami, and lower risk for hyperactive behavior at 60 months in Los Angeles. Longitudinal analyses indicated that children of intervention mothers in Miami were at lower risk for behavior problems from 24 to 60 months of age. Conclusions. Randomized controlled trials documented effectiveness of the Legacy model over time while allowing for implementation adaptations by 2 different sites. Broadly disseminable, parent-focused prevention models such as Legacy have potential for public health impact. These investments in prevention might reduce the need for later intervention strategies. PMID:23597356

  13. Neglect subtypes, race, and poverty: individual, family, and service characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett; Zhou, Pan

    2013-02-01

    Recent child maltreatment research has highlighted the very different context of poverty for Black and White children. Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment and strongly associated with poverty. Neglect is, however, not a unitary construct. We lack an understanding of whether reporting of and responding to different types of neglect may vary by poverty, race, or the intersection of the two. Administrative census, child welfare, welfare, health, and education data were used to examine how family and community poverty factors associate with various subtypes of neglect and subsequent case dispositions for Black and White children. Black children reported to child welfare reside in far poorer communities than Whites, even after taking into account family income (Aid to Families with Dependent Children [AFDC]/Temporary Aid to Needy Families [TANF]). Black children were more commonly reported and substantiated for severe and basic needs neglect. Community poverty indicators had a different relationship to report disposition for Black as compared to White children after controlling for neglect subtypes, child and family characteristics. Implications for practice and policy are discussed. PMID:23109353

  14. The negative effects of poverty & food insecurity on child development.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Mariana; Chyatte, Michelle; Breaux, Jennifer

    2007-10-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the first three years of life to the developing child, examines the importance of early childhood nutrition and the detrimental effects on child health and development due to poverty and food insecurity. As development experts learn more about the importance of the first three years of life, there is growing recognition that investments in early education, maternal-child attachment and nurturance, and more creative nutrition initiatives are critical to help break the cycle of poverty. Even the slightest forms of food insecurity can affect a young child's development and learning potential. The result is the perpetuation of another generation in poverty. Conceptualizing the poorly developed child as an embodiment of injustice helps ground the two essential frameworks needed to address food insecurity and child development: the capability approach and the human rights framework. The capability approach illuminates the dynamics that exist between poverty and child development through depicting poverty as capability deprivation and hunger as failure in the system of entitlements. The human rights framework frames undernutrition and poor development of young children as intolerable for moral and legal reasons, and provides a structure through which governments and other agencies of the State and others can be held accountable for redressing such injustices. Merging the development approach with human rights can improve and shape the planning, approach, monitoring and evaluation of child development while establishing international accountability in order to enhance the potential of the world's youngest children. PMID:18032801

  15. Mental Health and African Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of Non-Hispanic Whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  16. Poverty and common mental disorders in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vikram; Kleinman, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A review of English-language journals published since 1990 and three global mental health reports identified 11 community studies on the association between poverty and common mental disorders in six low- and middle-income countries. Most studies showed an association between indicators of poverty and the risk of mental disorders, the most consistent association being with low levels of education. A review of articles exploring the mechanism of the relationship suggested weak evidence to support a specific association with income levels. Factors such as the experience of insecurity and hopelessness, rapid social change and the risks of violence and physical ill-health may explain the greater vulnerability of the poor to common mental disorders. The direct and indirect costs of mental ill-health worsen the economic condition, setting up a vicious cycle of poverty and mental disorder. Common mental disorders need to be placed alongside other diseases associated with poverty by policy-makers and donors. Programmes such as investment in education and provision of microcredit may have unanticipated benefits in reducing the risk of mental disorders. Secondary prevention must focus on strengthening the ability of primary care services to provide effective treatment. PMID:14576893

  17. Snake Envenoming: A Disease of Poverty

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert A.; Hargreaves, Adam; Wagstaff, Simon C.; Faragher, Brian; Lalloo, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most epidemiological and clinical reports on snake envenoming focus on a single country and describe rural communities as being at greatest risk. Reports linking snakebite vulnerability to socioeconomic status are usually limited to anecdotal statements. The few reports with a global perspective have identified the tropical regions of Asia and Africa as suffering the highest levels of snakebite-induced mortality. Our analysis examined the association between globally available data on snakebite-induced mortality and socioeconomic indicators of poverty. Methodology/Principal Findings We acquired data on (i) the Human Development Index, (ii) the Per Capita Government Expenditure on Health, (iii) the Percentage Labour Force in Agriculture and (iv) Gross Domestic Product Per Capita from publicly available databases on the 138 countries for which snakebite-induced mortality rates have recently been estimated. The socioeconomic datasets were then plotted against the snakebite-induced mortality estimates (where both datasets were available) and the relationship determined. Each analysis illustrated a strong association between snakebite-induced mortality and poverty. Conclusions/Significance This study, the first of its kind, unequivocally demonstrates that snake envenoming is a disease of the poor. The negative association between snakebite deaths and government expenditure on health confirms that the burden of mortality is highest in those countries least able to deal with the considerable financial cost of snakebite. PMID:20027216

  18. Predicted health impacts of urban air quality management

    PubMed Central

    Mindell, J; Joffe, M

    2004-01-01

    Study objective: The 1995 UK Environment Act required local authorities to review air quality and, where UK National Air Quality Strategy objectives (except ozone) are likely to be exceeded in 2005, to declare local air quality management areas and prepare action plans. This study modelled the impacts on health of reductions from current levels of PM10 to these objectives. Design: The framework for conducting quantified health impact assessment assessed causality, then, if appropriate, examined the shape and magnitude of the exposure-response relations. The study modelled declines in pollution to achieve the objectives, then modelled the numbers of deaths and admissions affected if air pollution declined from existing levels to meet the objectives, using routine data. Setting: Westminster, central London. Main results: Attaining the 2004 PM10 24 hour objective in Westminster results in 1–21 lives no longer shortened in one year (annual deaths 1363). Reducing exceedences from 35 to seven almost doubles the estimates. The 2009 objective for the annual mean requires a substantial reduction in PM10, which would delay 8–20 deaths. About 20 respiratory and 14–20 circulatory admissions would be affected and around 5% of emergency hospital attendances for asthma by attaining the lower annual mean target. The effects of long term exposure to particulates may be an order of magnitude higher: models predict about 24 deaths are delayed by reaching the 2004 annual target (40 µg/m3[gravimetric]) and a hundred deaths by reducing annual mean PM10 to 20 µg/m3[gravimetric]. Conclusions: Modelling can be used to estimate the potential health impacts of air quality management programmes. PMID:14729886

  19. Case studies of occupational health management in the engineering construction industry.

    PubMed

    Gyi, D E; Haslam, R A; Gibb, A G

    1998-05-01

    Construction workers are exposed to considerable hazards carrying a health risk, e.g., dusts, fumes, noise and manual handling, yet there is often poor occupational health service provision particularly for subcontracted labourers. This paper presents seven case studies from large, engineering construction organizations, concerning current practice in occupational health management. The results supported the fact that data and records regarding health-related absence were limited and inconsistent, and that little existed in terms of medicals and health surveillance, particularly in the case of subcontracted workers. The main difficulties envisaged were reported to be the sizeable costs involved; the temporary and mobile work force; demonstrating cost-benefits to top management and a lack of interest amongst workers, perhaps exacerbated by the threat of lost livelihood. Managers also admitted limited health expertise and knowledge of the wider role health professionals could play in health management. Training and further research in this area are indicated. PMID:9800426

  20. Improving Imperfect Data from Health Management Information Systems in Africa Using Space–Time Geostatistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter W Gething; Abdisalan M Noor; Priscilla W Gikandi; Esther A. A Ogara; Simon I Hay; Mark S Nixon; Robert W Snow; Peter M Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    BackgroundReliable and timely information on disease-specific treatment burdens within a health system is critical for the planning and monitoring of service provision. Health management information systems (HMIS) exist to address this need at national scales across Africa but are failing to deliver adequate data because of widespread underreporting by health facilities. Faced with this inadequacy, vital public health decisions often

  1. Improving Imperfect Data from Health Management Information Systems in Africa Using Space–Time Geostatistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter W. Gething; Abdisalan M. Noor; Priscilla W. Gikandi; Esther A. A. Ogara; Simon I. Hay; Mark S. Nixon; Robert W. Snow; Peter M. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Background Reliable and timely information on disease-specific treatment burdens within a health system is critical for the planning and monitoring of service provision. Health management information systems (HMIS) exist to address this need at national scales across Africa but are failing to deliver adequate data because of widespread underreporting by health facilities. Faced with this inadequacy, vital public health decisions

  2. CSHM: Web-based safety and health monitoring system for construction management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sai On Cheung; Kevin K. W. Cheung; Henry C. H. Suen

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: This paper describes a web-based system for monitoring and assessing construction safety and health performance, entitled the Construction Safety and Health Monitoring (CSHM) system. Method: The design and development of CSHM is an integration of internet and database systems, with the intent to create a total automated safety and health management tool. A list of safety and health performance

  3. Diabetes self-management in a low-income population: impacts of social support and relationships with the health care system

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Bonnie M; Kahn, Linda S; Danzo, Andrew; Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene; Schuster, Roseanne C; Karl, Renée; Taylor, Robert; Glaser, Kathryn; Danakas, Alexandra; Fox, Chester H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This article reports on results of a qualitative study of social supports and institutional resources utilized by individuals living with diabetes in a high-poverty urban setting. The goal was to examine how access to social capital among low-income populations facilitates and impedes their self-efficacy in diabetes self-management. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 patients with diabetes from a safety net primary care practice in Buffalo, New York. Results Facilitators and barriers to successful self-management were identified in three broad areas: (1) the influence of social support networks; (2) the nature of the doctor-patient relationship; and (3) the nature of patient-health care system relationship. Patients' unmet needs were also highlighted across these three areas. Discussion Participants identified barriers to effective diabetes self-management directly related to their low-income status, such as inadequate insurance, and mistrust of the medical system. It may be necessary for patients to activate social capital from multiple social spheres to achieve the most effective diabetes management. PMID:23585634

  4. UW Environmental Health and Safety | Revision 5 | 05/14 UW Seattle Stormwater Management Program

    E-print Network

    Wilcock, William

    UW Environmental Health and Safety | Revision 5 | 05/14 UW Seattle Stormwater Management Program ............................................................................... 3 5. Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control .......................................................................... 5 6. Post-construction Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment ........ 5 7

  5. Vehicle Health Management Communications Requirements for AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Clements, Donna J.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2012-01-01

    As the development of standards for the aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) progresses, the process of identifying and quantifying appropriate uses for the system is progressing. In addition to defining important elements of AeroMACS standards, indentifying the systems uses impacts AeroMACS bandwidth requirements. Although an initial 59 MHz spectrum allocation for AeroMACS was established in 2007, the allocation may be inadequate; studies have indicated that 100 MHz or more of spectrum may be required to support airport surface communications. Hence additional spectrum allocations have been proposed. Vehicle health management (VHM) systems, which can produce large volumes of vehicle health data, were not considered in the original bandwidth requirements analyses, and are therefore of interest in supporting proposals for additional AeroMACS spectrum. VHM systems are an emerging development in air vehicle safety, and preliminary estimates of the amount of data that will be produced and transmitted off an aircraft, both in flight and on the ground, have been prepared based on estimates of data produced by on-board vehicle health sensors and initial concepts of data processing approaches. This allowed an initial estimate of VHM data transmission requirements for the airport surface. More recently, vehicle-level systems designed to process and analyze VHM data and draw conclusions on the current state of vehicle health have been undergoing testing and evaluation. These systems make use of vehicle system data that is mostly different from VHM data considered previously for airport surface transmission, and produce processed system outputs that will be also need to be archived, thus generating additional data load for AeroMACS. This paper provides an analysis of airport surface data transmission requirements resulting from the vehicle level reasoning systems, within the context of overall VHM data requirements.

  6. Intelligent Integrated Health Management for a System of Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harvey; Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent integrated health management system (IIHMS) incorporates major improvements over prior such systems. The particular IIHMS is implemented for any system defined as a hierarchical distributed network of intelligent elements (HDNIE), comprising primarily: (1) an architecture (Figure 1), (2) intelligent elements, (3) a conceptual framework and taxonomy (Figure 2), and (4) and ontology that defines standards and protocols. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a further brief description of this innovation: A system-of-systems (SoS) is an engineering system that comprises multiple subsystems (e.g., a system of multiple possibly interacting flow subsystems that include pumps, valves, tanks, ducts, sensors, and the like); 'Intelligent' is used here in the sense of artificial intelligence. An intelligent element may be physical or virtual, it is network enabled, and it is able to manage data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) focused on determining its condition in the context of the entire SoS; As used here, 'health' signifies the functionality and/or structural integrity of an engineering system, subsystem, or process (leading to determination of the health of components); 'Process' can signify either a physical process in the usual sense of the word or an element into which functionally related sensors are grouped; 'Element' can signify a component (e.g., an actuator, a valve), a process, a controller, an actuator, a subsystem, or a system; The term Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) not just data to control systems for safe and effective operation. A major novel aspect of the present development is the concept of intelligent integration. The purpose of intelligent integration, as defined and implemented in the present IIHMS, is to enable automated analysis of physical phenomena in imitation of human reasoning, including the use of qualitative methods. Intelligent integration is said to occur in a system in which all elements are intelligent and can acquire, maintain, and share knowledge and information. In the HDNIE of the present IIHMS, an SoS is represented as being operationally organized in a hierarchical-distributed format. The elements of the SoS are considered to be intelligent in that they determine their own conditions within an integrated scheme that involves consideration of data, information, knowledge bases, and methods that reside in all elements of the system. The conceptual framework of the HDNIE and the methodologies of implementing it enable the flow of information and knowledge among the elements so as to make possible the determination of the condition of each element. The necessary information and knowledge is made available to each affected element at the desired time, satisfying a need to prevent information overload while providing context-sensitive information at the proper level of detail. Provision of high-quality data is a central goal in designing this or any IIHMS. In pursuit of this goal, functionally related sensors are logically assigned to groups denoted processes. An aggregate of processes is considered to form a system. Alternatively or in addition to what has been said thus far, the HDNIE of this IIHMS can be regarded as consisting of a framework containing object models that encapsulate all elements of the system, their individual and relational knowledge bases, generic methods and procedures based on models of the applicable physics, and communication processes (Figure 2). The framework enables implementation of a paradigm inspired by how expert operators monitor the health of systems with the help of (1) DIaK from various sources, (2) software tools that assist in rapid visualization of the condition of the system, (3) analical software tools that assist in reasoning about the condition, (4) sharing of information via

  7. The Africanization of poverty: a retrospective on "Make Poverty History".

    PubMed

    Harrison, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which the British campaign coalition Make Poverty History represented Africa throughout 2005. Focusing particularly on the G8 Gleneagles summit, Make Poverty History (MPH) asserted a series of justice claims which had no geographical reference. Nevertheless, as a result of internal tensions within the coalition, and especially as a result of the ways in which MPH interacted with other political agencies as the summit approached, MPH's messages became increasingly interpolated by references to Africa as a result of the emergence of government, media, and celebrity involvement. The result of this was that global poverty increasingly became an African issue. As 2005 became the "Year of Africa," the justice messages that constituted MPH were largely effaced by the more familiar imperial legacy which represents Africa as a place of indigence in need of outside assistance. PMID:20830867

  8. Comparison of nurse managed health centers with federally qualified health centers as safety net providers.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Pilon, Bonnie; Benkert, Ramona

    2011-05-01

    Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHCs) provide a critical safety net function in their communities, yet they often remain invisible and challenged in terms of financial sustainability. This paper presents a comparison of demographics and financial status of NMHCs and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). The comparison is based on four years of annual NMHC national survey data that includes 42 NMHCs overall and the 2008 FQHC data in the Uniform Data System. Findings indicate that NMHCs and FQHCs serve very similar diverse populations yet funding and revenue differences were significant. NMHCs tend to rely more on grants and donations from the private sector as well as contracts while FQHCs have access to considerable federal support that is cost based when serving the underserved. In addition, NMHCs are challenged by the array of state, federal and third party insurers' regulations that often disadvantage nurse practitioners as primary care providers. PMID:22042615

  9. Concepts of health and well-being in managers: An organizational study

    PubMed Central

    Boness, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Global changes and new managerial challenges require new concepts of health and well-being in organizational contexts. In the South African context, health and well-being of managers have gained relevance in organizations and in management sciences. International organizations, in particular, attempt to address the increasing demand for health care and the delivery of health services to their managers. Careful and appropriate health management requires research to evaluate context-specific health concepts and strategies. The purpose and aim of this article is to assess managerial concepts on health and well-being that could be used by the organization to contribute to managerial well-being by implementing health promotion according to managerial needs. At the same time, this article contributes to salutogenetic health research that is very rare with regard to the South African organizational management research. This study is a multi-method research study conducted in a selected international organization in South Africa. However, in this article, selected qualitative findings will only be presented. This organizational study presents selected research findings on health concepts and strategies employed by managers. Findings demonstrate that the managerial concepts of health and strategies mainly refer to not only physical but also to mental and spiritual aspects, with a priority on physical health and well-being. The findings presented are based on qualitative research methods and their research criteria. This assessment serves as a foundation for new approaches to health management within the international work context in South Africa. It also contributes to a paradigm shift from pathogenetic to salutogenetic concepts of health and well-being within the South African organizational work context. The article produces new insights into the qualitative health concepts of South African managers and expatriates and contributes to promoting salutogenesis in organization within South Africa. PMID:22028736

  10. Managing Free Text for Secondary Use of Health Data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize the best papers in the field of Knowledge Representation and Management (KRM). Methods A comprehensive review of medical informatics literature was performed to select some of the most interesting papers of KRM and natural language processing (NLP) published in 2013. Results Four articles were selected, one focuses on Electronic Health Record (EHR) interoperability for clinical pathway personalization based on structured data. The other three focus on NLP (corpus creation, de-identification, and co-reference resolution) and highlight the increase in NLP tools performances. Conclusions NLP tools are close to being seriously concurrent to humans in some annotation tasks. Their use could increase drastically the amount of data usable for meaningful use of EHR. PMID:25123738

  11. Perceptions of Health Information Management Educational and Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Mari; Black, Clarence; Blair, Franchesica; Davis, Laquanda; Ingram, Steven; Lane, DaQuandra; McElderry, Alicia; Peagler, Bianca; Pickett, Jamie; Plettenberg, Cheryl; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Undergraduate students’ progress toward achievement of learning outcomes and entry-level competencies is an essential ingredient in efforts to meet the needs of the evolving national healthcare information infrastructure. Therefore, studies to evaluate variance in outcome assessment methods and perceived adequacy of educational curricula used by health information management (HIM) programs are vital. This study examined perceptions of HIM students, faculty, and individuals employed in healthcare regarding educational experiences and career preparation. Methods A convenience sample of attendees from the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) national conference in Atlanta, Georgia, was obtained. A survey was developed on the basis of a review of current literature related to the assessment of HIM educational programming. The authors used a prepared script to describe the study purpose and survey when approaching potential respondents. Completion of the survey was voluntary. Results Of the 100 surveys distributed, 58 were returned. Twenty-six respondents were employed in healthcare, 25 were students, and 7 were HIM faculty members; no respondents were HIM program directors. Ninety-six percent of the student respondents indicated that the programs’ HIM curriculum prepared them for an entry-level position, while 86 percent of the faculty respondents and 70 percent of the respondents employed in healthcare agreed with this statement. More than half (56 percent) of the respondents who were employed in healthcare indicated that they needed additional training when they entered their first entry-level position. The majority of the respondents indicated that they were not matched with a mentor during their educational experience. Conclusions This research supports the complementary roles that educational coursework and practical experiences provide individuals within the HIM field. However, additional research is needed to assess the potential impact of varied practical experiences and mentoring relationships on the students’ successful transition into the workforce. PMID:25214821

  12. Health Technologies for Monitoring and Managing Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Russell-Minda, Elizabeth; Jutai, Jeffrey; Speechley, Mark; Bradley, Kaitlin; Chudyk, Anna; Petrella, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this review was to determine the strength of evidence for the effectiveness of self-monitoring devices and technologies for individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) based on specific health-related outcome measures. Self-monitoring devices included those that assist patients with managing diabetes and preventing cardiovascular complications (CVCs). A secondary objective was to explore issues of feasibility, usability, and compliance among patients and providers. Methods Study criteria included individuals ?14 years and youth (7–14 years) with T1DM or T2DM, intervention with a self-monitoring device, assessment of clinical outcomes with the device, literature in English, and ?10 participants. Relevant published literature was searched from 1985 to 2008. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies were included. Data were extracted for clinical outcomes, feasibility and compliance methods, and results. Selected studies were independently evaluated with a validated instrument for assessing methodological quality. Results Eighteen trials were selected. Predominant types of device interventions included self-monitoring of blood glucose, pedometers, and cell phone or wireless technologies. Feasibility and compliance were measured in the majority of studies. Conclusions Self-monitoring of blood glucose continues to be an effective tool for the management of diabetes. Wireless technologies can improve diabetes self-care, and pedometers are effective lifestyle modification tools. The results of this review indicate a need for additional controlled trial research on existing and novel technologies for diabetes self-monitoring, on health outcomes associated with diabetes and CVCs, and device feasibility and compliance. PMID:20144402

  13. Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty

    E-print Network

    that will help rural women and men move out of poverty and, in the process, become part of the solution in Africa (AGRA) "In addition to being an in-depth evaluation of the status of rural poverty and its

  14. What happens when capitated behavioral health comes to town? The transition from the fort bragg demonstration to a capitated managed behavioral health contract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Anne Heflinger; Denine A. Northrup

    2000-01-01

    Capitated managed care contracts for behavioral health services are becoming more prevalent across the country in both public and private sectors. This study followed the transition from a demonstration project for child mental health services to a capitated managed behavioral health care contract with a for-profit managed care company. The focus of the study was on the impact—at both the

  15. Links between rural poverty and the environment in developing countries: Asset categories and investment poverty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen A. Vosti

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for analyzing the links between poverty and the environment in rural areas of developing countries. It introduces the concept of “investment poverty” and relates it to other measures of poverty in analysis of these links. The notion of poverty is examined in the context of categories of assets and categories of environment change, with particular

  16. Subjective Poverty and Its Relation to Objective Poverty Concepts in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandori, Eszter Siposne

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyzes subjective poverty in Hungary and compares it to the objective poverty concepts. Subjective poverty is defined by examining who people consider to be poor. Based on the Easterlin paradox, the initial hypothesis states that subjective and absolute poverty concepts are highly correlated. Taking into account that Hungary is a…

  17. SECONDARY LEVEL -LESSON PLAN AND ACTIVITIES A New Face on Poverty--Lesson Plan on Poverty

    E-print Network

    POVERTY SECONDARY LEVEL - LESSON PLAN AND ACTIVITIES A New Face on Poverty--Lesson Plan on Poverty Lesson plan on Poverty Grade Level: Secondary and Elementary Time: Three 60-minute periods with possible, poor sanitation and other losses of services. This lesson develops the concept from an individual

  18. 45 CFR 284.20 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State? 284.20...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...AN INCREASE IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT OF THE...

  19. 45 CFR 284.20 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State? 284.20...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...AN INCREASE IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT OF THE...

  20. 45 CFR 284.20 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State? 284.20...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...AN INCREASE IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT OF THE...

  1. 45 CFR 284.20 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State? 284.20...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...AN INCREASE IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT OF THE...

  2. 45 CFR 284.20 - What information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...information will we use to determine the child poverty rate in each State? 284.20...ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...AN INCREASE IN A STATE OR TERRITORY'S CHILD POVERTY RATE IS THE RESULT OF THE...

  3. Co-occurrence and coaction of stress management with other health risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, Jessica M; Paiva, Andrea L; Redding, Colleen A; Butterworth, Susan; Prochaska, James O

    2015-07-01

    This study provides a preliminary investigation of the role of stress management in multiple behavior change. Risk status on stress management and five health behaviors (healthy eating, exercise, alcohol, smoking, and depression management) was assessed before and after a multiple behavior change intervention. Findings suggested a link between stress management and a worse health risk behavior profile at baseline. Results also showed relationships between improved stress management over 6 months and heightened odds of improving on specific behaviors as well as improving one's overall behavioral risk profile. Particularly strong links between stress management and energy balance and other affective behaviors were observed. PMID:24165862

  4. Evaluating covariance in prognostic and system health management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sandeep; Jin, Xiaohang; Chow, Tommy W. S.; Pecht, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Developing a diagnostic and prognostic health management system involves analyzing system parameters monitored during the lifetime of the system. This data analysis may involve multiple steps, including data reduction, feature extraction, clustering and classification, building control charts, identification of anomalies, and modeling and predicting parameter degradation in order to evaluate the state of health for the system under investigation. Evaluating the covariance between the monitored system parameters allows for better understanding of the trends in monitored system data, and therefore it is an integral part of the data analysis. Typically, a sample covariance matrix is used to evaluate the covariance between monitored system parameters. The monitored system data are often sensor data, which are inherently noisy. The noise in sensor data can lead to inaccurate evaluation of the covariance in data using a sample covariance matrix. This paper examines approaches to evaluate covariance, including the minimum volume ellipsoid, the minimum covariance determinant, and the nearest neighbor variance estimation. When the performance of these approaches was evaluated on datasets with increasing percentage of Gaussian noise, it was observed that the nearest neighbor variance estimation exhibited the most stable estimates of covariance. To improve the accuracy of covariance estimates using nearest neighbor-based methodology, a modified approach for the nearest neighbor variance estimation technique is developed in this paper. Case studies based on data analysis steps involved in prognostic solutions are developed in order to compare the performance of the covariance estimation methodologies discussed in the paper.

  5. Poverty: Moving Forward with

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    and Mandate #12;What is Social Policy? Housing Employment Education Recreation Health Safety Care Social of supports A Growing Gap Rising income disparity diminishes social cohesion and can be a barrier to equality

  6. Why Hasn't Participatory Forest Management Helped the Forest-dependent Poor Out of Their Poverty? Evidence from Eastern India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Springate-Baginski; Ajit Banerjee; Kailas Sarap

    In India the poorest of the poor are generally rural land-poor households in forest-adjacent areas, who depend on forests for significant livelihood inputs. Joint Forest Management (JFM) has aimed to legitimize their forest use, improve forest conditions, and regulate access to it. However despite heavy funding and extensive implementation many studies have concluded that positive livelihood impacts, especially for the

  7. Data Fusion for Enhanced Aircraft Engine Prognostics and Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volponi, Al

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft gas-turbine engine data is available from a variety of sources, including on-board sensor measurements, maintenance histories, and component models. An ultimate goal of Propulsion Health Management (PHM) is to maximize the amount of meaningful information that can be extracted from disparate data sources to obtain comprehensive diagnostic and prognostic knowledge regarding the health of the engine. Data fusion is the integration of data or information from multiple sources for the achievement of improved accuracy and more specific inferences than can be obtained from the use of a single sensor alone. The basic tenet underlying the data/ information fusion concept is to leverage all available information to enhance diagnostic visibility, increase diagnostic reliability and reduce the number of diagnostic false alarms. This report describes a basic PHM data fusion architecture being developed in alignment with the NASA C-17 PHM Flight Test program. The challenge of how to maximize the meaningful information extracted from disparate data sources to obtain enhanced diagnostic and prognostic information regarding the health and condition of the engine is the primary goal of this endeavor. To address this challenge, NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and Pratt & Whitney have formed a team with several small innovative technology companies to plan and conduct a research project in the area of data fusion, as it applies to PHM. Methodologies being developed and evaluated have been drawn from a wide range of areas including artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, statistical estimation, and fuzzy logic. This report will provide a chronology and summary of the work accomplished under this research contract.

  8. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    PubMed

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer. PMID:24934398

  9. FROM INFORMATION FOR DECISION MAKING TO INFORMATION FOR KEEPING CORE KNOWLEDGE UPDATED - HEALTH MANAGERS WHO KNOW THEIR POPULATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zufan Damtew; Louisa Williamson

    This study pointed out how health information is gained and applied for action. Computer support for health management consists of reports of health indicators, which are supposed to be used for deciding upon changes in the health services. Qualitative case studies of low level health managers of two developing countries, on the other hand, showed that instead of checking such

  10. The Contribution of Social Networks to the Health and Self-Management of Patients with Long-Term

    E-print Network

    The Contribution of Social Networks to the Health and Self-Management of Patients with Long of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom, 2 National Institute for Health. Analysis: Multiple regression analysis of relationships between health status, self-management and health

  11. Training Health Care Professionals to Manage Overweight Adolescents: Experience in Rural Georgia Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, David A.; Yin, Zenong; Kibbe, Debra; Burns, Susan; Trowbridge, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Context: The obesity epidemic threatens the present and future health of adolescents in the United States. Yet, health care providers lack specific training for pediatric obesity assessment and management. Purpose: This study examined the adherence of rural Georgia primary care practitioners to an overweight adolescent management protocol. The…

  12. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  13. All That Glitters Is Not Always Gold: Medical Offset Effects and Managed Behavioral Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Scott Fraser

    1996-01-01

    This article urges caution in using broadly predicted medical offset effects in marketing managed behavioral care services. Three analyses of a health maintenance organization population who were provided managed mental health services showed that the use of simple percentage change in cost and use of hospital care may give deceptively positive results. The use of such methods may eventually undermine

  14. The Impact of Managed Behavioral Health Care on Rehabilitation Services to Persons with Serious Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutman, Irvin D.; Baron, Richard C.; Hadley, Trevor R.

    This monograph examines issues in the field of psychosocial/psychiatric rehabilitation (PSR) services for people with serious mental illness, placed in the context of a debate within the field about trends toward managed behavioral health care companies. Four main issues are addressed: (1) the degree to which managed behavioral health care…

  15. (Technological Development of Health Management Automation) 08:40 09:00 Registration

    E-print Network

    (Technological Development of Health Management Automation) 1120 08:40 ­ 09:00 Registration Management 10:30-10:40 Break 10:40 ­ 11:10 Formulating a Universal Law of Health and Disease 11:50 - Spinal reflex potentiation-possible roles in the visceral function and pain 15:50 ­ 16:20 : Sleep

  16. People Management Practices in the Public Health Sector: Developments from Victoria, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Pauline; Bartram, Timothy; Harbridge, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the impact on human resource management (HRM) practices in the public health sector in Victoria, Australia of two different government policy environments. First, it explores the Liberal Coalition Government's decentralisation of public health sector management, from 1992-1999 and second, the Labor Government's…

  17. Incremental adoption of information security in health-care organizations: implications for document management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel P. Lorence; Richard Churchill

    2005-01-01

    The incremental adoption of electronic media in U.S. health care has created increased risk of security and privacy violations in provider organizations. Protective regulatory efforts have been proposed to address ineffective security of patient information, with severe noncompliance penalties. Using data from a nationwide survey of health information managers, this study examines how industry-wide knowledge management trends may influence the

  18. Platform degrader analysis for the design and development of Vehicle Health Management Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Banks; K. M. Reichard; J. A. Hines; M. S. Brought

    2008-01-01

    The US Armypsilas Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT) is investigating the implementation of Vehicle Health Management Systems across its fleet of platforms. A vehicle degrader analysis was conducted to determine where the application of vehicle health management systems (VHMS) could potentially have the greatest impact on increasing maintainer effectiveness and operational availability. The analysis was conducted for M1 Abrams tanks

  19. Management of Childhood Illness at Health Facilities in Benin: Problems and Their Causes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander K. Rowe; Faustin Onikpo; Marcel Lama; Francois Cokou; Michael S. Deming

    Objectives. To prepare for the implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in Benin, we studied the management of ill children younger than 5 years at outpatient health facilities. Methods. We observed a representative sample of consultations; after each consultation, we interviewed caregivers and reexamined children. Health workers' performance was evaluated against IMCI guidelines. To identify determinants of performance,

  20. COLLABORATIVE ROBOTS IN REHABILITATION FOR SOCIAL SELF-MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH

    E-print Network

    of occupational therapy and Parkinson's disease. SOCIAL SELF-MANAGEMENT The concept of self-management of health , Matthias Scheutz2 , Ronald C. Arkin3 Departments of Occupational Therapy1 and Computer Science2 , Tufts, health and physical and mental well-being, such as by maintaining a balanced diet, and an appropriate