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Sample records for powder metallurgy techniques

  1. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  2. Metallography of powder metallurgy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lawley, Alan; Murphy, Thomas F

    2003-12-15

    The primary distinction between the microstructure of an ingot metallurgy/wrought material and one fabricated by the powder metallurgy route of pressing followed by sintering is the presence of porosity in the latter. In its various morphologies, porosity affects the mechanical, physical, chemical, electrical and thermal properties of the material. Thus, it is important to be able to characterize quantitatively the microstructure of powder metallurgy parts and components. Metallographic procedures necessary for the reliable characterization of microstructures in powder metallurgy materials are reviewed, with emphasis on the intrinsic challenges presented by the presence of porosity. To illustrate the utility of these techniques, five case studies are presented involving powder metallurgy materials. These case studies demonstrate problem solving via metallography in diverse situations: failure of a tungsten carbide-coated precipitation hardening stainless steel, failure of a steel pump gear, quantification of the degree of sinter (DOS), simulation of performance of a porous filter using automated image analysis, and analysis of failure in a sinter brazed part assembly.

  3. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a

  4. Porous titanium scaffolds fabricated using a rapid prototyping and powder metallurgy technique.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Garrett E; Pandit, Abhay S; Apatsidis, Dimitrios P

    2008-09-01

    One of the main issues in orthopaedic implant design is the fabrication of scaffolds that closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. This research reports on a multi-stage rapid prototyping technique that was successfully developed to produce porous titanium scaffolds with fully interconnected pore networks and reproducible porosity and pore size. The scaffolds' porous characteristics were governed by a sacrificial wax template, fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer. Powder metallurgy processes were employed to generate the titanium scaffolds by filling around the wax template with titanium slurry. In the attempt to optimise the powder metallurgy technique, variations in slurry concentration, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were investigated. By altering the wax design template, pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 microm were achieved. Scaffolds with porosities of 66.8 +/- 3.6% revealed compression strengths of 104.4+/-22.5 MPa in the axial direction and 23.5 +/- 9.6 MPa in the transverse direction demonstrating their anisotropic nature. Scaffold topography was characterised using scanning electron microscopy and microcomputed tomography. Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled the main architectural parameters such as pore size, interconnecting porosity, level of anisotropy and level of structural disorder to be determined. The titanium scaffolds were compared to their intended designs, as governed by their sacrificial wax templates. Although discrepancies in architectural parameters existed between the intended and the actual scaffolds, overall the results indicate that the porous titanium scaffolds have the properties to be potentially employed in orthopaedic applications. PMID:18556060

  5. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  6. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  7. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  8. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  9. Effects of copper content on the shell characteristics of hollow steel spheres manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-04-01

    Metallic hollow spheres are used as base materials in the manufacture of hollow sphere structures and metallic foams. In this study, steel hollow spheres were successfully manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique. The spheres' shells were characterized by optical microscopy in conjunction with microstructural image analysis software, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microscopic evaluations revealed that the shells consist of sintered iron powder, sintered copper powder, sodium silicate, and porosity regions. In addition, the effects of copper content on various parameters such as shell defects, microcracks, thickness, and porosities were investigated. The results indicated that increasing the copper content results in decreases in the surface fraction of shell porosities and the number of microcracks and an increase in shell thickness.

  10. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  11. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  1. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  2. Fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, N. A.; Kozlov, D. V.; Golovanov, V. N.; Klimov, E. S.; Grebchuk, E. E.; Efimov, M. S.; Kostishko, B. B.

    We report on fabrication of an aluminum matrix composite containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by MOCVD method and functionalized via acid treatment by a H2SO4/HNO3 mixture. Specimens were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the aluminum powder with different amounts of functionalized MWCNTs (FMWCNTs) in the range of 0.1-1 wt.%. We studied the effect of FMWCNTs amount on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites. It is shown that functionalization allows homogeneous dispersing of the MWCNTs in Al powder. The maximal increase in micro-hardness and tensile strength is registered at 0.1 wt.%.

  3. Preparation of Cu and Fly Ash Composite by Powder Metallurgy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, P. Y.; Lim, P. S.; Ng, M. C.; Zahi, S.; You, A. H.

    2011-03-30

    Cu and Fly Ash (FA) mixtures with different weight percentages were prepared. Pellets of the mixture powder were produced with the dimension of 17.7 mm in diameter and 10-15 mm in height. These different composites were compacted at a constant pressure of 280 MPa. One of the selected weight percentages was then compacted to form into pellet and sintered at different temperatures which were at 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C respectively for 2 hours. Density of green pellet was measured before sintered in furnace. After sintering, all the pellets with different temperatures were re-weighed and sintered density were calculated. The densification of the green and sintered pellets was required to be measured as one of the parameter in selection of the best material properties. Porosity of the pellet shall not be ignored in order to analyze the close-packed particles stacking in the pellet. SEM micrograph had been captured to observe the presence of pores and agglomeration of particles in the sample produced.

  4. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  5. Powder metallurgy of vanadium and its alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Radomysel'skii, I.D.; Solntsev, V.P.; Evtushenko, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the current powder metallurgy technology of vanadium and its alloys. Data are given on sintering, compacting, electrowinning and other current production techniques, as well as on the corrosion behavior and mechanical and physical properties of alloys produced by these different methods. The use of vanadium alloys as reactor and jet engine materials is also briefly discussed.

  6. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  7. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  8. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  9. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  11. A major advance in powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Stiglich, Jacob J., Jr.; Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultramet has developed a process which promises to significantly increase the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (PM) parts. Current PM technology uses mixed powders of various constituents prior to compaction. The homogeneity and flaw distribution in PM parts depends on the uniformity of mixing and the maintenance of uniformity during compaction. Conventional PM fabrication processes typically result in non-uniform distribution of the matrix, flaw generation due to particle-particle contact when one of the constituents is a brittle material, and grain growth caused by high temperature, long duration compaction processes. Additionally, a significant amount of matrix material is usually necessary to fill voids and create 100 percent dense parts. In Ultramet's process, each individual particle is coated with the matrix material, and compaction is performed by solid state processing. In this program, Ultramet coated 12-micron tungsten particles with approximately 5 wt percent nickel/iron. After compaction, flexure strengths were measured 50 percent higher than those achieved in conventional liquid phase sintered parts (10 wt percent Ni/Fe). Further results and other material combinations are discussed.

  12. Powder metallurgy process for manufacturing core projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Taufik; Setyowati, Vuri Ayu; Widyastuti

    2013-09-01

    Bullets are part of the defense equipment which the development is very rapid. There are a variety of forms but the bullet Lead is a metal that has always been used for applications projectiles. Lead core constituent materials are combined with antimony. In this research will be conducted by making the material for the core projectile with Tin Lead. The addition of Tin will increase the stiffness of Lead which is soft in nature. The Lead Tin composition variation was given in 10% weight of Sn. The manufacturing process using powder metallurgy using temperature and holding time variations of sintering at 100, 150, and 200°C for 1,2, and 3 hours. XRD samples will be tested to determine the form and phase morphology was observed using SEM-EDX. These results revealed that Pb-10%wtSn Composite which is sintered in temperature 200°C for 3 hours has the greatest density, 10.695 g/cm3 as well as the smallest porosity, 2.2%. In agreement with theoretical analysis that increasing higher temperature and longer holding time give decrease in porosity level due to activation energy which further promotes grain growth. Moreover, there is no intermetallic phase formation as well as no oxide found on composites.

  13. Electrothermal Defect Detection in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2006-03-01

    Faced with increasing market pressures, metal part manufacturers have turned to new processes and fabrication technologies. One of these processes is powder metallurgy (P/M), which is employed for low-cost, high-volume precision part manufacturing. Despite many advantages, the P/M process has created a number of challenges, including the need for high-speed quality assessment and control, ideally for each compact. Consequently, sophisticated quality assurance is needed to rapidly detect flaws early in the manufacturing cycle and at minimal cost. In this paper we will discuss our progress made in designing and refining an active infrared (IR) detection system for P/M compacts. After discussing the theoretical background in terms of underlying equations and boundary conditions, analytical and numerical solutions are presented that are capable of predicting temperature responses for various defect sizes and orientations of a dynamic IR testing system. Preliminary measurements with controlled and industrial samples have shown that this active IR methodology can successfully be employed to test both green-state and sintered P/M compacts. The developed system can overcome many limitations observed with a standard IR testing methodology such as emissivity, background calibration, and contact resistance.

  14. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  15. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  16. Powder-metallurgy superalloy strengthened by a secondary gamma phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotval, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments in which prealloyed powders of superalloy compositions were consolidated by extrusion after the strengthening by precipitation of a body-centered tetragonal gamma secondary Ni3 Ta phase. Thin foil electron microscopy showed that the mechanical properties of the resultant powder-metallurgy product were correlated with its microstructure. The product exhibited high strength at 1200 F without loss of ductility, after thermomechanical treatment and aging.

  17. Near-Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Rhenium Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, Todd; Hamister, Mark; Carlen, Jan C.; Biaglow, James; Reed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to produce a near-net shape (NNS) powder metallurgy (PM) rhenium combustion chamber of the size 445 N (100 lbf) used in a high performance liquid apogee engine. These engines are used in low earth Orbit and geostationary orbit for satellite positioning systems. The developments in near-net shape powder metallurgy rhenium combustion chambers reported in this paper will reduce manufacturing cost of the rhenium chambers by 25 percent, and reduce the manufacturing time by 30 to 40 percent. The quantity of rhenium metal powder used to produce a rhenium chamber is reduced by approximately 70 percent and the subsequent reduction in machining schedule and costs is nearly 50 percent.

  18. An application of powder metallurgy to dentistry.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Ueno, S; Kudoh, Y

    1995-11-01

    Generally, the dental casting method is used to fabricate dental prostheses made with metal. The method of fabricating dental prostheses from sintered titanium alloy has certain advantages: the elimination of casting defects, a sintering temperature that is lower than the melting point, and a shorter processing time. By examining (1) the properties of green, sintered compacts of titanium powder, (2) the effects of adding aluminum powder on the properties of green, sintered compacts of Ti-Al compound, and (3) the effects of adding copper powder on the properties of green, sintered compacts of Ti-Al-Cu compound, the authors developed a sintered titanium alloy on a trial basis. Because the properties satisfied the requirements of dental restorations, a powder metallurgical method of making dental restorations from this sintered titanium alloy was devised. Applications of such sintered titanium alloys for the metal coping of metal-ceramic crowns and denture base plates were discussed. PMID:8689755

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  20. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  1. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  2. Modulus Dependence on Large Scale Porosity of Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P. G.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Brown, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    This article compares the existing theoretical expressions for the porosity dependence on elastic constants to experimental data for a commercially available material, FC-0205 powder metallurgy (PM) steel. The modulus of compression, tension, effective torsion, and ultrasound-based data at varying porosity levels are plotted graphically against the theoretical expressions. An equation by McAdam ( J. Iron Steel Inst. Lond., 1950, 168, p 346) was able to most accurately predict the experimental data with the adjustment of only one material constant.

  3. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  4. Effect of Ca content percentage and sintering temperature on corrosion rate in Mg-Ca composite fabricated using powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaza Nabilla, M. S.; Zuraidawani, C. D.; Nazree, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is a good element with high potential to be used in various field of work. It has the benefit of lightweight and low density its application is limited for Mg is relatively low in term of strength. Hence, calcium (Ca) is chosen to be mixed with Mg as additional element for it is lightweight and non-toxic. In this research, Mg is prepared with different weight percentage (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 wt. %) of Cavia powder metallurgy (PM) method. The samples were sintered at 500 and 550°Cin argon atmosphere and electrochemically using SBF solution as the electrolyte medium. The effect of Ca content on corrosion rateis investigated by focusing on the microstructure and properties of sintered sample. Increase of Ca content causes reduction in grain structure due to increase Mg2Ca phase at grain boundaries. Subsequently, reduce corrosion resistance. Hence, the amount of Ca content and sintering temperature of Mg-Ca composite is controlled to acquire optimum corrosion rate.

  5. [Use of powder metallurgy for development of implants of Co-Cr-Mo alloy powder].

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, J R

    2001-04-01

    This paper discusses the application of powder metallurgy for the development of porous implantation materials. Powders obtained from Co-Cr-Mo alloy with different carbon content by water spraying and grinding, have been investigated. Cold pressing and rotary re-pressing methods were used for compressing the powder. It was found that the sintered materials obtained from water spraying have the most advantageous properties. PMID:11388037

  6. Powder metallurgy titanium 6A1-4V plate

    SciTech Connect

    Geisendorfer, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A powder metallurgical approach has been combined with controlled mill processing to produce a highly uniform plate material suitable for structural applications. Prealloyed ELI Titanium 6A1-4V powder produced by the rotating electrode process was consolidated into billet by hot isostatic pressing. The resulting billet of uniform composition and random texture was then hot cross-rolled to 3 cm thick plate. Following rolling, the plate was given a beta annealing heat treatment to maximize damage tolerance. The plate was characterized with respect to metallurgical structure, composition, texture, and room temperature mechanical properties. The results of the study show that a powder metallurgy titanium mill product possessing uniform macro- and microstructure is technically feasible and exhibits tensile and fatigue properties equivalent to those of conventionally produced ingot-source wrought plate.

  7. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In the last decade, Government/Industry programs have advanced powder metallurgy-near-net-shape technology to permit the use of hot isostatic pressed (HIP) turbine disks in the commercial aircraft fleet. These disks offer a 30% savings of input weight and an 8% savings in cost compared in cast-and-wrought disks. Similar savings were demonstrated for other rotating engine components. A compressor rotor fabricated from hot-die-forged-HIP superalloy billets revealed input weight savings of 54% and cost savings of 35% compared to cast-and-wrought parts. Engine components can be produced from compositions such as Rene 95 and Astroloy by conventional casting and forging, by forging of HIP powder billets, or by direct consolidation of powder by HIP. However, each process produces differences in microstructure or introduces different defects in the parts. As a result, their mechanical properties are not necessarily identical. Acceptance methods should be developed which recognize and account for the differences.

  8. Device for preparing combinatorial libraries in powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Evans, Julian R G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a powder-metering, -mixing, and -dispensing mechanism that can be used as a method for producing large numbers of samples for metallurgical evaluation or electrical or mechanical testing from multicomponent metal and cermet powder systems. It is designed to make use of the same commercial powders that are used in powder metallurgy and, therefore, to produce samples that are faithful to the microstructure of finished products. The particle assemblies produced by the device could be consolidated by die pressing, isostatic pressing, laser sintering, or direct melting. The powder metering valve provides both on/off and flow rate control of dry powders in open capillaries using acoustic vibration. The valve is simple and involves no relative movement, avoiding seizure with fine powders. An orchestra of such valves can be arranged on a building platform to prepare multicomponent combinatorial libraries. As with many combinatorial devices, identification and evaluation of sources of mixing error as a function of sample size is mandatory. Such an analysis is presented. PMID:15244416

  9. Powder metallurgy technology of NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, J. M.; Maziarz, W.; Czeppe, T.; Lityńska, L.; Nowacki, W. K.; Gadaj, S. P.; Luckner, J.; Pieczyska, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    Powder metallurgy technology was elaborated for consolidation of shape memory NiTi powders. The shape memory alloy was compacted from the prealloyed powder delivered by Memry SA. The powder shows Ms = 10°C and As = -34°C as results from DSC measurements. The samples were hot pressed in the as delivered spherical particle's state. The hot compaction was performed in a specially constructed vacuum press, at temperature of 680°C and pressure of 400 MPa. The alloy powder was encapsulated in copper capsules prior to hot pressing to avoid oxidation or carbides formation. The alloy after hot vacuum compaction at 680°C (i.e. within the B2 NiTi stability range) has shown similar transformation range as the powder. The porosity of samples compacted in the as delivered state was only 1%. The samples tested in compression up to ɛ = 0.06 have shown partial superelastic effect due to martensitic reversible transform- ation which started at the stress above 300 MPa and returned back to ɛ = 0.015 after unloading. They have shown also a high ultimate compression strength of 1600 MPa. Measurements of the samples temperature changes during the process allowed to detect the temperature increase above 12°C for the strain rate 10-2 s-1 accompanied the exothermic martensite transformation during loading and the temperature decrease related to the reverse endothermic transformation during unloading.

  10. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions

  11. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  12. N18, powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guedou, J.Y.; Lautridou, J.C.; Honnorat, Y. . Materials and Processes Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appropriate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 C for long-term applications and approximately 750 C for short-term use because of microstructural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without significant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astrology and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk applications.

  13. N18, Powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedou, J. Y.; Lautridou, J. C.; Honnorat, Y.

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appro-priate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 °C for long-term applications and approximately 750 °C for short-term use because of micro-structural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without signifi-cant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astroloy and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk ap-plications.

  14. Phase Stability of a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, P.; Telesman, Jack; Gang, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Advanced powder metallurgy superalloy disks in aerospace turbine engines now entering service can be exposed to temperatures approaching 700 C, higher than those previously encountered. They also have higher levels of refractory elements, which can increase mechanical properties at these temperatures but can also encourage phase instabilities during service. Microstructural changes including precipitation of topological close pack phase precipitation and coarsening of existing gamma' precipitates can be slow at these temperatures, yet potentially significant for anticipated disk service times exceeding 1,000 h. The ability to quantify and predict such potential phase instabilities and degradation of capabilities is needed to insure structural integrity and air worthiness of propulsion systems over the full life cycle. A prototypical advanced disk superalloy was subjected to high temperature exposures, and then evaluated. Microstructural changes and corresponding changes in mechanical properties were quantified. The results will be compared to predictions of microstructure modeling software.

  15. Advances in powder metallurgy - 1991. Vol. 5 - P/M materials; Proceedings of the Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, Chicago, IL, June 9-12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, L.F. III; Sansoucy, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present volume powder metallurgy materials discusses the state of the PM industry, a metallurgical evaluation of new steel powders, design criteria for the manufacturing of low-alloy steel powders, and homogenization processing of a PM maraging steel. Attention is given to the corrosion resistance of full density sintered 316 SS, the performance characteristics of a new sinter-hardening low-alloy steel, wear performance of compositions made by low alloy iron/high alloy powder mixtures, and the strengthening of an AISI 1020 steel by aluminum-microalloying during liquid dynamic compaction. Topics addressed include the influence of alloying on the properties of water-atomized copper powders, fundamentals of high pressure gas atomization process control, advanced sensors and process control of gas atomization, and bimetallic tubulars via spray forming. Also discussed are factors affecting the delamination of PM molybdenum during stamping, applications of powder metallurgy molybdenum in the 1990s, and powder processing of high-temperature oxides.

  16. POWDER METALLURGY TiAl ALLOYS: MICROSTRUCTURES AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2006-12-11

    The microstructures and properties of powder metallurgy TiAl alloys fabricated by hot extrusion of gas-atomized powder at different elevated temperatures were investigated. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1150 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains and coarse ordered B2 grains. Particles of ordered hexagonal {omega} phase were also observed in some B2 grains. The alloy containing B2 grains displayed a low-temperature superplastic behavior: a tensile elongation of 310% was measured when the alloy was tested at 800 C under a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1250 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains, coarse {alpha}{sub 2} grains, and lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. An observation of stacking faults associated with fine {gamma} lamellae in {alpha}{sub 2} grains reveals that the stacking fault of {alpha}{sub 2} phase plays an important role in the formation of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. Unlike the alloy fabricated at 1150{sup o}, the alloy fabricated at 1250{sup o} displayed no low-temperature superplasticity, but a tensile elongation of 260% at 1000 C was measured. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1400 C consisted of fully lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies with the colony size ranging between 50 {micro}m and 100 {micro}m, in which the width of {gamma} lamella is in a range between 100 nm and 350 nm, and the width of {alpha}{sub 2} lamella is in a range between 10 nm and 50 nm. Creep behavior of the ultrafine lamellar alloy and the effects of alloying addition on the creep resistance of the fully lamellar alloy are also investigated.

  17. Innovative technologies for powder metallurgy-based disk superalloys: Progress and proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong-Lin, Jia; Chang-Chun, Ge; Qing-Zhi, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) superalloys are an important class of high temperature structural materials, key to the rotating components of aero engines. In the purview of the present challenges associated with PM superalloys, two novel approaches namely, powder preparation and the innovative spray-forming technique (for making turbine disk) are proposed and studied. Subsequently, advanced technologies like electrode-induction-melting gas atomization (EIGA), and spark-plasma discharge spheroidization (SPDS) are introduced, for ceramic-free superalloy powders. Presently, new processing routes are sought after for preparing finer and cleaner raw powders for disk superalloys. The progress of research in spray-formed PM superalloys is first summarized in detail. The spray-formed superalloy disks specifically exhibit excellent mechanical properties. This paper reviews the recent progress in innovative technologies for PM superalloys, with an emphasis on new ideas and approaches, central to the innovation driving techniques like powder processing and spray forming. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  18. Iron's Role in Aluminum: A Powder Metallurgy and Sustainability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, Brandon Dale

    cryomilling. With respect to the powder, a differential scanning calorimetry and activation energy analysis elucidated the formation and phase transformation temperatures of the relevant intermetallic phases, and the microstructural factors that influenced them. With an understanding of the fundamental science behind the intermetallic formation in the Al-Fe system, the composition of helium atomized Al-2at.% Fe was chosen combined with high-pressure torsion processing to yield a bulk alloy that demonstrated an ultimate tensile strength of 488 MPa. This strength was achieved via a combination of two mechanisms: grain refinement (Hall-Petch) and dislocation-Al6Fe interactions (Orowan strengthening), with notable thermal stability present up until 450°C. Finally, the potential for Al-Fe as a sustainable alloy was studied and a link established between current environmental literature and metallurgy literature on the potential for incorporation of Fe into Al to create a structural alloy.

  19. Development of an extra-high strength powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to optimize the composition of NASA IIb-11, an alloy originally developed as a wrought material, for thermal stability and to determine the feasibility for producing the alloy using powder metallurgy techniques. Seven compositions were melted and atomized, hot isostatically pressed, cross rolled to disks and heat treated. Tensile and stress rupture properties from room temperature to 870 C (1600 F) were determined in addition to thermal stability characteristics. Processing variables included hot isostatic pressing parameters and handling, cross rolling procedures and heat treatment cycles. NASA IIb-11E displayed the best combination of overall properties for service as a 760 C (1400 F) disk material. Its composition is 0.06 C, 8.5 Cr, 9.0 Co, 2.0 Mo, 7.1 W, 6.6 Ta, 4.5 Al, 0.75 Ti, 0.5 V, 0.7 Hf, 0.01 B, 0.05 Zr and balance Ni. While the alloy exhibits the highest 760 C (1400 F) rupture strength reported for any powder metallurgy disk alloy to date, additional studies to further evaluate the effects of heat treatment may be required. The alloy is not susceptible to topologically close-packed phase formation during thermal exposure at 870 C (1600 F) for 1,500 hours, but its mechanical property levels are lowered due to grain boundary carbide formation.

  20. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  1. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  2. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  3. Mechanical properties of modified low cobalt powder metallurgy Udimet 700 type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1989-01-01

    Eight superalloys derived from Udimet 700 were prepared by powder metallurgy, hot isostatically pressed, heat treated and their tensile and creep rupture properties determined. Several of these alloys displayed properties superior to those of Udimet 700 similarly prepared, in one case exceeding the creep rupture life tenfold. Filter clogging by extracted gamma prime, its measurement and significance are discussed in an appendix.

  4. Powder metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported for the tensile strength, ductility, and heat performance characterisitics of powder metallurgy (p/m) superalloys. Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were also evaluated for their strength during thermal processing. The mechanical attributes evident in both p/m supperalloys and dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in terms of research into their possible combination.

  5. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE) program initiated by NASA are presented. Mechanical properties comparisons are made for superalloy parts produced by as-HIP powder consolidation and by forging of HIP consolidated billets. The effect of various defects on the mechanical properties of powder parts are shown.

  6. Investigation of machinability of iron based metal matrix composite (MMC) powder metallurgy parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Tibor; Czampa, Miklós; Markos, Sándor; Farkas, Balázs

    2012-09-01

    One of the advantages of powder metallurgy technology is that we may produce the final geometry of the required part saving considerable time and cost. However there are several applications that require parts need additional machining for example when the product contains threads, cross bore or slots. In these cases cutting of the hard and porous material may causes difficulties in manufacturing. The aim of the introduced research is the experimental investigation of the machinability of the iron based MMC powder metallurgy parts, determining the favourable composition of the powder and advantageous process parameters regarding the properties of the machinability. The research try to answer to the challenge of the poorly defined expression: machinability, and after defining the features and methods of the evaluation we develop advises for the proper technology parameters.

  7. Properties of WZ21 (%wt) alloy processed by a powder metallurgy route.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2015-06-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of WZ21 (%wt) alloy prepared by a powder metallurgy route from rapidly solidified powders have been studied. Results were compared to those of the same alloy prepared through a conventional route of casting and extrusion. The microstructure of the extruded ingot consisted of α-Mg grains and Mg3Zn3Y2 (W-phase) and LPSO-phase particles located at grain boundaries. Moreover, stacking faults were also observed within α-Mg grains. The alloy processed by the powder metallurgy route exhibited a more homogeneous and finer microstructure, with a grain size of 2 μm. In this case W-phase and Mg24Y5 phase were identified, but not the LPSO-phase. The microstructural refinement induced by the use of rapidly solidified powders strengthened the alloy at room temperature and promoted superplasticity at higher strain rates. Corrosion behaviour in PBS medium evidenced certain physical barrier effect of the almost continuous arrangements of second phases aligned along the extrusion direction in conventionally processed WZ21 alloy, with a stable tendency around 7 mm/year. On the other hand, powder metallurgy processing promoted significant pitting corrosion, inducing accelerated corrosion rate during prolonged immersion times. PMID:25792409

  8. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-01

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  9. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-21

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  10. High field performance of superconducting magnets using powder metallurgy processed Cu-Nb-Sn and Nb-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, A.J.; Foner, S.

    1984-06-01

    Small superconducting magnets were fabricated with powder metallurgy processed Nb-Al wire and with powder metallurgy processed multistrand Cu-Nb--Sn wire with 19 tin cores. Tests in a background field of up to 15 T showed that short sample characteristics were achieved for three coils. Upper limits of resistivity were established for both powder metallurgy processed wires. The reacted wires in the magnets gave upper limits of resistivity at 10 T of less than 1.4 x 10/sup -14/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb/sub 3/Sn wire, and less than 9 x 10/sup -13/ ..cap omega.. cm for the Nb-Al wire.

  11. Fabrication of Powder Metallurgy Pure Ti Material by Using Thermal Decomposition of TiH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoto, Takanori; Nakanishi, Nozomi; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been interested as an engineering material because they are widely used across various industrial applications, for example, motorcycle, automotive and aerospace industries, due to their light weight, high specific strength and superior corrosion resistance. Ti materials are particularly significant for the aircraft using carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, for example, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), because Ti materials are free from the problem of contact corrosion between C/C composites. However, the applications of Ti materials are limited because of their high cost. From a viewpoint of cost reduction, cost effective process to fabricate Ti materials is strongly required. In the present study, the direct consolidation of titanium hydride (TiH2) raw powders in solid-state was employed to fabricate pure Ti bulk materials by using thermal decomposition of TiH2. In general, the production cost of Ti components is expensive due to using commercially pure (CP) Ti powders after dehydrogenation. On the other hand, the novel process using TiH2 powders as starting materials is a promising low cost approach for powder metallurgy (P/M) Ti products. Furthermore, this new process is also attractive from a viewpoint of energy saving because the dehydrogenation is integrated into the sintering process. In this study, TiH2 raw powders were directly consolidated by conventional press technique at 600 MPa to prepare TiH2 powder compacted billets. To thermally decompose TiH2 and obtain sintered pure Ti billets, the TiH2 powder billets were heated in the integrated sintering process including dehydrogenation. The hot-extruded pure Ti material, which was heat treated at 1273 K for 180 min in argon gas atmosphere, showed tensile strength of 701.8 MPa and elongation of 27.1%. These tensile properties satisfied the requirements for JIS Ti Grade 4. The relationship between microstructures, mechanical properties response and heat treatment

  12. Porous mandrels provide uniform deformation in hydrostatic powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gripshover, P. J.; Hanes, H. D.

    1967-01-01

    Porous copper mandrels prevent uneven deformation of beryllium machining blanks. The beryllium powder is arranged around these mandrels and hot isostatically pressed to form the blanks. The mandrels are then removed by leaching.

  13. Study of alumina-trichite reinforcement of a nickel-based matric by means of powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walder, A.; Hivert, A.

    1982-01-01

    Research was conducted on reinforcing nickel based matrices with alumina trichites by using powder metallurgy. Alumina trichites previously coated with nickel are magnetically aligned. The felt obtained is then sintered under a light pressure at a temperature just below the melting point of nickel. The halogenated atmosphere technique makes it possible to incorporate a large number of additive elements such as chromium, titanium, zirconium, tantalum, niobium, aluminum, etc. It does not appear that going from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale in production would create any major problems.

  14. Method for forming biaxially textured articles by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured alloy article comprises the steps of preparing a mixture comprising Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacting the mixture, followed by heat treating and rapidly recrystallizing to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  15. A Nonvolume Preserving Plasticity Theory with Applications to Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    A plasticity theory has been developed to predict the mechanical response of powder metals during hot isostatic pressing. The theory parameters were obtained through an experimental program consisting of hydrostatic pressure tests, uniaxial compression and uniaxial tension tests. A nonlinear finite element code was modified to include the theory and the results of themodified code compared favorably to the results from a verification experiment.

  16. Making Self-Lubricating Parts By Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Compositions and parameters of powder-metallurgical fabrication processes determined for new class of low-friction, low-wear, self-lubricating materials. Used in oxidizing or reducing atmospheres in bearings and seals, at temperatures from below 25 degrees C to as high as 900 degrees C. Thick parts made with minimal waste.

  17. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Graphene Foams Using Powder Metallurgy Templates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Junwei; Gao, Caitian; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Li, Yilun; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2016-01-26

    A simple and scalable method which combines traditional powder metallurgy and chemical vapor deposition is developed for the synthesis of mesoporous free-standing 3D graphene foams. The powder metallurgy templates for 3D graphene foams (PMT-GFs) consist of particle-like carbon shells which are connected by multilayered graphene that shows high specific surface area (1080 m(2) g(-1)), good crystallization, good electrical conductivity (13.8 S cm(-1)), and a mechanically robust structure. The PMT-GFs did not break under direct flushing with DI water, and they were able to recover after being compressed. These properties indicate promising applications of PMT-GFs for fields requiring 3D carbon frameworks such as in energy-based electrodes and mechanical dampening. PMID:26678869

  18. Hydrogen halide cleaning of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The Cr2O3 content of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria was reduced with atmospheres consisting of hydrogen plus hydrogen chloride (HCl) or hydrogen bromide (HBr). The nonthoria oxygen content or 'oxygen excess' was reduced from an initial amount of greater than 50,000 ppm to less than 100 ppm. Low temperatures were effective, but lowest oxygen levels were achieved with the highest cleaning temperature of 1200 C.

  19. LACBED characterization of dislocations in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; Ibarra, A.; San Jean, J.; Morniro, J. P.; No, M. L.

    2003-10-01

    Powder metallurgy Cu-AI-Ni shape memory alloys show excellent thermomechanical properties, being the fracture behavior close to the one observed in single crystals. However, the microstructural mechanisms responsible of such behavior are still under study. In this paper we present the characterization of the dislocations present in these alloys by Large Angle Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction (LACBED) in two different stages of the elaboration process: after HIP compaction and after hot rolling.

  20. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  1. Development and Processing of Novel Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Materials for Heat Sink Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J. B.; Corbin, S. F.; Hexemer, R. L.; Donaldson, I. W.; Bishop, Donald Paul

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this research was to design aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) alloys and processing strategies that yielded sintered products with thermal properties that rivaled those of the cast and wrought aluminum alloys traditionally employed in heat sink manufacturing. Research has emphasized PM alloys within the Al-Mg-Sn system. In one sub-theme of research, the general processing response of each PM alloy was investigated through a combination of sintering trials, sintered density measurements, and microstructural assessments. In the second, the thermal properties of sintered products were studied in detail. Thermal conductivity was first determined using a calculated approach through discrete measurements of specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and density and subsequently verified using a transient plane source technique on larger specimens. Experimental PM alloys achieved >99 pct theoretical density and exhibited thermal conductivity that ranged from 179 to 225 W/m K. Thermal performance was largely dominated by the amount of magnesium present within the aluminum grains and, in turn, bulk alloy chemistry. Data confirmed that the novel PM alloys were highly competitive with even the most advanced heat sink materials such as wrought 6063 and 6061.

  2. Tribological properties of PM212 - A high temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  3. Tribological properties of PM212: A high-temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  4. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  5. Powder metallurgy processing and deformation characteristics of bulk multimodal nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Farbaniec, L.; Dirras, G.; Krawczynska, A.; Mompiou, F.; Couque, H.; Naimi, F.; Bernard, F.; Tingaud, D.

    2014-08-15

    Spark plasma sintering was used to process bulk nickel samples from a blend of three powder types. The resulting multimodal microstructure was made of coarse (average size ∼ 135 μm) spherical microcrystalline entities (the core) surrounded by a fine-grained matrix (average grain size ∼ 1.5 μm) or a thick rim (the shell) distinguishable from the matrix. Tensile tests revealed yield strength of ∼ 470 MPa that was accompanied by limited ductility (∼ 2.8% plastic strain). Microstructure observation after testing showed debonding at interfaces between the matrix and the coarse entities, but in many instances, shallow dimples within the rim were observed indicating local ductile events in the shell. Dislocation emission and annihilation at grain boundaries and twinning at crack tip were the main deformation mechanisms taking place within the fine-grained matrix as revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Estimation of the stress from loop's curvature and dislocation pile-up indicates that dislocation emission from grain boundaries and grain boundary overcoming largely contributes to the flow stress. - Highlights: • Bulk multi-modal Ni was processed by SPS from a powder blend. • Ultrafine-grained matrix or rim observed around spherical microcrystalline entities • Yield strength (470 MPa) and ductility (2.8% plastic strain) were measured. • Debonding was found at the matrix/microcrystalline entity interfaces. • In-situ TEM showed twinning, dislocation emission and annihilation at grain boundaries.

  6. Net-Shape HIP Powder Metallurgy Components for Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bampton, Cliff; Goodin, Wes; VanDaam, Tom; Creeger, Gordon; James, Steve

    2005-01-01

    True net shape consolidation of powder metal (PM) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) provides opportunities for many cost, performance and life benefits over conventional fabrication processes for large rocket engine structures. Various forms of selectively net-shape PM have been around for thirty years or so. However, it is only recently that major applications have been pursued for rocket engine hardware fabricated in the United States. The method employs sacrificial metallic tooling (HIP capsule and shaped inserts), which is removed from the part after HIP consolidation of the powder, by selective acid dissolution. Full exploitation of net-shape PM requires innovative approaches in both component design and materials and processing details. The benefits include: uniform and homogeneous microstructure with no porosity, irrespective of component shape and size; elimination of welds and the associated quality and life limitations; removal of traditional producibility constraints on design freedom, such as forgeability and machinability, and scale-up to very large, monolithic parts, limited only by the size of existing HIP furnaces. Net-shape PM HIP also enables fabrication of complex configurations providing additional, unique functionalities. The progress made in these areas will be described. Then critical aspects of the technology that still require significant further development and maturation will be discussed from the perspective of an engine systems builder and end-user of the technology.

  7. Advances in powder metallurgy - 1991. Vol. 6 - Aerospace, refractory and advanced materials; Proceedings of the Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, Chicago, IL, June 9-12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, L.F. III; Sansoucy, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on aerospace, refractory, and advanced materials are presented. Individual topics addressed include: nonequilibrium processing of powder alloys for aerospace applications, chemical conditioning of rapidly solidified aluminum alloy particulate, fabrication of rapidly solidified high temperature aluminum alloys, fatigue and fracture of an advanced PM-aluminum alloy, thermal and mechanical properties of extruded 7075-Al P/M alloys, reactive sintering and reactive hot isostatic pressing of iron aluminides, P/M processing and applications of Fe3Al-based intermetallics, properties of plasma atomized NiAl powders, processing of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl matrix composite. Also discussed are: powder forging process on an alumimum alloy, P/M magnesium particle composites, P/M short-fiber-reinforced magnesium, mechanical properties of a TiAl6V4 alloy processed by powder metallurgy, porous core/Be Ti-6-4 development for aerospace structures, consolidation and plasticity of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors, development of a new W-Ni-Mn heavy alloy.

  8. Powder metallurgy processing of high strength turbine disk alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Using vacuum-atomized AF2-1DA and Mar-M432 powders, full-scale gas turbine engine disks were fabricated by hot isostatically pressing (HIP) billets which were then isothermally forged using the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft GATORIZING forging process. While a sound forging was produced in the AF2-1DA, a container leak had occurred in the Mar-M432 billet during HIP. This resulted in billet cracking during forging. In-process control procedures were developed to identify such leaks. The AF2-1DA forging was heat treated and metallographic and mechanical property evaluation was performed. Mechanical properties exceeded those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability turbine disk alloys presently used.

  9. Influence of Sintering under Nitrogen Atmosphere on Microstructures of Powder Metallurgy Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, C.; Martin, F.; Blanco, Y.; de Tiedra, M. P.; Aparicio, M. L.

    2009-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (SS) obtained through powder metallurgy (PM) from austenitic AISI 316L and ferritic AISI 430L powders were mixed in different amounts to obtain a biphasic structure with an austenite/ferrite ratio of 50/50, 65/35, and 85/15. Prepared powders were compacted at 750 MPa and sintered in N2-H2 (95 pct-5 pct) at 1250 °C for 1 hour. Some samples sintered in vacuum were taken as references. Optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis of X-rays were used for microstructural characterization. Powder metallurgy base materials, AISI 430L and 316L, showed a single lamellar constituent after sintering in nitrogen. A mixed constituent was identified in PM duplex SS sintered in nitrogen and in vacuum. However, coarse and fine lamellar constituents were only present in PM duplex SS sintered in nitrogen. The effects of annealing solution heat treatment (1150 °C) on microstructures were evaluated. Homogeneous structures were obtained for the PM base materials, while for PM duplex SS, annealing dissolved lamellar constituents but mixed constituent were still present.

  10. Laser photothermal non-destructive metrology of cracks in un-sintered powder metallurgy manufactured automotive transmission sprockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolev, J.; Mandelis, A.

    2010-03-01

    A non-contact and non-intrusive method of revealing crack presence in un-sintered (green) automotive transmission parts (sprockets), manufactured by means of a powder metallurgy technology based on analysis of photo-thermal radiometric (PTR) signals and their statistical analysis was developed. The inspection methodology relies on the interaction of a modulated laser generated thermal wave with the potential crack and the resulting change in amplitude and phase of the detected signal [1-5]. The crack existence at points in high stress regions of a group of green (unsintered) sprockets was evaluated through frequency scans. The results were validated by independent destructive cross-sectioning of the sprockets following sintering and polishing. Examination of the sectioned sprockets under a microscope at the locations where signal changes was used for correlation with the PTR signals. Statistical analysis confirmed the capabilities of the method to detect the presence of hairline cracks (~5 - 10 μm size) with excellent sensitivity (91%) and good accuracy (78%) and specificity (61%). This measurement technique and the associated statistical analysis can be used as a simple and reliable on-line inspection methodology of industrial powder metallurgy manufactured steel products for non-destructive quality and feedback control of the parts forming process.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of americium, neptunium and curium bearing MOX fuels obtained by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Tribet, Magaly; Leorier, Caroline; Delahaye, Thibaud; Donnet, Louis; Dehaudt, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    MOX fuel pellets containing up to 1.4 wt% of Minor Actinides (MA), i.e. Am, Np and Cm, were fabricated to demonstrate the technical feasibility of powder metallurgy process involving, pelletizing and sintering in controlled atmosphere. The compounds were then characterized using XRD, SEM and EDX/EPMA. Dense pellets were obtained which closed porosity mean size is equal to 7 μm. The results indicate the formation of (U, Pu)O 2 solid solution. However, microstructure contains some isolated UO 2 grains. The distribution of Am and Cm appears to be homogeneous whereas Np was found to be clustered at some locations.

  12. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  13. Dose and Dose Risk Caused by Natural Phenomena - Proposed Powder Metallurgy Core Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.G.

    2001-08-16

    The offsite radiological effects from high velocity straight winds, tornadoes, and earthquakes have been estimated for a proposed facility for manufacturing enriched uranium fuel cores by powder metallurgy. Projected doses range up to 30 mrem/event to the maximum offsite individual for high winds and up to 85 mrem/event for very severe earthquakes. Even under conservative assumptions on meteorological conditions, the maximum offsite dose would be about 20 per cent of the DOE limit for accidents involving enriched uranium storage facilities. The total dose risk is low and is dominated by the risk from earthquakes. This report discusses this test.

  14. Mg-Zn based composites reinforced with bioactive glass (45S5) fabricated via powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab llah, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Daud, Z. C.; Zaludin, M. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic implants are shifting from bio-inert to bioactive and biodegradable materials. These changes are made in order to improve the stress shielding effect and bio-compatibility and also avoid the second surgery procedure. Second surgery procedure is required if the patient experienced infection and implant loosening. An implant is predicted to be well for 15 to 20 years inside patient body. Currently, magnesium alloys are found to be the new biomaterials because of their properties close to the human bones and also able to degrade in the human body. In this work, magnesium-zinc based composites reinforced with different content (5, 15, 20 wt. %) of bioactive glass (45S5) were fabricated through powder metallurgy technique. The composites were sintered at 450˚C. Density and porosity of the composites were determined using the gas pycnometer. Microstructure of the composites was observed using an optical microscope. In-vitro bioactivity behavior was evaluated in the simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) was used to characterize the apatite forming on the samples surface. The microstructure of the composite showed that the pore segregated near the grain boundaries and bioglass clustering was observed with increasing content of bioglass. The true density of the composites increased with the increasing content of bioglass and the highest value of porosity was indicated by the Mg-Zn reinforced with 20 wt.% of bioglass. The addition of bio-glass to the Mg-Zn has also induced the formation of apatite layer after soaking in SBF solution.

  15. Initial Assessment of the Effects of Nonmetallic Inclusions on Fatigue Life of Powder-Metallurgy-Processed Udimet(TM) 720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Kantzos, P. T.; Bonacuse, P. J.; Barrie, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modern powder metallurgy (PM) disk alloys are influenced by variabilities in alloy microstructure and mechanical properties. These properties can vary due to the different steps of materials/component processing and machining. One of these variables, the presence of nonmetallic inclusions, has been shown to significantly degrade low-cycle fatigue (LCF) life. Nonmetallic inclusions are inherent defects in powder alloys that are a by-product of powder-processing techniques. Contamination of the powder can occur in the melt, during powder atomization, or during any of the various handling processes through consolidation. In modern nickel disk powder processing facilities, the levels of inclusion contamination have been reduced to less than 1 part per million by weight. Despite the efforts of manufacturers to ensure the cleanliness of their powder production processes, the presence of inclusions remains a source of great concern for the designer. the objective of this study was to investigate the effects on fatigue life of these inclusions. Since natural inclusions occur so infrequently, elevated levels of inclusions were carefully introduced in a nickel-based disk superalloy, Udimet 720 (registered trademark of Special Metals Corporation), produced using PM processing. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were then performed on this material at 650 C. Analyses were performed to compare the LCF lives and failure initiation sites as functions of inclusion content and fatigue conditions. A large majority of the failures in specimens with introduced inclusions occurred at cracks initiating from inclusions at the specimen surface. The inclusions could reduce fatigue life by up to 100 times. These effects were found to be dependent on strain range and strain ratio. Tests at lower strain ranges and higher strain ratios produced larger effects of inclusions on life.

  16. Effects of fine porosity on the fatigue behavior of a powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy Astroloy was obtained which contained 1.4 percent fine porosity at the grain boundaries produced by argon entering the powder container during pressing. This material was tested at 650 C in fatigue, creep fatigue, tension, and stress-rupture and the results compared with previous data on sound Astroloy. The pores averaged about 2 micrometers diameter and 20 micrometers spacing. They did influence fatigue crack initiation and produced a more intergranular mode of propagation. However, fatigue life was not drastically reduced. A large 25 micrometers pore in one specimen resulting from a hollow particle did not reduce life by 60 percent. Fatigue behavior of the porous material showed typical correlation with tensile behavior. The plastic strain range life relation was reduced proportionately with the reduction in tensile ductility, but the elastic strain range-life relation was little changed reflecting the small reduction in sigma sub u/E for the porous material.

  17. Effects of fine porosity on the fatigue behavior of a powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Hot-isostatically-pressed powder-metallurgy Astroloy was obtained which contained 1.4 percent porosity at the grain boundaries produced by argon entering the powder container during pressing. This material was tested at 650 C in fatigue, creep-fatigue, tension, and stress-rupture and the results compared with data on sound Astroloy. They influenced fatigue crack initiation and produced a more intergranular mode of propagation but fatigue life was not drastically reduced. Fatigue behavior of the porous material showed typical correlation with tensile behavior. The plastic strain range-life relation was reduced proportionately with the reduction in tensile ductility, but the elastic strain range-life relation was changed little.

  18. The synthesis and characterization of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annur, Dhyah; Franciska P., L.; Erryani, Aprilia; Amal, M. Ikhlasul; Sitorus, Lyandra S.; Kartika, Ika

    2016-04-01

    Known for its biodegradation and biocompatible properties, magnesium alloys have gained many interests to be researched as implant material. In this study, Mg-3Zn-1Ca, Mg-29Zn-1Ca, and Mg-53Zn-4.3Ca (in wt%) were synthesized by means of powder metallurgy method. The compression strength and corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy were thoroughly examined. The microstructures of the alloy were characterized using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope, and also X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion resistance were evaluated using electrochemical analysis. The result indicated that Mg- Zn- Ca alloy could be synthesized using powder metallurgy method. This study showed that Mg-29Zn-1Ca would make the highest mechanical strength up to 159.81 MPa. Strengthening mechanism can be explained by precipitation hardening and grain refinement mechanism. Phase analysis had shown the formation of α Mg, MgO, and intermetallic phases: Mg2Zn11 and also Ca2Mg6Zn3. However, when the composition of Zn reach 53% weight, the mechanical strength will be decreasing. In addition, all of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy studied here had better corrosion resistance (Ecorr around -1.4 VSCE) than previous study of Mg. This study indicated that Mg- 29Zn- 1Ca alloy can be further analyzed to be a biodegradable implant material.

  19. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of porous iron prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Capek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2014-10-01

    The demand for porous biodegradable load-bearing implants has been increasing recently. Based on investigations of biodegradable stents, porous iron may be a suitable material for such applications. In this study, we prepared porous iron samples with porosities of 34-51 vol.% by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate as a space-holder material. We studied sample microstructure (SEM-EDX and XRD), flexural and compressive behaviors (universal loading machine) and hardness HV5 (hardness tester) of the prepared samples. Sample porosity increased with the amount of spacer in the initial mixtures. Only the pore surfaces had insignificant oxidation and no other contamination was observed. Increasing porosity decreased the mechanical properties of the samples; although, the properties were still comparable with human bone and higher than those of porous non-metallic biomaterials and porous magnesium prepared in a similar way. Based on these results, powder metallurgy appears to be a suitable method for the preparation of porous iron for orthopedic applications. PMID:25175241

  20. Comparison of the creep properties of cast and powder metallurgy-extruded binary NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, S.V.; Garg, A.; Bieler, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    The current emphasis in developing NiAl-based alloys for use in gas-turbine aircraft engines requires a fundamental understanding of the creep mechanisms dominant in these materials. Here, a comparison of published creep data on binary NiAl showed that there is a discrepancy in the reported magnitudes of the stress exponents, n, which usually vary between about 4.5 and 6.5. In general, a close examination of the data suggested that n {approx} 4.5 for cast materials and 6.5 for powder-metallurgy extruded NiAl. Constant load compression creep tests were conducted on a cast and extruded binary NiAl between 800 and 1,200 K over a wide range of initial applied stresses varying between 4.0 and 200 MPa. The microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The observed variations in the creep behavior of the extruded cast and powder-metallurgy NiAl appeared to be due to a grain size effect. Despite similarities in the values of n, no significant substructure was observed in most of the grains in the cast and extruded specimens at 1,100 and 1,200 K in contrast to the PM-extruded alloy, which revealed a wide range of substructural features in the power-law creep region. However, extensive subgrain formation and dislocations were widely observed at lower temperatures and higher stresses in the cast and extruded material.

  1. Assessment of Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Powder Metallurgy Alloy U720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tomothy P.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Sweeney, Joseph W.; Chatterjee, Amit; Green, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modem powder metallurgy disk alloys are influenced by variabilities in alloy microstructure and mechanical properties. These properties can vary as functions of variables the different steps of materials/component processing: powder atomization, consolidation, extrusion, forging, heat treating, and machining. It is important to understand the relationship between the statistical variations in life and these variables, as well as the change in life distribution due to changes in fatigue loading conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate these relationships in a nickel-base disk superalloy, U720, produced using powder metallurgy processing. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were performed at 538 C (1000 F) at limited sets of test conditions. Analyses were performed to: (1) assess variations of microstructure, mechanical properties, and LCF failure initiation sites as functions of disk processing and loading conditions; and (2) compare mean and minimum fatigue life predictions using different approaches for modeling the data from assorted test conditions. Significant variations in life were observed as functions of the disk processing variables evaluated. However, the lives of all specimens could still be combined and modeled together. The failure initiation sites for tests performed at a strain ratio R(sub epsilon) = epsilon(sub min)/epsilon(sub max) of 0 were different from those in tests at a strain ratio of -1. An approach could still be applied to account for the differences in mean and maximum stresses and strains. This allowed the data in tests of various conditions to be combined for more robust statistical estimates of mean and minimum lives.

  2. Study of Metallic Carbide (MC) in a Ni-Co-Cr-Based Powder Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Bin; Liu, Guo-Quan; Hu, Ben-Fu; Hu, Peng-Hui; Zhang, Yi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of carbides in a Ni-Cr-Co-based powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy in the as-atomized, as-atomized + annealed, hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) and HIPed + annealed conditions were systematically analyzed to understand the formation of blocky metallic carbide (MC) along the previous particle boundary (PPB). The results show that the carbides both on the powder surfaces and in the bulk of the powder particles are mainly fan-shaped MC whose decomposition temperatures are in the range of 1473 K to 1493 K (1200 °C to 1220 °C). PPB carbides in the HIPed alloy are mainly block-shaped MC, and the fan-shaped MC densely distributed in the area that have not been consumed by the recrystallized grains. The formation mechanism of PPB carbides can be described as follows: When the powders are HIPed at 1453 K (1180 °C), the fan-shaped carbides are decomposed at the migrating boundaries of recrystallized grains, and the preferential precipitation of block-shaped MC at PPB is promoted by the carbide-forming elements released by the fan-shaped carbides. When the HIPed alloy is annealed at 1453 K (1180 °C), the area fraction of PPB carbides increases with an increase in annealing time but that of the fan-shaped carbides exhibits opposite behavior. This proves the above formation mechanism of PPB carbides.

  3. Development of Cu-E-Glass Fiber Composites by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pallabi; Singh, Harspreet; Kumar, Lailesh; Sharma, Nidhi; Panda, Deepankar; Verma, Deepanshu; NasmulAlam, Syed

    2016-02-01

    Cu-E glass fiber composites were developed with different vol. % of E-glass fiber (10, 20, 30 and 40 vol. %) by powder metallurgy route. Both as-received Cu and nanostructured Cu developed by milling as-received Cu powder for 20 h were used to develop various Cu-E-glass fiber composites. The effect of using as-received Cu powder and nanostructured Cu powder on the properties of the various Cu-E-glass fiber composites was analysed. The samples were sintered at 900oC for 1 h in inert atmosphere. The results show good bonding between the matrix and the reinforcement and there is homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement in the matrix.. The hardness of the Cu-E-glass fiber composites was found to increase from 0.8GPa to 2.7GPa with increase in vol. % of the glass fiber in case of unmilled and from 1.2GPa to 2.9GPa for the milled Cu-E-glass fiber composites. The as-milled Cu-E- glass fiber composites shows better densification and sinterability compared to the unmilled CuE-glass fiber composites

  4. Mechanisms of fatigue crack retardation following single tensile overloads in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, G. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In ingot metallurgy (IM) alloys, the number of delay cycles following a single tensile overload typically increases from a minimum at an intermediate baseline stress intensity range, Delta-K(B), with decreasing Delta-K(B) approaching threshold and increasing Delta-K(B) approaching unstable fracture to produce a characteristic 'U' shaped curve. Two models have been proposed to explain this behavior. One model is based on the interaction between roughness and plasticity-induced closure, while the other model only utilizes plasticity-induced closure. This article examines these models, using experimental results from constant amplitude and single overload fatigue tests performed on two powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys, AL-905XL and AA 8009. The results indicate that the 'U'-shaped curve is primarily due to plasticity-induced closure, and that the plasticity-induced retardation effect is through-thickness in nature, occurring in both the surface and interior regions. However, the retardation effect is greater at the surface, because the increase in plastic strain at the crack tip and overload plastic zone size are larger in the plane-stress surface regions than in the plane-strain interior regions. These results are not entirely consistent with either of the proposed models.

  5. Electrochemical study of Aluminum-Fly Ash composites obtained by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Lekka, M.; Andreatta, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Itskos, G.; Koukouzas, N.

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, two different ASTM C 618 Class C fly ashes (FA) were used for the production of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMCs) using powder metallurgy (PM) technology. Calcareous FAs were sampled from the electrostatic precipitators of two different lignite-fired power stations: from Megalopolis, Southern Greece (MFA) and from Kardia, Northen Greece (KFA), under maximum electricity load. FAs were milled in order to reduce the mean particle diameter and Aluminum-FA composites containing 10% and 20% of FA were then prepared and compacted. The green products were sintered for 2 h at 600 Degree-Sign C. Sintered Al-FA MMCs showed increased hardness and wear resistance suggesting their possible use in industrial applications for example in covers, casings, brake rotors or engine blocks. As most possible industrial applications of MMCs not only require wear resistance, but also corrosion resistance in different mild aggressive medias, this paper aims to study the electrochemical behavior of FA MMCs in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance. The morphology and chemical composition of the phases in the Aluminum-FA composite samples were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Moreover, topographic and Volta potential maps were acquired by Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKP-FM). Volta potential maps provide information about the electrochemical behavior of the different phases in absence of electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior was investigated by Open Circuit Potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, while the corrosion mechanisms were studied by SEM observations after different times of immersion in a mild corrosive medium. In all cases it could be stated that the addition of the FA particles into the Al matrix might cause an increase of the hardness and mechanical properties of the pure aluminum but deteriorates the corrosion resistance. The degradation phenomena

  6. Crack Formation in Powder Metallurgy Carbon Nanotube (CNT)/Al Composites During Post Heat-Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Imai, Hisashi; Li, Shufeng; Jia, Lei; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    After the post heat-treatment (PHT) process of powder metallurgy carbon nanotubes (CNT)/Al composites, micro-cracks were observed in the composites, leading to greatly degraded mechanical properties. To understand and suppress the crack formation, an in situ observation of CNT/Al composites was performed at elevated temperatures. PHT was also applied to various bulk pure Al and CNT/Al composites fabricated under different processes. It was observed that the composites consolidated by hot-extrusion might form micro-cracks, but those consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) showed no crack after PHT. A high-temperature SPS process before hot-extrusion was effective to prevent crack formation. The release of residual stress in severe plastic deformed (SPD) materials was responsible for the cracking phenomena during the PHT process. Furthermore, a good particle bonding was essential and effective to suppress cracks for SPD materials in the PHT process.

  7. Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Processed TiC/316L Composites with Mo Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shaojiang; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-06-01

    To find out the effects of Mo addition on corrosion resistance of TiC/316L stainless steel composites, TiC/316L composites with addition of different contents of Mo were prepared by powder metallurgy. The corrosion resistance of these composites was evaluated by the immersion tests and polarization curves experiments. Results indicated that Mo addition decreased the corrosion rates of TiC/316L composites in H2SO4 solution in the case of Mo content below 2% whereas it displayed an opposite effect when Mo content was above that value. It was found that with an increase in the Mo content, the pitting corrosion resistance increased monotonically for TiC/316L composites in NaCl solution.

  8. Mechanical cycling effects at Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni SMAs obtained by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, B.; Söyler, U.; Comčneci, R. I.; Özkal, B.; Bujoreanu, L. G.

    Specimens from Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni SMA, obtained by powder metallurgy and compacted through hot rolling, were subjected to tensile loading-unloading cycles. The pseudoelastic parameters were determined based on recorded stress-strain curves, and their variation tendency with increasing the number of mechanical cycles was discussed. The gauges of tensile specimens were cut after mechanical cycling and were subjected to structural and dilatometric analysis. The structure was analyzed by XRD and SEM, aiming to reveal mechanical cycling effects. The thermomechanical response on heating, of mechanically cycled specimens, was recorded by dilatometry and revealed a tendency to enhance thermal expansion as an effect of increasing the number of cycles. The microstructural changes, induced by mechanical cycling, consisted in the stress induced formation of α' martensite.

  9. Effect of glow discharge sintering in the properties of a composite material fabricated by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, A.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento Santos, A.; Vera, E.

    2016-02-01

    Composite samples of 316 stainless steel and SiC were produced by powder metallurgy. Starting materials were mixed in different proportions and compacted to 700MPa. Sintering stage was performed by abnormal glow discharge plasma with direct current in an inert atmosphere of argon. The process was conducted at a temperature of 1200°C±5°C with a heating rate of 100°C/min. This work shows, the effectiveness of plasma sintering process to generate the first contacts between particles and to reduce vacancies. This fact is confirmed by comparing green and sintered density of the material. The results of porosity show a decrease after plasma sintering. Wear tests showed the wear mechanisms, noting that at higher SiC contents, the wear resistance decreases due to poor matrix-reinforcement interaction and by the porosity presence which causes matrix-reinforcement sliding.

  10. Abnormal magnetic behaviour of powder metallurgy austenitic stainless steels sintered in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, C.; Martin, F.; Blanco, Y.

    2009-10-01

    The magnetic response of AISI 304L and AISI 316L obtained through powder metallurgy and sintered in nitrogen were studied. AISI 304L sintered in nitrogen showed a ferromagnetic behaviour in as-sintered state while AISI 316L was paramagnetic. After solution annealing both were paramagnetic. Magnetic behaviour was analysed by using a vibrating sample magnetometer, a magnetic ferritscope and magnetic etching. A microstructural characterization was performed by means of optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDS). Some samples when needed were submitted to aged heat treatments at 675 and 875 °C for 90 min, 4, 6, 8 or 48 h. The main microstructural feature found was the presence of a lamellar constituent formed by nitride precipitates and an interlamellar matrix of austenite and/or ferrite. The abnormal magnetic response was explained based on this.

  11. Accelerated Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Effect-Powder Metallurgy Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low (Delta) K, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = K(sub min)/K(sub max)). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of K(sub max) (K(sub max) = 0.4 K(sub IC)). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and K(sub max) influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of P/M (powder metallurgy) Fe sub 3 Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knibloe, J.R.; Wright, R.N. ); Sikka, V.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al have an equilibrium DO{sub 3} structure at low temperatures and transform to a B2 structure above about 550{degree}C. The influence of different rates of quenching from the B2 region to room temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys with two different Cr contents has been examined. By optimizing the processing to maximize the amount of B2 order, room temperature ductility approaching 20% has been achieved although the fracture mode is primarily brittle cleavage. The refined microstructure resulting from P/M processing contributes to enhanced yield strength compared to ingot processed materials with similar ductility. Increasing the Cr content from 2 to 5% has little effect on mechanical properties. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity of copper processed by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, C.; Silvain, J. F.; Heintz, J. M.; Chandra, N.

    2012-03-01

    Powder metallurgy is a preferred method of processing copper-carbon composites due to the non-wetting nature of these materials. Porosities are inherently introduced in these material systems, and adversely affect the thermal conductivity of the composite material, among other factors including interfaces and reinforcement distribution. In this work, we focus on the matrix material of pure copper and systematically analyzed the effect of volume fraction of porosities on the thermal conductivity. Spherical and dendritic copper powder materials were processed and it was found that the surface chemistry and morphology of particles affected the thermal conductivity apart from the porosity values. In order to study the effect of porosities alone, dentritic powder was used in the study. The thermal conductivity vs. porosity behavior showed three distinct domains. In all the domains the thermal conductivity decreases as volume fraction of porosities increases; however, in domain II, the decrease was much steeper than the other two. We are able to explain the variation based on the presence of interconnected and open pores in domain III to closed pores in domain I, and the transition occurring in domain II. None of the existing models capture the overall behavior. However, if we specifically account for the variation of number of grain boundaries with sintering, then the modified EMT model can match the experimental data.

  14. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  15. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinationsmore » that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.« less

  16. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  17. Ultra-High Strength and Ductile Lamellar-Structured Powder Metallurgy Binary Ti-Ta Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Xu, Shenghang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kaiyang; Liu, Bin; Wu, Hong; Tang, Huiping

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and ductile powder metallurgy (PM) binary Ti-20at.%Ta alloy has been fabricated via sintering from elemental Ti and Ta powders and subsequent hot swaging and annealing. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in each stage were evaluated. Results show that inhomogeneous microstructures with Ti-rich and Ta-rich areas formed in the as-sintered Ti-Ta alloys due to limited diffusion of Ta. In addition, Kirkendall porosity was observed as a result of the insufficient diffusion of Ta. Annealing at 1000°C for up to 24 h failed to eliminate the pores. Hot swaging eliminated the residual sintering porosity and created a lamellar microstructure, consisting of aligned Ta-enriched and Ti-enriched phases. The hot-swaged and annealed PM Ti-20Ta alloy achieved an ultimate tensile strength of 1600 MPa and tensile elongation of more than 25%, due to its unique lamellar microstructure including the high toughness of Ta-enriched phases, the formation of α phase in the β matrix and the refined lamellae.

  18. An investigation of wear behaviors of different Monel alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esgin, U.; Özyürek, D.; Kaya, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, wear behaviors of Monel 400, Monel 404, Monel R-405 and Monel K-500 alloys produced by Powder Metallurgy (P/M) method were investigated. These compounds prepared from elemental powders were cold-pressed (600 MPa) and then, sintered at 1150°C for 2 hours and cooled down to the room temperature in furnace environment. Monel alloys produced by the P/M method were characterized through scanning electron microscope (SEM+EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness and density measurements. In wear tests, standard pin-on-disk type device was used. Specimens produced within four different Monel Alloys were tested under 1ms-1 sliding speed, under three different loads (20N, 30N and 40N) and five different sliding distances (400-2000 m). The results show that Monel Alloys have γ matrix and that Al0,9Ni4,22 intermetallic phase was formed in the structure. Also, the highest hardness value was measured with the Monel K-500 alloy. In wear tests, the maximum weight loss according to the sliding distance, was observed in Monel 400 and Monel 404 alloys while the minimum weight loss was achieved by the Monel K-500 alloy.

  19. Niobium-titanium superconductors produced by powder metallurgy having artificial flux pinning centers

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Larbalestier, David C.

    1993-01-01

    Superconductors formed by powder metallurgy have a matrix of niobium-titanium alloy with discrete pinning centers distributed therein which are formed of a compatible metal. The artificial pinning centers in the Nb-Ti matrix are reduced in size by processing steps to sizes on the order of the coherence length, typically in the range of 1 to 10 nm. To produce the superconductor, powders of body centered cubic Nb-Ti alloy and the second phase flux pinning material, such as Nb, are mixed in the desired percentages. The mixture is then isostatically pressed, sintered at a selected temperature and selected time to produce a cohesive structure having desired characteristics without undue chemical reaction, the sintered billet is reduced in size by deformation, such as by swaging, the swaged sample receives heat treatment and recrystallization and additional swaging, if necessary, and is then sheathed in a normal conducting sheath, and the sheathed material is drawn into a wire. The resulting superconducting wire has second phase flux pinning centers distributed therein which provide enhanced J.sub.ct due to the flux pinning effects.

  20. Interfacial reactions and wetting in Al-Mg sintered by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Heny; Darminto, Triwikantoro, Zainuri, M.

    2016-04-01

    Was conducted to analyze the effect of temperature variation on the bonding interface sintered composite Al-Mg and analyze the effect of variations of the density and hardness sinter. Research carried out by the base material powders of Al, Mg powder and solvent n-butanol. The method used in this study is a powder metallurgy, with a composition of 60% volume fraction of Al - 40% Mg. Al-Mg mixing with n-butanol for 1 hour at 500 rpm. Then the emphasis (cold comression) with a size of 1.4 cm in diameter dies and height of 2.8 cm, is pressed with a force of 20 MPa and held for 15 minutes. After the sample into pellets, then sintered at various temperatures 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C. Characterization is done by using the testing green density, sintered density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), vickers microhardness, and press test. XRD data analysis done by using X'Pert High Score Plus (HSP) to determine whether there is a new phase is formed. Test results show that the sintered density increasing sintering temperature, the resulting density is also increasing (shrinkage). However, at a temperature of 450 °C decreased (swelling). With the increased sinter density, interfacial bonding getting Kuta and more compact so that its hardness is also increased. From the test results of SEM / EDX, there Mg into Al in the border area. At temperatures of 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C, the phase formed is Al, Mg and MgO. While phase is formed at a temperature of 450 °C is aluminum magnesium (Al3Mg2), Aluminum Magnesium Zinc (AlMg2Zn).

  1. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  2. Analysis of Load Transfer Mechanism in Cu Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    Abstract: In this research, ductile and high-strength Cu-carbon nanotube (Cu-CNT) composites with different volume fractions of CNTs were fabricated using powder metallurgy route including mechanical milling and hot pressing and microstructure and tensile properties of the resulting materials were studied. Microstructural characterization through scanning electron microscope and quantifying the CNT agglomeration revealed that uniform dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix decreases with increasing CNT volume fraction. In case of the higher volume fraction of CNTs (i.e., 8 vol.%), ~ 40% of CNTs were observed as agglomerates in the microstructure. Compared to unreinforced Cu, the yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased considerably (about 33% and 12%, respectively) with incorporation of CNTs up to 4 vol.%, but remained constant afterward. Meanwhile, the elongation decreased from 15.6% for Cu to 6.9% for Cu with 8 vol.% CNT. The relationship between the change in yield strength of the composite and the microstructure was investigated using analytical models. The results showed good consistency between calculated and measured data when the negative effect of CNT agglomerates in the models were taken into account.

  3. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  4. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  5. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1985-06-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of γ' particles in a γ matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest γ' particles, and had the lowest γ-γ' lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650°C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760°C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the γ' particle size distribution and the γ-γ' mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  6. Spray forming and mechanical properties of a new type powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chong-Lin; Ge, Chang-Chun; Xia, Min; Gu, Tian-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The deposited billet of a new type powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy FGH4095M for use in turbine disk manufacturing has been fabricated using spray forming technology. The metallurgical quality of the deposited billet was analyzed in terms of density, texture, and grain size. Comparative research was done on the microstructure and mechanical properties between the flat disk preform prepared with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and the same alloy forgings prepared with HIP followed by isothermal forging (IF). The results show that the density of the spray-formed and nitrogen-atomized deposit billet is above 99% of the theoretical density, indicating a compact structure. The grains are uniform and fine. The billet has weak texture with a random distribution in the spray deposition direction and perpendicular to the direction of deposition. A part of atomizing nitrogen exists in the preform in the form of carbonitride. Nitrogen-induced microporosity causes the density reduction of the preform. Compared with the process of HIP+IF, the superalloy FGH4095M after HIP has better mechanical properties at both room temperature and high temperature. The sizes of the γ‧ phase are finer in microstructure of the preform after HIP in comparison with the forgings after HIP+IF. This work shows that SF+HIP is a viable processing route for FGH4095M as a turbine-disk material. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  7. Characterization of the carbides and the martensite phase in powder-metallurgy high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, Matjaz; Batic, Barbara Setina; Mandrino, Djordje; Nagode, Ales; Leskovsek, Vojteh; Skapin, Sreco D.; Jenko, Monika

    2010-04-15

    A microstructural characterization of the powder-metallurgy high-speed-steel S390 Microclean was performed based on an elemental distribution of the carbide phase as well as crystallographic analyses. The results showed that there were two types of carbides present: vanadium-rich carbides, which were not chemically homogeneous and exhibited a tungsten-enriched or tungsten-depleted central area; and chemically homogeneous tungsten-rich M{sub 6}C-type carbides. Despite the possibility of chemical inhomogenities, the crystallographic orientation of each of the carbides was shown to be uniform. Using electron backscatter diffraction the vanadium-rich carbides were determined to be either cubic VC or hexagonal V{sub 6}C{sub 5}, while the tungsten-rich carbides were M{sub 6}C. The electron backscatter diffraction results were also verified using X-ray diffraction. Several electron backscatter diffraction pattern maps were acquired in order to define the fraction of each carbide phase as well as the amount of martensite phase. The fraction of martensite was estimated using band-contrast images, while the fraction of carbides was calculated using the crystallographic data.

  8. Analysis of Load Transfer Mechanism in Cu Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this research, ductile and high-strength Cu-carbon nanotube (Cu-CNT) composites with different volume fractions of CNTs were fabricated using powder metallurgy route including mechanical milling and hot pressing and microstructure and tensile properties of the resulting materials were studied. Microstructural characterization through scanning electron microscope and quantifying the CNT agglomeration revealed that uniform dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix decreases with increasing CNT volume fraction. In case of the higher volume fraction of CNTs (i.e., 8 vol.%), ~ 40% of CNTs were observed as agglomerates in the microstructure. Compared to unreinforced Cu, the yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased considerably (about 33% and 12%, respectively) with incorporation of CNTs up to 4 vol.%, but remained constant afterward. Meanwhile, the elongation decreased from 15.6% for Cu to 6.9% for Cu with 8 vol.% CNT. The relationship between the change in yield strength of the composite and the microstructure was investigated using analytical models. The results showed good consistency between calculated and measured data when the negative effect of CNT agglomerates in the models were taken into account.

  9. Factors Influencing Dwell Fatigue Cracking in Notches of Powder Metallurgy Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Ghosn, L.; Garg, A.; Gayda, J.

    2011-01-01

    The influences of heat treatment and cyclic dwells on the notch fatigue resistance of powder metallurgy disk superalloys were investigated for low solvus high refractory (LSHR) and ME3 disk alloys. Disks were processed to produce material conditions with varied microstructures and associated mechanical properties. Notched specimens were first subjected to baseline dwell fatigue cycles having a dwell at maximum load, as well as tensile, stress relaxation, creep rupture, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests at 704 C. Several material heat treatments displayed a bimodal distribution of fatigue life with the lives varying by two orders-of-magnitude, while others had more consistent fatigue lives. This response was compared to other mechanical properties, in search of correlations. The wide scatter in baseline dwell fatigue life was observed only for material conditions resistant to stress relaxation. For selected materials and conditions, additional tests were then performed with the dwells shifted in part or in total to minimum tensile load. The tests performed with dwells at minimum load exhibited lower fatigue lives than max dwell tests, and also exhibited early crack initiation and a substantial increase in the number of initiation sites. These results could be explained in part by modeling evolution of peak stresses in the notch with continued dwell fatigue cycling. Fatigue-environment interactions were determined to limit life for the fatigue cycles with dwells.

  10. Dwell Notch Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Powder Metallurgy Nickel Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Yamada, Y.; Ghosn, L. J.; Jayaraman, N.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the processes which govern dwell notch low cycle fatigue (NLCF) behavior of a powder metallurgy (P/M) ME3 disk superalloy. The emphasis was placed on the environmentally driven mechanisms which may embrittle the highly stressed notch surface regions and reduce NLCF life. In conjunction with the environmentally driven notch surface degradation processes, the visco-plastic driven mechanisms which can significantly change the notch root stresses were also considered. Dwell notch low cycle fatigue testing was performed in air and vacuum on a ME3 P/M disk alloy specimens heat treated using either a fast or a slow cooling rate from the solutioning treatment. It was shown that dwells at the minimum stress typically produced a greater life debit than the dwells applied at the maximum stress, especially for the slow cooled heat treatment. Two different environmentally driven failure mechanisms were identified as the root cause of early crack initiation in the min dwell tests. Both of these failure mechanisms produced mostly a transgranular crack initiation failure mode and yet still resulted in low NLCF fatigue lives. The lack of stress relaxation during the min dwell tests produced higher notch root stresses which caused early crack initiation and premature failure when combined with the environmentally driven surface degradation mechanisms. The importance of environmental degradation mechanisms was further highlighted by vacuum dwell NLCF tests which resulted in considerably longer NLCF lives, especially for the min dwell tests.

  11. In vitro degradation and cytotoxicity of Mg/Ca composites produced by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y F; Gu, X N; Xi, Y L; Chai, D L

    2010-05-01

    Mg/Ca (1 wt.%, 5 wt.%, 10 wt.% Ca) composites were prepared from pure magnesium and calcium powders using the powder metallurgy method, aiming to enlarge the addition of Ca content without the formation of Mg(2)Ca. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicities of Mg/Ca composite samples were investigated. The corrosion of Mg/Ca composites in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) for various immersion intervals was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and environmental scanning electron microscope, with the concentrations of released Mg and Ca ions in DMEM for various immersion time intervals being measured. It was shown that the main constitutional phases were Mg and Ca, which were uniformly distributed in the Mg matrix. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of experimental composites decreased with increasing Ca content, and the UTS of Mg/1Ca composite was comparable with that of as-extruded Mg-1Ca alloy. The corrosion potential increased with increasing Ca content, whereas the current density and the impedance decreased. It was found that the protective surface film formed quickly at the initial immersion stage. With increasing immersion time, the surface film became compact, and the corrosion rate of Mg/Ca composites slowed down. The surface film consisted mainly of CaCO(3), MgCO(3)x3H(2)O, HA and Mg(OH)(2) after 72 h immersion in DMEM. Mg/1Ca and Mg/5Ca composite extracts had no significant toxicity (p>0.05) to L-929 cells, whereas Mg/10Ca composite extract induced approximately 40% reduced cell viability. PMID:19815098

  12. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Aghion, E. Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content. Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.

  13. Effects of carbon and hafnium concentrations in wrought powder-metallurgy superalloys based on NASA 2B-11 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A candidate alloy for advanced-temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications of that alloy with various C and Hf concentrations were produced as cross-rolled disks from prealloyed powder that was hot isostatically compacted. The mechanical properties, microstructures, and phase relations of the alloys are discussed in terms of their C and Hf concentrations. A low-C and high-Hf modification of IIB-11 had the best balance of mechanical properties for service below about 750 C. Because of their finer grain sizes, none of the powder-metallurgy alloys produced had the high-temperature rupture strength of conventionally cast and wrought IIB-11.

  14. Distribution of Inclusion-Initiated Fatigue Cracking in Powder Metallurgy Udimet 720 Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Barrie, Robert; Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of extrinsic surface damage, the fatigue life of metals is often dictated by the distribution of intrinsic defects. In powder metallurgy (PM) alloys, relatively large defects occur rarely enough that a typical characterization with a limited number of small volume fatigue test specimens will not adequately sample inclusion-initiated damage. Counterintuitively, inclusion-initiated failure has a greater impact on the distribution in PM alloy fatigue lives because they tend to have fewer defects than their cast and wrought counterparts. Although the relative paucity of defects in PM alloys leads to higher mean fatigue lives, the distribution in observed lives tends to be broader. In order to study this important failure initiation mechanism without expending an inordinate number of specimens, a study was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center where known populations of artificial inclusions (seeds) were introduced to production powder. Fatigue specimens were machined from forgings produced from the seeded powder. Considerable effort has been expended in characterizing the crack growth rate from inclusion-initiated cracks in seeded PM alloys. A rotating and translating positioning system, with associated software, was devised to map the surface inclusions in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) test bars and to monitor the crack growth from these inclusions. The preceding graph illustrates the measured extension in fatigue cracks from inclusions on a seeded LCF test bar subjected to cyclic loading at a strain range of 0.8 percent and a strain ratio (max/min) of zero. Notice that the observed inclusions fall into three categories: some do not propagate at all (arrest), some propagate with a decreasing crack growth rate, and a few propagate at increasing rates that can be modeled by fracture mechanics. The following graph shows the measured inclusion-initiated crack growth rates from 10 interrupted LCF tests plotted against stress intensities calculated for semi

  15. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  16. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  17. Rapid Synthesis of a Near-β Titanium Alloy by Blended Elemental Powder Metallurgy (BEPM) with Induction Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Gabbitas, Brian

    2015-10-01

    A near-β Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al alloy was produced by blended elemental powder metallurgy combining warm compaction and induction sintering. Two Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al powder compacts with different oxygen content were manufactured by mixing PREP and HDH Ti powders with Cr and AlV master alloy powders, respectively. The effect of isothermal holding time, at a sintering temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C), on pore characteristics and compositional homogeneity was investigated in this study. Pore coarsening by Ostwald ripening occurred with an increase in the isothermal holding time and Kirkendall voids were produced by a reaction between Ti and Cr. After an isothermal holding time of 10 minutes, the two sintered powder compacts had a homogeneous composition. Ti/AlV and Ti/Cr diffusion couples were used to predict the distribution of alloying elements, and the binary Ti-V, Ti-Al, and Ti-Cr interdiffusion coefficients were consistent with the distribution of alloying elements after isothermal holding. The mechanical properties of sintered powder compacts, prepared using PREP Ti powder as the raw powder, were optimized by sintered density and pore size.

  18. Phase Transformation Behavior of Porous TiNi Alloys Produced by Powder Metallurgy Using Magnesium as a Space Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydoğmuş, Tarik; Bor, Elif Tarhan; Bor, Şakir

    2011-09-01

    Porous TiNi alloys with porosities in the range of 51 to 73 pct were prepared successfully applying a new powder metallurgy fabrication route in which magnesium was used as a space holder, resulting in either single austenite phase or a mixture of austenite and martensite phases dictated by the composition of the starting powders, but entirely free from secondary brittle intermetallics, oxides, nitrides, and carbonitrides. Since transformation temperatures are very sensitive to composition, deformation, and oxidation, for the first time, transformation temperatures of porous TiNi alloys were investigated using chemically homogeneous specimens in as-sintered and aged conditions eliminating secondary phase, contamination, and deformation effects. It was found that the porosity content of the foams has no influence on the phase transformation temperatures both in as-sintered and aged conditions, while deformation, oxidation, and aging treatment are severely influential.

  19. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(d-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240–260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180–210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time. PMID:26837848

  20. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240-260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180-210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time.

  1. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(d-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240-260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180-210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time. PMID:26837848

  2. Shape memory characteristics of powder metallurgy processed Ti50Ni50 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon-wook; Jeon, Kyung-su

    Ti50Ni50 shape memory alloy powders were prepared by inert gas atomization and the powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) to fabricated dense bulk samples. Martensitic transformation temperatures and microstructures of the asatomized powders and the consolidated disks were investigated. DSC and XRD analysis showed that the B2-B19' martensitic transformation occurred in the powders and the disks. The martensitic transformation start temperature (Ms) of the powders was 22.9∘ C. However, the Ms of the SPS disk was 65.9∘ C. It is considered that this increase in transformation temperature is ascribed to the microstructural change during SPS processing.

  3. Using Microwave-Assisted Powder Metallurgy Route and Nano-size Reinforcements to Develop High-Strength Solder Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nai, S. M. L.; Kuma, J. V. M.; Alam, M. E.; Zhong, X. L.; Babaghorbani, P.; Gupta, M.

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, Sn-0.7Cu and Sn-3.5Ag lead-free solders used in the electronics packaging industry were reinforced with different volume percentages of nano-size alumina and tin oxide particulates, respectively, to synthesize two new sets of nanocomposites. These composites were developed using microwave-assisted powder metallurgy route followed by extrusion. The effects of addition of particulates on the physical, microstructural, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Mechanical properties (microhardness, 0.2% YS, and UTS) for both composite systems increase with the presence of particulates. The best tensile strength was realized for composite solders reinforced with 1.5 vol.% alumina and 0.7 vol.% tin oxide particulates, which far exceeds the strength of eutectic Sn-Pb solder. The morphology of pores was observed to be one of the most dominating factors affecting the strength of materials.

  4. Mechanical strength and thermophysical properties of PM212: A high temperature self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Phillip M.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Martineau, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A powder metallurgy composite, PM212, composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and solid lubricants is shown to be self-lubricating to a maximum application temperature of 900 C. The high temperature compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity data needed to design PM212 sliding contact bearings and seals are reported for sintered and isostatically pressed (HIPed) versions of PM212. Other properties presented are room temperature density, hardness, and elastic modulus. In general, both versions appear to have adequate strength to be considered as sliding contact bearing materials, but the HIPed version, which is fully dense, is much stronger than the sintered version which contains about 20 percent pore volume. The sintered material is less costly to make, but the HIPed version is better where high compressive strength is important.

  5. The wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, H.; Özyurek, D.; Yıldırım, M.; Bostan, B.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route were investigated. Different amount of Ti (2, 4, 6 %) added to gas atomized 7075 Al alloy powders and they were mixed in turbula with 47rpm for 45 minutes. Then the mixed powders were pre-shaped by press under 600 MPa pressure. The samples were cooled in the furnace after sintered at 580 °C for 4 hours in the atmosphere controlled furnace. Standard metallographic process such as grinding, polishing and etching were applied to sintered samples. The hardness values were measured. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) examines were carried out. The wear tests were performed in a pin-on disc type wear apparatus with 1 ms-1 sliding speed at six different sliding distance (500-3000 m) under 30 N loads. As a result of studies, hardness values were increased with increasing Ti content, in addition the weight losses were decreased with increasing Ti amount.

  6. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Effects of MgO Nano Particles on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite prepared via Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghchesara, Mohammad Amin; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Baharvandi, Hamid Reza

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties of Al/nano MgO composite prepared via powder metallurgy method. Pure atomized aluminum powder with an average particle size of 1μm and MgO particulate with an average particle size between 60 to 80 nm were used. Composites containing 1.5, 2.5 and 5 percent of volume fraction of MgO were prepared by powder metallurgy method. The specimens were pressed by Cold Isostatic Press machine (CIP), subsequently were sintered at 575, 600 and 625°C. After sintering and preparing the samples, mechanical properties were measured. The results of microstructure, compression and hardness tests indicated that addition of MgO particulates to aluminum matrix composites improves the mechanical properties.

  8. A Novel Powder Metallurgy Processing Approach to Prepare Fine-Grained Cu-Al-Ni Shape-Memory Alloy Strips from Elemental Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpai, S. K.; Dube, R. K.; Chatterjee, P.; Sangal, S.

    2012-07-01

    The current work describes the experimental results related to the successful preparation of fine-grained, Cu-Al-Ni, high-temperature shape-memory alloy (SMA) strips from elemental Cu, Al, and Ni powders via a novel powder metallurgy (P/M) processing approach. This route consists of short time period ball milling of elemental powder mixture, preform preparation from milled powder, sintering of preforms, hot-densification rolling of unsheathed sintered powder preforms under protective atmosphere, and postconsolidation homogenization treatment of the hot-rolled strips. It has been shown that it is possible to prepare chemically homogeneous Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips consisting of equiaxed grains of average size approximately 6 μm via the current processing approach. It also has been shown that fine-grained microstructure in the finished Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips resulted from the pinning effect of nanosized alumina particles present on the grain boundaries. The finished SMA strips were almost fully martensitic in nature, consisting of a mixture of β1^' } - and γ1^' } -type martensites. The Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips had 677 MPa average fracture strength, coupled with 13 pct average fracture strain. The fractured surfaces of the specimens exhibited primarily dimpled ductile type of fracture, together with some transgranular mode of fracture. The Cu-Al-Ni strips exhibited an almost 100 pct one-way shape recovery after bending followed by unconstrained heating at 1, 2, and 4 pct applied deformation prestrain. The two-way shape-memory strain was found approximately 0.35 pct after 15 training cycles at 4 pct applied training prestrain.

  9. Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Andrew Douglas

    Gas atomized magnesium powders are critical for the production of a wide variety of flares, tracer projectiles, and other munitions for the United States military, along with a growing number of applications in both alloying and powder metallurgy. Gas atomization of magnesium is performed by numerous companies worldwide, but represents a single point failure within the United States as there is only one domestic producer. These powders are pyrophoric and must be handled carefully and kept dry at all times. Recent studies have explored the ability of certain fluorine containing cover gases to protect molten magnesium in casting operations from excessive vaporization and burning by modifying the native oxide (MgO) through interaction with these gas atmospheres. The present study sought to adapt this melt protection strategy for use as an in-situ passivation technique that could be employed to form a protective reaction film during gas atomization of magnesium powders. This fluorinated oxide shell was intended to provide superior coverage and adherence to the underlying metal, which may improve the ability of powders to resist ignition at elevated temperatures and during powder handling. Two candidate gases were tested in this research, SF6 and NF3, and reaction films of both were produced on miniature melt samples in a controlled environment and characterized using auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultimately, SF6 was chosen to conduct a small scale magnesium atomization experiment for verification of the fluorination reaction and to experimentally test the ignition temperature of these coated particles compared to other magnesium powders available today. This novel passivation technique was found to be far superior to magnesium's native oxide at resisting ignition and, thus, to reduce the hazard associated with handling and transport of magnesium powders for defense applications. If fully commercialized, this passivation method also

  10. Processing condition for the development of cube texture in Ni and Ni alloy tapes fabricated by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bong Ki; Lee, Dong-Wook; Kim, Min-Woo; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Pyeong Yeal; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2004-10-01

    Bi-axially textured Ni, Ni-W (1, 3 and 5 at.%) and Ni-Cu alloy tapes for YBCO coated conductors were fabricated by powder metallurgy process including powder compaction, cold isostatic pressing, cold rolling and recrystallization heat treatment. The rod-like Ni and Ni alloy compacts were sintered at 1100 °C for 6 h in 96% Ar-4% H 2 atmosphere. The sintered Ni and Ni-W rods were successfully cold-rolled into thin tapes of 80-100 μm thickness with 5% reduction at each path, but the Ni-Cu alloy rods with Cu content less than 20 at.% were made into tapes. The Ni and Ni alloy tapes were heat-treated at 800-1200 °C for the development of cube texture. The good (2 0 0) texture was obtained for both Ni and Ni-W alloy tapes, while it was obtained only for the Ni-Cu tapes with low Cu contents. The W and Cu addition to Ni improved the mechanical properties by solid solution hardening. Critical current density ( Jc) of YBCO film deposited on the CeO 2/YSZ/CeO 2(CYC)/Ni template was 0.25 MA/cm 2 at 77 K and self-field.

  11. Effect of Cu addition on the martensitic transformation of powder metallurgy processed Ti–Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-wook; Choi, Eunsoo

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • M{sub s} of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders is 22 °C, while M{sub s} of SPS-sintered porous bulk increases up to 50 °C. • M{sub s} of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 40}Cu{sub 20} porous bulk is only 2 °C higher than that of the powders. • Recovered stain of porous TiNi and TiNiCu alloy is more than 1.5%. - Abstract: Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} powders were prepared by gas atomization and their transformation behaviors were examined by means of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. One-step B2–B19’ transformation occurred in Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders, while Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} powders showed B2–B19 transformation behavior. Porous bulks with 24% porosity were fabricated by spark plasma sintering. The martensitic transformation start temperature (50 °C) of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} porous bulk is much higher than that (22 °C) of the as-solidified powders. However, the martensitic transformation start temperature (35 °C) of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} porous bulk is almost the same as that (33 °C) of the powders. When the specimens were compressed to the strain of 8% and then unloaded, the residual strains of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} alloy bulks were 3.95 and 3.7%, respectively. However, these residual strains were recovered up to 1.7% after heating by the shape memory phenomenon.

  12. The combination of precipitation and dispersion hardening in powder metallurgy produced Cu-Ti-Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozic, D.; Dimcic, O.; Dimcic, B. Cvijovic, I.; Rajkovic, V.

    2008-08-15

    Microstructure and microhardness properties of precipitation hardened Cu-Ti and precipitation/dispersion hardened Cu-Ti-Si alloys have been analyzed. Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} (wt.%) atomized powders were characterized before and after consolidation by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing). Rapidly solidified powders and HIP-ed compacts were subsequently subjected to thermal treatment in hydrogen at temperatures between 300 and 600 deg. C. Compared to Cu-Ti powder particles and compacts, obtained by the same procedure, the strengthening effect in Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} powder particles and compacts was much greater. The binary and ternary powders both reveal properties superior to those of Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} compacts. Microhardness analysis as a function of the aging temperature of Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} alloy shows an interaction between precipitation and dispersion hardening which offers possibilities for an application at elevated temperatures.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Mg2Si/Mg Composites via Powder Metallurgy Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi; Yuasa, Eiji; Aizawa, Tatsuhiko

    The mechanical properties of the Mg2Si/Mg composites solid-state synthesized from the mixed Mg-Si powders have been investigated. The macro-hardness (HRE) and the tensile strength of the composites increase with increasing the Si content and decreasing the Si size. The particle size of the synthesized Mg2Si depends on the initial Si size; the mechanical properties of the Mg2Si/Mg composite are remarkably improved by using fine Si particles or by decreasing the grain size of Mg matrix grains when the powder mixture was prepared via bulk mechanical alloying process.

  14. Stress-strain behavior and shape memory effect in powder metallurgy TiNi alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, H.; Koyari, T.; Miura, S. . Dept. of Engineering Science); Tokizane, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The shape memory properties of the TiNi alloy produced by a powder metallurgical method have been evaluated from tensile stress-strain curves. The contamination of the powders during atomization can be suppressed by applying the Plasma Rotating Electrode Process (P-REP), so that the compact made by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is expected to exhibit the shape memory effect identical to the typical alloy grown from melt. The fracture behavior of the P/M alloy is also studied, and the improvement of fracture strength of the P/M alloy is attempted.

  15. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  16. Fatigue Performance of Powder Metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: A Critical Analysis of Current Fatigue Data and Metallurgical Approaches for Improving Fatigue Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Ravi Chandran, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive assessment of fatigue performance of powder metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V alloy, manufactured using various powder-based processing approaches to-date, is performed in this work. The focus is on PM processes that use either blended element (BE) or pre-alloyed (PA) powder as feedstock. Porosity and the microstructure condition have been found to be the two most dominant material variables that control the fatigue strength. The evaluation reveals that the fatigue performance of PM Ti-6Al-4V, in the as-sintered state, is far lower than that in the wrought condition. This is largely caused by residual porosity, even if it is present in small amounts, or, by the coarse lamellar colony microstructure. The fatigue strength is significantly improved by the closure of pores, and it approaches the levels of wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloys, after hot-isostatic-pressing (HIPing). Further thermo-mechanical and heat treatments lead to additional increases in fatigue strength-in one case, a high fatigue strength level, exceeding that of the mill-annealed condition, was achieved. The work identifies the powder, process and microstructure improvements that are necessary for achieving high fatigue strength in powder metallurgical Ti-6Al-4V alloys in order for them to effectively compete with wrought forms. The present findings, gathered from the traditional titanium powder metallurgy, are also directly applicable to additively manufactured titanium, because of the similarities in pores, defects, and microstructures between the two manufacturing processes.

  17. Development of superalloys by powder metallurgy for use at 1000 - 1400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    Consolidated powders of four nickel-base superalloys were studied for potential application as compressor and turbine discs in jet engines. All of the alloys were based on the Rene' 95 chemistry. Three of these had variations in carbon and A12O3 contents, and the fourth alloy was chemically modified to a higher volume fraction. The A12O3 was added by preoxidation of the powders prior to extrusion. Various levels of four experimental factors (1) alloy composition, (2) grain size, (3) thermomechanical processing, and (4) room temperature deformation plus final age were evaluated by tensile and stress rupture testing at 1200 F. Various levels of the four factors were assumed in order to construct the statistically-designed experiment, but the actual levels investigated were established in preliminary studies that preceded the statistical process development study.

  18. Development of Rare-Earth Free Mn-Al Permanent Magnet Employing Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Shyam, R.; Upadhyay, N. K.; Dhar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Most widely used high-performance permanent magnets are currently based on intermetallics of rare-earths in combination with Fe and Co. Rare-earth elements required for these magnets are getting expensive by the day. Consequently, there is a thrust worldwide to develop economical rare-earth free permanent magnets. It is acknowledged that the phase in Mn-Al alloys possesses magnetic properties without the presence of ferromagnetic elements such as Fe, Co, and Ni. In the present study, we report the synthesis of magnetic phase of Mn54Al46 alloy synthesized using mechanical alloying followed by solutionizing and annealing to obtain the desired magnetic phase. It is well known that Al dissolves partially in Mn matrix hence supersaturated solid solution of Mn54Al46 alloy powder was obtained by mechanical alloying using a planetary high-energy ball mill. For this purpose elemental Mn and Al powders were ball-milled in Argon atmosphere at 400 rpm using stainless steel bowl with ball to powder ratio of 15:1. These mechanically alloyed Mn54Al46 powders were then consolidated using spark plasma sintering at 550°C for 20 min. followed by solution treatment at 1050°C for 5 hrs and then water quenched to retain high temperature phase. Subsequently, the Mn54Al46 samples were annealed in the temperature range 450°C-650°C to obtain the magnetic phase. These samples were characterized by XRD and SEM and the magnetic properties were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was observed that the magnetization and coercivity of MnAl magnets exhibited strong dependence on annealing temperature and annealing time.

  19. Modeling the Constitutive Relationship of Powder Metallurgy Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr Alloy During Hot Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Lianxi; Ren, Junshuai

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, the isothermal compression tests of PM alloy Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr were carried out in the temperature range of 950-1200 °C. A Gleeble 1500D thermosimulation machine was used, and samples were tested at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 10-1 s-1. Based on the obtained flow stress curves, the hot deformation behavior was presented. The constitutive relationship of powder metallurgy (PM) Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr alloy was developed using an Arrhenius-type constitutive model that involves strain compensation in addition to an artificial neural network model. The accuracy and reliability of the developed models were quantified in terms of statistical parameters such as correlation coefficient and absolute value of relative error. It was found that deformation temperature and strain rate have obvious effects on the flow characteristics, and the flow stress increases with the increasing strain rate and the decreasing temperature. Moreover, the proposed models possess excellent prediction capability of flow stresses for the present alloy during hot deformation. Compared with the traditional Arrhenius-type model, the backpropagation neural network model is more accurate when presenting the isothermal compressing deformation behavior at elevated temperatures for PM Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr alloy.

  20. An Investigation of High-Temperature Precipitation in Powder-Metallurgy, Gamma/Gamma-Prime Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Kim, S.-L.; Zhang, F.; Tiley, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    The high-temperature-precipitation behavior of a typical powder-metallurgy, gamma-gamma-prime, nickel-base superalloy (LSHR) was determined and used to develop and validate a quantitative fast-acting model. To this end, a series of experiments comprising supersolvus solution treatment followed by continuous cooling at rates typical of those experienced during the manufacture of full-scale components was conducted for LSHR. The nucleation and growth of secondary-gamma-prime precipitates were deduced via metallography on samples water quenched at various temperatures during the cooling cycle. Further insight on nucleation and the extent of retained supersaturation during cooling was obtained from in situ synchrotron (X-ray diffraction) experiments involving cooling of LSHR samples at identical rates with or without a hold time at an intermediate temperature. The observations were interpreted using a fast-acting (spreadsheet) model which incorporated the important aspects of classical, homogeneous-nucleation theory and growth by bulk diffusion. In this regard, particular attention was paid to the determination of model input parameters such as the composition, free energy of formation, and surface energy of precipitates, and an effective diffusivity; the values so determined contrasted with those from existing thermodynamic and diffusion databases. It was demonstrated that fast-acting-model calculations based on a nickel-chromium pseudo-binary system gave good agreement with measurements of the evolution of precipitate volume fraction, number density, and size during continuous cooling.

  1. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms in an Ultrafine Grained Al-Mg-Sc Alloy Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Tammy J. Harrell; Troy D. Topping; Haiming Wen; Tao Hu; JULIE M. SCHOENUNG; ENRIQUE J. LAVERNIA

    2014-12-01

    Additions of Sc to an Al-Mg matrix were investigated, paying particular attention to the influence of Al3Sc precipitates and other dispersoids, as well as grain size, on mechanical behavior. Prior studies have shown that Sc significantly increases the strength of coarse-grained Al-Mg alloys. Prompted by these findings, we hypothesized that it would be of fundamental and technological interest to study the behavior of Sc additions to an ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure (e.g., 100’s nm). Accordingly, we investigated the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of a cryomilled ultrafine grained Al-5Mg-0.4Sc (wt pct) and compared the results to those of an equivalent fine-grained material (FG) produced by powder metallurgy. Experimental materials were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP’ing) followed by extrusion or dual mode dynamic forging. Under identical processing conditions, UFG materials generate large Al3Sc precipitates with an average diameter of 154 nm and spaced approximately 1 to 3 µm apart, while precipitates in the FG materials have a diameter of 24 nm and are spaced 50 to 200 nm apart. The strengthening mechanisms are calculated for all materials and it is determined that the greatest strengthening contributions for the UFG and FG materials are Mg-O/N dispersion strengthening and precipitate strengthening, respectively.

  2. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  3. Effect of reduced cobalt contents on hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy U-700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of reducing the cobalt content of prealloyed powders of UDIMET 700 (U-700) alloys to 12.7, 8.6, 4.3, and 0% was examined. The powders were hot isostatically pressed into billets, which were given heat treatments appropriate for turbine disks, namely partial solutioning at temperatures below the gamma prime solvus and four step aging treatments. Chemical analyses, metallographic examinations, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the materials. Minor effects on gamma prime content and on room temperature and 650 C tensile properties were observed. Creep rupture lives at 650 C reached a maximum at the 8.4% concentration, while at 760 C a maximum in life was reached at the 4.3% cobalt level. Minimum creep rates increased with decreasing cobalt content at both test temperatures. Extended exposures at 760 and 815 C resulted in decreased tensile strengths and rupture lives for all alloys. Evidence of sigma phase formation was also found.

  4. Study of the mechanical stability and bioactivity of Bioglass(®) based glass-ceramic scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technology.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Elena; Melli, Virginia; Catignoli, Gabriele; Altomare, Lina; Jahromi, Maryam Tavafoghi; Cerruti, Marta; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; De Nardo, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Large bone defects are challenging to heal, and often require an osteoconductive and stable support to help the repair of damaged tissue. Bioglass-based scaffolds are particularly promising for this purpose due to their ability to stimulate bone regeneration. However, processing technologies adopted so far do not allow for the synthesis of scaffolds with suitable mechanical properties. Also, conventional sintering processes result in glass de-vitrification, which generates concerns about bioactivity. In this work, we studied the bioactivity and the mechanical properties of Bioglass(®) based scaffolds, produced via a powder technology inspired process. The scaffolds showed compressive strengths in the range of 5-40 MPa, i.e. in the upper range of values reported so far for these materials, had tunable porosity, in the range between 55 and 77%, and pore sizes that are optimal for bone tissue regeneration (100-500 μm). We immersed the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 d and analyzed the evolution of the scaffold mechanical properties and microstructure. Even if, after sintering, partial de-vitrification occurred, immersion in SBF caused ion release and the formation of a Ca-P coating within 2 d, which reached a thickness of 10-15 μm after 28 d. This coating contained both hydroxyapatite and an amorphous background, indicating microstructural amorphization of the base material. Scaffolds retained a good compressive strength and structural integrity also after 28 d of immersion (6 MPa compressive strength). The decrease in mechanical properties was mainly related to the increase in porosity, caused by its dissolution, rather than to the amorphization process and the formation of a Ca-P coating. These results suggest that Bioglass(®) based scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technique are excellent candidates for bone regeneration applications. PMID:26836444

  5. Precipitation in cold-rolled Al–Sc–Zr and Al–Mn–Sc–Zr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlach, M.; Stulikova, I.; Smola, B.; Kekule, T.; Kudrnova, H.; Danis, S.; Gemma, R.; Ocenasek, V.; Malek, J.; Tanprayoon, D.; Neubert, V.

    2013-12-15

    The effects of cold-rolling on thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, microstructure and recrystallization behaviour of the AlScZr and AlMnScZr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy were studied. The powder was produced by atomising in argon with 1% oxygen and then consolidated by hot extrusion at 350 °C. The electrical resistometry and microhardness together with differential scanning calorimetry measurements were compared with microstructure development observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction. Fine (sub)grain structure developed and fine coherent Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles precipitated during extrusion at 350 °C in the alloys studied. Additional precipitation of the Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles and/or their coarsening was slightly facilitated by the previous cold rolling. The presence of Sc,Zr-containing particles has a significant antirecrystallization effect that prevents recrystallization at temperatures minimally up to 420 °C. The precipitation of the Al{sub 6}Mn- and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particles of a size ∼ 1.0 μm at subgrain boundaries has also an essential antirecrystallization effect and totally suppresses recrystallization during 32 h long annealing at 550 °C. The texture development of the alloys seems to be affected by high solid solution strengthening by Mn. The precipitation of the Mn-containing alloy is highly enhanced by a cold rolling. The apparent activation energy of the Al{sub 3}Sc particles formation and/or coarsening and that of the Al{sub 6}Mn and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particle precipitation in the powder and in the compacted alloys were determined. The cold deformation has no effect on the apparent activation energy values of the Al{sub 3}Sc-phase and the Al{sub 6}Mn-phase precipitation. - Highlights: • The Mn, Sc and Zr additions to Al totally suppresses recrystallization at 550 °C. • The Sc,Zr-containing particle

  6. Fatigue behavior of highly porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy with temporary space holders.

    PubMed

    Özbilen, Sedat; Liebert, Daniela; Beck, Tilmann; Bram, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Porous titanium cylinders were produced with a constant amount of temporary space holder (70 vol.%). Different interstitial contents were achieved by varying the starting powders (HDH vs. gas atomized) and manufacturing method (cold compaction without organic binders vs. warm compaction of MIM feedstocks). Interstitial contents (O, C, and N) as a function of manufacturing were measured by chemical analysis. Samples contained 0.34-0.58 wt.% oxygen, which was found to have the greatest effect on mechanical properties. Quasi-static mechanical tests under compression at low strain rate were used for reference and to define parameters for cyclic compression tests. Not unexpectedly, increased oxygen content increased the yield strength of the porous titanium. Cyclic compression fatigue tests were conducted using sinusoidal loading in a servo-hydraulic testing machine. Increased oxygen content was concomitant with embrittlement of the titanium matrix, resulting in significant reduction of compression cycles before failure. For samples with 0.34 wt.% oxygen, R, σ(min) and σ(max) were varied systematically to estimate the fatigue limit (~4 million cycles). Microstructural changes induced by cyclic loading were then characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and EBSD. PMID:26706551

  7. The effect of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of a Cu/CNT nanocomposite prepared via a powder metallurgy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh Pham, Van; Thang Bui, Hung; Tran, Bao Trung; Nguyen, Van Tu; Quang Le, Dinh; Tinh Than, Xuan; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Phuong Doan, Dinh; Phan, Ngoc Minh

    2011-03-01

    Metal matrix nanocomposites have become popular in industrial applications. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), since theirs appearance, with their unique properties such as exceptionally small diameters and high Young's modulus, tensile strength and high chemical stability, are considered to be an attractive reinforcement material for lightweight and high-strength metallic matrix composites. The powder metallurgy method allows nanocomposite materials, notably metal–ceramic composites, to be produced by sintering a mixture of powders. In this study, we have utilized the powder metallurgy method to fabricate a Cu/CNT nanocomposite. Sintering is the important process in this method; it is the process whereby powder compacts are heated so that adjacent particles fuse together. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of sintering temperature on the mechanical properties of the Cu/CNT nanocomposite. The sintering temperature was in the range of 850–950 °C for 2 h. A correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties, including the microstructure, density, hardness and compressive strength, is established. In this process, the density, and the physical and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites, can be changed, depending on the rate of sintering as well as the sintering temperature.

  8. Characterization of Plastic Flow Pertinent to the Evolution of Bulk Residual Stress in Powder-Metallurgy, Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Fagin, P. N.; Goetz, R. L.; Furrer, D. U.; Dutton, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    The plastic-flow behavior which controls the formation of bulk residual stresses during final heat treatment of powder-metallurgy (PM), nickel-base superalloys was quantified using conventional (isothermal) stress-relaxation (SR) tests and a novel approach which simulates concurrent temperature and strain transients during cooling following solution treatment. The concurrent cooling/straining test involves characterization of the thermal compliance of the test sample. In turn, this information is used to program the ram-displacement- vs-time profile to impose a constant plastic strain rate during cooling. To demonstrate the efficacy of the new approach, SR tests (in both tension and compression) and concurrent cooling/tension-straining experiments were performed on two PM superalloys, LSHR and IN-100. The isothermal SR experiments were conducted at a series of temperatures between 1144 K and 1436 K (871 °C and 1163 °C) on samples that had been supersolvus solution treated and cooled slowly or rapidly to produce starting microstructures comprising coarse gamma grains and coarse or fine secondary gamma-prime precipitates, respectively. The concurrent cooling/straining tests comprised supersolvus solution treatment and various combinations of subsequent cooling rate and plastic strain rate. Comparison of flow-stress data from the SR and concurrent cooling/straining tests showed some similarities and some differences which were explained in the context of the size of the gamma-prime precipitates and the evolution of dislocation substructure. The magnitude of the effect of concurrent deformation during cooling on gamma-prime precipitation was also quantified experimentally and theoretically.

  9. Oxidation and the Effects of High Temperature Exposures on Notched Fatigue Life of an Advanced Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Draper, Susan L.; Gorman, Timothy T.; Telesman, Jack; Gab, Timothy P.; Hull, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation and the effects of high temperature exposures on notched fatigue life were considered for a powder metallurgy processed supersolvus heat-treated ME3 disk superalloy. The isothermal static oxidation response at 704 C, 760 C, and 815 C was consistent with other chromia forming nickel-based superalloys: a TiO2-Cr2O3 external oxide formed with a branched Al2O3 internal subscale that extended into a recrystallized - dissolution layer. These surface changes can potentially impact disk durability, making layer growth rates important. Growth of the external scales and dissolution layers followed a cubic rate law, while Al2O3 subscales followed a parabolic rate law. Cr- rich M23C6 carbides at the grain boundaries dissolved to help sustain Cr2O3 growth to depths about 12 times thicker than the scale. The effect of prior exposures was examined through notched low cycle fatigue tests performed to failure in air at 704 C. Prior exposures led to pronounced debits of up to 99 % in fatigue life, where fatigue life decreased inversely with exposure time. Exposures that produced roughly equivalent 1 m thick external scales at the various isotherms showed statistically equivalent fatigue lives, establishing that surface damage drives fatigue debit, not exposure temperature. Fractographic evaluation indicated the failure mode for the pre-exposed specimens involved surface crack initiations that shifted with exposure from predominately single intergranular initiations with transgranular propagation to multi-initiations from the cracked external oxide with intergranular propagation. Weakened grain boundaries at the surface resulting from the M23C6 carbide dissolution are partially responsible for the intergranular cracking. Removing the scale and subscale while leaving a layer where M23C6 carbides were dissolved did not lead to a significant fatigue life improvement, however, also removing the M23C6 carbide dissolution layer led to nearly full recovery of life, with a

  10. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  11. Electrostatic Detection of Density Variations in Green-State Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Georg; Ludwig, Reinhold

    2003-03-01

    Producing P/M compacts is generally a low-cost, high-volume manufacturing effort with very special quality assurance requirements. When considering the three basic P/M steps of mixing, compacting, and sintering, it is the compaction process producing the green-state parts that offer the highest pay-off for quality control through nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. A detection of compacting-related problems in the green-state samples permits early process intervention, and thus prevents the creation of potentially significant numbers of faulty parts. Work at WPI currently has concentrated on extending the previously developed method for crack detections to measure density variations within the parts. In this paper a physical model and a mathematical formulation are reported that are capable of relating green-state density to electric conductivity for various lubricant concentrations. Electrostatic measurements of cylindrical compacts have so far confirmed the theoretical model assumptions. Specifically, the green-state conductivity increases as the sample density increases up to approximately 6.9 - 7.0 g/ccm. Any further density increase results in a decrease in conductivity. Preliminary measurements with a range of cylindrical samples support the theoretical model.

  12. The effect of space holder content and decomposition methods in fabrication of aluminum foams by powder metallurgy method using carbamide space holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirah, A. H.; Nurulakmal, M. S.; Anasyida, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of space holder amount and decomposition methods on the morphology, density and porosity and compressive properties of aluminum foams were investigated. Aluminum foam was fabricated by powder metallurgy method using spherical carbamide as space holder using three different decomposition method of carbamide includes; dissolution process, normal sintering process and two step sintering process. Aluminum foam with 60 wt.% carbamide has the lowest density and exhibited the highest porosity for all the decomposition. The results indicated that Al foams produced by dissolution method have the highest compressive properties with acceptable density and porosity value.

  13. Development of cube textured Ni 5at.%W alloy substrates for YBCO coated conductor application using a powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-S.; Tak, J.-S.; Bae, S.-Y.; Chung, J.-K.; Ahn, I.-S.; Kim, C.-J.; Kim, K.-W.; Cho, K.-K.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, Ni-5at.%W alloy substrate for YBCO coated conductor was fabricated by a dry powder metallurgy process including powder compaction, cold isostatic pressing (CIP), cold rolling and annealing for recrystallization. Ni and W powders were ball-milled at this process for various times of 10, 30, 50 and 100 h in argon atmosphere. The rod-like Ni-W alloy compacts were sintered at 1150 °C for 1 h in 96%Ar-4%H2 atmosphere. The sintered rods were cold rolling into thin tape of 70-90 μm thickness with 5% reduction at each path. The Ni-W alloy tapes were annealed at 800-1200 °C in an atmosphere of 96%Ar-4%H2 mixing gas for the development of cube texture. The tape with the best properties of low surface roughness, small grain size and strong cube texture was obtained at the condition annealed at 1200 °C using ball-milled powder for 30 min. The W addition to Ni improved the mechanical properties by solid solution hardening and inhibited grain growth for annealing heat treatment. The tapes were characterized by X-ray pole-figure, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  14. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual-Phase, Precipitation-Hardened, Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. L.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual-phase, precipitation-hardened, powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels, and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 811 K (538 °C) in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite nanohardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties.

  15. Enhancement on wettability and intermetallic compound formation with an addition of Al on Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder fabricated via powder metallurgy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adli, Nisrin; Razak, Nurul Razliana Abdul; Saud, Norainiza

    2016-07-01

    Due to the toxicity of lead (Pb), the exploration of another possibility for lead-free solder is necessary. Nowadays, SnCu alloys are being established as one of the lead-free solder alternatives. In this study, Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder with an addition of 1wt% and 5wt% Al were investigated by using powder metallurgy method. The effect of Al addition on the wettability and intermetallic compound thickness (IMC) of Sn-0.7Cu-Al lead-free solder were appraised. Results showed that Al having a high potential to enhance Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder due to its good wetting and reduction of IMC thickness. The contact angle and IMC of the Sn-0.7Cu-Al lead-free solder were decreased by 14.32% and 40% as the Al content increased from 1 wt% to 5 wt%.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. High damping Al-Fe-Mo-Si/Zn-Al composites produced by rapidly solidified powder metallurgy process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.Y.; Dai, S.L.; Chai, S.C.; Li, Y.R.

    2000-05-10

    The metallic materials commonly used in aircraft and aerospace fields, such as aluminum and titanium alloys, steels, etc., show extremely low damping capacity (usually of the order of or less than 10{sup {minus}3}). Thus, some problems related to vibration may emerge and influence the reliability, safety and life of airplanes, satellites, etc. It has been reported that almost two thirds of errors for rockets and satellites are related to vibration and noise. One effective way to solve these vibration-related problems is to adopt high damping metallic materials. Conventional high damping alloys exhibit damping capacity above 10{sup {minus}2}, however, their densities are usually great than 5 x 10{sup 3} kg m{sup {minus}3}, or their strengths are less than 200 MPa (for alloys based on dislocation damping), making them impossible to be applied to aircraft and aerospace areas. Recently, some low-density high-damping metal/metal composites based on aluminum and high damping alloys have been developed in Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials (BIAM) by the rapidly solidified power metallurgy process. This paper aims to report the properties of the composites based on a high temperature Al-Fe-Mo-Si alloy and a high damping Zn-Al alloy, and compare them with that of 2618-T61 alloy produced by the ingot metallurgy process.

  18. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution. PMID:27040264

  1. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Cmpendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Shape memory characteristics and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy processed Ti50Ni40Cu10 alloy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Wook

    2014-10-01

    Ti-Ni-Cu alloy powders were prepared by gas atomization and porous bulk specimens were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure of as-solidified powders exhibited a cellular structure and they contained a high density of nano-sized porosities which were located in the intercellular regions. XRD analysis showed that one-step martensitic transformation of B2-B19 occurred in all alloy powders and SPS specimens. When the martensitic transformation start temperature (M(s)) and austenite transformation finish temperature (A(f)) were determined in order to analyze the dependence of powder size on transformation temperatures, the M(s) increased slightly from -17.5 degrees C to - 14.6 degrees C as increasing the powder size ranging from between 25 and 50 μm to ranging between 100 and 150 μm. However, the M(s) and A(f) of the as-atomized powders is much smaller than those of SPS specimens and the M(s) of porous specimen was about 10.9 degrees C. Loading-unloading compressive tests were carried out to investigate the mechanical properties of porous Ti-Ni-Cu specimen. The specimen was compressed to the strain of 6% at a temperature higher than A,. After unloading, the residual strain was 2.1%. After the compressed specimen was heated to 60 degrees C and held for 30 minutes and then cooled to room temperature, the changes in the length of the specimens were measured. Then it was found that the recovered strain ascribed to shape memory effect was 1.5%. PMID:25942923

  5. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  6. Consolidation processing parameters and alternative processing methods for powder metallurgy Al-Cu-Mg-X-X alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of varying the vacuum degassing parameters on the microstructure and properties of Al-4Cu-1Mg-X-X (X-X = 1.5Li-0.2Zr or 1.5Fe-0.75Ce) alloys processed from either prealloyed (PA) or mechanically alloyed (M) powder, and consolidated by either using sealed aluminum containers or containerless vacuum hot pressing were studied. The consolidated billets were hot extruded to evaluate microstructure and properties. The MA Li-containing alloy did not include Zr, and the MA Fe- and Ce-containing alloy was made from both elemental and partially prealloyed powder. The alloys were vacuum degassed both above and below the solution heat treatment temperature. While vacuum degassing lowered the hydrogen content of these alloys, the range over which the vacuum degassing parameters were varied was not large enough to cause significant changes in degassing efficiency, and the observed variations in the mechanical properties of the heat treated alloys were attributed to varying contributions to strengthening by the sub-structure and the dispersoids. Mechanical alloying increased the strength over that of alloys of similar composition made from PA powder. The inferior properties in the transverse orientation, especially in the Li-containing alloys, suggested deficiencies in degassing. Among all of the alloys processed for this study, the Fe- and Ce-containing alloys made from MA powder possessed better combinations of strength and toughness.

  7. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šturm, Roman; Štefanikova, Maria; Steiner Petrovič, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  8. Effect of inclusion size on the high cycle fatigue strength and failure mode of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Qu, Xuan-hui; He, Xin-bo; Zhang, Lin

    2012-07-01

    The fatigue strength of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel with two different inclusion size levels, tempered at different temperatures, was investigated by a series of high cycle fatigue tests. It was shown that brittle inclusions with large sizes above 30 μm prompted the occurrence of subsurface crack initiation and the reduction in fatigue strength. The fracture toughness and the stress amplitude both exerted a significant influence on the fish-eye size. A larger fish-eye area would form in the sample with a higher fracture toughness subjected to a lower stress amplitude. The stress intensity factor of the inclusion was found to lie above a typical value of the threshold stress intensity factor of 4 MPa·m1/2. The fracture toughness of the sample with a hardness above HRC 56 could be estimated by the mean value of the stress intensity factor of the fish-eye. According to fractographic evaluation, the critical inclusion size can be calculated by linear fracture mechanics.

  9. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  10. Improvement of stability and absorbability of dry insulin powder for inhalation by powder-combination technique.

    PubMed

    Todo, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Hirokazu; Iida, Kotaro; Danjo, Kazumi

    2004-03-01

    The effect of pulmonary absorption enhancers on the stability of active ingredients is an important factor for successful inhalation therapy as well as the effect on pharmacological activity and safety. We examined the effect of pulmonary absorption enhancers on the stability of insulin in dry powders prepared by a spray-drying technique. Although the hypoglycemic effect was greatly improved when a dry insulin powder containing citric acid (MIC SD) was administered, insulin in the MIC SD was unstable compared with the other powders examined. Bacitracin and Span 85, which are potent pulmonary absorption enhancers of insulin formulated in solutions, showed no deteriorative effect on the stability of dry insulin powder. However, they did not improve the hypoglycemic effect of insulin in dry powders. We modified the insulin dosage form with citric acid to improve the insulin stability at room temperature without loss of hypoglycemic activity. MIC Mix was formulated as a combination of insulin powder (MI') and citric acid powder (MC). MIC Mix showed hypoglycemic activity comparable to MIC SD while the insulin stability was much better than that of MIC SD at a 60 degrees C/dry condition. However, moisture lowered the insulin stability and changed the particle morphology of MIC Mix with time at a 60 degrees C/75% relative humidity condition, suggesting that a package preventing moisture absorption was necessary for the MIC Mix powder. PMID:15129972

  11. Tailoring the microstructure and the mechanical properties of ultrafine grained high strength ferritic steels by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Boulnat, X.; Fabrègue, D.; Perez, M.; de Carlan, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Three model powder materials (i) atomized, (ii) atomized + milled, and, (iii) atomized + milled + alloyed with yttria (Y2O3) and titanium were consolidated within Spark Plasma Sintering device at 850, 950 and 1050°C. Depending on the materials, nanostructured, or even bimodal grain size distribution can be observed. These structures lead to a wide range of mechanical behavior: the tensile strength at room temperature can be tailored from 500 to 1200 MPa with total elongation from 8 to 35%. The bimodal grain size distribution is believed to provide both good yield stress and ductility. Finally, a yield stress model based on the effect of solute atoms, dislocations, grains boundaries and precipitates is presented and it permits to predict accurately the experimental values for all specimens and conditions.

  12. Effects of C and Hf concentration on phase relations and microstructure of a wrought powder-metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    NASA IIB-11, a candidate alloy for advanced temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications with varying C and Hf concentrations were produced from prealloyed powders. Several notable effects of C and Hf concentration in the alloys were observed. Both the amount of the gamma-prime phase and its solvus temperature increased with decreasing C, but only the gamma-prime solvus was affected by Hf, increasing with increasing Hf. Hf also promoted a cellular gamma-prime precipitation. Hf was, however, about equally distributed between gamma-prime and gamma. Hf and C both affected the carbides formed. Increasing both promoted formation of an MC relative to that of an M6C.

  13. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 115 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 97 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. The Influence of Sc and Zr Additions on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Ultrafine Grained Al-Mg Alloys Processed by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, Tammy Jeanne

    Additions of Sc and Zr to an Al-Mg matrix were investigated, paying particular attention to the influence of Al3Sc precipitates and other dispersoids, as well as grain size, on mechanical behavior. Prior studies have shown that Sc and Zr significantly increase the strength of coarse-grained Al-Mg alloys. Prompted by these findings, we hypothesized that it would be of fundamental and technological interest to study the behavior of Sc additions to an ultra-fine-grained (UFG) microstructure (e.g., 100's nm). Accordingly, we investigate the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of four powder metallurgy UFG Al-Mg-Sc-(Zr) compositions and compared the results to those of equivalent fine-grained (FG) compositions - Al-5Mg-0.1Sc, Al-3Mg-0.5Sc, Al-5Mg-0.4Sc and Al-5Mg-0.2Sc-0.2Zr (wt.%). Experimental materials were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP'ing) followed by extrusion or dual mode dynamic (DMD) forging. Under identical processing conditions, UFG ternary Al-5Mg-0.4Sc materials generate large Al3Sc precipitates with an average diameter of 154 nm and spaced approximately 1 - 3 μm apart, while precipitates in the FG materials have an average diameter of 24 nm and are spaced 50 - 200 nm apart. The strengthening mechanisms are quantitatively evaluated for all materials and it is determined that the greatest strengthening contributions for the UFG and FG materials are dispersion strengthening due to the presence of Mg-rich oxides/nitrides and precipitate strengthening, respectively. Preliminary results suggest that replacing 0.2 wt% Sc with Zr results in higher strength, lower ductility and a change in precipitate distribution.

  18. Effect of a supersolvus heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Darryl Slade

    Powder Metallurgy (P/M) processed nickel-base superalloys are used as turbine disk materials in jet engines. The P/M processing results in a homogenous microstructure. Large amounts of strengthening elements can be incorporated into the chemistry of these P/M alloys. In addition, the ability to produce near net-shaped parts with powder consolidation may offer the potential for large cost savings. However, the fatigue properties of P/M superalloys in the as-consolidated form have suffered because of the defect sensitivity of the as-consolidated microstructure. Expensive, thermomechanical steps are necessary to break down defects, so that the P/M parts can be considered defect-tolerant. As a result, the true potential cost savings for using P/M superalloys in turbines have never been realized. This program was undertaken to examine the potential for utilizing an alternate heat treatment with P/M Alloy 720LI to generate a potentially defect-tolerant microstructure. This heat treatment had a soak above the gamma' solvus temperature followed by a controlled cool through the solvus. This produced gamma grains with a regular array of large dendritic-shaped secondary gamma' within the grains. Mechanical testing was carried out to fully evaluate the effect of this alternate heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Alloy 720LI. The standard heat treatment had longer lifetimes at the lower stress range conditions during high cycle fatigue; however, the alternate heat treatment was superior at the highest stress range. Fracture analysis suggests that this is due to the grain size difference. During tensile testing, the standard heat treatment had higher yield and ultimate strengths but lower ductility than the alternate heat treatment. This is thought to be due to the larger amounts of tertiary gamma ' present in the microstructure produced by the standard heat treatment. Finally, the standard heat treatment had longer creep lifetimes at the lowest test temperature. The

  19. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  20. Study on effects of powder and flake chemistry and morphology on the properties of Al-Cu-Mg-X-X-X powder metallurgy advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, P. J.; Lederich, R. J.; Oneal, J. E.; Pao, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of alloy chemistry and particulate morphology on consolidation behavior and consolidated product properties in rapid solidification processed, powder-metallurgical Al-3Li-1.5Cu-1Mg-0.5Co-0.2Zr and Al-4.4Cu-1.5Mg-Fe-Ni-0.2Zr extrusions and forgings were studied. Microstructures and mechanical properties of both alloys are largely unaffected by particulate production method (vacuum atomization, ultrasonic atomization, or twin-roller quenching) and by particulate solidification rates between 1000 and 100,000 K/s. Consolidation processing by canning, cold compaction, degassing, and hot extrusion is sufficient to yield mechanical properties in the non-Li-containing alloy extrusions which are similar to those of 7075-Al, but ductilities and fracture toughnesses are inferior owing to poor interparticle bonding caused by lack of a vacuum-hot-pressing step during consolidation. Mechanical properties of extrusions are superior to those of forgings owing to the stronger textures produced by the more severe hot working during extrusion. The effects on mechanical properties of dispersoid size and volume fraction, substructural refinement, solid solution strengthening by Mg, and precipitate size and distribution are elucidated for both alloy types.

  1. Rapid-solidification processing and powder metallurgy of al alloys. Final technical report, 15 April 1982-15 April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1986-10-29

    Regarding work on the development of microstructure during rapid solidification, three areas were addressed. The first of these involved a determination of the mechanism of formation of the so-called zones A and B in hypereutectic Al-transition metal alloys. The second area of work involving the development of microstructure concerns submerged phase transformations. In a study of Al-Be hypereutectic alloys, it was determined that solidification proceeded by a set of phase transformations that may be described by a monotectic reaction. The third area of study concerning microstructural development involves quasi-crystalline Al alloys. In fact, work done in this program has concentrated on the potentially beneficial aspects of quasi-crystalline phases in the microstructure of Al alloys. Work on the consolidation of particulate was concentrated on the use of conventional techniques (.e. extrusion) and novel processes (i.e. dynamic compaction). An estimate of the mechanical properties of rapidly solidified Al alloys was obtained. As explained above, the effect of extrusion is to cause decomposition of the rapidly solidified microstructure. A comparison was made, using the alloy Al-8Fe-2Mo, between the tensile properties of the decomposed microstructure (.e. extruded) and subscale test specimens produced by laser surface melting, consisting entirely of zone A.

  2. History of ``NANO''-Scale VERY EARLY Solid-State (and Liquid-State) Physics/Chemistry/Metallurgy/ Ceramics; Interstitial-Alloys Carbides/Nitrides/Borides/...Powders and Cermets, Rock Shocks, ...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Colin; Siegel, Edward

    History of ``NANO'': Siegel-Matsubara-Vest-Gregson[Mtls. Sci. and Eng. 8, 6, 323(`71); Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72)] VERY EARLY carbides/nitrides/borides powders/cermets solid-state physics/chemistry/metallurgy/ ceramics FIRST-EVER EXPERIMENTAL NANO-physics/chemistry[1968 ->Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72); and EARLY NANO-``physics''/NANO-``chemistry'' THEORY(after: Kubo(`62)-Matsubara(`60s-`70s)-Fulde (`65) [ref.: Sugano[Microcluster-Physics, Springer('82 `98)

  3. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOEpatents

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; Antony, Leo V. M.; O'Dell, Scott; Power, Chris; Tabor, Terry

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  4. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  5. Production of ultra clean gas-atomized powder by the plasma heated tundish technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tingskog, T.A.; Andersson, V.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the improvements in cleanliness for different types of gas atomized powders produced by holding the melt in a Plasma Heated Tundish (PHT) before atomization. The cleanliness is measured on Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) or extruded samples. Significant improvements in slag levels and material properties have been achieved. On extruded powder metallurgy stainless steel and nickel alloy tubes, the rejection rate in ultra-sonic testing was reduced drastically. Tool steels and high speed steels have greatly improved ductility and bend strength.

  6. Plutonium Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-08-09

    Due to its nuclear properties, Pu will remain a material of global interest well into the future. Processing, Structure, Properties and Performance remains a good framework for discussion of Pu materials science Self-irradiation and aging effects continue to be central in discussions of Pu metallurgy Pu in its elemental form is extremely unstable, but alloying helps to stabilize Pu; but, questions remain as to how and why this stabilization occurs. Which is true Pu-Ga binary phase diagram: US or Russian? Metallurgical issues such as solute coring, phase instability, crystallographic texture, etc. result in challenges to casting, processing, and properties modeling and experiments. For Ga alloyed FCC stabilized Pu, temperature and pressure remain as variables impacting phase stability.

  7. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  8. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M. D.

    1998-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Mössbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  9. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. March 1986-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for March 1986-May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (This updated bibliography contains 349 citations, 194 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  10. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. 1970-march, 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for 1970-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Worldwide journal articles are cited on tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (This updated bibliography contains 302 citations, 54 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  11. A Comparison of Cocrystal Structure Solutions from Powder and Single Crystal Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    S Lapidus; P Stephens; K Arora; T Shattock; M Zaworotko

    2011-12-31

    We demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of high resolution powder diffraction for determination of cocrystal structures through a double-blind study. Structures of 10 cocrystals of varying complexity were determined independently using single crystal and powder techniques. The two methodologies give identical molecular packing and hydrogen bond topology, and an rms difference in covalent bond lengths of 0.035 {angstrom}. Powder techniques are clearly sufficient to establish a complete characterization of cocrystal geometry.

  12. Recent trends in extractive metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Metallurgists and solution geochemists are joining forces to develop processes for extraction of metals from low-grade ores. The processes, which come under the name hydrometallurgy, include several new applications of solvent extraction techniques. Aqueous solutions are employed, leaching metals from ores, mine waste dumps, and even from deposits still in the ground. It was notable, for example, that Chemical and Engineering News (Feb. 8, 1982) recently featured the subject of hydrometallurgy in a special report. They noted that ‘recovering metals by use of aqueous solutions at relatively low temperatures increasingly is competing with dry, high-temperature pyrometallurgical methods.’ The relatively new techniques have caused a revolution, of sorts, in engineering programs of university metallurgy departments. The challenge of developing selective metal dissolution processes is drawing upon the best national talent in the fields of solution geochemistry and metallurgy.

  13. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  14. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  15. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  16. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  17. NIRS and MIRS technique for the determination of protein and fat content in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Feng, Shuijuan; He, Chao; He, Yong

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to detect the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and non-destructively. Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared(MIR) spectroscopy techniques have been compared and evaluated for the determination of the protein and fat content in milk powder with the use of Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM). LS-SVM models have been developed by using both NIR and MIR spectra. Both methods have shown good correlations between infrared transmission values and two nutrition contents. MIRS provided better prediction performance over NIRS. It is concluded that infrared spectroscopy technique can quantify of the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and nondestructively. The process is simple and easy to operate than chemistry methods. The results can be beneficial for designing a simple and non-destructive instrument with MIRS or NIRS spectral sensor for the determination of the protein fat content in milk powder.

  18. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloy plate and sheet materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications, FY 1983/1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to fabricate and evaluate PM 2124 Al alloy plate and sheet materials according to NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Previous research has indicated the outstanding strength-toughness relationship available with PM 2124 Al-Zr modified alloy compositions in extruded product forms. The range of processing conditions was explored in the fabrication of plate and sheet gage materials, as well as the resultant mechanical and metallurgical properties. The PM composition based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.60 wt. pct. Zr was selected. Flat rolled material consisting of 0.250 in. thick plate was fabricated using selected thermal mechanical treatments (TMT). The schedule of TMT operations was designed to yield the extreme conditions of grain structure normally encountered in the fabrication of flat rolled products, specifically recrystallized and unrecrystallized. The PM Al alloy plate and sheet materials exhibited improved strength properties at thin gages compared to IM Al alloys, as a consequence of their enhanced ability to inhibit recrystallization and grain growth. In addition, the PM 2124 Al alloys offer much better combinations of strength and toughnessover equivalent IM Al. The alloy microstructures were examined by optical metallographic texture techniques in order to establish the metallurgical basis for these significant property improvements.

  19. Tungsten and tungsten-alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications-excluding lamps. November 1971-July 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1971-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys including various applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying-element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of various cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 60 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  20. Unusual high Bs for Fe-based amorphous powders produced by a gas-atomization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Bito, M.; Kageyama, J.; Shimizu, Y.; Abe, M.; Makino, A.

    2016-05-01

    Fe-based alloy powders with a high Fe content of about 81 at.% were produced by a gas-atomization technique. Powders of Fe81Si1.9B5.7P11.4 (at.%) alloy showed a good glass forming ability and exhibited unusual high saturation magnetic flux density of 1.57 T. The core-loss property at a frequency of 100 kHz for the compacted core made of the Fe81Si1.9B5.7P11.4 powder is evaluated to be less than 500 kW/m3 under a maximum induction of 100 mT. Moreover, good DC-superposition characteristic of the core was also confirmed. These results suggest that the present Fe-based alloy powder is promising for low-loss magnetic-core materials and expected to contribute in miniaturization of electric parts in the near future.

  1. Characterization techniques to validate models of density variations in pressed powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, T.; Mahoney, M.; Readey, M.; Ewsuk, K.; Gieske, J.; Stoker, G.; Min, S.

    1995-07-01

    Techniques for characterizing density gradients generated during typical powder compaction processes are reviewed and several are evaluated. The techniques reviewed are ultrasonic velocity measurements, laser ultrasonic velocity measurements, x-ray radiography, autoradiography, computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and simple image analysis of polished cross-sections. Experimental results are reported for all of these techniques except autoradiography, CT and MRI. The test specimens examined were right circular cylinders of a high length/diameter ratio (to ensure significant density variation) pressed from commercial spray-dried alumina powders. Although the density gradients could be detected with all four techniques, ultrasonic velocity measurements gave the best contour map of gradients and is therefore most suitable for model validation. On the other hand, it was concluded that x-ray radiography is preferable in situations where cost and/or number of samples are more important that high resolution.

  2. Detection and original dose assessment of egg powders subjected to gamma irradiation by using ESR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Talat

    2015-09-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) techniques were applied for detection and original dose estimation to radiation-processed egg powders. The un-irradiated (control) egg powders showed a single resonance line centered at g=2.0086±0.0005, 2.0081±0.0005, 2.0082±0.0005 (native signal) for yolk, white and whole egg, respectively. Irradiation induced at least one additional intense singlet overlapping to the control signal and caused a significant increase in signal intensity without any changes in spectral patterns. Responses of egg powders to different gamma radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were examined. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal of irradiated egg powders were investigated over a storage period of about 5 months. Additive reirradiation of the egg powders produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. The additive dose method gives an estimation of the original dose within ±12% at the end of the 720 h storage period.

  3. Microstructural evolution and dielectric properties of 1D AlN powders synthesized by microwave technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VasanthiPillay, V.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2012-06-01

    Low temperature synthesis of Aluminum nitride (AlN) powders through NH4Cl assisted nitridation have been studied by microwave technique. The effect of processing time on the synthesis of AlN powders has been investigated. The optimum processing time was determined to be 120 min at 630 W, 200 °C. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and Impedance analyzer. XRD results revealed that the product has wurtzite phase of AlN. SEM micrographs show a 1D nanorod of AlN with a granular morphology. FTIR spectra exhibit A1 (TO) and E1 (LO) modes of wurtzite AlN. Dielectric properties of the powders were investigated by means of C-V and C-f and ɛ'-f characteristics. The reported results indicate a reasonable quality of the obtained AlN powders with high dielectric constant, suitable for application in the fabrication of specific electronic devices.

  4. Effect of production conditions on the corrosion resistance of lanthanum hexaboride powders and parts made from them

    SciTech Connect

    Paderno, Y.B.; Dudnik, E.M.; Masyuk, T.V.; Tkasch, A.V.; Zaitseva, A.Z.

    1985-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of chemical and thermal treatments of an industrial LaB6 powder on the corrosion resistance of the powder itself and parts pressed hot from it. To start, two batches of an industrial lanthanum hexaboride powder were used; and any boron oxide present removed by washing the powders with warm distilled water. To free the powders of lanthanum borates and lanthanum oxide, the powders were treated with a hydrochloric acid solution. The authors determine that this hydrochloric acid cleaning method is an effective means of ridding an industrial lanthanum hexaboride powder of impurities. It is also shown that acid treatment of industrial LaB6 powders substantially improves the corrosion resistance of parts made from them by powder metallurgy techniques. Also, a mechanism of rupture of hotpressed and sintered lanthanum hexaboride parts is proposed.

  5. A sol-powder coating technique for fabrication of yttria stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanasiriwech, Darunee . E-mail: darunee@mfu.ac.th; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Stevens, Ron

    2006-08-10

    Yttria stabilised zirconia has been prepared using a simple sol-powder coating technique. The polymeric yttria sol, which was prepared using 1,3 propanediol as a network modifier, was homogeneously mixed with nanocrystalline zirconia powder and it showed a dual function: as a binder which promoted densification and a phase modifier which stabilised zirconia in the tetragonal and cubic phases. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that the polymeric yttria sol which decomposed at low temperature into yttrium oxide could change the m {sup {yields}} t phase transformation behaviour of the zirconia, possibly due to the small particle size and very high surface area of both yttria and zirconia particles allowing rapid alloying. The sintered samples exhibited three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic, in which cubic and tetragonal are the major phases. The weight fractions of the individual phases present in the selected specimens were determined using quantitative Rietveld analysis.

  6. Power metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Work conducted by NASA and NASA contractors on prealloyed superalloy powders and materials strengthened by oxide dispersion is reviewed. Fabrication, tensile strength, superplasticity, grain growth control, stress rupture life, and grain-size and dispersion-level effects are covered. Distinct strength advantages of powder metallurgy superalloys over conventional wrought alloys are noted.

  7. Metallurgy Beyond Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Metallurgy is one of the oldest sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BCE with the discovery of Gold, and each new discovery - Copper, Silver, Lead, Tin, Iron and Mercury - marked the beginning of a new era of civilization. Currently there are 86 known metals, but until the end of the 17th century, only 12 of these were known. Steel (Fe-C alloy) was discovered in the 11th century BCE; however, it took until 1709 CE before we mastered the smelting of pig-iron by using coke instead of charcoal and started the industrial revolution. The metallurgy of nowadays is mainly about discovering better materials with superior properties to fulfil the increasing demand of the global market. Promising are the Glassy Metals or Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) - discovered at first in the late 50s at the California Institute of Technology - which are several times stronger than the best industrial steels and 10-times springier. The unusual structure that lacks crystalline grains makes BMGs so promising. They have a liquid-like structure that means they melt at lower temperatures, can be moulded nearly as easily as plastics, and can be shaped into features just 10 nm across. The best BMG formers are based on Zr, Pd, Pt, Ca, Au and, recently discovered, also Fe. They have typically three to five components with large atomic size mismatch and a composition close to a deep eutectic. Packing in such liquids is very dense, with a low content of free volume, resulting in viscosities that are several orders of magnitude higher than in pure metal melts.

  8. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction technique for extraction of volatile smokeless powder compounds in forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2014-07-01

    Smokeless powders are low explosives and are potentially found in cases involving firearms and improvised explosive devices. Apart from inorganic compound analysis, forensic determination of organic components of these materials appears as a promising alternative, especially the chromatographic techniques. This work describes the optimization of a solid-phase microextraction technique using an 85 μm polyacrylate fiber followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection for smokeless powder. A multivariate experimental design was performed to optimize extraction-influencing parameters. A 2(4) factorial first-order design revealed that sample temperature and extraction time were the major influencing parameters. Doehlert matrix design has subsequently selected 66°C and 21 min as the compromised conditions for the two predetermined parameters. This extraction technique has successfully detected the headspace compounds of smokeless powders from different ammunition types and allowed for their differentiation. The novel technique allows more rapid sample preparation for chromatographic detection of smokeless powders. PMID:24611488

  9. Developments in Die Pressing Strategies for Low-Cost Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Weil, K. Scott; Lavender, Curt A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent developments in the production of low-cost titanium powders have rejuvenated interest in manufacturing titanium powder metallurgy components by direct press and sinter techniques. However excessive friction typically observed during titanium powder pressing operations leads to numerous problems ranging from non-homogeneous green densities of the compacted powder to excessive part ejection forces and reduced die life due to wear and galling. An instrumented double-acting die press was developed to both investigate the mechanics of titanium powder pressing (particularly for the new low-cost powder morphologies) and to screen potential lubricants that could reduce frictional effects. As will be discussed, the instrument was used to determine friction coefficients and to evaluate a number of candidate lubricants. These results were then used to optimize the lubricant system to reduce die-wall stresses and improve part density uniformity.

  10. NON-MELT PROCESSING OF "LOW-COST", ARMSTRONG TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOY POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A; Clive, Scorey; Ernst, Bill; McKernan, John; Kiggans, Jim; Rivard, John D; Yu, Dr. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade, a considerable effort has been made to develop new methods for producing low cost titanium and titanium powders. The Armstrong process is a new method of producing titanium powder via reducing TiCl4 vapor in molten sodium. The process is scalable, and can be used to produce pre-alloyed powders. Non-melt processing and powder metallurgy approaches are economically viable with the commercially pure powders. In this investigation, several non-melt processing technologies, including vacuum hot pressing, extrusion, roll compaction, and forging techniques, will be evaluated using the Armstrong titanium powders. The metallurgical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the processed titanium samples will be discussed.

  11. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  12. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  13. Development of cobalt ferrite powder preparation employing the sol-gel technique and its structural characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjia, M.; Oubaha, M.; Prescott, T.; Olabi, A. G.

    2010-06-01

    This work focuses on the development of a method to make nano cobalt ferrite powder using a solgel process. A particular emphasis is devoted to the understanding of the role of the chemical parameters involved in the solgel technique, and of the heat treatment on the structures and morphologies of the materials obtained. Several samples of cobalt ferrite powder were obtained by varying the initial parameters of the process in addition to the heat treatment temperature. Xray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to identify the structure and morphology of samples demonstrating the influence of the initial parameters. DTA/TGA was carried out on one sample to identify important reaction temperatures during the heat treatment. The average particle size, as estimated for one sample by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the strongest Xray diffraction (XRD) peak, was found to be about 45 nm. It has been found that the chelating agent and the crosslinker have a critical influence on the resultant structure, the particle size and the particle size distribution.

  14. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  15. Plasma preparation and low-temperature sintering of spherical TiC-Fe composite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-jun; Hao, Jun-jie; Guo, Zhi-meng; Wang, Song

    2015-12-01

    A spherical Fe matrix composite powder containing a high volume fraction (82vol%) of fine TiC reinforcement was produced using a novel process combining in situ synthesis and plasma techniques. The composite powder exhibited good sphericity and a dense structure, and the fine sub-micron TiC particles were homogeneously distributed in the α-Fe matrix. A TiC-Fe cermet was prepared from the as-prepared spherical composite powder using powder metallurgy at a low sintering temperature; the product exhibited a hardness of HRA 88.5 and a flexural strength of 1360 MPa. The grain size of the fine-grained TiC and special surface structure of the spherical powder played the key roles in the fabrication process.

  16. Nanospray drying as a novel technique for the manufacturing of inhalable NSAID powders.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Rita Patrizia; Stigliani, Mariateresa; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Mencherini, Teresa; Sansone, Francesca; Russo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of the nanospray drier as a novel apparatus for the manufacturing of a dry powder for inhalation containing ketoprofen lysinate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to control the inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. We produced several ketoprofen lysinate and leucine powder batches by means of nanospray dryer, studying the influence of process parameters on yield, particle properties (size distribution and morphology), and, mainly, aerodynamic properties of powders. Micronized particles were prepared from different hydroalcoholic solutions (alcohol content from 0 to 30% v/v) using ketoprofen in its lysine salt form and leucine as dispersibility enhancer in different ratios (from 5 to 15% w/w) with a total solid concentration ranging from 1 to 7% w/v. Results indicated that the spray head equipped with a 7 µm nozzle produced powders too big to be inhaled. The reduction of nozzle size from 7 to 4 µm led to smaller particles suitable for inhalation but, at the same time, caused a dramatic increase in process time. The selection of process variables, together with the nozzle pretreatment with a surfactant solution, allowed us to obtain a free flowing powder with satisfying aerosol performance, confirming the usefulness of the nanospray drier in the production of powder for inhalation. PMID:25580462

  17. Nanospray Drying as a Novel Technique for the Manufacturing of Inhalable NSAID Powders

    PubMed Central

    Rita Patrizia, Aquino; Mariateresa, Stigliani; Pasquale, Del Gaudio; Teresa, Mencherini; Francesca, Sansone; Paola, Russo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of the nanospray drier as a novel apparatus for the manufacturing of a dry powder for inhalation containing ketoprofen lysinate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to control the inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. We produced several ketoprofen lysinate and leucine powder batches by means of nanospray dryer, studying the influence of process parameters on yield, particle properties (size distribution and morphology), and, mainly, aerodynamic properties of powders. Micronized particles were prepared from different hydroalcoholic solutions (alcohol content from 0 to 30% v/v) using ketoprofen in its lysine salt form and leucine as dispersibility enhancer in different ratios (from 5 to 15% w/w) with a total solid concentration ranging from 1 to 7% w/v. Results indicated that the spray head equipped with a 7 µm nozzle produced powders too big to be inhaled. The reduction of nozzle size from 7 to 4 µm led to smaller particles suitable for inhalation but, at the same time, caused a dramatic increase in process time. The selection of process variables, together with the nozzle pretreatment with a surfactant solution, allowed us to obtain a free flowing powder with satisfying aerosol performance, confirming the usefulness of the nanospray drier in the production of powder for inhalation. PMID:25580462

  18. Wet powder suspensions as an additional technique for the enhancement of bloodied marks.

    PubMed

    Au, Catherine; Jackson-Smith, Hayley; Quinones, Ignacio; Jones, B J; Daniel, Barbara

    2011-01-30

    The enhancement of marks in blood on dark surfaces poses significant challenges to the forensic scientist. Current methods of enhancement include the sequential use of acid dyes (acid yellow, acid violet and acid black). Acid yellow is used to greatest effect on lighter deposits of blood on a non-porous background, and is visualised using a light source which causes it to fluoresce [1]. However, further enhancement with acid violet and acid black produces a dark product which may fail to improve the contrast of the mark against a dark background. The use of wet powder suspensions (WPSs) has been proposed as a complementary procedure for use in fingermark enhancement, beyond its typical use in the enhancement of marks on adhesive surfaces. In this investigation, the use of WPS was tested in conjunction with conventional acid dye treatments on marks in blood deposited on a selection of substrates. The results demonstrated that white WPS alone or together with acid dyes results in an overall enhancement of mark quality (p<0.005) on marks deposited on smooth non-porous surfaces. The technique was shown to not interfere with subsequent presumptive tests on blood. However WPS treatments were shown to reduce the amount of DNA recoverable from the marks, resulting on an average decrease of 91% compared to untreated controls. The decline in DNA yields was shown to result in a decrease in the quality of the DNA profiles obtained. The enhancement properties of WPS were evaluated by electron microscopy. It was shown that the titanium dioxide particles in the WPS primarily interact with the non-bloodied part of the mark, thus producing a contrasting effect with the background and acid dyes. PMID:20494531

  19. Coating of pellets with micronized ethylcellulose particles by a dry powder coating technique.

    PubMed

    Pearnchob, Nantharat; Bodmeier, Roland

    2003-12-11

    Pellets were coated with ethylcellulose powder to achieve extended release. The film forming ability of ethylcellulose powder and the effect of formulation factors (plasticizer type and concentration) and curing conditions (curing temperature and time) were investigated. The coating formulation was divided into two components consisting of a powder mixture (polymer plus talc) and a mixture of liquid materials (plasticizer plus binder solution), which were sprayed separately into the coating chamber of a fluidized bed coater (Glatt GPCG-1, Wurster insert). The coated pellets were oven-cured under different conditions (60-80 degrees C, 2-24 h) without and with humidity (100% relative humidity). Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug, and drug release was studied in 0.1 N HCl at 37 degrees C (USP XXV paddle method). Despite the high glass transition temperature of ethylcellulose (133.4 degrees C), micronized ethylcellulose powder can be used for dry powder coating by adjusting the coating temperature, amount and type of plasticizer applied, and curing conditions. 40% plasticizer and a curing step (80 degrees C, 24 h) were required to achieve complete coalescence of the polymer particles and extended drug release of coated pellets. Although ethylcellulose-coated pellets had an uneven surface, extended drug release could be obtained with coating level of 15%. Because of its high glass transition temperature, ethylcellulose-coated pellets showed unchanged drug release profiles upon storage at room temperature for 3 years. PMID:14643971

  20. Fabrication of dual-pore scaffolds using SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Sang; Hong, Myoung Wha; Kim, So-Youn; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Young Yul; Cho, Young-Sam

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a novel technique was proposed to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds combining both SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques. This technique has several advantages: solvent-free, no limit on the use of thermoplastic polymers as a raw material, and easiness of fabricating scaffolds with dual-scale pores that are interconnected randomized small pores. To fabricate dual-pore scaffolds, PCL and NaCl powders were mixed at a certain ratio. Subsequently, needles were inserted into a designed mold, and the mixture was filled into the mold thereafter. Subsequently, after the mold was pressurized, the mold was heated to melt the PCL powders. The PCL/NaCl structure and needles were separated from the mold. The structure was sonicated to leach-out the NaCl particles and was dried. Consequently, the remaining PCL structure became the dual-pore scaffold. To compare the characteristics of dual-pore scaffolds, control scaffolds, which are 3D plotter and SLUP scaffolds were fabricated. PMID:25491863

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Components Fabricated by a New Powder Injection Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Miller, Megan R.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a powder injection molding (PIM) binder system for titanium that employs naphthalene as the primary constituent to facilitate easy binder removal and mitigate problems with carbon contamination. In the study presented here, we examined densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties in specimens formed by this process. In general, we found that we could achieve tensile strengths comparable to wrought titanium in the PIM-formed specimens, but that maximum elongation was less than expected. Chemical and microstructural analyses suggest that use of higher purity powder and further process optimization will lead to significant improvements in ductility.

  2. Silicon solar cells: Physical metallurgy principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Michael G.

    2003-05-01

    This article reviews the physical metallurgy aspects of silicon solar cells. The production of silicon solar cells relies on principles of thermochemical extractive metallurgy, phase equilibria, solidification, and kinetics. The issues related to these processes and their impact on solar cell performance and cost are discussed.

  3. The Rules of Ferrous Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The ways in which the sciences have been delineated and categorized throughout history provide insights into the formation, stabilization, and establishment of scientific systems of knowledge. The Dresdener school’s approach for explaining and categorizing the genesis of the engineering disciplines is still valid, but needs to be complemented by further-reaching methodological and theoretical reflections. Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of social practice is applied to the question of how individual agents succeed in influencing decisively a discipline’s changing object orientation, institutionalisation and self-reproduction. Through the accumulation of social, cultural and economic capital, they succeed in realising their own organisational ideas and scientific programs. Key concepts for the analysis include the struggle for power and resources, monopolies of interpretation, and the degree of autonomy. A case study from the Aachener Technische Hochschule shows that the consolidation of ferrous metallurgy can be conceived as a symbolical struggle between Fritz Wüst, professor for ferrous metallurgy, and the German Iron and Steel Institute, leading to a construction of a system of differences in which scientists accepted being scientists rather than entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs accepted becoming entrepreneurs and renounced science.

  4. The effect of the granulometric composition of a hydroxyapatite powder on the structure and phase composition of coatings deposited by the detonation gas spraying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A. A.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Legostaeva, E. V.; Sitnikov, A. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.

    2013-04-01

    The granulometric composition of a hydroxyapatite powder has been investigated. The initial powder has been classified into particle size ranges (0.1-10, 10-20, 20-30, and 50-300 μm). Coatings prepared from a hydroxyapatite powder of different size have been deposited by the detonation gas spraying technique. The structure and phase composition of the coatings have been studied. Changing the initial granulometric composition of the powder mixture is shown to provide control over the sprayed surface roughness.

  5. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED

  6. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  7. Dual-Alloy Disks are Formed by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.; Miner, R. V.; Kortovich, C. S.; Marder, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    High-performance disks have widely varying properties from hub to rim. Dual property disk is fabricated using two nickel-base alloys, AF-115 for rim and Rene 95 for hub. Dual-alloy fabrication may find applications in automobiles, earth-moving equipment, and energy conversion systems as well as aircraft powerplants. There is potential for such applications as shafts, gears, and blades.

  8. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  9. Powder metallurgy Rene 95 rotating turbine engine parts, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, L. G.; Redden, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    A Rene 95 alloy as-HIP high pressure turbine aft shaft in the CF6-50 engine and a HIP plus forged Rene 95 compressor disk in the CFM56 engine were tested. The CF6-50 engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles and the CFM56 test for 2000 C cycles. Post test evaluation and analysis of the CF6-50 shaft and the CFM56 compressor disk included visual, fluorescent penetrant, and dimensional inspections. No defects or otherwise discrepant conditions were found. These parts were judged to have performed satisfactorily.

  10. Chemiluminescence measurements on irradiated garlic powder by the single photon counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaiz, P.

    1995-02-01

    The feasibility of identifying irradiated garlic powder measuring chemiluminescence by liquid scintillation spectrometry was studied. Samples packed in 100 μm thick polyethylene bags were irradiated in a 60Co semi-industrial facility, with doses of 10 and 30 kGy. Control and irradiated samples were stored at 20 ± 4°C and 70 ± 10% RH in darkness for 2 years. Assays were performed to establish the best sample concentration and pH of the buffer solution in which garlic powder was to be suspended for its measurement. The water content of garlic samples was also analyzed throughout storage time, as it related to the stability of the species causing luminescence. Chemiluminescence values diminished in every sample over storage time following an exponential pattern. Irradiated samples showed values significantly higher than those of the control samples, according to the radiation dose, throughout the storage period. This does not necessarily imply that the identification of the irradiated samples would be certain, since values of control samples coming from different origins have been found to fluctuate within a rather wide range. Nonetheless, in principle, the method looks promising for the measurement of chemiluminescence in irradiated samples