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Sample records for power cranes draglines

  1. Dust control for draglines

    SciTech Connect

    Grad, P.

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

  2. A dragline-forming mobile robot inspired by spiders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyu; Culha, Utku; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-03-01

    Mobility of wheeled or legged machines can be significantly increased if they are able to move from a solid surface into a three-dimensional space. Although that may be achieved by addition of flying mechanisms, the payload fraction will be the limiting factor in such hybrid mobile machines for many applications. Inspired by spiders producing draglines to assist locomotion, the paper proposes an alternative mobile technology where a robot achieves locomotion from a solid surface into a free space. The technology resembles the dragline production pathway in spiders to a technically feasible degree and enables robots to move with thermoplastic spinning of draglines. As an implementation, a mobile robot has been prototyped with thermoplastic adhesives as source material of the draglines. Experimental results show that a dragline diameter range of 1.17-5.27 mm was achievable by the 185 g mobile robot in descending locomotion from the solid surface of a hanging structure with a power consumption of 4.8 W and an average speed of 5.13 cm min(-1). With an open-loop controller consisting of sequences of discrete events, the robot has demonstrated repeatable dragline formation with a relative deviation within -4% and a length close to the metre scale. PMID:24434546

  3. Dragline noise survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Bauer, Eric R.

    2002-05-01

    It is estimated that 70%-90% of miners have enough noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) to be classified as a disability (NIOSH, Publication No. 76-172, 1976; Franks, NIOSH Internal Report, 1996). In response, NIOSH is conducting a cross-sectional survey of the mining industry in order to determine the sources of mining noise and offer recommendations on how to mitigate high noise levels, and bring mining operations into compliance with the recent mining noise regulation: 30CFR, Part 62. This paper will outline the results from noise surveys of eight draglines which operate in above-ground coal mining operations. The data recorded include noise dosimetry in conjunction with time-at-task studies and 1/3-octave sound level (Leq, Lmin, and Lmax) measurements. The 1/3-octave band readings were used to create noise contour maps which allowed the spatial and frequency information of the noise to be considered. Comparison of Lmin and Lmax levels offer insight into the variability of the noise levels inside the dragline. The potential for administrative controls is limited due to consistently high noise levels throughout the deck. Implementation of engineering controls is also hindered by the size and number of the noise sources and the frequency content of the noise.

  4. Controls and protective devices for d-c constant potential crane power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, A.E. ); Gomez, H.R. )

    1993-07-01

    Many changes have taken place in the American steel industry in recent years. Improvements in the efficiency of processes and systems are noticeable in all areas. To compete in the world market, older, less efficient mills and processes have been eliminated in favor of the new and more efficient. This drive for improvement has been noticeable in the area of electric overhead traveling cranes. Older, obsolete electrical equipment has been replaced by newer, more efficient systems. Improvements in collector systems and use of festooned systems has changed the characteristics of the typical soft d-c crane power supply. The 230-v or less d-c utilization voltage on cranes has now become 250 v (or higher) in many mills. The one large resistive element (ie, collectors, m-g sets, etc) in crane power distribution systems has all but disappeared. The changes in d-c crane power supplies have resulted in the need for changes in protection and in the design of traditional d-c constant potential controls. Higher fault currents are now available, and the 10 to 15 ms inductive time constant, traditionally used to determine the interrupting rating of protective devices (such as fuses and circuit breaker) may no longer be adequate. In addition, constant potential controls designed for 230 v may experience problems at voltages higher than 250 v d-c. This paper will discuss these problems and possible solutions involving testing of protective devices and changes to the traditional d-c crane control system.

  5. Blast optimization for improved dragline productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.; Baldwin, G.

    1994-12-31

    A project aimed at blast optimization for large open pit coal mines is utilizing blast monitoring and analysis techniques, advanced dragline monitoring equipment, and blast simulation software, to assess the major controlling factors affecting both blast performance and subsequent dragline productivity. This has involved collaborative work between the explosives supplier, mine operator, monitoring equipment manufacturer, and a mining research organization. The results from trial blasts and subsequently monitored dragline production have yielded promising results and continuing studies are being conducted as part of a blast optimization program. It should be stressed that the optimization of blasting practices for improved dragline productivity is a site specific task, achieved through controlled and closely monitored procedures. The benefits achieved at one location can not be simply transferred to another minesite unless similar improvement strategies are first implemented.

  6. Virtual reality for dragline planners

    SciTech Connect

    Cobcroft, T.

    2007-03-15

    3d-Dig as an invaluable mine planning and communication tool, developed by Earth Technology Pty Ltd., that makes it possible to easily communicate a mine plan through the use of animations and other graphics. An Australian company has been using it to plan in-detail pits and strips for up to five years in advance; a US operator is using it to optimise dragline stripping around inside corners and to accurately plan the traverse of ramps. The new system offers a better predication of rehandled volumes, linear coal advance and dig time within a strip. It is useful for optimising waste stripping and timing of uncovered coal to enhance blending and shipping reliability. It presents volumetric, spoil placement and positioning data while generating animations that communicate the plan. 5 figs.

  7. NIOSH alert: Request for assistance in preventing electrocutions of crane operators and crew members working near overhead power lines

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    In this alert, NIOSH warned that crane operators and crew members may be electrocuted when working near overhead power lines. Five cases were described which resulted in six electrocutions. Case 1 involved a 29 year old who pushed the crane cable on a 1 yard cement bucket into a 7,200 volt power line. Case 2 involved a 33 year old well driller who was electrocuted when a metal pipe lifted by a truck mounted crane contacted a 12,000 volt overhead power line. The third case involved a 24 year old forman for a telecommunications company who was electrocuted when he grabbed the door handle of a truck mounted crane whose boom was in contact with a 7,200 volt overhead power line. Case 4 involved a 37 year old construction laborer electrocuted while pulling a wire rope attached to a crane cable toward a load. The fifth case involved a 20 year old male truck driver and his 70 year old male employer who were electrocuted when the boom of a truck mounted crane contacted a 7,200 volt conductor of an overhead power line.

  8. 30 CFR 77.409 - Shovels, draglines, and tractors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shovels, draglines, and tractors. 77.409... COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.409 Shovels, draglines, and tractors. (a) Shovels, draglines, and tractors shall not be operated in the presence of any person exposed to a hazard from...

  9. Dragline mining returns to western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-05-15

    Armstrong Coal Co. now owns three Page draglines-one now operating at the Midway Surface mine, one due to go into operation at the Equality surface mine and a third that is being rebuilt also for use there. Armstrong is banking on the economics of scale to once again prove that these older machines are still the most efficient way to move large volumes of overburden. 4 photos.

  10. Nonhunting mortality in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Records of 170 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) necropsied at the National Wildlife Health Research Center, Wisconsin, from 1976 through 1985 were reviewed as representative samples to determine causes of nonhunting mortality in the mid-continent and Rocky Mountain populations of sandhill cranes. Avian cholera, avian botulism, and ingestion of mycotoxins were leading causes of nonhunting mortality. Hailstorms, lightning, lead poisoning, predation, avian tuberculosis, and collisions with power lines also killed cranes.

  11. 14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BYPASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BY-PASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE DIVERSION GATE ALONG THE OUTLET CHANNEL WITH THE ORIGINAL CHANNEL OF THE SOURIS RIVER - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  12. 5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at Mormon Flat. Photographer unknown, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. Diverse formulas for spider dragline fibers demonstrated by molecular and mechanical characterization of spitting spider silk.

    PubMed

    Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M; Garb, Jessica E

    2014-12-01

    Spider silks have outstanding mechanical properties. Most research has focused on dragline silk proteins (major ampullate spidroins, MaSps) from orb-weaving spiders. Using silk gland expression libraries from the haplogyne spider Scytodes thoracica, we discovered two novel spidroins (S. thoracica fibroin 1 and 2). The amino acid composition of S. thoracica silk glands and dragline fibers suggest that fibroin 1 is the major component of S. thoracica dragline silk. Fibroin 1 is dominated by glycine-alanine motifs, and lacks sequence motifs associated with orb-weaver MaSps. We hypothesize fibroin 2 is a piriform or aciniform silk protein, based on amino acid composition, spigot morphology, and phylogenetic analyses. S. thoracica's dragline silk is less tough than previously reported, but is still comparable to other dragline silks. Our analyses suggest that dragline silk proteins evolved multiple times. This demonstrates that spider dragline silk is more diverse than previously understood, providing alternative high performance silk designs. PMID:25340514

  14. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST TOWARD DRAGLINE WHICH IS STRIPPING OVERBURDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST TOWARD DRAGLINE WHICH IS STRIPPING OVERBURDEN AND RELOCATING IT TO THE OTHER SIDE OF THE PIT. IN LEDGE BELOW THIS OPERATION A FRONT END LOADER SCOOPS COAL INTO TRUCKS. - Drummond Coal Company Cedrum Mine, 8750 Pit, County Road 124, Townley, Walker County, AL

  15. Smart crane ammunition transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Killough, S.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of the Smart Crane Ammunition Transfer System (SCATS) project is to demonstrate robotic/telerobotic controls technology for a mobile articulated crane for missile/ munitions handling, delivery, and reload. Missile resupply and reload have been manually intensive operations up to this time. Currently, reload missiles are delivered by truck to the site of the launcher. A crew of four to five personnel reloads the missiles from the truck to the launcher using a hydraulic-powered crane. The missiles are handled carefully for the safety of the missiles and personnel. Numerous steps are required in the reload process and the entire reload operation can take over 1 h for some missile systems. Recent U.S. Army directives require the entire operation to be accomplished in a fraction of that time. Current requirements for the development of SCATS are being based primarily on reloading Patriot missiles. The planned development approach will integrate robotic control and sensor technology with a commercially available hydraulic articulated crane. SCATS is being developed with commercially available hardware as much as possible. Development plans include adding a 3-D.F. end effector with a grapple to the articulating crane; closed-loop position control for the crane and end effector; digital microprocessor control of crane functions; simplified operator interface; and operating modes which include rectilinear movement, obstacle avoidance, and partial automated operation. The planned development will include progressive technology demonstrations. Ultimate plans are for this technology to be transferred and utilized in the military fielding process.

  16. Crane hoisting monitoring using smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Jiao, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Gao, Shunde; Yu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, smart phone develops very fast, and it has been the most popular tool in daily life of the public. Smart phones, with powerful operating systems, data storage and processing function, varieties of high-performance sensors and easily data transmission when connected to network, are the good choice for structures status monitoring in some occasion. One kind of hoisting monitoring method was proposed in this paper based on smartphone and Monitoring App developed. Firstly, one monitoring App was designed and developed, which can monitor the acceleration and inclination information using MEMS sensors embedded in smartphone. Secondly, typical operation status model of crane hoisting was studied. Then one validation test of hoisting was designed and conducted to monitor the acceleration and inclination of different elements during the operation procedure of one crane. The test results show the feasibility of the crane hoisting safety monitoring method using smartphone.

  17. Coccidia of whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forrester, Donald J.; Carpenter, J.W.; Blankinship, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Coccidial oocysts were observed in 6 of 19 fecal samples from free-ranging whooping cranes (Grus americana) and 4 of 16 samples from captive whooping cranes. Eimeria gruis occurred in four free-ranging whooping cranes and E. reichenowi in two free-ranging and two captive whooping cranes. Fecal samples from two captive cranes contained oocysts of Isospora lacazei which was considered a spurious parasite. Oocysts of both species of Eimeria were prevalent in fecal samples collected from three free-ranging Canadian sandhill cranes (G. canadensis rowani) from whooping crane wintering grounds in Texas. These coccidia were prevalent also in fecal samples from 14 sandhill cranes (of 4 subspecies) maintained in captivity at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland.

  18. Supercontraction forces in spider dragline silk depend on hydration rate.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Boutry, Cecilia; Wong, Shing-Chung; Baji, Avinash; Dhinojwala, Ali; Sensenig, Andrew T; Blackledge, Todd A

    2009-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a model biological polymer for biomimetic research due to its many desirable and unusual properties. 'Supercontraction' describes the dramatic shrinking of dragline silk fibers when wetted. In restrained silk fibers, supercontraction generates substantial stresses of 40-50 MPa above a critical humidity of approximately 70% relative humidity (RH). This stress may maintain tension in webs under the weight of rain or dew and could be used in industry for robotics, sensor technology, and other applications. Our own findings indicate that supercontraction can generate stress over a much broader range than previously reported, from 10 to 140 MPa. Here we show that this variation in supercontraction stress depends upon the rate at which the environment reaches the critical level of humidity causing supercontraction. Slow humidity increase, over several minutes, leads to relatively low supercontraction stress, while fast humidity increase, over a few seconds, typically results in higher supercontraction stress. Slowly supercontracted fibers take up less water and differ in thermostability from rapidly supercontracted fibers, as shown by thermogravimetric analysis. This suggests that spider silk achieves different molecular configurations depending upon the speed at which supercontraction occurs. Ultimately, rate-dependent supercontraction may provide a mechanism to tailor the properties of silk or biomimetic fibers for various applications. PMID:19477107

  19. Cryopreservation of crane semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The method for the cryopreservation of crane semen at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center is described in detail. Cryopreservation is useful for the long-term storage of crane semen and for specialized propagation needs. A 50% fertility rate from most sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, inseminated with frozen-thawed semen can be expected. Additional research should improve the fertility rate and determine how applicable the technique is to other crane species.

  20. 46 CFR 107.309 - Crane plans and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... power failure. Note to § 107.309(a)(4): These plans must be submitted to the Coast Guard, if the crane...) One line diagrams of the electrical power circuits of the electric power crane overload protection required in Subpart 111.50 of this chapter. (2) Diagrams of the hydraulic or pneumatic power and...

  1. Total X-Ray Scattering of Spider Dragline Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmore, C. J.; Izdebski, T.; Yarger, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Total x-ray scattering measurements of spider dragline silk fibers from Nephila clavipes, Argiope aurantia, and Latrodectus hesperus all yield similar structure factors, with only small variations between the different species. Wide-angle x-ray scattering from fibers orientated perpendicular to the beam shows a high degree of anisotropy, and differential pair distribution functions obtained by integrating over wedges of the equatorial and meridian planes indicate that, on average, the majority (95%) of the atom-atom correlations do not extend beyond 1 nm. Futhermore, the atom-atom correlations between 1 and 3 nm are not associated with the most intense diffraction peaks at Q=1-2Å-1. Disordered molecular orientations along the fiber axis are consistent with proteins in similar structural arrangements to those in the equatorial plane, which may be associated with the silk’s greater flexibility in this direction.

  2. 4. Overview at top of crane showing crane bridge and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Overview at top of crane showing crane bridge and south truss full length, looking south east. - General Dynamics Corporation Shipyard, XYZ Crane & Towers, 97 East Howard Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  3. Crane and Excavator Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on crane and excavator operation is designed to enable the crane and excavator operator to perform his/her duties more proficiently. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students, a course introduction, and a study guide…

  4. Lunar crane system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In many lunar construction scenarios, mechanical cranes in some form will be indispensible in moving large masses around with various degrees of fine positioning. While thorough experience exists in the use of terrestrial cranes new thinking is required about the design of cranes to be used in extraterrestrial construction. The primary driving force for this new thinking is the need to automate the crane system so that space cranes can be operated as telerobotic machines with a large number of automatic capabilities. This is true because in extraterrestrial construction human resources will need to be critically rationed. The design problems of mechanisms and control systems for a lunar crane must deal with at least two areas of performance. First, the automated crane must be capable of maneuvering a large mass, so that when the mass arrives at the target position there are only small vibrations. Secondly, any residue vibrations must be automatically damped out and a fine positioning must be achieved. For extraterrestrial use there are additional challenges to a crane design - for example, to design a crane system so that it can be transformed for other construction uses. This initial project in crane design does not address such additional issues, although they may be the subject of future CSC research. To date the Center has designed and analyzed many mechanisms. The fundamental problem of trade-offs between passively stabilizing the load and actively controlling the load by actuators was extensively studied. The capability of 3D dynamics modeling now exists for such studies. A scaled model of a lunar crane was set up and it has been most fruitful in providing basic understanding of lunar cranes. Due to an interesting scaling match-up, this scaled model exhibits the load vibration frequencies one would expect in the real lunar case. Using the analytical results achieved to date, a laboratory crane system is now being developed as a test bed for verifying a wide

  5. Dragline silk: a fiber assembled with low-molecular-weight cysteine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thanh; Chuang, Tyler; Lin, Albert; Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry; Crawford, Taylor; Zhao, Liang; Williams, Caroline; Hsia, Yang; Vierra, Craig

    2014-11-10

    Dragline silk has been proposed to contain two main protein constituents, MaSp1 and MaSp2. However, the mechanical properties of synthetic spider silks spun from recombinant MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins have yet to approach natural fibers, implying the natural spinning dope is missing critical factors. Here we report the discovery of novel molecular constituents within the spinning dope that are extruded into dragline silk. Protein studies of the liquid spinning dope from the major ampullate gland, coupled with the analysis of dragline silk fibers using mass spectrometry, demonstrate the presence of a new family of low-molecular-weight cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) that colocalize with the MA fibroins. Expression of the CRP family members is linked to dragline silk production, specifically MaSp1 and MaSp2 mRNA synthesis. Biochemical data support that CRP molecules are secreted into the spinning dope and assembled into macromolecular complexes via disulfide bond linkages. Sequence analysis supports that CRP molecules share similarities to members that belong to the cystine slipknot superfamily, suggesting that these factors may have evolved to increase fiber toughness by serving as molecular hubs that dissipate large amounts of energy under stress. Collectively, our findings provide molecular details about the components of dragline silk, providing new insight that will advance materials development of synthetic spider silk for industrial applications. PMID:25259849

  6. High-Toughness Silk Produced by a Transgenic Silkworm Expressing Spider (Araneus ventricosus) Dragline Silk Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kuwana, Yoshihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Tamada, Yasushi; Kojima, Katsura

    2014-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a natural fiber that has excellent tensile properties; however, it is difficult to produce artificially as a long, strong fiber. Here, the spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline protein gene was cloned and a transgenic silkworm was generated, that expressed the fusion protein of the fibroin heavy chain and spider dragline protein in cocoon silk. The spider silk protein content ranged from 0.37 to 0.61% w/w (1.4–2.4 mol%) native silkworm fibroin. Using a good silk-producing strain, C515, as the transgenic silkworm can make the raw silk from its cocoons for the first time. The tensile characteristics (toughness) of the raw silk improved by 53% after the introduction of spider dragline silk protein; the improvement depended on the quantity of the expressed spider dragline protein. To demonstrate the commercial feasibility for machine reeling, weaving, and sewing, we used the transgenic spider silk to weave a vest and scarf; this was the first application of spider silk fibers from transgenic silkworms. PMID:25162624

  7. Characterization of the protein components of Nephila clavipes dragline silk.

    PubMed

    Sponner, Alexander; Schlott, Bernhard; Vollrath, Fritz; Unger, Eberhard; Grosse, Frank; Weisshart, Klaus

    2005-03-29

    Spider silk is predominantly composed of structural proteins called spider fibroins or spidroins. The major ampullate silk that forms the dragline and the cobweb's frame threads of Nephila clavipes is believed to be a composite of two spidroins, designated as Masp 1 and 2. Specific antibodies indeed revealed the presence of Masp 1 and 2 specific epitopes in the spinning dope and solubilized threads. In contrast, sequencing of specific peptides obtained from solubilized threads or gland urea extracts were exclusively homologous to segments of Masp 1, suggesting that this protein is more abundantly expressed in silk than Masp 2. The strength of immunoreactivities corroborated this finding. Polypeptides reactive against both Masp 1 and 2 specific antibodies were found to be expressed in the epithelia of the tail and different gland zones and accumulated in the gland secreted material. Both extracts of gland secretion and solubilized threads showed a ladder of polypeptides in the size range of 260-320 kDa in gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, whereas gel filtration chromatography yielded molecular masses of the proteins of approximately 300-350 kDa. In the absence of a reducing agent, dimeric forms of the spidroins were observed with estimated molecular masses of 420-480 kDa according to gel electrophoresis and 550-650 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography. Depending on the preparation, some silk material readily underwent degradation, and polypeptides down to 20 kDa in size and less were detectable. PMID:15779899

  8. Viscous Friction between Crystalline and Amorphous Phase of Dragline Silk

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sandeep P.; Xiao, Senbo; Gkagkas, Konstantinos; Markert, Bernd; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of spider dragline silk is composed of two major constituents, the amorphous phase and crystalline units, and its mechanical response has been attributed to these prime constituents. Silk mechanics, however, might also be influenced by the resistance against sliding of these two phases relative to each other under load. We here used atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain friction forces for the relative sliding of the amorphous phase and crystalline units of Araneus diadematus spider silk. We computed the coefficient of viscosity of this interface to be in the order of 102 Ns/m2 by extrapolating our simulation data to the viscous limit. Interestingly, this value is two orders of magnitude smaller than the coefficient of viscosity within the amorphous phase. This suggests that sliding along a planar and homogeneous surface of straight polyalanine chains is much less hindered than within entangled disordered chains. Finally, in a simple finite element model, which is based on parameters determined from MD simulations including the newly deduced coefficient of viscosity, we assessed the frictional behavior between these two components for the experimental range of relative pulling velocities. We found that a perfectly relative horizontal motion has no significant resistance against sliding, however, slightly inclined loading causes measurable resistance. Our analysis paves the way towards a finite element model of silk fibers in which crystalline units can slide, move and rearrange themselves in the fiber during loading. PMID:25119288

  9. Hybrid carbon nanotube yarn artificial muscle inspired by spider dragline silk.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Hyeong Kim, Shi; Kyoon Shin, Min; Hoon Kwon, Cheong; Park, Jihwang; Tae Kim, Youn; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Lima, Márcio D; Haines, Carter S; Baughman, Ray H; Jeong Kim, Seon

    2014-01-01

    Torsional artificial muscles generating fast, large-angle rotation have been recently demonstrated, which exploit the helical configuration of twist-spun carbon nanotube yarns. These wax-infiltrated, electrothermally powered artificial muscles are torsionally underdamped, thereby experiencing dynamic oscillations that complicate positional control. Here, using the strategy spiders deploy to eliminate uncontrolled spinning at the end of dragline silk, we have developed ultrafast hybrid carbon nanotube yarn muscles that generated a 9,800 r.p.m. rotation without noticeable oscillation. A high-loss viscoelastic material, comprising paraffin wax and polystyrene-poly(ethylene-butylene)-polystyrene copolymer, was used as yarn guest to give an overdamped dynamic response. Using more than 10-fold decrease in mechanical stabilization time, compared with previous nanotube yarn torsional muscles, dynamic mirror positioning that is both fast and accurate is demonstrated. Scalability to provide constant volumetric torsional work capacity is demonstrated over a 10-fold change in yarn cross-sectional area, which is important for upscaled applications. PMID:24557457

  10. Hybrid carbon nanotube yarn artificial muscle inspired by spider dragline silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Hyeong Kim, Shi; Kyoon Shin, Min; Hoon Kwon, Cheong; Park, Jihwang; Tae Kim, Youn; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Lima, Márcio D.; Haines, Carter S.; Baughman, Ray H.; Jeong Kim, Seon

    2014-02-01

    Torsional artificial muscles generating fast, large-angle rotation have been recently demonstrated, which exploit the helical configuration of twist-spun carbon nanotube yarns. These wax-infiltrated, electrothermally powered artificial muscles are torsionally underdamped, thereby experiencing dynamic oscillations that complicate positional control. Here, using the strategy spiders deploy to eliminate uncontrolled spinning at the end of dragline silk, we have developed ultrafast hybrid carbon nanotube yarn muscles that generated a 9,800 r.p.m. rotation without noticeable oscillation. A high-loss viscoelastic material, comprising paraffin wax and polystyrene-poly(ethylene-butylene)-polystyrene copolymer, was used as yarn guest to give an overdamped dynamic response. Using more than 10-fold decrease in mechanical stabilization time, compared with previous nanotube yarn torsional muscles, dynamic mirror positioning that is both fast and accurate is demonstrated. Scalability to provide constant volumetric torsional work capacity is demonstrated over a 10-fold change in yarn cross-sectional area, which is important for upscaled applications.

  11. 46 CFR 108.601 - Crane design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crane design. 108.601 Section 108.601 Shipping COAST... Cranes Cranes § 108.601 Crane design. (a) Each crane and crane foundation on a unit must be designed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Specification for Offshore Cranes, API Spec. 2C,...

  12. 46 CFR 108.601 - Crane design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crane design. 108.601 Section 108.601 Shipping COAST... Cranes Cranes § 108.601 Crane design. (a) Each crane and crane foundation on a unit must be designed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Specification for Offshore Cranes, API Spec. 2C,...

  13. 46 CFR 108.601 - Crane design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crane design. 108.601 Section 108.601 Shipping COAST... Cranes Cranes § 108.601 Crane design. (a) Each crane and crane foundation on a unit must be designed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Specification for Offshore Cranes, API Spec. 2C,...

  14. 46 CFR 108.601 - Crane design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crane design. 108.601 Section 108.601 Shipping COAST... Cranes Cranes § 108.601 Crane design. (a) Each crane and crane foundation on a unit must be designed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Specification for Offshore Cranes, API Spec. 2C,...

  15. 46 CFR 108.601 - Crane design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crane design. 108.601 Section 108.601 Shipping COAST... Cranes Cranes § 108.601 Crane design. (a) Each crane and crane foundation on a unit must be designed in accordance with the American Petroleum Institute Specification for Offshore Cranes, API Spec. 2C,...

  16. Complex gene expression in the dragline silk producing glands of the Western black widow (Latrodectus hesperus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Orb-web and cob-web weaving spiders spin dragline silk fibers that are among the strongest materials known. Draglines are primarily composed of MaSp1 and MaSp2, two spidroins (spider fibrous proteins) expressed in the major ampullate (MA) silk glands. Prior genetic studies of dragline silk have focused mostly on determining the sequence of these spidroins, leaving other genetic aspects of silk synthesis largely uncharacterized. Results Here, we used deep sequencing to profile gene expression patterns in the Western black widow, Latrodectus hesperus. We sequenced millions of 3′-anchored “tags” of cDNAs derived either from MA glands or control tissue (cephalothorax) mRNAs, then associated the tags with genes by compiling a reference database from our newly constructed normalized L. hesperus cDNA library and published L. hesperus sequences. We were able to determine transcript abundance and alternative polyadenylation of each of three loci encoding MaSp1. The ratio of MaSp1:MaSp2 transcripts varied between individuals, but on average was similar to the estimated ratio of MaSp1:MaSp2 in dragline fibers. We also identified transcription of TuSp1 in MA glands, another spidroin family member that encodes the primary component of egg-sac silk, synthesized in tubuliform glands. In addition to the spidroin paralogs, we identified 30 genes that are more abundantly represented in MA glands than cephalothoraxes and represent new candidates for involvement in spider silk synthesis. Conclusions Modulating expression rates of MaSp1 variants as well as MaSp2 and TuSp1 could lead to differences in mechanical properties of dragline fibers. Many of the newly identified candidate genes likely encode secreted proteins, suggesting they could be incorporated into dragline fibers or assist in protein processing and fiber assembly. Our results demonstrate previously unrecognized transcript complexity in spider silk glands. PMID:24295234

  17. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  18. CRANE POSITIONING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Landsiedel, F.W.; Wolff, H.

    1960-06-28

    An apparatus is described for automatically accomplishing the final accurate horizontal positioning of a crane after the latter has been placed to within 1/8 in. of its selected position. For this purpose there is provided a tiltable member on the crane mast for lowering into contact with a stationary probe. Misalignment of the tiltable member, with respect to the probe as the member is lowered, causes tilting of the latter to actuate appropriate switches that energize motors for bringing the mast into proper position. When properly aligned the member is not tilted and a central switch is actuated to indicate the final alignment of the crane.

  19. Fatigueless response of spider draglines in cyclic torsion facilitated by reversible molecular deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, Kamal P.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that spider draglines exhibit a fatigueless response in extreme cyclic torsion up to its breaking limit. The well defined Raman bands at 1095 and 1245 cm-1 shifted linearly towards lower wavenumbers versus increasing twist in both clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. Under thousands of continuous loading cycles of twist strain approaching its breaking limit, all the Raman bands were preserved and the characteristic Raman peak shifts were found to be reversible. Besides, nanoscale surface profile of the worked silk appeared as good as the pristine silk. This unique fatigueless twist response of draglines, facilitated by reversible deformation of protein molecules, could find applications in durable miniatured devices.

  20. Nanostructure and molecular mechanics of spider dragline silk protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Keten, Sinan; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer that outperforms most known materials in terms of its mechanical performance, despite its underlying weak chemical bonding based on H-bonds. While experimental studies have shown that the molecular structure of silk proteins has a direct influence on the stiffness, toughness and failure strength of silk, no molecular-level analysis of the nanostructure and associated mechanical properties of silk assemblies have been reported. Here, we report atomic-level structures of MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins from the Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk sequence, obtained using replica exchange molecular dynamics, and subject these structures to mechanical loading for a detailed nanomechanical analysis. The structural analysis reveals that poly-alanine regions in silk predominantly form distinct and orderly beta-sheet crystal domains, while disorderly regions are formed by glycine-rich repeats that consist of 31-helix type structures and beta-turns. Our structural predictions are validated against experimental data based on dihedral angle pair calculations presented in Ramachandran plots, alpha-carbon atomic distances, as well as secondary structure content. Mechanical shearing simulations on selected structures illustrate that the nanoscale behaviour of silk protein assemblies is controlled by the distinctly different secondary structure content and hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and semi-amorphous regions. Both structural and mechanical characterization results show excellent agreement with available experimental evidence. Our findings set the stage for extensive atomistic investigations of silk, which may contribute towards an improved understanding of the source of the strength and toughness of this biological superfibre. PMID:20519206

  1. Space spider crane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, Ian O. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Pennington, Jack E. (Inventor); Kinkead, Rebecca L. (Inventor); Bryan, Charles F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A space spider crane for the movement, placement, and or assembly of various components on or in the vicinity of a space structure is described. As permanent space structures are utilized by the space program, a means will be required to transport cargo and perform various repair tasks. A space spider crane comprising a small central body with attached manipulators and legs fulfills this requirement. The manipulators may be equipped with constant pressure gripping end effectors or tools to accomplish various repair tasks. The legs are also equipped with constant pressure gripping end effectors to grip the space structure. Control of the space spider crane may be achieved either by computer software or a remotely situated human operator, who maintains visual contact via television cameras mounted on the space spider crane. One possible walking program consists of a parallel motion walking program whereby the small central body alternatively leans forward and backward relative to end effectors.

  2. Dragline roller track improvement. Volume I. Evaluation of low hardness dragline track materials in rolling contact. Final report, September 30, 1976-July 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dunfee, J.; Leonard, L.; Rumbarger, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Franklin Research Center (FRC), a Division of the Franklin Institute, was contracted by the Bureau of Mines to improve walking dragline roller tracks. The contract was subsequently transferred to the Department of Energy. The period from September 1977 to September 1978 covered laboratory rolling contact rig tests to evaluate typical low hardness dragline track materials. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-1 Final Report, Volume I. The period from September 1978 to July 1980 covered field measurements of dragline roller circle loadings. The results of this work are covered by DOE/ET/9121-2 Final Report, Volume II. The laboratory rolling contact rig test results indicate that forged vacuum degassed air melt steel materials are recommended over air-melt cast materials for rollers and tracks. The steels tested exhibited good freedom from sensitivity to stress raisers like brinell marks and small holes or discontinuities (Volume I). The largest unknown in a recommended method for life testing roller tracks is the condition of the upper rotating frame structure and the lower tub supporting structure.

  3. 46. Interior detail of barge crane engine house with machinery. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Interior detail of barge crane engine house with machinery. Lambert Hoisting Engine Company Winder Powered by A Gray Marine Diesel. - Barbour Boat Works, Tryon Palace Drive, New Bern, Craven County, NC

  4. ANTI-SWING CRANE

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.

    1957-09-17

    A device that reduces or eliminntes the swing of an object being transported by a traveling crane is described. The supporting cable of the crane extends through a guide and follower positioned below the crane by an electric motor and follow-up circuit. The swing or horizontal motion of the cable is detected by the follower, and a signal is generated that will cause the motor to move the follower in opposition to the motion of the swing thus having a dampening effect on the pendulum action of the supported body. This improvement is particularly valuable when the supported load may be so radioactive that a person could not manually stop the swing.

  5. Lunar crane hook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, John Wilson, III; Cone, Alan E.; Garolera, Frank J.; German, David; Lindabury, David Peter; Luckado, Marshall Cleveland; Murphey, Craig; Rowell, John Bryan; Wilkinson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    The base and ball hook system is an attachment that is designed to be used on the lunar surface as an improved alternative to the common crane hook and eye system. The design proposed uses an omni-directional ball hook and base to overcome the design problems associated with a conventional crane hook. The base and ball hook is not sensitive to cable twist which would render a robotic lunar crane useless since there is little atmospheric resistance to dampen the motion of an oscillating member. The symmetric characteristics of the ball hook and base eliminates manual placement of the ball hook into the base; commonly associated with the typical hook and eye stem. The major advantage of the base and ball hook system is it's ease of couple and uncouple modes that are advantages during unmanned robotic lunar missions.

  6. Sandhill crane with baby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Sandhill Crane searches for food with its still-fuzzy fledgling by its side. The two, along with another adult crane, have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  7. Crane reproductive physiology and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    Some unique features of crane reproduction, management, and conservation are described. Because cranes are sexually monomorphic, sexing is difficult and must be accomplished using behavior, laparoscopy, cloacal examination, genetic techniques, or fecal steroid analysis. Although husbandry techniques for cranes are similar to those used with other nondomestic birds, a number of basic characteristics, such as extreme aggressiveness, imprinting by the crane chick on man, a delayed molt in the immature crane, delayed sexual maturity, and infertility, pose special problems for the propagator. Artificial insemination is a practical solution to crane infertility. Vigorous captive management and propagation efforts must become increasingly important if several endangered crane species are to survive the continuing decline in wild populations. The ultimate goal is the restoration of suitable habitat and sustainable native populations.

  8. Trouble-free hydraulic valve package for crane winches

    SciTech Connect

    DeLamatyr, G.

    1983-12-01

    Baker Marine Corporation has been producing hydraulically powered pedestal type cranes for the offshore industry for approximately three years. The original hydraulic system cranes was of the open loop type with multiple gear pumps driven by a single diesel engine. One pump in the stack serviced the main and auxiliary hook winches, while another worked the boom winch, and a third pump sent oil to the crane swing motor. For reasons of economy and simplicity, it was decided that this scheme would be kept as part of the new design.

  9. Beta transition and stress-induced phase separation in the spinning of spider dragline silk.

    PubMed

    Knight, D P; Knight, M M; Vollrath, F

    2000-06-13

    Spider dragline silk is formed as the result of a remarkable transformation in which an aqueous dope solution is rapidly converted into an insoluble protein filament with outstanding mechanical properties. Microscopy on the spinning duct in Nephila edulis spiders suggests that this transformation involves a stress-induced formation of anti-parallel beta-sheets induced by extensional flow. Measurements of draw stress at different draw rates during silking confirm that a stress-induced phase transition occurs. PMID:10828366

  10. Differential polymerization of the two main protein components of dragline silk during fibre spinning.

    PubMed

    Sponner, Alexander; Unger, Eberhard; Grosse, Frank; Weisshart, Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Spider silks are some of the strongest materials found in nature. Achieving the high tensile strength and elasticity of the dragline of orb-weaving spiders, such as Nephila clavipes, is a principal goal in biomimetics research. The dragline has a composite nature and is predominantly made up by two proteins, the major ampullate spidroins 1 and 2 (refs 3, 6, 7), which can be considered natural block copolymers. On the basis of their molecular structures both spidroins are thought to contribute, in different ways, to the mechanical properties of dragline silk. The spinning process itself is also considered important for determining the observed features by shaping the hierarchical structure of the fibre. Here we study the heterogeneous distribution of proteins along the radial axis of the fibre. This heterogeneity is generated during the conversion of the liquid spinning dope into solid fibre. Whereas spidroin 1 is distributed almost uniformly within the fibre core, spidroin 2 is missing in the periphery and is tightly packed in certain core areas. Our findings suggest that the role of spidroin 2 in the spinning process could be to facilitate the formation of fibrils and contribute directly to the elasticity of the silk. PMID:16184170

  11. Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Dries; Verduyn, Lieselot; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    Trade-offs among life history traits are central to understanding the limits of adaptations to stress. In animals, virtually all decisions taken during life are expected to have downstream consequences. To what degree rare, but energy-demanding, decisions carry over to individual performance is rarely studied in arthropods. We used spiders as a model system to test how single investments in silk use - for dispersal or predator escape - affect individual performance. Silk produced for safe lines and as threads for ballooning is of the strongest kind and is energetically costly, especially when resources are limited. We induced dragline spinning in two species of money spider at similar quantities to that under natural conditions and tested trade-offs with lifespan and egg sac production under unlimited prey availability and a dietary restriction treatment. We demonstrate strong trade-offs between dragline spinning and survival and fecundity. Survival trade-offs were additive to those imposed by the dietary treatment, but a reduction in eggs produced after silk use was only prevalent under conditions where food was restricted during the spider's life. Because draglines are not recycled after their use for dispersal or predator escape, their spinning incurs substantial fitness costs in dispersal, especially in environments with prey limitation. Rare but energetically costly decisions related to dispersal or predator escape may thus carry over to adult performance and explain phenotypic heterogeneity in natural populations. PMID:26596528

  12. Spider dragline silk proteins in transgenic tobacco leaves: accumulation and field production.

    PubMed

    Menassa, Rima; Zhu, Hong; Karatzas, Costas N; Lazaris, Anthoula; Richman, Alex; Brandle, Jim

    2004-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is a unique biomaterial and represents nature's strongest known fibre. As it is almost as strong as many commercial synthetic fibres, it is suitable for use in many industrial and medical applications. The prerequisite for such a widespread use is the cost-effective production in sufficient quantities for commercial fibre manufacturing. Agricultural biotechnology and the production of recombinant dragline silk proteins in transgenic plants offer the potential for low-cost, large-scale production. The purpose of this work was to examine the feasibility of producing the two protein components of dragline silk (MaSp1 and MaSp2) from Nephila clavipes in transgenic tobacco. Two different promoters, the enhanced CaMV 35S promoter (Kay et al., 1987) and a new tobacco cryptic constitutive promoter, tCUP (Foster et al., 1999) were used, in conjunction with a plant secretory signal (PR1b), a translational enhancer (alfalfa mosaic virus, AMV) and an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL), to express the MaSp1 and MaSp2 genes in the leaves of transgenic plants. Both genes expressed successfully and recombinant protein accumulated in transgenic plants grown in both greenhouse and field trials. PMID:17168889

  13. Blueprint for a High-Performance Biomaterial: Full-Length Spider Dragline Silk Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.; Tinghitella, Robin M.; Collin, Matthew A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2007-01-01

    Spider dragline (major ampullate) silk outperforms virtually all other natural and manmade materials in terms of tensile strength and toughness. For this reason, the mass-production of artificial spider silks through transgenic technologies has been a major goal of biomimetics research. Although all known arthropod silk proteins are extremely large (>200 kiloDaltons), recombinant spider silks have been designed from short and incomplete cDNAs, the only available sequences. Here we describe the first full-length spider silk gene sequences and their flanking regions. These genes encode the MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins that compose the black widow's high-performance dragline silk. Each gene includes a single enormous exon (>9000 base pairs) that translates into a highly repetitive polypeptide. Patterns of variation among sequence repeats at the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicate that the interaction of selection, intergenic recombination, and intragenic recombination governs the evolution of these highly unusual, modular proteins. Phylogenetic footprinting revealed putative regulatory elements in non-coding flanking sequences. Conservation of both upstream and downstream flanking sequences was especially striking between the two paralogous black widow major ampullate silk genes. Because these genes are co-expressed within the same silk gland, there may have been selection for similarity in regulatory regions. Our new data provide complete templates for synthesis of recombinant silk proteins that significantly improve the degree to which artificial silks mimic natural spider dragline fibers. PMID:17565367

  14. 46 CFR 107.309 - Crane plans and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) One line diagrams of the electrical power circuits of the electric power crane overload protection required in Subpart 111.50 of this chapter. (2) Diagrams of the hydraulic or pneumatic power and control... power failure. Note to § 107.309(a)(4): These plans must be submitted to the Coast Guard, if the...

  15. 46 CFR 107.309 - Crane plans and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) One line diagrams of the electrical power circuits of the electric power crane overload protection required in Subpart 111.50 of this chapter. (2) Diagrams of the hydraulic or pneumatic power and control... power failure. Note to § 107.309(a)(4): These plans must be submitted to the Coast Guard, if the...

  16. 46 CFR 107.309 - Crane plans and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) One line diagrams of the electrical power circuits of the electric power crane overload protection required in Subpart 111.50 of this chapter. (2) Diagrams of the hydraulic or pneumatic power and control... power failure. Note to § 107.309(a)(4): These plans must be submitted to the Coast Guard, if the...

  17. 46 CFR 107.309 - Crane plans and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) One line diagrams of the electrical power circuits of the electric power crane overload protection required in Subpart 111.50 of this chapter. (2) Diagrams of the hydraulic or pneumatic power and control... power failure. Note to § 107.309(a)(4): These plans must be submitted to the Coast Guard, if the...

  18. Ergonomic survey of mobile cranes.

    PubMed

    White, T G

    1973-06-01

    A mobile crane survey was pursued for two years in conjunction with the Construction Industry Training Board. Information was collected on mobile cranes of the wheel and track type. Operational tasks were studied together with interactions which affect the optimum performance of the system in relation to the site organisation in which they form a part. Visits to site were made during working hours, under prevailing weather conditions, and to plant hire companies in the South Wales area. Appendices detail noise exposures in crane cabins and an audiological survey of crane drivers and others. PMID:15677121

  19. Fatal injuries in the United States construction industry involving cranes 1984-1994.

    PubMed

    Suruda, A; Liu, D; Egger, M; Lillquist, D

    1999-12-01

    There is little published information concerning the epidemiology of injuries in the construction industry involving cranes other than for electrical injury from power line contact. For the 11-year period of 1984 through 1994, the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) investigated 502 deaths in 479 incidents involving cranes in the construction industry. Electrocution was the largest category, with 198 deaths (39%) reported. Other major categories were assembly/dismantling (58 deaths, 12%), boom buckling (41 deaths, 8%), crane upset/overturn (37 deaths, 7%), and rigging failure (36 deaths, 7%). The majority of the deaths during assembly/dismantling involved removal of the boom pins from lattice boom cranes. Only 34% of the construction firms employing the fatally injured workers had ever been inspected by OSHA. OSHA cited the employer for safety violations in 436 deaths (83%). Additional worker training, increased OSHA inspections, and crane inspection programs could prevent many crane-related deaths. PMID:10609224

  20. Structural hysteresis in dragline spider silks induced by supercontraction: an X-ray fiber micro-diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2014-11-27

    Interaction with water causes shrinkage and significant changes in the structure of spider dragline silks, which has been referred to as supercontraction in the literature. Preferred orientation or alignment of protein chains with respect to the fiber axis is extensively changed during this supercontraction process. Synchrotron X-ray micro-fiber diffraction experiments have been performed on Nephila clavipes and Argiope aurantia major and minor ampullate dragline spider fibers in the native dry, contracted (by immersion in water) and restretched (from contracted) states. Changes in the orientation of β-sheet nanocrystallites and the oriented component of the amorphous network have been determined from wide-angle X-ray diffraction patterns. While both the crystalline and amorphous components lose preferred orientation on wetting with water, the nano-crystallites regain their orientation on wet-restretching, whereas the oriented amorphous components only partially regain their orientation. Dragline major ampullate silks in both the species contract more than their minor ampullate silks.

  1. NSWC Crane Aerospace Cell Test History Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Harry; Moore, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Cell Test History Database was developed to provide project engineers and scientists ready access to the data obtained from testing of aerospace cell designs at Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division. The database is intended for use by all aerospace engineers and scientists involved in the design of power systems for satellites. Specifically, the database will provide a tool for project engineers to review the progress of their test at Crane and to have ready access to data for evaluation. Additionally, the database will provide a history of test results that designers can draw upon to answer questions about cell performance under certain test conditions and aid in selection of a cell for a satellite battery. Viewgraphs are included.

  2. Molecular dynamics of spider dragline silk fiber investigated by 2H MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2015-03-01

    The molecular dynamics of the proteins that comprise spider dragline silk were investigated with solid-state (2)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR line shape and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis. The experiments were performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-enriched N. clavipes dragline silk fibers. The silk protein side-chain and backbone dynamics were probed for Ala-rich regions (β-sheet and 31-helical domains) in both native (dry) and supercontracted (wet) spider silk. In native (dry) silk fibers, the side chains in all Ala containing regions undergo similar fast methyl rotations (>10(9) s(-1)), while the backbone remains essentially static (<10(2) s(-1)). When the silk is wet and supercontracted, the presence of water initiates fast side-chain and backbone motions for a fraction of the β-sheet region and 31-helicies. β-Sheet subregion 1 ascribed to the poly(Ala) core exhibits slower dynamics, while β-sheet subregion 2 present in the interfacial, primarily poly(Gly-Ala) region that links the β-sheets to disordered 31-helical motifs, exhibits faster motions when the silk is supercontracted. Particularly notable is the observation of microsecond backbone motions for β-sheet subregion 2 and 31-helicies. It is proposed that these microsecond backbone motions lead to hydrogen-bond disruption in β-sheet subregion 2 and helps to explain the decrease in silk stiffness when the silk is wet and supercontracted. In addition, water mobilizes and softens 31-helical motifs, contributing to the increased extensibility observed when the silk is in a supercontracted state. The present study provides critical insight into the supercontraction mechanism and corresponding changes in mechanical properties observed for spider dragline silks. PMID:25619304

  3. [Construction, fermentation and purification of high polymer spider dragline silk protein containing RGD peptide].

    PubMed

    Ruan, Chao-Ran; Huang, Jing-Xing; Wei, Mei-Hong; Li, Min

    2007-09-01

    Spider silk is a natural protein fibroin with excellent character as it is light and tenacious. It has a wild potential applications in the biomedical field due to its good biocompatibility and degradation. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) is a highly conserved amino acid sequence of many adhesion protein. Biological materials binding with RGD peptide in the surface can promote cells adhesion, migration and proliferation. Our lab had constructed the 16 muhimers with the introduced RGD peptide codons which involve cell adhesion for the first time. It was found that the mechanical capability of the 16 mulimer protein was very limited because of the big gap in molecular weight with nature spider proteins when it was used to made biomaterial scaffold.In this paper,based on the 16 multimers of the highly, repetitive sequence of spider dragline silk and with RGD peptide condons which has been constructed by our lab forestall, it was used to construct the 32 and 64 multimers sequence of spider dragline silk by the strategy of "head to tail". The 32 and 64 multimers were ligated into prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a, and then the B121 (DE3) pLysS. The fragments were in agreement with the desired through digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. By registration into the GenBank data-base, the serial numbers of DQ469929 and DQ837297 were gained respectively. The expression of recombinant protein was introduced by the addition of IPTG. SDS-PAGE analysis shows that the molecular weight of products expressed here are 102 kD and 196.6kD in agreement with the desired respectively. It was the first time for the high polymer spider dragline silk protein expressed in prokaryotic biology. Furthermore, a larger quantity of synthetical proteins with high density fermentation were searched after, and a suit of high efficient purification methods for 32 multimers protein were established. PMID:18051865

  4. Chromosome Mapping of Dragline Silk Genes in the Genomes of Widow Spiders (Araneae, Theridiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghui; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2010-01-01

    With its incredible strength and toughness, spider dragline silk is widely lauded for its impressive material properties. Dragline silk is composed of two structural proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2, which are encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. While previous studies have characterized the genes that encode the constituent proteins of spider silks, nothing is known about the physical location of these genes. We determined karyotypes and sex chromosome organization for the widow spiders, Latrodectus hesperus and L. geometricus (Araneae, Theridiidae). We then used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the genomic locations of the genes for the silk proteins that compose the remarkable spider dragline. These genes included three loci for the MaSp1 protein and the single locus for the MaSp2 protein. In addition, we mapped a MaSp1 pseudogene. All the MaSp1 gene copies and pseudogene localized to a single chromosomal region while MaSp2 was located on a different chromosome of L. hesperus. Using probes derived from L. hesperus, we comparatively mapped all three MaSp1 loci to a single region of a L. geometricus chromosome. As with L. hesperus, MaSp2 was found on a separate L. geometricus chromosome, thus again unlinked to the MaSp1 loci. These results indicate orthology of the corresponding chromosomal regions in the two widow genomes. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple MaSp1 loci in a conserved gene cluster across species suggests that MaSp1 proliferated by tandem duplication in a common ancestor of L. geometricus and L. hesperus. Unequal crossover events during recombination could have given rise to the gene copies and could also maintain sequence similarity among gene copies over time. Further comparative mapping with taxa of increasing divergence from Latrodectus will pinpoint when the MaSp1 duplication events occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of silk gene linkage patterns. PMID:20877726

  5. 46 CFR 109.521 - Cranes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cranes: General. 109.521 Section 109.521 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.521 Cranes: General. The master or person in charge shall ensure that each crane is operated...

  6. 46 CFR 109.521 - Cranes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes: General. 109.521 Section 109.521 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.521 Cranes: General. The master or person in charge shall ensure that each crane is operated...

  7. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with §...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1435 - Tower cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tower cranes. 1926.1435 Section 1926.1435 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1435 Tower cranes. (a) This section contains supplemental requirements for tower cranes; all sections of...

  9. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with §...

  10. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with §...

  11. 46 CFR 109.521 - Cranes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cranes: General. 109.521 Section 109.521 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.521 Cranes: General. The master or person in charge shall ensure that each crane is operated...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1435 - Tower cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tower cranes. 1926.1435 Section 1926.1435 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1435 Tower cranes. (a) This section contains supplemental requirements for tower cranes; all sections of...

  13. 46 CFR 109.521 - Cranes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cranes: General. 109.521 Section 109.521 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.521 Cranes: General. The master or person in charge shall ensure that each crane is operated...

  14. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with §...

  15. 46 CFR 109.521 - Cranes: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cranes: General. 109.521 Section 109.521 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.521 Cranes: General. The master or person in charge shall ensure that each crane is operated...

  16. 46 CFR 126.130 - Cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cranes. 126.130 Section 126.130 Shipping COAST GUARD... § 126.130 Cranes. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, cranes, if installed, must... chapter. (b) The manufacturer of a crane may have tests and inspections conducted in compliance with §...

  17. Dick Crane's California Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrow, Charles H.

    2011-03-01

    Horace Richard Crane (1907-2007) was born and educated in California. His childhood was full of activities that helped him become an outstanding experimental physicist. As a graduate student at the California Institute of Technology (1930-1934), he had the good fortune to work with Charles C. Lauritsen (1892-1968) just as he introduced accelerator-based nuclear physics to Caltech. They shared the euphoric excitement of opening up a new field with simple, ingenious apparatus and experiments. This work prepared Crane for his career at the University of Michigan (1935-1973) where in the 1950s, after making the first measurement of the electron's magnetic moment, he devised the g-2 technique and made the first measurement of the anomaly in the electron's magnetic moment. A man of direct, almost laconic style, he made lasting contributions to the exposition of physics to the general public and to its teaching in high schools, community colleges, four-year colleges, and universities. I tell how he became a physicist and describe some of his early achievements.

  18. Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Overhead Cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Faith; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This guideline provides standards for overhead crane cabs that can be applied to the design and modification of crane cabs to reduce the potential for human error due to design. This guideline serves as an aid during the development of a specification for purchases of cranes or for an engineering support request for crane design modification. It aids human factors engineers in evaluating existing cranes during accident investigations or safety reviews.

  19. 15. VIEW OF THE ORIGINAL 10TON OVERHEAD NILES TRAVELING CRANE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF THE ORIGINAL 10-TON OVERHEAD NILES TRAVELING CRANE. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  20. Modeling sandhill crane population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of sport hunting on the Central Flyway population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) has been a subject of controversy for several years. A recent study (Buller 1979) presented new and important information on sandhill crane population dynamics. The present report is intended to incorporate that and other information into a mathematical model for the purpose of assessing the long-range impact of hunting on the population of sandhill cranes.The model is a simple deterministic system that embodies density-dependent rates of survival and recruitment. The model employs four kinds of data: (1) spring population size of sandhill cranes, estimated from aerial surveys to be between 250,000 and 400,000 birds; (2) age composition in fall, estimated for 1974-76 to be 11.3% young; (3) annual harvest of cranes, estimated from a variety of sources to be about 5 to 7% of the spring population; and (4) age composition of harvested cranes, which was difficult to estimate but suggests that immatures were 2 to 4 times as vulnerable to hunting as adults.Because the true nature of sandhill crane population dynamics remains so poorly understood, it was necessary to try numerous (768 in all) combinations of survival and recruitment functions, and focus on the relatively few (37) that yielded population sizes and age structures comparable to those extant in the real population. Hunting was then applied to those simulated populations. In all combinations, hunting resulted in a lower asymptotic crane population, the decline ranging from 5 to 54%. The median decline was 22%, which suggests that a hunted sandhill crane population might be about three-fourths as large as it would be if left unhunted. Results apply to the aggregate of the three subspecies in the Central Flyway; individual subspecies or populations could be affected to a greater or lesser degree.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.179 - Overhead and gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... device used for retarding or stopping motion by friction or power means. (19) A drag brake is a brake which provides retarding force without external control. (20) A holding brake is a brake that automatically prevents motion when power is off. (21) Bridge means that part of a crane consisting of...

  2. Crane Lowers Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    January 31, 2003

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) aeroshell toward a rotation stand. Set to launch in 2003, the MER Mission will consist of two identical rovers designed to cover roughly 110 yards (100 meters) each Martian day. Each rover will carry five scientific instruments that will allow it to search for evidence of liquid water that may have been present in the planet's past. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. The first rover has a launch window opening May 30, and the second rover a window opening June 25, 2003.

  3. Repainting decontaminated canyon cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-23

    The paint on the H-area hot canyon crane is expected to be at least partially removed during the planned decontamination with high pressure Freon/reg sign/ blasting. Tests to evaluate two candidate finishes, DuPont Imron/reg sign/ polyurethane enamel and DuPont Colar/reg sign/ epoxy were carried out at Quadrex Co., Oak Ridge, TN, March 1984. Three types of 304L stainless steel surface finishes were included in the test (ASTM No. 1, bead blasted ASTM No. 1, and ASTM No. 2B). Two types of contamination were used (diluted dissolver solution, the type of contamination encountered in existing canyons; and raw sludge plus volatiles, the type of contamination expected in DWPF). Some specimens were coated with the type of grease (Mystic JT-6) used on cranes in SRP separations areas. The results of the test indicate that smoother surfaces are easier to decontaminate than rougher surfaces. Statistical analysis of the data from this experiment by R.L. Postles leads to the following conclusions: There is no statistical difference between the decontamination properties of DuPont Imron/reg sign/ polyurethane enamel and DuPont Colar/reg sign/ epoxy; DuPont Imron/reg sign/ polyurethane enamel and perhaps Type 304L stainless steel with an ASTM No. 2B surface finish are easier to decontaminate than Type 304L stainless steel with an ASTM No. 1 surface finish; dilute dissolver solution is harder to remove than raw sludge plus volatiles; specimens with grease are easier to decontaminate than specimens with no grease; and, Freon/reg sign/ blasting pressure has no statistically significant effect. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Floating Crane YD82 general view. Date taken unknown. Taken ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floating Crane YD-82 - general view. Date taken unknown. Taken by Pearl Harbor photographer. Crane Division Collection - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Hybrid system modeling, simulation, and visualization: a crane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiniduma Udugama Gamage, Sahan S.; Palmer, Patrick R.

    2003-08-01

    Modeling and visualization of a complex hybrid system with different domains of energy flow and signal flow are described in this paper. It is a crane system situated in a barge complete with the load, electrical power, drive and control systems. A dynamically and functionally accurate model of the crane was developed. The implementation is in the freely available software suit of Virtual Test Bed (VTB) for simulation and Visual Extension Engine (VXE) for visualization. The bidirectional interaction of simulator and visualizer is fully utilized in this application. The further challenges confronted in implementing this particular system and any other complex system are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  6. Portal Crane P51, 50ton Crane. Erecting side trusses and ladder. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Portal Crane P-51, 50-ton Crane. Erecting side trusses and ladder. Looking east. Taken April 12, 1920. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 3207 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Results of an experiment to lead cranes on migration behind motorized ground vehicles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Clauss, B.; Watanabe, T.; Mykut, R.C.; Kinloch, M.; Ellis, C.H.

    1997-01-01

    Ten greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida), trained to enter and ride in a specially equipped truck, were transported at 80? days of age from their rearing site at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent), Maryland, to a reintroduction site located within the species? former breeding range in northern Arizona. After 5 additional weeks of training, these juvenile cranes were led south ca 600 km to a wintering area on the Arizona/Mexico border. Nine of the 10 survived the trek, 495 km of which was flown, although only a few cranes flew every stage of the route. Their longest flight was 77 km. Major problems during the migration were power line collisions (three, one fatal), eagle attacks (none fatal), and overheating (when air temperatures exceeded ca 25?C). All cranes that entered training quickly learned to follow the truck, and their tenacity when following under unfavorable conditions (e.g., poor light, extreme dust, or heat) showed that cranes could consistently be led over long distances. We cannot predict if the cranes will retrace their route unassisted when adults, but 2 cranes returned 130 km to the starting point of the migration after the flock was scattered by an eagle during our migration south. Three other cranes were recovered 55 km from the attack site and on course toward the starting point.

  8. Sequential origin in the high performance properties of orb spider dragline silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Perea, Belén; Navarro, Andrés; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Elices, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Major ampullate (MA) dragline silk supports spider orb webs, combining strength and extensibility in the toughest biomaterial. MA silk evolved ~376 MYA and identifying how evolutionary changes in proteins influenced silk mechanics is crucial for biomimetics, but is hindered by high spinning plasticity. We use supercontraction to remove that variation and characterize MA silk across the spider phylogeny. We show that mechanical performance is conserved within, but divergent among, major lineages, evolving in correlation with discrete changes in proteins. Early MA silk tensile strength improved rapidly with the origin of GGX amino acid motifs and increased repetitiveness. Tensile strength then maximized in basal entelegyne spiders, ~230 MYA. Toughness subsequently improved through increased extensibility within orb spiders, coupled with the origin of a novel protein (MaSp2). Key changes in MA silk proteins therefore correlate with the sequential evolution high performance orb spider silk and could aid design of biomimetic fibers.

  9. Sequential origin in the high performance properties of orb spider dragline silk

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Todd A.; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Plaza, Gustavo R.; Perea, Belén; Navarro, Andrés; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Elices, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Major ampullate (MA) dragline silk supports spider orb webs, combining strength and extensibility in the toughest biomaterial. MA silk evolved ~376 MYA and identifying how evolutionary changes in proteins influenced silk mechanics is crucial for biomimetics, but is hindered by high spinning plasticity. We use supercontraction to remove that variation and characterize MA silk across the spider phylogeny. We show that mechanical performance is conserved within, but divergent among, major lineages, evolving in correlation with discrete changes in proteins. Early MA silk tensile strength improved rapidly with the origin of GGX amino acid motifs and increased repetitiveness. Tensile strength then maximized in basal entelegyne spiders, ~230 MYA. Toughness subsequently improved through increased extensibility within orb spiders, coupled with the origin of a novel protein (MaSp2). Key changes in MA silk proteins therefore correlate with the sequential evolution high performance orb spider silk and could aid design of biomimetic fibers. PMID:23110251

  10. Comparison of the spinning of selachian egg case ply sheets and orb web spider dragline filaments.

    PubMed

    Knight, D P; Vollrath, F

    2001-01-01

    Liquid crystal spinning appears to be widespread in the animal kingdom, utilizing protein dopes to give materials with a range of different secondary structures including beta-pleat, alpha-helix and collagen-fold. Here we seek to identify the essential design features used in natural liquid crystal spinning by comparing the spinning of two very different materials: the egg case wall of Selachians (dogfish, rays, and their allies) and the dragline silk of orb web spiders. The fish extrudes a "sea and island" composite in which the islands consist of flat ribbons of carefully orientated collagen and the sea, small quantities of an amorphous matrix. Dragline silk filaments are largely constructed from spidroin, a beta protein and have a skin and core structure together with two to three coats. The essential design features common to both systems appear to be the following: (i) intracellular co-storage of a hexagonal columnar liquid crystalline component and a peroxidase within the same secretory vesicles; (ii) luminal storage of a highly concentrated liquid crystalline dope; (iii) use of a dope containing immiscible droplets; (iv) hyperbolic extrusion dies; (v) control of pH and water content of the dope; (vi) preorientation of dope molecules before assembly into fibrils; (vii) combination of extrusion die, treatment/coating bath, and solvent recovery plant within a single microminiaturized device; (viii) slow natural spinning rates. The most important difference is that spiders produce a tough material by unfolding and hydrogen-bonding their silk dope molecules while Selachian fish do it by covalently cross-linking the molecules without unfolding them. PMID:11749189

  11. Evidence of Decoupling Protein Structure from Spidroin Expression in Spider Dragline Silks.

    PubMed

    Blamires, Sean J; Kasumovic, Michael M; Tso, I-Min; Martens, Penny J; Hook, James M; Rawal, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional strength and extensibility of spider dragline silk have been thought to be facilitated by two spidroins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and major ampullate spidroin 2 (MaSp2), under the assumption that protein secondary structures are coupled with the expressed spidroins. We tested this assumption for the dragline silk of three co-existing Australian spiders, Argiope keyserlingi, Latrodectus hasselti and Nephila plumipes. We found that silk amino acid compositions did not differ among spiders collected in May. We extended these analyses temporally and found the amino acid compositions of A. keyserlingi silks to differ when collected in May compared to November, while those of L. hasselti did not. To ascertain whether their secondary structures were decoupled from spidroin expression, we performed solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) analysis on the silks of all spiders collected in May. We found the distribution of alanine toward β-sheet and 3,10helix/random coil conformations differed between species, as did their relative crystallinities, with A. keyserlingi having the greatest 3,10helix/random coil composition and N. plumipes the greatest crystallinity. The protein secondary structures correlated with the mechanical properties for each of the silks better than the amino acid compositions. Our findings suggested that a differential distribution of alanine during spinning could decouple secondary structures from spidroin expression ensuring that silks of desirable mechanical properties are consistently produced. Alternative explanations include the possibility that other spidroins were incorporated into some silks. PMID:27517909

  12. Dual Thermosensitive Hydrogels Assembled from the Conserved C-Terminal Domain of Spider Dragline Silk.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Ming-Liang; Song, Wen-Wen; Xia, Xiao-Xia

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have great potentials in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Due to the advantages of precise control over molecular weight and being biodegradable, protein-based hydrogels and their applications have been extensively studied. However, protein hydrogels with dual thermosensitive properties are rarely reported. Here we present the first report of dual thermosensitive hydrogels assembled from the conserved C-terminal domain of spider dragline silk. First, we found that recombinant C-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) of the spider Nephila clavipes formed hydrogels when cooled to approximately 2 °C or heated to 65 °C. The conformational changes and self-assembly of the recombinant protein were studied to understand the mechanism of the gelation processes using multiple methods. It was proposed that the gelation in the low-temperature regime was dominated by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction between folded protein molecules, whereas the gelation in the high-temperature regime was due to cross-linking of the exposed hydrophobic patches resulting from partial unfolding of the protein upon heating. More interestingly, genetic fusion of the C-terminal domain to a short repetitive region of N. clavipes MaSp1 resulted in a chimeric protein that formed a hydrogel with significantly improved mechanical properties at low temperatures between 2 and 10 °C. Furthermore, the formation of similar hydrogels was observed for the recombinant C-terminal domains of dragline silk of different spider species, thus demonstrating the conserved ability to form dual thermosensitive hydrogels. These findings may be useful in the design and construction of novel protein hydrogels with tunable multiple thermosensitivity for applications in the future. PMID:26457360

  13. Evidence of Decoupling Protein Structure from Spidroin Expression in Spider Dragline Silks

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Kasumovic, Michael M.; Tso, I-Min; Martens, Penny J.; Hook, James M.; Rawal, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    The exceptional strength and extensibility of spider dragline silk have been thought to be facilitated by two spidroins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and major ampullate spidroin 2 (MaSp2), under the assumption that protein secondary structures are coupled with the expressed spidroins. We tested this assumption for the dragline silk of three co-existing Australian spiders, Argiope keyserlingi, Latrodectus hasselti and Nephila plumipes. We found that silk amino acid compositions did not differ among spiders collected in May. We extended these analyses temporally and found the amino acid compositions of A. keyserlingi silks to differ when collected in May compared to November, while those of L. hasselti did not. To ascertain whether their secondary structures were decoupled from spidroin expression, we performed solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) analysis on the silks of all spiders collected in May. We found the distribution of alanine toward β-sheet and 3,10helix/random coil conformations differed between species, as did their relative crystallinities, with A. keyserlingi having the greatest 3,10helix/random coil composition and N. plumipes the greatest crystallinity. The protein secondary structures correlated with the mechanical properties for each of the silks better than the amino acid compositions. Our findings suggested that a differential distribution of alanine during spinning could decouple secondary structures from spidroin expression ensuring that silks of desirable mechanical properties are consistently produced. Alternative explanations include the possibility that other spidroins were incorporated into some silks. PMID:27517909

  14. 46 CFR 107.258 - Crane certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crane certification. 107.258 Section 107.258 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.258 Crane certification. (a) The Coast Guard may accept current certificates issued by approved organizations as evidence of condition and suitability of cranes. The...

  15. 46 CFR 109.439 - Crane certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crane certificates. 109.439 Section 109.439 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.439 Crane certificates. The master or person in charge shall insure that the following certificates and records for each crane are maintained on the unit:...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1440 - Sideboom cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sideboom cranes. 1926.1440 Section 1926.1440 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes. (a) The provisions of this standard apply, except § 1926.1402 (Ground conditions), §...

  17. 46 CFR 107.258 - Crane certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crane certification. 107.258 Section 107.258 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.258 Crane certification. (a) The Coast Guard may accept current certificates issued by approved organizations as evidence of condition and suitability of cranes. The...

  18. 46 CFR 107.258 - Crane certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crane certification. 107.258 Section 107.258 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.258 Crane certification. (a) The Coast Guard may accept current certificates issued by approved organizations as evidence of condition and suitability of cranes. The...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1440 - Sideboom cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sideboom cranes. 1926.1440 Section 1926.1440 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes. (a) The provisions of this standard apply, except § 1926.1402 (Ground conditions), §...

  20. 46 CFR 109.439 - Crane certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crane certificates. 109.439 Section 109.439 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.439 Crane certificates. The master or person in charge shall insure that the following certificates and records for each crane are maintained on the unit:...

  1. 46 CFR 109.439 - Crane certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crane certificates. 109.439 Section 109.439 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.439 Crane certificates. The master or person in charge shall insure that the following certificates and records for each crane are maintained on the unit:...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1440 - Sideboom cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sideboom cranes. 1926.1440 Section 1926.1440 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes. (a) The provisions of this standard apply, except § 1926.1402 (Ground conditions), §...

  3. 46 CFR 109.439 - Crane certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crane certificates. 109.439 Section 109.439 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.439 Crane certificates. The master or person in charge shall insure that the following certificates and records for each crane are maintained on the unit:...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1440 - Sideboom cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sideboom cranes. 1926.1440 Section 1926.1440 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1440 Sideboom cranes. (a) The provisions of this standard apply, except § 1926.1402 (Ground conditions), §...

  5. 46 CFR 107.258 - Crane certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crane certification. 107.258 Section 107.258 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.258 Crane certification. (a) The Coast Guard may accept current certificates issued by approved organizations as evidence of condition and suitability of cranes. The...

  6. 46 CFR 109.439 - Crane certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crane certificates. 109.439 Section 109.439 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.439 Crane certificates. The master or person in charge shall insure that the following certificates and records for each crane are maintained on the unit:...

  7. 46 CFR 107.258 - Crane certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crane certification. 107.258 Section 107.258 Shipping... CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.258 Crane certification. (a) The Coast Guard may accept current certificates issued by approved organizations as evidence of condition and suitability of cranes. The...

  8. Mortality of Mississippi Sandhill Crane chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.

    2004-01-01

    Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) are a highly endangered species that live in the wild in 1 county in Mississippi. As part of a large effort to restore these endangered cranes, we are conducting a project to look at the causes of mortality in crane chicks on the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge in Gautier, MS, USA. This includes surgically implanting miniature radio transmitters in crane chicks to gather data on mortality. This article describes some of the practical difficulties in conducting this type of project in a savannah and swamp location along the Gulf Coast of the USA.

  9. Structural hysteresis in dragline spider silks induced by supercontraction: an X-ray fiber micro-diffraction study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sampath, Sujatha; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2014-11-27

    Interaction with water causes shrinkage and significant changes in the structure of spider dragline silks, which has been referred to as supercontraction in the literature. Preferred orientation or alignment of protein chains with respect to the fiber axis is extensively changed during this supercontraction process. Synchrotron X-ray micro-fiber diffraction experiments have been performed on Nephila clavipes and Argiope aurantia major and minor ampullate dragline spider fibers in the native dry, contracted (by immersion in water) and restretched (from contracted) states. Changes in the orientation of β-sheet nanocrystallites and the oriented component of the amorphous network have been determined from wide-anglemore » X-ray diffraction patterns. While both the crystalline and amorphous components lose preferred orientation on wetting with water, the nano-crystallites regain their orientation on wet-restretching, whereas the oriented amorphous components only partially regain their orientation. Dragline major ampullate silks in both the species contract more than their minor ampullate silks.« less

  10. Structural hysteresis in dragline spider silks induced by supercontraction: An x-ray fiber micro-diffraction study

    PubMed Central

    Yarger, Jeffery. L.

    2014-01-01

    Interaction with water causes shrinkage and significant changes in the structure of spider dragline silks, which has been referred to as supercontraction in the literature. Preferred orientation or alignment of protein chains with respect to the fiber axis is extensively changed during this supercontraction process. Synchrotron x-ray micro-fiber diffraction experiments have been performed on Nephila clavipes and Argiope aurantia major and minor ampullate dragline spider fibers in the native dry, contracted (by immersion in water) and restretched (from contracted) states. Changes in the orientation of β-sheet nanocrystallites and the oriented component of the amorphous network have been determined from wide-angle x-ray diffraction patterns. While both the crystalline and amorphous components lose preferred orientation on wetting with water, the nano-crystallites regain their orientation on wet-restretching, whereas the oriented amorphous components only partially regain their orientation. Dragline major ampullate silks in both the species contract more than their minor ampullate silks. PMID:25621168

  11. Allozyme evidence for crane systematics and polymorphisms within populations of Sandhill, Sarus, Siberian and Whooping Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dessauer, H.C.; Gee, G.F.; Rogers, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of proteins yielded evidence on the relationships of species of cranes and on genetic diversity within populations of some species. Diversity within the Greater Sandhill crane and a Florida population of the Florida Sandhill crane was similar to that of most other vertebrates, but diversity was low in the Mississippi Sandhill crane, in the Okefenokee population of the Florida Sandhill crane, and within the Siberian and Sarus cranes. Diversity was surprisingly high among whooping cranes, whose number dropped to less than 25 early in this century. Phylogenetic analysis, using both character state and distance algorithms, yielded highly concordant trees for the 15 species. The African crowned cranes (Balearica) were widely divergent from all other cranes. Species of Anthropoides, Bugeranus, and Grus clustered closely but sorted into two lineages: a Whooper Group consisted of the whooping, common, hooded, black-necked, white-naped, and red-crowned cranes of genus Grus; and a Sandhill Group included the Sandhill, Siberian, Sarus, and Brolga cranes of genus Grus, the wattled crane of genus Bugeranus, and the Demoiselle and blue cranes of genus Anthropoides.

  12. 31. CRANE RUNWAY FOR 5TON PUSH TYPE CRANE, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. CRANE RUNWAY FOR 5-TON PUSH TYPE CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, SEPT. 4, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523856-2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  13. General view of concrete foundation rail for Pintle Crane at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of concrete foundation rail for Pintle Crane at marine railway, completed. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 4640 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Hammerhead Crane (HH1) general view. Taken Jan 5, 1978. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hammerhead Crane (HH-1) - general view. Taken Jan 5, 1978. Taken by Pearl Harbor photographer - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Disseminated visceral coccidiosis in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.N.; Fayer, R.; Iverson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) caused by Eimeria spp was first recognized as a disease entity in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Because cranes produced at the Center are reintroduced to the wild to augment wild populations, studies involving both experimentally induced and natural infections were initiated to determine the potential or actual occurrence of DVC in wild Gruidae. Nine sandhill cranes dosed orally with eimerian oocysts of wild origin developed lesions characteristic of DVC. Extraintestinal granulomas associated with developing schizonts were found in 6 birds. Similar lesions were observed in wild sandhill cranes throughout parts of midwestern United States, Alaska, and Saskatchewan. These studies revealed the wide geographic distribution and the high frequency of occurrence of DVC in wild cranes.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1437 - Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges. 1926.1437 Section 1926.1437 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction...

  17. Use of a helicopter to capture flighted cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Hjertaas, D.; Johns, B.W.; Urbanek, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Using a helicopter, we pursued 12 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and captured 6. In forested habitat, cranes could be forced down, but we were unable to deploy the pursuit team, so cranes could not be captured. In open habitat, every crane we pursued was captured. Target cranes were forced to the ground in 0.3-14 minutes. Adjusting pursuit distance (50-150 m) was essential in promoting fatigue and in preventing escape of target cranes.

  18. Disseminated visceral coccidiosis in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Spraker, T.R.; Novilla, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    Three 13- to 18-day-old whooping cranes (Grus americana) and a 9-year-old whooping crane died in outdoor pens at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. The deaths were associated with an overwhelming systemic infection by an intracellular protozoan parasite, which resulted in enteritis, granulomatous bronchopneumonia, hepatitis, splenitis, and myocarditis. The clinical, histopathologic, and electron microscopic findings were similar to those in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Center found to be infected with Eimeria reichenowi and E gruis. Since these eimerian species also parasitize wild whooping cranes, this parasite might be an important pathogenic agent for this species.

  19. Kinematics of foldable discrete space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Exact kinematic description of a NASA proposed prototype foldable-deployable discrete space crane are presented. A computer program is developed which maps the geometry of the crane once controlling parameters are specified. The program uses a building block type approach in which it calculates the local coordinates of each repeating cell and then combines them with respect to a global coordinates system.

  20. Speed-sensing device aids crane operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    So that crane operators can judge payload movements accurately, a friction-driven multilobed cam device energizes a buzzer and indicator lamp in the crane cab. The signal frequency of this speed sensor has a sensitivity to hoist movement of 1/8 inch.

  1. Crane-Load Contact Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Cox, Robert

    2005-01-01

    An electronic instrument has been developed as a prototype of a portable crane-load contact sensor. Such a sensor could be helpful in an application in which the load rests on a base in a horizontal position determined by vertical alignment pins (see Figure 1). If the crane is not positioned to lift the load precisely vertically, then the load can be expected to swing once it has been lifted clear of the pins. If the load is especially heavy, large, and/or fragile, it could hurt workers and/or damage itself and nearby objects. By indicating whether the load remains in contact with the pins when it has been lifted a fraction of the length of the pins, the crane-load contact sensor helps the crane operator determine whether it is safe to lift the load clear of the pins: If there is contact, then the load is resting against the sides of the pins and, hence, it may not be safe to lift; if contact is occasionally broken, then the load is probably not resting against the pins, so it should be safe to lift. It is assumed that the load and base, or at least the pins and the surfaces of the alignment holes in the load, are electrically conductive, so the instrument can use electrical contact to indicate mechanical contact. However, DC resistance cannot be used as an indicator of contact for the following reasons: The load and the base are both electrically grounded through cables (the load is grounded through the lifting cable of the crane) to prevent discharge of static electricity. In other words, the DC resistance between the load and the pins is always low, as though they were always in direct contact. Therefore, instead of DC resistance, the instrument utilizes the AC electrical impedance between the pins and the load. The signal frequency used in the measurement is high enough (.1 MHz) that the impedance contributed by the cables and the electrical ground network of the building in which the crane and the base are situated is significantly greater than the contact

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1438 - Overhead & gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., except in 2-3.5.1(b), “29 CFR 1910.147” is substituted for “ANSI Z244.1.” ..., including semigantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, and others having the same... installed in a facility: Overhead and gantry cranes, overhead/bridge cranes, semigantry, cantilever...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.179 - Overhead and gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. (4) Cantilever gantry crane means a gantry or... more legs. It may have one or more fixed or hinged cantilever ends. (14) Wall crane means a crane.... This section applies to overhead and gantry cranes, including semigantry, cantilever gantry,...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.179 - Overhead and gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. (4) Cantilever gantry crane means a gantry or... more legs. It may have one or more fixed or hinged cantilever ends. (14) Wall crane means a crane.... This section applies to overhead and gantry cranes, including semigantry, cantilever gantry,...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.179 - Overhead and gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. (4) Cantilever gantry crane means a gantry or... more legs. It may have one or more fixed or hinged cantilever ends. (14) Wall crane means a crane.... This section applies to overhead and gantry cranes, including semigantry, cantilever gantry,...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.179 - Overhead and gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley. (4) Cantilever gantry crane means a gantry or... more legs. It may have one or more fixed or hinged cantilever ends. (14) Wall crane means a crane.... This section applies to overhead and gantry cranes, including semigantry, cantilever gantry,...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1438 - Overhead & gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., except in 2-3.5.1(b), “29 CFR 1910.147” is substituted for “ANSI Z244.1.” ..., including semigantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, and others having the same... installed in a facility: Overhead and gantry cranes, overhead/bridge cranes, semigantry, cantilever...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1438 - Overhead & gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., except in 2-3.5.1(b), “29 CFR 1910.147” is substituted for “ANSI Z244.1.” ..., including semigantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, and others having the same... installed in a facility: Overhead and gantry cranes, overhead/bridge cranes, semigantry, cantilever...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1438 - Overhead & gantry cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., except in 2-3.5.1(b), “29 CFR 1910.147” is substituted for “ANSI Z244.1.” ..., including semigantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, and others having the same... installed in a facility: Overhead and gantry cranes, overhead/bridge cranes, semigantry, cantilever...

  10. 46 CFR 109.525 - Cranes: Working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cranes: Working loads. 109.525 Section 109.525 Shipping... Cranes § 109.525 Cranes: Working loads. The master or person in charge shall ensure that tables... working the crane....

  11. 46 CFR 109.527 - Cranes: Operator designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes: Operator designation. 109.527 Section 109.527... OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.527 Cranes: Operator designation. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate, in writing, each crane operator. (b) The master or person in charge shall ensure that only...

  12. 46 CFR 109.527 - Cranes: Operator designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cranes: Operator designation. 109.527 Section 109.527... OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.527 Cranes: Operator designation. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate, in writing, each crane operator. (b) The master or person in charge shall ensure that only...

  13. 46 CFR 109.525 - Cranes: Working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cranes: Working loads. 109.525 Section 109.525 Shipping... Cranes § 109.525 Cranes: Working loads. The master or person in charge shall ensure that tables... working the crane....

  14. 46 CFR 109.525 - Cranes: Working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cranes: Working loads. 109.525 Section 109.525 Shipping... Cranes § 109.525 Cranes: Working loads. The master or person in charge shall ensure that tables... working the crane....

  15. 46 CFR 109.525 - Cranes: Working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cranes: Working loads. 109.525 Section 109.525 Shipping... Cranes § 109.525 Cranes: Working loads. The master or person in charge shall ensure that tables... working the crane....

  16. 46 CFR 109.527 - Cranes: Operator designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cranes: Operator designation. 109.527 Section 109.527... OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.527 Cranes: Operator designation. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate, in writing, each crane operator. (b) The master or person in charge shall ensure that only...

  17. 46 CFR 109.525 - Cranes: Working loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cranes: Working loads. 109.525 Section 109.525 Shipping... Cranes § 109.525 Cranes: Working loads. The master or person in charge shall ensure that tables... working the crane....

  18. 46 CFR 109.527 - Cranes: Operator designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cranes: Operator designation. 109.527 Section 109.527... OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.527 Cranes: Operator designation. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate, in writing, each crane operator. (b) The master or person in charge shall ensure that only...

  19. 46 CFR 109.527 - Cranes: Operator designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cranes: Operator designation. 109.527 Section 109.527... OPERATIONS Cranes § 109.527 Cranes: Operator designation. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate, in writing, each crane operator. (b) The master or person in charge shall ensure that only...

  20. X-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure within major and minor ampullate dragline spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Isdebski, Thomas; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Ayon, Joel V.; Henning, Robert W.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Antipoa, Olga; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-07-25

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction experiments were carried out on Nephila clavipes (NC) and Argiope aurantia (AA) major (MA) and minor ampullate (MiA) fibers that make up dragline spider silk. The diffraction patterns show a semi-crystalline structure with {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites embedded in a partially oriented amorphous matrix. A superlattice reflection 'S' diffraction ring is observed, which corresponds to a crystalline component larger in size and is poorly oriented, when compared to the {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites that are commonly observed in dragline spider silks. Crystallite size, crystallinity and orientation about the fiber axis have been determined from the wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. In both NC and AA, the MiA silks are found to be more highly crystalline, when compared with the corresponding MA silks. Detailed analysis on the amorphous matrix shows considerable differences in the degree of order of the oriented amorphous component between the different silks studied and may play a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the silks.

  1. An articulated-truss space crane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Bush, Harold G.; Wallsom, Richard E.

    1990-01-01

    An articulated-truss space-crane concept is described, and four articulating-joint (AJ) concepts are evaluated. The space-crane concept uses the same truss structure hardware as Space Station Freedom. The joint concepts are compared according to their actuator stroke ratio, actuator authority, and part count. One AJ concept is selected as a candidate space-crane joint because of its better performance and lower part count. The space-crane reach envelope is determined as a function of the number of AJs and the number of fixed-length booms. A space crane with three booms, three AJs, and one rotary joint provides an adequate reach envelope for an expected work area. The space-crane tip velocity, because of an allowable truss strut compressive load, is limited to approximately 1.0 in./sec for a 300,000-lbm payload. The displacement response is also shown for an emergency stop scenario as a function of the payload mass. The space-crane tip deflection is on the order of 12 in. for a 300,000-lbm payload.

  2. Demonstration of the smart crane ammunition transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Killough, S.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of the Smart Crane Ammunition Transfer System (SCATS) project is to demonstrate robotic/telerobotic controls technology for a mobile articulated crane for missile/munitions handling, delivery, and reload. Missile resupply and reload have been manually intensive operations up to this time. Currently, reload missiles are delivered by truck to the site of the launcher. A crew of four to five personnel reloads the missiles from the truck to the launcher using a hydraulic-powered crane. The missiles are handled carefully for the safety of the missiles and personnel. Numerous steps are required in the reload process and the entire reload operation can take over an hour for some missile systems. Recent US Army directives require the entire operation to be accomplished in a fraction of that time. Current development of SCATS is being based primarily on reloading Patriot missiles. This paper summarizes the current status of the SCATS project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additional information on project background and requirements has been described previously (Bradley, et al., 1995).

  3. Mycotoxin-induced disease in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Carpenter, J.W.; Gee, G.F.; Thomas, N.J.; Dein, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    In 1987, an epizootic in cranes at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA, caused illness in 80% of 300 captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and death of 15 of these cranes. Gross pathology findings were inconclusive and consisted of dehydration, atrophy of fat, renal insufficiency, and small spleens. Extensive testing resulted in isolation of Fusarium sp. mold from constituents of the grain-based diet. Low levels of two mycotoxins, T2 (1-2 ppm) and deoxynivalenol (0.4 ppm), were isolated from the pelleted feed.

  4. ASME Nuclear Crane Standards for Enhanced Crane Safety and Increased Profit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, Stephen N.

    2000-01-01

    The ASME NOG-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes', covers top running cranes for nuclear facilities; with the ASME NUM-1 standard, 'Rules for Construction of Cranes, Monorails, and Hoists', covering the single girder, underhung, wall and jib cranes, as well as the monorails and hoists. These two ASME nuclear crane standards provide criteria for designing, inspecting and testing overhead handling equipment with enhanced safety to meet the 'defense-in-depth' approach of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents NUREG 0554 and NUREG 0612. In addition to providing designs for enhanced safety, the ASME nuclear crane standards provide a basis for purchasing overhead handling equipment with standard safety features, based upon accepted engineering principles, and including performance and environmental parameters specific to nuclear facilities. The ASME NOG-1 and ASME NUM-1 standards not only provide enhanced safety for handling a critical load, but also increase profit by minimizing the possibility of load drops, by reducing cumbersome operating restrictions, and by providing the foundation for a sound licensing position. The ASME nuclear crane standards can also increase profit by providing the designs and information to help ensure that the right standard equipment is purchased. Additionally, the ASME nuclear crane standards can increase profit by providing designs and information to help address current issues, such as the qualification of nuclear plant cranes for making 'planned engineered lifts' for steam generator replacement and decommissioning.

  5. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTUR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    At 90 years of age, the APTA may be facing some of the greatest national and global challenges of its history. Membership has grown from 238 in 1921 to over 70,000 in 2011, but the expansion of the APTA may be restrictive to individual participation. A leadership gap appears imminent in practice and education. Fostering every member to understand the APTA and its great work is essential to ensuring a profession that lives its core values and meets societal needs. The Linda Crane Memorial Lecture in 2011 celebrated a vision of the APTA's 100th birthday with every member serving as a “professional centenarian” who stewards the organization to continued greatness. PMID:21637394

  6. Counter-balanced, multiple cable construction crane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Yang, Li-Farn (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a counter-balanced, multiple cable construction crane. The apparatus for hoisting payloads comprises a crane having a lifting means, the lifting means comprising an end effector means and three suspension means or cables. One end of each cable attaches to a different winding means located on the lifting means, and the other end of each cable attaches to a different point on the end effector, such that the three cables have a theoretical point of convergence with this point corresponding to the center of mass of the payload. Three controls command rotation of the winding means to a predetermined position. Accordingly, the crane provides precise and autonomous positioning of the payload without human guidance. The crane further comprises a counter-balancing means. Two controls position the counter-balancing means to offset the overturning moment which arises during the lifting of heavy payloads.

  7. Iatrogenic salt poisoning in captive sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Salt poisoning developed in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) when sea salt was added to normal drinking water to produce a sodium chloride concentration of 1%. Two of 18 cranes died and 2 were euthanatized when moribund. Muscle weakness, paresis, dyspnea, and depression were observed. Brain and serum sodium, serum uric acid,:and plasma osmolality values were abnormally high. Lesions were those of visceral gout, renal tubular necrosis, nephrosis, and skeletal muscle.necrosis.

  8. E-Spun Composite Fibers of Collagen and Dragline Silk Protein: Fiber Mechanics, Biocompatibility, and Application in Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite matrices with high mechanical strength, high stability, and the ability to direct matrix-specific stem cell differentiation are essential for the reconstruction of lesioned tissues in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Toward this end, we used the electrospinning technique to fabricate well-aligned composite fibers from collagen and spider dragline silk protein, obtained from the milk of transgenic goats, mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM) on a similar scale. Collagen and the dragline silk proteins were found to mix homogeneously at all ratios in the electrospun (E-spun) fibers. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength and elasticity of the fibers increased monotonically with silk percentage, whereas the stretchability was slightly reduced. Strikingly, we found that the incorporation of silk proteins to collagen dramatically increased the matrix stability against excessive fiber swelling and shape deformation in cell culture medium. When human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) were seeded on the collagen–silk matrices, the matrices were found to support cell proliferation at a similar rate as that of the pure collagen matrix, but they provided cell adhesion with reduced strengths and induced cell polarization at varied levels. Matrices containing 15 and 30 wt % silk in collagen (CS15, CS30) were found to induce a level of neural differentiation comparable to that of pure collagen. In particular, CS15 matrix induced the highest extent of cell polarization and promoted the development of extended 1D neural filaments strictly in-line with the aligned fibers. Taking the increased mechanical strength and fiber stability into consideration, CS15 and CS30 E-spun fibers offer better alternatives to pure collagen fibers as scaffolds that can be potentially utilized in neural tissue repair and the development of future nanobiodevices. PMID:25405355

  9. E-spun composite fibers of collagen and dragline silk protein: fiber mechanics, biocompatibility, and application in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bofan; Li, Wen; Lewis, Randolph V; Segre, Carlo U; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-12

    Biocomposite matrices with high mechanical strength, high stability, and the ability to direct matrix-specific stem cell differentiation are essential for the reconstruction of lesioned tissues in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Toward this end, we used the electrospinning technique to fabricate well-aligned composite fibers from collagen and spider dragline silk protein, obtained from the milk of transgenic goats, mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM) on a similar scale. Collagen and the dragline silk proteins were found to mix homogeneously at all ratios in the electrospun (E-spun) fibers. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength and elasticity of the fibers increased monotonically with silk percentage, whereas the stretchability was slightly reduced. Strikingly, we found that the incorporation of silk proteins to collagen dramatically increased the matrix stability against excessive fiber swelling and shape deformation in cell culture medium. When human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) were seeded on the collagen-silk matrices, the matrices were found to support cell proliferation at a similar rate as that of the pure collagen matrix, but they provided cell adhesion with reduced strengths and induced cell polarization at varied levels. Matrices containing 15 and 30 wt % silk in collagen (CS15, CS30) were found to induce a level of neural differentiation comparable to that of pure collagen. In particular, CS15 matrix induced the highest extent of cell polarization and promoted the development of extended 1D neural filaments strictly in-line with the aligned fibers. Taking the increased mechanical strength and fiber stability into consideration, CS15 and CS30 E-spun fibers offer better alternatives to pure collagen fibers as scaffolds that can be potentially utilized in neural tissue repair and the development of future nanobiodevices. PMID:25405355

  10. 45. DETAIL OF OVERHEAD SERVICE CRANE (5TON CRANE MANUFACTURED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. DETAIL OF OVERHEAD SERVICE CRANE (5-TON CRANE MANUFACTURED BY ARMINGTON CARRIAGE; 3-TON HOIST MANUFACTURED BY WRIGHT HOIST COMPANY) IN VALVEHOUSE FOR NEEDLE VALVE OUTLET WORKS ON GALLERY 2. VIEW TO EAST. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR

  11. Predicting and mapping potential Whooping Crane stopover habitat to guide site selection for wind energy projects.

    PubMed

    Belaire, J Amy; Kreakie, Betty J; Keitt, Timothy; Minor, Emily

    2014-04-01

    Migratory stopover habitats are often not part of planning for conservation or new development projects. We identified potential stopover habitats within an avian migratory flyway and demonstrated how this information can guide the site-selection process for new development. We used the random forests modeling approach to map the distribution of predicted stopover habitat for the Whooping Crane (Grus americana), an endangered species whose migratory flyway overlaps with an area where wind energy development is expected to become increasingly important. We then used this information to identify areas for potential wind power development in a U.S. state within the flyway (Nebraska) that minimize conflicts between Whooping Crane stopover habitat and the development of clean, renewable energy sources. Up to 54% of our study area was predicted to be unsuitable as Whooping Crane stopover habitat and could be considered relatively low risk for conflicts between Whooping Cranes and wind energy development. We suggest that this type of analysis be incorporated into the habitat conservation planning process in areas where incidental take permits are being considered for Whooping Cranes or other species of concern. Field surveys should always be conducted prior to construction to verify model predictions and understand baseline conditions. PMID:24372936

  12. Remote crane control techniques and closed circuit television for the US Deparment of Energy, Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    DaSilva, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), South Carolina is a nuclear waste facility being built to vitrify and containerize high level radioactive waste product. DWPF has a unique requirement for an unmanned crane system to install and replace equipment in the high humidity, high radiation and harsh chemical environment of permanently inaccessible processing cells. A radio control system is provided to control a 117 ton capacity bridge crane that is equipped with various power tools for remote handling of crane replaceable and maintained equipment. High resolution black and white Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) assemblies mounted on the crane and on the walls of the various processing cells are provided for viewing the equipment during normal operations and maintenance.

  13. Noise exposure profile among heavy equipment operators, associated laborers, and crane operators.

    PubMed

    Legris, M; Poulin, P

    1998-11-01

    This study, conducted in 1987 and 1988, has made it possible to quantify exposure to noise among heavy equipment operators, associated laborers, and crane operators. The average daily noise exposure was 84 to 99 dBA for heavy equipment, 90 dBA for the laborer, and 74 to 97 dBA for the crane operator. The main sources of noise to which heavy equipment operators are exposed are vehicle engines and the muffler exhaust system, usually located near the operator. The presence of insulated cabs such as those found on power shovels, backhoes, wheel loaders, and graders help reduce noise exposure. The type of tasks carried out by the laborers, the sources of noise from heavy equipment around which they work, and the manual equipment they use determine the noise levels to which such workers are exposed. In the case of crane operators, an insulated cab significantly reduces the operator's exposure to engine noise. PMID:9830084

  14. Calibrated water tank facilitates proof- loading of cranes and derricks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppi, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Calibrated steel water tank provides the weight loads required for proof-testing of cranes and derricks. The use of the water tank provides a safe, fast, economical method of proof-loading cranes and derricks.

  15. FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING CRANE RAILS, GREY IRON CUPOLA AND EMISSION RECOVERY SYSTEM. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Crane counterweight, view north from operator cab level; note pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Crane counterweight, view north from operator cab level; note pipe Coppersmithshop (Haer no. PA-387-T) in background to right. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Detail view southwest of miter gear; note crane jack to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view southwest of miter gear; note crane jack to right - miter and rack and pinion center top with universal joint at left. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING WESTNORTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE, SHOWING CRANE MOTOR AND MALLEABLE CUPOLAS WITH OPEN TOPS AND EMISSION RECOVERY DUCTS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 5. VIEW NORTHNORTHWEST FROM FLOOR OF DRYDOCK NO. 5; CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTH-NORTHWEST FROM FLOOR OF DRYDOCK NO. 5; CRANE LIFTING SHEET METAL SCRAP (JEFF DAVIS-CRANE OPERATOR). - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. 2. LOOKING NORTHWEST PAST THE CRANE AT THE WEST END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LOOKING NORTHWEST PAST THE CRANE AT THE WEST END OF THE PROJECT AREA, TOWARD THE CHANNEL AND MT. TAMALPAIS BEHIND THE CRANES IN THE FAR DISTANCE. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  1. 41. SWITCH BACK IN DAVIS CUTOFF ROAD AT LITTLE CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. SWITCH BACK IN DAVIS CUT-OFF ROAD AT LITTLE CRANE CREEK. NOTE STONE CULVERT BRIDGE AT BOTTOM AND CRANE FALLS BRIDGE AT TOP. - Yosemite National Park Roads & Bridges, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  2. 305 Building 2 ton bridge crane and monorail assembly analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axup, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    The analyses in the appendix of this document evaluate the integrity of the existing bridge crane structure, as depicted on drawing H-3-34292, for a bridge crane and monorail assembly with a load rating of 2 tons. This bridge crane and monorail assembly is a modification of a 1 1/2 ton rated manipulator bridge crane which originally existed in the 305 building.

  3. 46 CFR 109.437 - Crane record book.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crane record book. 109.437 Section 109.437 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.437 Crane record book. The master or person in charge shall ensure that the following are maintained in a crane record book: (a) Descriptive information...

  4. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Populations in Sandhill Crane Feces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandhill cranes have the potential to be important seasonal sources of waterborne fecal bacteria; however, it is currently not possible to measure the extent of crane fecal pollution in potentially impacted areas as there are no available crane-specific assays. This is in part d...

  5. Locomotive Crane placing concrete on trestle at coal dock (Pier ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Locomotive Crane placing concrete on trestle at coal dock (Pier 01) - looking southeast. Taken Jan 4, 1924. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 4872-B - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 46 CFR 109.437 - Crane record book.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crane record book. 109.437 Section 109.437 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.437 Crane record book. The master or person in charge shall ensure that the following are maintained in a crane record book: (a) Descriptive information...

  7. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  8. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  9. 46 CFR 107.259 - Crane inspection and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crane inspection and testing. 107.259 Section 107.259... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.259 Crane inspection and testing. (a) Each crane must be inspected and tested in accordance with Section 3 of the American Petroleum Institute...

  10. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  11. 46 CFR 109.437 - Crane record book.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crane record book. 109.437 Section 109.437 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.437 Crane record book. The master or person in charge shall ensure that the following are maintained in a crane record book: (a) Descriptive information...

  12. 46 CFR 107.259 - Crane inspection and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crane inspection and testing. 107.259 Section 107.259... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.259 Crane inspection and testing. (a) Each crane must be inspected and tested in accordance with Section 3 of the American Petroleum Institute...

  13. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  14. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in accordance with 46 CFR part 109, subpart F. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How must cranes be...

  15. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  16. 46 CFR 109.437 - Crane record book.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crane record book. 109.437 Section 109.437 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.437 Crane record book. The master or person in charge shall ensure that the following are maintained in a crane record book: (a) Descriptive information...

  17. General view of crane with legs erected temporary erection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of crane with legs erected - temporary erection towers still in place. Taken June 20, 1940. Fourteenth Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 13779 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Bridge Gantry Crane No. 1, Welding slab along Third Street, near intersection with Avenue G, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  19. 46 CFR 107.259 - Crane inspection and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crane inspection and testing. 107.259 Section 107.259... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.259 Crane inspection and testing. (a) Each crane must be inspected and tested in accordance with Section 3 of the American Petroleum Institute...

  20. 46 CFR 107.259 - Crane inspection and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crane inspection and testing. 107.259 Section 107.259... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.259 Crane inspection and testing. (a) Each crane must be inspected and tested in accordance with Section 3 of the American Petroleum Institute...

  1. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  2. Overall view of gantry crane and storage yard. Taken June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of gantry crane and storage yard. Taken June 20, 1940. Fourteenth Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 13770 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Bridge Gantry Crane No. 1, Welding slab along Third Street, near intersection with Avenue G, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  4. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in accordance with 46 CFR part 109, subpart F. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must cranes be...

  5. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  6. Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Workmen and Crawler Crane pouring roof slab and parapet wall of building - looking northwest. Taken Nov. 15, 1929. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 7165 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in accordance with 46 CFR part 109, subpart F. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must cranes be...

  8. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  9. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  10. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet the requirements in § 107.231(l), each crane must meet the following rated load test at both...

  11. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  12. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in accordance with 46 CFR part 109, subpart F. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must cranes be...

  13. 46 CFR 109.437 - Crane record book.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crane record book. 109.437 Section 109.437 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.437 Crane record book. The master or person in charge shall ensure that the following are maintained in a crane record book: (a) Descriptive information...

  14. 30 CFR 57.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 57.16014 Section 57.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  15. 30 CFR 56.16014 - Operator-carrying overhead cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operator-carrying overhead cranes. 56.16014 Section 56.16014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16014 Operator-carrying overhead cranes. Operator-carrying overhead cranes...

  16. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in accordance with 46 CFR part 109, subpart F. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must cranes be...

  17. Techniques for rearing and releasing nonmigratory cranes: Lessons from the Mississippi Sandhill Crane program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Olsen, G.H.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, J.M.; O'Malley, K.E.; Nagendran, M.; Hereford, Scott G.; Range, P.; Harper, W.T.; Ingram, R.P.; Smith, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Captive-reared Mississippi sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis pulla) reared at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) have been released at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge (MSCNWR) since 1981. Of 131 birds released through December 1990, 103 were reared by foster parents. The remaining 28 were experimentally hand-reared in 1989 and 1990. After refining release procedures, parent-reared birds have integrated into the wild flock, many have survived, and some have bred. Releases of hand-reared cranes elsewhere in the 1970's were largely unsuccessful, at least in part due to the lack of a lengthy acclimation period. A new hand-rearing protocol holds promise in producing release-worthy birds. The technique employs some features first used in the 1960's (e.g., a costume for the human caretaker and model crane heads used to train chicks to feed). In the mid-1980's, the following features were added: (1) the costumed caretaker was given a visor and feathers, (2) a taxidermic crane head or a hand puppet was held or suspended from the ceiling for use in stimulating chicks to feed, (3) a taxidermic mount of a brooding crane supplied warmth, (4) a full-sized live crane was maintained in an adjacent pen and in visual contact with neonatal young to provide an imprinting model, and (5) a small group of adult (or subadult) cranes was penned adjacent to the outdoor chick pens to provide socialization models. Recent releases of Mississippi sandhill cranes hand-reared according to this protocol and released in Mississippi have had high first-year survival rates. The now-operational technique holds promise for producing large numbers of release-worthy birds.

  18. Crane reliability and safety: a certification program

    SciTech Connect

    DelGaizo, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    In 1982, the US Navy undertook a project to upgrade shipboard rigging and load-handling operations by establishing a formal crane certification program. The program, which incorporated several features of the Navy's long successful submarine safety program, involved procedures for crane operation, including operator training and qualification, as well as procedures for maintenance, inspection, and testing of rigging and load-handling equipment. Special provisions were made for handling of critical loads, such as nuclear material. This project is quite relevant to the commercial nuclear industry, in particular, the areas of maintenance, inspection, testing, and certification. Just what impact this program will have on crane-related accident statistics in future years is only a subject of conjecture at this point, since the program has only recently been implemented. Regardless of these statistics, there can be little doubt that the overall effect of such a program on load-handling operations will be a beneficial one.

  19. Sandhill cranes browse for food near VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A family of sandhill cranes searches for food on the grounds near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  20. Sandhill cranes browse for food near VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    While the sandhill crane parents search for food in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building, their still-featherless baby nearby tests its voice. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  1. Conditioning of sandhill cranes during fall migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Body mass of adult female and male sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) increased an average of 17 and 20%, respectively, from early September to late October on staging areas in central North Dakota and varied by year. Increases in body mass averaged 550 and 681 g among female and male G. c. canadensis, respectively, and 616 and 836 g among female and male G. c. rowani. Adult and juvenile G. c. rowani were lean at arrival, averaging 177 and 83 g of fat, respectively, and fat reserves increased to 677 and 482 g by mid-October. Fat-free dry mass increased by 12% among juveniles, reflecting substantial growth, but remained constant among adults. The importance of fall staging areas as conditioning sites for sandhill cranes, annual variation in body mass, and vulnerability of cranes to habitat loss underscore the need to monitor status of fall staging habitat in the northern plains region and to take steps to maintain suitable habitat where necessary.

  2. Quay crane scheduling for an indented berth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Der-Horng; Chen, Jiang Hang; Cao, Jin Xin

    2011-09-01

    This article explores the quay crane scheduling problem at an indented berth. The indented berth is known as an innovative implementation in the container terminals to tackle the challenge from the emergence of more and more mega-containerships. A mixed integer programming model by considering the non-crossing and safety distance constraints is formulated. A Tabu search heuristic is developed to solve the proposed problem. The computational results from this research indicate that the designed Tabu search is an effective method to handle the quay crane scheduling problem at an indented berth.

  3. 29 CFR 1919.22 - Requirements governing braking devices and power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Requirements governing braking devices and power sources. All types of winches and cranes shall be provided... winch, or electric cranes shall be equipped so that a failure of the electric power shall stop the... electric winches and cranes during the tests shall be taken from the vessel's circuits. Shore current...

  4. 29 CFR 1919.22 - Requirements governing braking devices and power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements governing braking devices and power sources. All types of winches and cranes shall be provided... winch, or electric cranes shall be equipped so that a failure of the electric power shall stop the... electric winches and cranes during the tests shall be taken from the vessel's circuits. Shore current...

  5. 29 CFR 1919.22 - Requirements governing braking devices and power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements governing braking devices and power sources. All types of winches and cranes shall be provided... winch, or electric cranes shall be equipped so that a failure of the electric power shall stop the... electric winches and cranes during the tests shall be taken from the vessel's circuits. Shore current...

  6. 29 CFR 1919.22 - Requirements governing braking devices and power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Requirements governing braking devices and power sources. All types of winches and cranes shall be provided... winch, or electric cranes shall be equipped so that a failure of the electric power shall stop the... electric winches and cranes during the tests shall be taken from the vessel's circuits. Shore current...

  7. Efficacy of eastern encephalitis immunization in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Turell, M.J.; Pagac, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    An epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC), Laurel, Maryland (USA), in 1989 provided an opportunity to determine if EEE immunization protected whooping cranes (Grus americana). Based on seroconversion of 31 % of sympatric hatch-year sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, and a previous 35% case fatality rate in whooping cranes, 17 (37%) of the 46 susceptible whooping cranes should have been exposed to virus and six should have died. As there were no deaths in these birds, the EEE vaccination program appeared to be efficacious in this whooping crane population.

  8. Assessing sandhill crane roosting habitatalong the Platte River, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, P.J.; Nelson, J.M.; Parker, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    Each spring approximately 500,000 sandhill cranes and some endangered whooping cranes use the Central Platte River Valley in Nebraska as a staging habitat during their migration north to breeding and nesting grounds in Canada, Alaska, and the Siberian Arctic. Over the last century changes in the flow of the river have altered the river channels and the distribution of roost sites. USGS researchers studied linkages between water flow, sediment supply, channel morphology, and preferred sites for crane roosting. These results are useful for estimating crane populations and for providing resource managers with techniques to understand crane habitats.

  9. A review of crane safety in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, R L; Seixas, N S; Ren, K K

    2001-12-01

    The complex, dynamic, and continually changing nature of construction work has been recognized as an important contributor to the high rates of injuries and fatalities in the industry. Cranes are a central component of many construction operations and are associated with a large fraction of construction deaths; in fact, estimates suggest that cranes are involved in up to one-third of all construction and maintenance fatalities. Safety and health professionals serving the construction industry need adequate training and knowledge regarding available crane safety devices and procedures so that they may insure these techniques are effectively utilized during construction operations. This paper reviews available information on crane-related injuries, currently available safety devices, and commonly used crane safety procedures. Recommendations for improved crane injury prevention and future crane safety research are given. PMID:11783872

  10. Wireless monitoring system using LAN for crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kyung Jae; Choi, Yeol; Hong, Won-Hwa; Kim, Wha-Jung

    2006-03-01

    Various monitoring sensors have been used for the monitoring and damage prediction of structures. Piezoelectric and optical fiber sensor that are required housing for the field applications are used widely. The voltage change of piezoelectric for the steel girder is used for damage prediction. The inspection and monitoring for safety of crane is not easy because it is located in high level and the operation should be stop for the inspection. The constant input load by moving the crane girder with constant speed was used instead of ambient vibration. In this test, wireless monitoring system using LAN is tried for the long distance measurement. The objective of this paper is to present the dynamic measurement results to identify the potential damage of steel beam using piezoelectric sensor. Cantilever beams, a simply supported beam with bolted splice, and actual crane girder have been chosen for the test. FFT method was used for the damage identification. This output-only dynamic test is likely applied to the top crane to monitor the damage.

  11. Peace Crane Project: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBert, Linda L.; Calais, Jerry; Cuevas, Phyllis; Fruge', Hugh; Gardiner, Judy Carter; Larmon, Marilyn; Rees, Jocelyn

    To model collaboration and to "practice what we teach," a group of faculty members at McNeese State University in Louisiana developed a college-wide theme based on the book, "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes." This book was selected because of the importance of seeking and achieving peace in a world that is struggling and, seemingly, losing…

  12. Flight restraint techniques for captive cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Dein, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditional techniques for preventing escape of captive cranes (i.e., tenotomy, tenectomy, wing clipping, confinement under nets, and amputation) are discussed briefly. Two additional techniques (i.e., brailing and vane trimming) are described in detail. The advantages and limitations of each technique are presented.

  13. Lester Crane: Getting Approvals After the Fact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Mark F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a case study for use in business communication classes to help students understand and learn both the context and the strategies for communication with business and management. Discusses planning required to do business (selling speciality construction cranes) in the Middle East. Includes some correspondence and two assignments. (SR)

  14. Aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Duncan, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    An unusual form of pulmonary aspergillosis in a red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) is described in this report. The major lesion is unique because it closely resembles a lesion referred to as an aspergilloma. An aspergilloma is a single large granulomatous lesion that resembles a tumor and is caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus.

  15. Hydraulic hoist system for offshore cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Doan, T.C.; Featherstone, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A problem of hydraulic hoist systems for cranes has been the generation of heat within the hydraulic circuit. The generation of heat affects efficiency and performance. This paper describes our approach to obtaining improved efficiency and good performance by reduced heat generation.

  16. The "Crane Problem" in Journalism Historiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmarelli, Ron

    Attempting to correct and amplify the portrayal of Stephen Crane in journalism history, this paper provides an analysis of relevant works in journalism and other disciplines in order to point out the weaknesses in the journalism historiography and to show how they apparently came about. Evidence is presented from the literature of journalism,…

  17. Inclusion body disease of cranes: comparison of pathologic findings in cranes with acquired vs. experimentally induced disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuh, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Siegfried, L.M.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion body disease of cranes was the cause of death in 17 immature and mature cranes of 5 different species in Wisconsin. A herpesvirus of unknown origin was the apparent cause. An isolate of this herpesvirus was used to experimentally infect 3 species of cranes. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions associated with naturally acquired and experimentally induced disease were essentially identical. Multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis was found in all cranes evaluated. Necrosis of the gastrointestinal tract, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius also was seen in some of the cranes. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies often were commonly associated with hepatic lesions, sometimes with the splenic lesions, and rarely with the thymic or gastrointestinal tract lesions. The lesions of this inclusion body disease were similar to those reported for cranes in Austria from which a crane herpesvirus was isolated.

  18. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, Ming-Qin; GUO, Hong; JIANG, Jian-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65±0.53 (n=43) and 3.09±0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09±24.94 (n=23) and 28.94±27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes. PMID:25297076

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1407 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-assembly and disassembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1407 Power line safety (up to 350 kV)—assembly and disassembly...) Assembly/disassembly below power lines prohibited. No part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load... part of a crane/derrick, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories),...

  3. Use of ultralight aircraft for introducing migratory crane populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clegg, K.R.; Lewis, J.C.; Ellis, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives were to determine if captive-reared cranes could be led behind an ultralight aircraft (UL) along a migration route and, if after release on a wintering area, they would integrate with wild cranes and migrate north in spring to their natal area without assistance. Greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were used as the research surrogate for whooping cranes (Grus americana). In 1995, the senior author raised 15 cranes to fledging and trained them to respond to his vocal imitation of a sandhill crane brood call. Chicks learned to follow him as he walked, drove an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), or piloted an UL. The caretakers were not in crane costumes. Cranes were tame but allowed to roam at will without accompanying humans part of the day and were penned at night. Daily excursions provided exposure to habitats, foods, and predators the birds would encounter after release into the wild. In mid-October 1995, 11 radio-tagged cranes were led in migration from Grade, Idaho to Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (BdANWR), central New Mexico, and released near wild wintering sandhill cranes. The 1,204km migration took 11 days, including 1 day when the aircraft were grounded due to a winter storm. Hazards encountered enroute included mountainous terrain, turbulent air, and attacks by gold eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). On the wintering ground, hazards included crane hunters and coyotes (Canis latrans). Within 2 days after release at the BdANWR wintering site, the research cranes were associating with and imitating the behavior of wild cranes. The 4 surviving birds migrated north in spring 1996 and at the time of this writing 2 were within 53 km of their natal area in Idaho.

  4. Vertebral Formula in Red-Crowned Crane (Grus japonensis) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha)

    PubMed Central

    HIRAGA, Takeo; SAKAMOTO, Haruka; NISHIKAWA, Sayaka; MUNEUCHI, Ippei; UEDA, Hiromi; INOUE, Masako; SHIMURA, Ryoji; UEBAYASHI, Akiko; YASUDA, Nobuhiro; MOMOSE, Kunikazu; MASATOMI, Hiroyuki; TERAOKA, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Red-crowned cranes (Grus japonensis) are distributed separately in the east Eurasian Continent (continental population) and in Hokkaido, Japan (island population). The island population is sedentary in eastern Hokkaido and has increased from a very small number of cranes to over 1,300, thus giving rise to the problem of poor genetic diversity. While, Hooded cranes (Grus monacha), which migrate from the east Eurasian Continent and winter mainly in Izumi, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan, are about eight-time larger than the island population of Red-crowned cranes. We collected whole bodies of these two species, found dead or moribund in eastern Hokkaido and in Izumi, and observed skeletons with focus on vertebral formula. Numbers of cervical vertebrae (Cs), thoracic vertebrae (Ts), vertebrae composing the synsacrum (Sa) and free coccygeal vertebrae (free Cos) in 22 Red-crowned cranes were 17 or 18, 9–11, 13 or 14 and 7 or 8, respectively. Total number of vertebrae was 47, 48 or 49, and the vertebral formula was divided into three types including 9 sub-types. Numbers of Cs, Ts, vertebrae composing the Sa and free Cos in 25 Hooded cranes were 17 or 18, 9 or 10, 12–14 and 6–8, respectively. Total number of vertebrae was 46, 47, 48 or 49, and the vertebral formula was divided into four types including 14 sub-types. Our findings clearly showed various numerical vertebral patterns in both crane species; however, these variations in the vertebral formula may be unrelated to the genetic diversity. PMID:24334828

  5. Vertebral formula in red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) and hooded crane (Grus monacha).

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Takeo; Sakamoto, Haruka; Nishikawa, Sayaka; Muneuchi, Ippei; Ueda, Hiromi; Inoue, Masako; Shimura, Ryoji; Uebayashi, Akiko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Momose, Kunikazu; Masatomi, Hiroyuki; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2014-04-01

    Red-crowned cranes (Grus japonensis) are distributed separately in the east Eurasian Continent (continental population) and in Hokkaido, Japan (island population). The island population is sedentary in eastern Hokkaido and has increased from a very small number of cranes to over 1,300, thus giving rise to the problem of poor genetic diversity. While, Hooded cranes (Grus monacha), which migrate from the east Eurasian Continent and winter mainly in Izumi, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan, are about eight-time larger than the island population of Red-crowned cranes. We collected whole bodies of these two species, found dead or moribund in eastern Hokkaido and in Izumi, and observed skeletons with focus on vertebral formula. Numbers of cervical vertebrae (Cs), thoracic vertebrae (Ts), vertebrae composing the synsacrum (Sa) and free coccygeal vertebrae (free Cos) in 22 Red-crowned cranes were 17 or 18, 9-11, 13 or 14 and 7 or 8, respectively. Total number of vertebrae was 47, 48 or 49, and the vertebral formula was divided into three types including 9 sub-types. Numbers of Cs, Ts, vertebrae composing the Sa and free Cos in 25 Hooded cranes were 17 or 18, 9 or 10, 12-14 and 6-8, respectively. Total number of vertebrae was 46, 47, 48 or 49, and the vertebral formula was divided into four types including 14 sub-types. Our findings clearly showed various numerical vertebral patterns in both crane species; however, these variations in the vertebral formula may be unrelated to the genetic diversity. PMID:24334828

  6. Avian tuberculosis and salmonellosis in a whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroud, R.K.; Thoen, C.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The whooping crane has been the subject of intensive scientific study and management because it is an endangered species and has high public interest. Programs have been developed to identify critical habitat, to increase production through captive breeding, and in recent years, to use sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) as surrogate parents in establishing new populations of wild whooping cranes. Only a few reports describing diseases and parasites in wild whooping cranes appear in the literature because opportunities to secure specimens are limited for this rare, protected bird (for review, see Carpenter and Derrickson, In Proc. International Crane Workshop of 1983, Bharatur, India, in press). Avian tuberculosis and concurrent salmonellosis in a wild whooping crane are described in this case report.

  7. An input shaping controller enabling cranes to move without sway

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, N.; Singhose, W.; Kriikku, E.

    1997-06-01

    A gantry crane at the Savannah River Technology Center was retrofitted with an Input Shaping controller. The controller intercepts the operator`s pendant commands and modifies them in real time so that the crane is moved without residual sway in the suspended load. Mechanical components on the crane were modified to make the crane suitable for the anti-sway algorithm. This paper will describe the required mechanical modifications to the crane, as well as, a new form of Input Shaping that was developed for use on the crane. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new process. Several practical considerations will be discussed including a novel (patent pending) approach for making small, accurate moves without residual oscillations.

  8. Golden Eagle predation on experimental Sandhill and Whooping Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Clegg, K.R.; Lewis, J.C.; Spaulding, E.

    1999-01-01

    There are very few published records of Golden Eagles preying upon cranes, especially in North America. During our experiments to lead cranes on migration behind motorized craft in the western United States, we experienced 15 attacks (four fatal) and believe many more attacks would have occurred (and more would have been fatal) without human intervention. We recognize eagle predation as an important risk to cranes especially during migration.

  9. Compendium of crane behavior. Part 1: Individual (nonsocial) behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Archibald, G.W.; Swengel, S.R.; Kepler, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides the organizational framework, nomenclature, and abbreviated descriptions for all conspicuous nonsocial behavioral units for all 15 species of crane. We present eight generalized functional classes of behavior. These classes include about 90 discrete motor patterns that constitute the nonsocial repertoire of all cranes. We present this compendium to facilitate information exchanges among students of crane behavior and to encourage interest in future detailed studies of the descriptive ethology of each species.

  10. Sandhill cranes hunting food at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A pair of Sandhill Cranes searches for food with their still- fluffy fledgling close by. The trio have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  11. Artificial insemination of cranes with frozen semen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    For the first time (1978) artificial insemination (AI) with frozen greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) semen resulted in fertile eggs and chicks. During the 2 year (1977-78) study, 6 of 27 eggs produced were fertile. Three chicks hatched. Semen samples used for insemination were frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for two months or less. Recent improvements in the laboratory indicated that a more effective sample can be prepared and greater fertility rates should be expected.

  12. Metalimnobia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Metalimnobia Matsumura, 1911 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Metalimnobia (Metalimnobia) channpayna new species, is described and figured, M. (M.) bifasciata (Schrank, 1781), M. (M.) quadrinotata (Meigen, 1818) and M. (M.) zetterstedti (Tjeder, 1968) are listed for the first time in Korea, new information for previously known species, M. (M.) quadrimaculata (Linnaeus, 1760) is added. Identification key for all Korean Metalimnobia species is given. Wings, male and female terminalia are illustrated for all species. PMID:27395675

  13. Complete LQG propagator: Difficulties with the Barrett-Crane vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Alesci, Emanuele; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-11-15

    Some components of the graviton two-point function have been recently computed in the context of loop quantum gravity, using the spinfoam Barrett-Crane vertex. We complete the calculation of the remaining components. We find that, under our assumptions, the Barrett-Crane vertex does not yield the correct long-distance limit. We argue that the problem is general and can be traced to the intertwiner independence of the Barrett-Crane vertex, and therefore to the well-known mismatch between the Barrett-Crane formalism and the standard canonical spin networks. In another paper we illustrate the asymptotic behavior of a vertex amplitude that can correct this difficulty.

  14. Tetrameres grusi (Nemotoda: Tetrameridae) from foster-raised whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuggle, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    A juvenile whooping crane (Grus americana) that had been raised by greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) foster parents was attacked and killed by a golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) southwest of Rangely, Colorado (Windingstad et al., 1981, Auk 98:393-394). Since 1975, whooping crane eggs have been placed in the nests of sandhill cranes in an effort to increase the population of this endangered species. This bird was hatched at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Idaho and was attacked while migrating to wintering grounds in New Mexico. The bird was sent to the National Wildlife Health Laboratory for a detailed necropsy.

  15. Analysis and testing of a space crane articulating joint testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Wu, K. Chauncey

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: space crane concept with mobile base; mechanical versus structural articulating joint; articulating joint test bed and reference truss; static and dynamic characterization completed for space crane reference truss configuration; improved linear actuators reduce articulating joint test bed backlash; 1-DOF space crane slew maneuver; boom 2 tip transient response finite element dynamic model; boom 2 tip transient response shear-corrected component modes torque driver profile; peak root member force vs. slew time torque driver profile; and open loop control of space crane motion.

  16. Karyotype and identification of sex in two endangered crane species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodpasture, C.; Seluja, G.; Gee, G.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory procedure for sex identification of monomorphic birds was developed using modern cytological methods of detecting chromosome abnormalities in human amniotic fluid samples. A pin feather is taken from a pre-fledging bird for tissue culture and karyotype analysis. Through this method, the sex was identified and the karyotype described of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Mississippi sandhill crane (G. canadensis pulla). Giemsa-stained karyotypes of these species showed an identical chromosome constitution with 2n = 78 + 2. However, differences in the amount of centromeric heterochromatin were observed in the Mississippi sandhill crane when compared to the whooping crane C-banded karyotype.

  17. View northnortheast of drydock no. 2 and its portal cranes. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north-northeast of drydock no. 2 and its portal cranes. Main crane, 50 long tons capacity/maximum height 118 "2", is at left; whip crane, 53 long tons capacity maximum height 173 "8" is at center; auxiliary crane, 15 long tons capacity/maximum height 161 "0" is at right. Building at left is the turret shed. The vessel at the lower right of the photograph is a receiving ship formerly used for processing and temporary housing of naval personnel. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 2, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Reintroduction medicine: whooping cranes in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Keller, Dominique L; Hartup, Barry K

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents veterinary management strategies and diagnostic findings in the reintroduction of the endangered whooping crane (Grus americana). Between 2005 and 2010, 63 (27 male, 36 female) hatchling whooping cranes were assigned to a reintroduction project involving autumn release of costume-reared chicks in Wisconsin. Veterinary care included preventive measures and comprehensive pre-release evaluations to improve fitness and reduce translocation of potential disease agents to native habitats. A total of 44 clinically normal birds were released (70% of assigned individuals). Cases of morbidity were classified according to primary body system affected. Musculoskeletal disorders were described in 57 birds (90%); five birds were removed from the project prior to release (8%), all for abnormalities that prevented normal function. Fourteen birds died or were euthanized prior to release (22%); pre-release mortality was attributed to developmental abnormality, predation, trauma or infectious disease. Chronic respiratory aspergillosis, diagnosed in seven birds (11%), was the most common infectious disease of concern. Predation and trauma were primary causes of post-release mortality; no evidence of infectious disease of captive origin was detected in the study population by the end of 2010. The assessment of data accumulated by this project helped to outline successful health management strategies, as well as identify and mitigate ongoing risks to captive whooping cranes that impede reintroduction efforts and achieving management goals for species recovery. PMID:24027128

  19. Quay crane scheduling with dual cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Xiaoping

    2015-10-01

    In this article, the dual cycling quay crane scheduling problem (D-QCSP) with hatches is addressed to minimize the operation cycles of quay cranes. The problem is decomposed into two sub-problems: the intra-group stage (sequencing stacks within each hatch) and the inter-group stage (scheduling all hatches). A new stack sequencing method is constructed for stacks of each hatch, which is modelled as a two-machine non-permutation flow shop scheduling problem. By removing inner gaps using left-shifting, the adapted hatch scheduling sub-problem is modelled as a two-machine grouped flow shop scheduling problem, which contains more precise processing times. A composite heuristic is proposed for the D-QCSP. Based on the derived lower bound, the heuristic is compared with the best existing heuristics on a large number of instances. Experimental results illustrate that the proposal outperforms the existing methods on all instances and dual cycling needs many fewer quay crane operating cycles than single cycling.

  20. 12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; STONE CRANE HAS OAK SPAR, JIB AND BRACE, METAL SCREW, IRON YOKE AND DOGS; IRON PINS FIT THROUGH HOLES IN DOGS INTO HOLES DRILLED IN RUNNER STONE - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  1. A space crane concept for performing on-orbit assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: in-space assembly and construction enhances future mission planning flexibility; in-space assembly and construction facility concept; space crane concept with mobile base; fundamental characteristics; space crane research approach; spacecraft component positioning and assembly test-bed; and articulating joint testbed.

  2. STOCK YARD LOOKING SOUTHEAST SHOWING OVERHEAD YARD CRANE RAIL, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STOCK YARD LOOKING SOUTHEAST SHOWING OVERHEAD YARD CRANE RAIL, THE MALLEABLE CUPOLAS AND EMISSION RECOVERY SYSTEM, OLD SHED ROOF THAT COVERED THE EARLIER MALLEABLE CUPOLA CHARGING CRANE, MALLEABLE FOUNDRY, AND POLLUTION CONTROL BAGHOUSE. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & Engineering Company, Vancouver B.C., Seattle, New York. Two elevations and cab plan. No architect noted, drawn by Gould. Sheet A2, no 6365. Scaled not given. August 10, 1942. Proposal no. 318. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  4. A records system for a captive crane flock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Hartman, L.; Hereford, Scott G.; McMillen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Crane record keeping systems have been evolving at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) since 1966 and at the International Crane Foundation (ICF) since 1974. The system we present here, a hybrid of the two systems, has been reorganized to promote easy access of information and to limit redundancy.

  5. 29 CFR 1919.72 - Annual examination of cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual examination of cranes. 1919.72 Section 1919.72 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... examination of cranes. (a) In any year in which no quadrennial unit proof test is required, an...

  6. 29 CFR 1919.72 - Annual examination of cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual examination of cranes. 1919.72 Section 1919.72 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... examination of cranes. (a) In any year in which no quadrennial unit proof test is required, an...

  7. 29 CFR 1919.72 - Annual examination of cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual examination of cranes. 1919.72 Section 1919.72 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... examination of cranes. (a) In any year in which no quadrennial unit proof test is required, an...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.72 - Annual examination of cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual examination of cranes. 1919.72 Section 1919.72 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... examination of cranes. (a) In any year in which no quadrennial unit proof test is required, an...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.72 - Annual examination of cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual examination of cranes. 1919.72 Section 1919.72 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... examination of cranes. (a) In any year in which no quadrennial unit proof test is required, an...

  10. Cranes, hoists, and rigging. A safety training manual

    SciTech Connect

    Stinnett, L.

    1986-07-01

    The handling equipment discussed in this manual is the type that lifts, lowers, and locates (positions) heavy material - cranes and hoists. The crane/hoist family of equipment may be as small as a single pulley/rope system handling several pounds, or as large as a marine crane system that recently (1985) hoisted a 5005-metric ton oil drilling rig from a barge and placed it on the seabed of England's North Atlantic offshore oil field. An equivalent ''pick'' would be a 6-ft-high solid pine board, 360 ft long and 160 ft wide (the dimensions of a football field). The capacity of the cranes and hoists at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNLA) fits somewhere within the first 2% of the marine pick or lift described above. SNLA has several mobile cranes and more than 500 other types of cranes and hoists located in more than 100 buildings. The Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL have safety policies and directives that require the operators of heavy equipment to be trained and authorized. The Cranes, Hoists, and Rigging Safety Training Program, sponsored by the SNLA Safety Department, is an effort to fulfill those safety policy requirements. This manual will be used as a safety training aid and will be issued as a reference document for supervisors, operators, inspectors, and service personnel who use cranes or hoists during their regular duties.

  11. Tipping Loads of Mobile Cranes with Flexible Booms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliçslan, S.; Balkan, T.; Ider, S. K.

    1999-06-01

    In this study the characteristics of a mobile crane are obtained by using a flexible multibody dynamics approach, for the determination of safe loads to prevent tipping of a mobile crane. Only the boom of the crane is assumed to be flexible since it is the only element that has considerable deflections in applications. The coupled rigid and elastic motions of the crane are formulated and software is developed in order to carry out the dynamic analysis. The variation of piston force with respect to boom angular position for different boom motion times are simulated, load curves are generated and the results are compared with experimental results obtained from a 10 t mobile crane.

  12. Whooping crane titers to eastern equine encephalitis vaccinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Kolski, E.; Hatfield, J.S.; Docherty, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    In 1984 an epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus killed 7 of 39 (18%) whooping cranes in captivity at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, USA. Since that time whooping cranes have been vaccinated with a human EEE vaccine. This vaccine was unavailable for several years, necessitating use of an equine vaccine in the cranes. This study compared the antibody titers measured for three years using the human vaccine with those measured for two years using the equine form. Whooping cranes developed similarly elevated titers in one year using the human vaccine and both years using the equine vaccine. However, in two years where the human vaccine was used, the whooping cranes developed significantly lower titers compared to other years.

  13. Operator in-the-loop control of rotary cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.; Dohrmann, C.R.

    1996-03-01

    An open-loop control method is presented for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator commanded maneuvers. A typical rotary crane consists of a multiple degree-of-freedom platform for positioning a spherical pendulum with an attached payload. The crane operator positions the Payload by issuing a combination of translational and rotational commands to the platform as well as load-line length changes. Frequently, these pendulum modes are time-varying and exhibit low natural frequencies. Maneuvers are therefore performed at rates sufficiently slow so as not to excite oscillation. The strategy presented here generates crane commands which suppress vibration of the payload without a priori knowledge of the desired maneuver. Results are presented for operator in-the-loop positioning using a real-time dynamics simulation of a three-axis rotary crane where the residual sway magnitude is reduced in excess of 4OdB.

  14. Rhipidia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo; Kim, Sam-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Rhipidia Meigen, 1818 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Rhipidia (Rhipidia) serena, new species, is described and figured. Rhipidia (R.) longa Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014, R. (R.) maculata Meigen, 1818 and R. (R.) sejuga Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014 are recorded for the first time in Korea. Previously known species, Rhipidia (R.) septentrionis Alexander, 1913 is redescribed and illustrated. Identification key for all Korean Rhipidia species is given. Most antennae, wings, male and female terminalia of all species are illustrated for the first time. PMID:27395731

  15. 150ton Hulett Crane (YD25) carrying the boom from head of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150-ton Hulett Crane (YD-25) carrying the boom from head of dock to the 50-ton Crane - looking northwest. Taken July 21, 1920. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 3304 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1432 - Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements. (a) Plan development. Before beginning a crane/derrick operation in which more than one...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1432 - Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements. (a) Plan development. Before beginning a crane/derrick operation in which more than one...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1432 - Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements. (a) Plan development. Before beginning a crane/derrick operation in which more than one...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1432 - Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Multiple-crane/derrick lifts-supplemental requirements... Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1432 Multiple-crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements. (a) Plan development. Before beginning a crane/derrick operation in which more than one...

  20. Clinical pathology results from cranes with experimental West Nile Virus infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    2011-01-01

    Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) were vaccinated for and then challenged with West Nile virus. Resulting titers demonstrated protection in the vaccinated-challenged cranes as compared to the unvaccinated-challenged cranes. Clinical pathology results showed challenged cranes, whether vaccinated or not, had a decrease in their hematocrits and an elevation of 2.5-fold in their white blood cell counts as compared to unchallenged control sandhill cranes. No differences were apparent in the differential counts of heterophils and lymphocytes.

  1. Host–parasite behavioral interactions in a recently introduced, whooping crane population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Richard S.; McKann, Patrick C.; Gray, Brian R.; Putnam, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The whooping crane Grus americana has a long conservation history, but despite multiple attempts across North America, introduction success is lacking. Recently introduced, captively reared whooping cranes have had periods of poor reproductive performance in central Wisconsin that sometimes coincided with black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) emergences. Sandhill crane Grus canadensis reproductive performance in central Wisconsin is approximately double that of whooping cranes. We used comfort behaviors as a measure of black fly harassment to infer whether behavioral differences existed between nesting sandhill cranes and nesting whooping cranes and between successful and unsuccessful whooping crane pairs. To further explore the interaction between black flies and incubating whooping cranes, we examined differences in behaviors between incubating birds and their off-nest mates. Compared to their off-nest mates, incubating whooping cranes exhibited elevated comfort behaviors, suggesting a bird at a nest may experience greater harassment from black flies. Sandhill cranes had elevated head-flicks over whooping cranes. Whooping cranes exhibited more head-rubs than sandhill cranes, and successful whooping crane pairs had elevated head-rubs over pairs that deserted their nests. Behavioral differences between sandhill cranes and whooping cranes as well as differences in reproductive performance, could be explained by exposure to local breeding conditions. Whereas sandhill cranes have nested in the area for hundreds, if not thousands, of years, whooping cranes were only recently introduced to the area. Behavioral differences between the species as well as those between successful and unsuccessful whooping crane pairs could also be explained by the effect of captive exposure, which could affect all whooping crane introductions.

  2. Habitat use by migrant sandhill cranes in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Facey, D.E.; Fritzell, E.K.; Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal spring staging areas of the midcontinent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) are along the Platte and North Platte rivers in south-central Nebraska. Most of these lands are privately owned and managed for corn and cattle production. Diurnal habitat use by radio-tagged cranes was primarily in cropland (55%), native grassland (28%), and tame hayland (15%). Ninety-nine percent of the cropland use was in cornfields; 55% as grazed stubble, 36% as disced, cultivated, and plowed stubble, 7% as ungrazed stubble, and 1% unclassified. Grazed pastures accounted for 93% of the grassland locations and mowed alfalfa fields 77% of the tame hayland locations. Other habitats were seldom used. Time budget analyses indicated that cranes, while in croplands, grasslands, and haylands, spent 35, 36, and 50% of the time foraging, respectively. Cranes roosted in the shallows and on nearby sandbars of about 111 km of river channel. Cranes usually roosted where the channel was at least 150 m wide and avoided stretches narrower than 50 m. Height of woody vegetation along shorelines and on islands influenced where cranes roosted when unobstructed channel width was less than 150 m; bridges or roads adjacent to the channel also reduced use by about half. Management recommendations are made for maintaining suitable habitat for sandhill cranes on their staging areas in Nebraska.

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant TruDock crane system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, B.C.; Carter, M.

    1996-10-01

    The WIPP TruDock crane system located in the Waste Handling Building was identified in the WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), November 1995, as a potential accident concern due to failures which could result in a dropped load. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the frequency of failure of the TruDock crane system resulting in a dropped load and subsequent loss of primary containment, i.e. drum failure. The frequency of dropped loads was estimated to be 9.81E-03/year or approximately one every 102 years (or, for the 25% contingency, 7.36E-03/year or approximately one every 136 years). The dominant accident contributor was the failure of the cable/hook assemblies, based on failure data obtained from NUREG-0612, as analyzed by PLG, Inc. The WIPP crane system undergoes a rigorous test and maintenance program, crane operation is discontinued following any abnormality, and the crane operator and load spotter are required to be trained in safe crane operation, therefore it is felt that the WIPP crane performance will exceed the data presented in NUREG-0612 and the estimated failure frequency is felt to be conservative.

  4. Vitamin E in cranes: reference ranges and nutrient interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dierenfeld, Ellen S.; Sheppard, C.D.; Langenberg, J.; Mirande, C.; Spratt, J.; Dein, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Fat soluble vitamins E and A (quantified as alpha-tocopherol and all-trans retinol, respectively) were measured in plasma samples from 274 captive cranes from four institutions and five free-ranging birds. Ages ranged from 4 mo to 80 yr, and all 15 crane species were represented. Captive cranes had a mean +/- standard error (SE) of 6.57 +/- 0.82 micrograms/ml alpha-tocopherol; migrating greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadenis tabida) had a plasma concentration of 3.71 +/- 0.22 micrograms/ml. Sex and age differences were not significant, but crane species that evolved in temperate habitats had higher circulating levels of alpha-tocopherol than tropical or subtropical species. Mean +/- SE retinol values were 0.69 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml in captive cranes, and 0.66 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml in free-ranging cranes; values did not differ significantly by sex, age, or species. Dietary vitamin E concentrations were significantly correlated with plasma alpha-tocopherol levels in a logarithmic relationship. Dietary selenium at 0.5 mg/kg was associated with decreased circulating alpha-tocopherol concentrations.

  5. Development of remote crane system for use inside small argon hot-cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yu, Seung-Nam; Kim, Kiho; Cho, Ilje

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a novel crane system for the use in a small argon hot-cell where only a pair of master-slave manipulators (MSM) is available for the remote maintenance of the crane. To increase the remote maintainability in the space-limited environment, we devised a remote actuation mechanism in which electrical parts consisting of a servo-motor, a position sensor, and two limit switches located inside the workspace of the MSM transmit power to the mechanical parts located in the ceiling. Even though the design concept does not provide thoroughly sufficient solution because the mechanical parts are placed out of the MSM's workspace, the durability of mechanical parts can be easily increased if they have a high safety margin. Therefore, the concept may be one of the best solutions for our special crane system. In addition, we developed a servo-control system based on absolute positioning technology; therefore, it is possible for us to perform the given tasks more safely through an automatic operation. (authors)

  6. Mortality factors and diseases in free-ranging Eurasian cranes (Grus grus) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Fanke, Jane; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Krone, Oliver

    2011-07-01

    Detailed postmortem examinations were performed on 167 free-ranging Eurasian Cranes (Grus grus) from Germany, collected between September 1998 and December 2008 to evaluate causes of death and diseases. The most common causes of mortality were traumatic injuries (n=105, 62.9%) from collisions with power lines (n=39, 23.4%) and wire fences (n=12, 7.2%). A group of 28 Eurasian Cranes (16.8%) died from organophosphate intoxication. Predation by White-tailed Sea Eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) occurred in four cases (2.4%). Pathologic changes due to infectious diseases were associated with Aspergillus spp. (n=7, 4.2%), endoparasites (n=7, 4.2%), avian poxvirus (n=6, 3.6%), Mycobacterium spp. (n=2, 1.2%), and adenovirus infection (n=1, 0.6%). A severe Strigea spp. infection (n=1, 0.6%) and a leiomyosarcoma (n=1, 0.6%) were newly recognized diseases in Eurasian Cranes in this study. PMID:21719827

  7. Disseminated granulomas caused by an unidentified protozoan in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Spraker, T.R.; Gardiner, C.H.; Novilla, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Oral granulomas were observed in 31 (33%) of 95 captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Necropsy of six of the afflicted cranes revealed granulomatous nodules throughout many of their organ systems. Intracellular protozoan organisms morphologically resembling schizogonic stages were observed within the granulomas by light and electron microscopy. Sexual and asexual stages of coccidia were seen in sections of the intestines of 4 of 5 cranes examined microscopically, and Eimerian oocysts were seen in fecal flotation specimens from 3 of 4 birds.

  8. Quay crane scheduling with handling priority in port container terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Der-Horng; Qiu Wang, Hui; Miao, Lixin

    2008-02-01

    The quay crane scheduling problem studied in this article is to determine a handling sequence of ship bays for quay cranes assigned to a container ship considering handling priority of every ship bay. This article provides a mixed integer programming model for the considered problem. A genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to obtain near-optimal solutions. Computational experiments to examine the proposed model and solution algorithm are described. The computational results show that the proposed GA is effective and efficient in solving the considered quay crane scheduling problem.

  9. A sociogram for the cranes of the world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Swengel, S.R.; Archibald, G.W.; Kepler, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    The behavioral repertoire for the world's 15 species of cranes includes over 100 behavioral acts with clear social significance. Each species performs at least 60 discrete social postures, vocalizations, displays, and activities. Because all but a handful of the stereotyped social displays are common to all species, the presence or absence of social displays was useful only to a limited degree in comparing the relatedness of established crane taxonomic groups. However, the breadth of the repertoire for each species and for the family Gruidae tentatively places cranes at the apex of social complexity (at least for stereotyped displays) in the animal world.

  10. Pendulation control system and method for rotary boom cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, III, Rush D.; Groom, Kenneth N.; Feddema, John T.; Parker, Gordon G.

    2002-01-01

    A command shaping control system and method for rotary boom cranes provides a way to reduce payload pendulation caused by real-time input signals, from either operator command or automated crane maneuvers. The method can take input commands and can apply a command shaping filter to reduce contributors to payload pendulation due to rotation, elevation, and hoisting movements in order to control crane response and reduce tangential and radial payload pendulation. A filter can be applied to a pendulation excitation frequency to reduce residual radial pendulation and tangential pendulation amplitudes.

  11. Review of the mechanical design requirements for offshore pedestal cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, P.E.; Wong, W.

    1984-02-01

    Modern design philosophies for offshore cranes require the structural components to be designed for the dynamic loadings experienced in the offshore environment. If these predicted impact loads are applied to the relevant winch load-paths, then the components in those load-paths can be appropriately designed. Specifications do not at present, require the operator to predict at the enquiry stage, the service duty and load spectrums for the crane. When these are specified by the operator, the designer is able to apply appropriate stress levels to the components to attain the required crane life.

  12. Implementation of damped-oscillation crane control for existing ac induction motor-driven cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, M.W.; Kress, R.L.; Appleton, G.T.

    1993-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has implemented damped-oscillation crane control on one of its existing ac induction motor-driven facility overhead cranes. The purpose of this engineering grade test has been to determine feasibility, determine control and interfacing specifications, and establish the capability of newly available ac motor-control hardware. A flux vector inverter drive is used in the initial demonstration to investigate acceptability for swing-free crane control. Motor performance and restrictions are also examined. Control hardware design is based upon the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) standards. This includes the use of the VME bus and Motorola 680X0-based CPU boards for the hardware and UNIX and VxWorks for the software. However, smaller, cheaper, and more simple embedded controller design constraints are also considered in order to make the technology more attractive for general industrial use. Theoretical background, specific implementation, and recommendations are presented in this paper.

  13. Implementation of damped-oscillation crane control for existing ac induction motor-driven cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, M.W.; Kress, R.L. ); Appleton, G.T. . School of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has implemented damped-oscillation crane control on one of its existing ac induction motor-driven facility overhead cranes. The purpose of this engineering grade test has been to determine feasibility, determine control and interfacing specifications, and establish the capability of newly available ac motor-control hardware. A flux vector inverter drive is used in the initial demonstration to investigate acceptability for swing-free crane control. Motor performance and restrictions are also examined. Control hardware design is based upon the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) standards. This includes the use of the VME bus and Motorola 680X0-based CPU boards for the hardware and UNIX and VxWorks for the software. However, smaller, cheaper, and more simple embedded controller design constraints are also considered in order to make the technology more attractive for general industrial use. Theoretical background, specific implementation, and recommendations are presented in this paper.

  14. Applying vision feedback to crane controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Pan, Shing-Tai; Wijaya Lie, Handra; Chiang, Tung-Chien; Chang, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Encoders are generally used to track the motion of industrial mechanisms. However, the information obtained by encoders may have errors due to encoder aging or mechanism-design problem. Therefore, information by visual feedback is a better way to track the movement of industrial mechanisms. However, image information costs lots of computing effort so it is not easy to be used in real-time control applications. This manuscript derives a simple but effective visual feedback method to follow the target and the image information is obtained only by a general handy camcorder. Besides, the proposed method can track multi-locations in a meantime. Fast image pattern recognition and localisation of the colour histogram by using a moving tracking block is applied to increase the calculation speed. Finally, the obtained locations information by the proposed visual feedback method is applied in an industrial crane control system to verify the effectiveness.

  15. 32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SHAW BOX 5 TON CRANE, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 3, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455678-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 11. EAST SIDE OF DIKE, FACING SOUTH, SHOWING CRANES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. EAST SIDE OF DIKE, FACING SOUTH, SHOWING CRANES AND ELECTRICAL CAGE AT UPPER RIGHT. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 29. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of C. Howard Crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of C. Howard Crane Office Drawing of 1919. Courtesy Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Associates, Inc., Detroit, 1973 ORNAMENTAL IRON DETAILS: POSTER BOARDS AND STORE FRONTS, ETC. - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  18. FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING WESTSOUTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING SHED ROOF OF OLD MALLEABLE CUPOLA CHARGER. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FOUNDRY LANDSCAPE LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM MALLEABLE STOCK YARD CRANE SHOWING THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING AND THE BRASS FOUNDRY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF SERVICE BRIDGE, SHOWING TRAVELLING CRANE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF SERVICE BRIDGE, SHOWING TRAVELLING CRANE AND TAINTER GATE PIER WITH RECESSES FOR EMERGENCY BULKHEADS AND BULKHEAD DOGGING DEVICES, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  1. FIRST FLOOR LABORATORY, VIEW TO SOUTH FROM MEZZANINE, TRAVELING CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR LABORATORY, VIEW TO SOUTH FROM MEZZANINE, TRAVELING CRANE IN FOREGROUND - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  2. 49. OUTLET WORKS: THREE TON CRANE, ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO 4. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. OUTLET WORKS: THREE TON CRANE, ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NO 4. Sheet H-4, December 12, 1939. File no. SA 342/60. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  3. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Rendering by C. Howard Crane Office, 1919. Courtesy Detroit Historical Society. Photocopy by Jack E. Boucher, 1973 PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM SOUTH - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  4. View northeast of the waterfront from 350 ton crane. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast of the waterfront from 350 - ton crane. The "mothballed" carrier Iwo Jima is tied up at pier 2 in the mid-background. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. 13. DETAIL, LATERAL BRACING FOR INTERIOR OVERHEAD CRANE Delaware, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL, LATERAL BRACING FOR INTERIOR OVERHEAD CRANE - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  6. 17. INTERIOR, INSPECTION PITS, OVERHEAD CRANE SUPPORT AND CAR JACKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR, INSPECTION PITS, OVERHEAD CRANE SUPPORT AND CAR JACKING PADS, FACING EAST - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  7. 15. INTERIOR, INSPECTION PITS, OVERHEAD CATWALKS AND OVERHEAD CRANE SUPPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR, INSPECTION PITS, OVERHEAD CATWALKS AND OVERHEAD CRANE SUPPORT, FACING WEST - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  8. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of C. Howard Crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy of C. Howard Crane Office Drawing, 1919, Courtesy Smith, Hinchman & Grylls Associates, Inc., Detroit, 1973 PLOT PLAN (TITLE SHEET) - Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI

  9. 46 CFR 107.259 - Crane inspection and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....I.) Recommended Practice for Operation and Maintenance of Offshore Cranes, API RP 2D, First Edition (October 1972) with supplement 1, except that the rated load test must be performed in accordance...

  10. View of gantry crane on the east side of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of gantry crane on the east side of the dam, looking east. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  11. View of gantry crane on the east side of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of gantry crane on the east side of the dam, looking south. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. 10. Detail of crane over main floor inside machine shop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of crane over main floor inside machine shop section of roundhouse. View to southwest. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Roundhouse, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  13. 16. SEMIPORTAL CRANES ON WEST SIDE OF TERMINAL PIER, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SEMI-PORTAL CRANES ON WEST SIDE OF TERMINAL PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. c. 1949. (Original negative GT-801) - New York Barge Canal, Gowanus Bay Terminal Pier, East of bulkhead supporting Columbia Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  14. 1. Distant view of mill ruins with boom crane for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of mill ruins with boom crane for unloading sugar cane in foreground, looking W. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Sugar Mill, 2 miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  15. Interior of Left Powerhouse showing the Whiting (Company's) "Tiger" crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of Left Powerhouse showing the Whiting (Company's) "Tiger" crane with a capacity of 350 tons, looking west. Note the terrazzo floor below depicting a Francis turbine. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam Powerplant Complex, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  16. Swing-Free Cranes via Input Shaping of Operator Commands

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, Kenneth N.; Parker, Gordon G.; Robinett, Rush D.; Leban, Frank

    1999-08-25

    This paper presents an open-loop control method for suppressing payload oscillation or swing caused by operator commanded maneuvers in rotary boom cranes and the method is experimentally verified on a one-sixteenth scale model of a Hagglunds shipboard crane. The crane configuration consists of a payload mass that swings like a spherical pendulum on the end of a lift-line which is attached to a boom capable of hub rotation (slewing) and elevation (luffing). Positioning of the payload is accomplished through the hub and boom angles and the load-line length. Since the configuration of the crane affects the excitation and response of the payload, the swing control scheme must account for the varying geometry of the system. Adaptive forward path command filters are employed to remove components of the command signal which induce payload swing.

  17. Southeast corner with overhead crane in foreground Bureau of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast corner with overhead crane in foreground - Bureau of Mines Boulder City Experimental Station, Titanium Development Plant, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  18. Establishing paternity in whooping cranes (Grus Americana) by DNA analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Gee, G.F.; Hardekopf, C.L.; Mark, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting was used to study paternity and genetic variability within a captive flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana). Fingerprint patterns for 42 individuals were obtained by digesting genomic crane DNAs with HaeIII followed by electrophoresis, blotting, and hybridization to the M13 minisatellite probe. Despite finding reduced levels of genetic variation in the Whooping Crane due to a population 'bottleneck,' these polymorphisms were successfully used to determine paternity in six of seven cases of captive propagation where the maternal-offspring relationship was known, but where the sire was unknown. These determinations of paternity are required for effective genetic management of. the crane flock. These results also revealed a number of heterozygous minisatellite loci that will be valuable in future assessments of genetic variability in this endangered species.

  19. Effects of extended photoperiod on sandhill crane reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    Photoperiod studies were conducted with greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) from 1969 to 1972 and from 1982 to 1987 at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland. When housed indoors and exposed to long photoperiods, males produced semen during winter. When exposed to artificially extended photoperiods during spring in outdoor pens, females apparently laid earlier in the year and laid more eggs than they would have without the added light. Cranes did not exhibit any signs of photorefractory response to extended photoperiods.

  20. Initial training of cranes for an airship migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Olsen, G.H.; Kwitowski, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the first year of our efforts to train cranes to accept the unnatural stimuli associated with being transported south in cages suspended beneath an airship. All 4 experimental cranes readily acclimated to entering a suspended cage and were trained to accept being jostled while in the cage, even when the cage was transported in the back of a pickup truck. With minor changes, the training protocol is ready for use in an actual airship migration.

  1. Coyote and the Crane--A Legend of the Yakimas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Larry

    Written in plain terms, printed in large type, and accompanied by illustrations, this legend of the Yakima Indians tells of how the crane came to be; it is the story of how Coyote turns a man into a crane because the man would not share his catch of fish. "In the old days people shared things. It was our way of life. If a person was hungry and had…

  2. A Multi-Scale Approach to Investigating the Red-Crowned Crane-Habitat Relationship in the Yellow River Delta Nature Reserve, China: Implications for Conservation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingchang; Xu, Haigen; Le, Zhifang; Zhu, Mingchang; Cao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis (Statius Müller, 1776)) is a rare and endangered species that lives in wetlands. In this study, we used variance partitioning and hierarchical partitioning methods to explore the red-crowned crane-habitat relationship at multiple scales in the Yellow River Delta Nature Reserve (YRDNR). In addition, we used habitat modeling to identify the cranes' habitat distribution pattern and protection gaps in the YRDNR. The variance partitioning results showed that habitat variables accounted for a substantially larger total and pure variation in crane occupancy than the variation accounted for by spatial variables at the first level. Landscape factors had the largest total (45.13%) and independent effects (17.42%) at the second level. The hierarchical partitioning results showed that the percentage of seepweed tidal flats were the main limiting factor at the landscape scale. Vegetation coverage contributed the greatest independent explanatory power at the plot scale, and patch area was the predominant factor at the patch scale. Our habitat modeling results showed that crane suitable habitat covered more than 26% of the reserve area and that there remained a large protection gap with an area of 20,455 ha, which accounted for 69.51% of the total suitable habitat of cranes. Our study indicates that landscape and plot factors make a relatively large contribution to crane occupancy and that the focus of conservation effects should be directed toward landscape- and plot-level factors by enhancing the protection of seepweed tidal flats, tamarisk-seepweed tidal flats, reed marshes and other natural wetlands. We propose that efforts should be made to strengthen wetland restoration, adjust functional zoning maps, and improve the management of human disturbance in the YRDNR. PMID:26065417

  3. Land based crane operator training and licensing program

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, R. van der; Dingman, S.

    1995-12-31

    Working safely and having a healthy respect for safety has always been important to the Corps of Engineers. Because we recognize the increased importance of safety to crane operations, we have developed this Training and Licensing program for all crane operators. What the guidelines and this program intends is, think before you act and thinking requires a knowledge base. We feel the following program strengthens the guidelines to enable competent as well as confident crane operations by our personnel. This document outlines the Corps of Engineer`s Land Based Crane Training and Licensing Program for Class I, II, and III operators. The Corps of Engineer`s Portland District Operation`s Division melded guidelines from industry with specific Corps regulations to produce this program. The Crane Licensing and Training program includes three crane operator classes. Each class discusses licensing, physical and academic requirements and performance evaluations. Other related personnel and their responsibilities are also discussed. These include rigger/signalmen, maintenance staff, and inspectors. A section on testing requirements for specific needs follows with a glossary at the end of this document.

  4. A space crane concept: Preliminary design and static analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Davis, Robert C.; Greene, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Future in-space construction and assembly facilities will require the use of space cranes capable of supporting and manipulating large and massive loads. The large size of the space components being considered for construction will require that these cranes have a reach on the order of 100 meters. A space crane constructed from an erectable four-longeron truss beam with 19 5-sq-m truss bays is considered. This concept was selected to be compatible with the Space Station truss. This truss is hinged at three locations along its bottom edge and attached at one end to a rotary joint cantilevered to the assembly depot's main truss structure. The crane's boom sections are rotated by extensible longeron actuators located along the top edge of the beam. To achieve maximum position maneuvering capability for the crane requires that the individual sections be capable of rotating 180 degrees about the hinge point. This can only be accomplished by offsetting the hinges from the longeron axes. Since offset hinges introduce bending moments in the truss members, an analysis of the effect of hinge offsets on the load-carrying capacity of the structure is required. The objective of the static finite element analysis described is to determine the effect of various offset lengths on the overall bending stiffness of the crane and on the maximum stresses.

  5. [Feeding habitat of red-crowned crane and white-napped crane during their courtship period in Zhalong wetland].

    PubMed

    Zou, Hongfei; Wu, Qingming

    2006-03-01

    By the methods of fixed-spot observation, GPS positioning, plot sampling measurement and factor analysis, a comparative study was made on the feeding habitat of red-crowned and white-napped crane during their courtship period (from March to April) in Zhalong Nature Reserve in 2003 and 2004. The results showed that red-crowned crane preferred unique habitat for feed, mostly focused on water field (e. g., reed marsh). During its selection of microhabitat, food factor played a crucial role, followed by concealment factor, water factor, and identification factor. The feeding habitat of white-napped crane was of diversification, and dry field, e. g., Carex marsh, farmland and burned field, was the priority. White-napped crane had a strict requirement in selecting feeding microhabitat, with "valid food" factor as the most important ingredient, and disturbance and water factors as the subordinate one. PMID:16724740

  6. Timing of spring surveys for midcontinent sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Krapu, Gary L.; Brandt, David A.; Sargeant, Glen A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has used spring aerial surveys to estimate numbers of migrating sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska, USA. Resulting estimates index the abundance of the midcontinent sandhill crane population and inform harvest management decisions. However, annual changes in the index have exceeded biologically plausible changes in population size (>50% of surveys between 1982 and 2013 indicate >±20% change), raising questions about nuisance variation due to factors such as migration chronology. We used locations of cranes marked with very-high-frequency transmitters to estimate migration chronology (i.e., proportions of cranes present within the Platte River Valley). We also used roadside surveys to determine the percentage of cranes staging at the Platte River Valley but outside of the survey area when surveys occur. During March 2001–2007, an average of 86% (71–94%; SD = 7%) of marked cranes were present along the Platte River during scheduled survey dates, and 0–11% of cranes that were present along the Platte River were not within the survey boundaries. Timing of the annual survey generally corresponded with presence of the greatest proportion of marked cranes and with least inter-annual variation; consequently, accuracy of estimates could not have been improved by surveying on different dates. Conducting the survey earlier would miss birds not yet arriving at the staging site; whereas, a later date would occur at a time when a larger portion of birds may have already departed the staging site and when a greater proportion of birds occurred outside of the surveyed area. Index values used to monitor midcontinent sandhill crane abundance vary annually, in part, due to annual variation in migration chronology and to spatial distribution of cranes in the Platte River Valley; therefore, managers should interpret survey results cautiously, with awareness of a continuing need to identify and

  7. 29 CFR 1919.22 - Requirements governing braking devices and power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... winch, or electric cranes shall be equipped so that a failure of the electric power shall stop the... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements governing braking devices and power sources... Requirements governing braking devices and power sources. All types of winches and cranes shall be...

  8. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leuco-geranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Qin; Guo, Hong; Jiang, Jian-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65 ± 0.53 (n=43) and 3.09 ± 0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09 ± 24.94 (n=23) and 28.94 ± 27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes. PMID:25297076

  9. A reintroduction experiment involving mated pairs of parent-reared greater sandhill cranes in northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mummert, D.P.; Ellis, D.H.; Chambers, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    In April 1997, 4 mated pairs of adult greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were abrupt-released at Mormon Lake, Arizona. Five of 8 adult cranes died within 10 days of release. One crane flew from the release area within 10 days after release and was never relocated. One pair of cranes, with 1 pair member sustaining a broken wing 4 days after release, survived for 4 months and demonstrated the importance of maintaining pair bonds after release. The cause of death of at least 5 birds was predation. The high mediate mortality and complete long-term mortality experienced in this pilot project suggests that adult cranes are poor candidates for release. These poor results encourage that, in future release attempts with mated pairs or other adult cranes, it is important to provide the cranes with roosting habitat while still in captivity and to hold the cranes in an acclimation pen at the release site for several clays prior to release.

  10. Research note: Salmonella enteritidis and Arizona hinshawii isolated from wild sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Trainer, D.O.; Duncan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis serotype Rubislaw and Arizona hinshawii were isolated from cloacal swabs of 'healthy' live-trapped sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) in Indiana and Wisconsin. These respective isolations were the first reported from wild sandhill cranes.

  11. View south of boom structure of 350ton crane with pintle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south of boom structure of 350-ton crane with pintle in foreground. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. REPOSITORY SURFACE FACILITIES PRIMARY SYSTEM CRANE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    K. Schwartztrauber

    2005-03-14

    The purpose of this calculation is to compile crane design data for the mechanical primary structures, systems, and components (SSCs) required for the repository Waste Handling Building (WHB) and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB). The work presented in this document has been prepared in accordance with Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management approved program document AP-3.12Q, Calculations. This calculation has been developed to supplement information previously prepared using the development plan for ''WHB/WTB Space Program Analysis for Site Recommendation'' (Reference 5), which concentrates on the primary, primary support, facility support, and miscellaneous building support areas located in the WHB and Waste Treatment Building (WTB). The development plan was completed in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. The work in this calculation is a continuance of the work described in the previous development plan; therefore, in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', a new Technical Work Plan is not required.

  13. Preventive maintenance and load testing of fixed position cranes in support of major operations

    SciTech Connect

    Detrick, C.K.

    1980-07-23

    This paper will address load testing and preventive maintenance of fixed in-place cranes in general, and maintenance and load testing of the 200 ton Polar Gantry Crane at the FFTF in particular. This paper also covers the installation of a 100-ton bridge crane in the FFTF's Reactor Service Building, as well as use of these cranes in making important lifts of FFTF equipment.

  14. View southwest of 350ton crane, showing one of four castings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest of 350-ton crane, showing one of four castings which support a stationary, tapered steel girder structure called a "tower". This tower is located within an outer rotating framework designated as the "pintle" of the 350-ton crane. The whole crane pivots around bearing at the top of this tapered support tower. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. Capture myopathy in an endangered sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Thomas, N.J.; Reeves, S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite precautions to protect cranes, a 3-year-old endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was found caught in a leghold trap in Gautier, Mississippi, on 11 November 1987. The bird could have been in the trap for up to 16 hr and was standing and struggling to escape when it was discovered. Serum chemistries of the crane on 12 November revealed elevated lactic dehydrogenase (2,880 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (152 IU/L), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (>1,000 IU/L) values. Following surgical amputation of a fractured toe, the bird never attempted to stand and was unable to stand even when manually supported. Radiographic and physical examination of both legs did not reveal any anatomical abnormalities. Despite medical care, including supportive therapy, no improvement was observed in the bird's ability to stand and to support itself, and the bird died on 19 November. Serum chemistries and the postmortem and histopathologic findings were compatible with capture myopathy described in other species. Because of the possible susceptibility of long-legged birds such as the Mississippi sandhill crane to capture myopathy, special care must be taken when trapping, handling, chemically immobilizing, and transporting these species. In addition, precautions must be taken when conducting a predator-control program to ensure that nontarget wildlife are unlikely to encounter traps. Capture myopathy has only rarely been observed in wild birds, and this case represents the first report in a Mississippi sandhill crane.

  16. Hormonal treatment and flight feather molt in immature Sandhill Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molt, the production of a new generation of feathers, is a poorly understood physiological phenomenon in nondomestic birds. Often in large birds like geese, flight is restricted by clipping the primary remiges on 1 wing and flight is restored after the molt when the primaries are replaced. A similar technique would be desirable for use with cranes conditioned for release to the native habitat. However, immature sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) did not appear to replace their primaries annually; therefore, we studied their flight feather molt (from 4 months to 3.5 years of age) and attempted to influence molting. Under natural conditions tail feathers (rectrices) were replaced annually and all secondaries replaced in 2.5-year-old birds. However, replacement of primaries in immature sandhill cranes appears to be a gradual process beginning the 2nd year; about 33% of the original primaries (present at 10 months of age) persisted in the 3.5-year-oId birds. Pulling out the primaries of immature sandhill cranes induces the growth of new primaries, as is true of many other birds. However, the new primaries were incapable of supporting flight, fell out repeatedly, and those that remained were often deformed. Pulling the primaries, under the influence of tranquilizers and anesthetics to relax the feather papillae, also did not induce normal growth of the replacement primaries. Progesterone (including excessively high doses), thyroxine, and follicle stimulating hormone, although effective in inducing feather replacement in domestic poultry, had no effect on crane molt.

  17. Vibration suppression of fixed-time jib crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A jib crane consists of a pendulum-like end line attached to a rotatable jib. Within this general category of cranes there exist devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length and variable jib length. These cranes are commonly used for construction and transportation applications. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using jib cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. The resulting maneuvers are therefore performed slowly, contributing to high construction and transportation costs. The crane considered here consists of a spherical pendulum attached to a rigid jib. The other end of the jib is attached to a direct drive motor for generating rotational motion. A general approach is presented for determining the open-loop trajectories for the jib rotation for accomplishing fixed-time, point-to-point, residual oscillation free, symmetric maneuvers. These residual oscillation free trajectories purposely excite the pendulum modes in such a way that at the end of the maneuver the oscillatory degrees of freedom are quiescent. Simulation results are presented with experimental verification.

  18. Communal roosting and foraging behavior of staging sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Krapu, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    Each spring more than 300,000 Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) roost communally at night in river channels in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska and disperse at dawn to forage in agricultural fields. Cranes with central roosts had activity ranges double the size of those with peripheral roosts; 42% of the birds changed activity ranges prior to the onset of migration. Minimum daily flight distance generally increased during the staging period. Cranes used native grassland and planted hayland more often than expected, relative to their percentage of occurrence, and fed longest there; cornfields were underutilized. These differences probably reflect, in part, (1) limited distribution of grasslands and haylands resulting in a greater energy expenditure to acquire protein in the form of macroinvertebrates and (2) wider distribution of cornfields with adequate energyrich foods but limited protein. Cranes probably forage more efficiently and conserve energy by following conspecifics from communal roosts to local feeding grounds, by settling in fields where foraging flocks are already present, and by establishing diurnal activity centers. Alert behavior varied with flock size but not as predicted from group size, presumably because predation of staging adult cranes is inconsequential.

  19. Pathogenicity of West Nile virus and response to vaccination in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) using a killed vaccine.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Miller, K.J.; Docherty, D.E.; Bochsler, V.S.; Sileo, L.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus was introduced into the United States in the vicinity of New York, New York, USA in 1999. The virus has since killed large numbers of birds nationwide, especially, but not limited to, crows (Corvus brachyrhinchos). One sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) at the Bridgeport Zoo (Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA) reportedly died from West Nile virus, so sandhill cranes and endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana), both in the wild and in captive breeding colonies at United States Geological Service (USGS) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Laurel, Maryland, USA) were considered at risk. A killed vaccine in sandhill cranes was evaluated by vaccinating and then challenging these cranes with live West Nile virus. No sandhill cranes inoculated with the killed vaccine developed significant titers when compared with unvaccinated controls. No sandhill cranes inoculated with the vaccine and challenged with the virus died from West Nile virus infection. In addition, no unvaccinated challenged sandhill cranes died. However, 2 days postchallenge, vaccinated cranes had significantly less viremia (P < 0.05) than unvaccinated cranes. Seven days postchallenge vaccinated cranes had significantly less cloacal shedding of the virus (P < 0.05) than unvaccinated cranes and significantly less weight loss (P < 0.05) as compared with unvaccinated cranes. Vaccinated sandhill cranes developed significantly higher titers 14 days postchallenge and were viremic for shorter periods of time after challenge than unvaccinated individuals. Unvaccinated challenged cranes had glial cell aggregates in both the brain and brain stem areas, and this was not observed in vaccinated challenged cranes or in vaccinated unchallenged cranes.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gen...

  1. 78 FR 42800 - Certain Crawler Cranes and Components Thereof; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Crawler Cranes and Components Thereof; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to United... 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, on behalf of Manitowoc Cranes, LLC of... certain crawler cranes and components thereof by reason of infringement of U.S. Patent No....

  2. 78 FR 36572 - Certain Crawler Cranes and Components Thereof Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... COMMISSION Certain Crawler Cranes and Components Thereof Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation of... entitled Certain Crawler Cranes and Components Thereof, DN 2960; the Commission is soliciting comments on... Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure filed on behalf of Manitowoc Cranes, LLC on June 12, 2013....

  3. 76 FR 16764 - Crane & Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crane & Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the...: Exemption From Licensing b. Project No.: 13583-001 c. Date filed: March 9, 2011 d. Applicant: Crane..., 600-volt transmission line connected to the Crane & Company mill complex. The proposed project...

  4. 29 CFR 1919.28 - Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto. 1919.28... Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.28 Unit proof tests—cranes and gear accessory thereto. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, cranes and other hoisting machines,...

  5. 29 CFR 1919.28 - Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto. 1919.28... Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.28 Unit proof tests—cranes and gear accessory thereto. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, cranes and other hoisting machines,...

  6. 76 FR 75450 - Safety Zone; Container Crane Relocation, Cooper and Wando Rivers, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Container Crane Relocation, Cooper and... cranes on the Cooper and Wando Rivers during their relocation from berth 3 at Columbus Street Terminal to... zone is necessary to protect the public from hazards associated with transporting the large cranes...

  7. 29 CFR 1919.28 - Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto. 1919.28... Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.28 Unit proof tests—cranes and gear accessory thereto. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, cranes and other hoisting machines,...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.28 - Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto. 1919.28... Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.28 Unit proof tests—cranes and gear accessory thereto. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, cranes and other hoisting machines,...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.28 - Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unit proof tests-cranes and gear accessory thereto. 1919.28... Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.28 Unit proof tests—cranes and gear accessory thereto. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (e) of this section, cranes and other hoisting machines,...

  10. Workmen assembling 30ton Revolving Crane (TO1) on pier looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Workmen assembling 30-ton Revolving Crane (TO-1) on pier - looking offshore. Taken Jan. 5, 1932. 14th Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 9849 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Waterfront Crane Track System, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 29 CFR 1917.45 - Cranes and derricks (See also § 1917.50).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... access, operation, and the operator's view. (ii) A seat (lap) belt, meeting the requirements of 49 CFR..., applied directly to the motor shaft or gear train. (ii) Each independent hoisting unit of a crane, except... high wind alerts and for any coordination necessary with other cranes. (4) Securing of cranes in...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.45 - Cranes and derricks (See also § 1917.50).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... access, operation, and the operator's view. (ii) A seat (lap) belt, meeting the requirements of 49 CFR..., applied directly to the motor shaft or gear train. (ii) Each independent hoisting unit of a crane, except... high wind alerts and for any coordination necessary with other cranes. (4) Securing of cranes in...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.45 - Cranes and derricks (See also § 1917.50).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... access, operation, and the operator's view. (ii) A seat (lap) belt, meeting the requirements of 49 CFR..., applied directly to the motor shaft or gear train. (ii) Each independent hoisting unit of a crane, except... high wind alerts and for any coordination necessary with other cranes. (4) Securing of cranes in...

  14. Recovery of TMI-2 reactor building polar crane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, J.A. Sr.; Lefkowitz, S.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the TMI-2 reactor building polar crane, its history both during and after the accident, and the inspections and tests conducted to determine the extent of any damage that occurred. The survivability of key mechanical and electrical components is evaluated. The parts replacement and servicing activities performed to return the crane to a useable condition are reported. The experience at TMI-2 is used to formulate recommendations for other plants that might encounter accident conditions such as occurred at TMI-2. The recommendations are for mitigation of the extent of damage and loss of availability which would be important because use of the reactor building polar crane would be on the critical path for recovery from such an accident.

  15. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidlelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, C.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Paul-Murphy, P.; Hartup, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  16. Behavior of sandhill cranes harnessed with different satellite transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Ellis, D.H.; Landfried, S.E.; Miller, L.H.; Klugman, S.S.; Fuller, M.R.; Vermillion, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of various attachment methods and designs of platform transmitting terminals (PTT's) was tested on captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, during 1989-91. Combinations of attachment and transmitter designs included neoprene cord harness with batteries separate from the transmitter (2 harness designs), Teflon ribbon harness with batteries incorporated into the transmitter package (4 transmitter models), and a package attached directly to the bird with epoxy glue only. Physical effects seen on cranes wearing PTT's ranged from skin lacerations (caused by rubbing of harness material) to no observed effects (other than feather wear). The most successful harness material and design utilized a Teflon ribbon harness with the 4 ribbon ends from the transmitter forming a neck loop and a body loop joined at the sternum. Time spent by sandhill cranes performing most activities did not change after transmitter attachment using this harness method.

  17. An optimal performance control scheme for a 3D crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamed, Z.; Husain, A. R.; Tokhi, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal performance control scheme for control of a three dimensional (3D) crane system including a Zero Vibration shaper which considers two control objectives concurrently. The control objectives are fast and accurate positioning of a trolley and minimum sway of a payload. A complete mathematical model of a lab-scaled 3D crane is simulated in Simulink. With a specific cost function the proposed controller is designed to cater both control objectives similar to a skilled operator. Simulation and experimental studies on a 3D crane show that the proposed controller has better performance as compared to a sequentially tuned PID-PID anti swing controller. The controller provides better position response with satisfactory payload sway in both rail and trolley responses. Experiments with different payloads and cable lengths show that the proposed controller is robust to changes in payload with satisfactory responses.

  18. Parental development of eimerian coccidia in sandhill and whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novilla, M.N.; Carpenter, J.W.; Spraker, T.R.; Jeffers, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    In contrast with isosporoid species of coccidia that have established extraintestinal phases of development, the eimeriids, except for a few species, generally have been considered inhabitants of the intestinal tract. Eimeria infection in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G. americana) may result in disseminated visceral coccidiosis. Nodules were observed in the oral cavity of 33% (n = 95) of the G. canadensis at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in Laurel, MD. Necropsy of six of the afflicted cranes revealed granulomatous nodules in many tissues and organs. Histologic studies disclosed protozoan organisms morphologically resembling schizonts in the granulomas, and endogenous stages of coccidia were present in the intestines of four birds. Fecalysis of three of four sandhill cranes yielded oocysts of E. reichenowi and E. gruis. Only E. reichenowi-type oocysts were recovered from a dead whooping crane sample. Domestic broiler chicks each intubated with about 1 times 106 pooled sporulated oocysts of E. reichenowi and E. gruis were not infected. Exposure of six incubator-hatched and hand-reared sandhill crane chicks to oocysts artificially (two chicks) and naturally (four chicks) resulted in typical infection of intestinal epithelium with invasion of subepithelial tissues extending to the muscular layer and widespread extraintestinal development. Asexual and sexual stages occurred primarily in macrophages in the liver, spleen, heart, and lung. In the lung, oocysts were found in bronchial exudate and epithelial lining cells. Six of ten G. canadensis chicks, one adult G. americana, and three of five G. americana chicks that died naturally at PWRC had disseminated visceral coccidiosis.

  19. Command shaping for residual vibration free crane maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, G. G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.; Robinett, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Cranes used in the construction and transportation industries are generally devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length, variable jib length (usually via a trolley), and variable boom angles. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. Current crane maneuvers are therefore performed slowly contributing to high construction and transportation costs. This investigation details a general method for applying command shaping to various multiple degree of freedom cranes such that the payload moves to a specified point without residual oscillation. A dynamic programming method is used for general command shaping for optimal maneuvers. Computationally, the dynamic programming approach requires order M calculations to arrive at a solution, where M is the number of discretizations of the input commands. This feature is exploited for the crane command shaping problem allowing for rapid calculation of command histories. Fast generation of commands is a necessity for practical use of command shaping for the applications described in this work. These results are compared to near-optimal solutions where the commands are linear combinations of acceleration pulse basis functions. The pulse shape is required due to hardware requirements. The weights on the basis functions are chosen as the solution to a parameter optimization problem solved using a Recursive Quadratic Programming technique. Simulation results and experimental verification for a variable load-line length rotary crane are presented using both design procedures.

  20. Command shaping for residual vibration free crane maneuvers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.; Robinett, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    Cranes used in the construction and transportation industries are generally devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length, variable jib length (usually via a trolley), and variable boom angles. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. Current crane maneuvers are therefore performed slowly contributing to high construction and transportation costs. This investigation details a general method for applying command shaping to various multiple degree of freedom cranes such that the payload moves to a specified point without residual oscillation. A dynamic programming method is used for general command shaping for optimal maneuvers. Computationally, the dynamic programming approach requires order M calculations to arrive at a solution, where M is the number of discretizations of the input commands. This feature is exploited for the crane command shaping problem allowing for rapid calculation of command histories. Fast generation of commands is a necessity for practical use of command shaping for the applications described in this work. These results are compared to near-optimal solutions where the commands are linear combinations of acceleration pulse basis functions. The pulse shape is required due to hardware requirements. The weights on the basis functions are chosen as the solution to a parameter optimization problem solved using a Recursive Quadratic Programming technique. Simulation results and experimental verification for a variable load-line length rotary crane are presented using both design procedures.

  1. Unique Chernobyl Cranes for Deconstruction Activities in the New Safe Confinement - 13542

    SciTech Connect

    Parameswaran, N.A. Vijay; Chornyy, Igor; Owen, Rob; Schmieman, Eric; Kedrowski, Dan

    2013-07-01

    The devastation left behind from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) Unit 4 accident which occurred on April 26, 1986 presented unparalleled technical challenges to the world engineering and scientific community. One of the largest tasks that are in progress is the design and construction of the New Safe Confinement (NSC). The NSC is an engineered enclosure for the entire object shelter (OS) that includes a suite of process equipment. The process equipment will be used for the dismantling of the destroyed Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Unit. One of the major mechanical handling systems to be installed in the NSC is the Main Cranes System (MCS). The planned decontamination and decommissioning or dismantling (D and D) activities will require the handling of heavily shielded waste disposal casks containing nuclear fuel as well as lifting and transporting extremely large structural elements. These activities, to be performed within the NSC, will require large and sophisticated cranes. The article will focus on the unique design features of the MCS for the D and D activities. (authors)

  2. [Vibration-protective seats for female operators of bridge cranes].

    PubMed

    Chadova, M I; Gorokhov, R A; Kopnov, N A

    1990-01-01

    General vibration (GV) is regarded as one of the most unfavourable health related factors of the working conditions of female hosting crane operators in machine producing industries. To eliminate the unhealthy consequences of GV, a newly designed vibroprotected chair was introduced (lic. No 1323429), which ensured a GV decrease down to the level envisaged by the standard norms GOST 12.1.012-78. Small in size, easy to handle, compatible with other serially produced units, the newly designed chair is recommended for wide use in hosting crane production. PMID:2379852

  3. Antocha crane flies from Taiwan (Diptera: Limoniidae: Limoniinae).

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Young, Chen W

    2015-01-01

    Taiwanese species of the crane fly subgenus Antocha (Antocha) Osten Sacken, 1860, are reviewed. Antocha (Antocha) taiwanensis, new species, is described and figured. Previously known species, Antocha (A.) bifida Alexander, 1924a and Antocha (A.) styx Alexander, 1930 are redescribed and illustrated. Antocha (A.) javanensis Alexander, 1915 is removed from the list of Taiwanese crane flies. Antocha (A.) gracillima Alexander, 1924b and species close to Antocha (A.) streptocera Alexander, 1949 are listed for the first time in Taiwan. Identification key for all Taiwanese Antocha species is given. PMID:26624765

  4. Pathology and pathogenesis of disseminated visceral coccidiosis in cranes.

    PubMed

    Novilla, Meliton N; Carpenter, James W

    2004-06-01

    Disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) caused by Eimeria spp. was recognized as a disease entity in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (Grus americana) in the late 1970s. While most avian species of Eimeria inhabit the intestinal tract of its host, the crane eimerians, Eimeria reichenowi and Eimeria gruis, invade and multiply systemically and complete their development in both digestive and respiratory tracts. In DVC, cranes, especially chicks, may succumb to acute infections resulting in hepatitis, bronchopneumonia, myocarditis, splenitis, and enteritis. Cranes may also develop chronic, subclinical infections characterized by granulomatous nodules in various organs and tissues. This paper reviews the pathology and pathogenicity of natural and experimental DVC in sandhill and whooping cranes. Naturally infected birds appeared clinically normal, but progressive weakness, emaciation, greenish diarrhea, and recumbency before death were observed in birds administered doses > or = 10 x 10(3) sporulated oocysts per os. At necropsy, naturally infected birds had nodules in the mucosa of the oral cavity and the esophagus, and in thoracic and abdominal viscera. Experimentally infected birds necropsied less than 7 days after infection (a.i.) had no gross lesions. Birds examined later had hepatosplenomegaly, liver mottling, lung congestion and consolidation with frothy fluid in airways, and turgid intestinal tracts with hyperemic mucosa. From 28 days a.i., grossly visible granulomatous nodules were seen in the esophagus, heart, liver, cloaca, and eyelids. By light microscopy, the basic host response was a granulomatous inflammation with non-suppurative vasculitis affecting many organs and tissues. With time, multifocal aggregates of mononuclear cells, many laden with asexual coccidial stages, increased in size and number. Widespread merogony resulted in morbidity and death, particularly in birds administered 20 x 10(3) sporulated oocysts

  5. Seismic evaluation of K basin bridge cranes (HOI-320 & HOI-418) and supporting structure

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, B.V.; Kanjilad, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    The Safety Class 1 100-K fuel storage basins are vulnerable to impact damage if a bridge crane were to fall during a seismic event. The pupose of this report is to address the adequacy of the K Basin bridge cranes to resist a seismic-induced fall. The approach used to demonstrate adequacy against falling, was to evaluate the crane structural components relative to requirements specified in ASME NOG-1, Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes. Additionally, wheel lift-off and the adequacy of the crane supporting structure, are addressed. Seismic adequacy of the mechanical hoist equipment is not addressed in this report.

  6. [Genetic passportization and identification of Siberian cranes (Grus leucogeranus Pallas) in captivity].

    PubMed

    Mudrik, E A; Kashentseva, T A; Gamburg, E A; Politov, D V

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the founders of an artificial population of the Siberian crane Grus leucogeranus Pallas (rare species of cranes) was characterized using 10 microsatellite loci. It was established that the allelic diversity (on average, 5.9 alleles per locus) and genic (H(o) = 0.739) diversity of the Siberian crane is rather high and comparable with the estimations for natural populations of different crane species. Genetic passportization of the birds (119 individuals) from the register of the Siberian crane International Studbook was carried out at the initial stage. The efficiency of genetic passportization for individual identification, identification of the origin, paternity analysis, and exclusion of inbreeding was demonstrated in Siberian cranes under natural mating and artificial insemination. Cases of natural reproduction in pairs of Siberian cranes imprinted to the human and continuous storage of spermatozoa in the female reproductive ducts were registered. PMID:25731031

  7. Development and evaluation of a quantitative PCR assay targeting sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Lu, Jingrang; Vogel, Jason; Elk, Michael; Chávez-Ramírez, Felipe; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    While the microbial water quality in the Platte River is seasonally impacted by excreta from migrating cranes, there are no methods available to study crane fecal contamination. Here we characterized microbial populations in crane feces using phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene fecal clone libraries. Using these sequences, a novel crane quantitative PCR (Crane1) assay was developed, and its applicability as a microbial source tracking (MST) assay was evaluated by determining its host specificity and detection ability in environmental waters. Bacteria from crane excreta were dominated by bacilli and proteobacteria, with a notable paucity of sequences homologous to Bacteroidetes and Clostridia. The Crane1 marker targeted a dominant clade of unclassified Lactobacillales sequences closely related to Catellicoccus marimammalium. The host distribution of the Crane1 marker was relatively high, being positive for 69% (66/96) of the crane excreta samples tested. The assay also showed high host specificity, with 95% of the nontarget fecal samples (i.e., n = 553; 20 different free-range hosts) being negative. Of the presumed crane-impacted water samples (n = 16), 88% were positive for the Crane1 assay, whereas none of the water samples not impacted by cranes were positive (n = 165). Bayesian statistical models of the Crane1 MST marker demonstrated high confidence in detecting true-positive signals and a low probability of false-negative signals from environmental water samples. Altogether, these data suggest that the newly developed marker could be used in environmental monitoring studies to study crane fecal pollution dynamics. PMID:22492437

  8. Large xray room from crane ladder showing scissor lift for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Large x-ray room from crane ladder showing scissor lift for x-ray equipment, view facing west-northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Interior of small xray room with crane and floor mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of small x-ray room with crane and floor mounted x-ray machine, view facing south-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CRANE OPERATOR, TED SEALS, POURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH CRANE OPERATOR, TED SEALS, POURING MOLTEN METAL INTO A 1,300 TON ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE OR MIXER. AN ELECTRONIC SCALE RECORDED THAT 50.5 TONS OF METAL WERE POURED INTO THE FURNACE DURING THIS POUR. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 75 FR 47905 - Cranes and Derricks in Construction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... 36 FR 25232, Dec. 30, 1971). Subpart N of 29 CFR part 1926, entitled ``Cranes, Derricks, Hoists... derricks (see 53 FR 29116, Aug. 2, 1988). In 1993, former Sec. 1926.550(a)(19) was added to require that... Department of Labor,'' 57 FR 61925, Dec. 29, 1992). The Agency published a Notice of Intent to Establish...

  12. CAMERA IS ON CATWALK ABOVE MTR. CRANE HOOK LOWERS TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAMERA IS ON CATWALK ABOVE MTR. CRANE HOOK LOWERS TOP PLUG ONTO REACTOR. NOTE PLANK-LIKE BRIDGE (WALKWAY) TO BALCONY AT UPPER RIGHT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4502. Unknown Photographer, probable date 3/31/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 9. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE CRANE ON WEST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE CRANE ON WEST SIDE OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. CONTAMINATED AIR FILTERS LOADED IN TRANSPORT CASKS WERE TRANSFERRED TO VEHICLES AND SENT TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT COMPLEX FOR STORAGE. INEEL PROOF NUMBER HD-17-1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Facility 208 Oblique view from north. "Crane Construction Zone". ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility 208 - Oblique view from north. "Crane Construction Zone". View facing south. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Latrine Dry Dock No. 2 & Latrine Dry Dock No.3, Near Avenue G adjacent to Dry Dock No. 2 & Dry Dock No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Safety of West Nile Virus vaccines in sandhill crane chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Miller, K.J.; Docherty, D.E.; Bochsler, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    West Nile virus arrived in North America in 1999 and has spread across the continent in the ensuing years. The virus has proven deadly to a variety of native avian species including sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). In order to provide safe and efficacious protection for captive and released populations of whooping cranes (G. americana), we have conducted a series of four research projects. The last of these was a study of the effects of two different West Nile virus vaccines on young Florida sandhill crane (G. c. pratensis) chicks and subsequent challenge with the virus. We found that vaccinating crane chicks as early as day 7 post-hatch caused no adverse reactions or noticeable morbidity. We tested both a commercial equine vaccine West Nile - Innovator (Fort Dodge Laboratories, Fort Dodge, Iowa) and a new recombinant DNA vaccine (Centers for Disease Control). We had a 33% mortality in control chicks (n =6) from West Nile virus infection, versus 0% mortality in two groups of vaccinated chicks (n = 12), indicating the two vaccines tested were not only safe but effective in preventing West Nile virus.

  16. Detail of bridge crane sitting near the east end wall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bridge crane sitting near the east end wall, rail tracks in view, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Heavy Ordnance Storehouse & Annex, Avenue D near Eighth Street intersection, adjacent to the west of Parking Lot "A", Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 13. SIDE VIEW OF THE STACKERRETRIEVER CRANE FROM THE TRANSFER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SIDE VIEW OF THE STACKER-RETRIEVER CRANE FROM THE TRANSFER BAY. THE STACKER-RETRIEVER IS A REMOTELY-OPERATED, MECHANIZED TRANSPORT SYSTEM FOR RETRIEVING PLUTONIUM CONTAINERS FROM THE STORAGE VAULT. (1/80) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Square tubing reduces cost of telescoping bridge crane hoist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, G.; Graae, J.; Schraidt, J.

    1967-01-01

    Using standard square tubing in a telescoping arrangement reduces the cost of a bridge crane hoist. Because surface tolerances of square tubing need not be as accurate as the tubing used previously and because no spline is necessary, the square tubing is significantly less expensive than splined telescoping tubes.

  19. 29 CFR 1910.180 - Crawler locomotive and truck cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crawler locomotive and truck cranes. 1910.180 Section 1910.180 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Materials Handling and Storage §...

  20. 1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort rings in foreground were once located in Engine Room Building. See photo WA-131-A-2. Building on left is Machine Shop. Boiler Building is in front of stack. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  1. GRINDING ROOM, LOOKING EAST. NOTE OVERHEAD BRIDGE CRANE RIDING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM, LOOKING EAST. NOTE OVERHEAD BRIDGE CRANE RIDING ON STEEL RAILS SUPPORTED BY WOODEN BEAMS AND CYCLONE CLASSIFIER IN CENTER. AT RIGHT IS TOP PORTION OF FLASH FLOTATION CELL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  2. View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of gantry crane (manufactured by Ederer Corporation, Seattle, Wash., 1971) for Powerhouse No. 3, looking north. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  3. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 19. TRAVELING CRANE ATOP SUPERSTRUCTURE, FROM RUN LINE DECK. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. TRAVELING CRANE ATOP SUPERSTRUCTURE, FROM RUN LINE DECK. Looking up to north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Detailed interior view of the bridge crane and of upper ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed interior view of the bridge crane and of upper part of structural system at the west end of the taller half of the building. View facing northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Shipfitters, Metal Workers & Boiler Shop, Lake Erie Street at Russell Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOEpatents

    Robinett, Rush D.; Parker, Gordon G.; Feddema, John T.; Dohrmann, Clark R.; Petterson, Ben J.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory .gamma.(t), which includes a jib angular acceleration .gamma., a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle .theta.(t) and a radial rotation angle .phi.(t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular .gamma. and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach.

  8. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOEpatents

    Robinett, R.D.; Parker, G.G.; Feddema, J.T.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Petterson, B.J.

    1999-06-01

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory [gamma](t), which includes a jib angular acceleration [gamma], a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle [theta](t) and a radial rotation angle [phi](t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular [gamma] and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach. 25 figs.

  9. 3. General view of Pier 10 with crane rail imbedded ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. General view of Pier 10 with crane rail imbedded in concrete Dry Dock 5 edge at north side of pier, Pier 9 at extreme right. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. Detail of bridge crane #7216, with driver's cab in view, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bridge crane #72-16, with driver's cab in view, view facing northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, One-Story Storehouse, East side of the two 1936 Repair Basins, Berths B20 & B21, Fronting the intersection of Avenue C & Club Road, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, housing over penstock outlet (left) and storage building (right). Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. 3,000 Paper Cranes: Children's Literature for Remedial Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumaker, Marjorie P.; Shumaker, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how the educational experience of sixth grade remedial readers was revitalized and enriched through a project that grew out of reading "Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes." Suggests using "real" books (literature) to liberate remedial students from skill drills and reading games. (NH)

  13. Using Stephen Crane's "Maggie" To Teach the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerwin, David; Manolios, Vassilios; Popodopoulos, Lia

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a lesson plan designed for an eleventh-grade U.S. history class in which the students learn about the Progressive Era by reading Stephen Crane's "Maggie: A Girl of the Streets." Explains that students analyze point of view, role play a talk show, write an essay, and complete a long-term research project. (CMK)

  14. 63. DETAIL OF TRAVELING CRANE TRUSS FROM NORTHEAST. TRUSS IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. DETAIL OF TRAVELING CRANE TRUSS FROM NORTHEAST. TRUSS IS IN FRONT OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE BARREN SOLUTION TANK IS JUST VISIBLE IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  15. 23. LOOKING NORTH INTO FOUNDRY BUILDING WITH FOUNDRY CRANE INSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. LOOKING NORTH INTO FOUNDRY BUILDING WITH FOUNDRY CRANE INSIDE LARGE DOOR. THE CORE ROOM IS INSIDE THE SMALL DOOR ON THE RIGHT. CARL BORGH IN MAIN DOOR WEARING WHITE SHIRT. - Knight Foundry, 13 Eureka Street, Sutter Creek, Amador County, CA

  16. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STIFF LEG LADLE CRANE OPERATOR, LUKE WALKER, POURING OFF SLAG FROM LADLE AS SKIMMER, BRUCE ELLIOTT, RAKES THE SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL. - American Cast Iron Pipe Company, Mixer Building, 1501 Thirty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. TRUSS DETAILS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Includes crane ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUSS DETAILS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Includes crane girder section. No architect noted. Drawn by Penney. Plan no. 2-N-7. March 10, 1942, no revisions. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76, item no. 22A. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Warehouse, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of sandhill crane habitat management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kessler, Andrew C.; Merchant, James W.; Shultz, Steven D.; Allen, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species often threaten native wildlife populations and strain the budgets of agencies charged with wildlife management. We demonstrate the potential of cost-effectiveness analysis to improve the efficiency and value of efforts to enhance sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) roosting habitat. We focus on the central Platte River in Nebraska (USA), a region of international ecological importance for migrating avian species including sandhill cranes. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a valuation process designed to compare alternative actions based on the cost of achieving a pre-determined objective. We estimated costs for removal of invasive vegetation using geographic information system simulations and calculated benefits as the increase in area of sandhill crane roosting habitat. We generated cost effectiveness values for removing invasive vegetation on 7 land parcels and for the entire central Platte River to compare the cost-effectiveness of management at specific sites and for the central Platte River landscape. Median cost effectiveness values for the 7 land parcels evaluated suggest that costs for creating 1 additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat totaled US $1,595. By contrast, we found that creating an additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat could cost as much as US $12,010 for some areas in the central Platte River, indicating substantial cost savings can be achieved by using a cost effectiveness analysis to target specific land parcels for management. Cost-effectiveness analysis, used in conjunction with geographic information systems, can provide decision-makers with a new tool for identifying the most economically efficient allocation of resources to achieve habitat management goals.

  19. Designing Crane Controls with applied Mechanical and Electrical Safety Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, Bradford P.; Walczak, Thomas A.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The use of overhead traveling bridge cranes in many varied applications is common practice. In particular, the use of cranes in the nuclear, military, commercial, aerospace, and other industries can involve safety critical situations. Considerations for Human Injury or Casualty, Loss of Assets, Endangering the Environment, or Economic Reduction must be addressed. Traditionally, in order to achieve additional safety in these applications, mechanical systems have been augmented with a variety of devices. These devices assure that a mechanical component failure shall reduce the risk of a catastrophic loss of the correct and/or safe load carrying capability. ASME NOG-1-1998, (Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes, Top Running Bridge, and Multiple Girder), provides design standards for cranes in safety critical areas. Over and above the minimum safety requirements of todays design standards, users struggle with obtaining a higher degree of reliability through more precise functional specifications while attempting to provide "smart" safety systems. Electrical control systems also may be equipped with protective devices similar to the mechanical design features. Demands for improvement of the cranes "control system" is often recognized, but difficult to quantify for this traditionally "mechanically" oriented market. Finite details for each operation must be examined and understood. As an example, load drift (or small motions) at close tolerances can be unacceptable (and considered critical). To meet these high functional demands encoders and other devices are independently added to control systems to provide motion and velocity feedback to the control drive. This paper will examine the implementation of Programmable Electronic Systems (PES). PES is a term this paper will use to describe any control system utilizing any programmable electronic device such as Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), or an Adjustable Frequency Drive (AID) 'smart' programmable

  20. Wintering Sandhill Crane exposure to wind energy development in the central and southern Great Plains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Brandt, David; Krapu, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Numerous wind energy projects have been constructed in the central and southern Great Plains, USA, the main wintering area for midcontinental Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis). In an initial assessment of the potential risks of wind towers to cranes, we estimated spatial overlap, investigated potential avoidance behavior, and determined the habitat associations of cranes. We used data from cranes marked with platform transmitting terminals (PTTs) with and without global positioning system (GPS) capabilities. We estimated the wintering distributions of PTT-marked cranes prior to the construction of wind towers, which we compared with current tower locations. Based on this analysis, we found 7% spatial overlap between the distributions of cranes and towers. When we looked at individually marked cranes, we found that 52% would have occurred within 10 km of a tower at some point during winter. Using data from cranes marked after tower construction, we found a potential indication of avoidance behavior, whereby GPS-marked cranes generally used areas slightly more distant from existing wind towers than would be expected by chance. Results from a habitat selection model suggested that distances between crane locations and towers may have been driven more by habitat selection than by avoidance, as most wind towers were constructed in locations not often selected by wintering cranes. Our findings of modest regional overlap and that few towers have been placed in preferred crane habitat suggest that the current distribution of wind towers may be of low risk to the continued persistence of wintering midcontinental Sandhill Cranes in the central and southern Great Plains.

  1. Hydrological modelling for siberian crane Grus Leucogeranus stopover sites in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haibo; He, Chunguang; Sheng, Lianxi; Tang, Zhanhui; Wen, Yang; Yan, Tingting; Zou, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss is one of the key factors underlying the decline of many waterbird species, including Siberian Crane (Grus leucogeranus), a threatened species worldwide. Wetlands are the primary stopover for many waterbirds and restoration of these wetlands involves both hydrological restoration and water resource management. To protect the stopover sites of Siberian Cranes, we collected Siberian Crane stopover numbers, meteorological and hydrological data, and remote sensing data from 2008 to 2011 in Momoge National Nature Reserve, one of the largest wetlands in northeastern China. A model was developed to estimate the suitability of Siberian Crane stopover sites. According to our results, the most suitable daily water level for Siberian Cranes between 2008 and 2012 occurred in the spring of 2008 and in the Scirpus planiculmis growing season and autumn of 2010. We suggest a season-dependent water management strategy in order to provide suitable conditions at Siberian Crane stopover sites. PMID:25874552

  2. Dynamics and swing control of double-pendulum bridge cranes with distributed-mass beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Liang, Zan; Zang, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Motion-induced oscillations of crane payloads seriously degrade their effectiveness and safety. Significant progress has been achieved with reducing payload oscillations on a single-pendulum crane with a point-mass payload attached to the end of the cable. However, large payloads and the actual configuration of the hoisting mechanism may transform the crane to a double-pendulum system with a distributed-mass payload. The manipulation task can be more challenging because of the complicated dynamics. The dynamics of bridge cranes transporting distributed-mass beams are derived. A command-smoothing scheme is presented to suppress the complex payload oscillations. Simulations of a large range of motions are used to analyze the dynamic behavior of the cranes and the robustness of the method. Experimental results obtained from a small-scale double-pendulum bridge crane transporting a distributed-mass beam validate the simulated dynamic behavior and the effectiveness of the method.

  3. On trajectory generation for flexible space crane: Inverse dynamics analysis by LATDYN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Housner, J. M.; Wu, S.-C.; Chang, C.-W.

    1989-01-01

    For future in-space construction facility, one or more space cranes capable of manipulating and positioning large and massive spacecraft components will be needed. Inverse dynamics was extensively studied as a basis for trajectory generation and control of robot manipulators. The focus here is on trajectory generation in the gross-motion phase of space crane operation. Inverse dynamics of the flexible crane body is much more complex and intricate as compared with rigid robot link. To model and solve the space crane's inverse dynamics problem, LATDYN program which employs a three-dimensional finite element formulation for the multibody truss-type structures will be used. The formulation is oriented toward a joint dominated structure which is suitable for the proposed space crane concept. To track a planned trajectory, procedures will be developed to obtain the actuation profile and dynamics envelope which are pertinent to the design and performance requirements of the space crane concept.

  4. Hydrological Modelling for Siberian Crane Grus Leucogeranus Stopover Sites in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haibo; He, Chunguang; Sheng, Lianxi; Tang, Zhanhui; Wen, Yang; Yan, Tingting; Zou, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss is one of the key factors underlying the decline of many waterbird species, including Siberian Crane (Grus leucogeranus), a threatened species worldwide. Wetlands are the primary stopover for many waterbirds and restoration of these wetlands involves both hydrological restoration and water resource management. To protect the stopover sites of Siberian Cranes, we collected Siberian Crane stopover numbers, meteorological and hydrological data, and remote sensing data from 2008 to 2011 in Momoge National Nature Reserve, one of the largest wetlands in northeastern China. A model was developed to estimate the suitability of Siberian Crane stopover sites. According to our results, the most suitable daily water level for Siberian Cranes between 2008 and 2012 occurred in the spring of 2008 and in the Scirpus planiculmis growing season and autumn of 2010. We suggest a season-dependent water management strategy in order to provide suitable conditions at Siberian Crane stopover sites. PMID:25874552

  5. Effect of joint imperfections on static control of adaptive structures as space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, Senol; Wada, B. K.; Chen, G. S.

    1990-01-01

    Effect of imperfections in the joints of an adaptive structure on its slow (no inertia forces) motion along a prescribed trajectory as a space crane is studied. Two mathematical models to predict the effect of joint imperfections are proposed. The two models are used to obtain estimates of the deviations of the node of the space crane to which the end-effector is attached, from its prescribed trajectory. An application of the models to a two-section space crane is given.

  6. Effect of imperfections on static control of adaptive structures as a space crane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesh, A. V.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.; Chen, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of imperfections in the joints of an adaptive structure on its slow (no inertia forces) motion along a prescribed trajectory as a space crane is studied. Two mathematical models to predict the effect of joint imperfections are proposed. The two models are used to obtain estimates of the deviations of the node of the space crane to which the end-effector is attached, from its prescribed trajectory. An application of the models to a two-section space crane is given.

  7. Design and implementation of the ESL compact range underhung bridge crane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamansky, H. T.; Dominek, A. K.; Burnside, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    As the indoor compact range technology has continued to increase, the need to handle larger and heavier targets has also increased. This need for target lifting and handling prompted the feasibility study of the use of an underhung bridge crane to be installed in the ESL (ElectroScience Laboratory, Ohio State University) compact range. This report documents both the design of the underhung bridge crane that was installed and the implementation of the design in the actual installation of the crane.

  8. Use of an inactivated eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Dein, F.J.; Clark, G.G.; Watts, D.M.; Crabbs, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    An unprecedented outbreak of fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus occurred during the late summer and fall of 1984 in endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland. As part of efforts to prevent future epizootics of EEE. studies were conducted to evaluate the antibody response of cranes following vaccination with a formalin-inactivated EEE virus vaccine. Viral specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes following 1M inoculation with the vaccine. Among the 1M-inoculated cranes, peak antibody titers of 1:80 on days 30 to 60 had waned to undetectable levels by days 90 to 120. Although the initial titers were not increased by the first booster dose, the duration of the antibody was extended considerably. Whooping cranes, receiving vaccine 6 months after their first vaccination, developed titers of 1:80 to 1:320 by day 30. At 45 days after the final vaccination, these titers had dropped to 1:10 to 1:160. Cranes with preexisting EEE virus antibody, apparently reflecting natural infection, exhibited an anamnestic response indicated by a rapid increase and sustained high antibody titer. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to assess the significance of this response as a strategy for protecting whooping cranes against natural EEE virus infection. The loss of captive whooping cranes to the EEE virus presented a previously unrecognized risk and obstacle to recovery of this species. Not only was, there a setback in the captive breeding and reintroduction program for the whooping crane, but, because of the susceptibility of the species to the EEE virus. establishment of additional crane populations may be more complicated than initially envisioned. However, through continued surveillance, serological monitoring, and vaccination activities, we are confident that

  9. 29 CFR 1918.55 - Cranes (See also § 1918.11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cranes (See also § 1918.11). 1918.55 Section 1918.55 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.55 Cranes (See also § 1918.11). The following requirements shall apply to the use of cranes forming part of a...

  10. Conflicts between sandhill cranes and farmers in the western United States: evolving issues and solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The main conflicts between Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) and farmers in western United States occur in the Rocky Mountain region during migration and wintering periods. Most crop damage by cranes occurs in mature wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), young shoots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and cereal grains, chilies (Capsicum annuum), and silage corn (Zea mays). Damage is related to proximity of crop fields to roost sites and timing of crane concentrations relative to crop maturity or vulnerability. The evolution of conflicts between farmers and cranes and current solutions are described for two areas of the Rocky Mountains used by staging, migrating, or wintering cranes: Grays Lake, Idaho, and the Middle Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico. In both areas, conflicts with growing crane populations were aggravated by losses of wetlands and cropland, proximity of crops to roosts and other wetland areas, changing crop types and practices, and increasing urbanization. At Grays Lake, fall-staging cranes damaged barley fields near an important breeding refuge as well as fields 15-50 km away. In the Middle Rio Grande Valley, migrating and wintering cranes damaged young alfalfa fields, chilies, and silage corn. Solutions in both areas have been addressed through cooperative efforts among federal and state agencies, that manage wetlands and croplands to increase food availability and carrying capacity on public lands, provide hazing programs for private landowners, and strategically target crane hunting to problem areas. Sustaining the success of these programs will be challenging. Areas important to Sandhill Cranes in the western United Sates experience continued loss of habitat and food resources due to urbanization, changes in agricultural crops and practices, and water-use conflicts, which threaten the abilities of both public and private landowners to manage wetlands and croplands for cranes. Conservation of habitats and water resources are important

  11. 29 CFR 1918.55 - Cranes (See also § 1918.11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cranes (See also § 1918.11). 1918.55 Section 1918.55 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.55 Cranes (See also § 1918.11). The following requirements shall apply to the use of cranes forming part of a...

  12. Cold Vacuum Drying facility crane and hoist system design description (SYS 14)

    SciTech Connect

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) crane and hoist system. The overhead crane and hoist system is located in the process bays of the CVDF. It supports the processes required to drain the water and dry the spent nuclear fuel contained in the multi-canister overpacks after they have been removed from the K-Basins. The cranes will also be used to assist maintenance activities within the bays, as required.

  13. 29 CFR 1918.55 - Cranes (See also § 1918.11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cranes (See also § 1918.11). 1918.55 Section 1918.55 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.55 Cranes (See also § 1918.11). The following requirements shall apply to the use of cranes forming part of a...

  14. 29 CFR 1918.55 - Cranes (See also § 1918.11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cranes (See also § 1918.11). 1918.55 Section 1918.55 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.55 Cranes (See also § 1918.11). The following requirements shall apply to the use of cranes forming part of a...

  15. 29 CFR 1918.55 - Cranes (See also § 1918.11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cranes (See also § 1918.11). 1918.55 Section 1918.55 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.55 Cranes (See also § 1918.11). The following requirements shall apply to the use of cranes forming part of a...

  16. Spherical Pendulum Small Oscillations for Slewing Crane Motion

    PubMed Central

    Perig, Alexander V.; Stadnik, Alexander N.; Deriglazov, Alexander I.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the Lagrange mechanics-based description of small oscillations of a spherical pendulum with a uniformly rotating suspension center. The analytical solution of the natural frequencies' problem has been derived for the case of uniform rotation of a crane boom. The payload paths have been found in the inertial reference frame fixed on earth and in the noninertial reference frame, which is connected with the rotating crane boom. The numerical amplitude-frequency characteristics of the relative payload motion have been found. The mechanical interpretation of the terms in Lagrange equations has been outlined. The analytical expression and numerical estimation for cable tension force have been proposed. The numerical computational results, which correlate very accurately with the experimental observations, have been shown. PMID:24526891

  17. Artificial insemination in captive Whooping Cranes: Results from genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.L.; Nicolich, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial insemination has been used frequently in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana) population. In the 1980s, it was necessary at times to inseminate females with semen from several males during the breeding season or with semen from multiple males simultaneously due to unknown sperm viability of the breeding males. The goals of this study were to apply microsatellite DNA profiles to resolve uncertain paternities and to use these results to evaluate the current paternity assignment assumptions used by captive managers. Microsatellite DNA profiles were successful in resolving 20 of 23 paternity questions. When resolved paternities were coupled with data on insemination timing, substantial information was revealed on fertilization timing in captive whooping cranes. Delayed fertilization from inseminations 6+ days pre-oviposition suggests capability of sperm storage.

  18. Spherical pendulum small oscillations for slewing crane motion.

    PubMed

    Perig, Alexander V; Stadnik, Alexander N; Deriglazov, Alexander I

    2014-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the Lagrange mechanics-based description of small oscillations of a spherical pendulum with a uniformly rotating suspension center. The analytical solution of the natural frequencies' problem has been derived for the case of uniform rotation of a crane boom. The payload paths have been found in the inertial reference frame fixed on earth and in the noninertial reference frame, which is connected with the rotating crane boom. The numerical amplitude-frequency characteristics of the relative payload motion have been found. The mechanical interpretation of the terms in Lagrange equations has been outlined. The analytical expression and numerical estimation for cable tension force have been proposed. The numerical computational results, which correlate very accurately with the experimental observations, have been shown. PMID:24526891

  19. The Barrett-Crane model: asymptotic measure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    The original spin foam model construction for 4D gravity by Barrett and Crane suffers from a few troubling issues. In the simple examples of the vertex amplitude they can be summarized as the existence of contributions to the asymptotics from non-geometric configurations. Even restricted to geometric contributions the amplitude is not completely worked out. While the phase is known to be the Regge action, the so-called measure factor has remained mysterious for a decade. In the toy model case of the 6j symbol this measure factor has a nice geometric interpretation of V-1/2 leading to speculations that a similar interpretation should be possible also in the 4D case. In this paper we provide the first geometric interpretation of the geometric part of the asymptotic for the spin foam consisting of two glued 4-simplices (decomposition of the 4-sphere) in the Barrett-Crane model in the large internal spin regime.

  20. Inverse dynamics of adaptive structures used as space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S. K.; Utku, S.; Wada, B. K.

    1990-01-01

    As a precursor to the real-time control of fast moving adaptive structures used as space cranes, a formulation is given for the flexibility induced motion relative to the nominal motion (i.e., the motion that assumes no flexibility) and for obtaining the open loop time varying driving forces. An algorithm is proposed for the computation of the relative motion and driving forces. The governing equations are given in matrix form with explicit functional dependencies. A simulator is developed to implement the algorithm on a digital computer. In the formulations, the distributed mass of the crane is lumped by two schemes, vz., 'trapezoidal' lumping and 'Simpson's rule' lumping. The effects of the mass lumping schemes are shown by simulator runs.

  1. 100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and workers, original radome, RCA Services Company 2 October, 1965, Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6705. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. Suspected fusariomycotoxicosis in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis): clinical and pathological findings.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.; Stroud, Richard K.; Windingstad, Ronald M.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985 and 1986, large-scale natural die-offs of sandhill cranes in Texas were attributed to fusariomycotoxicosis. These birds demonstrated a progressive loss of motor control to the neck, wings, and legs. Based on necropsy and/or histopathology of 31 cranes, the most common lesions involved skeletal muscle and included hemorrhages, granulomatous myositis, thrombosis, and vascular degeneration. Serum chemistry results revealed that levels of creatinine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were above published normals. However, only alanine aminotransferase was higher in clinically affected cranes than in normal cranes collected from the same area.

  3. Pulmonary lesions in disseminated visceral coccidiosis of sandhill and whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novilla, M.N.; Carpenter, J.W.; Jeffers, T.K.; White, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty cranes, consisting of 46 sandhill (Grus canadensis) and four whooping cranes (Grus americana), were studied. Eighteen sandhill cranes and the four whooping cranes were naturally infected with disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC). The remaining sandhill cranes were chicks experimentally infected with oocysts of Eimeria reichenowi and/or E. gruis; five chicks served as controls. There were no clinical signs attributed to respiratory infection. Necropsy of naturally infected adult birds revealed nodules in many organs, including the lung, air sacs, trachea and nares. Artificially infected sandhill cranes and the whooping crane chicks that died from DVC had congestion and consolidated areas in the lung with frothy fluid in the airways. Grossly visible nodules were observed from 10 days postinoculation. Granulomatous pneumonia and tracheitis were observed with light microscopy. Lesions were associated with merogonic and gametogonic stages of eimerian coccidia. Granulomas and granulomatous foci contained parasitized large mononuclear cells. Merogonic stages were seen in lymphoid cells by ultrastructural examination. Oocysts were observed in the trachea and bronchial mucosa and admixed with exudate in the airways, indicating that crane eimerians can complete their life cycle at these sites. Of the few eimeriid coccidia that have extraintestinal stages of development in birds and mammals, only the species in cranes complete their life cycle in both the digestive and respiratory tracts.

  4. Fusarium spp. recovered from waste peanuts associated with sandhill crane mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.E.; Cole, R.J.; Tousson, T.A.; Dorner, J.W.; Windingstad, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Approximately 5000 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis ) died from undetermined causes in Gains County, Texas, 1985, and an additional 200 died in 1986. Prominent clinical signs were the inability of many sick cranes to hold their necks horizontal and the neck, head, and legs sometimes drooped perpendicularly during flight. Approximately 95% of the dead cranes' gizzards contained peanuts. Culturing of peanuts, shells, soil and soil debris from fields in which sandhill cranes died showed that Fusarium species were the fungi most frequently isolated and eight species were recovered from these substrates. Fusarium compactum, F. solani , and F. equiseti were the only species recovered from all substrates cultured from both fields.

  5. Load reduction test method of similarity theory and BP neural networks of large cranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruigang; Duan, Zhibin; Lu, Yi; Wang, Lei; Xu, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Static load tests are an important means of supervising and detecting a crane's lift capacity. Due to space restrictions, however, there are difficulties and potential danger when testing large bridge cranes. To solve the loading problems of large-tonnage cranes during testing, an equivalency test is proposed based on the similarity theory and BP neural networks. The maximum stress and displacement of a large bridge crane is tested in small loads, combined with the training neural network of a similar structure crane through stress and displacement data which is collected by a physics simulation progressively loaded to a static load test load within the material scope of work. The maximum stress and displacement of a crane under a static load test load can be predicted through the relationship of stress, displacement, and load. By measuring the stress and displacement of small tonnage weights, the stress and displacement of large loads can be predicted, such as the maximum load capacity, which is 1.25 times the rated capacity. Experimental study shows that the load reduction test method can reflect the lift capacity of large bridge cranes. The load shedding predictive analysis for Sanxia 1200 t bridge crane test data indicates that when the load is 1.25 times the rated lifting capacity, the predicted displacement and actual displacement error is zero. The method solves the problem that lifting capacities are difficult to obtain and testing accidents are easily possible when 1.25 times related weight loads are tested for large tonnage cranes.

  6. Changes of mercury contamination in red-crowned cranes, Grus japonensis, in East Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Tagami, Yukari; Kudo, Moe; Miura, Yoshiaki; Okamoto, Erika; Matsumoto, Fumio; Koga, Kimiya; Uebayashi, Akiko; Shimura, Ryoji; Inoue, Masako; Momose, Kunikazu; Masatomi, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Subramanian, Annamalai

    2012-07-01

    Red-crowned cranes (Grus japonensis) are native to eastern Hokkaido (island population), in contrast to the mainland, which migrates between the Amur River basin and eastern China-Korea peninsula. During the 1990s we found that Red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido were highly contaminated with mercury: however, the source was unknown. We investigated the time trend of mercury contamination in Red-crowned cranes. Total mercury levels in the livers and kidneys from cranes dead in the 2000s were lower than those dead in the 1990s. Feather is a major pathway of mercury excretion for many bird species and is used as an indicator of blood mercury level during feather growth. As internal organs from the specimens collected before 1988 were not available, we analyzed the flight feather shavings from stuffed Red-crowned cranes dead in 1959-1987 and found that the mercury level of feathers from cranes dead in the 1960s and 1970s was not more than those from the cranes dead in the 2000s. These results suggest that mercury contamination in Red-crowned cranes in Hokkaido decreased temporally during the 1990s-2000s. This indicates the possible occurrence of some mercury pollution in Red-crowned cranes' habitat in this region in the 1990s or before. PMID:22193864

  7. Comparison of Serum Protein Electrophoresis Values in Wild and Captive Whooping Cranes ( Grus americana ).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Cray, Carolyn; Hartup, Barry K

    2015-09-01

    Protein electrophoresis of serum samples from endangered, wild whooping cranes ( Grus americana ) was performed to help assess the health of the only self-sustaining, migratory population in North America. Serum samples from wild adult cranes (n = 22) were taken at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, USA during winter. Wild juvenile cranes (n = 26) were sampled at Wood Buffalo National Park, Northwest Territories, Canada, in midsummer. All captive crane samples were acquired from the International Crane Foundation, Baraboo, WI, USA. Captive adult cranes (n = 30) were sampled during annual examinations, and archived serum samples from captive juvenile cranes (n = 19) were selected to match the estimated age of wild juveniles. Wild juveniles had significantly lower concentrations of all protein fractions than wild adults, except for prealbumin and γ globulins. All protein fraction concentrations for wild juveniles were significantly lower compared with captive juveniles, except for prealbumin and γ globulins, which were higher. Wild adults had significantly greater γ globulin concentrations than captive adults. Captive juveniles had significantly lower prealbumin and albumin concentrations and albumin : globulin ratios than captive adults. The higher γ globulin concentrations in wild versus captive cranes are likely because of increased antigenic exposure and immune stimulation. Protein fraction concentrations vary significantly with age and natural history in this species. Reference intervals for serum protein electrophoresis results from captive adult whooping cranes are provided in this study. PMID:26378665

  8. Changes in agriculture and abundance of snow geese affect carrying capacity of sandhill cranes in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, A.T.; Krapu, G.L.; Brandt, D.A.; Kinzel, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The central Platte River valley (CPRV) in Nebraska, USA, is a key spring-staging area for approximately 80 of the midcontinent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; hereafter cranes). Evidence that staging cranes acquired less lipid reserves during the 1990s compared to the late 1970s and increases in use of the CPRV by snow geese (Chen caerulescens) prompted us to investigate availability of waste corn and quantify spatial and temporal patterns of crane and waterfowl use of the region. We developed a predictive model to assess impacts of changes in availability of corn and snow goose abundance under past, present, and potential future conditions. Over a hypothetical 60-day staging period, predicted energy demand of cranes and waterfowl increased 87 between the late 1970s and 19982007, primarily because peak abundances of snow geese increased by 650,000 and cranes by 110,000. Compared to spring 1979, corn available when cranes arrived was 20 less in 1998 and 68 less in 1999; consequently, the area of cornfields required to meet crane needs increased from 14,464 ha in 1979 to 32,751 ha in 1998 and 90,559 ha in 1999. Using a pooled estimate of 88 kg/ha from springs 19981999 and 20052007, the area of cornfields needed to supply food requirements of cranes and waterfowl increased to 65,587 ha and was greatest in the eastern region of the CPRV, where an estimated 54 of cranes, 47 of Canada geese (Branta canadensis), 45 of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons), and 46 of snow geese occurred during ground surveys. We estimated that a future reduction of 25 in available corn or cornfields would increase daily foraging flight distances of cranes by 2738. Crane use and ability of cranes to store lipid reserves in the CPRV could be reduced substantially if flight distance required to locate adequate corn exceeded a physiological maximum distance cranes could fly in search of food. Options to increase carrying capacity for cranes include increasing

  9. Lagrangian approach to the Barrett-Crane spin foam model

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzom, Valentin; Livine, Etera R.

    2009-03-15

    We provide the Barrett-Crane spin foam model for quantum gravity with a discrete action principle, consisting in the usual BF term with discretized simplicity constraints which in the continuum turn topological BF theory into gravity. The setting is the same as usually considered in the literature: space-time is cut into 4-simplices, the connection describes how to glue these 4-simplices together and the action is a sum of terms depending on the holonomies around each triangle. We impose the discretized simplicity constraints on disjoint tetrahedra and we show how the Lagrange multipliers distort the parallel transport and the correlations between neighboring simplices. We then construct the discretized BF action using a noncommutative * product between SU(2) plane waves. We show how this naturally leads to the Barrett-Crane model. This clears up the geometrical meaning of the model. We discuss the natural generalization of this action principle and the spin foam models it leads to. We show how the recently introduced spin foam fusion coefficients emerge with a nontrivial measure. In particular, we recover the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli spin foam model by weakening the discretized simplicity constraints. Finally, we identify the two sectors of Plebanski's theory and we give the analog of the Barrett-Crane model in the nongeometric sector.

  10. Design analysis of 2,000 lb JIB crane for chemical lab

    SciTech Connect

    ZIADA, H.H.

    1999-09-22

    A 2,000 lbf jib crane is needed to replace an existing 1,000 lbf jib crane in the Chemical Lab (Building MO-733). The existing 1,000 lbf jib crane (to be replaced) has a 174 boom (I-beam). The crane is attached to the wall through two brackets (about 8 1/2-ft apart). The boom is attached to the lower bracket, and a supporting rod is attached to the upper bracket. The supporting rod is attached to the boom at about 8-ft from the free end. After preliminary studies and discussions, it was decided to construct the new jib crane from two perpendicular I-beams (L-shape) without a supporting rod. The crane is to be supported on the wall through the two lower existing brackets (about 5-ft apart). The boom is to be 20-ft long cantilever (the horizontal I-beam). The vertical I-beam is to be attached to the lower two existing brackets to support the jib crane to the wall. This construction is to be similar to another existing 1,000 lbf jib crane (L-shape) in the lab. The purpose of this document is to perform a design analysis for the proposed 2,000 lbf jib crane to determine suitable sizes of members and configuration of the new jib crane assembly. After construction, if the as-built assembly differs from the 2,000 lbf jib crane as proposed in this document, a revision of this analysis needs to be performed to confirm the acceptability of the as-built assembly.

  11. 76 FR 55893 - Crane & Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission, Intent To Waive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crane & Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the...: Exemption from Licensing. b. Project No.: 13583-001. c. Date filed: March 9, 2011. d. Applicant: Crane...-volt transmission line connected to the Crane & Company mill complex. The proposed project is...

  12. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements must I follow for cranes and... CONTINENTAL SHELF General Performance Standards § 250.108 What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment? (a) All cranes installed on fixed platforms must be operated in...

  13. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements must I follow for cranes and... CONTINENTAL SHELF General Performance Standards § 250.108 What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment? (a) All cranes installed on fixed platforms must be operated in...

  14. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements must I follow for cranes and... CONTINENTAL SHELF General Performance Standards § 250.108 What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment? (a) All cranes installed on fixed platforms must be operated in...

  15. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Maintenance of Offshore Cranes (API RP 2D), incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198. (b) All...), incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198. (d) All cranes manufactured after March 17, 2003, and... specified in 30 CFR 250.198. (e) You must maintain records specific to a crane or the operation of a...

  16. Habitat preferences and conservation threats to Black-necked Cranes wintering in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Namgay, Rinchen; Wangchuk, Sangay

    2016-01-01

    Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis) is a vulnerable Red list species whose populations are declining. However, little is known about Black-necked Cranes' habitat requirements or the causes of their population decline. We identified Black-necked Cranes' winter roost and foraging preferences of Black-necked Cranes in Bhutan during the winter of 2013-2014. Black-necked Cranes' roosts were recorded using Garmin GPSmap 60CSx, while foraging preferences and threats to the birds were identified based on a survey of household heads (n = 107) residing within a 3 km radius of roost sites. We grouped the threats identified by the communities into four major categories, viz. biological, social, political and natural threats based on the relevance. Of the four major threats, communities residing within the roosting and foraging habitat of the Black-necked Crane reported biological threat as major. Biological threats as reported by communities include loss of habitat, food shortage and competition from other animals. We recommend the present roosting areas be designated as part of the conservation areas for Black-necked Crane wintering in Bumthang district. In addition to preserving these areas, government should also encourage farming in foraging habitats of Black-necked Crane, because they mainly feed on barley, wheat, paddy, potatoes and buckwheat, besides roots, tubers and insects in the wetlands. PMID:27026922

  17. ETRCF, TRA654, INTERIOR. CAMERA IS ON MAIN FLOOR. NOTE CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR-CF, TRA-654, INTERIOR. CAMERA IS ON MAIN FLOOR. NOTE CRANE HOOKS. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT IS PART OF PAST EXPERIMENT. DOOR AT LEFT EDGE OF VIEW LEADS TO REACTOR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD24-1-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, ca. 2003 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 78 FR 27913 - Revision of Crane Regulation Standards for Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs), Offshore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to revise regulations related to the design, certification, inspection, and testing of cranes. These regulations apply to cranes installed on Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs), Offshore Supply Vessels (OSVs), and floating Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) facilities. This revision would update industry standards incorporated by reference with more recent versions,......

  19. ETRCF, TRA654, INTERIOR. REACTOR TANK AND PARAPET. CRANE RAIL SUPPORTS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR-CF, TRA-654, INTERIOR. REACTOR TANK AND PARAPET. CRANE RAIL SUPPORTS. CAMERA FACING STORAGE MEZZANINE ON EAST SIDE. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD24-2-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, ca. 2003 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Observation of sandhill cranes' (Grus canadensis) flight behavior in heavy fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirsch, Eileen M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Suarez, Manuel J.; Diehl, Robert H.; Lutes, Jim; Woyczik, Wendy; Krapfl, Jon; Sojda, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The behaviors of birds flying in low visibility conditions remain poorly understood. We had the opportunity to monitor Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) flying in heavy fog with very low visibility during a comprehensive landscape use study of refuging cranes in the Horicon Marsh in southeastern Wisconsin. As part of the study, we recorded flight patterns of cranes with a portable marine radar at various locations and times of day, and visually counted cranes as they departed the roost in the morning. We compared flight patterns during a fog event with those recorded during clear conditions. In good visibility, cranes usually departed the night roost shortly after sunrise and flew in relatively straight paths toward foraging areas. In fog, cranes departed the roost later in the day, did not venture far from the roost, engaged in significantly more circling flight, and returned to the roost site rather than proceeding to foraging areas. We also noted that compared to mornings with good visibility, cranes flying in fog called more frequently than usual. The only time in this 2-year study that observers heard young of the year calling was during the fog event. The observed behavior of cranes circling and lingering in an area while flying in poor visibility conditions suggests that such situations may increase chances of colliding with natural or anthropogenic obstacles in the vicinity.

  1. 50 CFR 20.106 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... sandhill cranes. 20.106 Section 20.106 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.106 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes....

  2. 78 FR 71666 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cranes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... 13, 2013 (78 FR 56742). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB, Office of...; Cranes and Derricks in Construction Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On November 29, 2013, the... information collection request (ICR) revision titled, ``Cranes and Derricks in Construction Standard,'' to...

  3. View southeast of 30,000 pound crane in steel yard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of 30,000 - pound crane in steel yard north of structural assembly shop (building 541) (Haer no. PA-387-8) - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. 50 CFR 20.106 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... sandhill cranes. 20.106 Section 20.106 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.106 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes....

  5. 50 CFR 20.106 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... sandhill cranes. 20.106 Section 20.106 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.106 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes....

  6. 77 FR 27085 - TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek Division, Morton, WA; Notice of Negative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... Determination was published in the Federal Register on March 6, 2012 (77 FR 13355). Pursuant to 29 CFR 90.18(c... Employment and Training Administration TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek Division, Morton, WA; Notice of... (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of TMI Forest Products, Inc., Crane Creek...

  7. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E.; Hartup, Barry K.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross‐sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical. PMID:26592357

  8. 50 CFR 20.106 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... sandhill cranes. 20.106 Section 20.106 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.106 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes....

  9. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E; Hartup, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross-sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical. PMID:26592357

  10. 50 CFR 20.106 - Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this section, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... sandhill cranes. 20.106 Section 20.106 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.106 Seasons, limits, and shooting hours for sandhill cranes....

  11. Testing a West Nile virus vaccine in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Miller, K.; Docherty, D.; Sileo, L.

    2005-01-01

    Eight sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) were vaccinated with a commercial equine West Nile virus vaccine (Fort Dodge Animal Health, Fort Dodge, Iowa, USA) at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA. Three doses of the vaccine were given, the first dose (day 0) was followed by a second 21 days later and the third dose 7 days after the second day 28 after the first dose). All doses were 0.50 ml. In addition, 5 sandhill cranes were given injections of similar amounts of sterile water on the same schedule. Blood for complete blood counts, serum chemistries, and serological testing was collected at weekly intervals. Ten weeks after the first injection of the vaccine and 6 weeks after the last of the 3 injections of the vaccine, the cranes were shipped to the USGS National Wildlife Heath Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. After a two-week adjustment period, 11 of these cranes were injected intramuscularly with one mosquito dose of West Nile virus. Two of the vaccinated cranes were not challenged and acted as uninfected controls. One week post challenge the only abnormal findings were slight weight loss (average 6% loss since the time of challenge with West Nile virus) and elevated white blood cell counts (heterophilic leukocytosis). There were no deaths and no clinically ill cranes (unvaccinated or vaccinated cranes) among the 11 challenged birds. All cranes were euthanized 6 weeks post challenge, and necropsies were performed. Pre-challenge titers showed no titer response to the vaccinations. However, when challenged, vaccinated cranes developed titers more quickly (within 7-10 days), and were viremic and shed virus via the cloaca for a shorter period of time than the unvaccinated cranes (2-7 days for vaccinated cranes versus 2-10 days for unvaccinated cranes). No remarkable lesions were noted in any of the cranes during the necropsy examinations. Histopathological findings are available for only four of the cranes at this time. Three of those

  12. Impacts of invasive plants on Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) roosting habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kessler, Andrew C.; Merchant, James W.; Allen, Craig R.; Shultz, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive plants continue to spread in riparian ecosystems, causing both ecological and economic damage. This research investigated the impacts of common reed, purple loosestrife, riparian shrubland, and riparian woodlands on the quality and quantity of sandhill crane roosting habitat in the central Platte River, Nebraska, using a discrete choice model. A more detailed investigation of the impacts of common reed on sandhill crane roosting habitat was performed by forecasting a spread or contraction of this invasive plant. The discrete choice model indicates that riparian woodlands had the largest negative impact on sandhill crane roosting habitat. The forecasting results predict that a contraction of common reed could increase sandhill crane habitat availability by 50%, whereas an expansion could reduce the availability by as much as 250%. This suggests that if the distribution of common reed continues to expand in the central Platte River the availability of sandhill crane roosting habitat would likely be greatly reduced.

  13. Conceptual design of a multiple cable crane for planetary surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Yang, Li-Farn

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented of a mobile crane suitable for conducting remote, automated construction operations on planetary surfaces. A cursory study was made of earth based mobile cranes and the needs for major improvements were identified. Current earth based cranes have a single cable supporting the payload, and precision positioning is accomplished by the use of construction workers controlling the payload by the use of tethers. For remote, autonomous operations on planetary surfaces it will be necessary to perform the precision operations without the use of humans. To accomplish this the payload must be stabilized relative to the crane. One approach for accomplishing this is to suspend the payload on multiple cable. A 3-cable suspension system crane concept is discussed. An analysis of the natural frequency of the system is presented which verifies the legitimacy of the concept.

  14. Fusarium mycotoxins from peanuts suspected as a cause of sandhill crane mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Cole, R.J.; Nelson, P.E.; Roffe, T.J.; George, R.R.; Dorner, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An estimated 9,500 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) died in Gaines County, Texas and Roosevelt County, New Mexico between 1982 and 1987. The predominant clinical sign observed in sick cranes was their inability to hold their heads erect, both while standing and flying. Multiple muscle hemorrhages and submandibular edema were the most common lesions seen at necropsy. Mycotoxins produced by Fusarium sp. growing during cold, wet weather on peanuts left in the field after harvest, the predominant foods of the dead cranes at the time of these mortality events, were identified as the most likely cause of this mortality. Rendering moldy peanuts inaccessible to the cranes by conventional tillage resulted in reduced crane mortality in these areas.

  15. Research note: the isolation of a herpes virus from captive cranes with an inclusion body disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Henning, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A viral agent, identified as a herpesvirus and tentatively called 'inclusion body disease of cranes' (IBDC), was isolated from captive cranes involved in a die-off at the International Crane Foundation near Baraboo, Wisconsin. Preliminary animal susceptibility tests, based on experimental infections, suggested that White Pekin ducklings up to 17 days old and adult coots were susceptible to the IBDC virus whereas 16-day-old White Leghorn chicks and 64-day-old Muscovy ducks were not. No serum antibody to IBDC virus was detected in 95 wild sandhill cranes collected in Wisconsin or Indiana in 1976 and 1977. However, 9 of 11 captive cranes in the affected area at the ICF had antibody to this agent.

  16. Fecal corticoid monitoring in whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartup, B.K.; Olsen, G.H.; Czekala, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    We used radioimmunoassay to determine fecal corticoid concentrations and assess potential stress in 10 endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction to the wild. Fecal samples were collected shortly after hatching at a captive facility in Maryland, during field training in Wisconsin, and throughout a human-led migration to Florida. After a 14-day decline following hatching, fecal corticoid concentrations stabilized at baseline levels for the duration of the captive period, despite exposure to potentially stressful stimuli. Shipment of the cranes to the field training site was correlated with an eight- to 34-fold increase in fecal corticoid concentrations, which returned to baseline levels within 1 week. Increases were positively correlated with age but not body weight at the time of shipping. Fecal corticoid concentrations during the training period increased slightly and exhibited greater variation than levels observed at the captive facility, but were well within expected norms based on previous studies. Fecal corticoid concentrations increased twofold following premigration physical examinations and placement of radiotransmitters, and persisted for up to 4 days before they returned to baseline levels. Though fecal corticoid concentrations and variation during the migration period were similar to training levels, there was an overall decline in fecal corticoid concentrations during the artificial migration. Acute stressors, such as capture, restraint, and severe storms, were associated with stress responses by the cranes that varied in accordance with lasting physical or psychological stimuli. The overall reintroduction process of costume-rearing, ultralight aircraft habituation, training, and artificial migration was not associated with elevations in fecal corticoid concentrations suggestive of chronic stress.

  17. Fecal corticoid monitoring in whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartup, B.K.; Olsen, G.H.; Czekala, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    We used radioimmunoassay to determine fecal corticoid concentrations and assess potential stress in 10 endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) undergoing reintroduction to the wild. Fecal samples were collected shortly after hatching at a captive facility in Maryland, during field training in Wisconsin, and throughout a human-led migration to Florida. After a 14-day decline following hatching, fecal corticoid concentrations stabilized at baseline levels for the duration of the captive period, despite exposure to potentially stressful stimuli. Shipment of the cranes to the field training site was correlated with an eight- to 34-fold increase in fecal corticoid concentrations, which returned to baseline levels within 1 week. Increases were positively correlated with age but not body weight at the time of shipping. Fecal corticoid concentrations during the training period increased slightly and exhibited greater variation than levels observed at the captive facility, but were well within expected norms based on previous studies. Fecal corticoid concentrations increased twofold following premigration physical examinations and placement of radiotransmitters, and persisted for up to 4 days before they returned to baseline levels. Though fecal corticoid concentrations and variation during the migration period were similar to training levels, there was an overall decline in fecal corticoid concentrations during the artificial migration. Acute stressors, such as capture, restraint, and severe storms, were associated with stress responses by the cranes that varied in accordance with lasting physical or psychological stimuli. The overall reintroduction process of costume-rearing, ultralight aircraft habituation, training, and artificial migration was not associated with elevations in fecal corticoid concentrations suggestive of chronic stress. ?? 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. An alternate and reversible method for flight restraint of cranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sen Lin; Yang, Shu Hui; Li, Bing; Xu, Yan Chun; Ma, Jian Hua; Xu, Jian Feng; Zhang, Xian Guang

    2011-01-01

    Flight restraint is important for zoos, safaris, and breeding centers for large birds. Currently used techniques for flight restraint include both surgical and non-surgical approaches. Surgical approaches usually cause permanent change to or removal of tendon, patagial membrane, or wing bones, and can cause pain and inflammation. Non-surgical approaches such as clipping or trimming feathers often alter the bird's appearance, and can damage growing blood feathers in fledglings or cause joint stiffness. We observed microstructure of primary feathers of the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) and found that the width of barbs is a determinative factor influencing vane stiffness and geometric parameters. We hypothesized that partial longitudinal excision of barbs on the ventral surface of the primary feathers would reduce the stiffness of the vane and render the feathers unable to support the crane's body weight during flight. Furthermore, we hypothesized that this modification of barbs would also change the aerodynamic performance of feathers such that they could not generate sufficient lift and thrust during flapping to enable the bird to fly. We tested this hypothesis on a red-crowned crane that had normal flight capability by excising the ventral margin of barbs on all 10 primaries on the left wing. The bird was unable to take off until the modified feathers were replaced by new ones. Removal of barbs proved to be a simple, non-invasive, low-cost and reversible method for flight restraint. It is potentially applicable to other large birds with similar structural characteristics of primary feathers. PMID:21538502

  19. Diet Shift and Its Impact on Foraging Behavior of Siberian Crane (Grus Leucogeranus) in Poyang Lake

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yifei; Jiao, Shengwu; Zhang, Yamian; Zhou, Yan; Lei, Guangchun; Liu, Guanhua

    2013-01-01

    The study of habitat selection and diet has a long history in ecology. This is often used to assess the functional roles of wetland in biodiversity conservation. Shifting habitat and diet may be one of the survival strategies during extremely adverse conditions. Therefore, sudden changes in habitat selection may indicate the deterioration of the habitat quality, and management interventions are necessary. Siberian crane (Grus leucogeranus) became critically endangered due to loss of habitat, and is currently a global conservation focus. Every winter, more than 95% of the species' global population congregates at Poyang Lake, and feeds on tubers of Vallisneria spiralis in shallow water and mudflat habitat. In this study, we reported the first sighting of large numbers of Siberian cranes foraging at wet meadows, where they fed on a different plant, Potentilla limprichtii due to extreme scarcity of their preferred tuber. To understand how well the cranes adapted to such unusual habitat, field surveys to assess the distribution of cranes across different habitats, and food availability in each habitat were carried out in the winter of 2011. Field observations on crane behaviors at different habitats were also conducted. Results show that cranes displayed significantly different behavior patterns when using the wet meadow, compared to the crane's optimal habitat - shallow water and mudflat. Both juveniles and adults spent significantly less time foraging, and more time alerting in meadows than in shallow waters and mudflats. These results indicated that the meadow might be a suboptimal wintering ground for Siberian crane, which helped the cranes survive from extreme unfavorable conditions. To some degree, this finding alleviates the general concern over the fluctuating of its food resources which was caused by hydrological disturbances. However, more studies are needed to assess the consequences of such diet and habitat shift for crane survival. PMID:23823943

  20. Diet Shift and Its Impact on Foraging Behavior of Siberian Crane (Grus Leucogeranus) in Poyang Lake.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yifei; Jiao, Shengwu; Zhang, Yamian; Zhou, Yan; Lei, Guangchun; Liu, Guanhua

    2013-01-01

    The study of habitat selection and diet has a long history in ecology. This is often used to assess the functional roles of wetland in biodiversity conservation. Shifting habitat and diet may be one of the survival strategies during extremely adverse conditions. Therefore, sudden changes in habitat selection may indicate the deterioration of the habitat quality, and management interventions are necessary. Siberian crane (Grus leucogeranus) became critically endangered due to loss of habitat, and is currently a global conservation focus. Every winter, more than 95% of the species' global population congregates at Poyang Lake, and feeds on tubers of Vallisneria spiralis in shallow water and mudflat habitat. In this study, we reported the first sighting of large numbers of Siberian cranes foraging at wet meadows, where they fed on a different plant, Potentilla limprichtii due to extreme scarcity of their preferred tuber. To understand how well the cranes adapted to such unusual habitat, field surveys to assess the distribution of cranes across different habitats, and food availability in each habitat were carried out in the winter of 2011. Field observations on crane behaviors at different habitats were also conducted. Results show that cranes displayed significantly different behavior patterns when using the wet meadow, compared to the crane's optimal habitat - shallow water and mudflat. Both juveniles and adults spent significantly less time foraging, and more time alerting in meadows than in shallow waters and mudflats. These results indicated that the meadow might be a suboptimal wintering ground for Siberian crane, which helped the cranes survive from extreme unfavorable conditions. To some degree, this finding alleviates the general concern over the fluctuating of its food resources which was caused by hydrological disturbances. However, more studies are needed to assess the consequences of such diet and habitat shift for crane survival. PMID:23823943

  1. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTURE: Striving for Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sherrill H

    2010-01-01

    Historically, invited lecturers have often challenged us to define excel lence in physical therapy practice, or in our academic programs. While some have addressed different char acteristics of excellence, our profession has not really come together to address 2 very important questions: what does “quality” mean in physical therapist education? And how do we measure it? Using 3 elements of Friendship, Leadership, and Mentoring, and Defining Excellence and juxtaposing these with Linda Crane and her life, a vision of excellence in physical therapy educational programs was explored in this invited lecture. The text of that lecture ensues. PMID:20520760

  2. Nutritional value of winter foods for whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.T.; Slack, R.D.; Gee, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    We measured metabolizable energy and digestibility of Whooping Crane (Grus americana) winter foods (blue crab [Callinectes sapidus]), common Rangia clam (Rangia cuneata), wolfberry fruit (Lycium carolinianurn [wolfberry]), and live oak acorn (Ouercus virginiana [acorn])] with feeding trials to captive-reared Whooping Cranes. Apparent metabolizable energy coefficients (expressed as %) were for crab (34.1), Rangia clam (75.0), wolfberry (44.8), and acorn (43.2). Digestion coefficients for protein were lower for plant foods (48.9 and 53.4) than for animal foods (69.4 and 75.2). Digestion coefficients for total lipid differed among foods: highest and lowest lipid digestibility was for acorn (87.2) and wolfberry (60.0), respectively. We also determined total energy and percent protein and lipid of the four foods and stout razor clam (Tagelus plebeius); gross energy was 2-5x higher for acorn and wolfberry on a dry-weight basis than for blue crab and stout razor clam. Crude protein was 2-3x higher for blue crab than for wolfberry and stout razor clam. Wolfberry ranked the highest of five foods for metabolic energy and total lipid nutrient availability per kg of food ingested, and blue crab ranked highest for crude protein availability.

  3. Semen collection and fertility in naturally fertile sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, G.; Gee, G.F.; Nicolich, J.M.; Taylor, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aviculturists often ask if semen collection will interfere with fertility in naturally fertile pairs of cranes. We used 12 naturally fertile Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) pairs for this study, 6 control and 6 experimental. All pairs had produced fertile eggs in previous years and were in out-of-doors pens scattered throughout different pen complexes, within auditory range but physically isolated. Semen was collected on Tuesday mornings and Friday afternoons from 26 February 1993 to 4 June 1993. We used standard artificial insemination methods to collect and to evaluate the semen and spermatozoa. Semen collection did not affect semen quality or quantity. Semen volume, sperm density, sperm motility, sperm morphology, sperm live, sperm number per collection, and male response to semen collection exhibited significant daily variation (P < 0.05). Although semen collection began 13 days before the first egg in the experimental group, we observed no differences in the date of first egg laid or in fertility between experimental and control groups. Also, we observed no differences in the interval between clutches or in the percentage of broken eggs between experimental and control groups. Sires consistently producing better semen samples produced fewer fertile eggs than sires producing poorer semen samples (r = 0.60).

  4. A nondestructive test contribution to the safety of offshore cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, G.; Bourgeors-Jacquet, P.

    1995-10-01

    Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) plays a vital role in safety as well as in economics of manufacturing. This paper shows an example of how NDT has been successfully used offshore in Europe for a number of years, inspecting slewing bearings. Slewing bearings are the bearings that support among other things cranes and earth-moving equipment. These bearings carry a very heavy slow moving unbalanced axial-load. Due to the extreme environment and the very heavy and unbalanced loading supported by the bearings, particularly on oil exploration and production platforms in the North Sea, some bearings have failed catastrophically. In order to minimize the dangers, authorities have stipulated that slewing bearings for cranes employed in the North Sea are to be periodically inspected. The normal life-restricting failure mode of slewing bearings is spalling of the raceways. This is the rolling contact surface of the bearing breaking-up under the very heavy loads imposed upon it. The developed ultrasonic testing technique, apart from detecting and monitoring cracks in the stressed areas of the bearing, is also able to monitor the initiation and growth of any spalling on the main raceways of the bearings, thus enabling better planning on maintenance and replacements. This paper describes the development of the ultrasonic testing system.

  5. Gantry cranes gain scheduling feedback control with friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Hanafy M.; Nayfeh, Ali H.

    2005-03-01

    We designed a controller based on gain-scheduling feedback to move a load on a gantry crane from point to point within one oscillation cycle and without inducing large swings. The settling time of the system is taken to be equal to the period of oscillation of the load. This criterion enables calculation of the controller feedback gains for varying load weight and cable length. Numerical simulations show that the controller is effective in reducing load oscillations and transferring the load in a reasonable time compared with that of optimal control. To experimentally validate the theory, we had to compensate for friction. To this end, we estimated the friction, and then applied an opposite control action to cancel it. To estimate the friction force, we assumed a mathematical model, and then we estimated the model coefficients using an off-line identification technique, such as the method of least squares (LS). First, the process of identification is applied to a theoretical model of a DC motor with known friction coefficients. From this example, some guidelines and rules are deduced for the choice of the LS parameters. Then, the friction coefficients of the gantry crane model are estimated and validated.

  6. A comparison of behavior for two cohorts of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes released in northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mummert, D.P.; Chambers, C.L.; Ellis, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    To determine how the behavior of greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) changes according to time of year, time of day, and number of days after release, we observed the activities of 2 groups of captive-reared greater sandhill cranes at Mormon Lake, northern Arizona. The behaviors we compared were alert, loafing, sleeping, foraging, preening, locomotion, and other. We found costume-reared subadult greater sandhill cranes that were established at the study site for a year spent more time foraging and being alert towards predators than parent-reared juvenile greater sandhill cranes that were recently released from captivity. We also found that with time juvenile sandhill cranes were increasingly alert and spent less time loafing. It appeared that captive-reared juvenile sandhill cranes learn behavior important for survival from previously released captive-reared cranes.

  7. Closed-circuit television and remote crane control for vitrification facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.R.; Morrison, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility is currently under construction at the Savannah River Plant. Within the main process cell (MPC), a 117-ton capacity bridge crane is to be installed to facilitate remote handling and processing operations. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company defined and PRC designed and built an operational prototype closed-circuit television (CCTV) and remote control system. Phase I of the program developed the CCTV system to prove the feasibility of a remote viewing system. The phase II program added full crane functional remote control and installed it on an existing hot canyon crane. This prototype system established the criteria for the development of the MPC crane and future crane systems. Parameters were: (a) failsafe assurance, (b) high liability, (c) ease of maintenance for dressed-out personnel, (d) rapid malfunction diagnosis, (e) ergonomics, (f) known picture orientation, and (g) audio system to monitor operational sounds. The complete system has undergone a total demonstration of its operational capabilities using simulator circuits for crane functions and is now being integrated with the crane for a full operational demonstration. The system will then be mothballed pending installation by construction personnel ready for cold startup of the plant in 1988.

  8. Fat deposition and usage by arctic-nesting sandhill cranes during spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Iverson, G.C.; Reinecke, K.J.; Boise, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Body weight, fat, and protein levels of arctic-nesting Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) were measured at several locations during spring migration and on the breeding grounds. Body weights of adult males and females increased by about 34% (1,129 g) and 30% (953 g) from early March at the Platte River to late April at Last Mountain Lake, Saskatchewan; average fat content increased from about 250 to 990 g. Rates of weight gain and fat deposition among males and females averaged 25-18 and 16-13 g/day. Body weights and fat content of cranes staging along the North Platte River followed similar patterns and usually were higher than along the Platte River during comparable periods. Fat reserves of paired cranes collected after their arrival at a major breeding ground on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska averaged about 530 g, or about 46% less than peak fat content in Saskatchewan. Patterns of weight increase and fat deposition in cranes during migration were similar to those previously described for northern-nesting geese, except that nutrient storage is not sex specific in cranes. Body protein of adult female cranes did not change significantly during spring migration (P = 0.28). Female cranes allocate less nutrients to clutch formation in proportion to body size than do northern-nesting geese.

  9. Promoting wildness in sandhill cranes conditioned to follow an ultralight aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.W.; Lishman, W.A.; Clark, D.A.; Gee, G.F.; Sprague, D.T.; Ellis, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    During the 1998 field season, we developed and tested a new protocol to teach sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to follow ultralight aircraft yet avoid humans. Although successful in teaching the cranes a migration route, our previous migration (1997) resulted in birds that were overly tame and sought association with humans. For this study, 16 sandhill cranes were costume-reared at USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and transported to Ontario shortly before fledging. After the birds learned to follow the aircraft, 14 were transported to an isolated wintering site in South Carolina, 1300 km south of the training area. Twelve arrived safely. Eleven of 12 birds survived the winter. All of these 11 cranes moved north to Cape Hatteras in early May. Thereafter, 6 of the cranes were captured and translocated to northern New York state. The remaining 5 returned to South Carolina, autumn 1999. Prior to capture, although the cranes sometimes allowed humans to approach them, none of the cranes approached buildings or humans.

  10. Agricultural producers' perceptions of sandhill cranes in the San Luis Valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Management for migratory birds at an ecosystem scale requires forming cooperative partnerships with the private sector. To be effective, however, wildlife managers must understand the economic and social attitudes of private landowners to ensure that strategies involving stakeholders are viable and can be implemented. We documented attitudes of farmers in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado toward Rocky Mountain Population greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) using a self administered, mail-back survey. Overall response rate was 46.7%. Viewing sandhill cranes in the SLV was considered somewhat important or important by 78.6% of respondents. In contrast, only 62.1% of respondents indicated that viewing sandhill cranes was somewhat important or important on their own land. Farmers' attitudes toward viewing sandhill cranes on their own property were related (P=0.02) to perceived conflicts with crop production. The extent of crane use (P=0.04) was the only variable we tested that predicted whether conflicts were reported. Our results suggest that partnerships between farmers and natural resource agencies concerned with management of sandhill cranes may be viable. However, the role of farmers in any proposed management strategy must be examined carefully because there may be an upper limit of crane use on private land that farmers will tolerate.

  11. Identification, inheritance, and linkage of B-G-like and MHC class I genes in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    We identified B-G-like genes in the whooping and Florida sandhill cranes and linked them to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We evaluated the inheritance of B-G-like genes in families of whooping and Florida sandhill cranes using restriction fragment patterns (RFPs). Two B-G-like genes, designated wcbgl and wcbg2, were located within 8 kb of one another. The fully sequenced wcbg2 gene encodes a B-G IgV-like domain, an additional Ig-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a single heptad domain typical of '-helical coiled coils. Patterns of restriction fragments in DNA from the whooping crane and from a number of other species indicate that the B-G-like gene families of cranes are large with diverse sequences. Segregation of RFPs in families of Florida sandhill cranes provide evidence for genetic polymorphism in the B-G-like genes. The restriction fragments generally segregated in concert with MHC haplotypes assigned by serological typing and by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) assays based in the second exon of the crane MHC class I genes. This study supports the concept of a long-term association of polymorphic B-G-like genes with the MHC. It also establishes SSCP as a means for evaluating MHC genetic variability in cranes.

  12. Decision analysis for conservation breeding: Maximizing production for reintroduction of whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Des H.V.; Converse, Sarah J.; Gibson, Keith; Moehrenschlager, Axel; Link, William A.; Olsen, Glenn H.; Maguire, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Captive breeding is key to management of severely endangered species, but maximizing captive production can be challenging because of poor knowledge of species breeding biology and the complexity of evaluating different management options. In the face of uncertainty and complexity, decision-analytic approaches can be used to identify optimal management options for maximizing captive production. Building decision-analytic models requires iterations of model conception, data analysis, model building and evaluation, identification of remaining uncertainty, further research and monitoring to reduce uncertainty, and integration of new data into the model. We initiated such a process to maximize captive production of the whooping crane (Grus americana), the world's most endangered crane, which is managed through captive breeding and reintroduction. We collected 15 years of captive breeding data from 3 institutions and used Bayesian analysis and model selection to identify predictors of whooping crane hatching success. The strongest predictor, and that with clear management relevance, was incubation environment. The incubation period of whooping crane eggs is split across two environments: crane nests and artificial incubators. Although artificial incubators are useful for allowing breeding pairs to produce multiple clutches, our results indicate that crane incubation is most effective at promoting hatching success. Hatching probability increased the longer an egg spent in a crane nest, from 40% hatching probability for eggs receiving 1 day of crane incubation to 95% for those receiving 30 days (time incubated in each environment varied independently of total incubation period). Because birds will lay fewer eggs when they are incubating longer, a tradeoff exists between the number of clutches produced and egg hatching probability. We developed a decision-analytic model that estimated 16 to be the optimal number of days of crane incubation needed to maximize the number of

  13. Geophysical investigation at Mustard Gas Burial Ground, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Sjostrom, K.J.; Murphy, W.L.

    1997-06-01

    A geophysical investigation was conducted at the Mustard Gas Burial Ground (MGBG) at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, IN. The MGBG, an approximately 2-acre area, is a former Solid Waste Management Unit. The objective of the investigation was to detect and delineate anomalies indicating the locations of buried structures, objects, or disturbed zones associated with past hazardous waste burial at the MGBG. The locations of these objects are needed so they can be excavated for removal to a permanent treatment or disposal site. Frequency and time domain electromagnetic (EM) along with magnetic survey methods were used at the MGBG. All the surveys performed at the MGBG indicated an anomalous area approximately 10 ft in diameter centered on Station 255 on Line 130. The estimated depth of the anomaly, based on results of the transient EM surveys, is 1 to 2 ft. The anomaly is presumed to be ferrous in nature since it was detected by the magnetometer. An additional, 2- to 3-ft diameter anomaly, caused by a small metallic object was detected by the transient EM surveys.

  14. A crane moves toward the S0 truss to transfer it to a workstand in the O&C Bldg.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane is centered over the S0 truss segment before lowering. The crane will move it to a workstand in the O&C where it will undergo processing. In the foreground is the protective cover just removed. During the processing, the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, 'Destiny,' which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108.

  15. CRAnE: A JAS-based Data Acquisition System for Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willy G.J.

    2003-08-25

    Cosmic Ray Analysis Environment (CRAnE) is a software tool designed to collect and plot data from a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) connected to a computer serial port. As a plug-in to Java Analysis Studio (JAS), CRAnE provides visual displays of incoming cosmic ray rates as they are detected. In an effort to make the program user-friendly, it operates through a graphical user interface. This paper describes the features of CRAnE and includes installation and operation instructions in the appended user's manual.

  16. Development of Innovative Integrated Simulator on Shipboard Crane Considering Ship Sway and Transfer Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Ryuji; Terashima, Kazuhiko; Noda, Yoshiyuki; Iwasa, Takahiro

    In this paper, in order to systemize the state analysis of a shipboard crane, the integrated computer simulator tool of rotary crane with ship behavior in consideration of ship sway is newly built. The integrated simulator of shipboard crane considering ship sway was realized by corporating an external force interface routine of a component with Fluid analysis software. The transfer control system is conducted by HSA (Hybrid Shape Approach) using STT (Straight Transfer Transformation) method. The proposal method was confirmed to be effective in order to reduce both sway of a ship and a load by the simulation analysis.

  17. Probabilistic method to assess insulating link performance for protection of crane workers

    SciTech Connect

    Karady, G.G.; Shah, M.; Dumora, D.

    1996-01-01

    Contact between cranes and transmission lines is the most frequent cause of accidents, which may lead to electrocution of an operator or rigger. This accident can be prevented by inserting an insulating link in the crane`s cable. This paper analyzes currents during accidents and proposes a modified test method for contaminated insulating links. A new and better insulating link is also introduced. Flashover probability of contaminated insulator links is measured. The tests results are evaluated with a new probabilistic method which leads to better assessment of link efficiency. The paper concludes that the risk of link failure cannot be determined without the new flashover probability measurement.

  18. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.

    1996-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted on three critical locations on the lower flange of the load-beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. Based on these results, it appears that: 1. Propagation of a 5 mm long flaw, previously undetected by non-destructive examination (NDE), to a length sufficient to cause structural failure of either flange, should not occur in at least 100 times the postulated operating scenarios for each crane; 2. Should each crane undergo annual inspection, any surface flaw with a length greater that 20 mm should be removed and repaired by qualified and approved repair procedures.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1411 - Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines with no load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1411 Power line safety—while traveling under or near... equipment traveling under or near a power line on a construction site with no load. Equipment traveling on...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1411 - Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines with no load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1411 Power line safety—while traveling under or near... equipment traveling under or near a power line on a construction site with no load. Equipment traveling on...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1411 - Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines with no load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... qualified person with respect to electrical power transmission and distribution). ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1411 Power line safety—while traveling under or...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1411 - Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines with no load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... qualified person with respect to electrical power transmission and distribution). ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1411 Power line safety—while traveling under or...

  3. On an adaptive truss manipulator space crane concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    The paper describes an adaptive truss manipulator (ATM) space crane concept for in-space assembly and construction. The underlying mechanism of an ATM is that the batten members of the constituent octahedral modules are controllable in length. Through geometric transformations of the constituent modules, the basic manipulator functions such as articulation can be performed by the ATM. The mechanism can also provide deployment/retraction, high dexterity motion, and bracing operation. The advantages of an ATM over the conventional multijoint-multilink anthropomorphic manipulator are its compact stowage volume for in-space storage and mobility, deployment as needed, high dexterity in complex workspace, and high redundancy of the actuator function. The kinematic description of an ATM is formulated in the global cartesian coordinate system.

  4. On an adaptive truss manipulator space crane concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes an adaptive truss manipulator (ATM) space crane concept for in-space assembly and construction. The underlying mechanism of an ATM is that the batten members of the constituent octahedral modules are controllable in length. Through geometric transformations of the constituent modules, the basic manipulator functions such as articulation can be performed by the ATM. The mechanism can also provide deployment/retraction, high dexterity motion, and bracing operation. The advantages of an ATM over the conventional multijoint-multilink anthropomorphic manipulator are its compact stowage volume for in-space storage and mobility, deployment as needed, high dexterity in complex workspace, and high redundancy of the actuator function. The kinematic description of an ATM is formulated in the global cartesian coordinate system.

  5. An alternative approach to control measurements of crane rails.

    PubMed

    Marjetič, Aleš; Kregar, Klemen; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Kogoj, Dušan

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical positions of points for the control assessment of crane rails are classically determined separately. The procedure is time consuming and causes non-homogenous accuracy of the horizontal and vertical position of control points. The proposed alternative approach is based on polar measurements using a high accuracy total station instrument and a special platform with two precise surveying prisms fixed on it. Measurements are carried out from a single station thus ensuring a common coordinate system and homogenous accuracy. The position of the characteristic point of a rail is derived from the measured positions of both prisms with known geometry of the platform. The influence of platform non-horizontality is defined, along with its elimination procedure. Accuracy assessment is ensured with redundant measurements. Result of the proposed procedure is a numerical and graphical presentation of characteristic points. The control parameters required in international Eurocode standards are easily determined from them. PMID:22778621

  6. AmeriFlux US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Ken; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site. Site Description - Wind River Field Station flux tower site is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Protected since 1926, the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area (RNA) is administered by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Douglas-fir/western hemlock dominant stand is approximately 500 years old and represents end points of several ecological gradients including age, biomass, structural complexity, and density of the dominant overstory species. A complete stand replacement fire, approximately 450-500 years ago, resulted in the initial establishment. No significant disturbances have occurred since the fire aside from those confined to small groups of single trees, such as overturn from high wind activity and mechanical damage from winter precipitation.

  7. Roll motion analysis of deepwater pipelay crane vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Qu, Zhiguo; Wang, Tao

    2013-12-01

    For a large floating vessel in waves, radiation damping is not an accurate prediction of the degree of roll unlike other degrees of freedom motion. Therefore, to get the knowledge of roll motion performance of deepwater pipelay crane vessels and to keep the vessel working safety, the paper presents the relationship between a series of dimensionless roll damping coefficients and the roll response amplitude operator (RAO). By using two kinds of empirical data, the roll damping is estimated in the calculation flow. After getting the roll damping coefficient from the model test, a prediction of roll motion in regular waves is evaluated. According to the wave condition in the working region, short term statistics of roll motion are presented under different wave parameters. Moreover, the relationship between the maximal roll response level to peak spectral wave period and the roll damping coefficient is investigated. Results may provide some reference to design and improve this kind of vessel.

  8. 75 FR 39037 - Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... continue the CCP process for Crane Meadows NWR, which we began by publishing a notice of intent on (73 FR... favoring savanna and wetland habitats over existing prairies and woodlands. This alternative...

  9. Detail, cyclops 15ton overhead traveling crane and rails running the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, cyclops 15-ton overhead traveling crane and rails running the length of the building - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Pumping Plant No. 1, Bounded by Gila River & Union Pacific Railroad, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  10. Results of the second (1996) experiment to lead cranes on migration behind a motorized ground vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Clauss, B.; Watanabe, T.; Mykut, R.C.; Shawkey, M.; Mummert, D.P.; Sprague, D.T.; Ellis, C.H.; Trahan, F.B.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were trained to follow a specially-equipped truck and 12 were led along a ca 620-km route from Camp Navajo in northern Arizona to the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge near the Arizona/Mexico border. Ten survived the trek, 380 km of which were flown, although only a few cranes flew every stage of the route. Major problems during the migration were powerline collisions (ca 15, 2 fatal) and overheating (when air temperatures exceeded ca 25 C). The tenacity of the cranes in following both in 1995 and 1996 under unfavorable conditions (e.g., poor light, extreme dust, or heat) demonstrated that cranes could be led over long distances by motorized vehicles on the ground.

  11. 63. ARAII. Tenton crane in SL1 reactor building transports the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. ARA-II. Ten-ton crane in SL-1 reactor building transports the reactor head. February 24, 1958. Ineel photo no. 58-879. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Analysis of the D0 Crane Rail as a Support for a Horizontal Lifeline

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, H.; /Fermilab

    2000-03-02

    The D-Zero crane rail is analyzed for use as an anchor support for a one person Horizon{trademark} Horizontal Lifeline system that will span the pit area at D-Zero assembly hall. The lifeline will span 75 ft across the pit area, will be located out of the travel of the crane and above the concrete lentil wall. The crane rail is a suitable anchor for a one person Horizon TM Horizontal Lifeline system. The expected stress on the rail is 1,995 psi which has a factor of safety of 5.5 on the allowable stress. The anchor position is located 18 feet away from the concrete lentil wall and out of the travel of the overhead crane.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in blood plasma of quail, pheasants, and cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, R.S.; Bush, M.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Rate of appearance, peak concentration, and the biological half-life of gentamicin in the plasma of quail (Coturnix coturnix), pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), and cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were studied. Gentamicin was given IM in doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight. Peak plasma concentrations occurred earliest in the quail, latest in the cranes. The peak concentrations varied directly with the administered doses in all species. The biological half-life of gentamicin was 42 +/- 12 minutes in the quail, 75 +/- 15 minutes in the pheasants, and 165 +/- 37 minutes in the cranes. On the basis of the present data, dosage regimens for gentaminic of 5 mg/kg every 8 hours in pheasants and cranes, and 10 mg/kg every 6 hours in quail, would be expected to give constant plasma concentrations greater than 4.0 micrograms/ml.

  14. Seismic elastic-plastic time history analysis and reliability study of quayside container crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yulong; Li, Zengguang

    2010-06-01

    Quayside container crane is a kind of huge dimension steel structure, which is the major equipment used for handling container at modern ports. With the aim to validate the safety and reliability of the crane under seismic loads, besides conventional analysis, elastic-plastic time history analysis under rare seismic intensity is carried out. An ideal finite element (FEM) elastic-plastic mechanical model of the quayside container crane is presented by using ANSYS codes. Furthermore, according to elastic-plastic time history analysis theory, deformation, stress and damage pattern of the structure under rare seismic intensity are investigated. Based on the above analysis, the established reliability model according to the reliability theory, together with seismic reliability analysis based on Monte-Carlo simulation is applied to practical analysis. The results show that the overall structure of the quayside container crane is generally unstable under rare seismic intensity, and the structure needs to be reinforced.

  15. MAIN GENERATOR EXCITER UNIT IN FOREGROUND, WITH CYCLOPS 75TON CRANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN GENERATOR EXCITER UNIT IN FOREGROUND, WITH CYCLOPS 75-TON CRANE IN BACKGROUND. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  16. 36. SAR1 UNDER CONSTRUCTION, WITH WORKERS ATOP CRANE. EEC print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. SAR-1 UNDER CONSTRUCTION, WITH WORKERS ATOP CRANE. EEC print no. N-C-01-00031, no date. Photograph by Benjamin F. Pearson. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in blood plasma of quail, pheasants, and cranes.

    PubMed

    Custer, R S; Bush, M; Carpenter, J W

    1979-06-01

    Rate of appearance, peak concentration, and the biological half-life of gentamicin in the plasma of quail (Coturnix coturnix), pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), and cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were studied. Gentamicin was given IM in doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight. Peak plasma concentrations occurred earliest in the quail, latest in the cranes. The peak concentrations varied directly with the administered doses in all species. The biological half-life of gentamicin was 42 +/- 12 minutes in the quail, 75 +/- 15 minutes in the pheasants, and 165 +/- 37 minutes in the cranes. On the basis of the present data, dosage regimens for gentaminic of 5 mg/kg every 8 hours in pheasants and cranes, and 10 mg/kg every 6 hours in quail, would be expected to give constant plasma concentrations greater than 4.0 micrograms/ml. PMID:475144

  18. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in cranes.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Takami, Kazutoshi; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in cranes. Genomic sequences spanning exons 1 to 4 were amplified and determined in 13 crane species and three other species closely related to cranes. In all, 55 unique sequences were identified, and at least two polymorphic MHC class II B loci were found in most species. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms showed the signature of positive selection and recombination. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on exon 2 sequences indicated that trans-species polymorphism has persisted for at least 10 million years, whereas phylogenetic analyses of the sequences flanking exon 2 revealed a pattern of concerted evolution. These results suggest that both balancing selection and recombination play important roles in the crane MHC evolution. PMID:26452363

  19. First Report of Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum (Echinostomatidae) in a Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis) from Saskatchewan, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a new host record for Protechinostoma mucronisertulatum. These small trematode parasites were found in a debilitated, immature, male sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) during Autumn migration from the Canadian prairies. Necropsy examination identified fibrinonecrotizing and ulcerative jejuni...

  20. Post-release survival of hand-reared and parent-reared Mississippi Sandhill Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Gee, G.F.; Hereford, Scott G.; Olsen, G.H.; Chisolm, T.D.; Nicolich, J.M.; Sullivan, K.A.; Thomas, N.J.; Nagendran, M.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mississippi Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis pulla) reintroduction program is the largest crane reintroduction effort in the world. Here we report on a 4-year experiment in which we compared post-release survival rates of 56 hand-reared and 76 parent-reared Mississippi Sandhill Cranes. First-year survival was 80%. Surprisingly, hand-reared cranes survived better than parent-reared birds, and the highest survival rates were for hand-reared juveniles released in mixed cohorts with parent-reared birds. Mixing improved survival most for parent-reared birds released with hand-reared birds. These results demonstrate that hand-rearing can produce birds which survive at least as well as parent-reared birds and that improved survival results from mixing hand-reared and parent-reared birds.

  1. Post-release survival of hand-reared and parent-reared Mississippi sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Gee, G.F.; Hereford, Scott G.; Olsen, G.H.; Chisolm, T.D.; Nicolich, J.M.; Sullivan, K.A.; Thomas, N.J.; Nagendran, M.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    The Mississippi Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis pulla) reintroduction program is the largest crane reintroduction effort in the world. Here we report on a 4-year experiment in which we compared post-release survival rates of 56 hand-reared and 76 parent-reared Mississippi Sandhill Cranes. First-year survival was 80%. Surprisingly, hand-reared cranes survived better than parent-reared birds, and the highest survival rates were for hand-reared juveniles released in mixed cohorts with parent-reared birds. Mixing improved survival most for parent-reared birds released with hand-reared birds. These results demonstrate that hand-rearing can produce birds which survive at least as well as parent-reared birds and that improved survival results from mixing hand-reared and parent-reared birds.

  2. Monitoring Whooping Crane Abundance Using Aerial Surveys: Influences on Detectability

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Bradley N; Butler, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    The whooping crane (Grus americana), an endangered species, has been counted on its winter grounds in Texas, USA, since 1950 using fixed-wing aircraft. Many shortcomings of the traditional survey technique have been identified, calling into question its efficacy, defensibility, repeatability, and usefulness into the future. To improve and standardize monitoring effort, we began investigating new survey techniques. Here we focus on efficacy of line transect-based distance sampling during aerial surveys. We conducted a preliminary test of distance sampling during winter 2010–2011 while flying the traditional survey, which indicated that detectability within 500 m of transects was 0.558 (SE = 0.031). We then used an experimental decoy survey to evaluate impacts of observer experience, sun position, distance from transect, and group size on detectability. Our results indicated decoy detectability increased with group size and exhibited a quadratic relationship with distance likely due to pontoons on the aircraft. We found that detectability was 2.704 times greater when the sun was overhead and 3.912 times greater when the sun was at the observer's back than when it was in the observer's eyes. We found that an inexperienced observer misclassified non-target objects more often than an experienced observer. During the decoy experiment we used marks on the struts to categorize distances into intervals, but we found that observers misclassified distances 46.7% of the time (95% CI = 37.0–56.6%). Also, we found that detectability of individuals within detected groups was affected by group size and distance from transect. We discuss how these results inform design and implementation of future whooping crane monitoring efforts. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26388657

  3. Antibody response of sandhill and whooping cranes to an eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.G.; Dein, F.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Carpenter, J.W.; Watts, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a possible strategy to protect whooping cranes (Grus americana) from fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viral infection, studies were conducted to determine the immune response of this species and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to a formalin-inactivated EEE viral vaccine. Viral-specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in both species after intramuscular (IM) vaccination. Subcutaneous and intravenous routes of vaccination failed to elicit detectable antibody in sandhill cranes. Among the IM vaccinated cranes, the immune response was characterized by nondetectable or low antibody titers that waned rapidly following primary exposure to the vaccine. However, one or more booster doses consistently elicited detectable antibody and/or increased antibody titers in the whooping cranes. In contrast, cranes with pre-existing EEE viral antibody, apparently induced by natural infection, exhibited a rapid increase and sustained high-antibody titers. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to determine the protective efficacy of the antibody.

  4. Mortality of captive whooping cranes caused by eastern equine encephalitis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Carpenter, J.W.; Clark, G.G.; Montali, R.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Tsai, T.F.; Docherty, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Of 39 captive whooping cranes (Grus americana), 7 died during a 7-week period (Sept 17 through Nov 4, 1984) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Md. Before their deaths, 4 cranes did not develop clinical signs, whereas the other 3 cranes were lethargic and ataxic, with high aspartate transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and lactic acid dehydrogenase activities, and high uric acid concentrations. Necropsies indicated that the birds had ascites, intestinal mucosal discoloration, fat depletion, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, and visceral gout. Microscopically, extensive necrosis and inflammation were seen in many visceral organs; the CNS was not affected. Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus was isolated from specimens of the livers, kidneys, lungs, brains, and intestines of 4 of the 7 birds that died, and EEE virus-neutralizing antibody was detected in 14 (44%) of the 32 surviving birds. Other infectious or toxic agents were not found. Morbidity or mortality was not detected in 240 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) interspersed among the whooping cranes; however, 13 of the 32 sandhill cranes evaluated had EEE virus-neutralizing antibody. Of the 41 wild birds evaluated in the area, 3 (4%) had EEE virus-neutralizing antibody. Immature Culiseta melanura (the most probable mosquito vector) were found in scattered foci 5 km from the research center.

  5. Position Measurement of a Crane Spreader using an Image Sensor for Efficient Container Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hideki; Tanaka, Shoichi; Kim, Young-Bok; Choi, Yongwoon; Kubota, Yuzuru

    An image sensor that can accurately measure the position and height of a crane spreader has been proposed for suppressing the sway motion generated in the process of manually operating a crane. The image sensor consists of a pair of landmarks attached to the upper surface of the spreader, a CCD camera installed in the trolley on the top of the crane, and a PC, and has the following several advantages. (1) The image sensor is safe for the operators handling cranes due to the passive measurement method. (2) It employs a specific landmark. (3) It uses a robust template matching method “Vector Code Correlation method”, which is suitable for the landmark detection under outdoor light conditions. We verified these features through the fundamental experiments such as the position change of a crane spreader using a moving stage and the illumination condition change. As in the results, we estimated that the absolute error of the image sensor is within 3.3mm in sway motion and within 0.5% while moving from 5m to 20m in height. In addition, we also confirmed the usefulness of the image sensor by applying the measured data to an anti-sway controller on a model crane.

  6. Food consumption and retention time in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.T.; Gee, G.F.; Slack, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Food consumption, digesta retention time, and food preference were measured for captive whooping cranes fed pelleted diets. The basal commercial diet was compared to four mixtures containing 70% basal and 30% of one of four important winter foods for the whooping crane: blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), wolfberry fruit (Lycium carolinianurn), live oak acorn (Quercus virginiana), or common Rangia clam (Rangia cuneata). Because captive birds would not eat whole foods, we were prevented from direct food preference tests. Food passed through the gut rapidly, with almost complete elimination within 7 hr. There was some indication that retention time was shorter for the low fiber and high ash and calcium clam diet. Cranes ate less wolfberry feed (g/day) than the other feeds, and all birds ate less wolfberry feed on the day it was first fed, compared to basal diet the previous day. Birds ate more low energy feed than high energy feed. Due to combined effects of low energy content, lower metabolizable energy coefficients, and reduced feed consumption, less energy was assimilated for study diets than basal diet. Apparent shorter retention times for some diets con-taming whooping crane foods may partly explain lower digestibilities and metabolizable energy of winter whooping crane foods compared to commercial crane diet.

  7. Quantification of Plume-Soil Interaction and Excavation Due to the Sky Crane Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Jeffrey; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the particulate erosion that occurs as a result of a rocket exhaust plume impinging on soil during extraterrestrial landings is critical for future robotic and human lander mission design. The aerodynamic environment that results from the reflected plumes results in dust lifting, site alteration and saltation, all of which create a potentially erosive and contaminant heavy environment for the lander vehicle and any surrounding structures. The Mars Science Lab (MSL), weighing nearly one metric ton, required higher levels of thrust from its retro propulsive systems and an entirely new descent system to minimize these effects. In this work we seek to quantify plume soil interaction and its resultant soil erosion caused by the MSL's Sky Crane descent stage engines by performing three dimensional digital terrain and elevation mapping of the Curiosity rover's landing site. Analysis of plume soil interaction altitude and time was performed by detailed examination of the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) still frames and reconstructed inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor data. Results show initial plume soil interaction from the Sky Crane's eight engines began at ground elevations greater than 60 meters and more than 25 seconds before the rovers' touchdown event. During this time, viscous shear erosion (VSE) was dominant typically resulting in dusting of the surface with flow propagating nearly parallel to the surface. As the vehicle descended and decreased to four powered engines plume-plume and plume soil interaction increased the overall erosion rate at the surface. Visibility was greatly reduced at a height of roughly 20 meters above the surface and fell to zero ground visibility shortly after. The deployment phase of the Sky Crane descent stage hovering at nearly six meters above the surface showed the greatest amount of erosion with several large particles of soil being kicked up, recirculated, and impacting the bottom of the rover chassis. Image

  8. Case report: inclusion body disease of cranes: a serological follow-up to the 1978 die-off

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Romaine, Renee I.

    1983-01-01

    A herpesvirus was isolated from captive cranes involved in a 1978 die-off. Neutralizing antibody to this virus was detected in this captive population as early as 1975 and consistently thereafter through 1979. Exposure to the virus evidently occurred at least 2 1/2 years before the die-off, without causing any mortality diagnosed as being caused by inclusion body disease of cranes (IBDC). Overcrowding and environmental conditions in 1978 may have contributed to the deaths of certain species of cranes in one area and not in another. Mortality ratios and serological data suggest that crane species vary in their response to IBDC virus.

  9. Coccidian Parasites and Conservation Implications for the Endangered Whooping Crane (Grus americana).

    PubMed

    Bertram, Miranda R; Hamer, Gabriel L; Snowden, Karen F; Hartup, Barry K; Hamer, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    While the population of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) has grown from 15 individuals in 1941 to an estimated 304 birds today, the population growth is not sufficient to support a down-listing of the species to threatened status. The degree to which disease may be limiting the population growth of whooping cranes is unknown. One disease of potential concern is caused by two crane-associated Eimeria species: Eimeria gruis and E. reichenowi. Unlike most species of Eimeria, which are localized to the intestinal tract, these crane-associated species may multiply systemically and cause a potentially fatal disease. Using a non-invasive sampling approach, we assessed the prevalence and phenology of Eimeria oocysts in whooping crane fecal samples collected across two winter seasons (November 2012-April 2014) at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge along the Texas Gulf coast. We also compared the ability of microscopy and PCR to detect Eimeria in fecal samples. Across both years, 26.5% (n = 328) of fecal samples were positive for Eimeria based on microscopy. Although the sensitivity of PCR for detecting Eimeria infections seemed to be less than that of microscopy in the first year of the study (8.9% vs. 29.3%, respectively), an improved DNA extraction protocol resulted in increased sensitivity of PCR relative to microscopy in the second year of the study (27.6% and 20.8%, respectively). The proportion of positive samples did not vary significantly between years or among sampling sites. The proportion of Eimeria positive fecal samples varied with date of collection, but there was no consistent pattern of parasite shedding between the two years. We demonstrate that non-invasive fecal collections combined with PCR and DNA sequencing techniques provides a useful tool for monitoring Eimeria infection in cranes. Understanding the epidemiology of coccidiosis is important for management efforts to increase population growth of the endangered whooping crane. PMID

  10. Coccidian Parasites and Conservation Implications for the Endangered Whooping Crane (Grus americana)

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Miranda R.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Snowden, Karen F.; Hartup, Barry K.; Hamer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    While the population of endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) has grown from 15 individuals in 1941 to an estimated 304 birds today, the population growth is not sufficient to support a down-listing of the species to threatened status. The degree to which disease may be limiting the population growth of whooping cranes is unknown. One disease of potential concern is caused by two crane-associated Eimeria species: Eimeria gruis and E. reichenowi. Unlike most species of Eimeria, which are localized to the intestinal tract, these crane-associated species may multiply systemically and cause a potentially fatal disease. Using a non-invasive sampling approach, we assessed the prevalence and phenology of Eimeria oocysts in whooping crane fecal samples collected across two winter seasons (November 2012–April 2014) at the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge along the Texas Gulf coast. We also compared the ability of microscopy and PCR to detect Eimeria in fecal samples. Across both years, 26.5% (n = 328) of fecal samples were positive for Eimeria based on microscopy. Although the sensitivity of PCR for detecting Eimeria infections seemed to be less than that of microscopy in the first year of the study (8.9% vs. 29.3%, respectively), an improved DNA extraction protocol resulted in increased sensitivity of PCR relative to microscopy in the second year of the study (27.6% and 20.8%, respectively). The proportion of positive samples did not vary significantly between years or among sampling sites. The proportion of Eimeria positive fecal samples varied with date of collection, but there was no consistent pattern of parasite shedding between the two years. We demonstrate that non-invasive fecal collections combined with PCR and DNA sequencing techniques provides a useful tool for monitoring Eimeria infection in cranes. Understanding the epidemiology of coccidiosis is important for management efforts to increase population growth of the endangered whooping crane. PMID

  11. Detection of parasitizing coccidia and determination of host crane species, sex and genotype by faecal DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Honma, H; Suyama, Y; Nakai, Y

    2011-11-01

    In Japan, the three main crane species are the endangered red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) inhabiting Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan; the vulnerable hooded crane (Grus monacha); and the vulnerable white-naped crane (Grus vipio). Both the hooded and white-naped cranes migrate in winter to Izumi in Kyushu, the southern island of Japan. In this study, we investigated the cranes and their coccidian parasites, through a targeted molecular approach using faecal DNA to develop a noninvasive method for infectious disease research. To determine the origin of noninvasively collected faecal samples, host species were identified by sequencing a region of approximately 470 bp of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene in the faecal DNA. Furthermore, to avoid sample redundancy, individual determination was performed by fragment analysis using microsatellite and sex-linked markers. For microsatellite genotyping, previously reported markers and markers isolated in this study were examined, and seven loci for red-crowned cranes, eight for hooded cranes and six for white-naped cranes displayed polymorphisms. A low error rate was demonstrated by comparing microsatellite data generated from faecal DNA samples with that generated from feather DNA samples, indicating a high reliability. Polymerase chain reaction-based capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE), employing genetic markers in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA, was employed to detect crane coccidia. The sensitivity of detection of PCR-CE using faecal DNA was inferior to that with traditional microscopy; however, our results suggest that PCR-CE can depict crane coccidia diversity with higher resolution and it is a useful tool to characterize community composition of coccidia in detail. PMID:21791031

  12. Evaluation of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in cranes: applications to conservation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Miller, M.M.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness, especially in small breeding populations. More than half of the world's crane species are listed as endangered. Members of all 15 known species are represented among breeding animals for captive propagation at the International Crane Foundation (Wisconsin) and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Maryland). Collaborative multi-organization efforts and the availability of extensive pedigree records have allowed the study of Mhc variability in several species of cranes. We have found, for example, that Mhc diversity in the captive Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) population appears high, whereas in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana), which has undergone a severe 'genetic bottleneck,? both the number of alleles and the levels of heterozygosity appear to be substantially reduced.

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Job Stress of Electric Overhead Traveling Crane Operators

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Obilisetty B.; Maiti, Jhareswar; Ray, Pradip K.; Samanta, Biswajit; Mandal, Saptarshi; Sarkar, Sobhan

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, the measurement of job stress of electric overhead traveling crane operators and quantification of the effects of operator and workplace characteristics on job stress were assessed. Methods Job stress was measured on five subscales: employee empowerment, role overload, role ambiguity, rule violation, and job hazard. The characteristics of the operators that were studied were age, experience, body weight, and body height. The workplace characteristics considered were hours of exposure, cabin type, cabin feature, and crane height. The proposed methodology included administration of a questionnaire survey to 76 electric overhead traveling crane operators followed by analysis using analysis of variance and a classification and regression tree. Results The key findings were: (1) the five subscales can be used to measure job stress; (2) employee empowerment was the most significant factor followed by the role overload; (3) workplace characteristics contributed more towards job stress than operator's characteristics; and (4) of the workplace characteristics, crane height was the major contributor. Conclusion The issues related to crane height and cabin feature can be fixed by providing engineering or foolproof solutions than relying on interventions related to the demographic factors. PMID:26929839

  14. Lifting BLS Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychev, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This note describes BLS power supplies lifting techniques and provides stress calculations for lifting plate and handles bolts. BLS power supply weight is about 120 Lbs, with the center of gravity shifted toward the right front side. A lifting plate is used to attach a power supply to a crane or a hoist. Stress calculations show that safety factors for lifting plate are 12.9 (vs. 5 required) for ultimate stress and 5.7 (vs. 3 required) for yield stress. Safety factor for shackle bolt thread shear load is 37, and safety factor for bolts that attach handles is 12.8.

  15. The safety and physiologic effects of the anticoccidial drugs monensin and clazuril in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.N.; Hatfield, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Because crane chick mortality from disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center increased in 1988, suggesting that the parasite may be developing a resistance to amprolium, a target animal safety study using coccidiostats, monensin and clazuril, was conducted on 27 subadult sandhill cranes.

  16. 30 CFR 250.108 - What requirements must I follow for cranes and other material-handling equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Offshore Pedestal Mounted Cranes (API Spec 2C), incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR... meet the requirements of API Spec 2C, incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198. (e) You...), incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198. (b) All cranes installed on fixed platforms must...

  17. Single-Event Transient Testing of the Crane Aerospace and Electronics SMHF2812D Dual DC-DC Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this testing was to characterize the Crane Aerospace & Electronics (Crane) Interpoint SMHF2812D for single-event transient (SET) susceptibility. These data shall be used for flight lot evaluation, as well as qualification by similarity of the SMHF family of converters, all of which use the same active components.

  18. Testing the utility of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 sequences for phylogenetic estimates of relationships between crane (Grus) species.

    PubMed

    Yu, D B; Chen, R; Kaleri, H A; Jiang, B C; Xu, H X; Du, W-X

    2011-01-01

    Morphology and biogeography are widely used in animal taxonomy. Recent study has suggested that a DNA-based identification system, using a 648-bp portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), also known as the barcoding gene, can aid in the resolution of inferences concerning phylogenetic relationships and for identification of species. However, the effectiveness of DNA barcoding for identifying crane species is unknown. We amplified and sequenced 894-bp DNA fragments of CO1 from Grus japonensis (Japanese crane), G. grus (Eurasian crane), G. monacha (hooded crane), G. canadensis (sandhill crane), G. leucogeranus (Siberian crane), and Balearica pavonina (crowned crane), along with those of 15 species obtained from GenBank and DNA barcoding, to construct four algorithms using Tringa stagnatilis, Scolopax rusticola, and T. erythropus as outgroups. The four phylum profiles showed good resolution of the major taxonomic groups. We concluded that reconstruction of the molecular phylogenetic tree can be helpful for classification and that CO1 sequences are suitable for studying the molecular evolution of cranes. Although support for several deeper branches was limited, CO1 data gave remarkably good separations, especially considering that our analysis was based on just a fragment of the gene and that CO1 has generally been viewed as useful only for resolving shallow divergences. PMID:22194213

  19. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  20. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...