Science.gov

Sample records for power density distribution

  1. A High Power Density DC-DC Converter for Distributed PV Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Agamy, Mohammed S; Chi, Song; Elasser, Ahmed; Harfman-Todorovic, Maja; Jiang, Yan; Mueller, Frank; Tao, Fengfeng

    2012-06-01

    In order to maximize solar energy harvesting capabilities, power converters have to be designed for high efficiency and good MPPT and voltage/current performance. When many converters are used in distributed systems, power density also becomes an important factor as it allows for simpler system integration. In this paper a high power density string dc-dc converter suitable for distributed medium to large scale PV installation is presented. A simple partial power processing topology, implemented with all silicon carbide devices provides high efficiency as well as high power density. A 3.5kW, 100kHz converter is designed and tested to verify the proposed methods.

  2. Measurement of power density distribution and beam waist simulation for electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chunlong; Peng, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Qi

    2013-02-01

    The study aims to measure the power density distribution of the electron beam (EB) for further estimating its characteristics. A compact device combining deflection signal controller and current signal acquisition circuit of the EB was built. A software modelling framework was developed to investigate structural parameters of the electron beam. With an iterative algorithm, the functional relationship between the electron beam power and its power density was solved and the corresponding contour map of power density distribution was plotted through isoline tracking approach. The power density distribution of various layers of cross-section beam was reconstructed for beam volume by direct volume rendering technique. The further simulation of beam waist with all-known marching cubes algorithm reveals the evolution of spatial appearance and geometry measurement principle was explained in detail. The study provides an evaluation of promising to replace the traditional idea of EB spatial characteristics.

  3. Control of plasma density distribution via wireless power transfer in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Young-Cheol; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-06-01

    With an enlargement of the wafer size, development of large-area plasma sources and control of plasma density distribution are required. To control the spatial distribution of the plasma density, wireless power transfer is applied to an inductively coupled plasma for the first time. An inner powered antenna and an outer resonant coil connected to a variable capacitor are placed on the top of the chamber. As the self-resonance frequency ωr of the resonant coil is adjusted, the power transfer rate from the inner powered coil to the outer resonant coil is changed and the dramatic evolution of the plasma density profile is measured. As ωr of the outer resonant coil changes from the non-resonant condition (where ωr is not the driving angular frequency ωrf) to the resonant condition (where ωr = ωrf), the plasma density profile evolves from a convex shape with maximal plasma density at the radial center into a concave shape with maximal plasma density in the vicinity of the resonant antenna coil. This result shows that the plasma density distribution can be successfully controlled via wireless resonance power transfer.

  4. Experimental power density distribution benchmark in the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Stancar, Z.; Radulovic, V.; Podvratnik, M.; Zerovnik, G.; Trkov, A.; Barbot, L.; Domergue, C.; Destouches, C.

    2012-07-01

    In order to improve the power calibration process and to benchmark the existing computational model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Josef Stefan Inst. (JSI), a bilateral project was started as part of the agreement between the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives (CEA) and the Ministry of higher education, science and technology of Slovenia. One of the objectives of the project was to analyze and improve the power calibration process of the JSI TRIGA reactor (procedural improvement and uncertainty reduction) by using absolutely calibrated CEA fission chambers (FCs). This is one of the few available power density distribution benchmarks for testing not only the fission rate distribution but also the absolute values of the fission rates. Our preliminary calculations indicate that the total experimental uncertainty of the measured reaction rate is sufficiently low that the experiments could be considered as benchmark experiments. (authors)

  5. User's Guide: An Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup for the Profiling of the Power Density Distribution in Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Teruya, A T; Palmer, T A

    2002-06-01

    This handbook describes the assembly and operation of an enhanced Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) diagnostic device for measuring the power density distribution of high power electron beams used for welding. The most recent version of this diagnostic device, [1] Version 2.0, contains modifications to the hardware components of previous MFC designs.[2] These modifications allow for more complete capture of the electrons and better electrical grounding, thus improving the quality of the acquired data and enabling a more accurate computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction [3,4] of the power density distribution of the electron beam to be performed. [ 5-9

  6. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2001-01-01

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  7. Experimental Approbation of Selective Laser Melting of Powders by the Use of Non-Gaussian Power Density Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunkova, Anna; Volosova, Marina; Peretyagin, Pavel; Vladimirov, Yuri; Zhirnov, Ivan; Gusarov, A. V.

    Experimental results on laser beam modulation at selective laser melting (SLM) are presented. The modulation is a possible way to improve the efficiency of the SLM process. The optical diagnostics shows the energy loss up to 30%. This could be a consequence of high thermal gradients in the melt pool resulted by the Gaussian power density distribution. The Gaussian distribution can be changed to the flat-top one or to the inverse-Gaussian (donut) one. An experimental stand with a 200W laser source was developed. Twenty single tracks for each of the three modes were obtained for a Co-Cr alloy. The samples were studied by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) on irregularity. Optical diagnostics by high velocity camera (HVC) shows that the use of the non-Gaussian laser beam distributions can significantly reduce the width of the free-of-powder consolidation zone, which is considered as the main reason for irregularity of single tracks. A better metallurgical bonding of the single tracks with the substrate was obtained by the use of the flat-top laser beam. Both of these facts show a significant influence of the laser beam energy distribution on the energy loss at SLM, especially for high power laser sources. The observed escape of granules shows a possible influence of the dynamic factor. The use of the non-Gaussian distributions can enhance 3D parts, for example, improve the geometrical tolerance and decrease the residual porosity.

  8. Spatial Distribution of Oxygen Chemical Potential under Potential Gradients and Theoretical Maximum Power Density with 8YSZ Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Im, Ha-Ni; Song, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The maximum power density of SOFC with 8YSZ electrolyte as the function of thickness was calculated by integrating partial conductivities of charge carriers under various DC bias conditions at a fixed oxygen chemical potential gradient at both sides of the electrolyte. The partial conductivities were successfully taken using the Hebb-Wagner polarization method as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and the spatial distribution of oxygen partial pressure across the electrolyte was calculated based on Choudhury and Patterson’s model by considering zero electrode polarization. At positive voltage conditions corresponding to SOFC and SOEC, the high conductivity region was expanded, but at negative cell voltage condition, the low conductivity region near n-type to p-type transition was expanded. In addition, the maximum power density calculated from the current-voltage characteristic showed approximately 5.76 W/cm2 at 700 oC with 10 μm thick-8YSZ, while the oxygen partial pressure of the cathode and anode sides maintained ≈0.21 and 10-22 atm.

  9. Spatial Distribution of Oxygen Chemical Potential under Potential Gradients and Theoretical Maximum Power Density with 8YSZ Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Im, Ha-Ni; Song, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The maximum power density of SOFC with 8YSZ electrolyte as the function of thickness was calculated by integrating partial conductivities of charge carriers under various DC bias conditions at a fixed oxygen chemical potential gradient at both sides of the electrolyte. The partial conductivities were successfully taken using the Hebb-Wagner polarization method as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and the spatial distribution of oxygen partial pressure across the electrolyte was calculated based on Choudhury and Patterson’s model by considering zero electrode polarization. At positive voltage conditions corresponding to SOFC and SOEC, the high conductivity region was expanded, but at negative cell voltage condition, the low conductivity region near n-type to p-type transition was expanded. In addition, the maximum power density calculated from the current-voltage characteristic showed approximately 5.76 W/cm2 at 700 oC with 10 μm thick-8YSZ, while the oxygen partial pressure of the cathode and anode sides maintained ≈0.21 and 10−22 atm. PMID:26725369

  10. Spatial Distribution of Oxygen Chemical Potential under Potential Gradients and Theoretical Maximum Power Density with 8YSZ Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Im, Ha-Ni; Song, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The maximum power density of SOFC with 8YSZ electrolyte as the function of thickness was calculated by integrating partial conductivities of charge carriers under various DC bias conditions at a fixed oxygen chemical potential gradient at both sides of the electrolyte. The partial conductivities were successfully taken using the Hebb-Wagner polarization method as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and the spatial distribution of oxygen partial pressure across the electrolyte was calculated based on Choudhury and Patterson's model by considering zero electrode polarization. At positive voltage conditions corresponding to SOFC and SOEC, the high conductivity region was expanded, but at negative cell voltage condition, the low conductivity region near n-type to p-type transition was expanded. In addition, the maximum power density calculated from the current-voltage characteristic showed approximately 5.76 W/cm(2) at 700 (o)C with 10 μm thick-8YSZ, while the oxygen partial pressure of the cathode and anode sides maintained ≈0.21 and 10(-22) atm. PMID:26725369

  11. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  12. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  13. Density distribution in Earth.

    PubMed

    Press, F

    1968-06-14

    Earth models selected by a Monte Carlo procedure were tested against geophysical data; 5 million models were examined and six have passed all tests. Common features of successful models are an increased core radius and a chemically inhomogeneous core consistent with Fe-Ni alloy (20 to 50 percent Fe) for the solid portion and Fe-Si alloy (15 to 25 percent Fe) for the fluid core. The inhomogeneous mantle is consistent with an increase in the FeO:FeO + MgO ratio by a factor of 2 in the deep mantle. The transition zone is a region of not only phase change but also composition change; this condition would inhibit mantlewide convection. The upper-mantle solutions show large fluctuations in density; this state implies insufficient constraint on solutions for this region, or lateral variations in mantle composition ranging from pyrolite to eclogite. PMID:17818740

  14. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  15. EARLY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN A STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH A POWER-LAW DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2013-10-20

    A long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) has been widely thought to arise from the collapse of a massive star, and it has been suggested that its ambient medium is a homogenous interstellar medium (ISM) or a stellar wind. There are two shocks when an ultra-relativistic fireball that has been ejected during the prompt gamma-ray emission phase sweeps up the circumburst medium: a reverse shock that propagates into the fireball, and a forward shock that propagates into the ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the temporal evolution of the dynamics and emission of these two shocks in an environment with a general density distribution of n∝R {sup –k} (where R is the radius) by considering thick-shell and thin-shell cases. A GRB afterglow with one smooth onset peak at early times is understood to result from such external shocks. Thus, we can determine the medium density distribution by fitting the onset peak appearing in the light curve of an early optical afterglow. We apply our model to 19 GRBs and find that their k values are in the range of 0.4-1.4, with a typical value of k ∼ 1, implying that this environment is neither a homogenous ISM with k = 0 nor a typical stellar wind with k = 2. This shows that the progenitors of these GRBs might have undergone a new mass-loss evolution.

  16. Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

    2000-08-21

    Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities.

  17. Density Distributions of Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramines (RDX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M

    2002-03-19

    As part of the US Army Foreign Comparative Testing (FCT) program the density distributions of six samples of class 1 RDX were measured using the density gradient technique. This technique was used in an attempt to distinguish between RDX crystallized by a French manufacturer (designated insensitive or IRDX) from RDX manufactured at Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP), the current source of RDX for Department of Defense (DoD). Two samples from different lots of French IRDX had an average density of 1.7958 {+-} 0.0008 g/cc. The theoretical density of a perfect RDX crystal is 1.806 g/cc. This yields 99.43% of the theoretical maximum density (TMD). For two HAAP RDX lots the average density was 1.786 {+-} 0.002 g/cc, only 98.89% TMD. Several other techniques were used for preliminary characterization of one lot of French IRDX and two lot of HAAP RDX. Light scattering, SEM and polarized optical microscopy (POM) showed that SNPE and Holston RDX had the appropriate particle size distribution for Class 1 RDX. High performance liquid chromatography showed quantities of HMX in HAAP RDX. French IRDX also showed a 1.1 C higher melting point compared to HAAP RDX in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) consistent with no melting point depression due to the HMX contaminant. A second part of the program involved characterization of Holston RDX recrystallized using the French process. After reprocessing the average density of the Holston RDX was increased to 1.7907 g/cc. Apparently HMX in RDX can act as a nucleating agent in the French RDX recrystallization process. The French IRDX contained no HMX, which is assumed to account for its higher density and narrower density distribution. Reprocessing of RDX from Holston improved the average density compared to the original Holston RDX, but the resulting HIRDX was not as dense as the original French IRDX. Recrystallized Holston IRDX crystals were much larger (3-500 {micro}m or more) then either the original class 1 HAAP RDX or

  18. Exponentiated power Lindley distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Samir K.; Eltehiwy, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    A new generalization of the Lindley distribution is recently proposed by Ghitany et al. [1], called as the power Lindley distribution. Another generalization of the Lindley distribution was introduced by Nadarajah et al. [2], named as the generalized Lindley distribution. This paper proposes a more generalization of the Lindley distribution which generalizes the two. We refer to this new generalization as the exponentiated power Lindley distribution. The new distribution is important since it contains as special sub-models some widely well-known distributions in addition to the above two models, such as the Lindley distribution among many others. It also provides more flexibility to analyze complex real data sets. We study some statistical properties for the new distribution. We discuss maximum likelihood estimation of the distribution parameters. Least square estimation is used to evaluate the parameters. Three algorithms are proposed for generating random data from the proposed distribution. An application of the model to a real data set is analyzed using the new distribution, which shows that the exponentiated power Lindley distribution can be used quite effectively in analyzing real lifetime data. PMID:26644927

  19. Exponentiated power Lindley distribution.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Samir K; Eltehiwy, Mahmoud A

    2015-11-01

    A new generalization of the Lindley distribution is recently proposed by Ghitany et al. [1], called as the power Lindley distribution. Another generalization of the Lindley distribution was introduced by Nadarajah et al. [2], named as the generalized Lindley distribution. This paper proposes a more generalization of the Lindley distribution which generalizes the two. We refer to this new generalization as the exponentiated power Lindley distribution. The new distribution is important since it contains as special sub-models some widely well-known distributions in addition to the above two models, such as the Lindley distribution among many others. It also provides more flexibility to analyze complex real data sets. We study some statistical properties for the new distribution. We discuss maximum likelihood estimation of the distribution parameters. Least square estimation is used to evaluate the parameters. Three algorithms are proposed for generating random data from the proposed distribution. An application of the model to a real data set is analyzed using the new distribution, which shows that the exponentiated power Lindley distribution can be used quite effectively in analyzing real lifetime data. PMID:26644927

  20. THE DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN TURBULENT BISTABLE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Gazol, Adriana; Kim, Jongsoo E-mail: jskim@kasi.re.kr

    2013-03-01

    We numerically study the volume density probability distribution function (n-PDF) and the column density probability distribution function ({Sigma}-PDF) resulting from thermally bistable turbulent flows. We analyze three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in periodic boxes of 100 pc by side, where turbulence is driven in the Fourier space at a wavenumber corresponding to 50 pc. At low densities (n {approx}< 0.6 cm{sup -3}), the n-PDF is well described by a lognormal distribution for an average local Mach number ranging from {approx}0.2 to {approx}5.5. As a consequence of the nonlinear development of thermal instability (TI), the logarithmic variance of the distribution of the diffuse gas increases with M faster than in the well-known isothermal case. The average local Mach number for the dense gas (n {approx}> 7.1 cm{sup -3}) goes from {approx}1.1 to {approx}16.9 and the shape of the high-density zone of the n-PDF changes from a power law at low Mach numbers to a lognormal at high M values. In the latter case, the width of the distribution is smaller than in the isothermal case and grows slower with M. At high column densities, the {Sigma}-PDF is well described by a lognormal for all of the Mach numbers we consider and, due to the presence of TI, the width of the distribution is systematically larger than in the isothermal case but follows a qualitatively similar behavior as M increases. Although a relationship between the width of the distribution and M can be found for each one of the cases mentioned above, these relations are different from those of the isothermal case.

  1. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  2. Azimuthal Current Density Distribution Resulting from a Power Feed Vacuum Gap in Metallic Liner Experiments at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon; Cordaro, S. W.; Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Potter, W.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Jennings, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study investigating the initiation of plasma in solid, metallic liners where the liner thickness is large compared to the collisionless skin depth. A vacuum gap is introduced in the power feed and we investigate the effect of this on the azimuthal initiation of plasma in the liner. We present optical emission data from aluminum liners on the 1 MA, 100ns COBRA generator. We use radial and axial gated imaging and streak photography, which show a dependence of onset of emission with the size of a small power-feed vacuum gap. The evolution of ``hot-spots'' generated from breakdown vacuum gap evolves relatively slowly and azimuthal uniformity is not observed on the experimental time-scale. We also show measurements of the B-field both outside and inside the liner, using miniature Bdot probes, which show a dependence on the liner diameter and thickness, and a correlation to the details of the breakdown. These data will be compared to magneto-hydrodynamic simulations to infer how such non-uniformities may affect full liner implosion experiments.

  3. Industrial power distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrells, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a broad overview of industrial power distribution. Primary focus will be on selection of the various low voltage components to achieve the end product. Emphasis will be on the use of national standards to ensure a safe and well designed installation.

  4. Automated Power-Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Cindy; Anderson, Paul M.; Martin, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Automated power-distribution system monitors and controls electrical power to modules in network. Handles both 208-V, 20-kHz single-phase alternating current and 120- to 150-V direct current. Power distributed to load modules from power-distribution control units (PDCU's) via subsystem distributors. Ring busses carry power to PDCU's from power source. Needs minimal attention. Detects faults and also protects against them. Potential applications include autonomous land vehicles and automated industrial process systems.

  5. High power density spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Donald E.; Pais, Martin R.; Chow, Louis C.

    1989-07-01

    The research reported describes experimental and theoretical investigations of high power density evaporative spray cooling. Preliminary experiments demonstrating heat fluxes greater than 1,000 W/sq cm were conducted. Extensive laser phase Doppler measurements of spray characteristics were also taken. These measurements provided valuable insight into the heat transfer process. An in-depth analysis was conducted to determine the mechanisms responsible for critical heat flux. Theoretical modeling was also conducted to determine the most desirable heat transfer conditions. After analysis of these results, an improved experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated. The new apparatus provided greater experimental control and improve accuracy. New tests were conducted in which the critical heat flux was increased, and the heat transfer efficiency was greatly improved. These results are compared to those of previous researchers, and indicated substantial improvement.

  6. High Density Power Converters for Photovoltaic Power Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Rahul

    In typical photovoltaic systems, PV cells are connected in series to achieve high output voltages, which decreases conduction losses and helps the downstream power electronics operate at higher efficiencies. A series connection means that the current through the string is limited by the worst case cell, substring, or module, which can result in suboptimal operation of the rest of the string. Given how even small shading can have a large effect on performance, there has been growing interest in the use of distributed power management architectures to mitigate losses from variation in PV systems. In particular, partial power processing converters have gained traction as a means to improve the performance of PV arrays with small, distributed converters that configure in parallel with PV cells. These converters can use low voltage components, only process a fraction of the total power allowing them to achieve higher efficiencies and power density and also have higher reliability. This work details the design and operation of a partial power processing converter implemented as a Resonant Switched Capacitor (ReSC) converter. An integrated circuit (IC) is designed in 0.18 mum CMOS process. Operation at high frequencies (20-50 MHz) allows high levels of integration with air core inductors directly attached to the die through a gold bump, solder reflow process. Test results for the IC are presented with power density and efficiency metrics. The IC is then used as a partial power processing converter to implement equalization with a specially constructed PV panel. The converter is shown to mitigate power loss due to mismatch.

  7. Information Theory and the Earth's Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An argument for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia lead to a density distribution which was surprisingly close to the optimum distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  8. Power spectral density function and spatial autocorrelation of the ambient vibration full-wavefield generated by a distribution of spatially correlated surface sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunedei, Enrico; Albarello, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic dispersion curves are here computed in the frame of an ambient-vibration full-wavefield model, which relies on the description of both ambient-vibration ground displacement and its sources as stochastic fields defined on the Earth's surface, stationary in time and homogeneous in space. In this model, previously developed for computing synthetic Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio curves, the power spectral density function and the spatial autocorrelation of the displacement are naturally described as functions of the power spectral density function of the generating forces and of the subsoil properties (via the relevant Green's function), by also accounting for spatial correlation of these forces. Dispersion curves are computed from the displacement power spectral density function and from the spatial autocorrelation according with the well-known f-k and SPAC techniques, respectively. Two examples illustrate the way this new ambient-vibration model works, showing its possible use in better understanding the role of the surface waves in forming the dispersion curves, as well as its capability to capture some remarkable experimental findings.

  9. Information theory and the earth's density distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    The present paper argues for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia leads to a density distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  10. Optical power distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Lalmond, R.G.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes an apparatus for supplying electrical power to electrical components mounted on a circuit board. It consists of: a printed circuit board; electrical components mounted on the printed circuit board; electrically powered sources of optical energy; photovoltaic cell arrays; each photovoltaic cell array being mounted on a corresponding one of the electrical components to provide electrical power to the electrical component on which it is mounted; and means for coupling the optical energy from the electrically powered sources of optical energy to the photovoltaic cell arrays.

  11. Distributed Space Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of safely collecting solar power at geostationary orbit and delivering it to earth. A strategy which could harness a small fraction of the millions of gigawatts of sunlight passing near earth could adequately supply the power needs of earth and those of space exploration far into the future. Light collected and enhanced both spatially and temporally in space and beamed to earth provides probably the only practical means of safe and efficient delivery of this space solar power to earth. In particular, we analyzed the feasibility of delivering power to sites on earth at a comparable intensity, after conversion to a usable form, to existing power needs. Two major obstacles in the delivery of space solar power to earth are safety and the development of a source suitable for space. We focused our approach on: (1) identifying system requirements and designing a strategy satisfying current eye and skin safety requirements; and (2) identifying a concept for a potential space-based source for producing the enhanced light.

  12. Power management and distribution technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, John Ellis

    1993-01-01

    Power management and distribution (PMAD) technology is discussed in the context of developing working systems for a piloted Mars nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle. The discussion is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are covered: applications and systems definitions; high performance components; the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) high capacity power program; fiber optic sensors for power diagnostics; high temperature power electronics; 200 C baseplate electronics; high temperature component characterization; a high temperature coaxial transformer; and a silicon carbide mosfet.

  13. Kappa distribution and Probability Density Functions in Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurac, S.

    2004-12-01

    A signature of a statistical intermittency is the presence of large deviations from the average value: this increased probability of finding extreme deviations is characterized by Probability Density Functions (PDFs) which exhibit non Gaussian power-law tails. Such power-law distributions were observed over decades in biology, chemistry, finance and other fields. Known examples include heartbeat histograms, price distribution, turbulent fluid flow and many other non-equilibrium systems. It is shown that the Kappa distribution represents a good description of PDFs observed in Solar wind. The asymmetric fluctuations in variance over time observed in solar wind PDFs are Gamma distributed. It is shown that, by assuming such a distribution of variance, the Kappa distribution can be analitically derived.

  14. Power Law Distribution in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Hari M.; Campanha, José R.; Chavarette, Fábio R.

    We studied the statistical distribution of student's performance, which is measured through their marks, in university entrance examination (Vestibular) of UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista) with respect to (i) period of study-day versus night period (ii) teaching conditions - private versus public school (iii) economical conditions - high versus low family income. We observed long ubiquitous power law tails in physical and biological sciences in all cases. The mean value increases with better study conditions followed by better teaching and economical conditions. In humanities, the distribution is close to normal distribution with very small tail. This indicates that these power law tails in science subjects are due to the nature of the subjects themselves. Further and better study, teaching and economical conditions are more important for physical and biological sciences in comparison to humanities at this level of study. We explain these statistical distributions through Gradually Truncated Power law distributions. We discuss the possible reason for this peculiar behavior.

  15. High power density molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Johnson, S.A.; Geyer, H.K.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1995-07-01

    Our results to date indicate that the specific power of the MCFC can be increased from 1200 W/m{sup 2} to above 2000W/m{sup 2} through the use of advanced components such as the double doped LiFeO{sub 2} cathode and pressurized operation. Its volumetric power density can also be increased by an additional 60% by multiple manifolding. Therefore, MCFCs with two to three times the power density of the current generation of MCFCs are possible.

  16. Computerised method for recording platelet density distribution.

    PubMed

    Järemo, P

    1995-05-01

    In the present study a computerized apparatus was employed for scanning light transmission variations along test tubes containing density-separated platelets. The device consists of a stepping motor, a stationary halogen lamp and a photopotentiometer connected to a personal computer. Anticoagulated whole blood was layered on a performed continuous Percoll gradient having a density span from 1090 kg/l (bottom) to 1040 kg/l (top). After centrifugation at 3400g for 1.5 hours, high-density cells (i.e. erythrocytes) pass through to the bottom of the test tube and the lighter platelets remain in the gradient. The test tube is moved by the computer between the halogen lamp and the photopotentiometer. Transmission variations along the gradient were recorded and registered in the computer. Density markers beads were used as an internal standard and platelet peak density was determined. After perforating the test tube the gradient was divided into 45 aliquots. In all fractions determination of platelet counts and mean platelet volume was carried out. In addition, in the aliquots having a platelet count > 20 x 10(12)/l the ratio beta-thromboglobulin per platelet was also determined. The platelet distribution in the gradient was illustrated graphically. A good agreement was found when comparing platelet distributions in the gradients and light transmission variations along the test tubes. PMID:7781754

  17. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-08-15

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S prefer to occupy the 1d{sub 3/2} state rather than the 2s{sub 1/2} state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of {sup 46}Ar and {sup 44}S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  18. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  19. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HIGH COLUMN DENSITY TURNOVER IN THE H I COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Erkal, Denis; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-12-10

    We study the high column density regime of the H I column density distribution function and argue that there are two distinct features: a turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, which is present at both z = 0 and z Almost-Equal-To 3, and a lack of systems above N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} at z = 0. Using observations of the column density distribution, we argue that the H I-H{sub 2} transition does not cause the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} but can plausibly explain the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. We compute the H I column density distribution of individual galaxies in the THINGS sample and show that the turnover column density depends only weakly on metallicity. Furthermore, we show that the column density distribution of galaxies, corrected for inclination, is insensitive to the resolution of the H I map or to averaging in radial shells. Our results indicate that the similarity of H I column density distributions at z = 3 and 0 is due to the similarity of the maximum H I surface densities of high-z and low-z disks, set presumably by universal processes that shape properties of the gaseous disks of galaxies. Using fully cosmological simulations, we explore other candidate physical mechanisms that could produce a turnover in the column density distribution. We show that while turbulence within giant molecular clouds cannot affect the damped Ly{alpha} column density distribution, stellar feedback can affect it significantly if the feedback is sufficiently effective in removing gas from the central 2-3 kpc of high-redshift galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is meaningful to compare column densities averaged over {approx} kpc scales with those estimated from quasar spectra that probe sub-pc scales due to the steep power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations observed in nearby galaxies.

  20. Properties of the cosmological density distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardeau, Francis; Kofman, Lev

    1995-04-01

    The properties of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the cosmological continuous density field are studied. We focus our analysis on the quasi-linear regime where various calculations, based on dynamically motivated methods, have been presented: either by using the Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) or by using the perturbation theory to evaluate the behavior of the moments of the distribution function. We show how these two approaches are related to each other and that they can be used in a complementary way. For that respect, the one-dimensional dynamics, where the ZA is exact solution, has first been used as a testing ground. In particular, we show that, when the density PDF obtained with the ZA is regularized, its various moments exhibit the behavior expected by the perturbation theory applied to the ZA. We show that ZA approach can be used for arbitrary initial conditions (not only Gaussian) and that the nonlinear evolution of the moments can be obtained. The perturbation theory can be used for the exact dynamics. We take into account the final filtering of the density field both for ZA and perturbation theory. Applying these techniques, we got the generating function of the moments for the one-dimensional dynamics, the three-dimensional ZA, with and without smoothing effects. We also suggest methods to build PDFs. One is based on the Laplace inverse transform of the moment generating function. The other, the Edgeworth expansion, is obtained when the previous generating function is truncated at a given order and allows evaluation of the PDF out of limited number of moments. It provides insight on the relationship between the moments and the shape of the density PDF. In particular, it provides an alternative method to evaluate the skewness and kurtosis by measuring the PDF around its maximum. Eventually, results obtained from a numerical simulation with cold dark matter initial conditions have been used to validate the accuracy of the considered

  1. Relationship between input power and power density of SMA spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Ham, Sang Yong; Son, Young Su

    2016-04-01

    The important required characteristics of an artificial muscle for a human arm-like manipulator are high strain and high power density. From this viewpoint, an SMA (shape memory alloy) spring is a good candidate for the actuator of a robotic manipulator that utilizes an artificial muscle. In this study, the maximum power density of an SMA spring was evaluated with respect to the input power. The spring samples were fabricated from SMA wires of different diameters ranging between 0.1 and 0.3 mm. For each diameter, two types of wires with different transition temperatures were used. The relationship between the transition temperature and maximum power density was also evaluated. Each SMA spring was stretched downward by an attached weight and the temperature was increased through the application of an electric current. The displacement, velocity, and temperature of the SMA spring were measured by laser displacement sensors and a thermocouple. Based on the experimental data, it was determined that the maximum power densities of the different SMA springs ranged between 1,300 and 5,500 W/kg. This confirmed the applicability of an SMA spring to human arm-like robotic manipulators. The results of this study can be used as reference for design.

  2. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Piping Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission supported the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop empirical data on the density and distribution of fabrication flaws in nuclear reactor components. These data are needed to support probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations and studies on component structural integrity. PNNL performed nondestructive examination inspections and destructive testing on archived piping welds to determine the fabrication flaw size and distribution characteristics of the flaws in nuclear power plant piping weldments. Eight different processes and product forms in piping weldments were studied including wrought stainless steel and dissimilar metal weldments. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit was performed on the data. Results were created as a function of the through-wall size of the fabrication flaws as well as the length distribution. The results are compared and contrasted with those developed for reactor pressure vessel processes and product forms. The most significant findings were that the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size was higher in piping weldments than that for the reactor pressure vessel weldments, and the density of fabrication flaws versus through-wall size in both reactor pressure vessel weld repairs and piping weldments were greater than the density in the original weldments. Curves showing these distributions are presented.

  3. Pinning Loss Power Density in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2015-03-01

    The pinning loss power density is theoretically derived based on the resistive energy dissipation when the flux lines are driven by the Lorentz force in a superconductor. The obtained loss power density does not depend on the viscosity or flow resistivity, but is proportional to the pinning force density only, and it possesses the nature of hysteresis loss, as commonly measured in experiments. These features are predicted by the critical state model, which was recently proved theoretically. The obtained pinning force density is consistent with the prediction of the coherent potential approximation theory, a kind of statistical summation theory, for flux pinning. Thus, the irreversible properties associated with the flux pinning can be comprehensively described by these flux pinning theories. The irreversible flux pinning in the superconductor is compared with similar irreversible phenomena such as the motion of magnetic domain walls in ferromagnetic materials and the friction in mechanical systems. The possibility is also discussed for a general theoretical description of these irreversible phenomena in which the hysteresis loss occurs.

  4. Measurement Of Spectral Power Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The majority of spectroradiometers make measurements at a number of discrete wavelength settings spaced evenly across the spectrum. Many modern light sources such as fluorescent or metal halide lamps have complex line spectra which may not be properly evaluated by this method. An automated spectroradiometer system involving a non-stop spectral scan with continuous integration of the output signal from the detector is described. The method is designed to make accurate measurements of all types of spectral power distribution whether made up of lines or continuum or any mixture of the two.

  5. Space station power management and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1985-01-01

    The power system architecture is presented by a series of schematics which illustrate the power management and distribution (PMAD) system at the component level, including converters, controllers, switchgear, rotary power transfer devices, power and data cables, remote power controllers, and load converters. Power distribution options, reference power management, and control strategy are also outlined. A summary of advanced development status and plans and an overview of system test plans are presented.

  6. REJUVENATING POWER SPECTRA. II. THE GAUSSIANIZED GALAXY DENSITY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2011-04-20

    We find that, even in the presence of discreteness noise, a Gaussianizing transform (producing a more Gaussian one-point distribution) reduces nonlinearities in the power spectra of cosmological matter and galaxy density fields, in many cases drastically. Although Gaussianization does increase the effective shot noise, it also increases the power spectrum's fidelity to the linear power spectrum on scales where the shot noise is negligible. Gaussianizing also increases the Fisher information in the power spectrum in all cases and resolutions, although the gains are smaller in redshift space than in real space. We also find that the gain in cumulative Fisher information from Gaussianizing peaks at a particular grid resolution depends on the sampling level.

  7. Evolution of column density distributions within Orion A⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, A. M.; Kainulainen, J.

    2015-05-01

    We compare the structure of star-forming molecular clouds in different regions of Orion A to determine how the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF) varies with environmental conditions such as the fraction of young protostars. A correlation between the N-PDF slope and Class 0 protostar fraction has been previously observed in a low-mass star-formation region (Perseus); here we test whether a similar correlation is observed in a high-mass star-forming region. We used Herschel PACS and SPIRE cold dust emission observations to derive a column density map of Orion A. We used the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey catalog to accurately identify and classify the Orion A young stellar object content, including the cold and relatively short-lived Class 0 protostars (with a lifetime of ~0.14 Myr). We divided Orion A into eight independent regions of 0.25 square degrees (13.5 pc2); in each region we fit the N-PDF distribution with a power law, and we measured the fraction of Class 0 protostars. We used a maximum-likelihood method to measure the N-PDF power-law index without binning the column density data. We find that the Class 0 fraction is higher in regions with flatter column density distributions. We tested the effects of incompleteness, extinction-driven misclassification of Class 0 sources, resolution, and adopted pixel-scales. We show that these effects cannot account for the observed trend. Our observations demonstrate an association between the slope of the power-law N-PDF and the Class 0 fractions within Orion A. Various interpretations are discussed, including timescales based on the Class 0 protostar fraction assuming a constant star-formation rate. The observed relation suggests that the N-PDF can be related to an evolutionary state of the gas. If universal, such a relation permits evaluating the evolutionary state from the N-PDF power-law index at much greater distances than those accessible with protostar counts. Appendices are available in

  8. Breast density characterization using texton distributions.

    PubMed

    Petroudi, Styliani; Brady, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Breast density has been shown to be one of the most significant risks for developing breast cancer, with women with dense breasts at four to six times higher risk. The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) has a four class classification scheme that describes the different breast densities. However, there is great inter and intra observer variability among clinicians in reporting a mammogram's density class. This work presents a novel texture classification method and its application for the development of a completely automated breast density classification system. The new method represents the mammogram using textons, which can be thought of as the building blocks of texture under the operational definition of Leung and Malik as clustered filter responses. The new proposed method characterizes the mammographic appearance of the different density patterns by evaluating the texton spatial dependence matrix (TDSM) in the breast region's corresponding texton map. The TSDM is a texture model that captures both statistical and structural texture characteristics. The normalized TSDM matrices are evaluated for mammograms from the different density classes and corresponding texture models are established. Classification is achieved using a chi-square distance measure. The fully automated TSDM breast density classification method is quantitatively evaluated on mammograms from all density classes from the Oxford Mammogram Database. The incorporation of texton spatial dependencies allows for classification accuracy reaching over 82%. The breast density classification accuracy is better using texton TSDM compared to simple texton histograms. PMID:22255462

  9. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the power flux density at the Earth's surface produced by emissions from a space station for all conditions...

  10. Power spectral density of subsonic jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Yu, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The power-spectrum density (PSD) of the far-field noise of a subsonic unheated axisymmetric jet is investigated by analysis of about 80 sets of published noise spectra and of spectra obtained using 12.7 and 25.4-mm-diameter compressed-air jets at exit velocities 66 and 104 m/s and 67 and 91 m/s, respectively, in the NASA Langley anechoic flow facility. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include Strouhal-number scaling of the PSD at theta = 30 deg or more, scaling with the product of the Helmholtz number and the Doppler factor at theta less than 30 deg, best collapse at source convection Mach number 0.5, variation of PSD amplitude as U to the 6.5th at theta = 90 deg, and no sharp PSD-amplitude variation at any critical Reynolds number.

  11. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  12. Nearly degenerate electron distributions and superluminal radiation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2010-02-01

    Polylogarithmic fugacity expansions of the partition function, the caloric and thermal equations of state, and the specific heat of fermionic power-law distributions are derived in the nearly degenerate low-temperature/high-density quantum regime. The spectral functions of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma are obtained by averaging the tachyonic radiation densities of inertial electrons with Fermi power-laws, whose entropy is shown to be extensive and stable. The averaged radiation densities are put to test by performing tachyonic cascade fits to the γ-ray spectrum of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 in a low and high emission state. Estimates of the thermal electron plasma in this active galactic nucleus are extracted from the spectral fits, such as temperature, number count, and internal energy. The tachyonic cascades reproduce the quiescent as well as a burst spectrum of the blazar obtained with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov detectors. Double-logarithmic plots of the differential tachyon flux exhibit intrinsic spectral curvature, caused by the Boltzmann factor of the electron gas.

  13. Noise distribution and denoising of current density images

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod H.; Magtibay, Karl; Jaffray, David A.; Krishnan, Sridhar; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Current density imaging (CDI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that could be used to study current pathways inside the tissue. The current distribution is measured indirectly as phase changes. The inherent noise in the MR imaging technique degrades the accuracy of phase measurements leading to imprecise current variations. The outcome can be affected significantly, especially at a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have shown the residual noise distribution of the phase to be Gaussian-like and the noise in CDI images approximated as a Gaussian. This finding matches experimental results. We further investigated this finding by performing comparative analysis with denoising techniques, using two CDI datasets with two different currents (20 and 45 mA). We found that the block-matching and three-dimensional (BM3D) technique outperforms other techniques when applied on current density (J). The minimum gain in noise power by BM3D applied to J compared with the next best technique in the analysis was found to be around 2 dB per pixel. We characterize the noise profile in CDI images and provide insights on the performance of different denoising techniques when applied at two different stages of current density reconstruction. PMID:26158100

  14. Unstable density distribution associated with equatorial plasma bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherani, E. A.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; de Meneses, F. Carlos

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a simulation study of equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) in the evening time ionosphere. The fluid simulation is performed with a high grid resolution, enabling us to probe the steepened updrafting density structures inside EPB. Inside the density depletion that eventually evolves as EPB, both density and updraft are functions of space from which the density as implicit function of updraft velocity or the density distribution function is constructed. In the present study, this distribution function and the corresponding probability distribution function are found to evolve from Maxwellian to non-Maxwellian as the initial small depletion grows to EPB. This non-Maxwellian distribution is of a gentle-bump type, in confirmation with the recently reported distribution within EPB from space-borne measurements that offer favorable condition for small scale kinetic instabilities.

  15. High Power Density Blanket Design Study for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. H.; Zhu, Y. K.; Deng, P. Zh.

    2003-06-01

    A conceptual design study of a high power density blanket has been carried out. The Fusion Experimental Breeder, FEB, is adopted as the reference reactor. The neutron wall loading is 0.5 MW/m2. The blanket is cooled by 10 MPa helium in tube. The concept of LiPb eutectic/transuranium oxide suspension is adopted. The neutronics design is performed to provide the design basis, and it gives an energy multiplication of 37 and a flattened power density distribution with a peak value of 70 W/m3. Multiple cooling panels are introduced to reduce the peak temperature of the blanket. In spite of up to 15 cooling panels, the blanket module is calculated using the ANSYS code and analytically as well. The results are consistent with each other and can meet the thermal criteria. However, structural calculation results from ANSYS did not satisfy the criterion: The blanket structure design is then improved by using curved cooling panels to model the structure in detail. Temperature distribution is obtained using the Pro/Mechanica code. Detailed structural analyses are also done by this code. Some satisfactory results are obtained.

  16. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huan; Liu, Hui; Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-01

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  17. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan Liu, Hui Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-15

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  18. Electron density distributions in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1988-01-01

    Electron density profiles were constructed to study the plasma density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and the density variations with increasing altitude in the polar cap, using electric field spectrum measurements from the plasma wave instrument on DE-1. Sharply defined regions of depleted plasma densities were commonly observed on nightside auroral field lines, in which electron densities were strongly depleted in relation to the adjacent plasmaspheric and polar densities, forming a low-density cavity at about 70 deg invariant latitude. A correlation was found between low auroral plasma densities, upflowing ion distributions, and an energetic precipitating electron population, indicating that electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone are directly associated with auroral acceleration processes.

  19. Density and stress distribution in the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    1973-01-01

    A model is presented for the lateral variations of density within the moon. The model gives rise to a gravitational potential which is equal to the observed potential at the lunar surface; moreover, it minimizes the total shear-strain energy of the moon. The model exhibits lateral variations of about plus or minus 0.25 g/cc within 50 km depth. The variations, however, reduce to plus or minus 0.06 and plus or minus 0.008 g/cc within layers at 50 to 135 and 135 to 235 km respectively, and they become negligible below this region. The associated stress differences are found to be about 50 bar within 600 km depth, having their maximum values of about 90 bars at a depth of about 250 km. On the basis of these stress differences a strength of about 100 bar is concluded for the upper 400 km of the lunar interior for the last 3.3 b.y.

  20. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  1. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... propagation conditions. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  2. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dBW/m2/MHz. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  3. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dBW/m2/MHz. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 25.208, see the List of CFR... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power flux density limits. 25.208 Section 25... COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.208 Power flux density limits. (a) In the band 3650-4200 MHz, the...

  4. Electric power distribution and load transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Parkinson, Gerald W. (Inventor); Grant, Ross M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A power distribution system includes a plurality of power sources and load transfer units including transistors and diodes connected in series and leading to a common power output, each of the transistors being controller switchable subject to voltage levels of the respective input and output sides of said transistors, and the voltage and current level of said common power output. The system is part of an interconnection scheme in which all but one of the power sources is connected to a single load transfer unit, enabling the survival of at least a single power source with the failure of one of the load transfer units.

  5. Power dependence of electron density at various pressures in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Ju Ho; Jeon, Sang-Bum; Cho, Sung-Won; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-11-15

    Experimental observation of the electron density variation in inductively coupled plasmas with the electron energy probability function (EEPFs) was performed at various gas pressures at two RF powers (25 W and 200 W). The measured EEPFs at high power discharges (200 W) showed a Maxwellian distribution, while evolution of the EEPFs from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Druyvesteyn-like distribution was observed at low RF powers (25 W) with increasing pressure. A discrepancy of the electron density variation between the two RF powers was observed. This difference is explained by the modified collisional loss and the Bohm velocity from the EEPF of the bi-Maxwellian distribution and the Druyvesteyn–like distribution.

  6. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  7. The nomogram of density distribution of lunar craters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, S. G.; Bolkhovitinov, I. S.

    1994-12-01

    Least-square fits to the density of the distribution of lunar craters described by the approximating function are found for craters larger then 10 km in diamater. The nomogram of parameters of the approximating function is given for the estimate of density of primary, secondary and tertiary craters over an area of 104km2.

  8. Frontogenesis driven by horizontally quadratic distributions of density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the quadratic density distribution in a channel, which has been established by Simpson and Linden to be the simplest case of the horizontally nonlinear distribution of fluid density required for the production of frontogenesis. The porous-media and Boussinesq flow models are examined, and their evolution equations are reduced to one-dimensional systems. While both the porous-media and the inviscid/nondiffusive Boussinesq systems exhibit classic frontogenesis behavior, the viscous Boussinesq system exhibits a more complex behavior: boundary-layer effects force frontogenesis away from the lower boundary, and at late times the steepest density gradients are close to mid-channel.

  9. High density operation for reactor-relevant power exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    With increasing size of a tokamak device and associated fusion power gain an increasing power flux density towards the divertor needs to be handled. A solution for handling this power flux is crucial for a safe and economic operation. Using purely geometric arguments in an ITER-like divertor this power flux can be reduced by approximately a factor 100. Based on a conservative extrapolation of current technology for an integrated engineering approach to remove power deposited on plasma facing components a further reduction of the power flux density via volumetric processes in the plasma by up to a factor of 50 is required. Our current ability to interpret existing power exhaust scenarios using numerical transport codes is analyzed and an operational scenario as a potential solution for ITER like divertors under high density and highly radiating reactor-relevant conditions is presented. Alternative concepts for risk mitigation as well as strategies for moving forward are outlined.

  10. Sigmoidal particle density distribution in a subplinian scoria fall deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eychenne, Julia; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-12-01

    A general expression to describe particle density distribution in tephra fall deposits is essential to improve fallout tephra mass determination and numerical modelling of tephra dispersion. To obtain particle density distributions in tephra fall deposits, we performed high-resolution componentry and particle density analyses on samples from the 2006 subplinian eruption of Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador. Six componentry classes, including pumice and scoria, have been identified in our sample collection. We determined the class of 300 clasts in each 0.5ϕ fractions from -4.5ϕ to 3.5ϕ and carried out water pycnometry density measurements on selected size fractions. Results indicate that the mean particle density increases with ϕ up to a plateau of 2.6 g/cm3 for clasts finer than 1.5ϕ. The density of scoria and pumice increases between -3 and 1ϕ, while dense particle density is sub-constant with grainsize. We show that the mean particle density μ of the vesicular fractions is a function of grainsize i (ϕ scale) given by a sigmoidal law: μ (i)={{{K+β }} / {{( {1+α {e^{-ri }}} )}} .} , where K, β, α and r are constants. These sigmoidal distributions can be used to determine accurately the load of each componentry class and should be applicable to many tephra deposits and for modelling purposes.

  11. Statistical Models of Power-law Distributions in Homogeneous Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Ilan

    2011-01-04

    A variety of in-situ measurements in space plasmas point out to an intermittent formation of distribution functions with elongated tails and power-law at high energies. Power-laws form ubiquitous signature of many complex systems, plasma being a good example of a non-Boltzmann behavior for distribution functions of energetic particles. Particles, which either undergo mutual collisions or are scattered in phase space by electromagnetic fluctuations, exhibit statistical properties, which are determined by the transition probability density function of a single interaction, while their non-asymptotic evolution may determine the observed high-energy populations. It is shown that relaxation of the Brownian motion assumptions leads to non-analytical characteristic functions and to generalization of the Fokker-Planck equation with fractional derivatives that result in power law solutions parameterized by the probability density function.

  12. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  13. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  14. Computer Power: Part 1: Distribution of Power (and Communications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the distribution of power to personal computers and computer terminals addresses options such as extension cords, perimeter raceways, and interior raceways. Sidebars explain: (1) the National Electrical Code; (2) volts, amps, and watts; (3) transformers, circuit breakers, and circuits; and (4) power vs. data wiring. (MES)

  15. Space Solar Power Management and Distribution (PMAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Thomas H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, SSP PMAD (Space Solar Power Management and Distribution). The topics include: 1) Architecture; 2) Backside Thermal View; 3) Solar Array Interface; 4) Transformer design and risks; 5) Twelve phase rectifier; 6) Antenna (80V) Converters; 7) Distribution Cables; 8) Weight Analysis; and 9) PMAD Summary.

  16. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  17. A High Power Density Power System Electronics for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Pellerano, A.; Stone, R.; Travis, J.; Kercheval, B.; Alkire, G.; Ter-Minassian, V.

    2009-01-01

    A high power density, modular and state-of-the-art Power System Electronics (PSE) has been developed for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. This paper addresses the hardware architecture and performance, the power handling capabilities, and the fabrication technology. The PSE was developed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and is the central location for power handling and distribution of the LRO spacecraft. The PSE packaging design manages and distributes 2200W of solar array input power in a volume less than a cubic foot. The PSE architecture incorporates reliable standard internal and external communication buses, solid state circuit breakers and LiIon battery charge management. Although a single string design, the PSE achieves high reliability by elegantly implementing functional redundancy and internal fault detection and correction. The PSE has been environmentally tested and delivered to the LRO spacecraft for the flight Integration and Test. This modular design is scheduled to flight in early 2009 on board the LRO and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) spacecrafts and is the baseline architecture for future NASA missions such as Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) and Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS).

  18. The luminosity distribution and total space density of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The detailed distribution of dispersion measures and spectral fluxes for a sample of 50 pulsars in part of the galactic plane near longitude 50 deg is analyzed, and the intrinsic luminosity distribution of the pulsars is obtained along with some constraints on their spatial distribution. Expressions for the observed distributions of spectral fluxes, distances, and directions are given in terms of the spatial and luminosity distributions of the sources as well as the sensitivity of the detector. A previous analysis of the same sample is reviewed, and the intrinsic luminosity distribution is determined from the distribution of observed distances as well as from the observed distribution of spectral fluxes. The results indicate that the scale height of pulsars cannot be significantly less than 400 pc, the total space density of active pulsars is about 30 per cu kpc, and the birthrate required to maintain this population is about one in the Galaxy every 980 (450-2600) years.

  19. Intelligent Systems for Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The motivation behind an advanced technology program to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) systems is described. The program concentrates on developing digital control and distributed processing algorithms for PMAD components and systems to improve their size, weight, efficiency, and reliability. Specific areas of research in developing intelligent DC-DC converters and distributed switchgear are described. Results from recent development efforts are presented along with expected future benefits to the overall PMAD system performance.

  20. Density Distributions in TATB Prepared by Various Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Fontes, A T

    2008-05-13

    The density distribution of two legacy types of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) particles were compared with TATB synthesized by new routes and recrystallized in several different solvents using a density gradient technique. Legacy wet (WA) and dry aminated (DA) TATB crystalline aggregates gave average densities of 1.9157 and 1.9163 g/cc, respectively. Since the theoretical maximum density (TMD) for a perfect crystal is 1.937 g/cc, legacy TATB crystals averaged 99% of TMD or about 1% voids. TATB synthesized from phloroglucinol (P) had comparable particle size to legacy TATBs, but significantly lower density, 1.8340 g/cc. TATB synthesized from 3,5 dibromoanisole (BA) was very difficult to measure because it contained extremely fine particles, but had an average density of 1.8043 g/cc over a very broad range. Density distributions of TATB recrystallized from dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sulfolane, and an 80/20 mixture of DMSO with the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl- imidazolium acetate (EMImOAc), with some exceptions, gave average densities comparable or better than the legacy TATBs.

  1. Grid-connected distributed solar power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyle, R.; Chernoff, H.; Schweizer, T.

    This paper discusses some important, though often ignored, technical and economic issues of distributed solar power systems: protection of the utility system and nonsolar customers requires suitable interfaced equipment. Purchase criteria must mirror reality; most analyses use life-cycle costing with low discount rates - most buyers use short payback periods. Distributing, installing, and marketing small, distributed solar systems is more costly than most analyses estimate. Results show that certain local conditions and uncommon purchase considerations can combine to make small, distributed solar power attractive, but lower interconnect costs (per kW), lower marketing and product distribution costs, and more favorable purchase criteria make large, centralized solar energy more attractive. Specifically, the value of dispersed solar systems to investors and utilities can be higher than $2000/kw. However, typical residential owners place a value of well under $1000 on the installed system.

  2. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  3. Advanced Electric Distribution, Switching, and Conversion Technology for Power Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, James V.

    1998-01-01

    The Electrical Power Control Unit currently under development by Sundstrand Aerospace for use on the Fluids Combustion Facility of the International Space Station is the precursor of modular power distribution and conversion concepts for future spacecraft and aircraft applications. This unit combines modular current-limiting flexible remote power controllers and paralleled power converters into one package. Each unit includes three 1-kW, current-limiting power converter modules designed for a variable-ratio load sharing capability. The flexible remote power controllers can be used in parallel to match load requirements and can be programmed for an initial ON or OFF state on powerup. The unit contains an integral cold plate. The modularity and hybridization of the Electrical Power Control Unit sets the course for future spacecraft electrical power systems, both large and small. In such systems, the basic hybridized converter and flexible remote power controller building blocks could be configured to match power distribution and conversion capabilities to load requirements. In addition, the flexible remote power controllers could be configured in assemblies to feed multiple individual loads and could be used in parallel to meet the specific current requirements of each of those loads. Ultimately, the Electrical Power Control Unit design concept could evolve to a common switch module hybrid, or family of hybrids, for both converter and switchgear applications. By assembling hybrids of a common current rating and voltage class in parallel, researchers could readily adapt these units for multiple applications. The Electrical Power Control Unit concept has the potential to be scaled to larger and smaller ratings for both small and large spacecraft and for aircraft where high-power density, remote power controllers or power converters are required and a common replacement part is desired for multiples of a base current rating.

  4. Distribution of E/N and N/e/ in a cross-flow electric discharge laser. [electric field to neutral gas density and electron number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, J. W., Jr.; Lancashire, R. B.; Manista, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the effect of the convection of ions and electrons on the discharge characteristics in a large scale laser. The results are presented for one particular distribution of ballast resistance. Values of electric field, current density, input power density, ratio of electric field to neutral gas density (E/N), and electron number density were calculated on the basis of measurements of the discharge properties. In a number of graphs, the E/N ratio, current density, power density, and electron density are plotted as a function of row number (downstream position) with total discharge current and gas velocity as parameters. From the dependence of the current distribution on the total current, it appears that the electron production in the first two rows significantly affects the current flowing in the succeeding rows.

  5. Vibration Monitoring of Power Distribution Poles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath; John Svoboda

    2006-04-01

    Some of the most visible and least monitored elements of our national security infrastructure are the poles and towers used for the distribution of our nation’s electrical power. Issues surrounding these elements within the United States include safety such as unauthorized climbing and access, vandalism such as nut/bolt removal or destructive small arms fire, and major vandalism such as the downing of power poles and towers by the cutting of the poles with a chainsaw or torches. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an ongoing research program working to develop inexpensive and sensitive sensor platforms for the monitoring and characterization of damage to the power distribution infrastructure. This presentation covers the results from the instrumentation of a variety of power poles and wires with geophone assemblies and the recording of vibration data when power poles were subjected to a variety of stimuli. Initial results indicate that, for the majority of attacks against power poles, the resulting signal can be seen not only on the targeted pole but on sensors several poles away in the distribution network and a distributed sensor system can be used to monitor remote and critical structures.

  6. Study of nuclear matter density distributions using hadronic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kohama, Akihisa; Iida, Kei; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-06

    We briefly review our formula for a proton-nucleus total reaction cross section, {sigma}{sub R}, constructed in the black-sphere approximation of nuclei, in which a nucleus is viewed as a 'black' sphere of radius 'a'. Some years ago, using the Glauber model, one of the authors (A.K.) and his collaborators performed numerical simulations to examine the possibility to probe the nuclear matter density distributions of neutron-rich unstable nuclei from proton elastic scatterings 'model-independently'. The present study is another attempt to seek a 'model-independent' framework for systematically analyzing scattering data for studying the matter density distributions of atomic nuclei.

  7. Effect of power density on shrinkage of dental resin materials.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, Roelof J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares volumetric changes and rates of shrinkage during different stages of polymerization of dental resin composites and compomers exposed to the same total energy by using two different combinations of power density and exposure duration. A hybrid composite and its equivalent flowable and a compomer and its equivalent flowable were exposed using a halogen curing unit set at 400 mW/cm2 for 40 seconds and 800 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds: delivering 16 J/cm2 in both cases. Volumetric changes were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a mercury dilatometer. Ten replications per test condition were performed and the data were subjected to ANOVA. Statistically significant differences in shrinkage values and rates among different power densities were determined by means of paired t-tests at a 95% confidence level. Significantly more shrinkage (p<0.05) was found for the higher filled materials, Z250 and Dyract AP, when higher power density was used. However, no significant differences were found between their flowable counterparts when exposed to various power densities. Of the four materials, only Dyract AP exhibited no significant difference in shrinkage rate when various power densities were used. All the other materials exhibited significantly higher rates (p<0.05) at the higher power density. PMID:14531610

  8. Specification of optical components using the power spectral density function

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Wolfe, C.R.; Manes, K.R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Aikens, D.M.; English, R.E. Jr.

    1995-06-20

    This paper describes the use of Fourier techniques to characterize the wavefront of optical components, specifically, the use of the power spectral density, (PSD), function. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. Many of the optical components of interest to us have square, rectangular or irregularly shaped apertures with major dimensions up-to 800 mm. The wavefronts of components with non-circular apertures cannot be analyzed with Zernicke polynomials since these functions are an orthogonal set for circular apertures only. Furthermore, Zernicke analysis is limited to treating low frequency wavefront aberrations; mid-spatial scale and high frequency error are expressed only as ``residuals.`` A more complete and powerful representation of the optical wavefront can be obtained by Fourier analysis in 1 or 2 dimensions. The PSD is obtained from the amplitude of frequency components present in the Fourier spectrum. The PSD corresponds to the scattered intensity as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront and can be used to describe the intensity distribution at focus. The shape of a resultant wavefront or the focal spot of a complex multi-component laser system can be calculated and optimized using the PSDs of individual optical components which comprise it.

  9. Density distributions for trapped one-dimensional spinor gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yajiang; Zhang, Yunbo; Liang, J. Q.; Chen, Shu

    2006-05-01

    We numerically evaluate the density distribution of a spin-1 bosonic condensate in its ground state within a modified Gross-Pitaevskii theory, which is obtained by the combination of the exact solution of the corresponding integrable model with the local-density approximation. Our study reveals that atoms in the mF=0 state are almost completely suppressed for the antiferromagnetic interactions in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes, whereas all three components remain nonvanishing for ferromagnetic interactions. In particular, when the system is in the Tonks-Girardeau regime, obvious Fermi-like distribution emerges for each component. We also discuss the possible deviation of the spatial distribution from the Fermi-like distribution when the spin-spin interaction is strong enough.

  10. Longitudinal differences of ionospheric vertical density distribution and equatorial electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valladares, C. E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian ˜37°E and 290°E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as

  11. Longitudinal Differences of Ionospheric Vertical Density Distribution and Equatorial Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valledares, C.E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian approx. 37 deg and 290 deg E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation

  12. Power distribution studies for CMS forward tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Todri, A.; Turqueti, M.; Rivera, R.; Kwan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic Systems Engineering Department of the Computing Division at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is carrying out R&D investigations for the upgrade of the power distribution system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Pixel Tracker at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Among the goals of this effort is that of analyzing the feasibility of alternative powering schemes for the forward tracker, including DC to DC voltage conversion techniques using commercially available and custom switching regulator circuits. Tests of these approaches are performed using the PSI46 pixel readout chip currently in use at the CMS Tracker. Performance measures of the detector electronics will include pixel noise and threshold dispersion results. Issues related to susceptibility to switching noise will be studied and presented. In this paper, we describe the current power distribution network of the CMS Tracker, study the implications of the proposed upgrade with DC-DC converters powering scheme and perform noise susceptibility analysis.

  13. PIII Plasma Density Enhancement by a New DC Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Granda-Gutierrez, E. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.

    2006-12-04

    In practical terms, those plasmas produced by a DC voltage power supply do not attain densities above the 108 to 109 cm-3 band. Here we present a power supply, controlled in current and voltage, which has been successfully designed and constructed delivering plasma densities in the orders of 109 - 1010 cm-3. Its experimental performance test was conducted within one toroidal and one cylindrical chambers capable of 29 and 35 litres, respectively, using nitrogen gas. The DC plasma was characterized by a double electric probe. Several physical phenomena present in the PIII process have been keenly investigated including plasma sheath dynamics, interaction of plasma and surface, etc. In this paper we analyze the effect of the implantation voltage, plasma density and pulse time in the PIII average heating power and fluence density.

  14. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  15. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  16. Power quality monitoring of a distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, P.P.; Burke, J.T.; Mancao, R.T.; Short, T.A.; Warren, C.A. ); Burns, C.W.; Siewierski, J.J. )

    1994-04-01

    The Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) Research and Development Department sponsored a major power quality study of two distribution feeders in the Buffalo, New York region. All levels of these systems, from the substation bus to the customer service entrance, were instrumented with monitoring equipment. A variety of measurements, encompassing both transient and steady state system behavior, were performed. The use of multiple monitoring locations allowed NMPC to assess the origins and scope of various disturbances. The study generated a database which can serve as a guide for assessing relative power quality on the NMPC system. The study also formulated suggestions on areas which the industry (both the power industry and consumer products industry) might address in the future on the effect of standard utility operation towards consumer appliances.

  17. Molten carbonate fuel cell with high power density

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.F.; Bloom, I.; Geyer, H.; Johnson, S.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this research is a doubling of the current density of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) from the present value of 1600A/m{sup 2} to 3200 A/m{sup 2} and a similar increase in the volumetric power density. This project is linked to other projects concerning MCFCs (one on the multiply manifolded MCFCs, the other on lithium ferrate and lithium cobaltate cathodes for MCFCs).

  18. Power Management and Distribution System Developed for Thermionic Power Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft solar, bimodal system combines propulsion and power generation into a single integrated system. An Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) provides orbital transfer capabilities, power generation for payloads, and onboard propulsion to the spacecraft. A key benefit of a bimodal system is a greater payload-to-spacecraft mass ratio resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. NASA has joined efforts with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to develop enabling technologies for such a system. The NASA/Air Force bimodal concept uses solar concentrators to focus energy into an integrated power plant. This power plant consists of a graphite core that stores thermal energy within a cavity. An array of thermionic converters encircles the graphite cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions. During the power generation phase of the bimodal system, the thermionic converters are exposed to the heated cavity and convert the thermal energy to electricity. Near-term efforts of the ISUS bimodal program are focused on a ground demonstration of key technologies in order to proceed to a full space flight test. Thermionic power generation is one key technology of the bimodal concept. Thermionic power converters impose unique operating requirements upon a power management and distribution (PMAD) system design. Single thermionic converters supply large currents at very low voltages. Operating voltages can vary over a range of up to 3 to 1 as a function of operating temperature. Most spacecraft loads require regulated 28-volts direct-current (Vdc) power. A combination of series-connected converters and powerprocessing boosters is required to deliver power to the spacecraft's payloads at this level.

  19. Improved efficiency and power density for thermoacoustic coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofler, Thomas J.

    1994-06-01

    Research on improving the efficiency, cooling power, and cooling power density of thermoacoustic refrigerators is described. A heuristic analysis of short thermoacoustic heat exchangers in a high amplitude sound field is given. A heat exchanger experiment, utilizing a very high amplitude thermoacoustic prime-mover, shows some agreement with the heuristic analysis. This indicates that acoustic losses in the heat exchanger can be drastically reduced in high amplitude engines, while maintaining good thermal effectiveness. Other related, but more applied, research is briefly discussed. This includes the design and construction of a compact, portable, air-cooled, thermoacoustic refrigerator for the purpose of producing frost at a lecture demonstration. This design has roughly the same temperature span (40 deg C) as required by shipboard applications. Also, two new electrodynamic acoustic drivers have been designed and one design has been constructed. These designs offer high efficiency, good power density, and low cost and are probably scalable up to significantly higher acoustic power levels.

  20. Uncertainty evaluation in BEACON power distribution monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Goldstein, N.P. )

    1989-11-01

    BEACON is an advanced operational core support package that has a three-dimensional nodal code as its cornerstone. The three-dimensional calculation includes all necessary pressurized water reactor feedback effects. The generation of the measured power distribution from the core instrumentation is one of the primary functions of the core-monitoring software. The purpose of this paper is to discuss evaluation of the uncertainty in the measured assembly power from the BEACON system. The study covers not only the normal operating conditions, but off-normal situations to demonstrate BEACON's applicability for that condition.

  1. Control of plasma density profile via wireless power transfer in an inductively coupled discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Jin; Bang, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Young-Cheol; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-10-01

    Wireless power transfer via a strongly coupled magnetic resonance was applied to the field of plasma. Two antennas (an inner antenna coil was connected to the RF power and an outer antenna was a resonant antenna with a variable capacitor) were placed on the top of a chamber. The resonant antenna is electrically separated from the inner antenna coil. As the self-resonance frequency of the resonant antenna was adjusted, the power transfer ratio of the inner antenna to the outer antenna was changed and a dramatic evolution of the plasma density profile was measured. The density profiles were changed from a concave shape to a convex shape by varying the self-resonance frequency of the outer antenna. This result shows that the plasma density spatial distribution can be successfully controlled via wireless power transfer.

  2. The influence of density distribution on the stability of beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, F.W.; Lapostolle, P.M.; Wangler, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the effect of various density distributions in four-dimensional phase space and their projections in real and velocity space on the stability of continuous beams in alternating-gradient transport lines using particle-following computer simulations. We discuss the susceptibility of three different distributions (Kapchinskii-Vladimirskii, bicylinder, and thermal) to third- and higher-order mode instabilities. These distributions are all uniform in real space, but their velocity distributions are different; they also react differently to structure resonances. Velocity distributions of high-current beams tend to evolve to a peaked Gaussian-like form. Is there a specific velocity distribution that is stable and, therefore, the preferred injection distribution for minimizing emittance growth. Forced smoothness or uniformity in real space is necessary for setting up particle simulations of high-current beams so that spurious charge-redistribution emittance growth can be avoided. Is forced smoothness also desirable in four dimensions for continuous beams and possibly in six dimensions for bunched beams. We consider these and related questions.

  3. Longitudinal asymmetry of craters' density distributions on the icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leliwa-Kopystynski, Jacek; Banaszek, Marcin; Wlodarczyk, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Crater's density distribution versus satellitographical longitude was searched for seven icy satellites: two of Jupiter (Ganymede and Callisto) and five of Saturn (Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and Iapetus). Craters were classified according to their size. Four bins of the craters' diameter were used. Density distributions were found in the longitudinal sectors of the near-equatorial stripes that circumscribe the satellites. The size distributions (R-plots) were done independently for each of the eight longitudinal sectors of the satellites. Searching for the leading/trailing (apex/antapex) and the near-side/far-side asymmetry was done. It was found that the crater density is longitudinally asymmetric for all seven satellites being studied. However, the apex-antapex asymmetry is much less pronounced than predicted by theory of Zahnle et al. (2003), for impacts on the satellites by ecliptic comets. We conclude that the impact craters observed on the considered satellites are mostly originated from planetocentric swarm of debris. In that case longitudinal asymmetry is not expected, as stated by Horedt and Neukum (1984a, b). However, cratering longitudinal asymmetry that we observe for Mimas perfectly agrees with calculations of Alvarellos et al. (2005). It is very likely that important part of craters on Mimas were formed due to impacts of ejecta originated from crater Herschel.

  4. Testing pulse density distribution for terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukhaled, Marwan; Allen, Edward; Guessoum, Nidhal

    2014-07-01

    Maximum likelihood fits for the time profiles of 51 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (from Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment and Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor) were calculated for five proposed probability densities. A lognormal distribution, which had been used by other researchers, was compared with piecewise Gaussian, piecewise exponential, inverse Gaussian, and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck probability density functions. The piecewise Gaussian and piecewise exponential distributions are justified physically through assuming exponential growth and decay of the electron avalanches which result in the gamma ray bursts and are therefore highly relevant in this context. However, identifying the electron avalanche phenomenon as a form of stochastic exit time process, the inverse Gaussian and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck are reasonable alternatives. Results of the maximum likelihood calculations indicate that the five probability densities fit the gamma ray pulse data equally well. By this comparison, our aim is to indicate to terrestrial gamma ray flash researchers these other at least equally valid distribution functions, which may give insights into the physical processes that the electrons (and the positrons) undergo in the gamma ray flashes.

  5. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  6. Calculation of nanodrop profile from fluid density distribution.

    PubMed

    Berim, Gersh O; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2016-05-01

    Two approaches are examined, which can be used to determine the drop profile from the fluid density distributions (FDDs) obtained on the basis of microscopic theories. For simplicity, only two-dimensional (cylindrical, or axisymmetrical) distributions are examined and it is assumed that the fluid is either in contact with a smooth solid or separated from the smooth solid by a lubricating liquid film. The first approach is based on the sharp-kink interface approximation in which the density of the liquid inside and the density of the vapor outside the drop are constant with the exception of the surface layer of the drop where the density is different from the above ones. In this case, the drop profile was calculated by minimizing the total potential energy of the system. The second approach is based on a nonuniform FDD obtained either by the density functional theory or molecular dynamics simulations. To determine the drop profile from such an FDD, which does not contain sharp interfaces, three procedures can be used. In the first two procedures, P1 and P2, the one-dimensional FDDs along straight lines which are parallel to the surface of the solid are extracted from the two-dimensional FDD. Each of those one-dimensional FDDs has a vapor-liquid interface at which the fluid density changes from vapor-like to liquid-like values. Procedure P1 uses the locations of the equimolar dividing surfaces for the one-dimensional FDDs as points of the drop profile. Procedure P2 is based on the assumption that the fluid density is constant on the surface of the drop, that density being selected either arbitrarily or as a fluid density at the location of the equimolar dividing surface for one of the one-dimensional FDDs employed in procedure P1. In the third procedure, P3, which is suggested for the first time in this paper, the one-dimensional FDDs are taken along the straight lines passing through a selected point inside the drop (radial line). Then, the drop profile is

  7. Relativity, nonextensivity, and extended power law distributions.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Lima, J A S

    2005-11-01

    A proof of the relativistic theorem by including nonextensive effects is given. As it happens in the nonrelativistic limit, the molecular chaos hypothesis advanced by Boltzmann does not remain valid, and the second law of thermodynamics combined with a duality transformation implies that the parameter lies on the interval [0,2]. It is also proven that the collisional equilibrium states (null entropy source term) are described by the relativistic power law extension of the exponential Juttner distribution which reduces, in the nonrelativistic domain, to the Tsallis power law function. As a simple illustration of the basic approach, we derive the relativistic nonextensive equilibrium distribution for a dilute charged gas under the action of an electromagnetic field . Such results reduce to the standard ones in the extensive limit, thereby showing that the nonextensive entropic framework can be harmonized with the space-time ideas contained in the special relativity theory. PMID:16383791

  8. A safe, high-power-density lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, F.

    1985-03-01

    The Li/SOCl2 battery has received attention because of its high theoretical energy/power density. However, practical Li/SOCl2 cells have not provided the desired power density and have suffered from concerns with cell safety on discharge. In previous work, ECO has shown that the use of a TAA-type catalyst significantly improves the safety of the Li/S0Cl2 cell at high rate. The objective of this Phase 1 program was to determine whether a stacked disk electrode configuration with TAA-catalyzed cathodes would meet a high power-density design goal. Under the program, the effects of cathode thickness, preparation pressure, electrolyte gap and solute concentration on stacked-electrode cell performance and capacity were measured. The results of the Phase 1 program included the demonstration of stacked-electrode cell performance and capacity at levels suitable to meet a design goal of 400 W/kg with high energy density. Further work in a Phase 2 program will be required to demonstrate in laser-sealed fully-packaged cells that the results of Phase 1 can be practically applied to provide a safe high-rate, energy-dense power source for military applications.

  9. MULTIPLE POWER DENSITY WINDOWS AND THEIR POSSIBLE ORIGIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported that in vitro exposure of chick forebrain tissue to 50-Mz radiofrequency (RF) radiation, amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, would enhance the efflux of calcium ions only within two power density ranges: one spanning from 1.44 to 1.67 mW/cm2, and the ot...

  10. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  11. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  12. Electrical power systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, T.A.; Huval, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}Distributed Generation{close_quotes} has become the {open_quotes}buzz{close_quotes} word of an electric utility industry facing deregulation. Many industrial facilities utilize equipment in distributed installations to serve the needs of a thermal host through the capture of exhaust energy in a heat recovery steam generator. The electrical power generated is then sold as a {open_quotes}side benefit{close_quotes} to the cost-effective supply of high quality thermal energy. Distributed generation is desirable for many different reasons, each with unique characteristics of the product. Many years of experience in the distributed generation market has helped Stewart & Stevenson to define a range of product features that are crucial to most any application. The following paper will highlight a few of these applications. The paper will also examine the range of products currently available and in development. Finally, we will survey the additional services offered by Stewart & Stevenson to meet the needs of a rapidly changing power generation industry.

  13. Three-dimensional density distributions in the Asian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Li, C.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Fang, J.; Sino-probe-cugb

    2011-12-01

    We have inversed the residual Bouguer gravity anomalies to study the three-dimensional density distributions of the Asian lithosphere (60°~150°E and 15°~60°N). Firstly, we have collected the free-air gravity anomalies (30'×30') and topography data of GTOP030 with 5'×5' grid spacing, and then calculated the Bougouer gravity anomalies by terrain correction and Bougouer correction. We have also collected the depth data of the Moho discontinuity (30'×30') and the discontinuity of sedimentary layer. By using the Oldenburg-Parker formula (Parker, 1972) and the forward modeling method, we calculated the theoretical gravity anomalies which mainly are caused by the Moho discontinuity and the sedimentary layer discontinuity. In our study, the average depths of Moho discontinuity and sedimentary layer discontinuity are 33 km and 4 km, and the density differences are 0.42 g/cm3 and 0.2 g/cm3, respectively. In addition, we have simulated the gravity anomalies of the spherical harmonics with the 2-6 order for the lower mantle by using the formula of Bowin (1983) which represented the relation between the depth of field source and the order of the geopotential spherical harmonics. Using all data mentioned above, we have calculated the residual Bougouer gravity anomalies, which may be caused by anomalous density bodies in the lithosphere. Secondly, we used the calculated residual Bougouer gravity anomalies to inverse the three-dimensional density differences in the Asian lithosphere by using the Algebra Reconstruction Techniques (ART). During the inversion, the densities converted from the P-wave velocity data (with grid spacing of 2°×2°) according to the Birch Law are considered as the initial density model. The grid spacing is set as 2°×2° in the horizontal direction, and it is 25 km, 55 km and 100 km in the vertical direction, respectively. Comparing the density anomalies at the three depths, we can conclude that (1) the density in the lithosphere beneath Asian

  14. Doubled power density from salinity gradients at reduced intermembrane distance.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, David A; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2011-08-15

    The mixing of sea and river water can be used as a renewable energy source. The Gibbs free energy that is released when salt and fresh water mix can be captured in a process called reverse electrodialysis (RED). This research investigates the effect of the intermembrane distance and the feedwater flow rate in RED as a route to double the power density output. Intermembrane distances of 60, 100, 200, and 485 μm were experimentally investigated, using spacers to impose the intermembrane distance. The generated (gross) power densities (i.e., generated power per membrane area) are larger for smaller intermembrane distances. A maximum value of 2.2 W/m(2) is achieved, which is almost double the maximum power density reported in previous work. In addition, the energy efficiency is significantly higher for smaller intermembrane distances. New improvements need to focus on reducing the pressure drop required to pump the feedwater through the RED-device using a spacerless design. In that case power outputs of more than 4 W per m(2) of membrane area at small intermembrane distances are envisaged. PMID:21736348

  15. Power distribution for an Am/Cm bushing melter

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.; Hardy, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am{sup 243} and Cm{sup 244}. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to ORNL for processing. The nitric acid solution contains other isotopes and is intensely radioactive, which makes storage a problem and precludes shipment in the liquid form. In order to stabilize the material for onsite storage and to permit transport the material from SRS to ORNL, it has been proposed that the Am and Cm be separated from other isotopes in the solution and vitrified. Vitrification will be effected by depositing a liquid feed stream containing the isotopes in solution, together with a stream of glass frit, onto the top of a molten glass pool in a melter. The glass is non-conducting and the melter is a Platinum/Rhodium alloy vessel which is heated by passing an electric current through it. Because most of the power is required to evaporate the liquid feed at the top of the glass pool, power demands differ for the upper and lower parts of the melter. In addition, the melter is batch fed so that the local power requirements vary with time. In order to design a unique split power supply, which ensures adequate local power delivery, an analysis of the melter power distribution was performed with the ABAQUS finite element code. ABAQUS was used to calculate the electric potential and current density distributions in the melter for a variety of current and potential boundary conditions. The results of the calculation were compared with test data and will be used to compute power densities for input to a computational fluid dynamics model for the melter.

  16. On the probability distribution function of the mass surface density of molecular clouds. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischera, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) of the mass surface density of molecular clouds provides essential information about the structure of molecular cloud gas and condensed structures out of which stars may form. In general, the PDF shows two basic components: a broad distribution around the maximum with resemblance to a log-normal function, and a tail at high mass surface densities attributed to turbulence and self-gravity. In a previous paper, the PDF of condensed structures has been analyzed and an analytical formula presented based on a truncated radial density profile, ρ(r) = ρc/ (1 + (r/r0)2)n/ 2 with central density ρc and inner radius r0, widely used in astrophysics as a generalization of physical density profiles. In this paper, the results are applied to analyze the PDF of self-gravitating, isothermal, pressurized, spherical (Bonnor-Ebert spheres) and cylindrical condensed structures with emphasis on the dependence of the PDF on the external pressure pext and on the overpressure q-1 = pc/pext, where pc is the central pressure. Apart from individual clouds, we also consider ensembles of spheres or cylinders, where effects caused by a variation of pressure ratio, a distribution of condensed cores within a turbulent gas, and (in case of cylinders) a distribution of inclination angles on the mean PDF are analyzed. The probability distribution of pressure ratios q-1 is assumed to be given by P(q-1) ∝ q-k1/ (1 + (q0/q)γ)(k1 + k2) /γ, where k1, γ, k2, and q0 are fixed parameters. The PDF of individual spheres with overpressures below ~100 is well represented by the PDF of a sphere with an analytical density profile with n = 3. At higher pressure ratios, the PDF at mass surface densities Σ ≪ Σ(0), where Σ(0) is the central mass surface density, asymptotically approaches the PDF of a sphere with n = 2. Consequently, the power-law asymptote at mass surface densities above the peak steepens from Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-2 to Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-3. The

  17. Vertical Distribution of Temperature and Density in a Planetary Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.; Petzschmann, O.; Salo, Heikki

    1998-09-01

    We model temperature and density profiles for a dilute planetary ring, based on the hydrodynamic balance equations for momentum and energy of granular flows. Within our approximation the ring consists of inelastic smooth spheres of unique size and mass, while the fluxes of mass, momentum and energy are linear functions of the gradients of density, velocity and temperature. The phase space distribution function is an isotropic Gaussian with additive corrections that are first order in these gradients (Jenkins and Richman, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 87 (1985)). The resulting system of coupled differential equations leads to temperature and density profiles, which depend on the coefficient of restitution, a measure for the inelasticity of the particle collisions, the optical depth and the shear rate. We compare the results to those of the kinetic approach to ring dynamics (Simon and Jenkins, Icarus, 110 (1994)) , where the non-isotropic nature of the ring system is taken into account by use of a triaxial Gaussian velocity distribution. Furthermore we present event driven N-particle simulations that confirm the numerical results.

  18. Carbon density and distribution of six Chinese temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, QuanZhi; Wang, ChuanKuan

    2010-07-01

    Quantifying forest carbon (C) storage and distribution is important for forest C cycling studies and terrestrial ecosystem modeling. Forest inventory and allometric approaches were used to measure C density and allocation in six representative temperate forests of similar stand age (42-59 years old) and growing under the same climate in northeastern China. The forests were an aspen-birch forest, a hardwood forest, a Korean pine plantation, a Dahurian larch plantation, a mixed deciduous forest, and a Mongolian oak forest. There were no significant differences in the C densities of ecosystem components (except for detritus) although the six forests had varying vegetation compositions and site conditions. However, the differences were significant when the C pools were normalized against stand basal area. The total ecosystem C density varied from 186.9 tC hm(-2) to 349.2 tC hm(-2) across the forests. The C densities of vegetation, detritus, and soil ranged from 86.3-122.7 tC hm(-2), 6.5-10.5 tC hm(-2), and 93.7-220.1 tC hm(-2), respectively, which accounted for 39.7% +/- 7.1% (mean +/- SD), 3.3% +/- 1.1%, and 57.0% +/- 7.9% of the total C densities, respectively. The overstory C pool accounted for > 99% of the total vegetation C pool. The foliage biomass, small root (diameter < 5mm) biomass, root-shoot ratio, and small root to foliage biomass ratio varied from 2.08-4.72 tC hm(-2), 0.95-3.24 tC hm(-2), 22.0%-28.3%, and 34.5%-122.2%, respectively. The Korean pine plantation had the lowest foliage production efficiency (total biomass/foliage biomass: 22.6 g g(-1)) among the six forests, while the Dahurian larch plantation had the highest small root production efficiency (total biomass/small root biomass: 124.7 g g(-1)). The small root C density decreased with soil depth for all forests except for the Mongolian oak forest, in which the small roots tended to be vertically distributed downwards. The C density of coarse woody debris was significantly less in the two

  19. Longitudinal statistics and distribution of the He+ density depletions (bubbles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Larissa

    Plasma bubbles (PB), seen as He+ density depletions in the topside ionosphere, were under consideration. Their occurrence probability with respect to longitude is considered for the post-sunset hours under winter, summer and equinoctial conditions within of ±35° invariant latitudes. Study based on the ISS-b satellite observations, obtained during a high solar activity period 1978-79 (F10.7 200) at the topside ionosphere altitudes (1000-1200 km). The map of the He+ density depletion (PB) distribution as function of latitude-longitude for the post-sunset hours was also derived. The statistics and the map were compared with the ESF occurrence probability and PB distribution, obtained by Maruyama and Matuura (RRL, 27, 1980; JGR, 89(A12), 1984) on data from the ISS-b. Moreover the seasonal/longitudinal (s/l) variations of range spread F probability, obtained by McClure and colleagues (JGR, 103(A12), 1998) from the AE-E spacecraft data for the same period (1978-80), were also taken for comparison. It was revealed that there is a good conformity in occurrence probability and spatial distributions of these phenomena. The obtained results, indicated the strong s/l dependence, are discussed.

  20. Calculated power distribution of a thermionic, beryllium oxide reflected, fast-spectrum reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W.; Lantz, E.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure is developed and used to calculate the detailed power distribution in the fuel elements next to a beryllium oxide reflector of a fast-spectrum, thermionic reactor. The results of the calculations show that, although the average power density in these outer fuel elements is not far from the core average, the power density at the very edge of the fuel closest to the beryllium oxide is about 1.8 times the core avearge.

  1. Microwave Driven Actuators Power Allocation and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Timothy; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    Design, fabrication and test of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) network for microwave driven actuators is presented in this paper. Development of a circuit that would collect power from a rectenna array amplify and distribute the power to actuators was designed and fabricated for space application in an actuator array driven by a microwave. A P-SPICE model was constructed initially for data reduction purposes, and was followed by a working real-world model. A voltage up - converter (VUC) is used to amplify the voltage from the individual rectenna. The testing yielded a 26:1 voltage amplification ratio with input voltage at 9 volts and a measured output voltage 230VDC. Future work includes the miniaturization of the circuitry, the use of microwave remote control, and voltage amplification technology for each voltage source. The objective of this work is to develop a model system that will collect DC voltage from an array of rectenna and propagate the voltage to an array of actuators.

  2. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  3. Material Density Distribution of Small Debris in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, P. H.; Xu, Y.-l.; Opiela, J. N.; Hill, N. M.; Matney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 200 spacecraft and rocket body breakups in Earth orbit have populated that regime with debris fragments in the sub-micron through meter size range. Though the largest debris fragments can cause significant collisional damage to active (operational) spacecraft, these are few and trackable by radar. Fragments on the order of a millimeter to a centimeter in size are as yet untrackable. But this smaller debris can result in damage to critical spacecraft systems and, under the worst conditions, fragmenting collision events. Ongoing research at the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office on the sources of these small fragments has focused on the material components of spacecraft and rocket bodies and on breakup event morphology. This has led to fragment material density estimates, and also the beginnings of shape categorizations. To date the NASA Standard Breakup Model has not considered specific material density distinctions of small debris. The basis of small debris in that model is the fourth hypervelocity impact event of the Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT) series. This test targeted a flight-ready, U.S. Transit navigation satellite with a solid aluminum sphere impactor. Results in this event yield characteristic length (size) and area-to-mass distributions of fragments smaller than 10 cm in the NASA model. Recent re-analysis of the SOCIT4 small fragment dataset highlighted the material-specific characteristics of metals and non-metals. Concurrent analysis of Space Shuttle in-situ impact data showed a high percentage of aluminum debris in shuttle orbit regions. Both analyses led to the definition of three main on-orbit debris material density categories -low density (< 2 g/cc), medium density (2 to 6 g/cc), and high density (> 6 g/cc). This report considers the above studies in an explicit extension of the NASA Standard Breakup Model where separate material densities for debris are generated and these debris fragments are propagated in

  4. A Low Power Density Rectenna for SPS Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Yoshiyuki

    2002-01-01

    present launch technology. Due to the satellites low power and small antenna, the power flux density reaching the earth's surface is only 1 W/m2. This is probably insufficient for practical applications, so we investigated the minimum density required for a rectenna to operate. because the input power of the rectifying circuits is lower. We thus developed a rectenna with a larger aperture area that can operate satisfactorily when the power flux density is low because the input power to the rectifying circuits is not reduced. antenna array. Although constructing an antenna array is relatively easy, the substrate material is costly. We thus took the second approach--using a rectenna with a parabolic antenna. power transmission frequency was 5.8 GHz. We designed a center-feed parabolic antenna with a 60-cm diameter using a circular patch antenna as the primary feed. The gain and aperture efficiency were 29 dBi and 62 %, respectively. The 3-dB beam width was 7 degrees. Rectifying circuits were constructed on the reverse side of the patch antenna, and its efficiency was about 75 % at an input power of 300 mW and a load resistance of 300 ohms. Microwave power transmission experiments in an anechoic chamber showed that the efficiency of a rectenna with a parabolic reflector was 50 %. increase the amount of time to receive data from the satellite. Therefore, we changed the length of the two orthogonal directions of the reflector.We propose rectangular reflector rectenna that can arrange without clearance on the whole ground rectenna site. We calculated the directivity of this antenna by using the physical optics method. The major and minor axis length of antenna was 85 x 43 cm, and its 3-dB beam width was 4 and 8 degrees, respectively, and the gain was 30 dBi.The degradation in the aperture efficiency compared to the circular parabolic antenna was about 12 %. power region of its normal site in the SPS. The transmission using microwave power was successful even in a region

  5. Momentum distribution function of the electron gas at metallic densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Yasuhara, H.

    1991-10-01

    The momentum distribution function n(k) of the electron gas is calculated in the effective-potential-expansion method at metallic densities. The recently established self-consistency relation between n(k) and the correlation energy [Y. Takada and T. Kita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 25 (1991)] is employed to check the accuracy of our results. This check shows that the effective-potential-expansion method provides probably the exact and at least more accurate results of n(k) than all the other methods that have given n(k) thus far.

  6. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs.

  7. Network integration of distributed power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondi, Peter; Bayoumi, Deia; Haederli, Christoph; Julian, Danny; Suter, Marco

    The world-wide move to deregulation of the electricity and other energy markets, concerns about the environment, and advances in renewable and high efficiency technologies has led to major emphasis being placed on the use of small power generation units in a variety of forms. The paper reviews the position of distributed generation (DG, as these small units are called in comparison with central power plants) with respect to the installation and interconnection of such units with the classical grid infrastructure. In particular, the status of technical standards both in Europe and USA, possible ways to improve the interconnection situation, and also the need for decisions that provide a satisfactory position for the network operator (who remains responsible for the grid, its operation, maintenance and investment plans) are addressed.

  8. Interaction of lightning with power distribution lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, Carlos Tomas

    Triggered-lightning experiments were conducted in 1996, 1999, and 2000 to study the responses of overhead power distribution lines to lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) at Camp Blanding, Florida. The lightning was artificially initiated (triggered) from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique, and its current was directed to a phase conductor at midspan or at a pole near the center of the line. Experimental results and associated EMTP modeling are presented in this dissertation for the following line configurations: (1)a two-conductor, 740-m overhead distribution line with 2 arrester stations in 1996; (2)a four- conductor, 245-m overhead distribution line with 2 arrester stations in 1999; and (3)a four-conductor, 829-m overhead distribution line with 6 arrester stations in 2000. The three-phase lines tested in 1999 and 2000 were standard designs of a major Florida power company. Lightning peak currents injected into the lines ranged from 7 to 57 kA. Voltages and currents were measured at various locations along the line. Video and photographic cameras were used to image lightning channels and detect line flashovers. The significant results of the research are (1)flashovers between conductors were observed, both accompanied and not accompanied by arrester failures, (2)an arrester failed on seven of eight direct lightning strikes to the line in 2000, (3)arcing between conductors may prevent failures of arresters connected to the struck phase, (4)the bulk of the lightning current flows from the struck phase to neutral through the arresters closest to the strike point, (5)the withstand energy of the arresters can be exceeded due to the contribution from multiple strokes and/or relatively low-level, long-lasting current components, (6)the distribution of charge transferred to ground among multiple neutral grounds, which is determined by low-frequency, low-current grounding resistances is different from the

  9. High power distributed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutschy, Kris; Neculaes, Bogdan; Inzinna, Lou; Caiafa, Antonio; Reynolds, Joe; Zou, Yun; Zhang, Xi; Gunturi, Satish; Cao, Yang; Waters, Bill; Wagner, Dave; De Man, Bruno; McDevitt, Dan; Roffers, Rick; Lounsberry, Brian; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a distributed x-ray source with up to 60kW demonstrated instantaneous power. Component integration and test results are shown for the dispenser cathode electron gun, fast switching controls, high voltage stand-off insulator, brazed anode, and vacuum system. The current multisource prototype has been operated for over 100 hours without failure, and additional testing is needed to discover the limiting component. Example focal spot measurements and x-ray radiographs are included. Lastly, future development opportunities are highlighted.

  10. Distributed Power Electronics for PV Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.

    2011-12-01

    An overview of the benefits and applications of microinverters and DC power optimizers in residential systems. Some conclusions from this report are: (1) The impact of shade is greater than just the area of shade; (2) Additional mismatch losses include panel orientation, panel distribution, inverter voltage window, soiling; (3) Per-module devices can help increase performance, 4-12% or more depending on the system; (4) Value-added benefits (safety, monitoring, reduced design constraints) are helping their adoption; and (5) The residential market is growing rapidly. Efficiency increases, cost reductions are improving market acceptance. Panel integration will further reduce price and installation cost. Reliability remains an unknown.

  11. Power Law Distributions in Two Community Currencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichiji, N.; Nishibe, M.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight certain newly discovered social phenomena that accord with Zipf's law, in addition to the famous natural and social phenomena including word frequencies, earthquake magnitude, city size, income1 etc. that are already known to follow it. These phenomena have recently been discovered within the transaction amount (payments or receipts) distributions within two different Community Currencies (CC) that had been initiated as social experiments. One is a local CC circulating in a specific geographical area, such as a town. The other is a virtual CC used among members who belong to a certain community of interest (COI) on the Internet. We conducted two empirical studies to estimate the economic vitalization effects they had on their respective local economies. The results we found were that the amount of transactions (payments and receipts) of the two CCs was distributed according to a power-law distribution with a unity rank exponent. In addition, we found differences between the two CCs with regard to the shapes of their distribution over a low-transaction range. The result may originate from the difference in methods of issuing CCs or in the magnitudes of the minimum-value unit; however, this result calls for further investigation.

  12. Power Requirements Determined for High-Power-Density Electric Motors for Electric Aircraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    Future advanced aircraft fueled by hydrogen are being developed to use electric drive systems instead of gas turbine engines for propulsion. Current conventional electric motor power densities cannot match those of today s gas turbine aircraft engines. However, if significant technological advances could be made in high-power-density motor development, the benefits of an electric propulsion system, such as the reduction of harmful emissions, could be realized.

  13. Differential distribution of Shank and GKAP at the postsynaptic density.

    PubMed

    Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Yang, Yijung; Reese, Thomas S; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Shank and GKAP are scaffold proteins and binding partners at the postsynaptic density (PSD). The distribution and dynamics of Shank and GKAP were studied in dissociated hippocampal cultures by pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopy. Antibodies against epitopes containing their respective mutual binding sites were used to verify the expected juxtapositioning of Shank and GKAP. If all Shank and GKAP molecules at the PSD were bound to each other, the distribution of label for the two proteins should coincide. However, labels for the mutual binding sites showed significant differences in distribution, with a narrow distribution for GKAP located close to the postsynaptic membrane, and a wider distribution for Shank extending deeper into the cytoplasm. Upon depolarization with high K+, neither the intensity nor distribution of label for GKAP changed, but labeling intensity for Shank at the PSD increased to ~150% of controls while the median distance of label from postsynaptic membrane increased by 7.5 nm. These results indicate a preferential recruitment of Shank to more distal parts of the PSD complex. Conversely, upon incubation in Ca2+-free medium containing EGTA, the labeling intensity of Shank at the PSD decreased to ~70% of controls and the median distance of label from postsynaptic membrane decreased by 9 nm, indicating a preferential loss of Shank molecules in more distal parts of the PSD complex. These observations identify two pools of Shank at the PSD complex, one relatively stable pool, closer to the postsynaptic membrane that can bind to GKAP, and another more dynamic pool at a location too far away to bind to GKAP. PMID:25775468

  14. Differential Distribution of Shank and GKAP at the Postsynaptic Density

    PubMed Central

    Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Yang, Yijung; Reese, Thomas S.; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Shank and GKAP are scaffold proteins and binding partners at the postsynaptic density (PSD). The distribution and dynamics of Shank and GKAP were studied in dissociated hippocampal cultures by pre-embedding immunogold electron microscopy. Antibodies against epitopes containing their respective mutual binding sites were used to verify the expected juxtapositioning of Shank and GKAP. If all Shank and GKAP molecules at the PSD were bound to each other, the distribution of label for the two proteins should coincide. However, labels for the mutual binding sites showed significant differences in distribution, with a narrow distribution for GKAP located close to the postsynaptic membrane, and a wider distribution for Shank extending deeper into the cytoplasm. Upon depolarization with high K+, neither the intensity nor distribution of label for GKAP changed, but labeling intensity for Shank at the PSD increased to ~150% of controls while the median distance of label from postsynaptic membrane increased by 7.5 nm. These results indicate a preferential recruitment of Shank to more distal parts of the PSD complex. Conversely, upon incubation in Ca2+-free medium containing EGTA, the labeling intensity of Shank at the PSD decreased to ~70% of controls and the median distance of label from postsynaptic membrane decreased by 9 nm, indicating a preferential loss of Shank molecules in more distal parts of the PSD complex. These observations identify two pools of Shank at the PSD complex, one relatively stable pool, closer to the postsynaptic membrane that can bind to GKAP, and another more dynamic pool at a location too far away to bind to GKAP. PMID:25775468

  15. Super-X divertors and high power density fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P. M.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Canik, J.

    2009-05-15

    The Super-X Divertor (SXD), a robust axisymmetric redesign of the divertor magnetic geometry that can allow a fivefold increase in the core power density of toroidal fusion devices, is presented. With small changes in poloidal coils and currents for standard divertors, the SXD allows the largest divertor plate radius inside toroidal field coils. This increases the plasma-wetted area by 2-3 times over all flux-expansion-only methods (e.g., plate near main X point, plate tilting, X divertor, and snowflake), decreases parallel heat flux and hence plasma temperature at plate, and increases connection length by 2-5 times. Examples of high-power-density fusion devices enabled by SXD are discussed; the most promising near-term device is a 100 MW modular compact fusion neutron source 'battery' small enough to fit inside a conventional fission blanket.

  16. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  17. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  18. Global Distribution and Density of Constructed Impervious Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Tuttle, Benjamin T.; Sutton, Paul S.; Baugh, Kimberly E.; Howard, Ara T.; Milesi, Cristina; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2007-01-01

    We present the first global inventory of the spatial distribution and density of constructed impervious surface area (ISA). Examples of ISA include roads, parking lots, buildings, driveways, sidewalks and other manmade surfaces. While high spatial resolution is required to observe these features, the new product reports the estimated density of ISA on a one-km2 grid based on two coarse resolution indicators of ISA – the brightness of satellite observed nighttime lights and population count. The model was calibrated using 30-meter resolution ISA of the USA from the U.S. Geological Survey. Nominally the product is for the years 2000-01 since both the nighttime lights and reference data are from those two years. We found that 1.05% of the United States land area is impervious surface (83,337 km2) and 0.43 % of the world's land surface (579,703 km2) is constructed impervious surface. China has more ISA than any other country (87,182 km2), but has only 67 m2 of ISA per person, compared to 297 m2 per person in the USA. The distribution of ISA in the world's primary drainage basins indicates that watersheds damaged by ISA are primarily concentrated in the USA, Europe, Japan, China and India. The authors believe the next step for improving the product is to include reference ISA data from many more areas around the world.

  19. Probability density function modeling for sub-powered interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pater, Flavius; Amaricǎi, Alexandru

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes three mathematical models for reliability probability density function modeling the interconnect supplied at sub-threshold voltages: spline curve approximations, Gaussian models,and sine interpolation. The proposed analysis aims at determining the most appropriate fitting for the switching delay - probability of correct switching for sub-powered interconnects. We compare the three mathematical models with the Monte-Carlo simulations of interconnects for 45 nm CMOS technology supplied at 0.25V.

  20. Magnetocaloric Materials and the Optimization of Cooling Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Canavan, Edgar; Heine, Sarah Trowbridge; Matsumoto, Koichi; Numazawa, Takenori

    2014-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect is the thermal response of a material to an external magnetic field. This manuscript focuses on the physics and the properties of materials which are commonly used for magnetic refrigeration at cryogenic temperatures. After a brief overview of the magnetocaloric effect and associated thermodynamics, typical requirements on refrigerants are discussed from a standpoint of cooling power density optimization. Finally, a compilation of the most important properties of several common magnetocaloric materials is presented.

  1. High-density power management architecture for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsanuzzaman, S. M.

    This thesis introduces a power management architecture (PMA) and its on-chip implementation, designed for battery-powered portable applications. Compared to conventional two-stage PMA architectures, consisting of a front-end inductive converter followed by a set of point-of-load (PoL) buck converters, the presented PMA has improved power density. The new architecture, named MSC-DB, is based on a hybrid converter topology that combines a fixed ratio multi-output switched capacitor converter (MSC) and a set of differential-input buck (DB) converters, to achieve low volume and high power processing efficiency. The front-end switched capacitor stage has a higher power density than the conventionally used inductive converters. The downstream differential-input buck converters enable tight output voltage regulation, and allow for a drastic reduction of output filter inductors without the need for increasing switching frequency, hence limiting switching losses and improving the efficiency of the system. Furthermore, the new PMA provides battery cells balancing feature, not existing in conventional systems. The PMA architecture is implemented both as a discrete prototype and as an application-specific integrated circuit (IC) module. The on-chip implemented architecture is fabricated in a standard 0.13microm CMOS process and operates at 9.3 MHz switching frequency. Experimental comparisons with a conventional two-cell battery input architecture, providing 15 W of total power in three different voltage outputs, demonstrate up to a 50% reduction in the inductances of the downstream converter stages and up to a 53% reduction in losses, equivalent to the improvement of the power processing efficiency of a 12%. Moreover, the fabricated IC module is co-packaged with low-profile thin-film inductors, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the introduced architecture in reducing the volume of PMAs for portable applications and possibly providing complete on-chip implementation of PMAs

  2. Universal fractional noncubic power law for density of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Kono, Yoshio; Lin, Yu; Zeng, Zhidan; Wang, Junyue; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V; Park, Changyong; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Mao, Wendy L

    2014-05-01

    As a fundamental property of a material, density is controlled by the interatomic distances and the packing of microscopic constituents. The most prominent atomistic feature in a metallic glass (MG) that can be measured is its principal diffraction peak position (q1) observable by x-ray, electron, or neutron diffraction, which is closely associated with the average interatomic distance in the first shell. Density (and volume) would naturally be expected to vary under compression in proportion to the cube of the one-dimensional interatomic distance. However, by using high pressure as a clean tuning parameter and high-resolution in situ techniques developed specifically for probing the density of amorphous materials, we surprisingly found that the density of a MG varies with the 5/2 power of q1, instead of the expected cubic relationship. Further studies of MGs of different compositions repeatedly produced the same fractional power law of 5/2 in all three MGs we investigated, suggesting a universal feature in MG. PMID:24856706

  3. Test report light duty utility arm power distribution system (PDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-03-04

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Power Distribution System has completed vendor and post-delivery acceptance testing. The Power Distribution System has been found to be acceptable and is now ready for integration with the overall LDUA system.

  4. Observed Variations of O5+ Velocity Distributions with Electron Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Cranmer, S. R.; Frazin, R. A.; Miralles, M.; Strachan, L.

    2001-05-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the SOHO satellite has been used to measure the line profiles of O~VI 103.2 and 103.7 nm versus heliographic height in a variety of coronal holes and streamers during the period from 1996 to 2001. Those observations have been used to derive velocity distributions in the line-of-sight direction, which is typically perpendicular to the apparent magnetic field direction. In the case of polar coronal holes at solar minimum, the electron density is the smallest observed and the most-probable speed is the largest observed reaching values as high as 500 km/s at the largest heights. The O5+ most-probable speed is much larger than the hydrogen speed in those structures. The ratio of O5+ to hydrogen most-probable speeds increases with height. In contrast, the O5+ values are much smaller than those of hydrogen at the base of high-latitude streamers and never reach the hydrogen values at any observed height. The electron density in those structures is much greater than in the solar minimum coronal holes. Other structures have intermediate values of the electron density and O5+ most-probable speeds. In general, the O5+ most-probable speed and its ratio to the hydrogen value seem to decrease with increasing density. This apparent observational correlation may be related to thermalization from higher collision rates or it might be related to the physical process that causes the extreme O5+ perpendicular heating. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency, and by PRODEX (Swiss Contribution).

  5. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  6. Probabilistic Density Function Method for Stochastic ODEs of Power Systems with Uncertain Power Input

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Barajas-Solano, David A.; Constantinescu, Emil; Abhyankar, S.; Ghosh, Donetta L.; Smith, Barry; Huang, Zhenyu; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-09-22

    Wind and solar power generators are commonly described by a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations (SODEs) where random input parameters represent uncertainty in wind and solar energy. The existing methods for SODEs are mostly limited to delta-correlated random parameters (white noise). Here we use the Probability Density Function (PDF) method for deriving a closed-form deterministic partial differential equation (PDE) for the joint probability density function of the SODEs describing a power generator with time-correlated power input. The resulting PDE is solved numerically. A good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulations shows accuracy of the PDF method.

  7. Development of An On-Line, Core Power Distribution Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Tunc ALdemir; Don Miller; Peng Wang

    2007-10-02

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop a software package that can construct in three-dimensional core power distributions using the signals from constant temperature power sensors distributed in the reactor core. The software developed uses a mode-based state/parameter estmation technique that is particularly attractive when there are model uncertainties and/or large signal noise. The software yields the expected value of local power at the detector locations and points in between, as well as the probability distribution of the local power density

  8. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  9. Evidence for structure in the H I column density distribution of QSO absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petitjean, P.; Webb, J. K.; Rauch, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Lanzetta, K.

    1993-01-01

    The H I column density distribution function of QSO absorption line systems is investigated using recent data with high spectral resolution, and extensive surveys of the Lyman limit systems and damped Ly-alpha systems. The hypothesis that the differential distribution function is fitted by a single power law is rejected at the 99 percent confidence level. A double power law, with a break at N(H I) = 10 exp 16/sq cm, also provides a poor fit over the range in which the sample is complete. While there are no discontinuities in the observed distribution, there is a clear flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm, compared to lower column densities. These observed features can be understood using models of photoionized clouds which are confined by an external pressure with density profiles governed by gravity. In particular, the flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm can be explained in terms of a transition between metal-poor and metal-rich systems.

  10. Probability density function characterization for aggregated large-scale wind power based on Weibull mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Bueso, Maria C.; Kessler, Mathieu; Martin-Martinez, Sergio; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri -Mathias; Molina-Garcia, Angel

    2016-02-02

    Here, the Weibull probability distribution has been widely applied to characterize wind speeds for wind energy resources. Wind power generation modeling is different, however, due in particular to power curve limitations, wind turbine control methods, and transmission system operation requirements. These differences are even greater for aggregated wind power generation in power systems with high wind penetration. Consequently, models based on one-Weibull component can provide poor characterizations for aggregated wind power generation. With this aim, the present paper focuses on discussing Weibull mixtures to characterize the probability density function (PDF) for aggregated wind power generation. PDFs of wind power datamore » are firstly classified attending to hourly and seasonal patterns. The selection of the number of components in the mixture is analyzed through two well-known different criteria: the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). Finally, the optimal number of Weibull components for maximum likelihood is explored for the defined patterns, including the estimated weight, scale, and shape parameters. Results show that multi-Weibull models are more suitable to characterize aggregated wind power data due to the impact of distributed generation, variety of wind speed values and wind power curtailment.« less

  11. Distribution of High-Density Lipoprotein Subfractions and Hypertensive Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Sha; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The exact mechanisms of hypertension contributing to atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. Although multiple studies have clarified the association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions, uncertainty remains about its relationship with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively determine the relationship between distribution of HDL subfractions and hypertensive status. A total of 953 consecutive subjects without previous lipid-lowering drug treatment were enrolled and were categorized based on hypertension history (with hypertension [n = 550] or without hypertension [n = 403]). Baseline clinical and laboratory data were collected. HDL separation was performed using the Lipoprint System. Plasma large HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and large HDL percentage were dramatically lower whereas the small HDL-C and small HDL percentage were higher in patients with hypertension (all P < 0.05). The antihypertensive drug therapy was not associated with large or small HDL subfractions (on treatment vs not on treatment, P > 0.05; combination vs single drug therapy, P > 0.05). However, the blood pressure well-controlled patients have significantly lower small HDL subfraction (P < 0.05). Moreover, large HDL-C and percentage were inversely whereas small HDL percentage was positively associated with incident hypertension after adjusting potential confounders (all P < 0.05). In the multivariate model conducted in patients with and without hypertension separately, the cardio-protective value of large HDL-C was disappeared in patients with hypertension (OR 95%CI: 1.011 [0.974–1.049]). The distribution of HDL subfractions is closely associated with hypertensive status and hypertension may potentially impact the cardio-protective value of large HDL subfraction. PMID:26512616

  12. Global Distribution of Density Irregularities in the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed measurements of ion number density made by the retarding potential analyzer aboard the Atmosphere Explorer-E (AE-E) satellite, which was in an approximately circular orbit at an altitude near 300 km in 1977 and later at an altitude near 400 km. Large-scale (greater than 60 km) density measurements in the high-altitude regions show large depletions of bubble-like structures which are confined to narrow local time longitude, and magnetic latitude ranges, while those in the low-altitude regions show relatively small depletions which are broadly distributed,in space. For this reason we considered the altitude regions below 300 km and above 350 km and investigated the global distribution of irregularities using the rms deviation delta N/N over a path length of 18 km as an indicator of overall irregularity intensity. Seasonal variations of irregularity occurrence probability are significant in the Pacific regions, while the occurrence probability is always high in die Atlantic-African regions and is always low in die Indian regions. We find that the high occurrence probability in the Pacific regions is associated with isolated bubble structures, while that near 0 deg longitude is produced by large depictions with bubble structures which are superimposed on a large-scale wave-like background. Considerations of longitude variations due to seeding mechanisms and due to F region winds and drifts are necessary to adequately explain the observations at low and high altitudes. Seeding effects are most obvious near 0 deg longitude, while the most easily observed effect of the F region is the suppression of irregularity growth by interhemispheric neutral winds.

  13. Satellite control of electric power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, L.

    1981-01-01

    An L-band frequencies satellite link providing the medium for direct control of electrical loads at individual customer sites from remote central locations is described. All loads supplied under interruptible-service contracts are likely condidates for such control, and they can be cycled or switched off to reduce system loads. For every kW of load eliminated or deferred to off-peak hours, the power company reduces its need for additional generating capacity. In addition, the satellite could switch meter registers so that their readings automatically reflected the time of consumption. The system would perform load-shedding operations during emergencies, disconnecting large blocks of load according to predetermined priorities. Among the distribution operations conducted by the satellite in real time would be: load reconfiguration, voltage regulation, fault isolation, and capacitor and feeder load control.

  14. Hydroxyl functionalized thermosensitive microgels with quadratic crosslinking density distribution.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Begum; Tuncel, Murvet; Senel, Serap; Patir, S; Tuncel, Ali

    2007-09-01

    N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) based uniform thermosensitive microgels were synthesized by dispersion polymerization by using relatively hydrophilic crosslinking agents with hydroxyl functionality. Glycerol dimethacrylate (GDMA), pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) and pentaerythritol propoxylate triacrylate (PEPTA) were used as crosslinking agents with different hydrophilicities. A protocol was first proposed to determine the crosslinking density distribution in the thermosensitive microgel particles by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The microgels were fluorescently labeled by using hydroxyl group of the crosslinking agent. The CLSM observations performed with the microgels synthesized by three different crosslinking agents showed that the crosslinking density exhibited a quadratic decrease with the increasing radial distance in the spherical microgel particles. This structure led to the formation of more loose gel structure on the particle surface with respect to the center. Then the use of hydrophilic crosslinking agents in the dispersion polymerization of NIPA made possible the synthesis of thermosensitive microgels carrying long, flexible and chemically derivatizable (i.e., hydroxyl functionalized) fringes on the surface by a single-stage dispersion polymerization. The microgels with all crosslinking agents exhibited volume phase transition with the increasing temperature. The microgel obtained by the most hydrophilic crosslinking agent, GDMA exhibited higher hydrodynamic diameters in the fully swollen form at low temperatures than those obtained by PETA and PEPTA. Higher hydrodynamic size decrease from fully swollen form to the fully shrunken form was also observed with the same microgel. PMID:17532327

  15. Increased power density from a spiral wound microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Jia, Boyang; Hu, Dawei; Xie, Beizhen; Dong, Kun; Liu, Hong

    2013-03-15

    Using Microbial fuel cell (MFC) to convert organic and inorganic matter into electricity is of great interest for powering portable devices, which is now still limited by the output of MFC. In this study, a spiral wound MFC (SWMFC) with relatively large volume normalized surface area of separator (4.2 cm(2)/ml) was fabricated to enhance power generation. Compared with double-membrane MFC (DMMFC) and conventional double chamber MFC (DCMFC), the power density of SWMFC increased by 42% and 99% resulted from its lower internal resistance. Besides larger separator area, the better performance of SWMFC benefited from its structure sandwiching the cathodes between two separators. This point was proved again by a comparison of another DCMFC and a triple chamber MFC (TCMFC) as well as a simulation using finite element method. Moreover, the feature of SWMFC was more convenient and compact to scale up. Therefore, SWMFC provides a promising configuration for high power output as a portable power source. PMID:23116542

  16. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  17. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  18. An automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Filarowski, C.A.

    1994-12-01

    Precise welds with an electron beam welder are difficult to reproduce because the factors effecting the electron beam current density distribution are not easily controlled. One method for measuring the power density distribution in EB welds uses computer tomography to reconstruct an image of the current density distribution. This technique uses many separate pieces of hardware and software packages to obtain the data and then reconstruct it consequently, transferring this technology between different machines and operators is difficult. Consolidating all of the hardware and software into one machine to execute the same tasks will allow for real-time measurement of the EB power density distribution and will provide a facilitated means for transferring various welding procedure between different machines and operators, thereby enhancing reproducibility of electron beam welds.

  19. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  20. Power Spectrum Density of Stochastic Oscillating Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, G. B.; Ou, J. W.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we employ a stochastic oscillating accretion disk model for the power spectral index and variability of BL Lac object S5 0716+714. In the model, we assume that there is a relativistic oscillation of thin accretion disks and it interacts with an external thermal bath through a friction force and a random force. We simulate the light curve and the power spectrum density (PSD) at (i) over-damped, (ii) critically damped and (iii) under-damped cases, respectively. Our results show that the simulated PSD curves depend on the intrinsic property of the accretion disk, and it could be produced in a wide interval ranging from 0.94 to 2.05 by changing the friction coefficient in a stochastic oscillating accretion disk model. We argue that accretion disk stochastic oscillating could be a possible interpretation for observed PSD variability.

  1. Patch Network for Power Allocation and Distribution in Smart Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golembiewski, Walter T.

    2000-01-01

    The power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuitry is capable of allocating and distributing a single or multiple sources of power over multi-elements of a power user grid system. The purpose of this invention is to allocate and distribute power that is collected by individual patch rectennas to a region of specific power-user devices, such as actuators. The patch rectenna converts microwave power into DC power. Then this DC power is used to drive actuator devices. However, the power from patch rectennas is not sufficient to drive actuators unless all the collected power is effectively used to drive another group by allocation and distribution. The power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuitry solves the shortfall of power for devices in a large array. The PAD concept is based on the networked power control in which power collected over the whole array of rectennas is allocated to a sub domain where a group of devices is required to be activated for operation. Then the allocated power is distributed to individual element of power-devices in the sub domain according to a selected run-mode.

  2. Global Distribution and Density of Constructed Impervious Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Tuttle, Benjamin T.; Sutton, Paul S.; Baugh, Kimberly E.; Howard, Ara T.; Milesi, Christina; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Nemani, Ramakrishna R

    2007-01-01

    We present the first global inventory of the spatial distribution and density of constructed impervious surface area (ISA). Examples of ISA include roads, parking lots, buildings, driveways, sidewalks and other manmade surfaces. While high spatial resolution is required to observe these features, the product we made is at one km2 resolution and is based on two coarse resolution indicators of ISA. Inputs into the product include the brightness of satellite observed nighttime lights and population count. The reference data used in the calibration were derived from 30 meter resolution ISA estimates of the USA from the U.S. Geological Survey. Nominally the product is for the years 2000-01 since both the nighttime lights and reference data are from those two years. We found that 1.05% of the United States land area is impervious surface (83,337 km2) and 0.43 % of the world's land surface (579,703 km2) is constructed impervious surface. China has more ISA than any other country (87,182 km2), but has only 67 m2 of ISA per person, compared to 297 m2 per person in the USA. Hyrdologic and environmental impacts of ISA begin to be exhibited when the density of ISA reaches 10% of the land surface. An examination of the areas with 10% or more ISA in watersheds finds that with the exception of Europe, the majority of watershed areas have less than 0.4% of their area at or above the 10% ISA threshold. The authors believe the next step for improving the product is to include reference ISA data from many more areas around the world.

  3. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  4. Density matrix embedding in an antisymmetrized geminal power bath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Welborn, Matthew; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-07-14

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) has emerged as a powerful tool for performing wave function-in-wave function embedding for strongly correlated systems. In traditional DMET, an accurate calculation is performed on a small impurity embedded in a mean field bath. Here, we extend the original DMET equations to account for correlation in the bath via an antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) wave function. The resulting formalism has a number of advantages. First, it allows one to properly treat the weak correlation limit of independent pairs, which DMET is unable to do with a mean-field bath. Second, it associates a size extensive correlation energy with a given density matrix (for the models tested), which AGP by itself is incapable of providing. Third, it provides a reasonable description of charge redistribution in strongly correlated but non-periodic systems. Thus, AGP-DMET appears to be a good starting point for describing electron correlation in molecules, which are aperiodic and possess both strong and weak electron correlation.

  5. High power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Manko, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells use a perfluorosulfonic acid solid polymer film as an electrolyte which simplifies water and electrolyte management. Their thin electrolyte layers give efficient systems of low weight, and their materials of construction show extremely long laboratory lifetimes. Their high reliability and their suitability for use in a microgravity environment makes them particularly attractive as a substitute for batteries in satellites utilizing high-power, high energy-density electrochemical energy storage systems. In this investigation, the Dow experimental PEM (XUS-13204.10) and unsupported high platinum loading electrodes yielded very high power densities, of the order of 2.5 W cm(exp -2). A platinum black loading of 5 mg per cm(exp 2) was found to be optimum. On extending the three-dimensional reaction zone of fuel cell electrodes by impregnating solid polymer electrolyte into the electrode structures, Nafion was found to give better performance than the Dow experimental PEM. The depth of penetration of the solid polymer electrolyte into electrode structures was 50-70 percent of the thickness of the platinum-catalyzed active layer. However, the degree of platinum utilization was only 16.6 percent and the roughness factor of a typical electrode was 274.

  6. Power-Law Distributions Based on Exponential Distributions: Latent Scaling, Spurious Zipf's Law, and Fractal Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-03-01

    The difference between the inverse power function and the negative exponential function is significant. The former suggests a complex distribution, while the latter indicates a simple distribution. However, the association of the power-law distribution with the exponential distribution has been seldom researched. This paper is devoted to exploring the relationships between exponential laws and power laws from the angle of view of urban geography. Using mathematical derivation and numerical experiments, I reveal that a power-law distribution can be created through a semi-moving average process of an exponential distribution. For the distributions defined in a one-dimension space (e.g. Zipf's law), the power exponent is 1; while for those defined in a two-dimension space (e.g. Clark's law), the power exponent is 2. The findings of this study are as follows. First, the exponential distributions suggest a hidden scaling, but the scaling exponents suggest a Euclidean dimension. Second, special power-law distributions can be derived from exponential distributions, but they differ from the typical power-law distributions. Third, it is the real power-law distributions that can be related with fractal dimension. This study discloses an inherent link between simplicity and complexity. In practice, maybe the result presented in this paper can be employed to distinguish the real power laws from spurious power laws (e.g. the fake Zipf distribution).

  7. Design note about a 75 KVA quiet power distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.T.

    1984-04-05

    This note describes a 75KVA quiet power distribution system for X 653 in neutrino Lab D. It is fed from the regular AC distribution which exists in the building and it has no standby power. Its purpose is to remove electrical disturbances which are present on the regular AC distribution.

  8. Distributed density estimation in sensor networks based on variational approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarinejadian, Behrooz; Menhaj, Mohammad B.

    2011-09-01

    This article presents a peer-to-peer (P2P) distributed variational Bayesian (P2PDVB) algorithm for density estimation and clustering in sensor networks. It is assumed that measurements of the nodes can be statistically modelled by a common Gaussian mixture model. The variational approach allows the simultaneous estimate of the component parameters and the model complexity. In this algorithm, each node independently calculates local sufficient statistics first by using local observations. A P2P averaging approach is then used to diffuse local sufficient statistics to neighbours and estimate global sufficient statistics in each node. Finally, each sensor node uses the estimated global sufficient statistics to estimate the model order as well as the parameters of this model. Because the P2P averaging approach only requires that each node communicate with its neighbours, the P2PDVB algorithm is scalable and robust. Diffusion speed and convergence of the proposed algorithm are also studied. Finally, simulated and real data sets are used to verify the remarkable performance of proposed algorithm.

  9. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  10. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. IV - The evolution of the correlation function. [galaxy distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for the large-scale distribution of galaxies in an expanding universe is studied on the assumption that the perturbation densities lie in a Gaussian distribution centered on any given mass scale. The perturbations are evolved according to the Friedmann equation, and the correlation function for the resulting distribution of perturbations at the present epoch is calculated. It is found that: (1) the computed correlation function gives a satisfactory fit to the observed function in cosmological models with a density parameter (Omega) of approximately unity, provided that a certain free parameter is suitably adjusted; (2) the power-law slope in the nonlinear regime reflects the initial fluctuation spectrum, provided that the density profile of individual perturbations declines more rapidly than the -2.4 power of distance; and (3) both positive and negative contributions to the correlation function are predicted for cosmological models with Omega less than unity.

  11. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, M. D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Messick, L. J.; Nguyen, R.; Schmitz, D.; Juergensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFET's) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 microns. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  12. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, Michael D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard; Schmitz, Dietmar; Jurgensen, Holger

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFETs) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 micron. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  13. Excitation density distribution in electron-beam-pumped ZnSe semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Donskoi, E N; Zalyalov, A N; Petrushin, O N; Savel'ev, Yu A; Tarasov, M D; Shigaev, Yu S; Zhdanova, E V; Zverev, M M; Peregudov, D V; Ivanov, S V; Sedova, I V; Sorokin, S V

    2008-12-31

    The spatial density distribution of the absorbed energy in ZnSe semiconductor lasers excited by electrons with energies from 2 keV to 1 MeV is calculated by the Monte-Carlo method. Approximate analytic expressions determining the absorbed energy of electrons in ZnSe are presented. The pump power threshold in a semiconductor quantum-well ZnSe structure is experimentally determined. The lasing threshold in such structures is estimated as a function of the electron energy. (active media)

  14. Differential Density Statistics of the Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, V. V. L.; Iribarrem, A. S.; Ribeiro, M. B.; Stoeger, W. R.

    2007-03-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number density statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro, namely, the differential density γ and the integral differential density γ*. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro & Stoeger, which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts dN/dz are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both γ and γ* with various cosmological distance definitions, namely, area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance, and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey, and γ and γ* are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an Ωm0=0.3, ΩΛ0=0.7 standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in Ribeiro, as well as showing that plots of γ and γ* against the luminosity and redshift distances indicate that the CNOC2 galaxy distribution follows a power-law pattern for redshifts higher than 0.1. These findings support Ribeiro's theoretical proposition that using different cosmological distance measures in statistical analyses of galaxy surveys can lead to significant ambiguity in drawing conclusions about the behavior of the observed large-scale distribution of galaxies.

  15. CS multitransitional study of density distribution in star-forming regions. 2: The S140 region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shudong; Butner, Harold M.; Evans, Neal J., II; Guesten, Rolf; Kutner, Marc L.; Mundy, Lee G.

    1994-01-01

    The S140 molecular cloud was observed in five transitions of CS with resolutions of 11 to 45 arcsec. The data were analyzed with both the LVG and microturbulent models of radiative transfer to derive the density structure. It was found that the CS emission comes from three components of gas: a spherical component centered on the infrared cluster, an arc component along the ionization front between the S140 H II region and the dense molecular cloud core, and a high-velocity component from the dense part of a molecular outflow. The spherical component contributes most to the CS emission and was analyzed in more detail than the other components. Using a temperature distribution derived from an analysis of the dust emission from S140, we fit a power-law density distribution of n(r) = n(sub i)(r/r(sub i))(exp -alpha) to the spherical component. The best fit was for n(sub i) = 1.4 x 10(exp 6) (density at r(sub i) = 0.026 pc) and alpha = 0.8. The density (n(sub i)) was found to be greater than or equal to the density required to account for the dust emission, depending on the dust opacity laws adopted. The presence of optical emission (Dinerstein, Lester, & Rank 1979) suggests a clumpy structure for the dense gas. Considerations of the virial mass and the lowest amount of column density required to produce dust emission put the volume filling factor (f(sub nu)) of the dense gas at approximately 0.14-0.5. We compared S140 with other regions of star formation where the density structure has been derived from excitation analysis. Source-source variations in density gradients and clumpiness clearly exist, ranging from alpha = 2 and f(sub nu) approximately 1 in B335 to alpha approximately 0, f(sub nu) approximately 0.1 in M17. There is a tendency for more massive star-forming regions to have a flatter density distribution, a more clumpy structure, and a large number of young stars. The implications of this tendency are discussed.

  16. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  17. Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.

    2008-11-15

    This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microturbines and internal combustion engines.

  18. Developments in space power components for power management and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced power electronic components development for space applications is discussed. The components described include transformers, inductors, semiconductor devices such as transistors and diodes, remote power controllers, and transmission lines.

  19. 14 CFR 25.1310 - Power source capacity and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... functioning normally. (2) Essential loads, after failure of any one prime mover, power converter, or energy... source of power is required, after any failure or malfunction in any one power supply system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power source capacity and distribution....

  20. Geometry-independent Determination of Radial Density Distributions in Molecular Cloud Cores and Other Astronomical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krčo, Marko; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2016-05-01

    We present a geometry-independent method for determining the shapes of radial volume density profiles of astronomical objects whose geometries are unknown, based on a single column density map. Such profiles are often critical to understand the physics and chemistry of molecular cloud cores, in which star formation takes place. The method presented here does not assume any geometry for the object being studied, thus removing a significant source of bias. Instead, it exploits contour self-similarity in column density maps, which appears to be common in data for astronomical objects. Our method may be applied to many types of astronomical objects and observable quantities so long as they satisfy a limited set of conditions, which we describe in detail. We derive the method analytically, test it numerically, and illustrate its utility using 2MASS-derived dust extinction in molecular cloud cores. While not having made an extensive comparison of different density profiles, we find that the overall radial density distribution within molecular cloud cores is adequately described by an attenuated power law.

  1. Power Spectrum Density of Long-Term MAXI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Juri; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Serino, Motoko; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sato, Ryousuke; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro

    Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on the International Space Station has been observing the X-ray sky since 2009 August 15. It has accumulated the X-ray data for about four years, so far. X-ray objects are usually variable and their variability can be studied by the power spectrum density (PSD) of the X-ray light curves. We applied our method to calculate PSDs of several kinds of objects observed with MAXI. We obtained significant PSDs from 16 Seyfert galaxies. For blackhole binary Cygnus X-1 there was a difference in the shape of PSD between the hard state and the soft state. For high mass X-ray binaries, Cen X-3, SMC X-1, and LMC X-4, there were several peaks in the PSD corresponding to the orbital period and the superorbital period.

  2. PSD computations using Welch's method. [Power Spectral Density (PSD)

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Jr, O M

    1991-12-01

    This report describes Welch's method for computing Power Spectral Densities (PSDs). We first describe the bandpass filter method which uses filtering, squaring, and averaging operations to estimate a PSD. Second, we delineate the relationship of Welch's method to the bandpass filter method. Third, the frequency domain signal-to-noise ratio for a sine wave in white noise is derived. This derivation includes the computation of the noise floor due to quantization noise. The signal-to-noise ratio and noise flood depend on the FFT length and window. Fourth, the variance the Welch's PSD is discussed via chi-square random variables and degrees of freedom. This report contains many examples, figures and tables to illustrate the concepts. 26 refs.

  3. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  4. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  5. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress–energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  6. Planckian Power Spectral Densities from Human Calves during Posture Maintenance and Controlled Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between muscle anatomy and physiology and its corresponding electromyography activity (EMGA) is complex and not well understood. EMGA models may be broadly divided in stochastic and motor-unit-based models. For example, these models have successfully described many muscle physiological variables such as the value of the muscle fiber velocity and the linear relationship between median frequency and muscle fiber velocity. However they cannot explain the behavior of many of these variables with changes in intramuscular temperature, or muscle PH acidity, for instance. Here, we propose that the motor unit action potential can be treated as an electromagnetic resonant mode confined at thermal equilibrium inside the muscle. The motor units comprising the muscle form a system of standing waves or modes, where the energy of each mode is proportional to its frequency. Therefore, the power spectral density of the EMGA is well described and fit by Planck’s law and from its distribution we developed theoretical relationships that explain the behavior of known physiological variables with changes in intramuscular temperature or muscle PH acidity, for instance. Methods EMGA of the calf muscle was recorded during posture maintenance in seven participants and during controlled isometric contractions in two participants. The power spectral density of the EMGA was then fit with the Planckian distribution. Then, we inferred nine theoretical relationships from the distribution and compared the theoretically derived values with experimentally obtained values. Results The power spectral density of EMGA was fit by Planckian distributions and all the theoretical relationships were validated by experimental results. Conclusions Only by considering the motor unit action potentials as electromagnetic resonant modes confined at thermal equilibrium inside the muscle suffices to predict known or new theoretical relationships for muscle physiological variables that

  7. A unified optical damage criterion based on the probability density distribution of detector signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoskoi, T.; Vass, Cs.; Mero, M.; Mingesz, R.; Bozoki, Z.; Osvay, K.

    2013-11-01

    Various methods and procedures have been developed so far to test laser induced optical damage. The question naturally arises, that what are the respective sensitivities of these diverse methods. To make a suitable comparison, both the processing of the measured primary signal has to be at least similar to the various methods, and one needs to establish a proper damage criterion, which has to be universally applicable for every method. We defined damage criteria based on the probability density distribution of the obtained detector signals. This was determined by the kernel density estimation procedure. We have tested the entire evaluation procedure in four well-known detection techniques: direct observation of the sample by optical microscopy; monitoring of the change in the light scattering power of the target surface and the detection of the generated photoacoustic waves both in the bulk of the sample and in the surrounding air.

  8. Space Power Management and Distribution Status and Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reppucci, G. M.; Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of space power management and distribution (PMAD) is provided which encompasses historical and current technology trends. The PMAD components discussed include power source control, energy storage control, and load power processing electronic equipment. The status of distribution equipment comprised of rotary joints and power switchgear is evaluated based on power level trends in the public, military, and commercial sectors. Component level technology thrusts, as driven by perceived system level trends, are compared to technology status of piece-parts such as power semiconductors, capacitors, and magnetics to determine critical barriers.

  9. Student Difficulties in Learning Density: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-01-01

    Density has been reported as one of the most difficult concepts for secondary school students (e.g. Smith et al. 1997). Discussion about the difficulties of learning this concept has been largely focused on the complexity of the concept itself or student misconceptions. Few, if any, have investigated how the concept of density was constituted in…

  10. Two-dimensional-spatial distribution measurement of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Jang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-05-15

    A real-time measurement method for two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density was developed. The method is based on the floating harmonic method and the real time measurement is achieved with little plasma perturbation. 2D arrays of the sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board with a high speed multiplexer circuit were used. Experiments were performed in an inductive discharge under various external conditions, such as powers, gas pressures, and different gas mixing ratios. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction. Our method can measure the 2D spatial distribution of plasma parameters on a wafer-level in real-time. This method can be applied to plasma diagnostics to improve the plasma uniformity of plasma reactors for plasma processing.

  11. Validating MCNP for LEU Fuel Design via Power Distribution Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, Trent; Maldonado, G Ivan; Chandler, David

    2008-11-01

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction of flux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. A current 3-D Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model was modified to replicate the HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3) core of 1965. In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. Foils (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil s activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. The current work consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the normalizing foil. Power distributions were obtained for the clean core (no poison in moderator and symmetrical rod position at 17.5 inches) and fully poisoned-moderator (1.35 g B/liter in moderator and rods fully withdrawn) conditions. The observed deviations between the

  12. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power (P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  13. Validity of power functionals for a homogeneous electron gas in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaja, A.; Eich, F. G.; Baldsiefen, T.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-03-01

    Physically valid and numerically efficient approximations for the exchange and correlation energy are critical for reduced-density-matrix-functional theory to become a widely used method in electronic structure calculations. Here we examine the physical limits of power functionals of the form f (n ,n') =(nn')α for the scaling function in the exchange-correlation energy. To this end we obtain numerically the minimizing momentum distributions for the three- and two-dimensional homogeneous electron gas, respectively. In particular, we examine the limiting values for the power α to yield physically sound solutions that satisfy the Lieb-Oxford lower bound for the exchange-correlation energy and exclude pinned states with the condition n (k )<1 for all wave vectors k . The results refine the constraints previously obtained from trial momentum distributions. We also compute the values for α that yield the exact correlation energy and its kinetic part for both the three- and two-dimensional electron gas. In both systems, narrow regimes of validity and accuracy are found at α ≳0.6 and at rs≳10 for the density parameter, corresponding to relatively low densities.

  14. A Testbed for Deploying Distributed State Estimation in Power Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian

    2012-07-22

    Abstract—With the increasing demand, scale and data information of power systems, fast distributed applications are becoming more important in power system operation and control. This paper proposes a testbed for evaluating power system distributed applications, considering data exchange among distributed areas. A high-performance computing (HPC) version of distributed state estimation is implemented and used as a distributed application example. The IEEE 118-bus system is used to deploy the parallel distributed state estimation, and the MeDICi middleware is used for data communication. The performance of the testbed demonstrates its capability to evaluate parallel distributed state estimation by leveraging the HPC paradigm. This testbed can also be applied to evaluate other distributed applications.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1310 - Power source capacity and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Power source capacity and distribution. 23.1310 Section 23.1310 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1310 Power source capacity and distribution. (a) Each installation whose...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1310 - Power source capacity and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Power source capacity and distribution. 23.1310 Section 23.1310 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1310 Power source capacity and distribution. (a) Each installation whose...

  17. Improved calibration of mass stopping power in low density tissue for a proton pencil beam algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Daniel R.; Partridge, Mike; Hill, Mark A.; Peach, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Dose distributions for proton therapy treatments are almost exclusively calculated using pencil beam algorithms. An essential input to these algorithms is the patient model, derived from x-ray computed tomography (CT), which is used to estimate proton stopping power along the pencil beam paths. This study highlights a potential inaccuracy in the mapping between mass density and proton stopping power used by a clinical pencil beam algorithm in materials less dense than water. It proposes an alternative physically-motivated function (the mass average, or MA, formula) for use in this region. Comparisons are made between dose-depth curves calculated by the pencil beam method and those calculated by the Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX in a one-dimensional lung model. Proton range differences of up to 3% are observed between the methods, reduced to  <1% when using the MA function. The impact of these range errors on clinical dose distributions is demonstrated using treatment plans for a non-small cell lung cancer patient. The change in stopping power calculation methodology results in relatively minor differences in dose when plans use three fields, but differences are observed at the 2%-2 mm level when a single field uniform dose technique is adopted. It is therefore suggested that the MA formula is adopted by users of the pencil beam algorithm for optimal dose calculation in lung, and that a similar approach is considered when beams traverse other low density regions such as the paranasal sinuses and mastoid process.

  18. Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2007-06-30

    This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

  19. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Harold; Korich, Mark D.; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  20. Electric Transport Traction Power Supply System With Distributed Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, E. Y.; Schurov, N. I.; Rozhkova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states the problem of traction substation (TSS) leveling of daily-load curve for urban electric transport. The circuit of traction power supply system (TPSS) with distributed autonomous energy source (AES) based on photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage (ES) units is submitted here. The distribution algorithm of power flow for the daily traction load curve leveling is also introduced in this paper. In addition, it illustrates the implemented experiment model of power supply system.

  1. Automated distribution system management for multichannel space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, G. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    A NASA sponsored study of space power distribution system technology is in progress to develop an autonomously managed power system (AMPS) for large space power platforms. The multichannel, multikilowatt, utility-type power subsystem proposed presents new survivability requirements and increased subsystem complexity. The computer controls under development for the power management system must optimize the power subsystem performance and minimize the life cycle cost of the platform. A distribution system management philosophy has been formulated which incorporates these constraints. Its implementation using a TI9900 microprocessor and FORTH as the programming language is presented. The approach offers a novel solution to the perplexing problem of determining the optimal combination of loads which should be connected to each power channel for a versatile electrical distribution concept.

  2. Automation of Space Station module power management and distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, Robert; Weeks, Dave; Walls, Bryan

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on automation of space station module (SSM) power management and distribution (PMAD) system are presented. Topics covered include: reasons for power system automation; SSM/PMAD approach to automation; SSM/PMAD test bed; SSM/PMAD topology; functional partitioning; SSM/PMAD control; rack level autonomy; FRAMES AI system; and future technology needs for power system automation.

  3. Insights into the crystal chemistry of Earth materials rendered by electron density distributions: Pauling's rules revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2014-05-20

    Pauling's first two rules are examined in terms of the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms for a relatively large number of oxide and silicate crystals and siloxane molecules. The distribution of the electron density shows that the radius of the oxygen atom is not fixed, but that it actually decreases systematically from ~1.40 Å to ~ 0.65 Å as the polarizing power and the electronegativity of the bonded metal atoms increase and the distribution of the O atom is progressively polarized and contracted along the bond vectors by the impact of the bonded interactions. The contractions result in an aspherical oxygen atom that displays as many different bonded “radii” as it has bonded interactions. The bonded radii for the metal atoms match the Shannon and Prewitt ionic radii for the more electropositive atoms like potassium and sodium, but they are systematically larger for the more electronegative atoms like aluminum, silicon and phosphorous. Pauling's first rule is based on the assumption that the radius of the oxide anion is fixed and that the radii of the cations are such that radius sum of the spherical oxide anion and a cation necessarily equals the separation between the cation-anion bonded pair with the coordination number of the cation being determined by the ratio of the radii of the cation and anion. In the case of the bonded radii, the sum of the bonded radii for the metal atoms and the oxide anion necessarily equals the bond lengths by virtue of the way that the bonded radii were determined in the partitioning of the electron density along the bond path into metal and O atom parts. But, the radius ratio for the O and M atoms is an unsatisfactory rule for determining the coordination number of the metal atom inasmuch as a bonded O atom is not, in general, spherical, and its size varies substantially along its bonded directions. But by counting the number of bond paths that radiate from a bonded atom, the coordination

  4. 1310 nm quantum dot DFB lasers with high dot density and ultra-low linewidth-power product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Lester, L. F.; Gray, A. L.; Newell, T. C.; Hains, C.; Gogna, P.; Muller, R.; Maker, P.; Su, H.; Stintz, A.

    2002-01-01

    Laterally coupled distributed feedback lasers using high-density InAs quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) active region demonstrate a nominal wavelength of 1310 nm, a linewidth as small as 68 kHz, and a linewidth-power product of 100 kHz-mW.

  5. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  6. Noise power spectral density of the Sundstrand QA-2000 accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Rex; Grindeland, David; Baugher, Charles R. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    There are no good data on low frequency (less than 0.1 Hz) power spectral density (PSD) for the Q-Flex accelerometer. However, some preliminary stability measurements were made over periods of 12 to 24 hours and demonstrated stability less than 0.5 micro-g over greater than 12 hours. The test data appear to contain significant contributions from temperature variations at that level, so the true sensor contribution may be less than that. If what was seen could be construed as a true random process, it would correspond to about 0.1 micro-g rms over a bandwidth from 10(exp -5) Hz to about 1 Hz. Other studies of low frequency PSD in flexure accelerometers have indicated that material aging effects tend to approximate a first order Markhov process. If we combine such a model with the spectrum obtained at higher frequencies, it suggests the spectrum shown here as a conservative estimate of Q-Flex noise performance.

  7. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  8. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  9. High-resolution Tangential AXUV Arrays for Radiated Power Density Measurements on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L; Bell, R E; Faust, I; Tritz, K; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; Kozub, T A; LeBlanc, B P; Stratton, B C

    2014-07-01

    Precise measurements of the local radiated power density and total radiated power are a matter of the uttermost importance for understanding the onset of impurity-induced instabilities and the study of particle and heat transport. Accounting of power balance is also needed for the understanding the physics of various divertor con gurations for present and future high-power fusion devices. Poloidal asymmetries in the impurity density can result from high Mach numbers and can impact the assessment of their flux-surface-average and hence vary the estimates of P[sub]rad (r, t) and (Z[sub]eff); the latter is used in the calculation of the neoclassical conductivity and the interpretation of non-inductive and inductive current fractions. To this end, the bolometric diagnostic in NSTX-U will be upgraded, enhancing the midplane coverage and radial resolution with two tangential views, and adding a new set of poloidally-viewing arrays to measure the 2D radiation distribution. These systems are designed to contribute to the near- and long-term highest priority research goals for NSTX-U which will integrate non-inductive operation at reduced collisionality, with high-pressure, long energy-confinement-times and a divertor solution with metal walls.

  10. Comparing Different Fault Identification Algorithms in Distributed Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaabi, Salim

    A power system is a huge complex system that delivers the electrical power from the generation units to the consumers. As the demand for electrical power increases, distributed power generation was introduced to the power system. Faults may occur in the power system at any time in different locations. These faults cause a huge damage to the system as they might lead to full failure of the power system. Using distributed generation in the power system made it even harder to identify the location of the faults in the system. The main objective of this work is to test the different fault location identification algorithms while tested on a power system with the different amount of power injected using distributed generators. As faults may lead the system to full failure, this is an important area for research. In this thesis different fault location identification algorithms have been tested and compared while the different amount of power is injected from distributed generators. The algorithms were tested on IEEE 34 node test feeder using MATLAB and the results were compared to find when these algorithms might fail and the reliability of these methods.

  11. Detection of two power-law tails in the probability distribution functions of massive GMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Girichidis, P.; Rayner, T.; Motte, F.; André, Ph.; Russeil, D.; Abergel, A.; Anderson, L.; Arzoumanian, D.; Benedettini, M.; Csengeri, T.; Didelon, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; Hill, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Ossenkopf, V.; Pezzuto, S.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Spinoglio, L.; Tremblin, P.; Zavagno, A.

    2015-11-01

    We report the novel detection of complex high column density tails in the probability distribution functions (PDFs) for three high-mass star-forming regions (CepOB3, MonR2, NGC 6334), obtained from dust emission observed with Herschel. The low column density range can be fitted with a lognormal distribution. A first power-law tail starts above an extinction (AV) of ∼6-14. It has a slope of α 1.3-2 for the &ρ ≈ r-α profile for an equivalent density distribution (spherical or cylindrical geometry), and is thus consistent with free-fall gravitational collapse. Above AV ∼40, 60, and 140, we detect an excess that can be fitted by a flatter power-law tail with α > 2. It correlates with the central regions of the cloud (ridges/hubs) of size ∼;1 pc and densities above 104 cm-3. This excess may be caused by physical processes that slow down collapse and reduce the flow of mass towards higher densities. Possible are: (1) rotation, which introduces an angular momentum barrier, (2) increasing optical depth and weaker cooling, (3) magnetic fields, (4) geometrical effects, and (5) protostellar feedback. The excess/second power-law tail is closely linked to high-mass star-formation though it does not imply a universal column density threshold for the formation of (high-mass) stars.

  12. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  13. Hydroacoustic Estimates of Fish Density Distributions in Cougar Reservoir, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Batten, George W.; Mitchell, T. D.

    2012-09-01

    Day and night mobile hydroacoustic surveys were conducted once each month from April through December 2011 to quantify the horizontal and vertical distributions of fish throughout Cougar Reservoir, Lane County, Oregon.

  14. Quantitative grain density autoradiography and the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity in phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.B.; Maguire, B. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of a method of grain density autoradiography demonstrates that reliable measurements of the primary productivity of individual phytoplankton species can be obtained with this technique. Grain density autoradiography is particularly useful for providing an estimate of the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity. As an example, the productivity distribution of the marine diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus became positively skewed during a period of population decline.

  15. 10 CFR 960.5-2-1 - Population density and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., when issued by the NRC, in 10 CFR part 60, subpart I, “Emergency Planning Criteria.” ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Population density and distribution. 960.5-2-1 Section 960... Population density and distribution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that,...

  16. 10 CFR 960.5-2-1 - Population density and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., when issued by the NRC, in 10 CFR part 60, subpart I, “Emergency Planning Criteria.” ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Population density and distribution. 960.5-2-1 Section 960... Population density and distribution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that,...

  17. 10 CFR 960.5-2-1 - Population density and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., when issued by the NRC, in 10 CFR part 60, subpart I, “Emergency Planning Criteria.” ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Population density and distribution. 960.5-2-1 Section 960... Population density and distribution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that,...

  18. 10 CFR 960.5-2-1 - Population density and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., when issued by the NRC, in 10 CFR part 60, subpart I, “Emergency Planning Criteria.” ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Population density and distribution. 960.5-2-1 Section 960... Population density and distribution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that,...

  19. 10 CFR 960.5-2-1 - Population density and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., when issued by the NRC, in 10 CFR part 60, subpart I, “Emergency Planning Criteria.” ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Population density and distribution. 960.5-2-1 Section 960... Population density and distribution. (a) Qualifying condition. The site shall be located such that,...

  20. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  1. Distributed Power Sources for Mars Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Shaban, Yasser

    2003-01-01

    One of the fundamental needs for Mars colonization is an abundant source of energy. The total energy system will probably use a mixture of sources based on solar energy, fuel cells, and nuclear energy. Here we concentrate on the possibility of developing a distributed system employing several unique new types of nuclear energy sources, specifically small fusion devices using inertial electrostatic confinement and portable ``battery type'' proton reaction cells.

  2. Distribution and density of bird species hazardous to aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1975-01-01

    Only in the past 5 years has it become feasible to map the relative abundance of North American birds. Two programs presently under way and a third that is in the experimental phase are making possible the up-to-date mapping of abundance as well as distribution. A fourth program that has been used successfully in Europe and on a small scale in parts of North America yields detailed information on breeding distribution. The Breeding Bird Survey, sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Canadian Wildlife Service, involves 2,000 randomly distributed roadside counts that are conducted during the height of the breeding season in all U.S. States and Canadian Provinces. Observations of approximately 1.4 million birds per year are entered on magnetic tape and subsequently used both for statistical analysis of population trends and for computer mapping of distribution and abundance. The National Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count is conducted in about 1,000 circles, each 15 miles (24 km) in diameter, in the latter half of December. Raw data for past years have been published in voluminous reports, but not in a form for ready analysis. Under a contract between the U.S. Air Force and the U. S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife (in cooperation with the National Audubon Society), preliminary maps showing distribution and abundance of selected species that are potential hazards to aircraft are presently being mapped and prepared for publication. The Winter Bird Survey, which is in its fifth season of experimental study in a limited area in Central Maryland, may ultimately replace the Christmas Bird Count source. This Survey consists of a standardized 8-kilometer (5-mile) route covered uniformly once a year during midwinter. Bird Atlas programs, which map distribution but not abundance, are well established in Europe and are gaining interest in America

  3. Neutron density distributions of neutron-rich nuclei studied with the isobaric yield ratio difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Bai, Xiao-Man; Yu, Jiao; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-09-01

    The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) between two reactions of similar experimental setups is found to be sensitive to nuclear density differences between projectiles. In this article, the IBD probe is used to study the density variation in neutron-rich 48Ca . By adjusting diffuseness in the neutron density distribution, three different neutron density distributions of 48Ca are obtained. The yields of fragments in the 80 A MeV 40, 48Ca + 12C reactions are calculated by using a modified statistical abrasion-ablation model. It is found that the IBD results obtained from the prefragments are sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile, while the IBD results from the final fragments are less sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile.

  4. Electricity distribution network power quality regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Sanchez, Jose Maria

    The regulation of the electricity distribution utilities has evolved to a scenario based on competition and cost-effectiveness. This cost reduction may affect the quality performance. A quality regulatory proposal based on yardstick competition is presented in this Ph.D. thesis. The proposal focuses on the continuity of supply in the electricity distribution networks. The competition is against objective values of the selected zonal quality indices that are computed using a probabilistic model that takes into account the historical behavior of the distribution network and considers the quality indices as random variables. A monitoring scheme has been developed to obtain the basic reliability indices from the rough data. A methodology to segment the supplied area is proposed. The implementation plan of the regulatory proposal and the incentive/penalty scheme to encourage utilities to improve their quality indices, are also presented. An implementation study case of the scheme is shown. The conceptual framework of this proposal and the different regulations of the continuity of supply of several countries are also reviewed in detail.

  5. Bayesian semiparametric power spectral density estimation with applications in gravitational wave data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Meyer, Renate; Christensen, Nelson

    2015-09-01

    The standard noise model in gravitational wave (GW) data analysis assumes detector noise is stationary and Gaussian distributed, with a known power spectral density (PSD) that is usually estimated using clean off-source data. Real GW data often depart from these assumptions, and misspecified parametric models of the PSD could result in misleading inferences. We propose a Bayesian semiparametric approach to improve this. We use a nonparametric Bernstein polynomial prior on the PSD, with weights attained via a Dirichlet process distribution, and update this using the Whittle likelihood. Posterior samples are obtained using a blocked Metropolis-within-Gibbs sampler. We simultaneously estimate the reconstruction parameters of a rotating core collapse supernova GW burst that has been embedded in simulated Advanced LIGO noise. We also discuss an approach to deal with nonstationary data by breaking longer data streams into smaller and locally stationary components.

  6. Description of a 20 kilohertz power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    A single phase, 440 VRMS, 20 kHz power distribution system with a regulated sinusoidal wave form is discussed. A single phase power system minimizes the wiring, sensing, and control complexities required in a multi-sourced redundantly distributed power system. The single phase addresses only the distribution links multiphase lower frequency inputs and outputs accommodation techniques are described. While the 440 V operating potential was initially selected for aircraft operating below 50,000 ft, this potential also appears suitable for space power systems. This voltage choice recognizes a reasonable upper limit for semiconductor ratings, yet will direct synthesis of 220 V, 3 power. A 20 kHz operating frequency was selected to be above the range of audibility, minimize the weight of reactive components, yet allow the construction of single power stages of 25 to 30 kW. The regulated sinusoidal distribution system has several advantages. With a regulated voltage, most ac/dc conversions involve rather simple transformer rectifier applications. A sinusoidal distribution system, when used in conjunction with zero crossing switching, represents a minimal source of EMI. The present state of 20 kHz power technology includes computer controls of voltage and/or frequency, low inductance cable, current limiting circuit protection, bi-directional power flow, and motor/generator operating using standard induction machines. A status update and description of each of these items and their significance is presented.

  7. Description of a 20 Kilohertz power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    A single phase, 440 VRMS, 20 kHz power distribution system with a regulated sinusoidal wave form is discussed. A single phase power system minimizes the wiring, sensing, and control complexities required in a multi-sourced redundantly distributed power system. The single phase addresses only the distribution link; mulitphase lower frequency inputs and outputs accommodation techniques are described. While the 440 V operating potential was initially selected for aircraft operating below 50,000 ft, this potential also appears suitable for space power systems. This voltage choice recognizes a reasonable upper limit for semiconductor ratings, yet will direct synthesis of 220 V, 3 power. A 20 kHz operating frequency was selected to be above the range of audibility, minimize the weight of reactive components, yet allow the construction of single power stages of 25 to 30 kW. The regulated sinusoidal distribution system has several advantages. With a regulated voltage, most ac/dc conversions involve rather simple transformer rectifier applications. A sinusoidal distribution system, when used in conjunction with zero crossing switching, represents a minimal source of EMI. The present state of 20 kHz power technology includes computer controls of voltage and/or frequency, low inductance cable, current limiting circuit protection, bi-directional power flow, and motor/generator operating using standard induction machines. A status update and description of each of these items and their significance is presented.

  8. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  9. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in the Repairs of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2006-02-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw size and density distribution for the population of U.S. reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict vessel specific flaw rates for use in probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that estimate vessel failure probability. Considerable progress has been made on the construction of an engineering data base of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear RPVs. The fabrication processes and product forms used to construct U.S. RPVs are represented in the data base. A validation methodology has been developed for characterizing the flaws for size, shape, orientation, and composition. The relevance of construction records has been established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, and validated by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in weld repairs. Recent research results confirm that repair flaws are complex in composition and may include cracks on the repair ends. Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. PNNL has previously obtained the complete construction records for two RPVs. Analysis of these records show a significant change in repair frequency.

  10. Marginal Power Loss Extraction Method for Future High Output Power Density Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Kazuto; Adachi, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Yusuke; Ohashi, Hiromichi

    Novel exact MOSFET switching loss analysis and formulation methods have been proposed for designing high output power density converters. To analyze influences of circuit stray parameters on MOSFET switching loss with experiments, a parameter adjustable circuit board has been fabricated. The circuit board has a function to vary circuit stray inductance and capacitance values like a circuit simulator. Correlations between MOSFET switching loss energies and circuit stray parameters are successfully analyzed with the circuit board. Based on the analysis results, switching loss energies are formulated with empirical equations to establish a exact power loss calculation tool for the converter design. Switching loss energies caused by semiconductor device parameters are modeled by a capacitance charge/discharge model. The procedure to formulate the switching loss energies with empirical equations is presented. Switching loss energies calculated with empirical equations are verified with measurements, and high accuracy of more than 95% has been achieved.

  11. Thirty-Third Annual Power Distribution Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Oerting, J.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of how the Gulf Power Company which serves 10 westernmost counties of Florida deals with hurricanes. Gulf's hurricane procedures currently contain 661 pages of detailed information for each area of responsibility, including the general concept for restoration of damage, as well as details describing how this will be accomplished. Included are area storm center locations, personnel assignments, material allocations, vehicle assignments, radio frequencies, news media contacts, special priorities for restoration of service, details of logistics associated with lodging and feeding, telephone center operation to take incoming calls from customers and all of the other functions.

  12. A study of power conditioning and power distribution and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, H. M.; Honnell, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive simulation and analysis performed on the operation of the regulator part of the Charger/Battery/Regulator Module (CBRM) are detailed. The CBRM is utilized as an integral component of the Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) electrical power system and contains a switching mode electronic regulator. Implementing circuit analysis techniques, pertinent voltages and currents are calculated; these, in turn, are incorporated into the regulator system study. Investigation of the turn-on and turn-off times associated with the switching circuitry is performed and an examination is made on these calculations. A simulation model computer program is utilized to generate graphs that relate various CBRM parameters to one another.

  13. 99. POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS FOR BATTERIES AND RECTIFIERS, NORTHEAST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS FOR BATTERIES AND RECTIFIERS, NORTHEAST SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Power distribution in two-dimensional optical network channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xue; Karim, Mohammad A.

    1996-04-01

    The power distribution in two-dimensional optical network channels is analyzed. The maximum number of allowable channels as determined by the characteristics of optical detector is identified, in particular, for neural-network and wavelet-transform applications.

  15. Using ultrasound tomography to identify the distributions of density throughout the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Sherman, Mark E.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-04-01

    Women with high breast density are at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Breast density has usually been defined using mammography as the ratio of fibroglandular tissue to total breast area. Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an emerging modality that can also be used to measure breast density. UST creates tomographic sound speed images of the patient's breast which is useful as sound speed is directly proportional to tissue density. Furthermore, the volumetric and quantitative information contained in the sound speed images can be used to describe the distribution of breast density. The work presented here measures the UST sound speed density distributions of 165 women with negative screening mammography. Frequency distributions of the sound speed voxel information were examined for each patient. In a preliminary analysis, the UST sound speed distributions were averaged across patients and grouped by various patient and density-related factors (e.g., age, body mass index, menopausal status, average mammographic breast density). It was found that differences in the distribution of density could be easily visualized for different patient groupings. Furthermore, findings suggest that the shape of the distributions may be used to identify participants with varying amounts of dense and non-dense tissue.

  16. Numerical analysis of atomic density distribution in arc driven negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T. Shibata, T.; Hatayama, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hanada, M.; Sawada, K.

    2014-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to calculate atomic (H{sup 0}) density distribution in JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source. A collisional radiative model is developed for the calculation of the H{sup 0} density distribution. The non-equilibrium feature of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), which mainly determines the H{sup 0} production rate, is included by substituting the EEDF calculated from 3D electron transport analysis. In this paper, the H{sup 0} production rate, the ionization rate, and the density distribution in the source chamber are calculated. In the region where high energy electrons exist, the H{sup 0} production and the ionization are enhanced. The calculated H{sup 0} density distribution without the effect of the H{sup 0} transport is relatively small in the upper region. In the next step, the effect should be taken into account to obtain more realistic H{sup 0} distribution.

  17. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. D.; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  18. A comparative study of electric power distribution systems for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A.; King, Roger J.

    1990-01-01

    The electric power distribution systems for spacecraft are compared concentrating on two interrelated issues: the choice between dc and high frequency ac, and the converter/inverter topology to be used at the power source. The relative merits of dc and ac distribution are discussed. Specific converter and inverter topologies are identified and analyzed in detail for the purpose of detailed comparison. Finally, specific topologies are recommended for use in dc and ac systems.

  19. Effect of power density and pulse repetition on laser shock peening of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Shepard, M.J.; Prevey, P.S. III; Clauer, A.H.

    2000-02-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) was applied to Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) simulated airfoil specimens using a Nd:Glass laser. Laser shock peening processing parameters examined in the present study included power density (5.5, 7, and 9 GW/cm{sup 2}) and number of laser pulses per spot (one and three pulses/spot). The LSP's Ti-6Al-4V samples were examined using x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the residual stress distribution and percent cold work as a function of depth. It was found that the residual stress state and percent of cold work were relatively independent of LSP power density. However, the number of laser pulses per spot had a significant effect on both residual stress and percent of cold work for a given power density level. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the magnitude of residual compressive stresses generated and the percent cold work measured.

  20. Study of the height and density distributions of the 2-D granular system under vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk Kyu; Kim, Kipom; Jun, Yonggun

    1998-03-01

    Melecular dynamic simulations and experiments are used to investigate the pattern formation of the granular materials in a vertically vibrated rigid container. The height and density distributions of the peak of the patterns in two dimensional system are measured using the simulation. The height distribution agrees with the experimental observation. At the peak of height of the pattern the density is observed minimum. From the information of the vertical velocities of the particles, the momentum flux distributions are studied also.

  1. High-power CSI-fed induction motor drive with optimal power distribution based control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, S.-S.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, a current source inverter (CSI) fed induction motor drive with an optimal power distribution control is proposed for high-power applications. The CSI-fed drive is configured with a six-step CSI along with a pulsewidth modulated voltage source inverter (PWM-VSI) and capacitors. Due to the PWM-VSI and the capacitor, sinusoidal motor currents and voltages with high quality as well as natural commutation of the six-step CSI can be obtained. Since this CSI-fed drive can deliver required output power through both the six-step CSI and PWM-VSI, this article shows that the kVA ratings of both the inverters can be reduced by proper real power distribution. The optimal power distribution under load requirements, based on power flow modelling of the CSI-fed drive, is proposed to not only minimise the PWM-VSI rating but also reduce the six-step CSI rating. The dc-link current control of the six-step CSI is developed to realise the optimal power distribution. Furthermore, a vector controlled drive for high-power induction motors is proposed based on the optimal power distribution. Experimental results verify the high-power CSI-fed drive with the optimal power distribution control.

  2. OXIDATION OF DRY HYDROCARBONS AT HIGH-POWER DENSITY ANODES

    SciTech Connect

    K.Krist; O. Spaldon-Stewart; R. Remick

    2004-03-01

    performance life on dry methane with sulfur compounds was much longer than with dry methane alone. The effect of sulfur compounds in these cases appeared to correlate with inhibition of carbon deposition. Mixed results were obtained for the effect of the sulfur compounds on power density. Progress also was made in understanding the mechanisms involved in direct utilization of dry natural gas. Evidence was developed for three possible mechanisms for dry methane utilization in addition to the usually cited mechanism--direct oxidation of methane by oxygen anions. Further work is required at a fundamental level before the knowledge gained here can be translated into higher levels of performance.

  3. 62. View of amplifiermodulator control system with power distribution panel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. View of amplifier-modulator control system with power distribution panel on left, control power supply in middle, and amplifier modulator on right, second floor in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 14 CFR 23.1310 - Power source capacity and distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Power source capacity and distribution. 23.1310 Section 23.1310 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 23.1310 Power source...

  5. Crosscheck of different techniques for two dimensional power spectral density measurements of x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony

    2005-07-12

    The consistency of different instruments and methods for measuring two-dimensional (2D) power spectral density (PSD) distributions are investigated. The instruments are an interferometric microscope, an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the X-ray Reflectivity and Scattering experimental facility, all available at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measurements were performed with a gold-coated mirror with a highly polished stainless steel substrate. It was shown that these three techniques provide essentially consistent results. For the stainless steel mirror, an envelope over all measured PSD distributions can be described with an inverse power-law PSD function. It is also shown that the measurements can be corrected for the specific spatial frequency dependent systematic errors of the instruments. The AFM and the X-ray scattering measurements were used to determine the modulation transfer function of the interferometric microscope. The corresponding correction procedure is discussed in detail. Lower frequency investigation of the 2D PSD distribution was also performed with a long trace profiler and a ZYGO GPI interferometer. These measurements are in some contradiction, suggesting that the reliability of the measurements has to be confirmed with additional investigation. Based on the crosscheck of the performance of all used methods, we discuss the ways for improving the 2D PSD characterization of X-ray optics.

  6. Analytical Limit Distributions from Random Power-Law Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Irwin; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Nature is full of power-law interactions, e.g., gravity, electrostatics, and hydrodynamics. When sources of such fields are randomly distributed in space, the superposed interaction, which is what we observe, is naively expected to follow a Gauss or Lévy distribution. Here, we present an analytic expression for the actual distributions that converge to novel limits that are in between these already-known limit distributions, depending on physical parameters, such as the concentration of field sources and the size of the probe used to measure the interactions. By comparing with numerical simulations, the origin of non-Gauss and non-Lévy distributions are theoretically articulated.

  7. Multiple Streaming and the Probability Distribution of Density in Redshift Space

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Lam; Kofman, Lev; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    2000-07-01

    We examine several aspects of redshift distortions by expressing the redshift-space density in terms of the eigenvalues and orientation of the local Lagrangian deformation tensor. We explore the importance of multiple streaming using the Zeldovich approximation (ZA), and compute the average number of streams in both real and redshift space. We find that multiple streaming can be significant in redshift space but negligible in real space, even at moderate values of the linear fluctuation amplitude ({sigma}{sub l}(less-or-similar sign)1). Moreover, unlike their real-space counterparts, redshift-space multiple streams can flow past each other with minimal interactions. Such nonlinear redshift-space effects, which are physically distinct from the fingers-of-God due to small-scale virialized motions, might in part explain the well-known departure of redshift distortions from the classic linear prediction by Kaiser, even at relatively large scales where the corresponding density field in real space is well described by linear perturbation theory. We also compute, using the ZA, the probability distribution function (PDF) of the density, as well as S{sub 3}, in real and redshift space, and compare it with the PDF measured from N-body simulations. The role of caustics in defining the character of the high-density tail is examined. We find that (non-Lagrangian) smoothing, due to both finite resolution or discreteness and small-scale velocity dispersions, is very effective in erasing caustic structures, unless the initial power spectrum is sufficiently truncated. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  8. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  9. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  10. Density probability distribution functions of diffuse gas in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhuijsen, E. M.; Fletcher, A.

    2008-10-01

    In a search for the signature of turbulence in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in gas density distributions, we determined the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the average volume densities of the diffuse gas. The densities were derived from dispersion measures and HI column densities towards pulsars and stars at known distances. The PDFs of the average densities of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and the diffuse atomic gas are close to lognormal, especially when lines of sight at |b| < 5° and |b| >= 5° are considered separately. The PDF of at high |b| is twice as wide as that at low |b|. The width of the PDF of the DIG is about 30 per cent smaller than that of the warm HI at the same latitudes. The results reported here provide strong support for the existence of a lognormal density PDF in the diffuse ISM, consistent with a turbulent origin of density structure in the diffuse gas.