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1

Management of Hanford Site non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to provide radiologically, and industrially safe and cost-effective management of the non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site. The proposed action would place the Hanford Site`s non-defense production reactor SNF in a radiologically- and industrially-safe, and passive storage condition pending final disposition. The proposed action would also reduce operational costs associated with storage of the non-defense production reactor SNF through consolidation of the SNF and through use of passive rather than active storage systems. Environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with existing non-defense production reactor SNF storage facilities have been identified. DOE has determined that additional activities are required to consolidate non-defense production reactor SNF management activities at the Hanford Site, including cost-effective and safe interim storage, prior to final disposition, to enable deactivation of facilities where the SNF is now stored. Cost-effectiveness would be realized: through reduced operational costs associated with passive rather than active storage systems; removal of SNF from areas undergoing deactivation as part of the Hanford Site remediation effort; and eliminating the need to duplicate future transloading facilities at the 200 and 400 Areas. Radiologically- and industrially-safe storage would be enhanced through: (1) removal from aging facilities requiring substantial upgrades to continue safe storage; (2) utilization of passive rather than active storage systems for SNF; and (3) removal of SNF from some storage containers which have a limited remaining design life. No substantial increase in Hanford Site environmental impacts would be expected from the proposed action. Environmental impacts from postulated accident scenarios also were evaluated, and indicated that the risks associated with the proposed action would be small.

NONE

1997-03-01

2

Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Addendum (Final Environmental Impact Statement)  

SciTech Connect

The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE`s responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period.

Not Available

1992-12-01

3

Isotope Production at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to a request from the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) subcommittee on ''Long-Term Isotope Research and Production Plans.'' The NERAC subcommittee has asked for a reply to a number of questions regarding (1) ''How well does the Department of Energy (DOE) infrastructure sme the need for commercial and medical isotopes?'' and (2) ''What should be the long-term role of the federal government in providing commercial and medical isotopes?' Our report addresses the questions raised by the NERAC subcommittee, and especially the 10 issues that were raised under the first of the above questions (see Appendix). These issues are related to the isotope products offered by the DOE Isotope Production Sites, the capabilities and condition of the facilities used to produce these products, the management of the isotope production programs at DOE laboratories, and the customer service record of the DOE Isotope Production sites. An important component of our report is a description of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor at the Hbford Site and the future plans for its utilization as a source of radioisotopes needed by nuclear medicine physicians, by researchers, and by customers in the commercial sector. In response to the second question raised by the NERAC subcommittee, it is our firm belief that the supply of isotopes provided by DOE for medical, industrial, and research applications must be strengthened in the near future. Many of the radioisotopes currently used for medical diagnosis and therapy of cancer and other diseases are imported from Canada, Europe, and Asia. This situation places the control of isotope availability, quality, and pricing in the hands of non-U.S. suppliers. It is our opinion that the needs of the U.S. customers for isotopes and isotope products are not being adequately served, and that the DOE infrastructure and facilities devoted to the supply of these products must be improved This perception forms one of the fundamental bases for our proposal that the FFTF, which is currently in a standby condition, be reactivated to supply nuclear services and products such as radioisotopes needed by the U.S. medical, industrial, and research communities.

Ammoniums

1999-06-01

4

Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

Not Available

1980-08-01

5

Environmental Assessment: Relocation and storage of TRIGA{reg_sign} reactor fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In order to allow the shutdown of the Hanford 308 Building in the 300 Area, it is proposed to relocate fuel assemblies (101 irradiated, three unirradiated) from the Mark I TRIGA Reactor storage pool. The irradiated fuel assemblies would be stored in casks in the Interim Storage Area in the Hanford 400 Area; the three unirradiated ones would be transferred to another TRIGA reactor. The relocation is not expected to change the offsite exposure from all Hanford Site 300 and 400 Area operations.

NONE

1995-08-01

6

Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

Greenfield, Bryce A.

2009-12-20

7

Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

Kannberg, L.D.

1992-04-01

8

Engineering studies for the Surplus Production Reactor Decommissioning Project at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1942, the Hanford Site (near Richland, WA) was commissioned as a facility for the production of plutonium. On location there are nine water cooled, graphite-moderated plutonium production reactors, which are now retired from service. Because the reactors contain irradiated reactor components, and because the buildings that house the reactors are contaminated with low levels of reactivity, the DOE has determined that there is a need for action and that some form of decommissioning or continued surveillance and maintenance is necessary. This report discusses assessments of the alternatives which have determined that while continued surveillance and maintenance adequately isolates remaining radioactive materials from the environment and properly protects human health and safety; decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) will ultimately be necessary. The project is technically complex and will likely be designated as a Department of Energy (DOE) Major System Acquisition or Major Project.

Miller, R.L.; Powers, E.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Usher, J.M. [Ebasco Services, Inc., Augusta, GA (United States); Yannitell, D.M. [Ebasco Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-10-01

9

Savannah River Site production reactor technical specifications. K Production Reactor  

SciTech Connect

These technical specifications are explicit restrictions on the operation of the Savannah River Site K Production Reactor. They are designed to preserve the validity of the plant safety analysis by ensuring that the plant is operated within the required conditions bounded by the analysis, and with the operable equipment that is assumed to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Technical specifications preserve the primary success path relied upon to detect and respond to accidents. This report describes requirements on thermal-hydraulic limits; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance for the reactor, power distribution control, instrumentation, process water system, emergency cooling and emergency shutdown systems, confinement systems, plant systems, electrical systems, components handling, and special test exceptions; design features; and administrative controls.

NONE

1996-02-01

10

Measuring the productivity of university research reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

University Research Reactors (URRs) on 33 campuses in the United States provide valuable contributions to academic instruction and research programs. In most cases, there are no alternative diagnostic techniques to supplant the need for a reactor and associated facilities. Since URRs constitute a major financial commitment, it is important that they be operated in a productive manner. Productivity may be

Voth

1989-01-01

11

Characterization of stored defense production spent nulcear fuel and associated materials at Hanford Site, Richland Washington: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

There are about 2,100 tonnes (2,300 tons) of defense production spent nuclear fuel stored in the 100-K Area Basins located along the south shore of the Columbia River in the northern part of the Hanford Site. Some of the fuel which has been in storage for a number of years is in poor condition and continues to deteriorate. The basins also contain fuel fragments and radioactively contaminated sludge. The DOE needs to characterize defense production spent nuclear fuel and associated materials stored on the Hanford Site. In order to satisfy that need, the Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to select, collect and transport samples of spent nuclear fuel and associated materials to the 327 Building for characterization. As a result of that characterization, modes of interim storage can be determined that would be compatible with the material in its present state and alternative treatment processes could be developed to permit a broader selection of storage modes. Environmental impacts of the proposed action were determined to be limited principally to radiation exposure of workers, which, however, were found to be small. No health effects among workers or the general public would be expected under routine operations. Implementation of the proposed action would not result in any impacts on cultural resources, threatened, endangered and candidate species, air or water quality, socioeconomic conditions, or waste management.

NONE

1995-03-01

12

The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Nesse, R.J.; Schultz, R.W.; Stokowski, P.A.; Clark, D.C.

1987-08-01

13

Safe new reactor for radionuclide production  

SciTech Connect

In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

Gray, P.L.

1995-02-15

14

World Languages at Richland College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how Richland College, Texas, created a division of world languages to address the contemporary language acquisition of an increasingly diverse student body, noting the importance of today's students studying languages to prepare for tomorrow's global marketplace. The paper discusses changing student markets, fiscal support and staffing…

Mittelstet, Stephen K.

1999-01-01

15

The Modular Helium Reactor for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect

For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For hydrogen production, the concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. Two concepts that make direct use of the MHR high-temperature process heat are being investigated in order to improve the efficiency and economics of hydrogen production. The first concept involves coupling the MHR to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process and is referred to as the SI-Based H2-MHR. The second concept involves coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) and is referred to as the HTE-Based H2-MHR.

E. Harvego; M. Richards; A. Shenoy; K. Schultz; L. Brown; M. Fukuie

2006-10-01

16

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01

17

Alternatives to proposed replacement production reactors  

SciTech Connect

To insure adequate supplies of plutonium and tritium for defense purposes, an independent evaluation was made by Los Alamos National Laboratory of the numerous alternatives to the proposed replacement production reactors (RPR). This effort concentrated on the defense fuel cycle operation and its technical implications in identifying the principal alternatives for the 1990s. The primary options were identified as (1) existing commercial reactors, (2) existing and planned government-owned facilities (not now used for defense materials production), and (3) other RPRs (not yet proposed) such as CANDU or CANDU-type heavy-water reactors (HWR) for both plutonium and tritium production. The evaluation considered features and differences of various options that could influence choice of RPR alternatives. Barring a change in the US approach to civilian and defense fuel cycles and precluding existing commercial reactors at government-owned sites, the most significant alternatives were identified as a CANDU-type HWR at Savannah River Plant (SRP) site or the Three Mile Island commercial reactor with reprocessing capability at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant and at SRP.

Cullingford, H.S.

1981-06-01

18

Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model  

SciTech Connect

The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

2008-09-01

19

Silicon production in a fluidized bed reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Part of the development effort of the JPL in-house technology involved in the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the investigation of a low-cost process to produce semiconductor-grade silicon for terrestrial photovoltaic cell applications. The process selected was based on pyrolysis of silane in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Following initial investigations involving 1- and 2-in. diameter reactors, a 6-in. diameter, engineering-scale FBR was constructed to establish reactor performance, mechanism of silicon deposition, product morphology, and product purity. The overall mass balance for all experiments indicates that more than 90% of the total silicon fed into the reactor is deposited on silicon seed particles and the remaining 10% becomes elutriated fines. Silicon production rates were demonstrated of 1.5 kg/h at 30% silane concentration and 3.5 kg/h at 80% silane concentration. The mechanism of silicon deposition is described by a six-path process: heterogeneous deposition, homogeneous decomposition, coalescence, coagulation, scavenging, and heterogeneous growth on fines. The bulk of the growth silicon layer appears to be made up of small diameter particles. This product morphology lends support to the concept of the scavenging of homogeneously nucleated silicon.

Rohatgi, N. K.

1986-01-01

20

Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

2014-01-01

21

Hydrogen Production Using the Modular Helium Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The high-temperature characteristics of the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for the production of hydrogen using either thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Using heat from the MHR to drive a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical hydrogen process has been the subject of a DOE sponsored Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (NERI) project lead by General Atomics, with participation from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Texas A&M University. While the focus of much of the initial work was on the S-I thermochemical production of hydrogen, recent activities have also included development of a preconceptual design for an integral HTE hydrogen production plant driven by the process heat and electricity produced by a 600 MWt MHR. This paper describes RELAP5-3D analyses performed to evaluate alternative primary system cooling configurations for the MHR to minimize peak reactor vessel and core temperatures while achieving core helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900 oC to 1000 oC, needed for the efficient production of hydrogen using either the S-I thermochemical or HTE process. The cooling schemes investigated are intended to ensure peak fuel temperatures do not exceed specified limits under normal or transient upset conditions, and that reactor vessel temperatures do not exceed ASME code limits for steady-state or transient conditions using standard LWR vessel materials. Preconceptual designs for both an S-I thermochemical and HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a 600 MWt MHR at helium outlet temperatures in the range of 900 oC to 1000 oC are described and compared. An initial SAPHIRE model to evaluate the reliability, maintainablility, and availability of the S-I hydrogen production plant is also discussed, and plans for future assessments of conceptual designs for both a S-I thermochemical and HTE hydrogen production plant coupled to a 600 MWt modular helium reactor are described.

E. A. Harvego; S. M. Reza; M. Richards; A. Shenoy

2005-05-01

22

The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests  

SciTech Connect

Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere.

Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS E550, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

1991-01-10

23

Long-lived fission product transmutation in nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

One of the main directions in the management of high-level radioactive wastes is the development of specialized reactors for transmutation with maximum support coefficients for the existing power reactor. The developments have shown that it is more expetitious to design the reactor for actinide transmutation and for fission products separately. For the above purposes, the FBR type fast neutron reactor and FMF type fast reactor with melted fuel were considered.

Ganev, I.K.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Naumov, V.V.; Reshetov, V.A.

1993-12-31

24

NPR (New Production Reactor) capacity cost evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL Cost Evaluation Technical Support Group (CETSG) has been assigned by DOE-HQ Defense Programs (DP) the task defining, obtaining, and evaluating the capital and life-cycle costs for each of the technology/proponent/site/revenue possibilities envisioned for the New Production Reactor (NPR). The first part of this exercise is largely one of accounting, since all NPR proponents use different accounting methodologies in preparing their costs. In order to address this problem of comparing ''apples and oranges,'' the proponent-provided costs must be partitioned into a framework suitable for all proponents and concepts. If this is done, major cost categories can then be compared between concepts and major cost differences identified. Since the technologies proposed for the NPR and its needed fuel and target support facilities vary considerably in level of technical and operational maturity, considerable care must be taken to evaluate the proponent-derived costs in an equitable manner. The use of cost-risk analysis along with derivation of single point or deterministic estimates allows one to take into account these very real differences in technical and operational maturity. Chapter 2 summarizes the results of this study in tabular and bar graph form. The remaining chapters discuss each generic reactor type as follows: Chapter 3, LWR concepts (SWR and WNP-1); Chapter 4, HWR concepts; Chapter 5, HTGR concept; and Chapter 6, LMR concept. Each of these chapters could be a stand-alone report. 39 refs., 36 figs., 115 tabs.

none,

1988-07-01

25

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6  

SciTech Connect

This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

Not Available

1991-04-01

26

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01

27

RACEWAY REACTOR FOR MICROALGAL BIODIESEL PRODUCTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The proposed mathematical model incorporating mass transfer, hydraulics, carbonate/aquatic chemistry, biokinetics, biology and reactor design will be calibrated and validated using the data to be generated from the experiments. The practical feasibility of the proposed reactor...

28

POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

2011-10-19

29

The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests  

SciTech Connect

The experience base regarding fission product behavior developed during the Rover program, the nuclear rocket development program of 1955--1972, will be useful in planning a renewed nuclear rocket program. During the Rover program, 20 reactors were tested at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Nineteen of these discharged effluent directly into the atmosphere; the last reactor tested, a non-flight-prototypic, fuel-element-testing reactor called the Nuclear Furnace (NF-1) was connected to an effluent cleanup system that removed fission products before the hydrogen coolant (propellant) was discharged to the atmosphere. In general, we are able to increase both test duration and fuel temperature during the test series. Therefore fission product data from the later part of the program are more interesting and more applicable to future reactors. We have collected fission product retention (and release) data reported in both formal and informal publications for six of the later reactor tests; five of these were Los Alamos reactors that were firsts of a kind in configuration or operating conditions. We have also, with the cooperation of Westinghouse, included fission product data from the NRX-A6 reactor, the final member of series of developmental reactors with the same basic geometry, but with significant design and fabrication improvements as the series continued. Table 1 lists the six selected reactors and the test parameters for each.

Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J.

1991-01-01

30

The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The experience base regarding fission product behavior developed during the Rover program, the nuclear rocket development program of 1955 to 1972 will be useful in planning a renewed nuclear rocket program. During the Rover program, 20 reactors were tested at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Nevada. Nineteen of these discharged effluent directly into the atmosphere; the last reactor tested, a non-flight-prototypic, fuel-element-testing reactor called the Nuclear Furnace (NF-1) was connected to an effluent cleanup system that removed fission products before the hydrogen coolant (propellant) was discharged to the atmosphere. In general, we are able to increase both test duration and fuel temperature during the test series. Therefore fission product data from the later part of the program are more interesting and more applicable to future reactors. We have collected fission product retention (and release) data reported in both formal and informal publications for six of the later reactor tests; five of these were Los Alamos reactors that were firsts of a kind in configuration or operating conditions. We have also, with the cooperation of Westinghouse, included fission product data from the NRX-A6 reactor, the final member of a series of developmental reactors with the same basic geometry, but with significant design and fabrication improvements as the series continued. Table 1 lists the six selected reactors and the test parameters for each.

Bokor, Peter C.; Kirk, William L.; Bohl, Richard J.

31

78 FR 16713 - Board Meeting; April 16, 2013; Richland, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting; April 16, 2013; Richland, WA The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical...open public meeting in Richland, Washington, on Tuesday, April 16, 2013, to review information on U.S. Department of...

2013-03-18

32

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOEpatents

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19

33

Aerosol reactor production of uniform submicron powders  

DOEpatents

A method of producing submicron nonagglomerated particles in a single stage reactor includes introducing a reactant or mixture of reactants at one end while varying the temperature along the reactor to initiate reactions at a low rate. As homogeneously small numbers of seed particles generated in the initial section of the reactor progress through the reactor, the reaction is gradually accelerated through programmed increases in temperature along the length of the reactor to promote particle growth by chemical vapor deposition while minimizing agglomerate formation by maintaining a sufficiently low number concentration of particles in the reactor such that coagulation is inhibited within the residence time of particles in the reactor. The maximum temperature and minimum residence time is defined by a combination of temperature and residence time that is necessary to bring the reaction to completion. In one embodiment, electronic grade silane and high purity nitrogen are introduced into the reactor and temperatures of approximately 770.degree. K. to 1550.degree. K. are employed. In another embodiment silane and ammonia are employed at temperatures from 750.degree. K. to 1800.degree. K.

Flagan, Richard C. (Pasadena, CA); Wu, Jin J. (Pasadena, CA)

1991-02-19

34

Aerosol reactor production of uniform submicron powders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method of producing submicron nonagglomerated particles in a single stage reactor includes introducing a reactant or mixture of reactants at one end while varying the temperature along the reactor to initiate reactions at a low rate. As homogeneously small numbers of seed particles generated in the initial section of the reactor progress through the reactor, the reaction is gradually accelerated through programmed increases in temperature along the length of the reactor to promote particle growth by chemical vapor deposition while minimizing agglomerate formation by maintaining a sufficiently low number concentration of particles in the reactor such that coagulation is inhibited within the residence time of particles in the reactor. The maximum temperature and minimum residence time is defined by a combination of temperature and residence time that is necessary to bring the reaction to completion. In one embodiment, electronic grade silane and high purity nitrogen are introduced into the reactor and temperatures of approximately 770.degree. K. to 1550.degree. K. are employed. In another embodiment silane and ammonia are employed at temperatures from 750.degree. K. to 1800.degree. K.

Flagan, Richard C. (Inventor); Wu, Jin J. (Inventor)

1991-01-01

35

Hydrogen Production via a Commerically Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been known that use of the hydrogen selective membrane as a reactor (MR) could potentially improve the efficiency of the water shift reaction (WGS), one of the least efficient unit operations for production of high purity hydrogen from syngas. However, no membrane reactor technology has been reduced to industrial practice thus far, in particular for a large-scale operation.

Paul Liu

2007-01-01

36

Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor  

DOEpatents

A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19

37

Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor  

DOEpatents

Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

2014-09-16

38

Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01

39

NOVEL REACTOR DESIGN FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of this project is to scale-up a novel reactor for producing Biodiesel from alternative feedstocks. Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that can be produced from a wide variety of plant oils, animal oils and waste oils from food processing. The conventional feedstocks fo...

40

Preconceptual design of the new production reactor circulator test facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of a study of a new circulator test facility for the New Production Reactor Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The report addresses the preconceptual design of a stand-alone test facility with all the required equipment to test the Main Circulator\\/shutoff valve and Shutdown Cooling Circulator\\/shutoff valve. Each type of circulator will be tested in its own

Thurston

1990-01-01

41

Improving Jet Reactor Configuration for Production of Carbon Nanotubes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The jet mixing reactor has been proposed for the industrial production of fullerene carbon nanotubes. Here we study the flowfield of this reactor using the SIMPLER algorithm. Hot peripheral jets are used to enhance heating of the central jet by mixing with the ambiance of reactor. Numerous configurations of peripheral jets with various number of jets, distance between nozzles, angles between the central jet and a peripheral jets, and twisted configuration of nozzles are considered. Unlike the previous studies of jet mixing, the optimal configuration of peripheral jets produces strong non-uniformity of the central jet in a cross-section. The geometrical shape of reactor is designed to obtain a uniform temperature of a catalyst.

Povitsky, Alex

2000-01-01

42

Moving bed reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production  

SciTech Connect

Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor chambers between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between chambers during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat. In embodiments, chambers of a reactor are coupled to a heat exchanger to pre-heat the reactive particles prior to direct exposure to thermal energy with heat transferred from reduced reactive particles as the particles are oppositely conveyed between the thermal reduction chamber and the fuel production chamber. In an embodiment, particle conveyance is in part provided by an elevator which may further function as a heat exchanger.

Ermanoski, Ivan

2013-04-16

43

Thermal reactor. [liquid silicon production from silane gas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thermal reactor apparatus and method of pyrolyticaly decomposing silane gas into liquid silicon product and hydrogen by-product gas is disclosed. The thermal reactor has a reaction chamber which is heated well above the decomposition temperature of silane. An injector probe introduces the silane gas tangentially into the reaction chamber to form a first, outer, forwardly moving vortex containing the liquid silicon product and a second, inner, rewardly moving vortex containing the by-product hydrogen gas. The liquid silicon in the first outer vortex deposits onto the interior walls of the reaction chamber to form an equilibrium skull layer which flows to the forward or bottom end of the reaction chamber where it is removed. The by-product hydrogen gas in the second inner vortex is removed from the top or rear of the reaction chamber by a vortex finder. The injector probe which introduces the silane gas into the reaction chamber is continually cooled by a cooling jacket.

Levin, H.; Ford, L. B. (inventors)

1982-01-01

44

Economics of power plant district and process heating in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The economic feasibility of utilizing hot water from nuclear reactors to provide district heating for private residences in Richland, Washington, and space and process heating for nearby offices, part of the Hanford Reservation, and the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant is assessed. Specifically, the practicality of using hot water from the Washington Public Power Supply System's WNP-1 reactor, which is currently under construction on the Hanford Reservation, just north of the City of Richland is established. World-wide experience with district heating systems and the advantages of using these systems are described. The GEOCITY computer model used to calculate district heating costs is described and the assumptions upon which the costs are based are presented. District heating costs for the city of Richland, process heating costs for the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, district heating costs for the Horn Rapids triangle area, and process heating costs for the 300 and 3000 areas are discussed. An economic analysis is discussed and institutional restraints are summarized. (MCW)

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-04-01

45

Practical results of 60Co production at RBMK-reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents practical results of 60Co production in irradiation assemblies (IAs) in RBMK-1000 reactor during 1100 effective days of irradiation. Operational support of irradiation was performed by means of certified software system SAPFIR&RC-RBMK_RT. Integrity of IA in operating reactor was monitored by design system: no leaks in IAs were detected. Activity of 60Co contained in each capsule was measured in the hot cell by comparison, using reference dosimeter with absorbed gamma-dose rate measurement uncertainty not more than ±3% at confidence probability P=0.95. Total amount of 60Co produced was 2 MCi, average specific activity of 60Co—52±7 Ci/g. Achievable specific activity of 60Co in RBMK-reactor is 90±7 Ci/g and annual production capacity—about 8 MCi.

Shevchenko, V. G.; Garoussov, Y. V.; Lebedev, V. I.; Dmitriev, V. V.

2002-03-01

46

Reactor power history from fission product signatures  

E-print Network

The purpose of this research was to identify fission product signatures that could be used to uniquely identify a specific spent fuel assembly in order to improve international safeguards. This capability would help prevent and deter potential...

Sweeney, David J.

2009-05-15

47

Applications of catalytic inorganic membrane reactors to refinery products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catalytic membrane reactors are reviewed as applied to opportunities and applications within petroleum refineries. Since so many inorganic membranes take advantage of H2 permselectivity and H2 demands are increasing in a refinery, there are a number of interesting process applications being considered. H2 production can be enhanced by using Pd based membranes for dehydrogenation, oxydehydrogenation, and decomposition reactions. Permselective H2

J. N. Armor

1998-01-01

48

Continuous ( R )-mandelic acid production in an enzyme membrane reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The continuous conversion of phenylglyoxylic acid to (R)-mandelic acid was performed in an enzyme membrane reactor with simultaneous coenzyme regeneration employing mandelate dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase. A mathematical model of the coupled enzyme reactions was formulated and applied to determine optimal conditions for (R)-mandelic acid production. The experiments and calculations showed that the optimal operational points depend strongly on enzyme

Dj. Vasi?-Racki; M. Jonas; C. Wandrey; W. Hummel; M. R. Kula

1989-01-01

49

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect

A critical mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the planning, implementation, and completion of environmental restoration programs at DOE facilities. An integral part of this mission involves the safe and cost-effective environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. For over 40 years the Hanford Site supported United States national defense programs, largely through the production of nuclear materials. One legacy of historical Hanford Site operations is a significant waste inventory of radioactive and/or regulated chemical materials. Releases of these materials have, in some cases, contaminated the Hanford Site environment. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment from potential Hanford Site environmental hazards by identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks posed by contaminated sites.

NONE

1996-04-01

50

CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL IN HIGH PRODUCTIVITY BIOREACTORS USING ESCHERICHIA COLI FBR5: MEMBRANE AND FIXED CELL REACTORS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Biochemical reactor design plays a major role in determining the economics of fuel and chemical production. Reactors that result in continuously high productivities can significantly reduce the cost of the final product. With this aim, three different continuous reactor systems were evaluated for ...

51

CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL IN HIGH PRODUCTIVITY BIOREACTORS USING GENETICALLY ENGINEERED ESCHERICHIA COLI FBR5: MEMBRANE AND FIXED CELL REACTORS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Biochemical reactor design plays a major role in determining the economics of fuel and chemical production. Reactors that result in continuously high productivities can significantly reduce the cost of the final product. With this aim, five different reactor systems were evaluated for ethanol prod...

52

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-print Network

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjörn; Höistad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnér, Lars; Essén, Hanno

2013-01-01

53

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-print Network

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjörn Hartman; Bo Höistad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnér; Hanno Essén

2013-06-07

54

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. Hydrogen permeation data for several perovskite membranes BCN (BaCe{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (SrCe{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar in this project. However, it is known that the cerate-based perovskite materials can react with CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the stability issue of the proton conducting perovskite materials under CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S environments was examined. Tests were conducted in the Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA) unit for powder and disk forms of BCN and SCE. Perovskite materials doped with zirconium (Zr) are known to be resistant to CO{sub 2}. The results from the evaluation of the chemical stability for the Zr doped perovskite membranes are presented. During this reporting period, flowsheet simulation was also performed to calculate material and energy balance based on several hydrogen production processes from coal using high temperature membrane reactor (1000 C), low temperature membrane reactor (250 C), or conventional technologies. The results show that the coal to hydrogen process employing both the high temperature and the low temperature membrane reactors can increase the hydrogen production efficiency (cold gas efficiency) by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Using either high temperature or low temperature membrane reactor process also results in an increase of the cold gas efficiencies as well as the thermal efficiencies of the overall process.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2005-07-29

55

MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

GERBER MS

2009-04-28

56

Solar water splitting for hydrogen production with monolithic reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work proposes the exploitation of solar energy for the dissociation of water and production of hydrogen via an integrated thermo-chemical reactor\\/receiver system. The basic idea is the use of multi-channelled honeycomb ceramic supports coated with active redox reagent powders, in a configuration similar to that encountered in automobile exhaust catalytic aftertreatment.Iron-oxide-based redox materials were synthesized, capable to operate

C. Agrafiotis; M. Roeb; A. G. Konstandopoulos; L. Nalbandian; V. T. Zaspalis; C. Sattler; P. Stobbe; A. M. Steele

2005-01-01

57

Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor  

SciTech Connect

We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L., E-mail: vlmathe@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune- 411007 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai- 400085 (India)

2014-04-24

58

Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

2014-04-01

59

Hydrogen production in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The noncatalytic process of syngas production by means of partial oxidation of methane by air oxygen in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor has been investigated experimentally. We have investigated the influence of the equivalent ratio and the specific mass flow of the fuel mixture on the composition of conversion products and the maximum temperature in the reaction zone. The optimal conditions for the process providing the most effective conversion of methane to syngas have been established. The concentration of hydrogen is maximal for the equivalent ratio ? = 2.8 and the specific flow rate g = 1.8 kg / (m2?s).

Dmitrenko, Yu. M.; Klevan, P. A.

2011-11-01

60

Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

NONE

1997-07-01

61

192. View of the Richland Balsam Mountain Overlook. This is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

192. View of the Richland Balsam Mountain Overlook. This is the highest elevation, 6,047, on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Looking west-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

62

Long-lived activation products in reactor materials  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

1984-08-01

63

Richland Environmental Restoration Project management action process document  

SciTech Connect

This document is the prescribed means for providing direct input to the US Department of Energy Headquarters regarding the status, accomplishments, strategy, and issues of the Richland Environmental Restoration Project. The project mission, organizational interfaces, and operational history of the Hanford Site are provided. Remediation strategies are analyzed in detail. The document includes a status of Richland Environmental Restoration project activities and accomplishments, and it presents current cost summaries, schedules, and technical baselines.

NONE

1996-04-01

64

Westinghouse independent safety review of Savannah River production reactors  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a safety assessment of the Savannah River production reactors (K,L, and P) as requested by the US Department of Energy. This assessment was performed between November 1, 1988, and April 1, 1989, under the transition contract for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's preparations to succeed E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company as the US Department of Energy contractor for the Savannah River Project. The reviewers were drawn from several Westinghouse nuclear energy organizations, embody a combination of commercial and government reactor experience, and have backgrounds covering the range of technologies relevant to assessing nuclear safety. The report presents the rationale from which the overall judgment was drawn and the basis for the committee's opinion on the phased restart strategy proposed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Westinghouse, and the US Department of Energy-Savannah River. The committee concluded that it could recommend restart of one reactor at partial power upon completion of a list of recommended upgrades both to systems and their supporting analyses and after demonstration that the organization had assimilated the massive changes it will have undergone.

Leggett, W.D.; McShane, W.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Liparulo, N.J.; McAdoo, J.D.; Strawbridge, L.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear and Advanced Technology Div.); Toto, G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear Services Div.); Fauske, H.K. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA)); Call, D.W. (Westinghouse Savannah R

1989-04-01

65

Solar chemical reactor technology for industrial production of lime  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed the solar chemical reactor technology to effect the endothermic calcination reaction CaCO3(s)?CaO(s)+CO2(g) at 1200–1400K. The indirect heating 10kWth multi-tube rotary kiln prototype processed 1–5mm limestone particles, producing high purity lime that is not contaminated with combustion by-products. The quality of the solar produced quicklime meets highest industrial standards in terms of reactivity (low, medium, and high) and degree

Anton Meier; Enrico Bonaldi; Gian Mario Cella; Wojciech Lipinski; Daniel Wuillemin

2006-01-01

66

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the unit has been fully commissioned and is operational. The unit is capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. A double-seal technique has been developed and tested successfully to achieve leak-tight seal for the membranes. Initial data for a commercial Palladium-Gold membrane were obtained at temperatures to 450 C and pressures to 13 atm. Tests for the perovskite membranes are being performed and the results will be reported in the next quarter. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The results from the simulation work confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen. The presence of steam in the permeate side can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%. When the steam partial pressure is greater than 1 atm, the hydrogen flux becomes independent of the steam pressure.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-07-29

67

Development of Enzymatic Membrane Reactor (EMR) for Cyclodextrins Production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated on the fouling mechanisms in ultrafiltration membrane during separation of cyclodextrins from starch and CGTase. The Resistance-In-Series Model was used to identify the responsible hydraulic resistances. The result showed that the weak adsorption fouling resistance (ra1) was the main factor that contributed the rate and extent of flux decline. Moreover the significant organic fouling that is contributed by starch, CDs, CGTase and intermediate by-products in organic colloids and/or macromolecular revealed that the fouling potential was ra1> rg > rcp > ra2. The overall results indicate that the fouling mechanism consists of pore mouth adsorption and subsequently narrowing of the pores as those components (starch and CGTase) are small enough not to be excluded by steric considerations. In the latter stage unreacted starch would be accumulated to form gel/cake layer. The measured flux recovery of enzymatic membrane reactor for CDs production was about 95%.

Mimi Sakinah, A. M.; Ismail, A. F.; Illias, Rosli Md; Hassan, Osman

68

Chemistry of fission product iodine in light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Control of fission product iodine in LWRs have been based on the assumption that the bulk of the iodine is uncombined chemically. Recent studies, however, have indicated that fission product iodine released from LWR fuel rods with defected cladding is combined chemically with electropositive species. Thermodynamic studies indicate that the most likely form of the iodine is cesium iodide. In most cases, the chemical form of the radioiodine in the vapor phase is determined by reactions in the aqueous phase. Studies of aqueous iodine chemistry indicate that the predominant dissolved species are iodide and iodate ions in relative concentrations determined by the redox conditions involved. Moreover, volatile species over the aqueous system can be maintained at very low levels. Work performed to date suggests that the dominant chemical form of radioiodine to be controlled in a reactor containment building (excluding aerosols) is methyl iodide, albeit at low concentration.

Malinauskas, A.P.; Bell, J.T.; Campbell, D.O.; Lorenz, R.A.

1981-01-01

69

Biobutanol production in a Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm reactor integrated with simultaneous product recovery by adsorption  

PubMed Central

Background Clostridium acetobutylicum can propagate on fibrous matrices and form biofilms that have improved butanol tolerance and a high fermentation rate and can be repeatedly used. Previously, a novel macroporous resin, KA-I, was synthesized in our laboratory and was demonstrated to be a good adsorbent with high selectivity and capacity for butanol recovery from a model solution. Based on these results, we aimed to develop a process integrating a biofilm reactor with simultaneous product recovery using the KA-I resin to maximize the production efficiency of biobutanol. Results KA-I showed great affinity for butanol and butyrate and could selectively enhance acetoin production at the expense of acetone during the fermentation. The biofilm reactor exhibited high productivity with considerably low broth turbidity during repeated batch fermentations. By maintaining the butanol level above 6.5 g/L in the biofilm reactor, butyrate adsorption by the KA-I resin was effectively reduced. Co-adsorption of acetone by the resin improved the fermentation performance. By redox modulation with methyl viologen (MV), the butanol-acetone ratio and the total product yield increased. An equivalent solvent titer of 96.5 to 130.7 g/L was achieved with a productivity of 1.0 to 1.5 g?·?L-1?·?h-1. The solvent concentration and productivity increased by 4 to 6-fold and 3 to 5-fold, respectively, compared to traditional batch fermentation using planktonic culture. Conclusions Compared to the conventional process, the integrated process dramatically improved the productivity and reduced the energy consumption as well as water usage in biobutanol production. While genetic engineering focuses on strain improvement to enhance butanol production, process development can fully exploit the productivity of a strain and maximize the production efficiency. PMID:24401161

2014-01-01

70

Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors  

E-print Network

Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

2008-08-06

71

Radionuclide inventory and source terms for the surplus production reactors at Hanford  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radionuclide inventories have been estimated for the eight surplus production reactors at Hanford. The inventories listed represent more than 95% of the total curie burden; the remaining 5% is distributed in piping, tunnels, and various other locations within the reactor building and unaccounted for inventories within the reactors or fuel storage basins. Estimates are conservative as the methodology was designed

R. L. Miller; J. M. Steffes

1987-01-01

72

Radionuclide inventory and source terms for the surplus production reactors at Hanford  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radionuclide inventories have been estimated for the eight surplus production reactors at Hanford. The inventories listed represent more than 95% of the total curie burden; the remaining 5% is distributed in piping, tunnels, and various other locations within the reactor building and unaccounted for inventories within the reactors or fuel storage basins. Estimates are conservative as the methodology was designed

R. L. Miller; J. M. Steffes

1986-01-01

73

Bio-hydrogen production from molasses by anaerobic fermentation in continuous stirred tank reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study of bio-hydrogen production was performed in a continuous flow anaerobic fermentation reactor (with an available volume of 5.4 L). The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for bio-hydrogen production was operated under the organic loading rates (OLR) of 8-32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d (COD: chemical oxygen demand) with molasses as the substrate. The maximum hydrogen production yield of 8.19 L/d was obtained in the reactor with the OLR increased from 8 kg COD/m3 reactor/d to 24 kg COD/m3 d. However, the hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) drastically decreased at an OLR of 32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d. Ethanoi, acetic, butyric and propionic were the main liquid fermentation products with the percentages of 31%, 24%, 20% and 18%, which formed the mixed-type fermentation.

Han, Wei; Li, Yong-feng; Chen, Hong; Deng, Jie-xuan; Yang, Chuan-ping

2010-11-01

74

Treatment of wastewater from red and tropical fruit wine production by zeolite anaerobic fluidized bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters derived from red (RWWW) and tropical fruit wine (TFWWW) production was carried out in four laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactors with natural zeolite as bacterial support. These reactors operated at mesophilic temperature (35°C). Reactors R1 and R2 contained Chilean natural zeolite, while reactors R3 and R4 used Cuban natural zeolite as microorganism support.

S. Montalvo; L. Guerrero; R. Borja; I. Cortés; E. Sánchez; M. F. Colmenarejo

2008-01-01

75

Isobutylene production from synthesis gas over zirconia in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect

Selective formation of isobutylene from synthesis gas over two types of zirconia was investigated in a laboratory slurry reactor. Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of space velocity and CO/H{sub 2} ratio on CO conversion and hydrocarbon product distribution. Comparisons have been made to fixed bed reactor data. A reactor model in the absence of mass transfer limitations was found to represent the experimental data closely with rate expressions obtained from fixed bed reactor studies.

Erkey, C.; Wang, J.; Postula, W.; Feng, Z.; Philip, C.V.; Akgerman, A.; Anthony, R.G. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1995-04-01

76

A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The unit was fully commissioned and is operational. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and tested in the new permeation unit. These membranes were fabricated by either uniaxial pressing or tape casting technique with thickness ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm. Hydrogen permeation data for the BCN perovskite membrane have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar. The highest hydrogen flux was measured at 1.6 STPcc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of 12 bar and 950 C with a membrane thickness of 0.22 mm. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The hydrogen flux predicted from the modeling results are in line with the data from the experimental measurement. The simulation also shows that the presence of steam in the permeate side or the feed side of the membrane can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2004-10-26

77

Pipe break testing of primary loop piping similar to the Department of Energy's new production reactor-heavy water reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides information about and results from specific tests completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) new production reactor-heavy water reactor (NPR-HWR) program. The paper also provides detailed analytical studies completed by Battelle Columbus Laboratory. All of this information is presented in a demonstration that the primary piping of the NPR-HWR,

A. B. Poole; J. A. Clinard; R. L. Battiste; W. R. Hendrich

1995-01-01

78

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

SciTech Connect

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimate. The overall economics of hydrogen production from this new process was assessed and compared with conventional hydrogen production technologies from coal. Several proton-conducting perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), SCE (Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3}) and SCTm (SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) were successfully tested in a new permeation unit at temperatures between 800 and 1040 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bars. The experimental data confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing hydrogen partial pressure at the feed side. The highest hydrogen flux measured was 1.0 cc/min/cm{sup 2} (STP) for the SCTm membrane at 3 bars and 1040 C. The chemical stability of the perovskite membranes with respect to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S can be improved by doping with Zr, as demonstrated from the TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analysis) tests in this project. A conceptual design, using the measured hydrogen flux data and a modeling approach, for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without a substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions. Flowsheet simulations show that the coal to hydrogen process employing the proposed membrane reactor concept can increase the hydrogen production efficiency by more than 50% compared to the conventional process. Preliminary economic analysis also shows a 30% cost reduction for the proposed membrane reactor process, assuming membrane materials meeting DOE's flux and cost target. Although this study shows that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier, placing the membrane module outside the gasifier in a closely coupled way in terms of temperature and pressure can still offer the same performance advantage. This could also avoid the complicated fluid dynamics and heat transfer issues when the membrane module is installed inside the gasifier. Future work should be focused on improving the permeability and stability for the proton-conducting membranes, testing the membranes with real syngas from a gasifier and scaling up the membrane size.

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-20

79

Extracting Silicon Product From Fluidized-Bed Reactors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Silicon particles continuously removed from bottom of fluidizedbed reactor when grown to large size. In reactor, silane (SiH4) flows through bed of small silicon seed particles at temperature of 650 degrees to 700 degrees C. Silane decomposes into silicon vapor and hydrogen gas, and vapor deposits as solid on seed particles. With withdrawal system, reactor operates continuously.

Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Morrison, A. D.

1986-01-01

80

33 CFR 100.1305 - Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. 100.1305 Section 100.1305 Navigation and Navigable...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. (a) Regulated area. By this regulation,...

2011-07-01

81

33 CFR 100.1305 - Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. 100.1305 Section 100.1305 Navigation and Navigable...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. (a) Regulated area. By this regulation,...

2014-07-01

82

33 CFR 100.1305 - Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. 100.1305 Section 100.1305 Navigation and Navigable...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. (a) Regulated area. By this regulation,...

2010-07-01

83

33 CFR 100.1305 - Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. 100.1305 Section 100.1305 Navigation and Navigable...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. (a) Regulated area. By this regulation,...

2013-07-01

84

33 CFR 100.1305 - Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. 100.1305 Section 100.1305 Navigation and Navigable...Richland, Washington, west coast outboard championship hydro races. (a) Regulated area. By this regulation,...

2012-07-01

85

78 FR 37222 - Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of Settlement AGENCY: Environmental Protection...Superfund Site located in Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina. The settlement addresses cost incurred by the...

2013-06-20

86

Cultivation of Acetobacter xylinum for bacterial cellulose production in a modified airlift reactor.  

PubMed

Acetobacter xylinum for bacterial cellulose production was cultivated in a modified airlift reactor. Better results were obtained from the modified reactor than from a conventional bubble column. After 72 h of cultivation, the final concentration of bacterial cellulose was 7.72 g/l and the productivity was 0.107 g/l per h in the modified airlift reactor. The concentration of bacterial cellulose was about three times higher than that produced in the conventional bubble column. Moreover, the bacterial cellulose produced using the modified reactor formed a unique elliptical pellet (the average diameter was 10 mm), which is different from the fibrous form produced using the stirred-tank reactor. The modified airlift reactor with the suspended bacterial cellulose in pellet form had a higher volumetric oxygen-transfer coefficient and mixing capability than that with bacterial cellulose in fibrous form. The dissolved oxygen in the modified airlift reactor could be maintained above 35% throughout the cultivation. PMID:11916454

Cheng, Hai-Peng; Wang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Jech-Wei; Wu, Wen-Teng

2002-04-01

87

Options for monitoring the US Russian bilateral cutoff agreement on shutdown of plutonium production reactors  

SciTech Connect

Six options are presented for monitoring operating Russian reactors and reprocessing plants under the bilateral cutoff agreement. In order of increasing intrusiveness they are: (A) monitoring of product (oxide or metal) storage only, supplemented with transparency measures at the reactors, (B) monitoring of product storage and reactor operating parameters, to assess reactor plutonium production, (C) monitoring of product storage, reactor operating parameters, and the input accountability tank of the reprocessing plant, (D) monitoring of product storage, the input accountability tank of the reprocessing plant, and application of surveillance to spent fuel, (E) IAEA/NPT-based material accountancy verification without major facility upgrades, and (F) IAEA/NPT-based safeguards, attempting to fulfill IAEA standards for material accountancy accuracy. Each of these options is considered in terms of cost, inspection effort, and effectiveness; however, the paper emphasizes the many uncertainties attendant on such assessments based on our current state of knowledge of these facilities.

Sanborn, J.; Fishbone, L.G.; Lu, Minh-Shih [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stanbro, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Libby, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-07-01

88

Hydrogen Production via a Commerically Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect

It has been known that use of the hydrogen selective membrane as a reactor (MR) could potentially improve the efficiency of the water shift reaction (WGS), one of the least efficient unit operations for production of high purity hydrogen from syngas. However, no membrane reactor technology has been reduced to industrial practice thus far, in particular for a large-scale operation. This implementation and commercialization barrier is attributed to the lack of a commercially viable hydrogen selective membrane with (1) material stability under the application environment and (2) suitability for large-scale operation. Thus, in this project, we have focused on (1) the deposition of the hydrogen selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane we have developed on commercially available membranes as substrate, and (2) the demonstration of the economic viability of the proposed WGS-MR for hydrogen production from coal-based syngas. The commercial stainless steel (SS) porous substrate (i.e., ZrO{sub 2}/SS from Pall Corp.) was evaluated comprehensively as the 1st choice for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation. The CMS membrane synthesis protocol we developed previously for the ceramic substrate was adapted here for the stainless steel substrate. Unfortunately no successful hydrogen selective membranes had been prepared during Yr I of this project. The characterization results indicated two major sources of defect present in the SS substrate, which may have contributed to the poor CMS membrane quality. Near the end of the project period, an improved batch of the SS substrate (as the 2nd generation product) was received from the supplier. Our characterization results confirm that leaking of the crimp boundary no longer exists. However, the thermal stability of the ZrO{sub 2}/SS substrate through the CMS membrane preparation condition must be re-evaluated in the future. In parallel with the SS membrane activity, the preparation of the CMS membranes supported on our commercial ceramic membrane for large-scale applications, such as coal-based power generation/hydrogen production, was also continued. A significant number (i.e., 98) of full-scale membrane tubes have been produced with an on-spec ratio of >76% during the first production trial. In addition, we have verified the functional performance and material stability of this hydrogen selective CMS membrane with a hydrocracker purge gas stream at a refinery pilot testing facility. No change in membrane performance was noted over the >100 hrs of testing conducted in the presence of >30% H{sub 2}S, >5,000 ppm NH{sub 3} (estimated), and heavy hydrocarbons on the order of 25%. The excellent stability of our hydrogen selective CMS membrane opens the door for its use in WGS-MR with a significantly reduced requirement of the feedstock pretreatment.

Paul Liu

2007-06-30

89

The Severe Accident Analysis Program for the Savannah River nuclear production reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe accident phenomena pertinent to the heavy-water-moderated production reactors of the US Department of Energy are being studied in the Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) at the Savannah River Site. The SAAP has sought to define the behavior of the Savannah River reactors in accident scenarios involving significant fuel melting. The goal of the program is to make possible accident

Hyder

2009-01-01

90

Molten-Salt-Cooled Advanced High-Temperature Reactor for Production of Hydrogen and Electricity  

SciTech Connect

The molten-salt-cooled Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept designed to provide very high-temperature (750 to 1000 deg. C) heat to enable efficient low-cost thermochemical production of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) or production of electricity. This paper provides an initial description and technical analysis of its key features. The proposed AHTR uses coated-particle graphite-matrix fuel similar to that used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), such as the General Atomics gas turbine-modular helium reactor. However, unlike the HTGRs, the AHTR uses a molten-salt coolant and a pool configuration, similar to that of the General Electric Super Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (S-PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Because the boiling points for molten fluoride salts are near {approx}1400 deg. C, the reactor can operate at very high temperatures and atmospheric pressure. For thermochemical H{sub 2} production, the heat is delivered at the required near-constant high temperature and low pressure. For electricity production, a multireheat helium Brayton (gas-turbine) cycle, with efficiencies >50%, is used. The low-pressure molten-salt coolant, with its high heat capacity and natural circulation heat transfer capability, creates the potential for robust safety (including fully passive decay-heat removal) and improved economics with passive safety systems that allow higher power densities and scaling to large reactor sizes [>1000 MW(electric)].

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

2003-12-15

91

A reverse flow catalytic membrane reactor for the production of syngas: an experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper experimental results are presented for a demonstration unit of a recently proposed novel integrated reactor concept (Smit et. al., 2005) for the partial oxidation of natural gas to syngas (POM), namely a Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactor (RFCMR). Natural gas has great potential as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels via the Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) process,

J. Smit; G. J. Bekink; Sint Annaland van M; J. A. M. Kuipers

2005-01-01

92

Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

Bonnell, Leo W. (Macungie, PA); Perka, Alan T. (Macungie, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

1988-01-01

93

Simulation of methane production in a laboratory-scale reactor containing hydrate-bearing porous medium  

SciTech Connect

Production of methane, induced by depressurization of hydrate sediment in a reactor, was investigated by numerical simulations using a computational fluid dynamics code TOUGH+/Hydrate. The methane production rates were computed at well-pressure drops of 4.2, 14.7, and 29.5 MPa and at a reactor temperature of 21 0C. The predicted behavior of methane production from the reactor is consistent with field-scale simulations and observations. The production rate increases with pressure drop at the well. Evolution patterns of gas and hydrate distributions are similar to those obtained in field-scale simulations. These preliminary results clearly indicate that numerical simulators can be applied to laboratory-scale reactors to anticipate scenarios observed in field experiments.

Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Zhang, Wu; Warzinski, R.P.

2008-01-01

94

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOEpatents

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19

95

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOEpatents

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19

96

Multiscale hydrodynamic investigation to intensify the biogas production in upflow anaerobic reactors.  

PubMed

Hydrodynamics plays a main role for the performance of an anaerobic reactor involving three phases: wastewater, sludge granules and biogas bubbles. The present work was focused on an original approach to investigate the hydrodynamics at different scales and then to intensify the performance of such complex reactors. The experiments were carried out respectively in a 3D reactor at macroscale, a 2D reactor at mesoscale and a 1D anaerobic reactor at microscale. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), a micro-PIV and a high-speed camera were employed to quantify the liquid flow fields and the relative motion between sludge granules and bubbles. Shear rates exerted on sludge granules were quantified from liquid flow fields. The optimal biogas production is obtained at mean shear rate varying from 28 to 48s(-1), which is controlled by two antagonistic mechanisms. The multiscale approach demonstrates pertinent mechanisms proper to each scale and allows a better understanding of such reactors. PMID:24398185

Jiang, Jiankai; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Jinbai; Poncin, Souhila; Li, Huai Z

2014-03-01

97

Antibody production in packed bed reactors using serum-free and protein-free medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work demonstrates the utility of packed bed reactors for the production of monoclonal antibody. We present data from a continuous process run for the production of over 100 grams of antibody, using serum-free medium. An additional pilot run also demonstrates the potential for continued antibody production under protein-free conditions, using a standard basal medium.

R. Bliem; R. Oakley; K. Matsuoka; R. Varecka; V. Taiariol

1990-01-01

98

Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect

The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2013-07-01

99

Biological production of ethanol from coal. Task 4 report, Continuous reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

The production of ethanol from synthesis gas by the anaerobic bacterium C. ljungdahlii has been demonstrated in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), CSTRs with cell recycle and trickle bed reactors. Various liquid media were utilized in these studies including basal medium, basal media with 1/2 B-vitamins and no yeast extract and a medium specifically designed for the growth of C. ljungdahlii in the CSTR. Ethanol production was successful in each of the three reactor types, although trickle bed operation with C. ljungdahlii was not as good as with the stirred tank reactors. Operation in the CSTR with cell recycle was particularly promising, producing 47 g/L ethanol with only minor concentrations of the by-product acetate.

Not Available

1992-10-01

100

Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.  

PubMed

Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30?L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO? availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO? content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39?g?L?ą ?day?ą for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4?g?mol?photons?ą was obtained for the first 6 days of cultivation. PMID:23616347

Münkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

2013-11-01

101

A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production From Coal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas Technology Institute has developed a novel concept of a membrane reactor closely coupled with a coal gasifier for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes were

Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atrosphenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

2006-01-01

102

Syngas Production from Methane Using AC Gliding Arc Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

AC gliding arc reactor producing syngas (H2+CO) for partial oxidation of methane in an atmospheric gliding arc discharge has been designed and constructed. In this case, no catalysts are used to assist reforming; the plasmas play a role as catalyst and provide the energy for such reactions. The oxygen in the air is used for the partial oxidation of methane.

Guofeng Xu; Xinwei Ding

2011-01-01

103

Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438  

SciTech Connect

Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01

104

Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons  

DOEpatents

A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

2006-08-29

105

Lactic acid production by immobilized Lactobacillus casei in recycle batch reactor: a step towards optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different nutritional and process parameters influencing lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei, adsorbed to Poraver beads in a recycle batch reactor system, were studied in an attempt to set up a system having a long operational lifetime and permitting use of high substrate concentrations for maximal conversion to the product. The presence of lactose, even as a minor fraction of

Appadurai Senthuran; Vasanthe Senthuran; Rajni Hatti-Kaul; Bo Mattiasson

1999-01-01

106

Reactor production and processing of radioisotopes for therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactors continue to play an important role in providing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. Many reactor-produced radioisotopes are ``neutron rich`` and decay by beta-emission and are thus of interest for therapeutic applications. This talk discusses the production and processing of a variety of reactor-produced radioisotopes of current interest, including those produced by the single neutron capture process, double neutron capture and those available from beta-decay of reactorproduced radioisotopes. Generators prepared from reactorproduced radioisotopes are of particular interest since repeated elution inexpensively provides many patient doses. The development of the alumina-based W-188/Re-188 generator system is discussed in detail.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.; Beets, A.L.

1995-02-01

107

Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor).

Liem, Peng Hong; Tran, Hoai Nam; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Arbie, Bakri

2014-09-01

108

Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production  

SciTech Connect

To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

Liem, Peng Hong [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.) Scientific Computational Division, 416 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tran, Hoai Nam [Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Applied Physics, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, Banten (Indonesia); Arbie, Bakri [PT MOTAB Technology, Kedoya Elok Plaza Blok DA 12, Jl. Panjang, Kebun Jeruk, Jakarta Barat (Indonesia)

2014-09-30

109

Correlations for fission product release from N Reactor fuel under high-temperature accident conditions  

SciTech Connect

Empirical correlations were derived for fission product release from metallic uranium alloy 601 N Reactor fuel during postulated accident conditions in which the fuel nears, reaches, or exceeds the melting temperature. The correlations were based on a sparse data base from fuel melted in an inert or steam atmosphere. The empirical correlations are presented for use in subsequent deterministic analyses of N Reactor behavior during hypothetical severe accidents beyond the design basis. 20 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Birney, K.R.; Bechtold, D.B.; McCall, T.B.

1988-03-01

110

Air quality impact analysis in support of the new production reactor environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this air quality impact analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this work was to provide Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the required estimates of ground-level concentrations of five criteria air pollutants at the Hanford Site boundary from each of the stationary sources associated with the new production reactor (NPR) and its supporting facilities. The DOE proposes to provide new production capacity for the primary production of tritium and secondary production of plutonium to support the US nuclear weapons program. Three alternative reactor technologies are being considered by DOE: the light-water reactor, the low-temperature, heavy-water reactor, and the modular high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor. In this study, PNL provided estimates of the impacts of the proposed action on the ground-level concentration of the criteria air pollutants for each of the alternative technologies. The criteria pollutants were sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, total suspended particulates, and particulates with a diameter of less than 10 microns. Ground-level concentrations were estimated for the peak construction phase activities expected to occur in 1997 and for the operational phase activities beginning in the year 2000. Ground-level concentrations of the primary air pollutants were estimated to be well below any of the applicable national or state ambient air quality standards. 12 refs., 19 tabs.

Hadley, D L

1991-04-01

111

MHTGR: New production reactor summary of experience base  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide interest in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) stems from the capability of the system to retain the advanced fuel and thermal performance while providing unparalleled levels of safety. The small power level of the MHTGR and its passive systems give it a margin of safety not attained by other concepts being developed for power generation. This report covers the experience base for the key nuclear system, components, and processes related to the MHTGR-NPR. 9 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-03-01

112

Continuous production of monoacylglycerols from palm olein in packed-bed reactor with immobilized lipase PS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A packed-bed reactor (PBR) system using immobilized lipase PS as biocatalyst was developed for continuous monoacylglycerols (MAG) production. The condition for continuous MAG production using immobilized lipase PS (IM-PS) of 1.5g (550U) in PBR (0.68cm i.d., 25cm long) was optimized. The effect of molar ratio of glycerol to palm olein, water content in glycerol and residence time on MAG production

Aran H-Kittikun; Wiphum Kaewthong; Benjamas Cheirsilp

2008-01-01

113

Modeling and simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under power perturbations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved methodology is presented for simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) under power perturbations. Using time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24Na, 56Mn, 59Fe, 60Co and 99Mo show

Farah Deeba; Anwar M Mirza; Nasir M Mirza

1999-01-01

114

Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.  

PubMed

The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

2013-07-14

115

Performance of coimmobilized yeast and amyloglucosidase in a fluidized bed reactor for fuel ethanol production.  

PubMed

The performance of coimmobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and amyloglucosidase (AG) was evaluated in a fluidized-bed reactor. Soluble starch and yeast extracts were used as feed stocks. Conversion of soluble starch streams to ethanol has potential practical applications in corn dry and wet milling and in developmental lignocellulosic processes. The biocatalyst performed well, and demonstrated no significant loss of activity or physical integrity during 10 wk of continuous operation. The reactor was easily operated and required no pH control. No operational problems were encountered from bacterial contaminants even though the reactor was operated under nonsterile conditions over the entire course of experiments. Productivities ranged between 25 and 44 g ethanol/L/h/. The experiments demonstrated that ethanol inhibition and bed loading had significant effects on reactor performance. PMID:9170248

Sun, M Y; Bienkowski, P R; Davison, B H; Spurrier, M A; Webb, O F

1997-01-01

116

Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

2011-01-01

117

[Characteristics and operation of enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production reactor using support carrier].  

PubMed

A kind of granular activated carbon, whose granular size is no more than 2mm and specific gravity is 1.54g/cm3, was used as the support carrier to allow retention of activated sludge within a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) using molasses wastewater as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. Continuous operation characteristics and operational controlling strategy of the enhanced continuous bio-hydrogen production system were investigated. It was indicated that, support carriers could expand the activity scope of hydrogen production bacteria, make the system fairly stable in response to organic load impact and low pH value (pH <3.8), and maintain high biomass concentration in the reactor at low HRT. The reactor with ethanol-type fermentation achieved an optimal hydrogen production rate of 0.37L/(g x d), while the pH value ranged from 3.8 to 4.4, and the hydrogen content was approximately 40% approximately 57% of biogas. It is effective to inhibit the methanogens by reducing the pH value of the bio-hydrogen production system, consequently accelerate the start-up of the reactor. PMID:16921957

Ren, Nan-qi; Tang, Jing; Gong, Man-li

2006-06-01

118

Treatment of wastewater from red and tropical fruit wine production by zeolite anaerobic fluidized bed reactor.  

PubMed

A study of the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters derived from red (RWWW) and tropical fruit wine (TFWWW) production was carried out in four laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactors with natural zeolite as bacterial support. These reactors operated at mesophilic temperature (35 degrees C). Reactors R1 and R2 contained Chilean natural zeolite, while reactors R3 and R4 used Cuban natural zeolite as microorganism support. In addition, reactors R1 and R3 processed RWWW, while reactors R2 and R4 used TFWWW as substrate. The biomass concentration attached to zeolites in the four reactors studied was found to be in the range of 44-46 g volatile solids (VS)/L after 90 days of operation time. Both types of zeolites can be used indistinctly in the fluidized bed reactors achieving more than 80%-86% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals for organic loading rates (OLR) of up to at least 20 g COD/L d. pH values remained within the optimal range for anaerobic microorganisms for OLR values of up to 20 and 22 g COD/L d for RWWW and TFWWW, respectively. Toxicity and inhibition levels were observed at an OLR of 20 g COD/L d in reactors R1 and R3 while processing RWWW, whereas the aforementioned inhibitory phenomena were not observed at an OLR of 24 g COD/L d in R2 and R4, treating TFWWW as a consequence of the lower phenolic compound content present in this substrate. The volatile fatty acid (VFA) levels were always lower in reactors processing TFWWW (R2 and R4) and these values (< 400 mg/L, as acetic acid) were lower than the suggested limits for digester failure. The specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was twice as high in reactors R2 and R4 than in R1 and R3 after 120 days of operation when all reactors operated at an OLR of 20 g COD/L d. PMID:18576225

Montalvo, S; Guerrero, L; Borja, R; Cortés, I; Sánchez, E; Colmenarejo, M F

2008-06-01

119

Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.  

PubMed

Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system. PMID:25867207

Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

2015-05-15

120

Air quality impact analysis in support of the new production reactor environmental impact statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this air quality impact analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this work was to provide Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the required estimates of ground-level concentrations of five criteria air pollutants at the Hanford Site boundary from each of the stationary sources associated with the new production reactor (NPR)

Hadley

1991-01-01

121

Fast flux fluid fuel reactor: A concept for the next generation of nuclear power production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear energy has not become the preferred method of electrical energy production largely because of economic, safety, and proliferation concerns and challenges posed by nuclear waste disposal. Economies is the most important factor. To reduce the capital costs, the authors propose a compact configuration with a very high power density and correspondingly reduced reactor component sizes. Enhanced efficiency made possible

G. Palmiotti; E. E. Feldman

1999-01-01

122

Enhanced penicillin production by oligosaccharides from batch cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum in stirred-tank reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alginate and galactomannan-derived oligosaccharides enhanced the production of penicillin G when added to stirred tank reactor cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. The addition of oligomannuronate and oligoguluronate blocks increased penicillin G yield by 47% and 49%, respectively. The effect of mannan oligosaccharides was found to be more pronounced with 69% higher yield than the control cultures. The maximum increase in the

Bolatito Ariyo; Candan Tamerler; Christopher Bucke; Tajalli Keshavarz

1998-01-01

123

Hydrogen production from propane in Rh-impregnated metallic microchannel reactors and alumina foams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rh-impregnated alumina foams and metallic microchannel reactors have been studied for production of hydrogen-rich syngas through short contact time catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and oxidative steam reforming (OSR) of propane. Effects of temperature and residence time have been compared for the two catalytic systems. Temperature profiles obtained along the central axis were valuable in understanding the different behaviour of the

Ingrid Aartun; Bozena Silberova; Hilde Venvik; Peter Pfeifer; Oliver Görke; Klaus Schubert; Anders Holmen

2005-01-01

124

Venting of fission products and shielding in thermionic nuclear reactor systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most thermionic reactors are designed to allow the fission gases to escape out of the emitter. A scheme to allow the fission gases to escape is proposed. Because of the low activity of the fission products, this method should pose no radiation hazards.

Salmi, E. W.

1972-01-01

125

Continuous enzymatic production of lactobionic acid using glucose-fructose oxidoreductase in an ultrafiltration membrane reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis catalyzed the oxidation of various aldose sugars to the corresponding aldonic acids. The enzyme was used for the selective and high-yield conversion of lactose to lactobionic acid in batch, fed-batch and continous reaction mode. A productivity of 110 g L d was obtained in an ultrafiltration membrane reactor, operated for 70 h.

M. Satory; M. Fürlinger; D. Haltrich; K. D. Kulbe; F. Pittner; B. Nidetzky

1997-01-01

126

Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

M. J. Russell

2006-06-01

127

Numerical evaluation of the production of radionuclides in a nuclear reactor (Part II)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer program called LAURA has been developed to predict the production rates of any member of a nuclei network undergoing spontaneous decay and\\/or induced neutron transformation in a nuclear reactor. The theoretical bases for the development of LAURA were discussed in Part I. In particular, in Part I, we described how an expression based on the Rubinson (1949) approach

Saed Mirzadeh; Phillip Walsh

1998-01-01

128

Production of specific-structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification in a pilot continuous enzyme bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Production of specific-structured lipids (interesterified lipids with a specific structure) by enzymatic interesterification\\u000a was carried out in a continuous enzyme bed pilot scale reactor. Commercial immobilized lipase (Lipozyme IM) was used and investigations\\u000a of acyl migration, pressure drop, water dependence, production efficiency, and other basic features of the process were performed.\\u000a The extent of acyl migration (defined as a side

X. Xu; S. Balchen; C. E. Hřy; J. Adler-Nissen

1998-01-01

129

Production of {sup 99}Mo using LEU and molybdenum targets in a 1 MW Triga reactor  

SciTech Connect

The production of {sup 99}Mo using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) and natural molybdenum targets in a 1 MW Triga reactor is investigated. The successive linear programming technique is applied to minimize the target loadings for different yield constraints. The irradiation time is related to the kinetics of the growth and decay of {sup 99}Mo. The feasibility of a neutron generated based {sup 99}Mo production system is discussed.

Mo, S.C.

1993-12-31

130

Development of a novel integrated continuous reactor system for biocatalytic production of biodiesel.  

PubMed

A novel integrated immobilized enzyme-reactor system involving a continuous stirred tank reactor with two packed bed reactors in series was developed for the continuous production of biodiesel. The problem of methanol solubility into oil was solved by introducing a stirred tank reactor to dissolve methanol into partially converted oil. This step made the process perfectly continuous without requiring any organic solvent and intermittent methanol addition in the process. The substrate feeding rate of 0.74 mL/min and enzyme loading of 0.75 g per reactor were determined to be optimum for maximum biodiesel yield. The integrated continuous process was stable up to 45 cycles with biodiesel productivity of 137.2 g/L/h, which was approximately 5 times higher than solvent free batch process. In comparison with the processes reported in literature using expensive Novozyme 435 and hazardous organic solvent, the present process is completely green and perfectly continuous with economic and environmental advantages. PMID:24001564

Chattopadhyay, Soham; Sen, Ramkrishna

2013-11-01

131

A molten Salt Am242M Production Reactor for Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of Am242m holds great promise for increasing the efficiency nuclear thermal rocket engines. Because Am242m has the highest fission cross section of any known isotope (1000's of barns), its extremely high reactivity may be used to directly heat a propellant gas with fission fragments. Since this isotope does not occur naturally, it must be bred in special production reactors designed for that purpose. The primary advantage to using molten salt reactors for breeding Am242m is that the reactors can be reprocessed continually yielding a constant rate of production of the isotope. Once built and initially fueled, the reactor will continually breed the additional fuel it needs to remain critical. The only feedstock required is a salt of U238. No enriched fuel is required during normal operation and all fissile material, except the Am242m, is maintained in a closed loop. For a reactor operating at 200 MW several kilograms of Am242m may be bred each year.

Emrich, William

2005-01-01

132

Routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site (Hanford), Richland, Washington. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents an reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Washington regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted May 2--13, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

Not Available

1994-05-01

133

Numerical Simulation of Titanium Production in the Plasma Quench Reactor  

E-print Network

:sis/Processing of Lightweight Metallic Materials Edited by F. H. Fr0e5. C Suryanarayana. and C. M. Ward-CIOf,C The Minerab to their coarse-grain counterparts. The unique properties of nanophase materials may lead to new and unusual and teeth replacements as well as other light weight metal and advanced material products. The small uniform

134

Fission-product data analysis from actinide samples exposed in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Since 1979 a cooperative agreement has been in effect between the United States and the United Kingdom to investigate the irradiation of various actinide species placed in the core of the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). The irradiated species were isotopes of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. A set of actinide samples (mg quantities) was exposed to about 490 effective full power days (EFPD) of reactor operations. The fission-product results are reported here. The actinide results will be report elsewhere.

Murphy, B.D.; Dickens, J.K.; Walker, R.L.; Newton, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31

135

USE OF THE MODULAR HELIUM REACTOR FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

OAK-B135 A significant ''Hydrogen Economy'' is predicted that will reduce our dependence on petroleum imports and reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels, but contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels. The author has recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy

K. R. Schultz

2003-01-01

136

Production of Biodiesel at Kinetic Limit Achieved in a Centrifugal Reactor/Separator  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of the transesterification of soybean oil has been investigated in a centrifugal reactor at temperatures from 45 to 80 C and pressures up to 2.6 bar using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The yields of product methyl esters were quantified using IR, proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H1NMR), and viscosity measurements and were found to achieve 90% of the yield in 2 min; however, to meet ASTM specifications with one pass through the reactor, a 15 min residence time was needed. Performance was improved by sequential reactions, allowing separation of by-product glycerine and injection of additional small aliquots of methanol. The kinetics was modeled using a three-step mechanism of reversible reactions, which was used to predict performance at commercial scale. The mechanism correctly predicted the exponential decline in reaction rate as the concentration of the products allowed significant reverse reactions to occur.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Jennings, Hal L [ORNL; Pahmer Boitrago, Amy M [ORNL; Terpstra, Sarah M [ORNL

2010-01-01

137

Continuous fermentative hydrogen production using a two-phase reactor system with recycle.  

PubMed

The effects of effluent recycle were examined in a two-phase anaerobic system where the first phase was operated for fermentative hydrogen production and the second for methanogenesis. The hydrogen reactor was operated as a chemostat at 35 degrees C and pH 5.5 with a 10 h hydraulic retention time, and the methane reactor was operated as an up-flow reactor at 28 degrees C and pH between 6.9 and 7.2. Two recycle ratios were examined: 0 and 0.98. Effluent recycle reduced the required alkalinity for pH control by approximately 40%. The H2 productivity metric, with a basis in electrons and incorporating both gaseous and dissolved H2, was developed as a more fundamental reporting method than the molar H2 yield. Without recycle, the H2 productivity was 0.115 g of H2 COD/g of feed COD, but decreased to 0.015 q of H2 COD/g of feed COD with recycle (COD = chemical oxygen demand). Mass balances indicated the lower H2 productivity during recycle was due to electrons being partitioned to methane and less-oxidized soluble constituents such as propionic acid, ethanol, and butanol. The results indicated that achieving high H2 productivity with nonsterile wastewaters will be challenging and membrane filtration of the recycle liquid may be required to exclude the return of hydrogen-consuming organisms. PMID:15952391

Kraemer, Jeremy T; Bagley, David M

2005-05-15

138

Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options for disposal of fission gas wastes. In each option, lithostatic pressure, a kilometer or more underground, eliminates the pressure driving force for noble gas release and dissolves any untrapped gas in deep groundwater or into incorporated solid waste forms. The options, challenges, and potential for these methods to dispose of gaseous fission products are described. With this research, we hope to help both MSRs and other advanced reactors come one step closer to commercialization. (authors)

Messenger, S. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 54-1717, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 24-207, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Massie, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., NW12-230, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-07-01

139

Heat losses in a CVD reactor for polysilicon production: Comprehensive model and experimental validation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work addresses heat losses in a CVD reactor for polysilicon production. Contributions to the energy consumption of the so-called Siemens process are evaluated, and a comprehensive model for heat loss is presented. A previously-developed model for radiative heat loss is combined with conductive heat loss theory and a new model for convective heat loss. Theoretical calculations are developed and theoretical energy consumption of the polysilicon deposition process is obtained. The model is validated by comparison with experimental results obtained using a laboratory-scale CVD reactor. Finally, the model is used to calculate heat consumption in a 36-rod industrial reactor; the energy consumption due to convective heat loss per kilogram of polysilicon produced is calculated to be 22-30 kWh/kg along a deposition process.

Ramos, A.; Rodríguez, A.; del Cańizo, C.; Valdehita, J.; Zamorano, J. C.; Luque, A.

2014-09-01

140

Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-VI data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(?, ?) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

Wang, Xin-Hua; Guo, Hai-Ping; Mou, Yun-Feng; Zheng, Pu; Liu, Rong; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Jian

2013-05-01

141

Production of mouse interleukin-12 is greater in tobacco hairy roots grown in a mist reactor than in an airlift reactor.  

PubMed

We compared the growth and productivity of a tobacco line of hairy roots that produces murine interleukin 12 (mIL-12) grown in three different culture systems: shake flasks, an airlift reactor, and a scalable mist reactor. Of the total mIL-12 produced by cultures grown in shake flasks ( approximately 434.8 microg L(-1)), almost 21% was recovered from the medium. In contrast to roots harvested from shake flasks and the mist reactor, roots were not uniformly distributed in the airlift reactor. Roots formed a dense ring around the wall of the reactor and surrounding the central rising column of fine aeration bubbles. Root quality was also better in both the shake flasks and mist reactor than in the airlift reactor. There were more pockets of dark roots in the airlift reactor suggesting some of the roots were nutrient starved. Although the best root growth (7 g DW L(-1)) was in the shake flasks, both reactors produced about the same, but less dry mass, nearly 5 g DW L(-1). Total mIL-12 concentration was highest in the mist reactor at 5.3 microg g(-1) FW, but productivity, 31 microg g(-1) FW day(-1) was highest in shake flasks. Roots grown in the mist reactor produced about 49.5% more mIL-12 than roots grown in the airlift reactor. Protease activity in the media increased steadily during culture of the roots in all three systems. The comparisons of protease activity, protein and mIL-12 levels done in the shake flask system suggest that the increase in proteases associated with progression into stationary phase is most detrimental to mIL-12 concentration. This is the first description of the design and operation of a scalable version of a mist bioreactor that uses a plastic bag. This also the first report of reasonable production levels of functional mIL-12, or any protein, produced by hairy roots grown in a mist reactor. Results will prove useful for further optimization and scale-up studies of plant-produced therapeutic proteins. PMID:18988263

Liu, Chunzhao; Towler, Melissa J; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

2009-03-01

142

Generalized kinetics of ethanol fermentation and ethanol production in a Ca-alginate plate reactor  

SciTech Connect

An immobilized cell reactor system was developed for continuous ethanol fermentation of a feedstock containing small particulate matter. Polyester fiber cloth coated with a mixture of Ca-alginate and yeast cells was used for immobilized cell support. The cloth plates were inserted vertically in the reactor to prevent blocking the flow path of particulates in the feedstock. Immobilized cell density in the Ca-alginate gel coated polyester fabric was investigated, and ethanol productivities were studied for different fermentation conditions. Average immobilized cell loading of 0.006 g/cm{sup 2} was obtained using 1% alginate solution. At 0.456 h{sup {minus}1} dilution rate, ethanol productivity was 8.37 g/lh using a plate surface area to reactor volume ratio of 1.471 cm{sup 2} (10 plates). Using data for ethanol fermentation reported in the literature, a kinetic model for ethanol fermentation was developed. The model fit the literature data better than other models which have been suggested. Using the new mathematical model, computer simulations were performed for fermentations using various feed glucose concentrations and various dilution rates with 10 plates in the reactor. The simulation followed experimental data during both steady and transient states. The characteristics of batch fermentation in the new plate reactor were investigated using both a synthetic glucose medium and the liquid fraction of screened sorghum mashes having different particle size distributions. As the particle size of the feedstock increased, the ethanol fermentation rate decreased. Using the liquid fraction screened through 0.5 mm openings, continuous fermentation was carried out. The new immobilized plate reactor successfully fermented this feedstock.

Sung, M.

1989-01-01

143

Biodiesel production from palm oil using combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor.  

PubMed

This paper investigates the production of biodiesel from palm oil using a combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor (MS-US). The incorporation of mechanical stirring into the ultrasonic reactor explored the further improvement the transesterification of palm oil. Initial reaction rate values were 54.1, 142.9 and 164.2 mmol/L min for the mechanical-stirred (MS), ultrasonic (US) and MS-US reactors, respectively. Suitable methanol to oil molar ratio and the catalyst loading values were found to be 6 and 1 of oil, respectively. The effect of ultrasonic operating parameters; i.e. frequency, location, and number of transducer, has been investigated. Based on the conversion yield at the reactor outlet after 1 h, the number of transducers showed a relevant role in the reaction rate. Frequency and transducer location would appear to have no significant effect. The properties of the obtained biodiesel (density, viscosity, pour point, and flash point) satisfy the ASTM standard. The combined MS-US reactors improved the reaction rate affording the methyl esters in higher yield. PMID:24418101

Choedkiatsakul, I; Ngaosuwan, K; Cravotto, G; Assabumrungrat, S

2014-07-01

144

Immobilization of Trametes versicolor cultures for improving laccase production in bubble column reactor intensified by sonication.  

PubMed

The mycelia of Trametes versicolor immobilized in alginate beads provided higher laccase production than that in pelleted form. An efficient ultrasonic treatment enhanced laccase production from the immobilized T. versicolor cultures. The optimized treatment process consisted of exposing 36-h-old bead cultures to 7-min ultrasonic treatments twice with a 12-h interval using a fixed ultrasonic power and frequency (120 W, 40 kHz). Using the intensification strategy with sonication, laccase production increased by more than 2.1-fold greater than the untreated control in both flasks and bubble column reactors. The enhancement of laccase production by ultrasonic treatment is related to the improved mass transfer of nutrients and product between the liquid medium and the gel matrix. These results provide a basis for the large-scale and highly-efficient production of laccase using sonobioreactors. PMID:23188414

Wang, Feng; Guo, Chen; Liu, Chun-Zhao

2013-01-01

145

Ethanol production in a multimembrane bioreactor: Cell and reactor modeling and continuous fermentation  

SciTech Connect

A novel bioreactor, in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic membranes segregate cells, nutrient, and solvent, has been previously described. The model system studied has been ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae with tributyl phosphate as the extractive solvent. A structured, nonsegregated model of model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar in philosophy to the E. coli models extensively developed at Cornell, has been constructed. The model establishes a basis for a realistic model of multi-membrane bioreactor fermentations as well as lays the groundwork for an increasingly detailed description of the cell. A model of a pressure cycled reactor has been constructed around the model of the cells. Tested against actual reactor fermentations, the model's predictions were in quantitative agreement. The model was used to computationally survey the relative utility of variations in system design and operating strategy, suggesting that increased mixing between the cell and nutrient layers and the use of a solvent with a distribution coefficient much higher than that of TBP would significantly improve productivity. The reactor has been operated continuously without failure for over 3000 hours, demonstrating that it can be run for the periods dictated by process economics. Two natural substrates were fermented in the reactor. Corn starch hydrolysate appears to be a highly suitable substrate, blackstrap molasses does not. Zymomonas mobilis was a less effective catalyst than Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Steinmeyer, D.E.

1990-01-01

146

Bacterial cellulose production by Acetobacter xylinum in a 50-L internal-loop airlift reactor.  

PubMed

Bacterial cellulose (BC) production was realized in a batch cultivation of Acetobacter xylinum subsp. sucrofermentans BPR2001 in a 50-L internal-loop airlift reactor. When the bacterium was cultivated with air supply, 3.8 g/L of BC was produced after 67 hours. When oxygen-enriched gas was supplied, the concentration of BC was doubled and the production rate of BC was 0.116 g/L. h, which was two times higher than that of air-supplied culture and comparable to that in a mechanically agitated stirred-tank fermentor. Bacterial cellulose produced by the airlift reactor formed a unique ellipse pellet (BC pellet), different from the fibrous form which was produced in an agitated stirred-tank fermentor. The BC-pellet suspension was demonstrated to have a higher volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient than the fibrous BC suspension in a 50-L internal-loop airlift reactor. The mixing time of BC-pellet suspension in the airlift reactor was also shorter than that in water. PMID:10745203

Chao, Y; Ishida, T; Sugano, Y; Shoda, M

2000-05-01

147

Production of l-DOPA using Cu-alginate gel immobilized tyrosinase in a batch and packed bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, production of l-DOPA (l-3, 4-dihydroxy phenylalanine) was investigated by using tyrosinase enzyme in batch and packed bed reactors. Tyrosinase has been immobilized with method of entrapment in copper-alginate gels. l-DOPA concentration obtained from batch reactor for free and immobilized enzyme was 9.5 and 4.5mg\\/L, respectively. l-DOPA concentration was obtained as 1.2mg\\/L in the packed bed reactor. When

Selma Ates; Esra Cortenlioglu; Emine Bayraktar; Ulku Mehmetoglu

2007-01-01

148

Fission products from the damaged Fukushima reactor observed in Hungary.  

PubMed

Fission products, especially (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (NPP) were detected in many places worldwide shortly after the accident caused by natural disaster. To observe the spatial and temporal variation of these isotopes in Hungary, aerosol samples were collected at five locations from late March to early May 2011: Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI, Debrecen, East Hungary), Paks NPP (Paks, South-Central Hungary) as well as at the vicinity of Aggtelek (Northeast Hungary), Tapolca (West Hungary) and Bátaapáti (Southwest Hungary) settlements. In addition to the aerosol samples, dry/wet fallout samples were collected at ATOMKI, and airborne elemental iodine and organic iodide samples were collected at Paks NPP. The peak in the activity concentration of airborne (131)I was observed around 30 March (1-3 mBq m(-3) both in aerosol samples and gaseous iodine traps) with a slow decline afterwards. Aerosol samples of several hundred cubic metres of air showed (134)Cs and (137)Cs in detectable amounts along with (131)I. The decay-corrected inventory of (131)I fallout at ATOMKI was 2.1±0.1 Bq m(-2) at maximum in the observation period. Dose-rate contribution calculations show that the radiological impact of this event at Hungarian locations was of no considerable concern. PMID:24437973

Bihari, Árpád; Dezs?, Zoltán; Bujtás, Tibor; Manga, László; Lencsés, András; Dombóvári, Péter; Csige, István; Ranga, Tibor; Mogyorósi, Magdolna; Veres, Mihály

2014-01-01

149

Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources  

SciTech Connect

High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

2009-09-01

150

A High-Temperature Reducing Jet Reactor for Flame-Based Metal Nanoparticle Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new flame-based aerosol reactor configuration that combines thermal decomposition and hydrogen reduction to produce metal nanoparticles. This approach uses a fuel-rich hydrogen flame as a source of low-cost energy to initiate particle synthesis, but separates the flame chemistry from the particle formation chemistry. Hot combustion products pass through a nozzle to produce a high-temperature reducing jet. A

William J. Scharmach; Raymond D. Buchner; Vasilis Papavassiliou; Perry Pacouloute; Mark T. Swihart

2010-01-01

151

Neutronics analysis of water-cooled energy production blanket for a fusion–fission hybrid reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neutronics calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of blanket energy multiplication factor (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in a fusion–fission hybrid reactor for energy production named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-EM (Energy Multiplier) blanket. The most significant and main goal of the FDS-EM blanket is to achieve the energy gain of about 1GWe with self-sustaining tritium, i.e. the M

Jieqiong Jiang; Minghuang Wang; Zhong Chen; Yuefeng Qiu; Jinchao Liu; Yunqing Bai; Hongli Chen; Yanglin Hu

2010-01-01

152

Production of ultrafine calcite particles by coccolithophorid algae grown in a biosolar reactor supplied with sunlight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultrafine calcite particle production by coccolithophorid algae using a biosolar reactor system was carried out. Solar light\\u000a was collected by Fresnel lenses and transmitted to a bundle of light diffusing optical fibers (LDOFs) that distributed light\\u000a through the algal culture. The irradiance spectrum of light emitted from the LDOF surface was the same as that of solar light.Emiliania huxleyi was

Hiroyuki Takano; Hiroyuki Furu-une; J. Grant Burgess; Eichi Manabe; Morio Hirano; Megumi Okazaki; Tadashi Matsunaga

1993-01-01

153

Continuous enzymatic transesterification of high oleic sunflower oil in a packed bed reactor: influence of the glycerol production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transesterification of high oleic sunflower oil with butanol by the immobilized Lipozyme® in n-hexane was carried out in a continuous packed bed reactor, oleic acid, butyl ester, and glycerol being formed as the main products. It was found that glycerol, insoluble in n-hexane, remained in the reactor adsorbed onto the enzymatic support, leading to a drastic decrease in enzymatic

Valérie Dossat; Didier Combes; Alain Marty

1999-01-01

154

POTENTIAL OF THORIUM MOLTEN SALT REACTORS : DETAILED CALCULATIONS AND CONCEPT EVOLUTIONS IN VIEW OF A LARGE NUCLEAR ENERGY PRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss here the concept of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor dedicated to future nuclear energy production. The fuel of such reactors being liquid, it can be easily reprocessed to overcome neutronic limits. In the late sixties, the MSBR project showed that breeding is possible with thorium in a thermal spectrum, provided that an efficient pyrochemical reprocessing is added. With tools

A. NUTTIN; D. HEUER; A. BILLEBAUD; R. BRISSOT; S. DAVID

155

Production of polygalacturonases by Aspergillus section Nigri strains in a fixed bed reactor.  

PubMed

Polygalacturonases (PG) are pectinolytic enzymes that have technological, functional and biological applications in food processing, fruit ripening and plant-fungus interactions, respectively. In the present, a microtitre plate methodology was used for rapid screening of 61 isolates of fungi from Aspergillus section Nigri to assess production of endo- and exo-PG. Studies of scale-up were carried out in a fixed bed reactor operated under different parameters using the best producer strain immobilised in orange peels. Four experiments were conducted under the following conditions: the immobilised cells without aeration; immobilised cells with aeration; immobilised cells with aeration and added pectin; and free cells with aeration. The fermentation was performed for 168 h with removal of sample every 24 h. Aspergillus niger strain URM 5162 showed the highest PG production. The results obtained indicated that the maximum endo- and exo-PG activities (1.18 U ? mL-1 and 4.11 U ? mL-1, respectively) were obtained when the reactor was operating without aeration. The microtitre plate method is a simple way to screen fungal isolates for PG activity detection. The fixed bed reactor with orange peel support and using A. niger URM 5162 is a promising process for PG production at the industrial level. PMID:23358324

Maciel, Marília; Ottoni, Cristiane; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Moreira, Keila; Souza-Motta, Cristina

2013-01-01

156

Environmental Assessment: Waste Tank Safety Program, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action in the near-term, to accelerate resolution of waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and reduce the risks associated with operations and management of the waste tanks. The DOE has conducted nuclear waste management operations at the Hanford Site for nearly 50 years. Operations have included storage of high-level nuclear waste in 177 underground storage tanks (UST), both in single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank configurations. Many of the tanks, and the equipment needed to operate them, are deteriorated. Sixty-seven SSTs are presumed to have leaked a total approximately 3,800,000 liters (1 million gallons) of radioactive waste to the soil. Safety issues associated with the waste have been identified, and include (1) flammable gas generation and episodic release; (2) ferrocyanide-containing wastes; (3) a floating organic solvent layer in Tank 241-C-103; (4) nuclear criticality; (5) toxic vapors; (6) infrastructure upgrades; and (7) interim stabilization of SSTs. Initial actions have been taken in all of these areas; however, much work remains before a full understanding of the tank waste behavior is achieved. The DOE needs to accelerate the resolution of tank safety concerns to reduce the risk of an unanticipated radioactive or chemical release to the environment, while continuing to manage the wastes safely.

Not Available

1994-02-01

157

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01

158

A review of existing gas-cooled reactor circulators with application of the lessons learned to the new production reactor circulators  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of the lessons learned during the design, testing, and operation of gas-cooled reactor coolant circulators. The intent of this study is to identify failure modes and problem areas of the existing circulators so this information can be incorporated into the design of the circulators for the New Production Reactor (NPR)-Modular High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The information for this study was obtained primarily from open literature and includes data on high-pressure, high-temperature helium test loop circulators as well as the existing gas cooled reactors worldwide. This investigation indicates that trouble free circulator performance can only be expected when the design program includes a comprehensive prototypical test program, with the results of this test program factored into the final circulator design. 43 refs., 7 tabs.

White, L.S.

1990-07-01

159

Hydrogen production from rice winery wastewater in an upflow anaerobic reactor by using mixed anaerobic cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous production of hydrogen from the anaerobic acidogenesis of a high-strength rice winery wastewater by a mixed bacterial flora was demonstrated. The experiment was conducted in a 3.0-l upflow reactor to investigate individual effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) (2–24h), chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in wastewater (14–36g COD\\/l), pH (4.5–6.0) and temperature (20–55°C) on bio-hydrogen production from the wastewater.

Hanqing Yu; Zhenhu Zhu; Wenrong Hu; Haisheng Zhang

2002-01-01

160

A strategy for intensive production of molybdenum-99 isotopes for nuclear medicine using CANDU reactors.  

PubMed

Technetium-99m is an important medical isotope utilized worldwide in nuclear medicine and is produced from the decay of its parent isotope, molybdenum-99. The online fueling capability and compact fuel of the CANDU(®)(1) reactor allows for the potential production of large quantities of (99)Mo. This paper proposes (99)Mo production strategies using modified target fuel bundles loaded into CANDU fuel channels. Using a small group of channels a yield of 89-113% of the weekly world demand for (99)Mo can be obtained. PMID:21816619

Morreale, A C; Novog, D R; Luxat, J C

2012-01-01

161

Production of Gadolinium-loaded Liquid Scintillator for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment  

E-print Network

We report on the production and characterization of liquid scintillators for the detection of electron antineutrinos by the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. One hundred eighty-five tons of gadolinium-loaded (0.1% by mass) liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) and two hundred tons of unloaded liquid scintillator (LS) were successfully produced from a linear-alkylbenzene (LAB) solvent in six months. The scintillator properties, the production and purification systems, and the quality assurance and control (QA/QC) procedures are described.

Beriguete, Wanda; Ding, Yayun; Hans, Sunej; Heeger, Karsten M; Hu, Liangming; Huang, Aizhong; Luk, Kam-Biu; Nemchenok, Igor; Qi, Ming; Rosero, Richard; Sun, Hansheng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Yifang; Wen, Liangjian; Yang, Yi; Yeh, Minfang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Li

2014-01-01

162

Production of Gadolinium-loaded Liquid Scintillator for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment  

E-print Network

We report on the production and characterization of liquid scintillators for the detection of electron antineutrinos by the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. One hundred eighty-five tons of gadolinium-loaded (0.1% by mass) liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) and two hundred tons of unloaded liquid scintillator (LS) were successfully produced from a linear-alkylbenzene (LAB) solvent in six months. The scintillator properties, the production and purification systems, and the quality assurance and control (QA/QC) procedures are described.

Wanda Beriguete; Jun Cao; Yayun Ding; Sunej Hans; Karsten M. Heeger; Liangming Hu; Aizhong Huang; Kam-Biu Luk; Igor Nemchenok; Ming Qi; Richard Rosero; Hansheng Sun; Ruiguang Wang; Yifang Wang; Liangjian Wen; Yi Yang; Minfang Yeh; Zhiyong Zhang; Li Zhou

2014-02-27

163

Determination of Optimal Process Flowrates and Reactor Design for Autothermal Hydrogen Production in a Heat-Integrated Ceramic Microchannel Network  

E-print Network

The present work aimed at designing a thermally efficient microreactor system coupling methanol steam reforming with methanol combustion for autothermal hydrogen production. A preliminary study was performed by analyzing three prototype reactor...

Damodharan, Shalini

2012-07-16

164

Production of volatile fatty acids from wastewater screenings using a leach-bed reactor.  

PubMed

Screenings recovered from the inlet works of wastewater treatment plants were digested without pre-treatment or dilution using a lab-scale, leach-bed reactor. Variations in recirculation ratio of the leachate of 4 and 8 l/lreactor/day and pH values of 5 and 6 were evaluated in order to determine the optimal operating conditions for maximum total volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. By increasing the recirculation ratio of the leachate from 4 to 8 l/lreactor/day it was possible to increase VFA production (11%) and soluble COD (17%) and thus generate up to 264 g VFA/kg-dry screenings. These VFA were predominantly acetic acid with some propionic and butyric acid. The optimum pH for VFA production was 6.0, when the methanogenic phase was inhibited. Below pH 5.0, acid-producing fermentation was inhibited and some alcohols were produced. Ammonia release during the hydrolysis of screenings provided adequate alkalinity; consequently, a digestion process without pH adjustment could be recommended. The leach-bed reactor was able to achieve rapid rates of screenings degradation with the production of valuable end-products that will reduce the carbon footprint associated with current screenings disposal techniques. PMID:24862954

Cadavid-Rodríguez, Luz Stella; Horan, Nigel J

2014-09-01

165

Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications  

SciTech Connect

Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

Kern, K.; Becker, M.; Broeders, C. [Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, KIT Campus Nord, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01

166

Production of L(+)Lactic Acid Using Acid-Adapted Precultures of Rhizopus arrhizus in a Stirred Tank Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cultivations of filamentous fungi in stirred tank reactors (STRs) to produce metabolites are often limited by insufficient\\u000a mixing and mass transfer because of the formation of mycelial clumps inside the reactors. This study developed an acid-adapted\\u000a preculture approach to control the morphology of filamentous Rhizopus arrhizus in a STR, consequently to enhance the production yield and productivity of L(+)-lactic acid

Zhan Ying Zhang; Bo Jin; Joan M. Kelly

2008-01-01

167

Simulation of methane conversion to syngas in a membrane reactor: Part I A model including product oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-dimensional dense membrane reactor (DMR) model has been developed to simulate the partial oxidation of methane to syngas. A combustion–reforming mechanism was adopted and the oxidation of reforming products, i.e. H2 and CO, was considered. The performance of the DMR and a conventional fixed-bed reactor was compared and discussed. The results show that the incorporation of the product oxidation

Zebao Rui; Ke Zhang; Yongdan Li; Y. S. Lina

2008-01-01

168

Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

2012-01-01

169

Butanol production by bioconversion of cheese whey in a continuous packed bed reactor.  

PubMed

Butanol production by Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 fermentation was investigated. Unsupplemented cheese whey was adopted as renewable feedstock. The conversion was successfully carried out in a biofilm packed bed reactor (PBR) for more than 3 months. The PBR was a 4 cm ID, 16 cm high glass tube with a 8 cm bed of 3mm Tygon rings, as carriers. It was operated at the dilution rate between 0.4h(-1) and 0.94 h(-1). The cheese whey conversion process was characterized in terms of metabolites production (butanol included), lactose conversion and biofilm mass. Under optimized conditions, the performances were: butanol productivity 2.66 g/Lh, butanol concentration 4.93 g/L, butanol yield 0.26 g/g, butanol selectivity of the overall solvents production 82 wt%. PMID:23619138

Raganati, F; Olivieri, G; Procentese, A; Russo, M E; Salatino, P; Marzocchella, A

2013-06-01

170

Inulinase production in a packed bed reactor by solid state fermentation.  

PubMed

In this work, production of inulinase was carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR) under solid state fermentation. Kluyveromyces marxianus var. marxianus was used to produce the inulinase using pressmud as substrate. The parameters like air flow rate, packing density and particle size were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximize the inulinase production. The optimum conditions for the maximum inulinase production were: air flow rate - 0.82 L/min, packing density - 40 g/L and particle size - 0.0044 mm (mesh - 14/20). At these optimized conditions, the production of inulinase was found to be 300.5 unit/gram of dry substrate (U/gds). PMID:23688470

Dilipkumar, M; Rajamohan, N; Rajasimman, M

2013-07-01

171

Semicontinuous Production of Lactic Acid From Cheese Whey Using Integrated Membrane Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semicontinuous production of lactic acid from cheese whey using free cells of Bifidobacterium longum with and without nanofiltration was studied. For the semicontinuous fermentation without membrane separation, the lactic acid productivity of the second and third runs is much lower than the first run. The semicontinuous fermentation with nanoseparation was run semicontinuously for 72 h with lactic acid to be harvested every 24 h using a nanofiltration membrane unit. The cells and unutilized lactose were kept in the reactor and mixed with newly added cheese whey in the subsequent runs. Slight increase in the lactic acid productivity was observed in the second and third runs during the semicontinuous fermentation with nanofiltration. It can be concluded that nanoseparation could improve the lactic acid productivity of the semicontinuous fermentation process.

Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Coulibaly, Sekou; Mims, Michele M.

172

Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials  

SciTech Connect

INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The projected size of the INL 300 kW pilot model reactor would be about 15% that of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. Including the safety net factor the projected INL pilot reactor size would be 25-30% of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma pilot reactor. Due to the modularity of the INL plasma reactor and the energy cascading effect from the upstream plasma to the downstream plasma the energy utilization is more efficient in material processing. It is envisioning that the material through put range for the INL pilot reactor would be comparable to the PPG 300 kW pilot reactor but the energy consumption would be lower. The INL hybrid plasma technology is rather close to being optimized for scaling to a pilot system. More near term development work is still needed to complete the process optimization before pilot scaling.

Peter C. Kong

2011-12-01

173

Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis  

PubMed Central

Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS) were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L) that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L). The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93%) and similar crystal size (5.2 nm) to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to the control BC. The results clearly demonstrated that implementation of PCS within agitated fermentation enhanced BC production and improved its mechanical properties and thermal stability. PMID:19630969

Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Catchmark, Jeff M; Demirci, Ali

2009-01-01

174

Continuous production of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals in a flow reactor.  

PubMed

A procedure for the continuous production of Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) nanoparticles with controlled composition is presented. CZTS nanoparticles were prepared through the reaction of the metals' amino complexes with elemental sulfur in a continuous-flow reactor at moderate temperatures (300-330 °C). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed the nanocrystals to have a crystallographic structure compatible with that of the kesterite. Chemical characterization of the materials showed the presence of the four elements in each individual nanocrystal. Composition control was achieved by adjusting the solution flow rate through the reactor and the proper choice of the nominal precursor concentration within the flowing solution. Single-particle analysis revealed a composition distribution within each sample, which was optimized at the highest synthesis temperatures used. PMID:22211575

Shavel, Alexey; Cadavid, Doris; Ibáńez, Maria; Carrete, Alex; Cabot, Andreu

2012-01-25

175

Transmutation of high-level fission products and actinides in a laser-driven fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Incineration of [sup 90]Sr and [sup 137]Cs b thermal or fast neutrons is a very difficult problem. A 14-MeV neutron source based on intertial confinement fusion is a more appropriate choice. For the first time, the contribution of the (n,2n) reaction to incineration is revealed. The energy and nuclei balance for a system of several nuclear power plants and a fusion reactor for transmutation is analyzed. If the fusion reactor supports a sufficient number of nuclear power plants, it need not produce energy or tritium. Target and blanket material problems are considered. This paper reports that laser fusion incinerator has the best prospects because of its fast neutron spectrum and high driver efficiency by target gain product.

Basov, N.; Rozanov, V.B. (P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., Leninsky Pr., 63, 117924 Moscow (USSR)); Belousov, N.I.; Grishunin, P.A.; Kharitonov, V.V. (Moscow Engineering Physics Inst., Kashirskoye Chausse, 31, 115409 Moscow (USSR)); Subbotin, V.I. (Obninsk Physics and Energy Inst., Obninsk (USSR))

1992-11-01

176

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-09-30

177

Microbial community composition and reactor performance during hydrogen production in a UASB reactor fed with raw cheese whey inoculated with compost.  

PubMed

This study investigated the microbial community developed in a UASB reactor for hydrogen production and correlated it to reactor performance. The reactor was inoculated with kitchen waste compost and fed with raw cheese whey at two organic loading rates, 20 gCOD/Ld and 30 gCOD/Ld. Hydrogen production was very variable, using an OLR of 30 gCOD/Ld averaged 1.0 LH(2)/Ld with no methane produced under these conditions. The hydrogen yield was also very variable and far from the theoretical. This low yield could be explained by selection of a mixed fermentative population with presence of hydrogen producing organisms (Clostridium, Ruminococcus and Enterobacter) and other non-hydrogen producing fermenters (Lactobacillus, Dialister and Prevotella). The molecular analysis of the raw cheese whey used for feeding revealed the presence of three predominant organisms that are affiliated with the genera Buttiauxella (a low-yield hydrogen producer) and Streptococcus (a lactic acid-producing fermenter). Although these organisms did not persist in the reactor, the continuous addition of these fermenters could decrease the reactor's hydrogen yield. PMID:22156132

Castelló, E; Perna, V; Wenzel, J; Borzacconi, L; Etchebehere, C

2011-01-01

178

Assessing optimal fermentation type for bio-hydrogen production in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors.  

PubMed

In this study, the optimal fermentation type and the operating conditions of anaerobic process in continuous-flow acidogenic reactors was investigated for the maximization of bio-hydrogen production using mixed cultures. Butyric acid type fermentation occurred at pH>6, propionic acid type fermentation occurred at pH about 5.5 with E(h) (redox potential) >-278mV, and ethanol-type fermentation occurred at pH<4.5. The representative strains of these fermentations were Clostridium sp., Propionibacterium sp. and Bacteriodes sp., respectively. Ethanol fermentation was optimal type by comparing the operating stabilities and hydrogen production capacities between the fermentation types, which remained stable when the organic loading rate (OLR) reached the highest OLR at 86.1kgCOD/m(3)d. The maximum hydrogen production reached up to 14.99L/d. PMID:16935495

Ren, N Q; Chua, H; Chan, S Y; Tsang, Y F; Wang, Y J; Sin, N

2007-07-01

179

Analysis of Reference Design for Nuclear-Assisted Hydrogen Production at 750°C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

SciTech Connect

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This report describes the resulting new INL reference design coupled to two alternative HTGR power conversion systems, a Steam Rankine Cycle and a Combined Cycle (a Helium Brayton Cycle with a Steam Rankine Bottoming Cycle). Results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions when coupled to the two different power cycles are also presented. A 600 MWt high temperature gas reactor coupled with a Rankine steam power cycle at a thermal efficiency of 44.4% can produce 1.85 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.6 kg/s of oxygen. The same capacity reactor coupled with a combined cycle at a thermal efficiency of 42.5% can produce 1.78 kg/s of hydrogen and 14.0 kg/s of oxygen.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego

2010-05-01

180

Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding  

SciTech Connect

The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

2013-01-15

181

Continuous production of L(+)-tartaric acid from cis-epoxysuccinate using a membrane recycle reactor.  

PubMed

The one-step bioconversion of cis-epoxysuccinate (CES) to L(+)-tartaric acid by dried Rhodococcus rhodochrous cells containing CES hydrolase activity was studied by using a continuous bioconversion process. The influence of the pH and the temperature was assessed. A mathematical model was used to quantify the CES hydrolase activity and stability. The optimal pH, which resulted in a maximal CES hydrolase activity and stability, was pH 8.0. A large increase in stability (half-life time) could be obtained when the temperature was decreased from 37 to 14 degrees C during the continuous bioconversion. A total bioconversion was maintained for more than 100 days. This resulted in a large value for the specific productivity since the effect of the large increase in stability was much more important than the decrease of activity at the lower temperature. This continuous bioconversion process was further optimised by calculating the productivity for several continuously stirred tank reactors in series. The specific productivity could be nearly doubled when the number of reactors in the series was increased from 1 to 4. PMID:16217652

Willaert, Ronnie; De Vuyst, Luc

2006-06-01

182

ACRR (Annular Core Research Reactor) fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2  

SciTech Connect

Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Allen, M.D.; Stockman, H.W.; Reil, K.O.; Grimley, A.J.; Camp, W.J.

1988-01-01

183

Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity was 25--44g/L-hr (based on reactor volume), the average yield was 0.45 g ethanol/g starch, the biocatalyst retained physical integrity and contamination did not affect fermentation. For the Z. mobilis system the maximum volumetric productivity was 38 g ethanol/L-h, the average yield was 0.51 g ethanol/g starch and the FBR was successfully operated for almost one month. In order to develop, scale-up and economically evaluate this system more efficiently, a predictive mathematical model that is based on fundamental principles was developed and verified. This model includes kinetics of reactions, transport phenomena of the reactant and product by diffusion within the biocatalyst bead, and the hydrodynamics of the three phase fluidized bed. The co-immobilized biocatalyst involves a consecutive reaction mechanism The mathematical descriptions of the effectiveness factors of reactant and the intermediate product were developed. Hydrodynamic literature correlations were used to develop the dispersion coefficient and gas, liquid, and solid holdup. The solutions of coupled non-linear second order equations for biocatalyst bead and reactor together with the boundary conditions were solved numerically. This model gives considerable information about the system, such as concentration profiles inside both the beads and column, flow rate and feed concentration influences on productivity and phase hold up, and the influence of enzyme and cell mass loading in the catalyst. This model is generic in nature such that it can be easily applied to a diverse set of applications and operating conditions.

Sun, May Yongmei

184

Membrane reactor microstructure for polymer grade olefin production and hydrogen cogeneration.  

PubMed

The current communication describes research work on effective membrane reactor nanostructures and nanoreaction-nanoseparation technology for polymer grade olefin production via catalytic paraffin dehydrogenation reactions. Emphasis is given in systems of permreactors and permeators to perform the described reactive and separative operations. We elaborate on new membrane microstructure designs for paraffin dehydrogenations including the design of experiments, operation, and best parameter selection and optimization of such systems. The described processes are of current significance in the area of new microreactor design and operation including hydrocarbon processing and conversion to valuable fuels and chemicals such as hydrogen, olefins, and polyolefins. These improved results are because of the unique design characteristics of the examined microreactor systems to perform accurate multiphase and heterogeneous functions into one unit operation. A number of membrane reactor configurations were made and tested on stream for the catalytic propane dehydrogenation reaction to propylene with successful results. Some of the results are discussed below which show the better performance of nanostructured membrane reactors for the specific dehydrogenation. PMID:21133187

Ziaka, Zoe D; Navrozidou, Anna; Paraschopoulou, Louisa; Vasileiadis, Savvas P

2010-09-01

185

Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

Dawn M. Scates; John (Jack) K Hartwell; John B. Walter

2008-09-01

186

Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

Dawn M. Scates; John (Jack) K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

2010-10-01

187

Azadirachtin production by hairy root cultivation of Azadirachta indica in a modified stirred tank reactor.  

PubMed

Present investigation involves hairy root cultivation of Azadirachta indica in a modified stirred tank reactor under optimized culture conditions for maximum volumetric productivity of azadirachtin. The selected hairy root line (Az-35) was induced via Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA 920-mediated transformation of A. indica leaf explants (Coimbatore variety, India). Liquid culture of the hairy roots was developed in a modified Murashige and Skoog medium (MM2). To further enhance the productivity of azadirachtin, selected growth regulators (1.0 mg/l IAA and 0.025 mg/l GA(3)), permeabilizing agent (0.5 % v/v DNBP), a biotic elicitor (1 % v/v Curvularia (culture filtrate)) and an indirectly linked biosynthetic precursor (50 mg/l cholesterol) were added in the growth medium on 15th day of the hairy root cultivation period in shake flask. Highest azadirachtin production (113 mg/l) was obtained on 25th day of the growth cycle with a biomass of 21 g/l DW. Further, batch cultivation of hairy roots was carried out in a novel liquid-phase bioreactor configuration (modified stirred tank reactor with polyurethane foam as root support) to investigate the possible scale-up of the established A. indica hairy root culture. A biomass production of 15.2 g/l with azadirachtin accumulation in the hairy roots of 6.4 mg/g (97.28 mg/l) could be achieved after 25 days of the batch cultivation period, which was ~27 and ~14 % less biomass and azadirachtin concentration obtained respectively, in shake flasks. An overall volumetric productivity of 3.89 mg/(l day) of azadirachtin was obtained in the bioreactor. PMID:22580745

Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, A K

2012-11-01

188

Fast flux fluid fuel reactor: A concept for the next generation of nuclear power production  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy has not become the preferred method of electrical energy production largely because of economic, safety, and proliferation concerns and challenges posed by nuclear waste disposal. Economies is the most important factor. To reduce the capital costs, the authors propose a compact configuration with a very high power density and correspondingly reduced reactor component sizes. Enhanced efficiency made possible by higher operating temperatures will also improve the economics of the design, and design simplicity will keep capital, operational, and maintenance costs down. The most direct solution to the nuclear waste problem is to eliminate waste production or, at least, minimize its amount and long-term radiotoxicity. This can be achieved by very high burnups, ideally 100%, and by the eventual transmutation of the long-lived fission products in situ. Very high burnups also improve the economics by optimal exploitation of the fuel. Safety concerns can be addressed by an inherently safe reactor design. Because of the intrinsic nature of nuclear materials, there probably is no definitive answer to proliferation concerns for systems that generate neutrons; however, it is important to minimize proliferation risks. The thorium cycle is a promising option because (a) plutonium is produced only in very small quantities, (b) the presence of {sup 232}U makes handling the fuel very difficult and therefore proliferation resistant, and (c) {sup 233}U is a fissile isotope that is less suitable than {sup 239}Pu for making weapons and can be diluted with other uranium isotopes. An additional benefit of the thorium cycle is that it increases nuclear fuel resources by one order of magnitude. A fast flux fluid fuel reactor is a concept that can satisfy all the foregoing requirements. The fluid fuel systems have a very simple structure. Because integrity of the fuel is not an issue, these systems can operate at very high temperatures, can have high power densities, and can achieve very high burnups. It is possible to continuously remove the fission products and to minimize maintenance requirements. Fluid fuel systems possess favorable in-core transient response via a very high immediate negative temperature coefficient because of the expansion of the liquid fuel. Control rods are not necessary because the loss of reactivity can be compensated for by adding fuel in the on-line circuit. The main challenges posed by fluid fuel systems are possible fluctuations of reactivity caused by density changes, loss of delayed neutrons in the fuel leaving the core for the on-line reprocessing circuit, and corrosion and erosion of the containers. The fast flux choice is dictated by the much better neutronic economy offered by a hard spectrum system. The system is flexible enough to be either a burner, a converter, or a breeder. The fast spectrum is the only one that will allow all the transuranics to be efficiently burned. Moreover, because of the very high operating temperatures (1,000 C or more), refractory metals have to be used for the container. These materials have quite large absorption cross sections in the thermal and epithermal range. Therefore, they can be used only in a hard spectrum system without compromising the neutronic efficiency. Two different types of fast flux fluid fuel reactors are being considered: liquid-metal fluid fuel reactors and molten salt reactors.

Palmiotti, G.; Feldman, E.E.

1999-07-01

189

Method of production H/sub 2/ using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source  

DOEpatents

A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300/degree/ to 1400/degree/F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices. 1 fig.

Paulson, L.E.

1988-05-13

190

Co-production of hydrogen and carbon black from solar thermal methane splitting in a tubular reactor prototype  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study addresses the solar thermal decomposition of natural gas for the co-production of hydrogen and carbon black (CB) as a high-value nano-material with the bonus of zero CO2 emission. The work focused on the development of a medium-scale solar reactor (10kW) based on the indirect heating concept. The solar reactor is composed of a cubic cavity receiver (20cm-side), which

Sylvain Rodat; Stéphane Abanades; Gilles Flamant

2011-01-01

191

Production of Thorium-229 at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of targeted cancer therapy using -emitters has developed considerably in recent years and clinical trials have generated promising results. In particular, the initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the -emitter 213Bi in killing cancer cells [1]. Pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both 213Bi and its 225Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy [2]. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of the 10-d 225Ac parent, a member of the 7340-y 229Th chain. Currently, 233U is the only viable source for high purity 229Th; however, due to increasing difficulties associated with 233U safeguards, processing additional 233U is presently unfeasible. The recent decision to downblend and dispose of enriched 233U further diminished the prospects for extracting 229Th from 233U stock. Nevertheless, the anticipated growth in demand for 225Ac may soon exceed the levels of 229Th (~40 g or ~8 Ci; ~80 times the current ORNL 229Th stock) present in the aged 233U stockpile. The alternative routes for the production of 229Th, 225Ra and 225Ac include both reactor and accelerator approaches [3]. Here, we describe production of 229Th via neutron transmutation of 226Ra targets in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

Boll, Rose Ann [ORNL; Garland, Marc A [ORNL; Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL

2008-01-01

192

Integrated side-stream reactor for biological nutrient removal and minimization of sludge production.  

PubMed

Integrated processes to reduce in situ the sludge production in wastewater treatment plants are gaining attention in order to facilitate excess sludge management. In contrast to post-treatments, such as anaerobic digestion which is placed between the activated sludge system and dewatering processes, integrated technologies are placed in the sludge return line. This study evaluates the application of an anoxic side-stream reactor (SSR) which creates a physiological shock and uncouples the biomass metabolism and diverts the activity from assimilation for biosynthesis to non-growth activities. The effect of this system in biological nutrient removal for both nitrogen and phosphorus was evaluated for the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic reactors. The RedOx potential within the SSR was maintained at -150 mV while the sludge loading rate was modified by increasing the percentage of recycled activated sludge feed to the SSR (0 and 40% at laboratory scale and 0, 10, 50 and 100% at pilot scale). The use of the SSR presented a slight reduction of phosphorus removal but maintained the effluent quality to the required discharge values. Nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 75 to 86% while reducing the sludge production rate by 18.3%. PMID:25860709

Coma, M; Rovira, S; Canals, J; Colprim, J

2015-01-01

193

Fatty acids production from hydrogen and carbon dioxide by mixed culture in the membrane biofilm reactor.  

PubMed

Gasification of waste to syngas (H2/CO2) is seen as a promising route to a circular economy. Biological conversion of the gaseous compounds into a liquid fuel or chemical, preferably medium chain fatty acids (caproate and caprylate) is an attractive concept. This study for the first time demonstrated in-situ production of medium chain fatty acids from H2 and CO2 in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor by mixed microbial culture. The hydrogen was for 100% utilized within the biofilms attached on the outer surface of the hollow-fiber membrane. The obtained concentrations of acetate, butyrate, caproate and caprylate were 7.4, 1.8, 0.98 and 0.42 g/L, respectively. The biomass specific production rate of caproate (31.4 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was similar to literature reports for suspended cell cultures while for caprylate the rate (19.1 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was more than 6 times higher. Microbial community analysis showed the biofilms were dominated by Clostridium spp., such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri. This study demonstrates a potential technology for syngas fermentation in the hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactors. PMID:23941982

Zhang, Fang; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Man; Ding, Zhao-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

2013-10-15

194

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect

High purity hydrogen is commercially produced from syngas by the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) in high and low temperature shift reactors using iron oxide and copper catalysts respectively. However, the WGSR is thermodynamically limited at high temperatures towards hydrogen production necessitating excess steam addition and catalytic operation. In the calcium looping process, the equilibrium limited WGSR is driven forward by the incessant removal of CO{sub 2} by-product through the carbonation of calcium oxide. At high pressures, this process obviates the need for a catalyst and excess steam requirement, thereby removing the costs related to the procurement and deactivation of the catalyst and steam generation. Thermodynamic analysis for the combined WGS and carbonation reaction was conducted. The combined WGS and carbonation reaction was investigated at varying pressures, temperatures and S/C ratios using a bench scale reactor system. It was found that the purity of hydrogen increases with the increase in pressure and at a pressure of 300 psig, almost 100% hydrogen is produced. It was also found that at high pressures, high purity hydrogen can be produced using stoichiometric quantities of steam. On comparing the catalytic and non catalytic modes of operation in the presence of calcium oxide, it was found that there was no difference in the purity of hydrogen produced at elevated pressures. Multicyclic reaction and regeneration experiments were also conducted and it was found that the purity of hydrogen remains almost constant after a few cycles.

Shwetha Ramkumar; Mahesh Iyer; Danny Wong; Himanshu Gupta; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Lhih Fan

2008-09-30

195

Gasification of refuse derived fuel in a fixed bed reactor for syngas production  

SciTech Connect

Steam gasification of two different refuse derived fuels (RDFs), differing slightly in composition as well as thermal stability, was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure. The proximate and ultimate analyses reveal that carbon and hydrogen are the major components in RDFs. The thermal analysis indicates the presence of cellulose and plastic based materials in RDFs. H{sub 2} and CO are found to be the major products, along with CO{sub 2} and hydrocarbons resulting from gasification of RDFs. The effect of gasification temperature on H{sub 2} and CO selectivities was studied, and the optimum temperature for better H{sub 2} and CO selectivity was determined to be 725 deg. C. The calorific value of product gas produced at lower gasification temperature is significantly higher than that of gas produced at higher process temperature. Also, the composition of RDF plays an important role in distribution of products gas. The RDF with more C and H content is found to produce more amounts of CO and H{sub 2} under similar experimental conditions. The steam/waste ratio showed a notable effect on the selectivity of syngas as well as calorific value of the resulting product gas. The flow rate of carrier gas did not show any significant effect on products yield or their distribution.

Dalai, Ajay K. [Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ajay.dalai@usask.ca; Batta, Nishant [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Eswaramoorthi, I. [Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Schoenau, Greg J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

2009-01-15

196

Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01

197

76 FR 51023 - Richland-Stryker Generation LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Commission [Docket No. ER11-4266-000] Richland-Stryker Generation LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...in the above-referenced proceeding of Richland-Stryker Generation LLC's application for market-based rate authority,...

2011-08-17

198

EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES  

SciTech Connect

An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

2010-09-30

199

Radioisotope research, production, and processing at the University of Missouri Research Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is a 10 MW, light-water-cooled and moderated research reactor which first achieved criticality in 1996 and is currently the highest powered university-owned research reactor in the U.S. For many years a major supplier of reactor-produced isotopes for research and commercial purposes, in the last 15 years MURR has concentrated on development of reactor-produced

G. J. Ehrhardt; A. R. Ketring; Wei Ja; D. Ma; K. Zinn; J. Lanigan

1995-01-01

200

Rotating algal biofilm reactor and spool harvester for wastewater treatment with biofuels by-products.  

PubMed

Maximizing algae production in a wastewater treatment process can aid in the reduction of soluble nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the wastewater. If harvested, the algae-based biomass offers the added benefit as feedstock for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. However, difficulties in harvesting, concentrating, and dewatering the algae-based biomass have limited the development of an economically feasible treatment and production process. When algae-based biomass is grown as a surface attached biofilm as opposed to a suspended culture, the biomass is naturally concentrated and more easily harvested. This can lead to less expensive removal of the biomass from wastewater, and less expensive downstream processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts. In this study, a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) was designed, built, and tested at bench (8 L), medium (535 L), and pilot (8,000 L) scales. The RABR was designed to operate in the photoautotrophic conditions of open tertiary wastewater treatment, producing mixed culture biofilms made up of algae and bacteria. Growth substrata were evaluated for attachment and biofilm formation, and an effective substratum was discovered. The RABR achieved effective nutrient reduction, with average removal rates of 2.1 and 14.1 g m(-2) day(-1) for total dissolved phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen, respectively. Biomass production ranged from 5.5 g m(-2) day(-1) at bench scale to as high as 31 g m(-2) day(-1) at pilot scale. An efficient spool harvesting technique was also developed at bench and medium scales to obtain a concentrated product (12-16% solids) suitable for further processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts. PMID:22328283

Christenson, Logan B; Sims, Ronald C

2012-07-01

201

Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

2010-10-01

202

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production by the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) is equilibrium limited due to thermodynamic constrains. However, this can be overcome by continuously removing the product CO{sub 2}, thereby driving the WGSR in the forward direction to enhance hydrogen production. This project aims at using a high reactivity, mesoporous calcium based sorbent (PCC-CaO) for removing CO{sub 2} using reactive separation scheme. Preliminary results have shown that PCC-CaO dominates in its performance over naturally occurring limestone towards enhanced hydrogen production. However, maintenance of high reactivity of the sorbent over several reaction-regeneration cycles warrants effective regeneration methods. We have identified sub-atmospheric calcination (vacuum) as vital regeneration technique that helps preserve the sorbent morphology. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the significance of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of diluent gas, and sorbent loading on the kinetics of calcination and the morphology of the resultant CaO sorbent. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, has been envisioned as a potential diluent gas due to its better thermal properties resulting in effective heat transfer. A novel multi-fixed bed reactor was designed which isolates the catalyst bed from the sorbent bed during the calcination step. This should prevent any potential catalyst deactivation due to oxidation by CO{sub 2} during the regeneration phase.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-04-01

203

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The water gas shift reaction (WGSR) plays a major role in increasing the hydrogen production from fossil fuels. However, the enhanced hydrogen production is limited by thermodynamic constrains posed by equilibrium limitations of WGSR. This project aims at using a mesoporous, tailored, highly reactive calcium based sorbent system for incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} product which drives the equilibrium limited WGSR forward. In addition, a pure sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced simultaneously. A detailed project vision with the description of integration of this concept with an existing coal gasification process for hydrogen production is presented. Conceptual reactor designs for investigating the simultaneous water gas shift and the CaO carbonation reactions are presented. In addition, the options for conducting in-situ sorbent regeneration under vacuum or steam are also reported. Preliminary, water gas shift reactions using high temperature shift catalyst and without any sorbent confirmed the equilibrium limitation beyond 600 C demonstrating a carbon monoxide conversion of about 80%. From detailed thermodynamic analyses performed for fuel gas streams from typical gasifiers the optimal operating temperature range to prevent CaO hydration and to effect its carbonation is between 575-830 C.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-03-10

204

Two stage anaerobic baffled reactors for bio-hydrogen production from municipal food waste.  

PubMed

A two-step anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR-1 and ABR-2) for H2 production from municipal food waste (MFW) was investigated at a temperature of 26 °C. In ABR-1, the average yield of H2 at an HRT of 26 h and OLR of 58 kg COD/m3 d was 250 ml H2/g VS removed. As unexpected; the H2 production in the ABR-2 was further increased up to 370 ml H2/gVS removed at a HRT of 26 h and OLR of 35 kg COD/m3 d. The total H2 yield in the two-step process was estimated to be 4.9 mol H2/mol hexose. The major part of H2 production in the ABR-1 was due to the conversion of COD(particulate) (36%). In the ABR-2 the H2 yield was mainly due to the conversion of COD in the soluble form (76%). Based on these results MFW could be ideal substrate for H2 production in a two-step ABR processes. PMID:21498075

Tawfik, A; Salem, A; El-Qelish, M

2011-09-01

205

Evaluation of Selected Chemical Processes for Production of Low-cost Silicon, Phase 3. [using a fluidized bed reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The construction and operation of an experimental process system development unit (EPSDU) for the production of granular semiconductor grade silicon by the zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles is presented. The construction of the process development unit (PDU) is reported. The PDU consists of four critical units of the EPSDU: the fluidized bed reactor, the reactor by product condenser, the zinc vaporizer, and the electrolytic cell. An experimental wetted wall condenser and its operation are described. Procedures are established for safe handling of SiCl4 leaks and spills from the EPSDU and PDU.

Blocher, J. M., Jr.; Browning, M. F.

1979-01-01

206

Reservoir characterization of the Mississippian Ratcliffe, Richland County, Montana, Williston Basin. Topical report, September 1997  

SciTech Connect

This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Mississippian Ratcliffe in portions of Richland County, MT. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity and methods for improved recovery. The report covers investigations of geology, petrography, reservoir engineering and seismic. The Ratcliffe is a low permeability oil reservoir which appears to be developed across much of the study area and occurs across much of the Williston Basin. The reservoir has not been a primary drilling target in the study area because average reserves have been insufficient to payout the cost of drilling and completion despite the application of hydraulic fracture stimulation. Oil trapping does not appear to be structurally controlled. For the Ratcliffe to be a viable drilling objective, methods need to be developed for (1) targeting better reservoir development and (2) better completions. A geological model is presented for targeting areas with greater potential for commercial reserves in the Ratcliffe. This model can be best utilized with the aid of 3D seismic. A 3D seismic survey was acquired and is used to demonstrate a methodology for targeting the Ratcliffe. Other data obtained during the project include oriented core, special formation-imaging log, pressure transient measurements and oil PVT. Although re-entry horizontal drilling was unsuccessfully tested, this completion technology should improve the economic viability of the Ratcliffe. Reservoir simulation of horizontal completions with productivity of three times that of a vertical well suggested two or three horizontal wells in a 258-ha (640-acre) area could recover sufficient reserves for profitable drilling.

Sippel, M.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.

1998-07-01

207

New reactor for production of tungsten disulfide hollow onion-like (inorganic fullerene-like) nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MS 2 (M=Mo, W) hollow onion-like nanoparticles were the first inorganic fullerene-like ( IF) materials, found in 1992. Understanding of the IF-MS 2 growth mechanism in 1996 enabled us to build a rather simple reactor, which produced about 0.4 g per batch, of an almost pure IF-WS 2 powder. Soon after, it was found that the new powder showed better tribological properties compared with the regular MS 2 (M=Mo, W) powder, which is a well-known solid lubricant. The present work shows a new synthetic approach, which allows for a scale-up of IF-WS 2 production by more than two orders of magnitude. The falling-bed and, especially, fluidized-bed methods, which are presented here, pave the way for an almost ideal growth condition of the IF synthesis from an oxide precursor. As a result, the presently produced IF has a more uniform (spherical) shape and can grow to a larger size (up to 0.5 ?m). It is expected that the relatively spherical IF-WS 2 nanoparticles, which are produced by the falling (fluidized) bed reactor, will exhibit superior tribological properties, than reported before.

Feldman, Y.; Zak, A.; Popovitz-Biro, R.; Tenne, R.

2000-10-01

208

Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

2012-03-01

209

Optimization of a free-fall reactor for the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil.  

PubMed

A central composite design of experiments was performed to optimize a free-fall reactor for the production of bio-oil from red oak biomass. The effects of four experimental variables including heater set-point temperature, biomass particle size, sweep gas flow rate and biomass feed rate were studied. Heater set-point temperature ranged from 450 to 650 °C, average biomass particle size from 200 to 600 ?m, sweep gas flow rate from 1 to 5 sL/min and biomass feed rate from 1 to 2 kg/h. Optimal operating conditions yielding over 70 wt.% bio-oil were identified at a heater set-point temperature of 575 °C, while feeding red oak biomass sized less than 300 ?m at 2 kg/h into the 0.021 m diameter, 1.8m tall reactor. Sweep gas flow rate did not have significant effect on bio-oil yield over the range tested. PMID:22036914

Ellens, C J; Brown, R C

2012-01-01

210

Evaluation of radcal gamma thermometers for in-core monitoring of Savannah River Site production reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently obtained a quantity of Radcal Gamma Thermometer Assemblies (RGTAs) for in-core monitoring of local power in their production reactors. The RGTAs, manufactured by DELTA M Corporation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contained seven Self Calibrating Gamma Thermometer (SCGT) sensors within a 7.26 mm diameter, 3.06 m length with a total length of 5.6 m. All RGTAs contained an isolated segmented heater cable for in-situ calibration. Each SCGT sensor was subjected to a 40 point calibration at discrete power levels from 0.5 to 6 watts per gram (w/g) under both joule and cable power. Calibration equations were developed from this to predict reactor power at each sensor. Additionally three units were calibrated at combined joule and cable heating conditions from 0.5 to 2.5 w/g cable and 0.5 to 6 w/g joule. A statistical analysis of all data was used to derive prediction equations that enable SRS engineers to precisely track any changes in sensor calibration throughout the lifetime of the instruments. This paper presents the detailed configuration of the 36 units manufactured for SRS, reviews the calibration results, and discusses the utility and accuracy of the statistically derived prediction equations for in-situ calibration.

McCulloch, R.W.; Crowley, J.L. [DELTA M Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Croft, W.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1991-12-31

211

Evaluation of radcal gamma thermometers for in-core monitoring of Savannah River Site production reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently obtained a quantity of Radcal Gamma Thermometer Assemblies (RGTAs) for in-core monitoring of local power in their production reactors. The RGTAs, manufactured by DELTA M Corporation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contained seven Self Calibrating Gamma Thermometer (SCGT) sensors within a 7.26 mm diameter, 3.06 m length with a total length of 5.6 m. All RGTAs contained an isolated segmented heater cable for in-situ calibration. Each SCGT sensor was subjected to a 40 point calibration at discrete power levels from 0.5 to 6 watts per gram (w/g) under both joule and cable power. Calibration equations were developed from this to predict reactor power at each sensor. Additionally three units were calibrated at combined joule and cable heating conditions from 0.5 to 2.5 w/g cable and 0.5 to 6 w/g joule. A statistical analysis of all data was used to derive prediction equations that enable SRS engineers to precisely track any changes in sensor calibration throughout the lifetime of the instruments. This paper presents the detailed configuration of the 36 units manufactured for SRS, reviews the calibration results, and discusses the utility and accuracy of the statistically derived prediction equations for in-situ calibration.

McCulloch, R.W.; Crowley, J.L. (DELTA M Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Croft, W.D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1991-01-01

212

Lagrangian Approach to Jet Mixing and Optimization of the Reactor for Production of Carbon Nanotubes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study was motivated by an attempt to optimize the High Pressure carbon oxide (HiPco) process for the production of carbon nanotubes from gaseous carbon oxide, The goal is to achieve rapid and uniform heating of catalyst particles by an optimal arrangement of jets. A mixed Eulerian and Lagrangian approach is implemented to track the temperature of catalyst particles along their trajectories as a function of time. The FLUENT CFD software with second-order upwind approximation of convective terms and an algebraic multigrid-based solver is used. The poor performance of the original reactor configuration is explained in terms of features of particle trajectories. The trajectories most exposed to the hot jets appear to be the most problematic for heating because they either bend towards the cold jet interior or rotate upwind of the mixing zone. To reduce undesirable slow and/or oscillatory heating of catalyst particles, a reactor configuration with three central jets is proposed and the optimal location of the central and peripheral nozzles is determined.

Povitsky, Alex; Salas, Manuel D.

2001-01-01

213

Richland Community College's Self-Study and Institutional Plan, Spring 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing detailed information on Richland Community College (RCC), in Decatur, Illinois, this report reviews institutional planning, services, and assessment at the college and presents recommendations for improvement. The first chapter reviews the history of RCC, focusing on the college's accreditation history. The second chapter describes RCC's…

Richland Community Coll., Decatur, IL.

214

Green engineering: continuous production of biodiesel using an alkaline catalyst in an intensified narrow channel reactor.  

PubMed

This paper describes an energy efficient continuous process for the production of biodiesel using canola oil as feedstock. A narrow channel reactor was used, employing both slug and stratified flow behaviors, which are associated with flow through channels of small hydraulic diameter. In this intensified system, high conversions were achieved and good separation efficiencies were observed. Experiments were carried out using canola oil and methanol as reactants with sodium hydroxide as the catalyst to study the influence of catalyst loading, residence time and temperature on the reaction rate. Using a catalyst loading of 1% and a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C and pressure of 80 psig greater than 98% conversion was achieved in a residence time of 3 min. PMID:19280042

Jachuck, R; Pherwani, G; Gorton, S M

2009-03-01

215

Determination of production biology of cladocera in a reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents from a nuclear production reactor. [Par Pond  

SciTech Connect

The effects on zooplankton of residence in a cooling reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents directly from a nuclear-production-reactor were studied. Rates of cladoceran population production were compared at two stations in the winter and summer of 1976 on Par Pond located on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC. One station was located in an area of the reservoir directly receiving hyperthermal effluent (Station MAS) and the second was located about 4 km away in an area where surface temperatures were normal for reservoirs in the general geographical region (Station CAS). A non-parametric comparison between stations of standing stock and fecundity data for Bosmina longirostris, taken for the egg ratio model, was used to observe potential hyperthermal effluent effects. There was a statistically higher incidence of deformed eggs in the Bosmina population at Station MAS in the summer. Bosmina standing stock underwent two large oscillations in the winter and three large oscillations in the summer at Station MAS compared with two in the winter and one in the summer at Station CAS. These results are consistent with almost all other Par Pond studies which have found the two stations to be essentially similar in spectra composition but with some statistically significant differences in various aspects of the biology of the species.

Vigerstad, T J

1980-01-01

216

Biohydrogen production from food waste hydrolysate using continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactors.  

PubMed

A continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor (CMISR) using activated carbon as support carrier for dark fermentative hydrogen production from enzymatic hydrolyzed food waste was developed. The effects of immobilized sludge packing ratio (10-20%, v/v) and substrate loading rate (OLR) (8-40kg/m(3)/d) on biohydrogen production were examined, respectively. The hydrogen production rates (HPRs) with packing ratio of 15% were significantly higher than the results obtained from packing ratio of 10% and 20%. The best HPR of 353.9ml/h/L was obtained at the condition of packing ratio=15% and OLR=40kg/m(3)/d. The Minitab was used to elicit the effects of OLR and packing ratio on HPR (Y) which could be expressed as Y=5.31 OLR+296 packing ratio+40.3 (p=0.003). However, the highest hydrogen yield (85.6ml/g food waste) was happened at OLR of 16kg/m(3)/d because of H2 partial pressure and oxidization/reduction of NADH. PMID:25590421

Han, Wei; Liu, Da Na; Shi, Yi Wen; Tang, Jun Hong; Li, Yong Feng; Ren, Nan Qi

2015-03-01

217

Performance of a cutinase membrane reactor for the production of biodiesel in organic media.  

PubMed

The enzymatic transesterification of oils with an alcohol, using recombinant cutinase of Fusarium solani pisi microencapsulated in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reversed micelles, was performed in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). A tubular ceramic membrane with a nominal molecular weight cut off of 15,000 Da was used to retain the enzyme, and characterized in terms of rejection coefficients of the reaction components by transmission experiments. The performance of the MBR in a total recirculation-batch mode was compared with results obtained in a stirred batch tank reactor. The continuous operation of the MBR was also evaluated and the influence of the alcohol type and permeate flow rate on conversion degree and productivity (up to 500 g(product) /day/g(enzyme) was attained) were analyzed. Cutinase wild type and mutant T179C were tested for this process and the high long-term operational stability of the cutinase mutant demonstrated its potential as biocatalyst for the enzymatic continuous production of biodiesel. PMID:21290382

Badenes, Sara M; Lemos, Francisco; Cabral, Joaquim M S

2011-06-01

218

Gluconic acid production from sucrose in an airlift reactor using a multi-enzyme system.  

PubMed

Sucrose from sugarcane is produced in abundance in Brazil, which provides an opportunity to manufacture other high-value products. Gluconic acid (GA) can be produced by multi-enzyme conversion of sucrose using the enzymes invertase, glucose oxidase, and catalase. In this process, one of the byproducts is fructose, which has many commercial applications. This work concerns the batch mode production of GA in an airlift reactor fed with sucrose as substrate. Evaluation was made of the influence of temperature and pH, as well as the thermal stability of the enzymes. Operational conditions of 40 °C and pH 6.0 were selected, based on the enzymatic activity profiles and the thermal stabilities. Under these conditions, the experimental data could be accurately described by kinetic models. The maximum yield of GA was achieved within 3.8 h, with total conversion of sucrose and glucose and a volumetric productivity of around 7.0 g L(-1) h(-1). PMID:25326720

Mafra, Agnes Cristina Oliveira; Furlan, Felipe Fernando; Badino, Alberto Colli; Tardioli, Paulo Waldir

2015-04-01

219

Analysis of fission product revaporization in a BWR reactor cooling system during a station blackout accident  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary analysis of fission product revaporization in the Reactor Cooling System (RCS) after the vessel failure. The station blackout transient for BWR Mark I Power Plant is considered. The TRAPMELT3 models of evaporization, chemisorption, and the decay heating of RCS structures and gases are adopted in the analysis. The RCS flow models based on the density-difference between the RCS and containment pedestal region are developed to estimate the RCS outflow which carries the revaporized fission product to the containment. A computer code called REVAP is developed for the analysis. The REVAP is incorporated with the MARCH, TRAPMELT3 and NAUA codes of the Source Term Code Pack Package (STCP). The NAUA code is used to estimate the impact of revaporization on environmental release. The results show that the thermal-hydraulic conditions between the RCS and the pedestal region are important factors determining the magnitude of revaporization and subsequent release of the volatile fission product. 8 figs., 1 tab.

Yang, J.W.; Schmidt, E.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

1988-01-01

220

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production cannot be maximized from fossil fuels (gas/coal) via the WGS reaction at high temperatures as the WGS-equilibrium constant K{sub WGS} (= [CO{sub 2}][H{sub 2}]/[CO][H{sub 2}O]), falls with increasing temperatures. However, CO{sub 2} removal down to ppm levels by the carbonation of CaO to CaCO{sub 3} in the temperature range 650-850 C, leads to the possibility of stoichiometric H{sub 2} production at high temperature/pressure conditions and at low steam to fuel ratios. Further, CO{sub 2} is also captured in the H{sub 2} generation process, making this coal to hydrogen process compatible with CO{sub 2} sequestration goals. While microporous CaO sorbents attain <50% conversion over cyclical carbonation-calcination, the OSU-patented, mesoporous CaO sorbents are able to achieve >95% conversion. Novel calcination techniques could lead to an ever-smaller footprint, single-stage reactors that achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production at high temperatures and pressures for on/off site usage. Experimental results indicate that the PCC-CaO sorbent is able to achieve complete conversion of CO for 240 seconds as compared to only a few seconds with CaO derived from natural sources.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-03-10

221

Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the engineering methods, models, and results used in an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a proposed next-generation nuclear power plant. Standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies were used to answer the risk-related questions for a combined nuclear and chemical facility: what can go wrong? how likely is it to happen? and what are the consequences of it happening? As part of answering these questions, a model was developed suitable for determining the distances separating a hydrogen-production process and nuclear plant structures. The objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions relating to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic efficiency standpoint, close proximity of the two facilities is beneficial. Safety and regulatory implications, however, force the separation to be increased, perhaps substantially. The likelihood of obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the United States without answering these safety questions is uncertain. The quantitative analysis performed and described in this paper offers a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters relating to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. The calculations indicate that when the facilities are less than 100 m apart, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications (blast-deflection barriers, for example) could significantly reduce risk and should be further explored as design of the hydrogen production facility evolves.

Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; William Galyean

2006-06-01

222

Organics removal from landfill leachate and activated sludge production in SBR reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study is aimed at estimating organic compounds removal and sludge production in SBR during treatment of landfill leachate. Four series were performed. At each series, experiments were carried out at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12, 6, 3 and 2 d. The series varied in SBR filling strategies, duration of the mixing and aeration phases, and the sludge age. In series 1 and 2 (a short filling period, mixing and aeration phases in the operating cycle), the relationship between organics concentration (COD) in the leachate treated and HRT was pseudo-first-order kinetics. In series 3 (with mixing and aeration phases) and series 4 (only aeration phase) with leachate supplied by means of a peristaltic pump for 4 h of the cycle (filling during reaction period) - this relationship was zero-order kinetics. Activated sludge production expressed as the observed coefficient of biomass production (Y {sub obs}) decreased correspondingly with increasing HRT. The smallest differences between reactors were observed in series 3 in which Y {sub obs} was almost stable (0.55-0.6 mg VSS/mg COD). The elimination of the mixing phase in the cycle (series 4) caused the Y {sub obs} to decrease significantly from 0.32 mg VSS/mg COD at HRT 2 d to 0.04 mg VSS/mg COD at HRT 12 d. The theoretical yield coefficient Y accounted for 0.534 mg VSS/mg COD (series 1) and 0.583 mg VSS/mg COD (series 2). In series 3 and 4, it was almost stable (0.628 mg VSS/mg COD and 0.616 mg VSS/mg COD, respectively). After the elimination of the mixing phase in the operating cycle, the specific biomass decay rate increased from 0.006 d{sup -1} (series 3) to 0.032 d{sup -1} (series 4). The operating conditions employing mixing/aeration or only aeration phases enable regulation of the sludge production. The SBRs operated under aerobic conditions are more favourable at a short hydraulic retention time. At long hydraulic retention time, it can lead to a decrease in biomass concentration in the SBR as a result of cell decay. On the contrary, in the activated sludge at long HRT, a short filling period and operating cycle of the reactor with the mixing and aeration phases seem the most favourable.

Klimiuk, Ewa [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Fisheries, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Sloneczna St. 45G, 10-957 Olsztyn (Poland); Kulikowska, Dorota [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Fisheries, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Sloneczna St. 45G, 10-957 Olsztyn (Poland)]. E-mail: dorotak@uwm.edu.pl

2006-07-01

223

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOEpatents

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01

224

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

2011-01-01

225

Enhancement of l(+)-lactic acid production using acid-adapted precultures of Rhizopus arrhizus in a bubble column reactor.  

PubMed

88 g/L lactic acid was produced from waste potato starch (equivalent to 100 g/L glucose) in a bubble column reactor using appropriate acid-adapted precultures of Rhizopus arrhizus. Further experiment showed that repeated dilution of cultures caused the decrease of lactic acid concentration and productivity due to formation of large fungal pellets. PMID:19716526

Zhang, Zhan Ying; Jin, Bo; Kelly, Joan M

2009-10-01

226

Safety Issues at the Defense Production Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an assessment of safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and private contractors. Chapter 1, "The DOE Safety Framework," examines safety objectives for production reactors and processes to implement the objectives. Chapter 2, "Technical Issues," focuses on a variety…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

227

Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the methods, models, and results of an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a nuclear power plant. In order to answer the risk-related questions for this combined nuclear and chemical facility, we utilized standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies to answer three questions: what can happen, how likely is it, and what are the consequences? As part of answering these questions, we developed a model suitable to determine separation distances for hydrogen process structures and the nuclear plant structures. Our objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions related to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic standpoint we would like the two facilities to be quite close. However, safety and regulatory implications force the separation distance to be increased, perhaps substantially. Without answering these safety questions, the likelihood for obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the U.S. would be questionable. The quantitative analysis performed for this report provides us with a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters related to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. From our calculations, we estimate that when the separation distance is less than 100m, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications, for example blast-deflection barriers, were explored to determine the impact of potential mitigating strategies. We found that these mitigating cases may significantly reduce risk and should be explored as the design for the hydrogen production facility evolves.

Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; Bill Galyean

2005-09-01

228

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16

229

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS, AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - 11052  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical Separation Facilities (canyons).

Bergren, C.; Flora, M.; Belencan, H.

2010-11-17

230

Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor is a reactor that eliminates the traditional safety concerns of nuclear fission reactors. The US reactor has an insignificant source term and no reasonable criticality accident. Furthermore, the negligible residual after-heat in the reactor renders its shutdown capability comparable or superior to conventional power sources. Fission products are continuously removed at the rate they are

U. Gat; S. R. Daugherty

1985-01-01

231

Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant one, which contributed to 56-58% of the total soluble metabolite production, indicative of an acetic acid fermentation system, and acetate-to-butyrate ratio was found to be closely related to hydrogen yield. pH level influenced every aspect of the ASBR performance for hydrogen production. ASBR operation at five pHs ranging from 4.4 to 5.6 (4.4, 4.7, 5.0, 5.3, 5.6) showed distinct dynamic profiles of both biogas production and the changes of H2 and CH4 percentage in the biogas during a running period of 22 days. The H2 content in biogas, H 2 production rate and H2 yield were all pH-dependent, in the range of 5.1-36.9 %, 0.71-8.97 L/d and 0.12-1.50 mol-H2/mol-glucose, respectively, and maximum values for all three responses were simultaneously achieved at pH 5.0. Methanogens appeared to be significantly activated at pH of 5.3 or higher since significant CH4 evolution and concurrent reduction in H2 production was observed at pH 5.3 and 5.6. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and ethanol were main aqueous products in all pH tests and their distribution was influenced by pH. Analysis of kinetic models developed from modified Gompertz equations for batch experiments showed that pH had a profound effect on all kinetic parameters for hydrogen production including hydrogen potential, maximum hydrogen production rate and the length of the lag phase, as well as the maximum substrate utilization rate. The low pH of 4.4 gave the highest hydrogen production potential but with the lowest hydrogen production rate. A contrast experiment was conducted with an initial pH of 5.3 but not controlled, came up with a rapid pH decline, leading to a low hexose degradation efficiency of 33.2% and a significantly suppressed H2 production, indicating the importance of pH control and the effect of pH on H2 production and substrate consumption. pH 5.0 was verified as the optimal for the proposed fermentation system by kinetic models. An extremely linear relationship (R2= 0.993) between the maximum H2 production rate and the maximum hexose degradation rate suggested that the pH inhibitio

Wu, Xiao

2009-12-01

232

Measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates from Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland area shores. Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radiation exposure rate measurements are taken on and around the Hanford Site for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. In 1992, environmental radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from shoreline and island areas ranging from Vernita, along the Hanford Reach, down to the Richland Pumphouse. Measurements were taken primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates as determined by examination of aerial photographs depicting radiation exposure measurements. Results from the 1992 survey indicated radiation exposure rates taken from the Hanford Reach area were elevated in comparison to the measurements taken from the Vernita area with ranges of 8 to 28 {mu}R/hr and 4 to 11 {mu}R/hr, respectively. In January 1994, additional shoreline radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from the Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland areas to determine the relationship of radiation exposure rates along the Richland area shores when compared to Vernita and Hanford Reach area exposure rates (measurements along the Richland area were not collected during the 1992 survey). This report discusses the 1994 results and is an addendum to the report that discussed the 1992 survey. An analysis of variance indicated a significant location interaction at a p-value of 0.0014. To determine differences between paried locations a post-hoc comparison of location means was performed on log transformed data using the Scheff{acute e}`s F-test. This test indicated a significant difference between Hanford Reach and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.075 /{mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.0014. No significant difference was found between Hanford Reach and Vernita area means: The mean difference was 0.031 {mu}R/hr and the p-value was 0.3138. No significant difference was found between Vernita and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.044 {mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.1155.

Cooper, A.T.

1995-02-01

233

Evaluating Carriers for Immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Ethanol Production in a Continuous Column Reactor  

PubMed Central

We evaluated a more practical and cost-effective immobilization carriers for ethanol production using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three candidate materials-rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust-were tested for their cell-adsorption capacity and operational durability. Derivatizations of rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust with the optimal concentration of 0.5 M of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl chloride hydrochloride (DEAE · HCl) resulted in > 95% adsorption of the initial yeast cells at 2 hr for DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-sawdust and in only approximately 80% adsorption for DEAE-rice straw. In addition, DEAE-sawdust was found to be a more practical carrier for immobilizing yeast cells in terms of operational durability in shaking flask cultures with two different speeds of 60 and 150 rpm. Furthermore, the biosorption isotherms of DEAE-rice hull, -rice straw, and -sawdust for yeast cells revealed that the Qmax of DEAE-sawdust (82.6 mg/g) was greater than that of DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-rice straw. During the 404-hr of continuous column reactor operation using yeast cells immobilized on DEAE-sawdust, no serious detachment of the yeast cells from the DEAE-sawdust was recorded. Ethanol yield of approximately 3.04 g/L was produced steadily, and glucose was completely converted to ethanol at a yield of 0.375 g-ethanol/g-glucose (73.4% of the theoretical value). Thus, sawdust is a promising practical immobilization carrier for ethanol production, with significance in the production of bioethanol as a biofuel. PMID:25346601

Cha, Hye-Geun; Kim, Yi-Ok; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong

2014-01-01

234

Production of L(+)-lactic acid using acid-adapted precultures of Rhizopus arrhizus in a stirred tank reactor.  

PubMed

Cultivations of filamentous fungi in stirred tank reactors (STRs) to produce metabolites are often limited by insufficient mixing and mass transfer because of the formation of mycelial clumps inside the reactors. This study developed an acid-adapted preculture approach to control the morphology of filamentous Rhizopus arrhizus in a STR, consequently to enhance the production yield and productivity of L(+)-lactic acid efficiently using waste potato starch as substrate. Using the acid-adapted precultures as inoculum, the morphology of R. arrhizus was maintained as large clumps, coalesced loose small pellets, and freely dispersed small pellets. The highest lactic acid concentration of 85.7 g/L with a yield of 86% was obtained in association with the formation of coalesced loose small pellets. The results indicate that the use of the acid-adapted precultures as inoculum is a promising approach for lactic acid production in STRs. PMID:18500587

Zhang, Zhan Ying; Jin, Bo; Kelly, Joan M

2008-06-01

235

Beneficial synergetic effect on gas production during co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge and biomass in a vacuum reactor.  

PubMed

A vacuum fixed bed reactor was used to pyrolyze sewage sludge, biomass (rice husk) and their blend under high temperature (900°C). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effect on gas production was observed. Gas yield of blend fuel was evidently higher than that of both parent fuels. The syngas (CO and H2) content and gas lower heating value (LHV) were obviously improved as well. It was highly possible that sewage sludge provided more CO2 and H2O during co-pyrolysis, promoting intense CO2-char and H2O-char gasification, which benefited the increase of gas yield and lower heating value. The beneficial synergetic effect, as a result, made this method a feasible one for gas production. PMID:25728344

Zhang, Weijiang; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Yang, Xiao

2015-05-01

236

FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS  

SciTech Connect

A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led to an increased understanding of the acceptable ranges for process parameters and additional reduction in required operating times. Another result of this test program was to double the kernel production rate. Following the development tests, approximately 40 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels have been produced for use in coater scale up tests, and approximately 10 kg of low enriched uranium UCO kernels for use in the AGR-2 experiment.

Charles M Barnes

2008-09-01

237

Performance of co-immobilized yeast and glucoamylase in a fluidized bed reactor for fuel ethanol production  

SciTech Connect

The performance of co-immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase was evaluated in a fluidized bed reactor. Soluble starch and yeast extract were used as feed stocks. The biocatalyst performed well and demonstrated no significant loss of activity or physical integrity during 10 weeks of continuous operation. The reactor was easily operated and required no pH control. No operational problems were encountered from bacterial contaminants even though the reactor was operated under non-sterile conditions over the entire course of experiments. Productivities ranged between 25 to 44 g ethanol L{sup -1} h{sup -1}. The experiments demonstrated that ethanol inhibition and bed loading had significant effects on bed performance.

Sun, M.Y.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Davison, B.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Spurrier, M.A.; Webb, O.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-07-01

238

Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

2012-01-01

239

Alternative Energy Saving Technology Analysis Report for Richland High School Renovation Project  

SciTech Connect

On July 8, 2004, L&S Engineering, Inc. submitted a technical assistance request to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to help estimate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of the solar energy and daylighting design alternatives for Richland High School Renovation Project in Richland, WA. L&S Engineering expected PNNL to evaluate the potential energy savings and energy cost savings, the probable installation costs, incentives or grants to reduce the installed costs and simple payback for the following alternative measures: (1) Daylighting in New Gym; (2) Solar Photovoltaics; (3) Solar Domestic Hot Water Pre-Heat; and (4) Solar Outside Air Pre-Heat Following are the findings of the energy savings and cost-effectiveness analysis of above alternative energy saving technologies.

Liu, Bing

2004-08-09

240

Application of a triga research reactor as the neutron source for a production neutron radiography facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

GA Technologies Inc. (GA) has developed a Stationary Neutron Radiography System (SNRS) using a 250-1000 kW TRIGA reactor as the neutron source. The partially below ground reactor will be equipped with four vertical beam tubes originating in the reactor graphite reflector and installed tangential to the core to provide a strong current of thermal neutrons with minimum gamma-ray contamination. The

Chesworth

1988-01-01

241

Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (? emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found

Tomaž Žagar; Matjaž Boži?; Matjaž Ravnik

2004-01-01

242

Richland Environmental Restoration Project Fiscal Year 2000--2002 Detailed Work Plan -- Surveillance/Maintenance and Transition Project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), directed Hanford Site contractors to update multi-year work plans in accordance with the guidance provided to them. The Richland Environmental Restoration Project continued the Detailed Work Plan update approach that was approved in fiscal year 1998. This Detailed Work Plan provides the cost, scope, and schedule for the FY00 through FY02 activities required to support the Surveillance/Maintenance and Transition Project.

Swan, K.N.

1999-09-29

243

Environmental Assessment Use of Existing Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operates the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The DOE needs to identify and operate onsite locations for a continued supply of raw aggregate materials [approximately 7,600,000 cubic meters (10,000,000 cubic yards) over the next 10 years] for new facility construction, maintenance of existing facilities and transportation corridors, and fill and capping material for remediation and other sites.

N /A

2001-10-10

244

Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor  

SciTech Connect

The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic); Srank, J. [Nuclear Physics Inst. of the Academy of Sciences, Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01

245

Test of an anaerobic prototype reactor coupled with a filtration unit for production of VFAs.  

PubMed

The artificial ecosystem MELiSSA, supported by the European Space Agency is a closed loop system consisting of 5 compartments in which food, water and oxygen are produced out of organic waste. The first compartment is conceived as a thermophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor liquefying organic waste into VFAs, ammonium and CO2 without methane. A 20 L reactor was assembled to demonstrate the selected design and process at prototype scale. We characterized system performance from start-up to steady state and evaluated process efficiencies with special attention drawn to the mass balances. An overall efficiency for organic matter biodegradation of 50% was achieved. The dry matter content was stabilized around 40-50 g L(-1) and VFA production around 5-6 g L(-1). The results were consistent for the considered substrate mixture and can also be considered relevant in a broader context, as a first processing step to produce building blocks for synthesis of primary energy vectors. PMID:23333084

Poughon, Laurent; Creuly, Catherine; Farges, Bérangčre; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Schiettecatte, Wim; Jovetic, Srdjan; De Wever, Heleen

2013-10-01

246

Uncertainties in source term calculations generated by the ORIGEN2 computer code for Hanford Production Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The ORIGEN2 computer code is the primary calculational tool for computing isotopic source terms for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The ORIGEN2 code computes the amounts of radionuclides that are created or remain in spent nuclear fuel after neutron irradiation and radioactive decay have occurred as a result of nuclear reactor operation. ORIGEN2 was chosen as the primary code for these calculations because it is widely used and accepted by the nuclear industry, both in the United States and the rest of the world. Its comprehensive library of over 1,600 nuclides includes any possible isotope of interest to the HEDR Project. It is important to evaluate the uncertainties expected from use of ORIGEN2 in the HEDR Project because these uncertainties may have a pivotal impact on the final accuracy and credibility of the results of the project. There are three primary sources of uncertainty in an ORIGEN2 calculation: basic nuclear data uncertainty in neutron cross sections, radioactive decay constants, energy per fission, and fission product yields; calculational uncertainty due to input data; and code uncertainties (i.e., numerical approximations, and neutron spectrum-averaged cross-section values from the code library). 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.

1991-03-01

247

An investigation of sulfate production in clouds using a flow-through chemical reactor model approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flow-through chemical reactor model is developed to describe the mass transfer and chemical processes that atmospheric gases undergo in clouds. The model includes the simultaneous absorption of SO2, NH3, O3, NO(x), HNO3, CO2 and H2O2, the accompanying dissociation and oxidation reactions in cloud water, considers electrical neutrality, and includes qualitative parameterization of cloud microphysics. The model is used to assess the importance of the oxidation reactions H2O2-S(IV), O3-S(IV), and S(IV)-Mn(2+) catalysis, and the effects of cloud parameters such as drop size, rain intensity, liquid water content, and updraft velocity. Both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds are studied. Model results predict sulfate production rates varying from 3 percent/hr to 230 percent/hr. The actual rate is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the uptake air and the physical conditions of the cloud. Model results also show that both the H2O2 and the O3 oxidation reactions can be significant.

Hong, M. S.; Carmichael, G. R.

1983-01-01

248

Groundwater modeling of the proposed new production reactor site, Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses groundwater modeling performed to support the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that is being prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE). The EIS pertains to construction and operation of a new production reactor (NPR) that is under consideration for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Three primary issues are addressed by the modeling analysis: (1) groundwater availability, (2) changes in vertical hydraulic gradients as a result of groundwater pumpage, and (3) migration of potential contaminants from the NPR site. The modeling indicates that the maximum pumpage to be used, 1000 gpm, will induce only minor drawdown across SRS. Pumpage of this magnitude will have a limited effect on the upward gradient from the Cretaceous into the Tertiary near Upper Three Runs Creek. Potentiometric surface maps generated from modeled results indicate that horizontal flow in the water table is either towards Four Mile Creek to the north or to Pen Branch on the south. Particle tracking analysis indicates that the primary flow paths are vertical into the Lower Tertiary Zone, with very little lateral migration. Total travel times from the NPR site to the edge of the model (approximately 3 miles) is on the order of 50 years. The flow direction of water in the Lower Tertiary Zone is relatively well defined due to the regional extent of the flow system. The Pen Branch Fault does not influence contaminant migration for this particular site because it is in the opposite direction of Lower Tertiary Zone groundwater flow. 20 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Andersen, P.F.; Spalding, C.P.; Davis, D.H.

1990-01-05

249

[Start-up and continuous operation of bio-hydrogen production reactor at pH 5].  

PubMed

A continuous stirred-tank reactor(CSTR)for bio-hydrogen production using molasses wastewater as substrate was investigated. Emphasis was placed on assessing the start-up and continuous operation characteristics when keeping pH value constant. It was found that at pH of 5, biomass of 6g/L, organic loading rate (OLR) of 7.0kg/(m3 x d) and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6h, an equilibrial hydrogen-producing microbial community could be established within 30 days. Following that, oxidation redox potential (ORP) were kept within the ranges - 460mV - -480mV. Typical mixed acid type fermentation was exhibited in the reactor. Little difference was observed in the distribution of liquid end products. The liquid end products proportion of the total amount was 36% of acetic acid, 33% of ethanol, 18% of butyric acid, 13% of propionic acid and valeric acid, respectively. Hydrogen content in the biogas was about 30% - 35% . Maximal hydrogen production rate was 1.3m3/(m3 x d). The acid-producing fermentative bacteria were in the same preponderant status when the reactor showed mixed acid type fermentation. They are mostly cocci and bacilli. PMID:16004324

Gong, Man-li; Ren, Nan-qi; Tang, Jing

2005-03-01

250

Simple automatic device for real time sampling of gas production by a reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An innovative automatic device, allowing periodically drawing samples of the gases produced by a generic reactor, is presented. The gases evolving during the reaction are collected in a storage manifold, equipped with a variable volume consisting of a stainless steel bellow, whose expansion or contraction is driven by a linear step motor. A capacitive gauge monitors the pressure inside the storage manifold, while a feedback control loop reacts to any pressure change adjusting the variable volume (by means of the step motor) in such a way to keep the pressure at a desired set point P0. As long as the reaction proceeds, the gas production results in a progressive expansion of the variable volume, whose instantaneous value is constantly monitored by means of a slide potentiometer, whose lever is rigidly connected to the bellow's moving extremity. Once the bellow's expansion has reached a predetermined volume increment ?V, which means that an amount of gas P0?V has been produced and collected in the storage circuit, a quantity P0VS?P0?V of gas is released to the analysis system. A set of electropneumatic valves, automatically operated by the control system, allows for gas delivery to the analysis equipment and retrieval of the set point pressure, by compression of the variable volume, with no influence on the reaction. All relevant parameters are monitored and logged on a personal computer. The control and data acquisition software, made out using National Instrument LABVIEW™, also provides control of the analysis equipment. The ability of the proposed setup to not affect the ongoing process allows real time monitoring (by drawing samples at regular time intervals during the reaction) of the gas production. Moreover, since the amount of gas P0VS drawn at each sampling is always the same, it is possible to establish at a glance whether or not there are changes in the concentration of any component, by directly comparing the results of the analysis of successive samples.

Frattolillo, A.

2006-06-01

251

Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013  

SciTech Connect

This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

2013-11-01

252

Production of hydrogen and carbon by solar thermal methane splitting. I. The unseeded reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solar thermal methane splitting was performed in a series of tests with an unseeded low capacity reactor. Effective screening of the reactor window from contact with carbon particles was achieved by application of the tornado flow configuration (J Solar Energy Eng 124 (2002) 206). The tests were performed at atmospheric pressure and at temperatures up to 1320K. An extent of

Meir Kogan; Abraham Kogan

2003-01-01

253

Thermal and fast-spectrum molten salt reactors for actinide burning and fuel production  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a molten salt reactor (MSR), the fuel is dissolved in a fluoride salt coolant. The technology was partly developed in the 1950's and 1960's. With changing goals for advanced reactors and new technologies, there is currently a renewed interest in MSRs. The new technologies include (1) Brayton power cycles (rather than steam cycles) that eliminate many of the historical

Charles W. Forsberg; Charles W

2007-01-01

254

Hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas using a catalytic membrane reactor based process  

Microsoft Academic Search

IGCC coal plants show promise for environmentally benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified into syngas, which is then processed in a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to further enhance its hydrogen content for power generation. However, impurities in the syngas, primarily H2S, are detrimental to catalyst life and must be removed before the gas enters the WGS reactor.

Mitra Abdollahi; Jiang Yu; Paul K. T. Liu; Richard Ciora; Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2010-01-01

255

Fast Pyrolysis of Poplar Using a Captive Sample Reactor: Effects of Inorganic Salts on Primary Pyrolysis Products  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed a captive sample reactor (CSR) to study fast pyrolysis of biomass. The reactor uses a stainless steel wire mesh to surround biomass materials with an isothermal environment by independent controlling of heating rates and pyrolysis temperatures. The vapors produced during pyrolysis are immediately entrained and transported in He carrier gas to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Formation of secondary products is minimized by rapidly quenching the sample support with liquid nitrogen. A range of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) and transition metal salts were tested to study their effect on composition of primary pyrolysis products. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the MBMS data shows that transition metal salts enhance pyrolysis of carbohydrates and AAEM salts enhances pyrolysis of lignin. This was supported by performing similar separate studies on cellulose, hemicellulose and extracted lignin. The effect of salts on char formation is also discussed.

Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.; Jarvis, M.; Mino, K.; Bahng, M. K.; Nimlos, M.

2012-01-01

256

Combination of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery and packed-bed reactor for scalable production of adeno-associated virus.  

PubMed

The production of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) commonly requires plasmid cotransfection, which hinders its mass production. Herein we describe the development of a novel process for rAAV production by combining the advantages of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery and BelloCell bioreactor (a novel packed-bed reactor for animal cell culture; CESCO Bioengineering, Hsinchu, Taiwan). We constructed three baculoviral vectors: Bac-LacZ carries the lacZ gene flanked by AAV inverted terminal repeats, Bac-RC harbors AAV rep and cap genes, and Bac-Helper carries helper genes derived from adenovirus. Cotransduction of HEK-293 cells with these three baculoviruses resulted in successful production of rAAV, and the protein and rAAV yield did not decrease with Bac-RC passage for up to four passages. By adjusting the dose ratio of Bac-LacZ to Bac-RC, adding sodium butyrate, and transferring the production process to the BelloCell-500-AP (500 ml), which allowed for high-density culture and effective baculovirus-mediated transduction of HEK-293 cells, the maximal specific rAAV yield reached approximately 3.8 x 10(4) vector genome (VG) or 247 infectious viral particles (IVP) per cell, which corresponded to approximately 1 x 10(14) VG or 8.5 x 10(11) IVP per reactor run. The yield was comparable or superior to those obtained with other production systems. Baculoviral transduction is simple and cost-effective and the BelloCell-500-AP offers high-density culture of HEK-293 cells. Altogether, the combination of baculoviral transduction and BelloCell reactor culture provides a novel and economically viable approach for rAAV production. PMID:17944574

Huang, Kuo-Shiang; Lo, Wen-Hsin; Chung, Yao-Chi; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Chou, Szu-Ting; Hu, Yu-Chen

2007-11-01

257

Continuous production of acrylamide using immobilized Brevibacterium sp. CH2 in a two-stage packed bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Acrylamide was enzymatically produced from acrylonitrile (AN) in a two-stage packed bed reactor with immobilizedBrevibacterium sp. CH2 cells. Continuous production became possible because of higher tolerance of CH2 nitrile hydratase with respect to 6% AN than either the CH1 enzyme or theCorynebacterium enzyme of Nitto Chemical Industry which rapidly deactivated in a solution of 3% AN. The maximum volumetric

Cheo Young Lee; Ho Nam Chang

1990-01-01

258

Citric acid production by solid-state fermentation in a packed-bed reactor using Aspergillus niger  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kumara, a starch-containing root crop grown extensively in New Zealand, has been used as a substrate for citric acid production using Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation. When the process was operated in a packed-bed reactor, the bed loading was the most important operational parameter. The airflow rate and substrate particle size were also important but their net effects varied depending

Minyuan Lu; John D. Brooks; Ian S. Maddox

1997-01-01

259

In-place condensation of reaction mixture using hollow fiber membrane reactors improved productivity of cell-free protein synthesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors intended to raise the protein production rate of continuous flow cell-free (CFCF) translation by applying in-place condensation of the reaction mixture containing wheat germ extract (WGE), mRNA, tRNA, amino acids, and high energy biochemicals. A hollow fiber membrane reactor (HFMR) composed of a shell and 80 hollow fibers made of ultrafiltration (UF) membrane was developed for condensing the

Yuichi Yamamoto; Shunjiro Sugimoto; Xin-chun Shen; Teruyuki Nagamune; Shui-liang Yao; Eiji Suzuki

1999-01-01

260

Citrus peel influences the production of an extracellular naringinase by Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2 in a stirred tank reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2, Gram-positive coccus, a nonpathogenic member of the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus family was isolated from soil and used to produce naringinase in a stirred tank reactor. An initial medium at pH 5.5 and\\u000a a cultivation temperature of 30°C was found to be optimal for enzyme production. The addition of Ca+2 caused stimulation of enzyme activity. The effect of various physico-chemical

Munish Puri; Aneet Kaur; Colin J. Barrow; Ram Sarup Singh

2011-01-01

261

SynGas Production from Catalytic Steam Gasification of Municipal Solid Wastes in a Combined Fixed Bed Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The catalytic steam gasification of municipal solid wastes (MSW) for syn-gas production was experimentally investigated in a combined fixed bed reactor using the newly developed tri-metallic catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore the effects of catalyst presence, catalytic temperature, catalyst to MSW weight ratio (C\\/M) and steam to MSW ratio (S\\/M) on the composition and yield

Jianfen Li; Jianjun Liu; Shiyan Liao; Xiaorong Zhou; Rong Yan

2010-01-01

262

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17–18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131I, 132I, 132Te, 134Cs, and 137Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-01-01

263

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-01-01

264

Model for continuous production of solvents from whey permeate in a packed bed reactor using cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum immobilized by adsorption onto bonechar  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model has been developed to describe the operation of a packed bed reactor for the continuous production of solvents from whey permeate. The model has been used to quantitate the amounts of different physiological\\/ morphological types of biomass present in the reactor. The majority of biomass is inert, i.e. it neither grows nor produces solvent. Only relatively small

N. Qureshi; A. H. J. Paterson; I. S. Maddox

1988-01-01

265

Fission product retention in newly discovered organic-rich natural fission reactors at Oklo and Bangombe, Gabon  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of naturally occurring fission reactors in the rock strata of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian Basin in the Republic of Gabon in equatorial West Africa led to several programs to define migration and/or retention of uranium and fissiogenic isotopes from/in the natural reactor zones. Although much understanding has been gained, new insight is needed regarding the chemical and physical parameters that control movement and retention of fission products over almost two billion years from/in the natural reactors. Seventeen known natural fission reactors sustained criticality for 0.1 to 1 million years in hydrothermally altered sedimentary rocks 1968 +/- 50 million years ago. These natural nuclear reactors attained criticality because of high concentrations of uranium in small pockets in uranium ores, the lack of neutron poisons, and because at the time they reached criticality, the abundance of [sup 235]U was five times greater than it is today. Water acted as a moderator, and temperature in the natural reactors was between 160 and 360[degrees]C. Both the uranium-rich pockets and the uranium ore bodies in which these pockets are located were formed when aqueous solutions moving through highly fractured zones in the Francevillian sedimentary rocks met organic-rich sediments. This resulted in the reduction of U(VI) in the dissolved uranyl ions to U(IV), causing the precipitation of pitchblende and uraninite. It has been proposed that between 2.2 and 1.9 billion years ago, the earth's atmosphere experienced a remarkable temporary rise in O[sub 2] content; this event may account for the uranium-bearing, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the Francevillian rocks.

Nagy, B.; Rigali, M.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

1993-01-01

266

Effect of sulfate addition on methane production and sulfate reduction in a mesophilic acetate-fed anaerobic reactor.  

PubMed

A mesophilic anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was operated to evaluate the effect of sulfate addition on methane production and sulfate reduction using acetate as the sole carbon source. The results show that at the organic loading rate of 4.0 g TOC/L/day, the TOC removal efficiencies and the biogas production rates achieved over 95 % and 7000 mL/L/day without sulfate, respectively, and slightly decreased with sulfate addition (500-800 mg/L). Methane production capacities were not influenced significantly with the addition of sulfate, while sulfate reduction efficiencies were not stable with 23-87 % in the acetate-fed reactor. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to analyze the functional microbial compositions of acetate-degrading methane-producing bacteria (MPB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the reactor. The results found that as the increase of sulfate concentration, the proportion of Methanomicrobiales increased up to 58?±?2 %, while Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina decreased. The dominant methanogens shifted into hydrogenotrophic methanogens from even distribution of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. When hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant, sulfate reduction efficiency was high, while sulfate reduction efficiency was low as acetoclastic methanogens were dominant. PMID:25427678

Yang, Sen-Lin; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Jiang, Xia

2015-04-01

267

Investigation of the effects of radiolytic-gas bubbles on the long-term operation of solution reactors for medical-isotope production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most common and important medical radioisotopes is 99Mo, which is currently produced using the target irradiation technology in heterogeneous nuclear reactors. The medical isotope 99Mo can also be produced from uranium fission using aqueous homogeneous solution reactors. In solution reactors, 99Mo is generated directly in the fuel solution, resulting in potential advantages when compared with the target irradiation process in heterogeneous reactors, such as lower reactor power, less waste heat, and reduction by a factor of about 100 in the generation of spent fuel. The commercial production of medical isotopes in solution reactors requires steady-state operation at about 200 kW. At this power regime, the formation of radiolytic-gas bubbles creates a void volume in the fuel solution that introduces a negative coefficient of reactivity, resulting in power reduction and instabilities that may impede reactor operation for medical-isotope production. A model has been developed considering that reactivity effects are due to the increase in the fuel-solution temperature and the formation of radiolytic-gas bubbles. The model has been validated against experimental results from the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranyl fluoride Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA), and the SILENE uranyl nitrate solution reactor, commissioned at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, in Valduc, France. The model shows the feasibility of solution reactors for the commercial production of medical isotopes and reveals some of the important parameters to consider in their design, including the fuel-solution type, 235U enrichment, uranium concentration, reactor vessel geometry, and neutron reflectors surrounding the reactor vessel. The work presented herein indicates that steady-state operation at 200 kW can be achieved with a solution reactor consisting of 120 L of uranyl nitrate solution enriched up to 20% with 235U and a uranium concentration of 145 kg/m3 in a graphite-reflected cylindrical geometry.

Souto Mantecon, Francisco Javier

268

Correlation between hydroxyl radical production and theoretical pressure distribution in a sonochemical reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of operational parameters upon the hydroxyl radical generation of sonochemical reactors are critical to optimize this technology for wastewater treatment purposes. Ultrasonic wave characteristics are usually considered as the main parameter to be taken into account. Nevertheless, it is the interaction of these waves with the liquid medium and the reactor what really affects the process. Therefore, the characterization of sonochemical reactors should be based on the effective pressure distribution in the reactor, which not only includes the wave characteristics but also the propagation and reflection of these ultrasonic oscillations. The pressure field can be characterized using different parameters, such as maximum pressure amplitude or volumetric integration of pressure in the reactor. This study intends to find a correlation between such calculated pressure-distribution-related parameters and experimental measurements of hydroxyl radicals in the process. Both experiments and calculations are run varying the tip-bottom distance (keeping the rest of parameters constant), creating different reflection effects with the reactor walls and therefore different pressure distributions across the reactor. The hydroxyl radical measurements are performed with salicylic acid dosimetry, applying a specific developed method for biphasic cavitating systems. On the other hand, the pressure distribution was calculated simulating the different configurations with the computational tool COMSOL.

Martínez-Tarifa, A.; Arrojo, S.; Louisnard, O.; González-García, José; Tudela, I.

2010-01-01

269

Basic energy efficiency of plasma production in electrical discharge and electron beam reactors  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge of electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. This paper presents a comparative assessment of various non-thermal plasma reactors. The goal of our project is two-fold: (1) to understand the feasibility and scalability of various non-thermal plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to optimize process parameters and provide performance and economic data. Experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, pulsed corona reactor and dielectric-barrier discharge will be presented. These reactors have been used to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas decomposition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. The decomposition mechanisms are discussed to illustrate how the chemistry could strongly affect the economics of the process. An analysis of the electron kinetics show that electrical discharge reactors are the most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For pollution control applications requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the sue of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption.

Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A. [Plasma and Materials Technologies, Inc., Chatsworth, CA (United States); Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)

1996-11-01

270

Kinetics, design and biomass production of a bacteria reactor treating RAS effluent streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics and design of a suspended bacteria growth reactor, which can be integrated in a 100MT African catfish farm, were determined. Such a reactor converted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from RAS effluents into heterotrophic bacteria biomass. The determined kinetics were: yield=0.537gVSS\\/gC; endogenous decay coefficient=0.033h?1; maximum specific growth rate=0.217h?1; half-velocity constant=0.025g\\/l; maximum rate of substrate utilization=0.404gC\\/gVSSh. A reactor integrated

Oliver Schneider; Vasiliki Sereti; Ep. H. Eding; Johan A. J. Verreth; Bram Klapwijk

2007-01-01

271

High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of a high volume, high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means of producing solar grade silicon was tested. Bromosilanes and hydrogen were used as the feedstocks for the reactor along with preheated silicon particles which function both as nucleation and deposition sites. A complete reactor system was designed and fabricated. Initial preheating studies have shown the stability of tetrabromosilane to being heated as well as the ability to preheat hydrogen to the desired temperature range. Several test runs were made and some silicon was obtained from runs carried out at temperatures in excess of 1180 K.

Woerner, L.

1977-01-01

272

The Hanford Site New Production Reactor (NPR) economic and demographic baseline forecasts  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this is to present baseline employment and population forecasts for Benton, Franklin, and Yakima Counties. These forecasts will be used in the socioeconomic analysis portion of the New Production Reactor Environmental Impact Statement. Aggregate population figures for the three counties in the study area were developed for high- and low-growth scenarios for the study period 1990 through 2040. Age-sex distributions for the three counties during the study period are also presented. The high and low scenarios were developed using high and low employment projections for the Hanford site. Hanford site employment figures were used as input for the HARC-REMI Economic and Demographic (HED) model to produced baseline employment forecasts for the three counties. These results, in turn, provided input to an integrated three-county demographic model. This model, a fairly standard cohort-component model, formalizes the relationship between employment and migration by using migration to equilibrate differences in labor supply and demand. In the resulting population estimates, age-sex distributions for 1981 show the relatively large work force age groups in Benton County while Yakima County reflects higher proportions of the population in the retirement ages. The 2040 forecasts for all three counties reflect the age effects of relatively constant and low fertility increased longevity, as well as the cumulative effects of the migration assumptions in the model. By 2040 the baby boom population will be 75 years and older, contributing to the higher proportion of population in the upper end age group. The low scenario age composition effects are similar. 13 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Cluett, C.; Clark, D.C. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (USA))

1990-08-01

273

Cellulase production by Trichoderma harzianum in static and mixed solid-state fermentation reactors under nonaseptic conditions  

SciTech Connect

Cellulase production from lignocellulosic materials was studied in solid-state cultivation by both static and mixed techniques under nonaseptic conditions. The effects of fermentation conditions, such as moisture content, pH, temperature, and aeration, on cellulase production by Trichoderma harzianum using a mixture of wheat straw (80%) and bran (20%) were investigated. With a moisture content of 74% and a pH of 5.8, 18 IU filter paper activity and 198 IU endoglucanase activity/g initial substrate content were obtained in 66 hours. The extension from static column cultivation to stirred tank reactor of 65 l capacity gave similar yields of cellulase.

Deschamps, F.; Giuliano, C.; Asther, M.; Huet, M.C.; Roussos, S.

1985-09-01

274

Removal of Total Coliforms, Thermotolerant Coliforms, and Helminth Eggs in Swine Production Wastewater Treated in Anaerobic and Aerobic Reactors  

PubMed Central

The present work evaluated the performance of two treatment systems in reducing indicators of biological contamination in swine production wastewater. System I consisted of two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, with 510 and 209?L in volume, being serially arranged. System II consisted of a UASB reactor, anaerobic filter, trickling filter, and decanter, being also organized in series, with volumes of 300, 190, 250, and 150?L, respectively. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) applied in the first UASB reactors were 40, 30, 20, and 11?h in systems I and II. The average removal efficiencies of total and thermotolerant coliforms in system I were 92.92% to 99.50% and 94.29% to 99.56%, respectively, and increased in system II to 99.45% to 99.91% and 99.52% to 99.93%, respectively. Average removal rates of helminth eggs in system I were 96.44% to 99.11%, reaching 100% as in system II. In reactor sludge, the counts of total and thermotolerant coliforms ranged between 105 and 109?MPN (100?mL)?1, while helminth eggs ranged from 0.86 to 9.27?eggs?g?1?TS. PMID:24812560

Zacarias Sylvestre, Silvia Helena; Lux Hoppe, Estevam Guilherme; de Oliveira, Roberto Alves

2014-01-01

275

The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

2014-03-01

276

Production of Organic Oxygenates in the Partial Oxidation of Methane in a Silent Electric Discharge Reactor  

E-print Network

these reactors can be used to control NOx, SOx, toxic gases, volatile organic compounds, and hazardous emissions. It is a clean resource that gives more energy per CO2 molecule created than oil. It, therefore, can potentially

Mallinson, Richard

277

Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR  

DOEpatents

A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19

278

Heterotrophic denitrification plays an important role in N?O production from nitritation reactors treating anaerobic sludge digestion liquor.  

PubMed

Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from nitritation reactors receiving real anaerobic sludge digestion liquor have been reported to be substantially higher than those from reactors receiving synthetic digestion liquor. This study aims to identify the causes for the difference, and to develop strategies to reduce N2O emissions from reactors treating real digestion liquor. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) performing nitritation, fed with real (SBR-R) and synthetic (SBR-S) digestion liquors, respectively, were employed. The N2O emission factors for SBR-R and SBR-S were determined to be 3.12% and 0.80% of the NH4(+)-N oxidized, respectively. Heterotrophic denitrification supported by the organic carbon present in the real digestion liquor was found to be the key contributor to the higher N2O emission from SBR-R. Heterotrophic nitrite reduction likely stopped at N2O (rather than N2), with a hypothesised cause being free nitrous acid inhibition. This implies that all nitrite reduced by heterotrophic bacteria was converted to and emitted as N2O. Increasing dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration from 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L, or above, decreased aerobic N2O production from 2.0% to 0.5% in SBR-R, whereas aerobic N2O production in SBR-S remained almost unchanged (at approximately 0.5%). We hypothesised that DO at 1 mg/L or above suppressed heterotrophic nitrite reduction thus reduced aerobic heterotrophic N2O production. We recommend that DO in a nitritation system receiving anaerobic sludge digestion liquor should be maintained at approximately 1 mg/L to minimise N2O emission. PMID:24956602

Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Ye, Liu; Pijuan, Maite; Yuan, Zhiguo

2014-10-01

279

Production of bio-hydrogen by mesophilic anaerobic fermentation in an acid-phase sequencing batch reactor.  

PubMed

The pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) were varied to optimize the conversion of carbohydrate-rich synthetic wastewater into bio-hydrogen. A full factorial design using evolutionary operation (EVOP) was used to determine the effect of the factors and to find the optimum condition of each factor required for high hydrogen production rate. Experimental results from 20 runs indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4,460-5,540 mL/L/day under the volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR) of 75 g-COD/L/day obtained at an observed design point of HRT = 8 h and pH = 5.7. The hydrogen production rate was strongly dependent on the HRT, and the effect was statistically significant (P < 0.05). However, no significant effect (P > 0.05) was found for the pH on the hydrogen production rate. When the ASBR conditions were set for a maximum hydrogen production rate, the hydrogen production yield and specific hydrogen production rate were 60-74 mL/g-COD and 330-360 mL/g-VSS/day, respectively. The hydrogen composition was 43-51%, and no methanogenesis was observed. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, caproate, and ethanol were major liquid intermediate metabolites during runs of this ASBR. The dominant fermentative types were butyrate-acetate or ethanol-acetate, representing the typical anaerobic pathway of Clostridium species. This hydrogen-producing ASBR had a higher hydrogen production rate, compared with that produced using continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). This study suggests that the hydrogen-producing ASBR is a promising bio-system for prolonged and stable hydrogen production. PMID:17013946

Cheong, Dae-Yeol; Hansen, Conly L; Stevens, David K

2007-02-15

280

Citrus peel influences the production of an extracellular naringinase by Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2 in a stirred tank reactor.  

PubMed

Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2, Gram-positive coccus, a nonpathogenic member of the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus family was isolated from soil and used to produce naringinase in a stirred tank reactor. An initial medium at pH 5.5 and a cultivation temperature of 30°C was found to be optimal for enzyme production. The addition of Ca(+)˛ caused stimulation of enzyme activity. The effect of various physico-chemical parameters, such as pH, temperature, agitation, and inducer concentration was studied. The enzyme production was enhanced by the addition of citrus peel powder (CPP) in the optimized medium. A twofold increase in naringinase production was achieved using different technological combinations. The process optimization using technological combinations allowed rapid optimization of large number of variables, which significantly improved enzyme production in a 5-l reactor in 34 h. An increase in sugar concentration (15 g?l?ą) in the fermentation medium further increased naringinase production (8.9 IU?ml?ą) in the bioreactor. Thus, availability of naringinase renders it attractive for potential biotechnological applications in citrus processing industry. PMID:20922381

Puri, Munish; Kaur, Aneet; Barrow, Colin J; Singh, Ram Sarup

2011-02-01

281

The production of zinc by thermal dissociation of zinc oxide—solar chemical reactor design  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the design, fabrication, and preliminary test of a novel solar chemical reactor for conducting the thermal dissociation of ZnO into zinc and oxygen at above 2000 K. The reactor configuration features a windowed rotating cavity-receiver lined with ZnO particles that are held by centrifugal force. With this arrangement, ZnO is directly exposed to high-flux solar irradiation and serves

P. Haueter; S. Moeller; R. Palumbo; A. Steinfeld

1999-01-01

282

Production of structured lipids in a packed-bed reactor with thermomyces lanuginosa lipase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lipase-catalyzed interesterification between fish oil and medium-chain TAG has been investigated in a packedbed reactor with\\u000a a commercially immobilized enzyme. The enzyme, a Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase immobilized on silica by granulation (lipozyme TL IM; Novozymes A\\/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), has recently been developed\\u000a for fat modification. This study focuses on the new characteristics of the lipase in a packed-bed reactor when

Xuebing Xu; Trine Porsgaard; Hong Zhang; Jens Adler-Nissen; Carl-Erik Hřy

2002-01-01

283

Hydrogen production from two-step steam methane reforming in a fluidized bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

s Based on the chemical looping (CL) concept, two-step steam methane reforming (SMR) system with a reduction\\/oxidation (redox) reaction of iron oxides to produce pure hydrogen is proposed. This system consists of fuel reactor (FR) and steam reactor (SR). The feasibility of producing pure hydrogen without any purifying steps in SR and the synthetic gas (syngas, CO ţ H2) to

Kang Seok Go; Sung Real Son; Sang Done Kim; Kyoung Soo Kang; Chu Sik Park

2009-01-01

284

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

2005-02-13

285

Determination of Long-Lived Neutron Activation Products in Reactor Shielding Concrete Samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of activation studies of TRIGA research reactor concrete shielding are given. Samples made of ordinary and barytes concrete were irradiated in the reactor to simulate neutron activation in the shielding concrete. Long-lived neutron-induced gamma-ray-emitting radioactive nuclides were measured in the samples with a high-purity germanium detector. The most active long-lived radioactive nuclides in the ordinary concrete samples were

Tomaz Zagar; Matjaz Ravnik

2002-01-01

286

Effect of bone on the pyrolysis product distribution and composition in a fixed bed reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Co-pyrolysis of Biomass including Pistachio shell (PS), Pine wood (PW) and Wheat Straw (WS) with Bone matter (BM) have been investigated to determine the effect of bone on the quality of bio-char and bio-oil produced. The aim of this study is to generate stable and nitrogen enriched bio-char that can act as fertilizer while at the same time optimizes the chemical stability of the char to act as a Carbon Capture and Storage system (CCS) and co-produce high quality oils for renewable energy generation. To achieve this, the present study has focused on the influence of bone matter addition from 0wt% to 25wt% to the biomasses in a fixed bed pyrolysis reactor at 3000C. The analysis of the char products shows that the addition of bone to the biomass increased their char yields up to 10wt% addition. Higher addition was found to reduce the overall char yield from the biomass. At 10wt% bone addition, the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen content, and the gross calorific value of the chars were increased by 7wt%, 29wt%, 163wt% and 19Mj/kg, for Wheat straw, 62wt%, 46wt%, 135wt%, 110Mj/kg for Pine wood and 7wt%, 76wt%, 42wt% and 33Mj/kg for Pistachio shells. The oxygen content of the Wheat straw, Pistachio shells and pine wood mixed with 10wt% BM decreased by 28wt%, 21wt%, and 93wt%, respectively. The bio-oil yield increased for the bone addition up to 5%wt% for all the samples, its energy value and concentration of its major chemical components was improved for fuel and pharmaceutical use. Port experiment has shown that plant grown on soil amended with the bio-char produced gave higher yield as compared to that from un-amended soil. Comparison between the three biomasses investigated showed similar pattern of change. Hence it can be concluded that at optimum addition of bone to the biomass, bio-chars and oil yield could be optimized for soil amendment, energy production, while retaining carbon for sequestration.

Alhassan, M.; Andresen, J. M.

2012-04-01

287

A monolithic lipase reactor for biodiesel production by transesterification of triacylglycerides into fatty acid methyl esters  

PubMed Central

An enzymatic reactor with lipase immobilized on a monolithic polymer support has been prepared and used to catalyze the transesterification of triacylglycerides into the fatty acid methyl esters commonly used for biodiesel. A design of experiments procedure was used to optimize the monolithic reactor with variables including control of the surface polarity of the monolith via variations in the length of the hydrocarbon chain in alkyl methacrylate monomer, time of grafting of 1-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone used to activate the monolith, and time used for the immobilization of porcine lipase. Optimal conditions involved the use of a poly(stearyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith, grafted first with vinylazlactone, then treated with lipase for 2 h to carry out the immobilization of the enzyme. Best conditions for the transesterification of glyceryl tributyrate included a temperature of 37°C and a 10 min residence time of the substrate in the bioreactor. The reactor did not lose its activity even after pumping through it a solution of substrate equaling 1,000 reactor volumes. This enzymatic reactor was also used for the transesterification of triacylglycerides from soybean oil to fatty acid methyl esters thus demonstrating the ability of the reactor to produce biodiesel. PMID:21915852

Urban, Jiri; Svec, Frantisek; Fréchet, Jean M.J.

2011-01-01

288

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01

289

Production of hydrogen and syngas via gasification of the corn and wheat dry distiller grains (DDGS) in a fixed-bed micro reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Production of hydrogen and syngas via gasification of the corn and wheat dry distiller grains (DDGS) with oxygen in a continuous downflow fixed bed micro reactor are studied in this paper. A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of reaction time (15–45 min), reactor temperature (700–900 °C) and oxygen to nitrogen ratio (0.08–0.2 vol.\\/vol.) on product gas composition,

Ahmad Tavasoli; Masoumeh G. Ahangari; Chirayu Soni; Ajay K. Dalai

2009-01-01

290

[Interview]: Alexandre Shvartsburg, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA  

SciTech Connect

Q1. What are your main research activities in ion mobility mass spectrometry (past or present)? My early efforts focused on the structural characterization of atomic (carbon and semiconductor) clusters. After the production of bulk fullerenes, many hoped that other nanoclusters discovered in the gas phase could also coalesce into new materials. As these studies required accurate and robust mobility calculations for any ion geometry, I strived to build the needed theory and implement it in the Mobcal software widely employed today. Since 2004, I have been developing methods and novel applications of differential IMS (FAIMS) at PNNL. The principal achievement has been raising the resolving power by over tenfold (up to ~400 for multiply-charged peptides) using elevated fields, helium and hydrogen-rich buffers, and extended filtering times. This performance broadly allows previously unthinkable separations of very similar species, for example sequence inversions and post-translational modification localization isomers of peptides (including “middle-down” peptides such as histone tails), lipid regioisomers, and even isotopomers. Another major direction is investigating the dipole alignment of larger proteins, which creates an exceptionally strong FAIMS effect that is a potential tool for structural biology. Q2: What have been the most significant instrumentation or applications developments in the history of ion mobility - mass spectrometry? In 1995 when I started graduate research at Northwestern, only two groups worldwide worked with IMS/MS and “the literature” meant papers by Bowers (UCSB). Well-wishers counseled me to “learn something useful like HPLC, as IMS would never have real utility”. This booklet showcases the scale of change since. First, the practical IMS/ToF platforms for complex biological analyses demonstrated by Clemmer have turned IMS/MS from an esoteric physical chemistry technique into a powerful analytical tool. By commercializing the IMS/ToF technology in Synapt instruments, Waters has greatly increased its impact via expanded number and diversity of applications. Concurrently, Guevremont at Canadian NRC has perfected FAIMS coupled to MS, deployed it for real-world bio and environmental analyses, and widely distributed it in the Ionalytics Selectra system (subsequently installed on Thermo MS platforms). The latest breakthrough is ultra-FAIMS by Owlstone, where extreme fields allow numerous qualitatively new separations and operational modes that we just begin to explore. Q3: Where do you see ion mobility - mass spectrometry making the most impact in the next 5 years? Any predictions for where the field will go? Sciences dealing with perturbations in media (such as optics or acoustics) at some point shift from the linear to nonlinear paradigm, where propagation depends on the magnitude of perturbation or its driving force. While the linear part remains industrially important (e.g., eyewear and architectural glass for optics), frontline research moves to nonlinear phenomena. IMS is undergoing that transition now with the rise of FAIMS, which should continue as the fundamental understanding improves, new modalities and applications emerge, and more instrumentation is introduced by vendors. Modifying and augmenting FAIMS separations through vapor dopants that render ion mobilities less linear is becoming routine. I expect this area to advance, extending to more specific interactions and to complexation with solution additives. Another route to higher separation power is integrating FAIMS with conventional IMS; proliferation of both technologies would make such 2-D platforms common. Along with mass spectrometry and conventional IMS, FAIMS will address increasingly large macromolecules, including proteins and their complexes.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

2012-12-01

291

Bioenergy production from diluted poultry manure and microbial consortium inside Anaerobic Sludge Bed Reactor at sub-mesophilic conditions.  

PubMed

In this study, anaerobic treatability of diluted chicken manure (with an influent feed ratio of 1 kg of fresh chicken manure to 6 L of tap water) was investigated in a lab-scale anaerobic sludge bed (ASB) reactor inoculated with granular seed sludge. The ASB reactor was operated at ambient temperature (17-25°C) in order to avoid the need of external heating up to higher operating temperatures (e.g., up to 35°C for mesophilic digestion). Since heat requirement for raising the temperature of incoming feed for digestion is eliminated, energy recovery from anaerobic treatment of chicken manure could be realized with less operating costs. Average biogas production rates were calculated ca. 210 and 242 L per kg of organic matter removed from the ASB reactor at average hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 13 and 8.6 days, respectively. Moreover, average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of ca. 89% was observed with suspended solids removal more than 97% from the effluent of the ASB reactor. Influent ammonia, on the other hand, did not indicate any free ammonia inhibition due to dilution of the raw manure while pH and alkalinity results showed stability during the study. Microbial quantification results indicated that as the number of bacterial community decreased, the amount of Archaea increased through the effective digestion volume of the ASB reactor. Moreover, the number of methanogens displayed an uptrend like archaeal community and a strong correlation (-0.645) was found between methanogenic community and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration especially acetate. PMID:25065830

Jaxybayeva, Aigerim; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Cetecioglu, Zeynep; Ozbayram, E Gozde; Yilmaz, Fatih; Ince, Orhan

2014-01-01

292

Application of a packed bed reactor for the production of hydrogen from cheese whey permeate: effect of organic loading rate.  

PubMed

The production of H2 was studied using a packed bed reactor with polyurethane foam acting as support material. Experiments were performed using mixed microflora under non sterile conditions. The system was initially operated with synthetic wastewater as the sole substrate. Subsequently, cheese whey permeate was added to the system at varying organic loading rates (OLR). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by applying a continuous decrease in OLR. As a result, a significant decrease in H2 yields (HY) was observed with the decrease in OLR from 18.8 to 6.3 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L d. Microbial analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of non-hydrogen producers, Sporolactobacillus sp. and Prevotella, was the main reason for low HYs obtained. This behavior indicates that the fermentation under non-sterile conditions was favored by high concentrations of substrate by creating an adverse environment for nonhydrogen producer organisms. PMID:24171421

Fernández, Camino; Carracedo, Begońa; Martínez, Elia Judith; Gómez, Xiomar; Morán, Antonio

2014-01-01

293

Continuous hydrogen production from co-digestion of municipal food waste and kitchen wastewater in mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor.  

PubMed

This study was carried out to assess the impact of organic loading rate (OLR) on the performance of mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) for H(2) production from a co-digestion of municipal food waste and kitchen wastewater. The reactor was operated at different organic loading rates (OLRs) of 29, 36 and 47 g COD(total)/Ld. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was kept constant at 1.6d. The results showed that increasing the OLR from 29 to 36 g COD(total)/Ld, leads to a significant (p ? 0.01) drop in the H(2) production from 6.0±0.5 to 5.4±1.04 L H(2)/d, respectively. However, the H(2) production remained at the same level of 5.3±1.04 L H(2)/d at increasing the OLR from 36 to 47 g COD(total)/Ld. The H(2) generation was mainly due to conversion of COD (57%) and carbohydrate (81%). Protein and lipids conversion represents only 23.3% and 4.1% respectively for H(2) production. PMID:22446053

Tawfik, A; El-Qelish, M

2012-06-01

294

Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (? emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

Žagar, Tomaž; Boži?, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

2004-12-01

295

Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

2012-10-02

296

Comparative Study to Determine an Optimal Material for Tritium Production in a Direct Drive IFE Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important technical and economic consideration in designing the prospective direct drive inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor is the determination of a suitable mechanism for tritium breeding. A comprehensive review is undertaken to determine the optimal breeding material, examining two candidate compounds: 83Pb-17Li and (LiF)2BeF2 (FLiBe). In this study, the compounds are evaluated based on chemical and physical properties, structural requirements, feasibility, hazards, and costs of application. Preliminary results seemed to indicate that FLiBe may be the more practical option, due to its mechanical utility and the relative projected efficacy of blanket design. However, much remains to be investigated, particularly the properties of breeder and structural materials in the specific conditions of a reactor. This evaluation process will require further theoretical modeling as well as practical trial, currently planned in other progenitor reactor designs. This paper will present the results of the analysis of these candidate breeder materials.

Aristova, Maria; Gentile, Charles

2007-11-01

297

Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D  

SciTech Connect

The coal to hydrogen project utilizes the iron/iron oxide looping process to produce high purity hydrogen. The input energy for the process is provided by syngas coming from gasification process of coal. The reaction pathways for this process have been studied and favorable conditions for energy efficient operation have been identified. The Magnetically Stabilized Porous Structure (MSPS) is invented. It is fabricated from iron and silica particles and its repeatable high performance has been demonstrated through many experiments under various conditions in thermogravimetric analyzer, a lab-scale reactor, and a large scale reactor. The chemical reaction kinetics for both oxidation and reduction steps has been investigated thoroughly inside MSPS as well as on the surface of very smooth iron rod. Hydrogen, CO, and syngas have been tested individually as the reducing agent in reduction step and their performance is compared. Syngas is found to be the most pragmatic reducing agent for the two-step water splitting process. The transport properties of MSPS including porosity, permeability, and effective thermal conductivity are determined based on high resolution 3D CT x-ray images obtained at Argonne National Laboratory and pore-level simulations using a lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE)-based mesoscopic model developed during this investigation. The results of those measurements and simulations provide necessary inputs to the development of a reliable volume-averaging-based continuum model that is used to simulate the dynamics of the redox process in MSPS. Extensive efforts have been devoted to simulate the redox process in MSPS by developing a continuum model consist of various modules for conductive and radiative heat transfer, fluid flow, species transport, and reaction kinetics. Both the Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches for species transport of chemically reacting flow in porous media have been investigated and verified numerically. Both approaches lead to correct prediction of hydrogen production rates over a large range of experimental conditions in the laboratory scale reactor and the bench-scale reactor. In the economic analysis, a comparison of the hydrogen production plants using iron/iron oxide looping cycle and the conventional process has been presented. Plant configurations are developed for the iron/iron oxide looping cycle. The study suggests a higher electric power generation but a lower hydrogen production efficiency comparing with the conventional process. Additionally, it was shown that the price of H{sub 2} obtained from our reactor can be as low as $1.7/kg, which is 22% lower than the current price of the H{sub 2} obtained from reforming plants.

Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

2013-09-30

298

27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in February 1945 in this case, showing the vertical safety rods (VSRs) and the cables that support them. The rods could be dropped into the pile to effect a rapid shutdown. The four silvered-colored drums on the left contained boron solution and are part of the last ditch safety system. Should the VSRs channels become blocked by an occurrence such as an earthquake, the solution could be dumped into the VSR channels to help shut down the reactor. D-8334 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

299

Catalytic steam gasification of pig compost for hydrogen-rich gas production in a fixed bed reactor.  

PubMed

The catalytic steam gasification of pig compost (PC) for hydrogen-rich gas production was experimentally investigated in a fixed bed reactor using the developed NiO on modified dolomite (NiO/MD) catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore the effects of catalyst, catalytic temperature, steam to PC ratio and PC particle size on the gas quality and yield. The results indicate that the NiO/MD catalyst could significantly eliminate the tar in the gas production and increase the hydrogen yield, and the catalyst lives a long lifetime in the PC steam gasification. Moreover, the higher catalytic temperature and smaller PC particle size can contribute to more hydrogen production and gas yield. Meanwhile, the optimal ratio of steam to PC (S/P) is found to be 1.24. PMID:23422306

Wang, Jingbo; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; He, Piwen; Guo, Dabin; Hu, Mian; Qi, Fangjie; Luo, Siyi

2013-04-01

300

Effect of catalyst additives on the production of biofuels from palm oil cracking in a transport riser reactor.  

PubMed

Catalytic cracking of crude palm oil (CPO) and used palm oil (UPO) were studied in a transport riser reactor for the production of biofuels at a reaction temperature of 450 degrees C, with residence time of 20s and catalyst-to-oil ratio (CTO) of 5 gg(-1). The effect of HZSM-5 (different Si/Al ratios), beta zeolite, SBA-15 and AlSBA-15 were studied as physically mixed additives with cracking catalyst Rare earth-Y (REY). REY catalyst alone gave 75.8 wt% conversion with 34.5 wt% of gasoline fraction yield using CPO, whereas with UPO, the conversion was 70.9 wt% with gasoline fraction yield of 33.0 wt%. HZSM-5, beta zeolite, SBA-15 and AlSBA-15 as additives with REY increased the conversion and the yield of organic liquid product. The transport riser reactor can be used for the continuous production of biofuels from cracking of CPO and UPO over REY catalyst. PMID:19138514

Chew, Thiam Leng; Bhatia, Subhash

2009-05-01

301

HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

Gorensek, M.

2011-07-06

302

Hydrogen production for fuel cell application in an autothermal micro-channel reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results concerning the coupling of the steam reforming (SR) and total oxidation (TOX) of methanol in a two-passage reactor are presented. A commercially available copper based catalyst is used for the steam reforming. For the total oxidation, a highly active cobalt oxide catalyst was developed. Both catalysts are used in form of thin layers immobilized on the wall of the

Pierre Reuse; Albert Renken; Katja Haas-Santo; Oliver Görke; Klaus Schubert

2004-01-01

303

Nuclear track membranes: Production in nuclear reactors and prospects of application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear track membranes are produced by a physico-chemical treatment of polymeric films exposed to fission fragments in nuclear reactors or to heavy ion beams. Heavy charged particles form in the solids along their trajectories regions of high ionization density where polymer destruction takes place. Selective dissolution of damaged material converts the initial film into a microfiltration membrane with cylindrical through

B. I. Fursov; E. A. Kryuchkov; N. N. Mironov

1993-01-01

304

Multiscale Modeling of TiO2 Nanoparticle Production in Flame Reactors: Effect of Chemical Mechanism  

E-print Network

on the precursor injection con- figuration. Both precursor transport and reaction history affect particle evolution, these kinetics are strongly coupled the combustion kinetics through the temperature-dependent rate constants (i manufactured in flame reactors, the precursor is injected into a pre-existing flame, exposing it to a high-temperature

Raman, Venkat

305

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-print Network

heat and mass transfer limitations that affect the rate of the reformation reactions.reaction rate is also dependant on reactor geometry. The variation in heatheat transfer path leading to a temperature profile within the catalyst bed. Since chemical reaction rates

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01

306

Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

2013-06-01

307

Minimization of sludge production by a side-stream reactor under anoxic conditions in a pilot plant.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the application of an anoxic side-stream reactor in the sludge return line of a conventional activated sludge system for the reduction of biomass production. The oxidation-reduction potential was maintained at -150 mV while the applied sludge loading rate was modified by changing the percentage of return sludge treated in this reactor. The observed yield from the conventional system (0.513 kg VSS kg(-1) COD) was continuously reduced when the portion of return sludge treated was increased. A maximum reduction of 18.3% of the observed yield was obtained treating the whole sludge return line. The sludge age maintained through the experiment. The organic matter removal was not deteriorated, even improved, by the proposed plant modification. Thus, simply applying an anoxic side-stream reactor would decrease the final volume of waste sludge while maintaining the sludge retention time and would, in fact, decrease the economic costs in terms of sludge handling. PMID:23247151

Coma, M; Rovira, S; Canals, J; Colprim, J

2013-02-01

308

The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.  

PubMed

The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (<1 kDa) and lower percentage of large molecular size (>100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids. PMID:24077152

Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

2013-11-01

309

Evaluation of selected ex-reactor accidents related to the tritium and medical isotope production mission at the FFTF  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been proposed as a production facility for tritium and medical isotopes. A range of postulated accidents related to ex-reactor irradiated fuel and target handling were identified and evaluated using new source terms for the higher fuel enrichment and for the tritium and medical isotope targets. In addition, two in-containment sodium spill accidents were re-evaluated to estimate effects of increased fuel enrichment and the presence of the Rapid Retrieval System. Radiological and toxicological consequences of the analyzed accidents were found to be well within applicable risk guidelines.

Himes, D.A.

1997-11-17

310

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

E-print Network

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on March 11, 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima nuclear reactor complex. On March 17-18, 2011 we detected the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. The highest detected activity to date is <~32 mBq/m^3 of 131-I.

Leon, J Diaz; Knecht, A; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G

2011-01-01

311

Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)  

E-print Network

The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

Rodriguez, Judy N

2013-01-01

312

Reactor cover gas monitoring at the Fast Flux Test Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt (thermal) sodium-cooled reactor designed for irradiation testing of fuels, materials and components for LMRs. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy on the government-owned Hanford reservation near Richland, Washington. The first 100-day operating cycle began in April 1982 and the eighth operating cycle was

R. A. Bechtold; F. E. Holt; G. E. Meadows; R. E. Schenter

1986-01-01

313

ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

2009-06-11

314

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

315

Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor.

Mie Hiruta; Gannon Johnson; Maziar Rostamian; Gabriel P. Potirniche; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Massimo Bertino; Louis Franzel; Akira Tokuhiro

2013-10-01

316

Update to the NARAC NNPP Non-Reactor Source Term Products  

SciTech Connect

Recent updates to NARAC plots for NNPP requires a modification to your iClient database. The steps you need to take are described below. Implementation of the non-reactor source terms in February 2009 included four plots, the traditional three instantaneous plots (1-3) and a new Gamma Dose Rate: 1. Particulate Air Concentration 2. Total Ground Deposition 3. Whole Body Inhalation Dose Rate (CEDE Rate) 4. Gamma Dose Rate These plots were all initially implemented to be instantaneous output and generated 30 minutes after the release time. Recently, Bettis and NAVSEA have requested the Whole Body CEDE rate plot to be changed to an integrated dose valid at two hours. This is consistent with the change made to the Thyroid Dose rate plot conversion to a 2-hour Integrated Thyroid dose for the Reactor and Criticality accidents.

Vogt, P

2009-06-29

317

Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER-type nuclear reactors. II. 60Co  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the case of intact fuel claddings, the predominant source of radioactivity in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors is the activation of corrosion products in the core. The most important corrosion product radionuclides in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are 60Co, 58Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe (as well as 110mAg in some Soviet-made VVER-type reactor). The second part of this series is focused on the complex studies of the formation and build-up of 60Co-containing species on an austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) and magnetite-covered carbon steel often to be used in Soviet-planned VVERs. The kinetics and mechanism of the cobalt accumulation were studied by a combination (coupling) of an in situ radiotracer method and voltammetry in a model solution of the primary circuit coolant. In addition, independent techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and ICP-OES are also used to analyze the chemical state of Co species in the passive layer formed on stainless steel as well as the chemical composition of model solution. The experimental results have revealed that: (i) The passive behavior of the austenitic stainless steel at open-circuit conditions, the slightly alkaline pH and the reducing water chemistry can be considered to be optimal to minimize the 60Co contamination. (ii) The highly potential dependent deposition of various Co-oxides at E>1.10 V (vs. RHE) offers a unique possibility to elaborate a novel electrochemical method for the decrease or removal of cobalt traces from borate-containing coolants contaminated with 60Co and/or 58Co radionuclides.

Varga, Kálmán; Hirschberg, Gábor; Németh, Zoltán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter

2001-10-01

318

An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

2014-03-01

319

Design of adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. Application to production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas were designed at conditions suitable for the production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells. A steady-state, one-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model was applied in the simulations. Intra-particle concentration gradients were taken into account explicitly, by solving the continuity equations in the catalyst pellet at each position along the fixed-bed

C. R. H. de Smet; R. J. Berger; GBMM Marin; J. C. Schouten

2001-01-01

320

Application of a multi-layer packed-bed reactor to citric acid production in solid-state fermentation using Aspergillus niger  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid-state fermentation, using the fungus Aspergillus niger, has been employed for the production of citric acid from kumara, a starch-containing root crop. A multi-layer packed-bed reactor was designed and operated in an attempt to understand mass and heat transfer during the fermentation. Although only a limited understanding was obtained, the multi-layer packed-bed reactor improved the mass transfer considerably compared with

M. Y. Lu; I. S. Maddox; J. D. Brooks

1998-01-01

321

Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production

James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

2008-01-01

322

New reactor for production of tungsten disulfide hollow onion-like (inorganic fullerene-like) nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

MS2 (M=Mo, W) hollow onion-like nanoparticles were the first inorganic fullerene-like (IF) materials, found in 1992. Understanding of the IF-MS2 growth mechanism in 1996 enabled us to build a rather simple reactor, which produced about 0.4 g per batch, of an almost pure IF-WS2 powder. Soon after, it was found that the new powder showed better tribological properties compared with

Y. Feldman; A. Zak; R. Popovitz-Biro; R. Tenne

2000-01-01

323

Microsomal immobilized-enzyme-reactor for on-line production of glucuronides in a HPLC column  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonsolubilized rat liver microsomes have been noncovalently immobilized on an immobilized artifical membrane (IAM) HPLC chromatographic support to create a microsomal immobilized enzyme reactor (MIC-IMER). The MIC-IMER has been used for the on-line synthesis and analysis of Phase II metabolism conjugates. The activity of the MIC-IMER was investigated by following thein vitro glucuronidation of two well known UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT; EC

T. Alebi?-Kolbah; I. W. Wainer

1993-01-01

324

Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors  

DOEpatents

A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

1983-06-10

325

Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors  

DOEpatents

A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA); Trapp, Turner J. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01

326

Wood\\/plastic copyrolysis in an auger reactor: Chemical and physical analysis of the products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies observed that slow copyrolysis of wood and plastic in enclosed autoclaves produced an upgraded raw bio-oil with increased hydrogen content. We now demonstrate that fast simultaneous pyrolyses of 50:50, w\\/w, pine wood\\/waste plastics in a 2kg\\/h lab scale auger-fed reactor at 1atm, with a short vapor residence time, generates higher heating value upgraded bio-oils. Three plastics: polystyrene (PS),

Priyanka Bhattacharya; Philip H. Steele; El Barbary M. Hassan; Brian Mitchell; Leonard Ingram; Charles U. Pittman Jr.

2009-01-01

327

Continuous production of biogas from dairy manure using an innovative no-mix reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 25 L no-mix anaerobic digester was designed and fabricated. The digester was designed to act as liquid-solid separator.\\u000a The sludges obtained from the bottom of the digester had high nitrogen and ash concentrations while the effluent had no offensive\\u000a odor. The performance of the no-mix digester was compared to that of a continuous stirred tank reactor at two temperatures

A. E. Ghaly; R. M. Ben-Hassan

1989-01-01

328

Determination of Long-Lived Neutron Activation Products in Reactor Shielding Concrete Samples  

SciTech Connect

The results of activation studies of TRIGA research reactor concrete shielding are given. Samples made of ordinary and barytes concrete were irradiated in the reactor to simulate neutron activation in the shielding concrete. Long-lived neutron-induced gamma-ray-emitting radioactive nuclides were measured in the samples with a high-purity germanium detector. The most active long-lived radioactive nuclides in the ordinary concrete samples were found to be {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. In the barytes concrete samples, the most active long-lived radioactive nuclides were {sup 60}Co, {sup 133}Ba, and {sup 152}Eu. Activation in the concrete was also calculated using the ORIGEN2 code and compared to experimental results. Simple radioactive nuclide generation and depletion calculation using one-group cross-section libraries provided together with the ORIGEN2 code did not give conservative results. Significant discrepancies were observed for some nuclides. For accurate long-lived radioactive nuclide generation in reactor shielding, material-specific cross-section libraries should be generated and verified by measurement.

Zagar, Tomaz; Ravnik, Matjaz ['Jozef Stefan' Institute (Slovenia)

2002-10-15

329

Physicochemical properties of cross-linked and acetylated starches and products of their hydrolysis in continuous recycle membrane reactor.  

PubMed

The aim of the present work was to study the physicochemical properties of doubly modified, by cross-linking and acetylating, starches as well as the products of their enzymatic hydrolysis. A two step procedure of hydrolysis, including the batch and membrane reactors, were investigated. The second step of enzymatic processes were carried out in a continuous recycle membrane reactor (CRMR). Three kinds of commercial starches--two preparations of acetylated distarch adipate E1422 of different degrees of cross-linking, as well as one preparation of acetylated distarch phosphate E1414 were examined. It was found that the degree of substitution of acetyl groups in the macromolecules of starch did not influence the effectiveness of hydrolysis. However, the degree of cross-linking with adipate groups slightly decreased the efficiency of processing in the CRMR. Additionally, the relationship between the type of hydrocolloid and its adsorption activity in the air/water and oil/water systems was considered. All obtained derivatives revealed adsorption properties and reduced the surface/interface tension in the air/water and oil/water systems. The efficiency and effectiveness of adsorption of the investigated hydrocolloids were affected by the type of modification as well as the degree of substitution of acetyl groups in the macromolecules of starch. Particle size distributions formed in aqueous solutions for all investigated hydrolyses were determined and compared with results obtained for commercial products. PMID:19734024

Prochaska, Krystyna; Konowa?, Emilia; Sulej-Chojnacka, Joanna; Lewandowicz, Grazyna

2009-11-01

330

The Phase Behavior Effect on the Reaction Engineering of Transesterification Reactions and Reactor Design for Continuous Biodiesel Production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demand for renewable forms of energy has increased tremendously over the past two decades. Of all the different forms of renewable energy, biodiesel, a liquid fuel, has emerged as one of the more viable possibilities. This is in large part due to the fact that biodiesel can readily be used in modern day diesel engines with nearly no engine modifications. It is commonly blended with conventional petroleum-derived diesel but it can also be used neat. As a result of the continued growth of the industry, there has been a correspondingly large increase in the scientific and technical research conducted on the subject. Much of the research has been conducted on the feasibility of using different types of feedstocks, which generally vary with respect to geographic locale, as well as different types of catalysts. Much of the work of the present study was involved with the investigation of the binary liquid-liquid nature of the system and its effects on the reaction kinetics. Initially, the development of an analytical method for the analysis of the compounds present in transesterification reaction mixtures using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed. The use of UV(205 nm) as well as refractive index detection (RID) were shown capable to detect the various different types of components associated with transesterification reactions. Reversed-phase chromatography with isocratic elution was primarily used. Using a unique experimental apparatus enabling the simultaneous analysis of both liquid phases throughout the reaction, an experimental method was developed for measuring the reaction rate under both mass transfer control and reaction control. The transesterification reaction rate under each controlling mechanism was subsequently evaluated and compared. It was determined that the reaction rate is directly proportional to the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase. Furthermore, the reaction rate accelerates rapidly as the system transitions from two phases to a single phase, or pseudo-single phase. The transition to a single phase or pseudo-single phase is a function of the methanol content. Regardless, the maximum observed reaction rate occurs at the point of the phase transition, when the concentration of triglycerides in the methanol phase is largest. The phase transition occurs due to the accumulation of the primary product, biodiesel methyl esters. Through various experiments, it was determined that the rate of the triglyceride mass transfer into the methanol phase, as well as the solubility of triglycerides in methanol, increases with increasing methyl ester concentration. Thus, there exists some critical methyl ester concentration which favors the formation of a single or pseudo-single phase system. The effect of the by-product glycerol on the reaction kinetics was also investigated. It was determined that at low methanol to triglyceride molar ratios, glycerol acts to inhibit the reaction rate and limit the overall triglyceride conversion. This occurs because glycerol accumulates in the methanol phase, i.e. the primary reaction volume. When glycerol is at relatively high concentrations within the methanol phase, triglycerides become excluded from the reaction volume. This greatly reduces the reaction rate and limits the overall conversion. As the concentration of methanol is increased, glycerol becomes diluted and the inhibitory effects become dampened. Assuming pseudo-homogeneous phase behavior, a simple kinetic model incorporating the inhibitory effects of glycerol was proposed based on batch reactor data. The kinetic model was primarily used to theoretically compare the performance of different types of continuous flow reactors for continuous biodiesel production. It was determined that the inhibitory effects of glycerol result in the requirement of very large reactor volumes when using continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR). The reactor volume can be greatly reduced using tubular style plug flow reactors (PFR). Despite this fact, the use of CSTRs is more common than the use of PFR

Csernica, Stephen N.

331

Activation of Canadian coals in a fixed-bed reactor: effect of the particle size on product quality  

SciTech Connect

Three Canadian coals, namely, Bienfait lignite, Montgomery sub-bituminous C, and Coal Valley high volatile bituminous C were activated in a fixed-bed reactor. For each coal, two different sizes of particles in the ranges of 0-1.25 mm (fines) and 1.25-2.5 mm (granules) along with cylindrical pellets of 3.18 mm in diameter and 7{+-}2 mm long were activated. The qualities of the products were determined by measuring iodine and methylene blue numbers, specific Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, bulk densities, and ash contents. The specific surface areas and iodine and methylene blue numbers of bituminous coal products were lower than the values obtained with the lignite and sub-bituminous coals, although the product yields were higher. Products obtained from pellets were found to have superior quality compared to that obtained from fines. The ash content of the feed coal influences the quality of the product activated carbon. It was established that a first-order reaction between steam and coal pellets occurred in the process. The activation energies for the process were also determined. 17 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Ajay K. Dalai; Narayan C. Pradhan; Jian Liu; Amitabha Majumdar; Eric L. Tollefson [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-07-15

332

The influence of the buffering capacity on the production of organic acids and alcohols from wastewater in anaerobic reactor.  

PubMed

Some bacteria common in anaerobic digestion process can ferment a broad variety of organic compounds to organic acids, alcohols, and hydrogen, which can be used as biofuels. Researches are necessary to control the microbial interactions in favor of the alcohol production, as intermediary products of the anaerobic digestion of organic compounds. This paper reports on the effect of buffering capacity on the production of organic acids and alcohols from wastewater by a natural mixed bacterial culture. The hypothesis tested was that the increase of the buffering capacity by supplementation of sodium bicarbonate in the influent results in benefits for alcohol production by anaerobic fermentation of wastewater. When the influent was not supplemented with sodium bicarbonate, the chemical oxygen demand (COD)-ethanol and COD-methanol detected in the effluent corresponded to 22.5 and 12.7 % of the COD-sucrose consumed. Otherwise, when the reactor was fed with influent containing 0.5 g/L of sodium bicarbonate, the COD-ethanol and COD-methanol were effluents that corresponded to 39.2 and 29.6 % of the COD-sucrose consumed. Therefore, the alcohol production by supplementation of the influent with sodium bicarbonate was 33.6 % higher than the fermentation of the influent without sodium bicarbonate. PMID:25480346

Silva, A J; Pozzi, E; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

2015-02-01

333

Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

2012-07-01

334

Glutamate production from CO{sub 2} by marine cyanobacterium synechococcus sp. using a novel biosolar reactor employing light-diffusing optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

A photobioreactor was constructed in the form of a Perspex column 900 mm tall with an internal diameter of 70 mm. The reactor volume was 1.8 L and the light source consisted of a metal-halide lamp to reproduce sunlight. Light was distributed through the culture using a new type of optical fiber that diffuses light out through its surface, perpendicular to the fiber axis. A cluster of 661 light-diffusing optical fibers (LDOFs) pass from the light source through the reactor column (60-cm culture depth) and are connected to a mirror at the top of the reactor. This biosolar reactor has been used for the production of glutamate from CO{sub 2} by the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG040607. We present here details of the construction of the biosolar reactor and characterization of its properties. The effect of light intensity on glutamate production was measured. Carbon dioxide-to-glutarnate conversion ratios were determined at different cell densities: the maximum conversion ratio (28%) was achieved at a cell density of 3{times}10{sup 8} cells/mL. A comparison of glutamate production using the LDOF biosolar reactor described here with production by batch culture using free or immobilized cells showed that use of an optical-fiber biosolar reactor increased glutamate-production efficiency 6.75-fold. We conclude that as a result of its high surface-to-volume ratio (692/m) increased photoproduction of useful compounds may be achieved. Such a system is generally applicable to all aspects of photobiotechnology.

Matsunaga, Tadashi; Takeyama, Haruko; Sudo, Hiroaki [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)] [and others

1991-12-31

335

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 2710 Crimson Way | Richland, WA 99354 | (509) 372-7180 | nursing.wsu.edu  

E-print Network

WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING 2710 Crimson Way | Richland, WA 99354 | (509) 372 to Sociology, Statistics, Chemistry (with lab), Microbiology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Human Nutrition. UCORE field. Otherwise, students must complete 30 quarter credits in: Roots of Contemporary Issues (currently

Collins, Gary S.

336

Overview of Chromium Remediation Technology Evaluations At The Hanford Site, Richland Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will present an overview of the different technologies and the results to date for optimizing and improving the remediation of Cr+6 in the soil and groundwater at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site, par of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)nuclear weapons complex, encompasses approximately 586 square miles in southeast Washington State. The Columbia River flows through the site (Hanford Reach.) Reactors were located along the Hanford Reach as part of the production process. Sodium dichromate was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the cooling water for the reactors. As a result chromium (Cr+6) is present in the soil and groundwater. Since the mid 90's interim groundwater pump and treat systems have been in place to try and contain or mitigate the migration of contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River. The primary concern being the protection of aquatic spawning habitat for salmon and other species. In order to improve the effectiveness of the remedial actions a number of different technologies have been evaluated and/or deployed. These include, permeable reactive barriers, in-situ bio-stimulation, in-situ chemical reduction, zero-valent iron injection and evaluation of improved above ground treatment technologies. An overview of the technologies and results to date are presented.

Morse, J. G.; Hanson, J. P.

2009-12-01

337

Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

NONE

1997-11-10

338

Assessment of low-flow water quality in Richland Creek, Illinois  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To study the effects of urbanization on water quality, the relations of several stream processes to concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other constituents were evaluated during low-flow periods for a 30.1-mi reach of Richland Creek in southwestern Illinois. The study used both measured data and computer simulations. Reaeration rates and traveltimes were measured at various flow rates using a steady-state, gas-tracer technique. Sediment-oxygen demands were measured at several locations throughout the study reach. Stream discharge, stage, temperature, and chemical-constituent concentrations were measured during two 24-hr periods in July and August 1984. The data were then used to describe water quality and to calibrate and verify the QUAL-II one-dimensional, steady-state, water quality model. (USGS)

Freeman, W.O.; Schmidt, A.R.

1986-01-01

339

Geologic map of the Richland 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This map of the Richland 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of these quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports. The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey, and the Moses Lake, Ritzville quadrangles have already been released.

Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

1993-09-01

340

Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product  

DOEpatents

A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

Thompson, Larry D. (San Diego, CA); Johnson, Jr., William R. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01

341

Microstructured Reactors for Development and Production in Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The true potential of microprocess technology for process\\u000a \\u0009 intensification is not yet fully clear and needs to be actively\\u000a \\u0009 explored, although more and more industrial case stories provide\\u000a \\u0009 information. This paper uses a short-cut cost analysis to\\u000a \\u0009 show the major cost portions for processes conducted by\\u000a \\u0009 microstructured reactors. This leads to predicting novel chemical\\u000a \\u0009 protocol conditions, which are tailored for microprocess

V. Hessel; P. Löb; U. Krtschil; H. Löwe

2007-01-01

342

Production and oxidative stability of a human milk fat substitute produced from lard by enzyme technology in a pilot packed-bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Residence time and time of production were investigated during the enzymatic production of a specific structured lipid\\/human milk fat substitute (SL-HMFS), on a kg scale, made from lard and soybean oil fatty acids, using a packed-bed reactor and short path distillation. There were no effects of residence time or time of production on C18:2 and C18:3 incorporation or on acyl

Nina Skall Nielsen; Tiankui Yang; Xuebing Xu; Charlotte Jacobsen

2006-01-01

343

Secondary charged particle activation method for measuring the tritium production rate in the breeding blankets of a fusion reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, a new passive technique has been developed for measuring the tritium production rate in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) test blanket modules. This method is based on the secondary charged particle activation, in which the irradiated sample contains two main components: a tritium producing target (6Li or 7Li) and an indicator nuclide, which has a relatively high cross-section for an incoming tritium particle (triton). During the neutron irradiation, the target produces a triton, which has sufficiently high energy to cause the so-called secondary charged particle activation on an indicator nuclide. If the product of this reaction is a radioactive nuclide, its activity must be proportional to the amount of generated tritium. A comprehensive set of irradiations were performed at the Training Reactor of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. The following charged particle reactions were observed and investigated: 27Al(t,p)29Al; 26Mg(t,p)28Mg; 26Mg(t,n)28Al; 32S(t,n)34mCl; 16O(t,n)18F; and O(t,?)18N17. The optimal atomic ratio of the indicator elements and 6Li was also investigated. The reaction rates were estimated using calculations with the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code. The trend of the measured and the simulated data are in good agreement, although accurate data for triton induced reaction cross-sections cannot be found in the literature. Once the technique is calibrated with a reference LSC (Liquid Scintillation Counting) measurement, a new passive method becomes available for tritium production rate measurements.

Rovni, István; Szieberth, Máté; Fehér, Sándor

2012-10-01

344

300 Area process sewer piping upgrade and 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility discharge to the City of Richland Sewage System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by constructing and operating a new process sewer collection system that would discharge to the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The DOE is also considering the construction of a tie-line from the TEDF to the 300 Area Sanitary Sewer for discharging the process wastewater to the City of Richland Sewage System. The proposed action is needed because the integrity of the old piping in the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System is questionable and effluents might be entering the soil column from leaking pipes. In addition, the DOE has identified a need to reduce anticipated operating costs at the new TEDF. The 300 Area Process Sewer Piping Upgrade (Project L-070) is estimated to cost approximately $9.9 million. The proposed work would involve the construction and operation of a new process sewer collection system. The new system would discharge the effluents to a collection sump and lift station for the TEDF. The TEDF is designed to treat and discharge the process effluent to the Columbia River. The process waste liquid effluent is currently well below the DOE requirements for radiological secondary containment and is not considered a RCRA hazardous waste or a State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act dangerous waste. A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination, System (NPDES) permit has been obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for discharge to the Columbia River. The proposed action would upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by the construction and operation of a new combined gravity, vacuum, and pressurized process sewer collection system consisting of vacuum collection sumps, pressure pump stations, and buried polyvinyl chloride or similar pipe. Two buildings would also be built to house a main collection station and a satellite collection station.

NONE

1995-05-01

345

In situ hydrogen utilization for high fraction acetate production in mixed culture hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor.  

PubMed

Syngas fermentation is a promising route for resource recovery. Acetate is an important industrial chemical product and also an attractive precursor for liquid biofuels production. This study demonstrated high fraction acetate production from syngas (H? and CO?) in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor, in which the hydrogen utilizing efficiency reached 100% during the operational period. The maximum concentration of acetate in batch mode was 12.5 g/L, while the acetate concentration in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 9 days was 3.6 ± 0.1 g/L. Since butyrate concentration was rather low and below 0.1 g/L, the acetate fraction was higher than 99% in both batch and continuous modes. Microbial community analysis showed that the biofilm was dominated by Clostridium spp., such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium drakei, the percentage of which was 70.5%. This study demonstrates a potential technology for the in situ utilization of syngas and valuable chemical production. PMID:24196583

Zhang, Fang; Ding, Jing; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Zhaowei; Dai, Kun; Zeng, Raymond J

2013-12-01

346

Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

1991-01-01

347

Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

1991-12-31

348

Use of Glucose Oxidase in a Membrane Reactor for Gluconic Acid Production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article aims at the evaluation of the catalytic performance of glucose oxidase (GO) (EC.1.1.3.4) for the glucose/gluconic acid conversion in the ultrafiltration cell type membrane reactor (MB-CSTR). The reactor was coupled with a Millipore ultrafiltration-membrane (cutoff of 100 kDa) and operated for 24 h under agitation of 100 rpm, pH 5.5, and 30°C. The experimental conditions varied were the glucose concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, and 40.0 mM), the feeding rate (0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0/h), dissolved oxygen (8.0 and 16.0 mg/L), GO concentration (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 UGO/mL), and the glucose oxidase/catalase activity ratio (UGO/UCAT)(1?0, 1?10, 1?20, and 1?30). A conversion yield of 80% and specific reaction rate of 40×10-4 mmol/h·UGO were attained when the process was carried out under the following conditions: D=3.0/h, dissolved oxygen=16.0 mg/L, [G]=40 mM, and (UGO/UCAT)=1?20. A simplified model for explaining the inhibition of GO activity by hydrogen peroxide, formed during the glucose/gluconic acid conversion, was presented.

Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; Vitolo, Michele

349

Experimental simulation of personal dosimetry in production of medical radioisotopes by research reactor.  

PubMed

Due to their work conditions, research reactor personnel are exposed to ionising nuclear radiations. Because the absorbed dose values are different for different tissues due to variations in sensitivity, in this work personal dosimetry has been performed under normal working conditions at anatomical locations relevant to more sensitive tissues as well as for the whole body by employing a Rando phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Fifty-two TLDs-100H were positioned at high-risk organ locations such as the thyroid, eyes as well as the left breast, which was used to assess the whole-body dose in order to study the absorbed doses originating from selected locations in the vicinity of the reactor. The results have employed the tissue weighting factors based on International Commission on Radiological Protection ICRP 103 and ICRP 60 and the measured results were below the dose limits recommended by ICRP. The mean effective dose rates calculated from ICRP 103 were the following: whole body, 30.64-6.44 µSv h(-1); thyroid, 1.22-0.23 µSv h(-1); prostate, 0.085-0.045 µSv h(-1); gonads, 1.00-0.51 µSv h(-1); breast, 3.68-0.77 µSv h(-1); and eyes, 33.74-7.01 µSv h(-1). PMID:21862507

Mossadegh, N; Karimian, A; Shahhosseini, E; Mohammadzadeh, A; Sheibani, Sh

2011-09-01

350

Utilization of high-strength wastewater for the production of biogas as a renewable energy source using hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion of distillery spentwash, a high-strength wastewater, was studied using a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor for 240 days under ambient conditions. The HUASB reactor combined an open volume in the bottom two-thirds of the reactor for sludge blanket and polypropylene pall rings packing in the upper one-third of the reactor. The aim of the study was to achieve optimum biogas production and waste treatment. Using non-granular anaerobic sewage sludge as seed, the start-up of the HUASB reactor was successfully completed, with the production of active bacterial granules of 1--2 mm size, within 90 days. Examination of the bacterial granules under scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that Methanothrix like microorganisms were the dominant species besides Methanosarcina. An organic loading of 24 kg COD/m{sup 3}d at a low hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours was achieved with 82% reduction in COD. Biogas with high methane content (80%) was produced at these loadings. The specific biogas yield was 0.36 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg COD. Packing in the upper third of the reactor was very efficient as a gas-solid separator (GSS); and in addition it retained the biomass.

Shivayogimath, C.B.; Ramanujam, T.K.

1998-07-01

351

Continuous production of lipase-catalyzed biodiesel in a packed-bed reactor: optimization and enzyme reuse study.  

PubMed

An optimal continuous production of biodiesel by methanolysis of soybean oil in a packed-bed reactor was developed using immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) as a catalyst in a tert-butanol solvent system. Response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design were employed to evaluate the effects of reaction temperature, flow rate, and substrate molar ratio on the molar conversion of biodiesel. The results showed that flow rate and temperature have significant effects on the percentage of molar conversion. On the basis of ridge max analysis, the optimum conditions were as follows: flow rate 0.1?mL/min, temperature 52.1°C, and substrate molar ratio 1?:?4. The predicted and experimental values of molar conversion were 83.31 ± 2.07% and 82.81 ± .98%, respectively. Furthermore, the continuous process over 30 days showed no appreciable decrease in the molar conversion. The paper demonstrates the applicability of using immobilized lipase and a packed-bed reactor for continuous biodiesel synthesis. PMID:20936129

Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Ju, Hen-Yi; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Lee, Chih-Chen; Chang, Cheng; Chung, Yi-Lin; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

2011-01-01

352

High solids fermentation reactor  

DOEpatents

A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01

353

High solids fermentation reactor  

DOEpatents

A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

1993-03-02

354

Continuous ethanol production from nonsterilized carob pod extract by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae on mineral kissiris using a two-reactor system  

SciTech Connect

The continuous production of ethanol from nonsterilized carob pod extract by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae on mineral kissiris using one- and two-reactor systems has been investigated. A maximum ethanol productivity of 9.6 g/L/h was obtained at an initial sugar concentration of 200 g/L and D = 0.4 h{sup -1} with 68% of theoretical yield and 34% of sugar utilization using the one-reactor system. At S{sub 0} = 200 g/L, D = 0.05 h{sup -1}, 83% of theoretical yield, and 64% of sugar utilization, an ethanol productivity of 2.6 g/L/h was achieved. In the two-reactor system, a maximum ethanol productivity of 11.4 g/L/h was obtained at S{sub 0} = 200 g/L and D = 0.4 h{sup -1} with 68.5% of theoretical yield and 41.5% of sugar utilization. The two-reactor system was operated at a constant dilution rate of 0.3 h{sup -1} for 60 d without loss of the original immobilized yeast activity. In this case, the average ethanol productivity, ethanol yield (% of theoretical), and sugar utilization were 10.7 g/L/h, 71.5%, and 48%, respectively. 18 refs., 3 figs.

Roukas, T. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece)

1996-06-01

355

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

E-print Network

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-08-23

356

PRODUCTION OF ACETONE BUTANOL (AB) FROM AGRICULTURAL RESIDUES USING CLOSTRIDIUM ACETOBUTYLICUM IN BATCH REACTORS COUPLED WITH PRODUCT RECOVERY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Substrate cost is one of the most important factors that affects price of butanol production by fermentation. For this reason, use of economically available substrates such as agricultural residues should be investigated. Hence, wheat straw (WS) was chosen for the present studies for acetone butan...

357

Tokamak reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features.

Baker, C.C.

1981-01-01

358

The kinetics of inhibitor production resulting from hydrothermal deconstruction of wheat straw studied using a pressurised microwave reactor  

PubMed Central

Background The use of a microwave synthesis reactor has allowed kinetic data for the hydrothermal reactions of straw biomass to be established from short times, avoiding corrections required for slow heating in conventional reactors, or two-step heating. Access to realistic kinetic data is important for predictions of optimal reaction conditions for the pretreatment of biomass for bioethanol processes, which is required to minimise production of inhibitory compounds and to maximise sugar and ethanol yields. Results The gravimetric loss through solubilisation of straw provided a global measure of the extent of hydrothermal deconstruction. The kinetic profiles of furan and lignin-derived inhibitors were determined in the hydrothermal hydrolysates by UV analysis, with concentrations of formic and acetic acid determined by HPLC. Kinetic analyses were either carried out by direct fitting to simple first order equations or by numerical integration of sequential reactions. Conclusions A classical Arrhenius activation energy of 148 kJmol?1 has been determined for primary solubilisation, which is higher than the activation energy associated with historical measures of reaction severity. The gravimetric loss is primarily due to depolymerisation of the hemicellulose component of straw, but a minor proportion of lignin is solubilised at the same rate and hence may be associated with the more hydrophilic lignin-hemicellulose interface. Acetic acid is liberated primarily from hydrolysis of pendant acetate groups on hemicellulose, although this occurs at a rate that is too slow to provide catalytic enhancement to the primary solubilisation reactions. However, the increase in protons may enhance secondary reactions leading to the production of furans and formic acid. The work has suggested that formic acid may be formed under these hydrothermal conditions via direct reaction of sugar end groups rather than furan breakdown. However, furan degradation is found to be significant, which may limit ultimate quantities generated in hydrolysate liquors. PMID:24678822

2014-01-01

359

Biofuels from Pyrolysis: Catalytic Biocrude Production in a Novel, Short-Contact Time Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: RTI is developing a new pyrolysis process to convert second-generation biomass into biofuels in one simple step. Pyrolysis is the decomposition of substances by heating—the same process used to render wood into charcoal, caramelize sugar, and dry roast coffee and beans. RTI’s catalytic biomass pyrolysis differs from conventional flash pyrolysis in that its end product contains less oxygen, metals, and nitrogen—all of which contribute to corrosion, instability, and inefficiency in the fuel-production process. This technology is expected to easily integrate into the existing domestic petroleum refining infrastructure, making it an economically attractive option for biofuels production.

None

2010-01-01

360

Impact of organic loading rate on biohydrogen production in an up-flow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAnPBR).  

PubMed

This study assesses the impact of organic loading rate on biohydrogen production from glucose in an up-flow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAnPBR). Two mesophilic UAPBRs (UAnPBR1 and 2) were tested at organic loading rates (OLRs) ranging from 6.5 to 51.4 g COD L(-1)d(-1). To overcome biomass washout, design modifications were made in the UAnPBR2 to include a settling zone to capture the detached biomass. The design modifications in UAnPBR2 increased the average hydrogen yield from 0.98 to 2.0 mol-H2 mol(-1)-glucose at an OLR of 25.7 g COD L(-1)d(-1). Although, a maximum hydrogen production rate of 23.4 ± 0.9 L H2 L(-1)d(-1) was achieved in the UAnPBR2 at an OLR of 51.4 g COD L(-1)d(-1), the hydrogen yield dropped by 50% to around 1 mol-H2 mol(-1)-glucose. The microbiological analysis (PCR/DGGE) showed that the biohydrogen production was due to the presence of the hydrogen and volatile acid producers such as Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium butyricum, Megasphaera elsdenii and Propionispira arboris. PMID:24865326

Ferraz, Antônio Djalma Nunes; Zaiat, Marcelo; Gupta, Medhavi; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George

2014-07-01

361

Effects of CMC addition on bacterial cellulose production in a biofilm reactor and its paper sheets analysis.  

PubMed

Bacterial cellulose (BC) can be grown into any desired shape such as pellicles, pellets, and spherelike balls, depending on the cultivation method, additives, and cell population. In this study, Acetobacter xylinum (ATCC 700178) was grown in the production medium with different concentrations of carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) and were evaluated for BC production by using a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that BC production was enhanced to its maximum (?13 g/L) when 1.5% of CMC was applied, which was 1.7-fold higher than the result obtained from control culture. The major type of the produced BC was also switched from BC pellicle to small pellets. The ratio of BC pellets in suspension increased from 0 to 93%. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that CMC was incorporated into BC during fermentation and resulted in the decreased crystallinity and crystal size. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that CMC-BC exhibited both lower crystallinity (80%) and crystal size (4.2 nm) when compared with control samples (86% and 5.3 nm). The harvested BC was subjected to paper formation and its mechanical strength was determined. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results demonstrated that BC paper sheets exhibited higher tensile strength and Young's modulus when compared with regular paper. PMID:21250667

Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M; Demirci, Ali

2011-03-14

362

[Influences of hydraulic retention time on the ethanol type fermentation hydrogen production system in a hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor].  

PubMed

Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on bio-hydrogen production and operational stability of ethanol-type fermentation was investigated in a hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor (HABR) using brown sugar as substrate. The results showed that five HRTs were examined, ranging from 8 to 36 h. At a HRT of 12 h, the highest hydrogen production rate was achieved [13.86 mmol x (h x L)(-1)], with a COD remove rate of 51.51%, and the pH value of five compartments was between 4.22-4.47. The ethanol and acetate were the predominant metabolites. The ratios of ethanol and acetic acid from the 1th compartment to the 5th compartment were 1.90, 1.94, 1.80, 1.77 and 1.91, respectively. The results demonstrated that the best energy production rate was 11.11 kJ x (h x L)(-1), occurred at a HRT of 12 h. PMID:25158527

Liu, Xiao-Ye; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yong-Feng

2014-06-01

363

Continuous Recycle Enzymatic Membrane Reactor System for In-situ Production of Pure and Sterile Glucose Solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, an efficient Continuous Recycle Enzymatic Membrane Reactor (CREMR) system for production of in-situ glucose solution was developed and the Simultaneous Gelatinization, Liquefaction and Saccharification (SGLS) carried out at temperatures below 60°C, is proposed to replace the conventional starch hydrolysis. Using a 30 kD polysulfone hollow fibre membrane and 10% (w/w) tapioca starch concentration, it is found that during the steady state continuous operation, the SGLS process in the CREMR at temperatures of 55 and 60°C and trans-membrane pressures of 0.5 and 1 bar has produced a steady state glucose concentration in the permeate stream as high as 64 g L-1 over a period of eight hours operation. The glucose solution obtained is of high purity greater than 99.9% and sterile, hence can be utilised as intravenous dripping solution and other medical products without post-treatments. In addition, the CREMR system is also relatively easy to scale-up, has a smaller footprint c.f. conventional systems, thus allowing in-situ production.

Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; England, Richard

364

Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

1981-03-01

365

28. A typical main control panel in a 105 reactor ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. A typical main control panel in a 105 reactor building, in this case 105-F in February 1945. A single operator sat at the controls to regulate the pile's rate of reaction and monitor it for safety. The galvanometer screens (the two horizontal bars just below the nine round gauges that showed the positions of the control rods) showed the pile's current power setting. With that information, the operator could set the control rod positions to increase, decrease, or maintain the power. D-8310 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

366

Ni-Si Alloys for the S-I Reactor-Hydrogen Production Process Interface  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop Ni-Si alloys for use in vessels to contain hot, pressurized sulfuric acid. The application was to be in the decomposition loop of the thermochemical cycle for production of hydrogen.

Joseph W. Newkirk; Richard K. Brow

2010-01-21

367

Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor is a reactor that eliminates the traditional safety concerns of nuclear fission reactors. The US reactor has an insignificant source term and no reasonable criticality accident. Furthermore, the negligible residual after-heat in the reactor renders its shutdown capability comparable or superior to conventional power sources. Fission products are continuously removed at the rate they are produced. The reactor is operated with no excess criticality, hence no criticality accident is reasonably possible. The reactor is controlled safely by its negative temperature coeffiient. The reactor maintains criticality by an internal breeding ratio that is trimmed to be exactly one. The US reactor requires a fluid fuel and on-line, continuous fuel processing. Molten salt fuel was selected for its low vapor pressure at high temperature; adequate solubility of uranium and thorium as fluorides; good compatibility with structural materials; absence of irradiation damage; high negative temperature coefficient and amply developed technology and experience.

Gat, U.; Daugherty, S.R.

1985-01-01

368

Influence of reactor configuration on the production of carvone from carveol by whole cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biocatalysis with whole cells in aqueous–organic systems is extremely attractive for conversion of substrates with low water solubility, specially if co-factor regeneration is required. However, in the latter case, cells should be able to stay viable, which makes both reactor configuration and operation conditions important.Three reactor configuration types were tested: mechanically stirred direct contact reactor, silicone tube membrane reactor and

Carla C. C. R de Carvalho; M. Manuela R da Fonseca

2002-01-01

369

ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers  

PubMed Central

Background Automated radiosynthesizers are vital for routine production of positron-emission tomography tracers to minimize radiation exposure to operators and to ensure reproducible synthesis yields. The recent trend in the synthesizer industry towards the use of disposable kits aims to simplify setup and operation for the user, but often introduces several limitations related to temperature and chemical compatibility, thus requiring reoptimization of protocols developed on non-cassette-based systems. Radiochemists would benefit from a single hybrid system that provides tremendous flexibility for development and optimization of reaction conditions while also providing a pathway to simple, cassette-based production of diverse tracers. Methods We have designed, built, and tested an automated three-reactor radiosynthesizer (ELIXYS) to provide a flexible radiosynthesis platform suitable for both tracer development and routine production. The synthesizer is capable of performing high-pressure and high-temperature reactions by eliminating permanent tubing and valve connections to the reaction vessel. Each of the three movable reactors can seal against different locations on disposable cassettes to carry out different functions such as sealed reactions, evaporations, and reagent addition. A reagent and gas handling robot moves sealed reagent vials from storage locations in the cassette to addition positions and also dynamically provides vacuum and inert gas to ports on the cassette. The software integrates these automated features into chemistry unit operations (e.g., React, Evaporate, Add) to intuitively create synthesis protocols. 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-5-methyl-?-l-arabinofuranosyluracil (l-[18F]FMAU) and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-?-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine (d-[18F]FAC) were synthesized to validate the system. Results l-[18F]FMAU and d-[18F]FAC were successfully synthesized in 165 and 170 min, respectively, with decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 46% ± 1% (n = 6) and 31% ± 5% (n = 6), respectively. The yield, repeatability, and synthesis time are comparable to, or better than, other reports. d-[18F]FAC produced by ELIXYS and another manually operated apparatus exhibited similar biodistribution in wild-type mice. Conclusion The ELIXYS automated radiosynthesizer is capable of performing radiosyntheses requiring demanding conditions: up to three reaction vessels, high temperatures, high pressures, and sensitive reagents. Such flexibility facilitates tracer development and the ability to synthesize multiple tracers on the same system without customization or replumbing. The disposable cassette approach simplifies the transition from development to production. PMID:23849185

2013-01-01

370

Production of hydrogen and carbon by solar thermal methane splitting. II. Room temperature simulation tests of seeded solar reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the design of a solar thermal methane splitting reactor seeded with powder particles, care must be taken to prevent destruction of the reactor window by contact with incandescent solid particles. The method of screening the window by application of the tornado flow configuration (Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 28 (11) (2003) 1187) inside the reactor enclosure was studied experimentally by

Abraham Kogan; Meir Kogan; Shmuel Barak

2004-01-01

371

Fission product heating effects after shutdown of the Scottish Universities Research Reactor with simulated bottom blockage of the core tanks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation described in this report was carried out using the Scottish Universities' Research Reactor at East Kilbride, Scotland. Reactor tests have been performed in order to investigate, after reactor shutdown, the fuel plate temperature behavior under a simulated bottom blockage of the core tanks. This simulated blockage was obtained by either returning water to partially fill the core tanks,

J. A. Riley; S. R. Donald

1972-01-01

372

SCREENING FOR POTENTIAL FERMENTATIVE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM BLACK WATER AND KITCHEN WASTE IN ON?SITE UASB REACTOR AT 20°C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential of black water and a mixture of black water and kitchen waste as substrates for on?site dark fermentative hydrogen production was screened in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors at 20°C. Three different inocula were used with and without heat treatment. With glucose, the highest specific hydrogenogenic activity was 69 ml H2 g volatile solids d in batch assays

S. Luostarinen; O. Pakarinen; J. Rintala

2008-01-01

373

The influence of preculture on the process performance of penicillin V production in a 100-l air-lift tower loop reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of stirrer speed in the third preculture on the performance of penicillin V production by Penicillium chrysogenum in complex medium in a 100-l air-lift tower loop reactor was investigated. The process performance in the main culture was improved by increasing the stirrer speed from 500 to 750 rpm: the pellet size was reduced to half, the cell growth

J. Möller; J. Niehoff; S. Hotop; M. Dors; K. Schügerl

1992-01-01

374

Tar Production from Biomass Pyrolysis in a Fluidized Bed Reactor: A Novel Turbulent Multiphase Flow Formulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel multiphase flow model is presented for describing the pyrolysis of biomass in a 'bubbling' fluidized bed reactor. The mixture of biomass and sand in a gaseous flow is conceptualized as a particulate phase composed of two classes interacting with the carrier gaseous flow. The solid biomass is composed of three initial species: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. From each of these initial species, two new solid species originate during pyrolysis: an 'active' species and a char, thus totaling seven solid-biomass species. The gas phase is composed of the original carrier gas (steam), tar and gas; the last two species originate from the volumetric pyrolysis reaction. The conservation equations are derived from the Boltzmann equations through ensemble averaging. Stresses in the gaseous phase are the sum of the Newtonian and Reynolds (turbulent) contributions. The particulate phase stresses are the sum of collisional and Reynolds contributions. Heat transfer between phases, and heat transfer between classes in the particulate phase is modeled, the last resulting from collisions between sand and biomass. Closure of the equations must be performed by modeling the Reynolds stresses for both phases. The results of a simplified version (first step) of the model are presented.

Bellan, J.; Lathouwers, D.

2000-01-01

375

Optimization of biodiesel production in a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor using used frying oil.  

PubMed

The present work demonstrates the application of a hydrodynamic cavitation reactor for the synthesis of biodiesel with used frying oil as a feedstock. The synthesis involved the transesterification of used frying oil (UFO) with methanol in the presence of potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. The effect of geometry and upstream pressure of a cavitating orifice plate on the rate of transesterification reaction has been studied. It is observed that the micro level turbulence created by hydrodynamic cavitation somewhat overcomes the mass transfer limitations for triphasic transesterification reaction. The significant effects of upstream pressure on the rate of formation of methyl esters have been seen. It has been observed that flow geometry of orifice plate plays a crucial role in process intensification. With an optimized plate geometry of 2mm hole diameter and 25 holes, more than 95% of triglycerides have been converted to methyl esters in 10 min of reaction time with cavitational yield of 1.28 × 10(-3) (Grams of methyl esters produced per Joule of energy supplied). The potential of UFO to produce good quality methyl esters has been demonstrated. PMID:22922070

Ghayal, Dyneshwar; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Rathod, Virendra K

2013-01-01

376

Evaluation of biomass production in unleaded gasoline and BTEX-fed batch reactors.  

PubMed

BTEX removal under aerobic conditions by unleaded gasoline acclimated biomass and BTEX acclimated biomass, and the effect of surfactant on BTEX biodegradation were evaluated. The effect of BTEX concentration as the sole source of carbon for biomass acclimation and the effect of yeast extract on cell growth in unleaded gasoline-fed reactors were also evaluated. For the unleaded gasoline acclimated biomass, benzene was shown the most recalcitrant among all BTEX, followed by o-xylene and toluene with 16-23%, 35-41% and 57-69% biodegradation, respectively. Ethylbenzene was consistently the fastest BTEX chemical removed with 99% biodegradation for the four bioreactor acclimated biomasses tested. For the 1,200 ppm BTEX acclimated biomass, benzene showed the highest removal efficiency (99%) among the four biomass environmental conditions tested, along with 99% toluene and 99% ethylbenzene biodegradation. O-xylene showed 92-94% removal. In all bioassays tested Tergitol NP-10 was fully removed, and did not have a substantial effect on BTEX biodegradation at the end of a 10-day evaluation. PMID:14682579

Acuna-Askar, K; Englande, A J; Ramirez-Medrano, A; Coronado-Guardiola, J E; Chavez-Gomez, B

2003-01-01

377

Analysis of Tritium Behavior in Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with Thermochemical Iodine-Sulfur Process for Hydrogen Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tritium concentration in the hydrogen product in Japan's future very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) system coupled with a thermochemical water-splitting iodine-sulfur (IS) process (VHTRIS system), named GTHTR300C, was estimated by numerical analysis. The tritium concentration in the hydrogen product significantly depended on undetermined parameters, i.e., the permeabilities of a SO3 decomposer and a H2SO4vaporizer made of SiC. Thus,

Hirofumi OHASHI; Nariaki SAKABA; Tetsuo NISHIHARA; Yukio TACHIBANA; Kazuhiko KUNITOMI

2008-01-01

378

Reactor comparison and scale-up for the microaerobic production of 2,3-butanediol by Enterobacter aerogenes at constant oxygen transfer rate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stirred tank (STR), bubble column (BCR) and airlift (ALR) bioreactors of 0.05 and 1.5 m3 total volume were compared for the production of 2,3-butanediol using Enterobacter aerogenes under microaerobic conditions. Batch fermentations were carried out at constant oxygen transfer rate (OTR=35 mmol\\/lh). At 0.05 m3 scale, the STR reactor achieved much higher biomass and product concentrations than the BCR and

T.-G. Byun; A.-P. Zeng; W.-D. Deckwer

1994-01-01

379

A SINGLE-STAGE, LIQUID-PHASE DIMETHYL ETHER SYNTHESIS PROCESS FROM SYNGAS II. COMPARISON OF PER-PASS SYNGAS CONVERSION, REACTOR PRODUCTIVITY AND HYDROGENATION EXTENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

In part I of this series on the development of a single-stage, liquid-phase dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis process from syngas, the process feasibility and the process variable effects on the dual catalyst activity were discussed. This part focuses on the comparison of the single-stage reactor productivity of liquid phase methanol synthesis to that of the co-production of methanol and DME.

Sunggyu Lee; Makarand R. Gogate; Conrad J. Kulik

1991-01-01

380

High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

2011-07-31

381

EFFICACY OF COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS IN ENHANCING OIL BIODEGRADATION IN CLOSED LABORATORY REACTORS  

EPA Science Inventory

A laboratory screening protocol was designed and conducted to test the efficacy of eight commercial bacterial cultures and two non-bacterial products in enhancing the biodegradation of weathered Alaska North Slope crude oil in closed flasks. Three lines of evidence were used to ...

382

Isothermal kinetic measurements for hydrogen production from hydrocarbon fuels using a novel kinetic reactor concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of efficient reformers for the on-board-production of hydrogen from liquid hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline is one of the challenges for the implementation of fuel cell propulsion systems for automobiles. It requires detailed kinetic information about the reforming reactions of the main gasoline components. Such information is presently only scarcely available, mainly because of the unusual high temperature and

S. Springmann; G. Friedrich; M. Himmen; M. Sommer; G. Eigenberger

2002-01-01

383

Optimum washcoat thickness of a monolith reactor for syngas production by partial oxidation of methane  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) production was investigated by a numerical model of an adiabatic monolithic reformer (e.g. for a micro fuel cell system). The study includes the thermal and diffusive properties of a washcoat of finite thickness that is modeled as a porous layer composed of a ceramic support containing catalytic active rhodium sites. It was

Michael J. Stutz; Dimos Poulikakos

2008-01-01

384

Production of high concentrations of H2O2 in a bioelectrochemical reactor fed with real municipal wastewater.  

PubMed

Bioelectrochemical systems can be used to energy-efficiently produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. Organic compounds in the wastewater are oxidized by microorganisms using the anode as electron acceptor. H2O2 is produced by reduction of oxygen on the cathode. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time production of high concentrations of H2O2 production from real municipal wastewater. A concentration of 2.26 g/L H2O2 was produced in 9 h at 8.3 kWh/kgH2O2. This concentration could potentially be useful for membrane cleaning at membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants. With an acetate-containing nutrient medium as anode feed, a H2O2 concentration of 9.67 g/L was produced in 21 h at an energy cost of 3.0 kWh/kgH2O2. The bioelectrochemical reactor used in this study suffered from a high internal resistance, most likely caused by calcium carbonate deposits on the cathode-facing side of the cation exchange membrane separating the anode and cathode compartments. PMID:24527636

Modin, Oskar; Fukushi, Kensuke

2013-01-01

385

Efficient production of methane from artificial garbage waste by a cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor containing carbon fiber textiles.  

PubMed

A cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) containing carbon fiber textiles (CFT; BER?+?CFT) has characteristics of bioelectrochemical and packed-bed systems. In this study, utility of a cylindrical BER?+?CFT for degradation of a garbage slurry and recovery of biogas was investigated by applying 10% dog food slurry. The working electrode potential was electrochemically regulated at -0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Stable methane production of 9.37 L-CH4?·?L-1?·?day-1 and dichromate chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) removal of 62.5% were observed, even at a high organic loading rate (OLR) of 89.3 g-CODcr?·?L-1?·?day-1. Given energy as methane (372.6 kJ?·?L-1?·?day-1) was much higher than input electric energy to the working electrode (0.6 kJ?·?L-1?·?day-1) at this OLR. Methanogens were highly retained in CFT by direct attachment to the cathodic working electrodes (52.3%; ratio of methanogens to prokaryotes), compared with the suspended fraction (31.2%), probably contributing to the acceleration of organic material degradation and removal of organic acids. These results provide insight into the application of cylindrical BER?+?CFT in efficient methane production from garbage waste including a high percentage of solid fraction. PMID:23497472

Sasaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kengo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Morita, Masahiko; Igarashi, Yasuo; Ohmura, Naoya

2013-01-01

386

Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01

387

Efficient production of methane from artificial garbage waste by a cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor containing carbon fiber textiles  

PubMed Central

A cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) containing carbon fiber textiles (CFT; BER?+?CFT) has characteristics of bioelectrochemical and packed-bed systems. In this study, utility of a cylindrical BER?+?CFT for degradation of a garbage slurry and recovery of biogas was investigated by applying 10% dog food slurry. The working electrode potential was electrochemically regulated at ?0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Stable methane production of 9.37 L-CH4?·?L?1?·?day?1 and dichromate chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) removal of 62.5% were observed, even at a high organic loading rate (OLR) of 89.3 g-CODcr?·?L?1?·?day?1. Given energy as methane (372.6 kJ?·?L?1?·?day?1) was much higher than input electric energy to the working electrode (0.6 kJ?·?L?1?·?day?1) at this OLR. Methanogens were highly retained in CFT by direct attachment to the cathodic working electrodes (52.3%; ratio of methanogens to prokaryotes), compared with the suspended fraction (31.2%), probably contributing to the acceleration of organic material degradation and removal of organic acids. These results provide insight into the application of cylindrical BER?+?CFT in efficient methane production from garbage waste including a high percentage of solid fraction. PMID:23497472

2013-01-01

388

Start-up of bio-hydrogen production reactor seeded with sewage sludge and its microbial community analysis.  

PubMed

Start-up of a continuously stirred tank reactor for bio-hydrogen production under different initial organic loading rate (OLR) of 3, 7 and 10 kgCOD/m3 d, respectively, was carried out with sewage sludge as inoculum. Molasses wastewater was used as substrate and hydraulic retention time was kept at 6 h. This study aimed to assess OLR on the formation of fermentation types and the structure of microbial communities during the start-up period. It was found that at an initial OLR of 7 kgCOD/m3 d and an initial biomass of 6.24 gVSS/L, an equilibrial microbial community of ethanol-type fermentation could be established within 30 days. The observed average specific hydrogen production rate was 276 mLH2/gVSS d, which was 40% higher than that of the one acclimated with 3 kgCOD/m3 d. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles, significant microbial population shifts took place at the first 15 days, but a longer period up to 30 days was required to establish a microbial community with stable metabolic activity. PMID:16180417

Gong, M L; Ren, N Q; Xing, D F

2005-01-01

389

Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath.

Dominguez, Jesus; Sibille, Laurent

2010-01-01

390

Evaluation of a high temperature immobilised enzyme reactor for production of non-reducing oligosaccharides  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is interest in the production of non-reducing carbohydrates due to their potential application in various industrial\\u000a fields, particularly the food industry. In this paper, we describe the development of an immobilised cell bioprocess for the\\u000a synthesis of non-reducing maltodextrins at high temperatures. The trehalosyl-dextrins-forming enzyme (TDFE) isolated from\\u000a the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (strain MT4), was recently expressed at

Chiara Schiraldi; Isabella Di Lernia; Mariateresa Giuliano; Maddalena Generoso; Antonella D'Agostino; Mario De Rosa

2003-01-01

391

Biodiesel fuel production with solid superacid catalysis in fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid superacid catalysts of sulfated tin and zirconium oxides and tungstated zirconia are prepared and evaluated in the trans-esterification of soybean oil with methanol at 200–300 °C and the esterification of n-octanoic acid with methanol at 175–200 °C. Tungstated zirconia–alumina is a promising solid acid catalyst for the production of biodiesel fuels from soybean oil because of its high performance

Satoshi Furuta; Hiromi Matsuhashi; Kazushi Arata

2004-01-01

392

Nonlinear fuzzy control of a fed-batch reactor for penicillin production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process of penicillin production is characterized by nonlinearities and parameter uncertainties that make it difficult to control. In the paper the development and testing of a multivariable fuzzy control system that makes use of type-2 fuzzy sets for the control of pH and temperature are described. The performance of the type-2 fuzzy logic control system (T2FLCS) is compared by

Bartolomeo Cosenza; Mosč Galluzzo

393

A Fisheries Evaluation of the Richland and Toppenish/Satus Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1986 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The fisheries evaluation phase of diversion screen effectiveness summarizes the results of work at the Richland and Toppenish/Satus Fish screening facilities (Richland Screens and Toppenish/Satus Screens) during 1986. More than 10,000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, and chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were released at the screen diversions. At the Richland Screens, 61% of the released steelhead were recovered and 1.1% were descaled; 93% of the spring chinook salmon were recovered and less than 1% were descaled. At the Toppenish/Satus Screens, only steelhead were evaluated for descaling; 88.9% were recovered and 23.9% were descaled. Only steelhead were evaluated because the Yakima River fisheries managers did not expect any other smolts to occur in Toppenish Creek. Because of the acclimation conditions and the amount of time the fish had to be held before testing, some of the test population were descaled during holding and transportation. The 23.9% descaling for the test fish was compared to 26.4% for the controls.

Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Lusty, E. William

1987-05-01

394

Online recovery of nisin during fermentation and its effect on nisin production in biofilm reactor.  

PubMed

An online removal of nisin by silicic acid coupled with a micro-filter module was proposed as an alternative to reduce detrimental effects caused by adsorption of nisin onto producer, enzymatic degradation by protease, and product inhibition during fermentation. In this study, silicic acid was successfully used to recover nisin from the fermentation broth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NIZO 22186. The effect of pH (at 6.8 and 3.0) during adsorption process and several eluents (deionized water, 20% ethanol, 1 M NaCl, and 1 M NaCl + 20% ethanol) for desorption were evaluated in a small batch scale. Higher nisin adsorption onto silicic acid was achieved when the adsorption was carried out at pH 6.8 (67% adsorption) than at pH 3.0 (54% adsorption). The maximum recovery was achieved (47% of nisin was harvested) when the adsorption was carried out at pH 6.8 and 1 M NaCl + 20% ethanol was used as an eluent for desorption. Most importantly, nisin production was significantly enhanced (7,445 IU/ml) when compared with the batch fermentation without the online recovery (1,897 IU/ml). This may possibly be attributed to preventing the loss of nisin due the detrimental effects and a higher biomass density achieved during online recovery process, which stimulated production of nisin during fermentation. PMID:17111139

Pongtharangku, Thunyarat; Demirci, Ali

2007-03-01

395

Mass spectrometry studies of fission product behavior: 1, Fission products released from irradiated LWR (light-water reactor) fuel  

SciTech Connect

The chemical form and rate of release of volatile fission products (i.e., Xe, Kr, Cs, Te, I...) effused from an irradiated LWR fuel pin sample were studied using quadrupole mass spectrometry. Experiments, up to a temperature of 2120 K, 2060 K have identified krypton, xenon, cesium, and tellurium as the species released from the fuel. In addition, there was a weak signal for atomic iodine at 1325 K. The source of the atomic iodine, e.g. dissociation of cesium iodine or dissociation of molecular iodine, has yet to be resolved. The observed rate of release of xenon was several orders of magnitude lower than previously reported. However, the xenon release rate increased significantly after the fuel was oxidized. In complementary experiments on nonradioactive material, the release of tellurium was hindered by reaction with Zircaloy cladding. Above 1300/sup 0/C, gaseous SnTe was observed; its formation is attributed to reaction of the tin (in the cladding) with ZrTe/sub 2/. 4 refs., 5 figs.

Johnson, I.; Johnson, C.E.

1987-01-01

396

Sludge stabilization at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to operate two laboratory-size muffle furnaces in glovebox HC-21C, located in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The muffle furnaces would be used to stabilize chemically reactive sludges that contain approximately 25 kilograms (55 pounds) of plutonium by heating to approximately 500 to 1000{degrees}C (900 to 1800{degrees}F). The resulting stable powder, mostly plutonium oxide with impurities, would be stored in the PFP vaults. The presence of chemically reactive plutonium-bearing sludges in the process gloveboxes poses a risk to workers from radiation exposure and limits the availability of storage space for future plant cleanup. Therefore, there is a need to stabilize the material into a form suitable for long-term storage. This proposed action would be an interim action, which would take place prior to completion of an Environmental Impact Statement for the PFP which would evaluate stabilization of all plutonium-bearing materials and cleanout of the facility. However, only 10 percent of the total quantity of plutonium in reactive materials is in the sludges, so this action will not limit the choice of reasonable alternatives or prejudice the Record of Decision of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Environmental Impact Statement.

Not Available

1994-10-01

397

Inspection of surveillance equipment and activities at DOE Field Office, Richland  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this inspection was to review surveillance activities by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Office, Richland (RL) and contractor employees at the RL Hanford site for efficiency and economy and compliance with laws and regulations. The scope included surveillance activities, procedures, training, types of surveillance equipment, and management controls over the equipment and activities. We also looked at Departmental policies and procedures regarding the equipment and activities. Allegations of illegal surveillance that came to our attention during the course of this inspection were referred to the Department of Justice. As part of our review, inspectors were on-site at RL from February 11, 1991, through March 1, 1991. Follow-up trips to RL were also made in April, May, and June 1991. We also conducted interviews at Albuquerque, Savannah River, and Germantown of former RL employees and RL contractors who were on travel. Officials from DOE's Office of General Counsel (OGC), Office of Security Affairs, and Office of Safeguards and Security (S S) were also interviewed regarding the Department's purchase and possession of wiretapping and eavesdropping devices. We obtained 75 signed sworn statements from 55 individuals during the course of the inspection. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-09-30

398

A literature survey and an experimental study of coal devolatilization at mild and severe conditions: Influence of heating rate, temperature, and reactor type on product yield and composition  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to investigate how relatively mild operating conditions (i.e., relatively low temperatures and pressures) influence product quality by comparing devolatilized products obtained at various temperatures and heating rates. Fixed-, fluid-, and entrained-flow reactor units were used to obtain pyrolysis products. In addition, available literature data on tar yield in various reactor units at a range of temperatures and residence times were surveyed and compared with the data generated in the present study. Liquids were characterized by a number of techniques (e.g., field ionization mass spectroscopy or FIMS, sequential elution solvent chromatography or SESC, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or FTIR, elemental analysis). 34 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

Khan, M.R.

1989-06-01

399

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PTCA  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C.W.; Hobbs, R.L.

1998-06-01

400

Analysis of coolability of the control rods of a Savannah River Site production reactor with loss of normal forced convection cooling  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Production Reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling has been performed. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost, and the limit of critical heat flux that sets the acceptance criteria for the study. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor. The study accomplishes this objective with a very tractable simplified analysis for the modest restart power. In addition, a best-estimate calculation is performed, and the results are compared to results from sub-scale scoping experiments. 5 refs.

Easterling, T.C.; Hightower, N.T. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Smith, D.C.; Amos, C.N. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1992-01-01

401

Analysis of coolability of the control rods of a Savannah River Site production reactor with loss of normal forced convection cooling  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Production Reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling has been performed. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost, and the limit of critical heat flux that sets the acceptance criteria for the study. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor. The study accomplishes this objective with a very tractable simplified analysis for the modest restart power. In addition, a best-estimate calculation is performed, and the results are compared to results from sub-scale scoping experiments. 5 refs.

Easterling, T.C.; Hightower, N.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, D.C.; Amos, C.N. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-05-01

402

Development Program of IS Process Pilot Test Plant for Hydrogen Production With High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

At the present time, we are alarmed by depletion of fossil energy and effects on global environment such as acid rain and global warming, because our lives depend still heavily on fossil energy. So, it is universally recognized that hydrogen is one of the best energy media and its demand will be increased greatly in the near future. In Japan, the Basic Plan for Energy Supply and Demand based on the Basic Law on Energy Policy Making was decided upon by the Cabinet on 6 October, 2003. In the plan, efforts for hydrogen energy utilization were expressed as follows; hydrogen is a clean energy carrier without carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission, and commercialization of hydrogen production system using nuclear, solar and biomass, not fossil fuels, is desired. However, it is necessary to develop suitable technology to produce hydrogen without CO{sub 2} emission from a view point of global environmental protection, since little hydrogen exists naturally. Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy, especially the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is one of the most attractive solutions for the environmental issue, because HTGR hydrogen production by water splitting methods such as a thermochemical iodine-sulfur (IS) process has a high possibility to produce hydrogen effectively and economically. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project from the view to establishing technology base on HTGR and also on the IS process. In the IS process, raw material, water, is to be reacted with iodine (I{sub 2}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to produce hydrogen iodide (HI) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), the so-called Bunsen reaction, which are then decomposed endo-thermically to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}), respectively. Iodine and sulfur dioxide produced in the decomposition reactions can be used again as the reactants in the Bunsen reaction. In JAEA, continuous hydrogen production was demonstrated with the hydrogen production rate of about 30 NL/hr for one week using a bench-scale test apparatus made of glass. Based on the test results and know-how obtained through the bench-scale tests, a pilot test plant that can produce hydrogen of about 30 Nm{sup 3}/hr is being designed. The test plant will be fabricated with industrial materials such as glass coated steel, SiC ceramics etc, and operated under high pressure condition up to 2 MPa. The test plant will consist of a IS process plant and a helium gas (He) circulation facility (He loop). The He loop can simulate HTTR operation conditions, which consists of a 400 kW-electric heater for He hating, a He circulator and a steam generator working as a He cooler. In parallel to the design study, key components of the IS process such as the sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and the sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) decomposers working under-high temperature corrosive environments have been designed and test-fabricated to confirm their fabricability. Also, other R and D's are under way such as corrosion, processing of HIx solutions. This paper describes present status of these activities. (authors)

Jin Iwatsuki; Atsuhiko Terada; Hiroyuki Noguchi; Yoshiyuki Imai; Masanori Ijichi; Akihiro Kanagawa; Hiroyuki Ota; Shinji Kubo; Kaoru Onuki; Ryutaro Hino [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

2006-07-01

403

Hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactor experimentation and modeling for the production of solar absorbing carbon nanoparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much of combustion research focuses on reducing soot particulates in emissions. However, current research at San Diego State University (SDSU) Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory (CSEL) is underway to develop a high temperature solar receiver which will utilize carbon nanoparticles as a solar absorption medium. To produce carbon nanoparticles for the small particle heat exchange receiver (SPHER), a lab-scale carbon particle generator (CPG) has been built and tested. The CPG is a heated ceramic tube reactor with a set point wall temperature of 1100-1300°C operating at 5-6 bar pressure. Natural gas and nitrogen are fed to the CPG where natural gas undergoes pyrolysis resulting in carbon particles. The gas-particle mixture is met downstream with dilution air and sent to the lab scale solar receiver. To predict soot yield and general trends in CPG performance, a model has been setup in Reaction Design CHEMKIN-PRO software. One of the primary goals of this research is to accurately measure particle properties. Mean particle diameter, size distribution, and index of refraction are calculated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and a Diesel Particulate Scatterometer (DPS). Filter samples taken during experimentation are analyzed to obtain a particle size distribution with SEM images processed in ImageJ software. These results are compared with the DPS, which calculates the particle size distribution and the index of refraction from light scattering using Mie theory. For testing with the lab scale receiver, a particle diameter range of 200-500 nm is desired. Test conditions are varied to understand effects of operating parameters on particle size and the ability to obtain the size range. Analysis of particle loading is the other important metric for this research. Particle loading is measured downstream of the CPG outlet and dilution air mixing point. The air-particle mixture flows through an extinction tube where opacity of the mixture is measured with a 532 nm laser and detector. Beer's law is then used to calculate particle loading. The CPG needs to produce a certain particle loading for a corresponding receiver test. By obtaining the particle loading in the system, the reaction conversion to solid carbon in the CPG can be calculated to measure the efficiency of the CPG. To predict trends in reaction conversion and particle size from experimentation, the CHEMKIN-PRO computer model for the CPG is run for various flow rates and wall temperature profiles. These predictions were a reason for testing at higher wall set point temperatures. Based on these research goals, it was shown that the CPG consistently produces a mean particle diameter of 200-400 nm at the conditions tested, fitting perfectly inside the desired range. This led to successful lab scale SPHER testing which produced a 10-point efficiency increase and 150°C temperature difference with particles present. Also, at 3 g/s dilution air flow rate, an efficiency of 80% at an outlet temperature above 800°C was obtained. Promise was shown at higher CPG experimental temperatures to produce higher reaction conversion, both experimentally and in the model. However, based on wall temperature data taken during experimentation, it is apparent that the CPG needs to have multiple heating zones with separate temperature controllers in order to have an isothermal zone rather than a parabolic temperature profile. As for the computer model, it predicted much higher reaction conversion at higher temperature. The mass fraction of fuel in the inlet stream was shown to not affect conversion while increasing residence time led to increasing conversion. Particle size distribution in the model was far off and showed a bimodal distribution for one of the statistical methods. Using the results from experimentation and modeling, a preliminary CPG design is presented that will operate in a 5MWth receiver system.

Frederickson, Lee Thomas

404

A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams  

SciTech Connect

An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continuous, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculant yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrate ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CCRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

Dale, M.C. [Bio-Process Innovation, Inc., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lei, S.; Zhou, C. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

1995-11-01

405

Electrochemical enhancement of glucose oxidase kinetics : gluconic acid production with anion exchange membrane reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Enzyme-catalysed reactions provide a means to perform many industrial processes because they enhance chemical reactions specifically and avoid the formation of by-products and the use of toxic organic solvents. Current enzyme applications range from laundry detergent supplements to the destruction of nerve gas agents. Although enzyme specificity is attractive there are also significant disadvantages to enzymatic catalysis. One of the principal disadvantages being relatively short lifetimes, ranging from a few hours to several days. However, literature has shown that by immobilizing an enzyme on a support matrix, the lifetime of the enzyme is increased since the rigidity of the support matrix helps prevent unfolding. Microfiltration membranes are often a good choice for enzyme attachment. The high surface area in the pores allows for enzyme attachment and reduction of mass transfer limitations.

Hestekin, J.A.; Lin, Y. P.; Frank, J.; Snyder, S.; St. Martin, E.; Energy Systems

2002-09-01

406

Identification of the change in fouling potential of soluble microbial products (SMP) in membrane bioreactor coupled with worm reactor.  

PubMed

This study focused on the effect of predated sludge recycle on the fouling potential of soluble microbial products (SMP) in the MBR coupled with Static Sequencing Batch Worm Reactor (SSBWR-MBR). The S-SMP (SMP in SSBWR-MBR) filtration showed slower diminishing rate of flux than C-SMP (SMP in Control-MBR) filtration, and the standard blocking model showed the most excellent fit (R˛ = 0.9999) for both C-SMP and S-SMP filtration, confirming that hydrophobic/hydrophilic attractive force was supposed to play a major role in SMP filtration. Based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) analysis, the decrease in the hydrophobic interactions between SMP and membrane (Adhesion) and between the SMP themselves (Cohesion) was found. The structural parameters analysis indicated the S-SMP fouling layer showed a higher porosity, lower biovolume and thinner average thickness than the C-SMP fouling layer at the end of filtration. Further investigations demonstrated that these changes could be attributed to the lower hydrophobic interaction as the result of the decrease in the relative abundance of unsaturated groups (aromatic protein-like substances) in the S-SMP. PMID:23399079

Tian, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Ding, Yi; Lu, Yaobin

2013-04-15

407

Simulation of Radioactive Corrosion Product in Primary Cooling System of Japanese Sodium-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioactive Corrosion Product (CP) is a main cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance with no breached fuel in fast breeder reactor (FBR) plants. The most important CP is 54Mn and 60Co. In order to establish techniques of radiation dose estimation for radiation workers in radiation-controlled areas of the FBR, the PSYCHE (Program SYstem for Corrosion Hazard Evaluation) code was developed. We add the Particle Model to the conventional PSYCHE analytical model. In this paper, we performed calculation of CP transfer in JOYO using an improved calculation code in which the Particle Model was added to the PSYCHE. The C/E (calculated / experimentally observed) value for CP deposition was improved through use of this improved PSYCHE incorporating the Particle Model. Moreover, among the percentage of total radioactive deposition accounted for by CP in particle form, 54Mn was estimated to constitute approximately 20 % and 60Co approximately 40 % in the cold-leg region. These calculation results are consistent with the measured results for the actual cold-leg piping in the JOYO.

Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Izumi, Yoshinobu

408

Synthesis of aluminum oxides from the products of the rapid thermal decomposition of hydrargillite in a centrifugal flash reactor: II. Physicochemical properties of the products obtained by the centrifugal thermal activation of hydrargillite  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of physicochemical methods were used to characterize the product of the rapid thermal decomposition of hydrargillite\\u000a in a centrifugal flash reactor under the following conditions: the average particle size of the reactant, 80–120 ?m; the temperature\\u000a of the solid heating surface (plate or cylinder), 300–700C; hot-zone residence time, ?1 s; transfer of the product to the\\u000a cooled zone

Yu. Yu. Tanashev; E. M. Moroz; L. A. Isupova; A. S. Ivanova; G. S. Litvak; Yu. I. Amosov; N. A. Rudina; A. G. Stepanov; I. V. Kharina; E. V. Kul’ko; V. V. Danilevich; V. A. Balashov; V. Yu. Kruglyakov; I. A. Zolotarskii; V. N. Parmon

2007-01-01

409

Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products: Mechanical completion and start-up new transport reactor system. Third quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, by-products, and other low-value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed material to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids, which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the partial oxidation process. To date, the project has gone through essentially three phases of testing, with the third phase still in progress. Initial testing was.done in a bench-scale reactor unit (BRU), a dense phase fluidized bed semi-batch reactor. These tests were of a scoping nature, to identify system parameters for subsequent tests. The second phase consisted of tests in the Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU), a continuous flow pilot plant transport system which can be run either in the pyrolysis mode, or combustion mode, or as a fully integrated partial oxidation system. However, owing to severe operational problems, integrated operation with a highly coking feed could not be achieved, and only a limited number of pyrolysis/gasification runs were completed. As a result, Kellogg decided to build a new transport pilot plant facility specifically designed for handling heavy hydrocarbon feeds.

NONE

1995-09-01

410

Diversification of 99Mo/99mTc separation: non–fission reactor production of 99Mo as a strategy for enhancing 99mTc availability.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the benefits of obtaining (99m)Tc from non-fission reactor-produced low-specific-activity (99)Mo. This scenario is based on establishing a diversified chain of facilities for the distribution of (99m)Tc separated from reactor-produced (99)Mo by (n,?) activation of natural or enriched Mo. Such facilities have expected lower investments than required for the proposed chain of cyclotrons for the production of (99m)Tc. Facilities can receive and process reactor-irradiated Mo targets then used for extraction of (99m)Tc over a period of 2 wk, with 3 extractions on the same day. Estimates suggest that a center receiving 1.85 TBq (50 Ci) of (99)Mo once every 4 d can provide 1.48-3.33 TBq (40-90 Ci) of (99m)Tc daily. This model can use research reactors operating in the United States to supply current (99)Mo needs by applying natural (nat)Mo targets. (99)Mo production capacity can be enhanced by using (98)Mo-enriched targets. The proposed model reduces the loss of (99)Mo by decay and avoids proliferation as well as waste management issues associated with fission-produced (99)Mo. PMID:25537991

Pillai, Maroor R A; Dash, Ashutosh; Knapp, Furn F Russ

2015-01-01

411

Effect of thermal pre-treatment on inoculum sludge to enhance bio-hydrogen production from alkali hydrolysed rice straw in a mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor.  

PubMed

The effect of thermal pre-treatment on inoculum sludge for continuous H2 production from alkali hydrolysed rice straw using anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated. Two reactors, ABR1 and ABR2, were inoculated with untreated and thermally pre-treated sludge, respectively. Both reactors were operated in parallel at a constant hydraulic retention time of 20 h and organic loading rate ranged from 0.5 to 2.16 g COD/L d. The results obtained indicated that ABR2 achieved a better hydrogen conversion rate and hydrogen yield as compared with ABR1. The hydrogen conversion rates were 30% and 24%, while the hydrogen yields were 1.19 and 0.97 mol H2/mol glucose for ABR2 and ABR1, respectively. Similar trend was observed for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and carbohydrate removal, where ABR2 provided a removal efficiency of 53 +/- 2.3% for COD and 46 +/- 2% for carbohydrate. The microbial community analysis using 16S rRNA phylogeny revealed the presence of different species of bacteria, namely Clostridium, Prevotella, Paludibacter, Ensifer, and Petrimonas within the reactors. Volatile fatty acids generated from ABR1 and ABR2 were mainly in the form of acetate and butyrate and a relatively low fraction ofpropionate was detected in ABR1. Based on these results, thermal pre-treatment ofinoculum sludge is preferable for hydrogen production from hydrolysed rice straw. PMID:24350450

El-Bery, Haitham; Tawfik, Ahmed; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

2013-01-01

412

Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Diffusion of Fission Product Surrogates  

SciTech Connect

MAX phases, such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been suggested in the literature as a possible fuel cladding material. Prior to the application, it is necessary to investigate diffusivities of fission products in the ternary compound at elevated temperatures. This study attempts to obtain relevant data and make an initial assessment for Ti3SiC2. Ion implantation was used to introduce fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal (Au) in Ti3SiC2, SiC, and a dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/SiC synthesized at PNNL. Thermal annealing and in-situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to study the diffusivity of the various implanted species in the materials. In-situ RBS study of Ti3SiC2 implanted with Au ions at various temperatures was also performed. The experimental results indicate that the implanted Ag in SiC is immobile up to the highest temperature (1273 K) applied in this study; in contrast, significant out-diffusion of both Ag and Au in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 occurs during ion implantation at 873 K. Cs in Ti3SiC2 is found to diffuse during post-irradiation annealing at 973 K, and noticeable Cs release from the sample is observed. This study may suggest caution in using Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures. Further studies of the related materials are recommended.

Henager, Charles H.; Jiang, Weilin

2014-11-01

413

Production of fissioning uranium plasma to approximate gas-core reactor conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The intense burst of neutrons from the d-d reaction in a plasma-focus apparatus is exploited to produce a fissioning uranium plasma. The plasma-focus apparatus consists of a pair of coaxial electrodes and is energized by a 25 kJ capacitor bank. A 15-g rod of 93% enriched U-235 is placed in the end of the center electrode where an intense electron beam impinges during the plasma-focus formation. The resulting uranium plasma is heated to about 5 eV. Fission reactions are induced in the uranium plasma by neutrons from the d-d reaction which were moderated by the polyethylene walls. The fission yield is determined by evaluating the gamma peaks of I-134, Cs-138, and other fission products, and it is found that more than 1,000,000 fissions are induced in the uranium for each focus formation, with at least 1% of these occurring in the uranium plasma.

Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.; Hohl, F.; Kim, K. H.

1974-01-01

414

Process development of continuous glycerolysis in an immobilized enzyme-packed reactor for industrial monoacylglycerol production.  

PubMed

Continuous and easily operated glycerolysis was studied in different lipase-packed columns to evaluate the most potential process set-ups for industrial monoacylglycerol (MAG) production. Practical design-related issues such as enzyme-filling degree, required reaction time, mass transfer investigations, and capacity and stability of the enzyme were evaluated. A commercially available immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B was used to catalyze the glycerolysis reaction between glycerol and sunflower oil dissolved in a binary tert-butanol: tert-pentanol medium. Considering easy handling of the enzyme and measured expansion when wetted with a reaction mixture, a filling degree of 52 vol % dry enzymes particles per column volume seemed appropriate. Twenty minutes was required to reach equilibrium conditions with a MAG content of 50-55 wt %. Only insignificant indications of mass transfer limitations were observed. Hence, the commercial lipase seemed adequate to use in its available particle size distribution ranging from 300 to 900 microm. A column length-to-diameter ratio of less than 25 did not interfere with the transfer of the fluid mixture through the column. Under the tested conditions, the enzyme could be active for approximately 92 days before enzyme renewal was needed. This corresponds to a very high enzyme capacity with approximately 2000 L pure MAG produced per kg enzyme. PMID:17715899

Damstrup, Marianne Linde; Kiil, Sřren; Jensen, Anker Degn; Sparsř, Flemming Vang; Xu, Xuebing

2007-09-19

415

Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01

416

Heat production in depth up to 2500m via in situ combustion of methane using a counter-current heat-exchange reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In situ combustion is a well-known method used for exploitation of unconventional oil deposits such as heavy oil/bitumen reservoirs where the required heat is produced directly within the oil reservoir by combustion of a small percentage of the oil. A new application of in situ combustion for the production of methane from hydrate-bearing sediments was tested at pilot plant scale within the first phase of the German national gas hydrate project SUGAR. The applied method of in situ combustion was a flameless, catalytic oxidation of CH4 in a counter-current heat-exchange reactor with no direct contact between the catalytic reaction zone and the reservoir. The catalyst permitted a flameless combustion of CH4 with air to CO2 and H2O below the auto-ignition temperature of CH4 in air (868 K) and outside the flammability limits. This led to a double secured application of the reactor. The relatively low reaction temperature allowed the use of cost-effective standard materials for the reactor and prevented NOx formation. Preliminary results were promising and showed that only 15% of the produced CH4 was needed to be catalytically burned to provide enough heat to dissociate the hydrates in the environment and release CH4. The location of the heat source right within the hydrate-bearing sediment is a major advantage for the gas production from natural gas hydrates as the heat is generated where it is needed without loss of energy due to transportation. As part of the second period of the SUGAR project the reactor prototype of the first project phase was developed further to a borehole tool. The dimensions of this counter-current heat-exchange reactor are about 540 cm in length and 9 cm in diameter. It is designed for applications up to depths of 2500 m. A functionality test and a pressure test of the reactor were successfully carried out in October 2013 at the continental deep drilling site (KTB) in Windischeschenbach, Germany, in 600 m depth and 2000 m depth, respectively. In this study we present technical details of the reactor, the catalyst and potential fields of application beside the production of natural gas from hydrate bearing sediments.

Schicks, Judith Maria; Spangenberg, Erik; Giese, Ronny; Heeschen, Katja; Priegnitz, Mike; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven; Klump, Jens

2014-05-01

417

A low-temperature co-fired ceramic micro-reactor system for high-efficiency on-site hydrogen production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A ceramic-based, meso-scale fuel processor for on-board production of syngas fuel was demonstrated for applications in micro-scale solid-oxide fuel cells (?-SOFCs). The processor had a total dimension of 12 mm × 40 mm × 2 mm, the gas reforming micro reactor occupying the hot end of a cantilever had outer dimensions of 12 × 18 mm. The device was fabricated through a novel progressive lamination process in low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology. Both, heating function and desired fluidic structures were integrated monolithically into the processor. Using catalytic partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon fuel (propane) as a reaction model, a thermally self-sustaining hydrogen production was achieved. The output flow is sufficiently high to drive an optimized single membrane ?SOFC cell of about the same footprint as the micro reactor. Microsystem design, fabrication, catalyst integration as well as the chemical characterization are discussed in detail.

Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Santis-Alvarez, Alejandro J.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Muralt, Paul

2015-01-01

418

Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear wear rate is obtained. The nonlinear wear law proposed in this study serves as a model to predict the effect of changing surface topology on the wear behavior of graphite. This tribological model is valid for applications where mass removal is in the form of powder formation rather than flake or chip formation. Dust explosion tests performed by Poulsen, University of Idaho, under the same project, have revealed that the smallest amount of graphite dust mass that can lead to explosions is three orders of magnitudes larger than the maximum amount predicted to be generated in the present work. Therefore, it is concluded that pebble-pebble frictional contact is not a plausible source of dust generation and subsequent explosion hazard under normal operating conditions or even accident scenarios. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Rostamian, Maziar

419

Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1988-12-01

420

Biodiesel-fuel production in a packed-bed reactor using lipase-producing Rhizopus oryzae cells immobilized within biomass support particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

A packed-bed reactor (PBR) system using fungus whole-cell biocatalyst was developed for biodiesel fuel production by plant oil methanolysis. Lipase-producing Rhizopus oryzae cells were immobilized within 6mm×6mm×3mm cuboidal polyurethane foam biomass support particles (BSPs) during batch cultivation in a 20-l air-lift bioreactor. Emulsification of the reaction mixture containing soybean oils and water improved the methanolysis reaction rate. Using a high

Shinji Hama; Hideki Yamaji; Takahiro Fukumizu; Takao Numata; Sriappareddy Tamalampudi; Akihiko Kondo; Hideo Noda; Hideki Fukuda

2007-01-01

421

Hydrogen production with effluent from an ethanol–H 2-coproducing fermentation reactor using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen can be produced by bacterial fermentation of sugars, but substrate conversion to hydrogen is incomplete. Using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), we show that additional hydrogen can be produced from the effluent of an ethanol-type dark-fermentation reactor. An overall hydrogen recovery of 83±4% was obtained using a buffered effluent (pH 6.7–7.0), with a hydrogen production rate of 1.41±0.08m3

Lu Lu; Nanqi Ren; Defeng Xing; Bruce E. Logan

2009-01-01

422

Hydrogen production with high yield and high evolution rate by self-flocculated cells of Enterobacter aerogenes in a packed-bed reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous hydrogen gas evolution by self-flocculated cells of Enterobacter aerogenes, a natural isolate HU-101 and its mutant AY-2, was performed in a packed-bed reactor under glucose-limiting conditions in\\u000a a minimal medium. The flocs that formed during the continuous culture were retained even when the dilution rate was increased\\u000a to 0.9?h?1. The H2 production rate increased linearly with increases in the

M. A. Rachman; Y. Nakashimada; T. Kakizono; N. Nishio

1998-01-01

423

La 1? x Sr x FeO 3? ? perovskites as redox materials for application in a membrane reactor for simultaneous production of pure hydrogen and synthesis gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work reports on the preparation and characterization of perovskitic materials with the general formula La1?xSrxFeO3 (x=0, 0.3, 0.7, 1) for application in a dense mixed conducting membrane reactor process for simultaneous production of synthesis gas and pure hydrogen. Thermogravimetric experiments indicated that the materials are able to loose and uptake reversibly oxygen from their lattice up to 0.2 oxygen

A. Evdou; V. Zaspalis; L. Nalbandian

2010-01-01

424

Effect of Internal Diffusional Restrictions on the Hydrolysis of Penicillin G: Reactor Performance and Specific Productivity of 6APA with Immobilized Penicillin Acylase  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model that describes the heterogeneous reaction–diffusion process involved in penicillin G hydrolysis in a\\u000a batch reactor with immobilized penicillin G acylase is presented. The reaction system includes the bulk liquid phase containing\\u000a the dissolved substrate (and products) and the solid biocatalyst phase represented by glyoxyl-agarose spherical porous particles\\u000a carrying the enzyme. The equations consider reaction and diffusion components

Pedro Valencia; Sebastián Flores; Lorena Wilson; Andrés Illanes

425

Back propagation neural network modelling of biodegradation and fermentative biohydrogen production using distillery wastewater in a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.  

PubMed

In a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor, biodegradation in association with biohydrogen production was studied using distillery wastewater as substrate. The experiments were carried out at ambient temperature (34±1°C) and acidophilic pH of 6.5 with constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24h at various organic loading rates (OLRs) (1-10.2kgCODm(-3)d(-1)) in continuous mode. A maximum hydrogen production rate of 1300mLd(-1) was achieved. A back propagation neural network (BPNN) model with network topology of 4-20-1 using Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm was developed and validated. A total of 231 data points were studied to examine the performance of the HUASB reactor in acclimatisation and operation phase. The statistical qualities of BPNN models were significant due to the high correlation coefficient, R(2), and lower mean absolute error (MAE) between experimental and simulated data. From the results, it was concluded that BPNN modelling could be applied in HUASB reactor for predicting the biodegradation and biohydrogen production using distillery wastewater. PMID:24746339

Sridevi, K; Sivaraman, E; Mullai, P

2014-08-01

426

Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell grade hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming: A comparative multiple reactor modeling study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of a fuel processor based on methanol steam reforming has been carried out to produce fuel cell grade H2. Six reactor configurations namely FBR1 (fixed bed reactor), MR1 (H2 selective membrane reactor with one reaction tube), MR2 (H2 selective membrane reactor with two reaction tubes), FBR2 (FBR1 + preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactor), MR3 (MR1 + PROX), and MR4 (MR2 + PROX) are evaluated by simulation to identify the suitable processing scheme. The yield of H2 is significantly affected by H2 selective membrane, residence time, temperature, and pressure conditions at complete methanol conversion. The enhancement in residence time in MR2 by using two identical reaction tubes provides H2 yield of 2.96 with 91.25 mol% recovery at steam/methanol ratio of 1.5, pressure of 2 bar and 560 K temperature. The exit retentate gases from MR2 are further treated in PROX reactor of MR4 to reduce CO concentration to 4.1 ppm to ensure the safe discharge to the environment. The risk of carbon deposition on reforming catalyst is highly reduced in MR4, and MR4 reactor configuration generates 7.4 NL min-1 of CO free H2 from 0.12 mol min-1 of methanol which can provide 470 W PEMFC feedstock requirement. Hence, process scheme in MR4 provides a compact and innovative fuel cell grade H2 generating unit.

Katiyar, Nisha; Kumar, Shashi; Kumar, Surendra

2013-12-01

427

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor ( HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.5×1015 neutrons/cm2/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety of neutron-rich medical radioisotopes of current interest for therapy. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117 m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube ( HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle (22-24 days) and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions ( PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117 m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

Knapp, F. F.; Beets, A. L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C. W.; Hobbs, R. L.

1999-01-01

428

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.5×1015 neutrons/cm2/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety o