Sample records for power-plutonium production reactor richland

  1. Measurements and calculation of /sup 10/B(n,He) and /sup 235/U(n,f) reaction rates and a control rod mockup in ZPPR (Zero Power Plutonium Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Oliver, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported for /sup 10/B(n,He) reaction rate measurements inside B/sub 4/C pellets in a prototypic control rod mockup in the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor. The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) technique was used, with absolute amounts of helium measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Rates of /sup 235/U fission were measured in foils irradiated between B/sub 4/C pellets. Both helium production and uranium fission rates were calculated using three-dimensional nodal transport methods. Average C/E values in the control rod were 0.961 +- 0.034 for boron capture and 1.094 +- 0.008 for uranium fission based on ENDF/B version V.2 cross sections. The C/E values were nearly constant in the rod interior but changed by a few percent near the rod tip. For both reactions, the C/E values were brought closer to unity by increasing the boron capture cross sections.

  2. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  3. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2009-12-20

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  4. ICF tritium production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.R.; McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.; Steele, W.G.

    1985-02-28

    The conceptual design of an ICF tritium production reactor is described. The chamber design uses a beryllium multiplier and a liquid lithium breeder to achieve a tritium breeding ratio of 2.08. The annual net tritium production of this 532 MW/sub t/ plant is 16.9 kg, and the estimated cost of tritium is $8100/g.

  5. The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Nesse, R.J.; Schultz, R.W.; Stokowski, P.A.; Clark, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs.

  6. Richland Kiwanis Foundation Scholarship Grant Program

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Richland Kiwanis Foundation Scholarship Grant Program Eligible Students The Richland Kiwanis Foundation provides one-year grants to deserving students whose ability to obtain post- secondary education. _______________________________________________________________________ Description of Grants Richland Kiwanis Scholarships: Three grants will be awarded for the 2012-13 school year

  7. Reactor for production of U-233

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. W. Lang; R. L. Stetson

    1983-01-01

    The production of a novel nuclear fuel utilizing clean uranium 233 in combination with other nuclear materials is made possible by utilization of an equally novel reactor configuration and method of operation. Clean uranium 233 is produced from thorium in a light water reactor while utilizing discrete separation of the thorium being irradiated from the fissile fuel. This clean uranium

  8. Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  9. Richland College Established in 1972, Richland College (RLC) is one of

    E-print Network

    Magee, Joseph W.

    and Richland College with an Associate of Arts degree. The school will be tuition free, and the curriculumRichland College Established in 1972, Richland College (RLC) is one of seven two-year community colleges in the Dallas County Community College District. RLC's unique "Thunderduck" culture is rooted

  10. Alternatives to proposed replacement production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.

    1981-06-01

    To insure adequate supplies of plutonium and tritium for defense purposes, an independent evaluation was made by Los Alamos National Laboratory of the numerous alternatives to the proposed replacement production reactors (RPR). This effort concentrated on the defense fuel cycle operation and its technical implications in identifying the principal alternatives for the 1990s. The primary options were identified as (1) existing commercial reactors, (2) existing and planned government-owned facilities (not now used for defense materials production), and (3) other RPRs (not yet proposed) such as CANDU or CANDU-type heavy-water reactors (HWR) for both plutonium and tritium production. The evaluation considered features and differences of various options that could influence choice of RPR alternatives. Barring a change in the US approach to civilian and defense fuel cycles and precluding existing commercial reactors at government-owned sites, the most significant alternatives were identified as a CANDU-type HWR at Savannah River Plant (SRP) site or the Three Mile Island commercial reactor with reprocessing capability at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant and at SRP.

  11. Silicon production in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Part of the development effort of the JPL in-house technology involved in the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the investigation of a low-cost process to produce semiconductor-grade silicon for terrestrial photovoltaic cell applications. The process selected was based on pyrolysis of silane in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Following initial investigations involving 1- and 2-in. diameter reactors, a 6-in. diameter, engineering-scale FBR was constructed to establish reactor performance, mechanism of silicon deposition, product morphology, and product purity. The overall mass balance for all experiments indicates that more than 90% of the total silicon fed into the reactor is deposited on silicon seed particles and the remaining 10% becomes elutriated fines. Silicon production rates were demonstrated of 1.5 kg/h at 30% silane concentration and 3.5 kg/h at 80% silane concentration. The mechanism of silicon deposition is described by a six-path process: heterogeneous deposition, homogeneous decomposition, coalescence, coagulation, scavenging, and heterogeneous growth on fines. The bulk of the growth silicon layer appears to be made up of small diameter particles. This product morphology lends support to the concept of the scavenging of homogeneously nucleated silicon.

  12. SINTERED ALUMINUM PRODUCTS FOR REACTOR APPLICATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1961-01-01

    Preliminary examination on sintered aluminum product (SAP) alloys for ; reactor application was carried out by the Metallurgical Laboratory of the AEK. ; The mechanical properties of SAP at elevated temperatures are only slightly ; altered by prolonged heating. Its structural stability is shown to be affected ; by heat treatment at 400 deg C and above. Blistering starts at

  13. Green nanoparticle production using micro reactor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kck, A.; Steinfeldt, M.; Prenzel, K.; Swiderek, P.; Gleich, A. v.; Thming, J.

    2011-07-01

    The importance and potential of nanoparticles in daily life as well as in various industrial processes is becoming more predominant. Specifically, silver nanoparticles are increasingly applied, e.g. in clothes and wipes, due to their antibacterial properties. For applications in liquid phase it is advantageous to produce the nanoparticles directly in suspension. This article describes a green production of silver nanoparticles using micro reactor technology considering principles of green chemistry. The aim is to reveal the potential and constraints of this approach and to show, how economic and environmental costs vary depending on process conditions. For this purpose our research compares the proposed process with water-based batch synthesis and demonstrates improvements in terms of product quality. Because of the lower energy consumption and lower demand of cleaning agents, micro reactor is the best ecological choice.

  14. The behavior of fission products during nuclear rocket reactor tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bokor, P.C.; Kirk, W.L.; Bohl, R.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS E550, Los Alamos, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-01-10

    Fission product release from nuclear rocket propulsion reactor fuel is an important consideration for nuclear rocket development and application. Fission product data from the last six reactors of the Rover program are collected in this paper to provide as basis for addressing development and testing issues. Fission product loss from the fuel will depend on fuel composition and reactor design and operating parameters. During ground testing, fission products can be contained downstream of the reactor. The last Rover reactor tested, the Nuclear Furnance, was mated to an effluent clean-up system that was effective in preventing the discharge of fission products into the atmosphere.

  15. Hydrogen production using modular helium reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, A.S.; Tangirala, V.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen can play a major role in reducing global CO{sub 2} emissions in the 21st century. Produced using nuclear energy, hydrogen can replace many existing fossil fuels such as oil and coal, in providing a CO{sub 2}-free energy supply for many stationary and transportation uses. The Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) system can deliver the required electric energy and is unique in its capacity to supply high temperature process heat for thermochemical production of hydrogen. Three distinct hydrogen production processes and their interface with the MHR heat source in those processes are presented. Assessment of these and other nuclear approaches to the production of hydrogen should be undertaken to assure the availability of commercial hydrogen production processes early in the 21st century.

  16. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  17. Notes on reactor operation within a product specification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. W. Lang; W. I. Neef

    1961-01-01

    A product specification will impose operating problems for the HAPO reactors and the separation facilities. A preliminary analysis of several methods of operating have been considered using a linear program analysis. This document considers some of the implications. A linear programmed study of HAPO reactors was made in which six percent Pu was maximized under several reactor plans.

  18. Tritium production, releases and population doses at nuclear power reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Baker

    1985-01-01

    Tritium is produced in light-water-cooled reactors as a product of ternary fission and by nuclear reactions with the coolant and with neutron-absorbing materials used for reactor control. Pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have greater amounts of tritium produced in or released into the coolant than boiling water reactors (BWRs). Consequently, tritium releases to the environment from PWRs (29 GBq\\/MW(e)-y (0.78 Ci\\/MW(e)-y)°

  19. Selection of a toroidal fusion reactor concept for a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Jassby

    1987-01-01

    The basic fusion driver requirements of a toroidal materials production reactor are considered. The tokamak, stellarator, bumpy torus, and reversed-field pinch are compared with regard to their demonstrated performance, probable near-term development, and potential advantages and disadvantages if used as reactors for materials production. Of the candidate fusion drivers, the tokamak is determined to be the most viable for a

  20. POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

    2011-10-19

    A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

  1. Fission product behavior in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. Compere; S. S. Kirslis; E. G. Bohlmann; F. F. Blankenship; W. R. Grimes

    1975-01-01

    Essentially all the fission product data for numerous and varied samples ; taken during operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment or as part of the ; examination of specimens removed after particular phases of operation are ; reported, together with the appropriate inventory or other basis of comparison, ; and relevant reactor parameters and conditions. Fission product behavior fell

  2. RACEWAY REACTOR FOR MICROALGAL BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed mathematical model incorporating mass transfer, hydraulics, carbonate/aquatic chemistry, biokinetics, biology and reactor design will be calibrated and validated using the data to be generated from the experiments. The practical feasibility of the proposed reactor...

  3. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: American production reactors, 1942--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, R.P.; Zenzen, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Although the history of commercial-power nuclear reactors is well known, the story of the government reactors that produce weapons-grade plutonium and tritium has been shrouded in secrecy. In the first detailed look at the origin and development of these production reactors, the authors describe a fifty-year government effort no less complex, expensive, and technologically demanding than the Polaris or Apollo programs--yet one about which most Americans know virtually nothing. The book describes the evolution of the early reactors, the atomic weapons establishment that surrounded them, and the sometimes bitter struggles between business and political constituencies for their share of 'nuclear pork.' They show how, since the 1980s, aging production reactors have increased the risk of radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and water table. And they describe how the Department of Energy mounted a massive effort to find the right design for a new generation of reactors, only to abandon that effort with the end of the Cold War. Today, all American production reactors remain closed. Due to short half-life, the nation's supply of tritium, crucial to modern weapons, is rapidly dwindling. As countries like Iraq and North Korea threaten to join the nuclear club, the authors contend, the United States needs to revitalize tritium production capacity in order to maintain a viable nuclear deterrent. Meanwhile, as slowly decaying artifacts of the Cold War, the closed production reactors at Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina, loom ominously over the landscape.

  4. Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  5. Aerosol reactor production of uniform submicron powders

    DOEpatents

    Flagan, Richard C. (Pasadena, CA); Wu, Jin J. (Pasadena, CA)

    1991-02-19

    A method of producing submicron nonagglomerated particles in a single stage reactor includes introducing a reactant or mixture of reactants at one end while varying the temperature along the reactor to initiate reactions at a low rate. As homogeneously small numbers of seed particles generated in the initial section of the reactor progress through the reactor, the reaction is gradually accelerated through programmed increases in temperature along the length of the reactor to promote particle growth by chemical vapor deposition while minimizing agglomerate formation by maintaining a sufficiently low number concentration of particles in the reactor such that coagulation is inhibited within the residence time of particles in the reactor. The maximum temperature and minimum residence time is defined by a combination of temperature and residence time that is necessary to bring the reaction to completion. In one embodiment, electronic grade silane and high purity nitrogen are introduced into the reactor and temperatures of approximately 770.degree. K. to 1550.degree. K. are employed. In another embodiment silane and ammonia are employed at temperatures from 750.degree. K. to 1800.degree. K.

  6. Aerosol reactor production of uniform submicron powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagan, Richard C. (Inventor); Wu, Jin J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing submicron nonagglomerated particles in a single stage reactor includes introducing a reactant or mixture of reactants at one end while varying the temperature along the reactor to initiate reactions at a low rate. As homogeneously small numbers of seed particles generated in the initial section of the reactor progress through the reactor, the reaction is gradually accelerated through programmed increases in temperature along the length of the reactor to promote particle growth by chemical vapor deposition while minimizing agglomerate formation by maintaining a sufficiently low number concentration of particles in the reactor such that coagulation is inhibited within the residence time of particles in the reactor. The maximum temperature and minimum residence time is defined by a combination of temperature and residence time that is necessary to bring the reaction to completion. In one embodiment, electronic grade silane and high purity nitrogen are introduced into the reactor and temperatures of approximately 770.degree. K. to 1550.degree. K. are employed. In another embodiment silane and ammonia are employed at temperatures from 750.degree. K. to 1800.degree. K.

  7. Review of Hanford production reactor confinement (Project CGI791)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trumble

    1960-01-01

    The Project CGI-791, Reactor Confinement for Hanford production reactors, vas conceived as a result of deliberations concerning the release of the Wahluke Slope secondary exclusion zone for private use, and initiated by an authorization and directive from the Atomic Energy Commission to proceed with such a project on a high priority basis. This authorization was coupled with the establishment of

  8. Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  9. Effect of proposed HAPO (Hanford Atomic Products Operation) reactor production increases on radioactivity discharged to the Columbia River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Hall; P. C. Jerman

    1960-01-01

    The incentive to increase the production of the existing Hanford reactors is being examined. Increased reactor production will increase the radioactivity discharged to the Columbia River in reactor effluent water. It is the purpose of the document to evaluate the increased effluent problems which will result. Study of the production increases which are possible with present reactors indicate that the

  10. NOVEL REACTOR DESIGN FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is to scale-up a novel reactor for producing Biodiesel from alternative feedstocks. Biodiesel is an alternative fuel that can be produced from a wide variety of plant oils, animal oils and waste oils from food processing. The conventional feedstocks fo...

  11. Chemistry of fission product iodine under nuclear reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Bell, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotopes of iodine are generally acknowledged to be the species whose release into the biosphere as a result of a nuclear reactor accident is of the greatest concern. In the course of its release, the fission product is subjected to differing chemical environments; these can alter the physicochemical form of the fission product and thus modify the manner and extent to which release occurs. Both the chemical environments which are characteristic of reactor accidents and their effect in determining physical and chemical form of fission product iodine have been studied extensively, and are reviewed in this report. 76 refs.

  12. Wetlands: Their impact on siting a proposed nuclear production reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. L. Hooker; S. A. Danker; A. R. Grainger; V. A. Rogers

    1993-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 780-km[sup 2] US Department of Energy (DOE) site managed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the production of nuclear materials for defense and other purposes. Five nuclear production reactors (NPRs) constructed in the 1950s are located on the site, and all but one are either on standby or shut down. The possibility

  13. Lactic Acid Production in a Mixed-Culture Biofilm Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Ali; Pometto, Anthony L.; Johnson, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Novel solid supports, consisting of polypropylene blended with various agricultural materials (pp composite), were evaluated as supports for pure- and mixed-culture continuous lactic acid fermentations in biofilm reactors. Streptomyces viridosporus T7A (ATCC 39115) was used to form a biofilm, and Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus (ATCC 11443) was used for lactic acid production. For mixed-culture fermentations, a 15-day continuous fermentation of S. viridosporus was performed initially to establish the biofilm. The culture medium was then inoculated with L. casei subsp. rhamnosus. For pure-culture fermentation, L. casei subsp. rhamnosus was inoculated directly into the reactors containing sterile pp composite chips. The biofilm reactors containing various pp composite chips were compared with a biofilm reactor containing pure polypropylene chips and with a reactor containing a suspension culture. Continuous fermentation was started, and each flow rate (0.06 to 1.92 ml/min) was held constant for 24 h; steady state was achieved after 10 h. Lactic acid production was determined throughout the 24-h period by high-performance liquid chromatography. Production rates that were two to five times faster than those of the suspension culture (control) were observed for the pure- and mixed-culture bioreactors. Both lactic acid production rates and lactic acid concentrations in the culture medium were consistently higher in mixed-culture than in pure-culture fermentations. Biofilm formation on the chips was detected at harvest by chip clumping and Gram staining. PMID:16348843

  14. Silicon production in an aerosol reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. J.; Alam, M. K.; Johnson, B. E.; Flagan, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    An aerosol reactor for the growth of large silicon particles by silane pyrolysis was shown to demonstrate the following properties: (1) generate seed particles by pyrolysis of a small amount of silane; (2) mix seed aerosol with primary silane flow, limiting number concentration such that the amount of silane is sufficient to grow the desired size of particles from the seed; and (3) react the silane at a rate which is controlled such that the seed particles scavenge the condensible vapors rapidly enough to inhibit further nucleation.

  15. Moving bed reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production

    DOEpatents

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2013-04-16

    Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor chambers between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between chambers during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat. In embodiments, chambers of a reactor are coupled to a heat exchanger to pre-heat the reactive particles prior to direct exposure to thermal energy with heat transferred from reduced reactive particles as the particles are oppositely conveyed between the thermal reduction chamber and the fuel production chamber. In an embodiment, particle conveyance is in part provided by an elevator which may further function as a heat exchanger.

  16. Thermal reactor. [liquid silicon production from silane gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Ford, L. B. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A thermal reactor apparatus and method of pyrolyticaly decomposing silane gas into liquid silicon product and hydrogen by-product gas is disclosed. The thermal reactor has a reaction chamber which is heated well above the decomposition temperature of silane. An injector probe introduces the silane gas tangentially into the reaction chamber to form a first, outer, forwardly moving vortex containing the liquid silicon product and a second, inner, rewardly moving vortex containing the by-product hydrogen gas. The liquid silicon in the first outer vortex deposits onto the interior walls of the reaction chamber to form an equilibrium skull layer which flows to the forward or bottom end of the reaction chamber where it is removed. The by-product hydrogen gas in the second inner vortex is removed from the top or rear of the reaction chamber by a vortex finder. The injector probe which introduces the silane gas into the reaction chamber is continually cooled by a cooling jacket.

  17. Reactor power history from fission product signatures

    E-print Network

    Sweeney, David J.

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this research was to identify fission product signatures that could be used to uniquely identify a specific spent fuel assembly in order to improve international safeguards. This capability would help prevent and deter potential...

  18. Corrosion-product release in light water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lister; R. D. Davidson

    1989-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program aimed at measuring and studying the release of corrosion products from typical PWR and BWR materials to reactor coolant. The program has provided measurements of release from stainless steel, steam generator alloys and hard-facing material (Stellite) to PWR coolant under several chemistry conditions. Kinetic expressions for cumulative release as a function

  19. Fumaric acid production in airlift loop reactor with porous sparger

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianxin Du; Ningjun Cao; Cheng S. Gong; George T. Tsao; Naiju Yuan

    1997-01-01

    Airlift loop reactors with porous spargers were investigated and used in the process of fumaric acid production byRhizopus oryzae ATCC 20344. In order to enhance oxygen mass transfer, which is very important for organic acid production, two kinds of porous spargers\\u000a (stainless steel membrane tube and porcelain tube) were examined. Gas holdup, liquid circulation velocity, mixing time, bubble\\u000a size, and

  20. Green nanoparticle production using micro reactor technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kck; M. Steinfeldt; K. Prenzel; P. Swiderek; A. v. Gleich; J. Thming

    2011-01-01

    The importance and potential of nanoparticles in daily life as well as in various industrial processes is becoming more predominant. Specifically, silver nanoparticles are increasingly applied, e.g. in clothes and wipes, due to their antibacterial properties. For applications in liquid phase it is advantageous to produce the nanoparticles directly in suspension. This article describes a green production of silver nanoparticles

  1. Reactor power history from fission product signatures

    E-print Network

    Sweeney, David J.

    2009-05-15

    safeguards are needed to detect and deter any attempts to circumvent the safeguards system. Diversion of spent nuclear fuel in order to obtain plutonium is one method for weapons production.2 Assuming that it is difficult to defeat IAEA fuel assembly... of plutonium in the fuel, a higher concentration of Pu-239 in the plutonium, or a lower concentration of Pu-240 in the plutonium.3 These and other factors are dependent on the power history of the fuel assembly and allow for greater optimization...

  2. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  3. Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device

    E-print Network

    Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjrn Hartman; Bo Histad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnr; Hanno Essn

    2013-06-07

    An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

  4. Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device

    E-print Network

    Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjrn; Histad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnr, Lars; Essn, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

  5. 192. View of the Richland Balsam Mountain Overlook. This is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    192. View of the Richland Balsam Mountain Overlook. This is the highest elevation, 6,047, on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Looking west-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  6. Hydrogen Production via a Commercially Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2005-08-23

    Single stage low-temperature-shift water-gas-shift (WGS-LTS) via a membrane reactor (MR) process was studied through both mathematical simulation and experimental verification in this quarter. Our proposed MR yields a reactor size that is 10 to >55% smaller than the comparable conventional reactor for a CO conversion of 80 to 90%. In addition, the CO contaminant level in the hydrogen produced via MR ranges from 1,000 to 4,000 ppm vs 40,000 to >70,000 ppm via the conventional reactor. The advantages of the reduced WGS reactor size and the reduced CO contaminant level provide an excellent opportunity for intensification of the hydrogen production process by the proposed MR. To prepare for the field test planned in Yr III, a significant number (i.e., 98) of full-scale membrane tubes have been produced with an on-spec ratio of >76% during this first production trial. In addition, an innovative full-scale membrane module has been designed, which can potentially deliver >20 to 30 m{sup 2}/module making it suitable for large-scale applications, such as power generation. Finally, we have verified our membrane performance and stability in a refinery pilot testing facility on a hydrocracker purge gas. No change in membrane performance was noted over the >100 hrs of testing conducted in the presence of >30% H{sub 2}S, >5,000 ppm NH{sub 3} (estimated), and heavy hydrocarbons on the order of 25%. The high stability of these membranes opens the door for the use of our membrane in the WGS environment with significantly reduced pretreatment burden.

  7. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Liu

    2003-01-01

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps

  8. Hydrogen production in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, Yu. M.; Klevan, P. A.

    2011-11-01

    The noncatalytic process of syngas production by means of partial oxidation of methane by air oxygen in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor has been investigated experimentally. We have investigated the influence of the equivalent ratio and the specific mass flow of the fuel mixture on the composition of conversion products and the maximum temperature in the reaction zone. The optimal conditions for the process providing the most effective conversion of methane to syngas have been established. The concentration of hydrogen is maximal for the equivalent ratio ? = 2.8 and the specific flow rate g = 1.8 kg / (m2?s).

  9. Corrosion-product release in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, D.; Davidson, R.D. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.)

    1989-09-01

    This is the final report of a research program aimed at measuring and studying the release of corrosion products from typical PWR and BWR materials to reactor coolant. The program has provided measurements of release from stainless steel, steam generator alloys and hard-facing material (Stellite) to PWR coolant under several chemistry conditions. Kinetic expressions for cumulative release as a function of time have been developed. Corrosion measurements in- and out-reactor have indicated little effect of reactor radiation on corrosion of these materials. Detailed surface analysis has characterized the formation of oxide films in PWR coolant, and has led to suggestions of mechanisms of release. The mechanisms have been made the basis of a system model which has been used to evaluate the effects of various system parameters on the concentration of dissolved cobalt in the coolant--i.e., on the source term for activity transport. The understanding of film formation and release have led to a proposed method of preconditioning PWRs to reduce substantially radiation fields during subsequent operation. Correlations for elemental release from stainless steel and Stellite under BWR conditions have also been derived. They indicate that cobalt-based alloys in BWR reactor circuits are the major source of corrosion-released cobalt. The effects of zinc on the growth of oxide films on carbon steel, Inconel-600 and Stellite-6 are also described. 39 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Long-lived activation products in reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

  11. Production of transplutonium elements in the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Corbett, B.L.; King, L.J.; McGuire, S.C.; Sims, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques described here have been demonstrated to predict the contents of transplutonium element production targets, at least for isotopes of mass 253 or less. The HFIR irradiation model is a workhorse for planning the TRU processing campaigns, for certifying the heat evolution rate of targets prior to insertion in the reactor, for predicting future production capabilities over a multi-year period, and for making optimization studies. Practical considerations, however, may limit the range of available options so that optimum operation is not always achievable. We do intend, however, to keep fine-tuning the constants which define the cross sections as time permits. We need to do more work on optimizing the production of /sup 250/Cm, /sup 254/Es, /sup 255/Es, and ultimately /sup 257/Fm, since researchers are interested in obtaining larger quantities of these rare and difficult-to-produce nuclides. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Westinghouse independent safety review of Savannah River production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, W.D.; McShane, W.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Liparulo, N.J.; McAdoo, J.D.; Strawbridge, L.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear and Advanced Technology Div.); Toto, G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear Services Div.); Fauske, H.K. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA)); Call, D.W. (Westinghouse Savannah R

    1989-04-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a safety assessment of the Savannah River production reactors (K,L, and P) as requested by the US Department of Energy. This assessment was performed between November 1, 1988, and April 1, 1989, under the transition contract for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's preparations to succeed E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company as the US Department of Energy contractor for the Savannah River Project. The reviewers were drawn from several Westinghouse nuclear energy organizations, embody a combination of commercial and government reactor experience, and have backgrounds covering the range of technologies relevant to assessing nuclear safety. The report presents the rationale from which the overall judgment was drawn and the basis for the committee's opinion on the phased restart strategy proposed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Westinghouse, and the US Department of Energy-Savannah River. The committee concluded that it could recommend restart of one reactor at partial power upon completion of a list of recommended upgrades both to systems and their supporting analyses and after demonstration that the organization had assimilated the massive changes it will have undergone.

  13. A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

    2004-07-29

    Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. During this reporting period, the unit has been fully commissioned and is operational. The unit is capable of operating at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. A double-seal technique has been developed and tested successfully to achieve leak-tight seal for the membranes. Initial data for a commercial Palladium-Gold membrane were obtained at temperatures to 450 C and pressures to 13 atm. Tests for the perovskite membranes are being performed and the results will be reported in the next quarter. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The results from the simulation work confirm that the hydrogen flux increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen. The presence of steam in the permeate side can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%. When the steam partial pressure is greater than 1 atm, the hydrogen flux becomes independent of the steam pressure.

  14. (COMEDIE program review and fission product transport in MHTGR reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.

    1990-03-15

    The subcontract between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and the CEA provides for the refurbishment of the high pressure COMEDIE test loop in the SILOE reactor and a series of experiments to characterize fission product lift-off from MHTGR heat exchanger surfaces under several depressurization accident scenarios. The data will contribute to the validation of models and codes used to predict fission product transport in the MHTGR. In the meeting at CEA headquarters in Paris the program schedule and preparation for the DCAA and Quality Assurance audits were discussed. Long-range interest in expanded participation in the gas-cooled reactor technology Umbrella Agreement was also expressed by the CEA. At the CENG, in Grenoble, technical details on the loop design, fabrication components, development of test procedures, and preparation for the DOE quality assurance (QA) audit in May were discussed. After significant delays in CY 1989 it appears that good progress is being made in CY 1990 and the first major test will be initiated by December. An extensive list of agreements and commitments was generated to facilitate the coordination and planning of future work. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Radionuclide inventory and source terms for the surplus production reactors at Hanford

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Miller; J. M. Steffes

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide inventories have been estimated for the eight surplus production reactors at Hanford. The inventories listed represent more than 95% of the total curie burden; the remaining 5% is distributed in piping, tunnels, and various other locations within the reactor building and unaccounted for inventories within the reactors or fuel storage basins. Estimates are conservative as the methodology was designed

  16. Radionuclide inventory and source terms for the surplus production reactors at Hanford

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Miller; J. M. Steffes

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclide inventories have been estimated for the eight surplus production reactors at Hanford. The inventories listed represent more than 95% of the total curie burden; the remaining 5% is distributed in piping, tunnels, and various other locations within the reactor building and unaccounted for inventories within the reactors or fuel storage basins. Estimates are conservative as the methodology was designed

  17. 78 FR 37222 - Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of Settlement AGENCY: Environmental Protection...Superfund Site located in Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina. The settlement addresses cost incurred by the...

  18. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-print Network

    Z. Djurcic; J. A. Detwiler; A. Piepke; V. R. Foster Jr.; L. Miller; G. Gratta

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in electron anti-neutrino detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties and their relevance to reactor anti-neutrino experiments.

  19. Bio-hydrogen production from molasses by anaerobic fermentation in continuous stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Li, Yong-feng; Chen, Hong; Deng, Jie-xuan; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    A study of bio-hydrogen production was performed in a continuous flow anaerobic fermentation reactor (with an available volume of 5.4 L). The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for bio-hydrogen production was operated under the organic loading rates (OLR) of 8-32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d (COD: chemical oxygen demand) with molasses as the substrate. The maximum hydrogen production yield of 8.19 L/d was obtained in the reactor with the OLR increased from 8 kg COD/m3 reactor/d to 24 kg COD/m3 d. However, the hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) drastically decreased at an OLR of 32 kg COD/m3 reactor/d. Ethanoi, acetic, butyric and propionic were the main liquid fermentation products with the percentages of 31%, 24%, 20% and 18%, which formed the mixed-type fermentation.

  20. Numerical results of Production Test IP651AI, Tripout Test: H Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Morrissey

    1964-01-01

    During the January, 1964, outage at H reactor, major rear-face hardware modifications were performed and enlarged venturis were installed full reactor. These modifications significantly change the reactor hydraulic characteristics. Process Standards - Water Plant) 190-B-070, requires tripout tests be performed whenever a major change is made to either the process pumping system or the reactor hydraulic characteristics. Production Test IP-651-Al

  1. Enhancement of Energy Yield for Ozone Production via Packed-Bed Reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsin Liang Chen; How Ming Lee; Moo Been Chang

    2006-01-01

    The present work aims to enhance the energy yield of ozone production via packed-bed reactors. It has been experimentally demonstrated that ozone concentration and corresponding energy yield achieved by packed-bed reactors are significantly higher than that achieved by DBD only. The so-called packed-bed reactor is constructed by packing granular dielectric pellets within a DBD reactor. Two kinds of dielectric materials

  2. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Buitrn, Germn; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used. PMID:25521125

  3. A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

    2004-10-26

    Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. The unit was fully commissioned and is operational. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and tested in the new permeation unit. These membranes were fabricated by either uniaxial pressing or tape casting technique with thickness ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.7 mm. Hydrogen permeation data for the BCN perovskite membrane have been successfully obtained for temperatures between 800 and 950 C and pressures from 1 to 12 bar. The highest hydrogen flux was measured at 1.6 STPcc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of 12 bar and 950 C with a membrane thickness of 0.22 mm. A membrane gasification reactor model was developed to consider the H{sub 2} permeability of the membrane, the kinetics and the equilibriums of the gas phase reactions in the gasifier, the operating conditions and the configurations of the membrane reactor. The results show that the hydrogen production efficiency using the novel membrane gasification reactor concept can be increased by about 50% versus the conventional gasification process. This confirms the previous evaluation results from the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. A rigorous model for hydrogen permeation through mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic membranes was also developed based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The hydrogen flux predicted from the modeling results are in line with the data from the experimental measurement. The simulation also shows that the presence of steam in the permeate side or the feed side of the membrane can have a small negative effect on the hydrogen flux, in the order of 10%.

  4. Preliminary design of a low-temperature heavy water production reactor: nonelectric option

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.; Graves, W.E.; McAllister, J.E.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes a conceptual design for a low temperature heavy water reactor with no electricity generation (LTHWR-NE) to be built as a new production reactor at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The reactor design is based on the proven SRP reactor design with enhancements and state-of-the-art equipment. Aluminum cladding temperatures would be the same as with current operations. The reactor will be built on a time schedule to allow startup testing in September 1991 and first operation in March 1992. A modified reactor design using the same aluminum cladding temperatures as C-Reactor but permitting natural circulation in both the primary and secondary coolant loops is presented in the Appendix. This concept would use the same primary loop flow, temperature range, and secondary coolant parameters as the design in Section I of this report. The differences between the two reactor designs are also discussed in the Appendix.

  5. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  6. A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR FOR DIRECT HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shain Doong; Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Roberts

    2005-04-28

    Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane reactor coupled with a gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed protonic-electronic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}), Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) were successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, a thin BCN membrane supported on a porous BCN layer was fabricated. The objective was to increase the hydrogen flux with a further reduction of the thickness of the active membrane layer. The thinnest dense layer that could be achieved in our laboratory currently was about 0.2 mm. Nevertheless, the membrane was tested in the permeation unit and showed reasonable flux compared to the previous BCN samples of the same thickness. A long term durability test was conducted for a SCTm membrane with pure hydrogen in the feed side and nitrogen in the sweep side. The pressure was 1 bar and the temperature was around 1010 C. No decline of hydrogen flux was observed after continuous running of over 250 hours. This long term test indicates that the perovskite membrane has good thermal stability under the reducing conditions of the hydrogen atmosphere. A conceptual design of the membrane reactor configuration for a 1000 tons-per-day (TPD) coal gasifier was completed. The design considered a tubular membrane module located within the freeboard area of a fluidized bed gasifier. The membrane ambipolar conductivity was based on the value calculated from the measured permeation data. A membrane thickness of 25 micron was assumed in the calculation. The GTI's gasification model combined with a membrane reactor model were used to determine the dimensions of the membrane module. It appears that a membrane module can be configured within a fluidized bed gasifier without substantial increase of the gasifier dimensions.

  7. Hydrogen Production Via a Commercially Ready Inorganic Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K. T. Liu

    2006-09-30

    In the last report, we covered the experimental verification of the mathematical model we developed for WGS-MR, specifically in the aspect of CO conversion ratio, and the effect of the permeate sweep. Bench-top experimental study has been continuing in this period to verify the remaining aspects of the reactor performance, including hydrogen recovery ratio, hydrogen purity and CO contaminant level. Based upon the comparison of experimental vs simulated results in this period along with the results reported in the last period, we conclude that our mathematical model can predict reliably all aspects of the membrane reactor performance for WGS using typical coal gasifier off-gas as feed under the proposed operating condition. In addition to 250 C, the experimental study at 225 C was performed. As obtained at 250 C, the predicted values match well with the experimental results at this lower temperature. The pretreatment requirement in our proposed WGS-MR process can be streamlined to the particulate removal only. No excess water beyond the stoichiometric requirement for CO conversion is necessary; thus, power generation efficiency can be maximized. PROX will be employed as post-treatment for the elimination of trace CO. Since the CO contaminant level from our WGS-MR is projected to be 20-30 ppm, PROX can be implemented economically and reliably to deliver hydrogen with <10 ppm CO to meet the spec for PEM fuel cell. This would be a more cost effective solution than the production of on-spec hydrogen without the use of prost treatment. WGS reaction in the presence of sulfur can be accomplished with the use of the Co/MoS{sub 2} catalyst. This catalyst has been employed industrially as a sour gas shift catalyst. Our mathematical simulation on WGS-MR based upon the suggested pre- and post-treatment has demonstrated that a nearly complete CO conversion (i.e., 99+%) can be accomplished. Although conversion vs production cost may play an important role in an overall process optimization, no cost optimization has been taken into consideration presently. We estimate that {approx}90% of the hydrogen produced from the H{sub 2}+CO in the coal gasifier off-gas can be recovered via our proposed WGS-MR process. Its purity level ranges from 80 to 92% depending upon the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of 10 to 25 respectively. If the purity of 95% is required, the hydrogen recovery ratio will drop to {approx}80% level for the membrane with H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} = 25.

  8. Hydrogen Production via a Commerically Ready Inorganic membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Liu

    2007-06-30

    It has been known that use of the hydrogen selective membrane as a reactor (MR) could potentially improve the efficiency of the water shift reaction (WGS), one of the least efficient unit operations for production of high purity hydrogen from syngas. However, no membrane reactor technology has been reduced to industrial practice thus far, in particular for a large-scale operation. This implementation and commercialization barrier is attributed to the lack of a commercially viable hydrogen selective membrane with (1) material stability under the application environment and (2) suitability for large-scale operation. Thus, in this project, we have focused on (1) the deposition of the hydrogen selective carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane we have developed on commercially available membranes as substrate, and (2) the demonstration of the economic viability of the proposed WGS-MR for hydrogen production from coal-based syngas. The commercial stainless steel (SS) porous substrate (i.e., ZrO{sub 2}/SS from Pall Corp.) was evaluated comprehensively as the 1st choice for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation. The CMS membrane synthesis protocol we developed previously for the ceramic substrate was adapted here for the stainless steel substrate. Unfortunately no successful hydrogen selective membranes had been prepared during Yr I of this project. The characterization results indicated two major sources of defect present in the SS substrate, which may have contributed to the poor CMS membrane quality. Near the end of the project period, an improved batch of the SS substrate (as the 2nd generation product) was received from the supplier. Our characterization results confirm that leaking of the crimp boundary no longer exists. However, the thermal stability of the ZrO{sub 2}/SS substrate through the CMS membrane preparation condition must be re-evaluated in the future. In parallel with the SS membrane activity, the preparation of the CMS membranes supported on our commercial ceramic membrane for large-scale applications, such as coal-based power generation/hydrogen production, was also continued. A significant number (i.e., 98) of full-scale membrane tubes have been produced with an on-spec ratio of >76% during the first production trial. In addition, we have verified the functional performance and material stability of this hydrogen selective CMS membrane with a hydrocracker purge gas stream at a refinery pilot testing facility. No change in membrane performance was noted over the >100 hrs of testing conducted in the presence of >30% H{sub 2}S, >5,000 ppm NH{sub 3} (estimated), and heavy hydrocarbons on the order of 25%. The excellent stability of our hydrogen selective CMS membrane opens the door for its use in WGS-MR with a significantly reduced requirement of the feedstock pretreatment.

  9. Industrial production of fructooligosaccharides by immobilized cells of Aureobasidium pullulans in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Jung, K H; Bang, S H; Oh, T K; Park, H J

    2011-08-01

    Continuous production of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) by Aureobasidium pullulans immobilized on calcium alginate beads with a packed bed was investigated at a plant scale reactor. Optimum conditions were with 770g sucrose/l, being fed at 200l/h at 50C which gave a productivity of 180g FOS/lh. Initial activity was maintained for more than 100days. The reactor was successfully scaled up to a production scale of 1.2m(3). PMID:21479630

  10. Extracellular polysaccharide production in outdoor mass cultures of Porphyridium sp. in flat plate glass reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Surendra Singh; Amos Richmond

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns an attempt to develop large scalecultivation of Porphyridium sp. outdoors. Theimpact on cell growth and production of solublesulphated polysaccharides of light-path length (LP)was studied in flat plate glass reactors outdoors. TheLP of the plate reactors ranged from 1.330 cm,corresponding to culture volumes of 372 L. The sidewalls of all reactors were covered, ensuring similarilluminated surfaces for all

  11. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-04-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  12. Anaerobic biofilm reactors for dark fermentative hydrogen production from wastewater: A review.

    PubMed

    Barca, Cristian; Soric, Audrey; Ranava, David; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thrse; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry

    2015-06-01

    Dark fermentation is a bioprocess driven by anaerobic bacteria that can produce hydrogen (H2) from organic waste and wastewater. This review analyses a relevant number of recent studies that have investigated dark fermentative H2 production from wastewater using two different types of anaerobic biofilm reactors: anaerobic packed bed reactor (APBR) and anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR). The effect of various parameters, including temperature, pH, carrier material, inoculum pretreatment, hydraulic retention time, substrate type and concentration, on reactor performances was investigated by a critical discussion of the results published in the literature. Also, this review presents an in-depth study on the influence of the main operating parameters on the metabolic pathways. The aim of this review is to provide to researchers and practitioners in the field of H2 production key elements for the best operation of the reactors. Finally, some perspectives and technical challenges to improve H2 production were proposed. PMID:25746594

  13. A Novel Membrane Reactor for Direct Hydrogen Production from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Shain Doong, Estela Ong; Mike Atroshenko; Francis Lau; Mike Robers

    2004-12-31

    Gas Technology Institute is developing a novel concept of membrane gasifier for high efficiency, clean and low cost production of hydrogen from coal. The concept incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane within a gasification reactor for direct extraction of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gases. The objective of this project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this concept by screening, testing and identifying potential candidate membranes under high temperature, high pressure, and harsh environments of the coal gasification conditions. The best performing membranes will be selected for preliminary reactor design and cost estimates. To evaluate the performances of the candidate membranes under the gasification conditions, a high temperature/high pressure hydrogen permeation unit has been constructed in this project. The unit is designed to operate at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures to 60 atm for evaluation of ceramic membranes such as mixed ionic conducting membrane. Several perovskite membranes based on the formulations of BCN (BaCe{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) and BCY (BaCe{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x}) were prepared by GTI and successfully tested in the new permeation unit. During this reporting period, two different types of membranes, Eu-doped SrCeO{sub 3} (SCE) and SrCe{sub 0.95}Tm{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (SCTm) provided by the University of Florida and the University of Cincinnati, respectively were tested in the high pressure permeation unit. The SCTm membrane, with a thickness of 1.7 mm, showed the highest hydrogen permeability among the perovskite membranes tested in this project so far. The hydrogen flux measured for the SCTm membrane was close to 0.8 cc/min/cm{sup 2} at a hydrogen feed pressure of about 4 bar at 950 C. SEM and EDX analysis for the tested SCTm membrane showed a separate Ce-rich phase deposited along the grain boundaries in the region towards the feed side of the membrane. No such phase separation was observed towards the permeate side. Partial reduction of the SCTm perovskite material by the high pressure hydrogen, especially in the feed side of the membrane, was postulated to be the possible reason for the phase separation. Further investigation of the stability issue of the perovskite membrane is needed.

  14. Increased production study B, D, DR, F, H and C reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. F. Fifer; F. J. Kempf

    1960-01-01

    This document studies a broad study program which is currently in progress in Irradiation Processing Department to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of various methods of obtaining increased production from the six older reactors (B, D, DR, F, H, and C Reactors). Due to time limitations this study has been in general terms only, but has indicated that considerable

  15. Dynamic responses of fuel and target assemblies of a production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, D.A.; Yau, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the qualification research aimed at assuring safe operation of the production reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), the dynamic reponses of internal reactor components are being analyzed. One such program investigates the responses of heavy fuel and target assemblies undergoing two types of loading - the distrurbances due to the motion of machines that transport the assemblies to and from the reactor, and the seismic loading due to a design basis earthquake during reactor operation. This qualification research is supported by an experimental program to verify the analytical predictions.

  16. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Helium Production in US BWR Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Oliver, Brian M.

    2005-12-28

    Helium production in reactor steel is calculated as the summation of all neutron reactions that produce helium either with thermal or fast neutrons. Thermal helium production is due to elements or impurities that are known to have a thermal neutron cross section for helium production, including 10B and 59Ni. Fast neutrons produce helium in all materials due to the threshold (n,?) reactions as well as other reactions that include helium as one of the reaction products. A generalized equation is given for helium production in all reactor materials and comparisons are given for helium measurements in steel and inconel samples. The helium production calculated using the generalized equation is in good agreement with helium measurements in samples from BWR reactors. Simplified equations are given with numerical values and generic parameters to facilitate calculations. However, it is important to use the actual boron content when known to obtain reliable estimates of the helium production.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of corn stovers for methane production in a novel bionic reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixia; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Fan, Shiyang; Jin, Shuguang; Wu, Dan; Fang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To improve the biogas production from corn stovers, a new bionic reactor was designed and constructed. The bionic reactor simulated the rumen digestion of ruminants. The liquid was separated from corn stovers and refluxed into corn stovers again, which simulated the undigested particles separated from completely digested materials and fed back again for further degradation in ruminant stomach. Results showed that the bionic reactor was effective for anaerobic digestion of corn stovers. The liquid amount and its reflux showed an obvious positive correlation with biogas production. The highest biogas production rate was 21.6 ml/gVS-addedd, and the total cumulative biogas production was 256.5 ml/gVS-added. The methane content in biogas ranged from 52.2% to 63.3%. The degradation of corn stovers were greatly enhanced through simulating the animal digestion mechanisms in this bionic reactor. PMID:24923659

  18. Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  19. Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  20. CFD optimization of continuous stirred-tank (CSTR) reactor for biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Ren, Nan-Qi; Guo, Wan-Qian

    2010-09-01

    There has been little work on the optimal configuration of biohydrogen production reactors. This paper describes three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of gas-liquid flow in a laboratory-scale continuous stirred-tank reactor used for biohydrogen production. To evaluate the role of hydrodynamics in reactor design and optimize the reactor configuration, an optimized impeller design has been constructed and validated with CFD simulations of the normal and optimized impeller over a range of speeds and the numerical results were also validated by examination of residence time distribution. By integrating the CFD simulation with an ethanol-type fermentation process experiment, it was shown that impellers with different type and speed generated different flow patterns, and hence offered different efficiencies for biohydrogen production. The hydrodynamic behavior of the optimized impeller at speeds between 50 and 70 rev/min is most suited for economical biohydrogen production. PMID:20427177

  1. Action Plan for updated Chapter 15 Accident Analysis in the SRS Production Reactor SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, N.T. III; Burnett, T.W.

    1989-11-15

    This report describes the Action Plan for the upgrade of the Chapter 15 Accident Analysis in the SRS Production Reactor SAR required for K-Restart. This Action Plan will be updated periodically to reflect task accomplishments and issue resolutions.

  2. Analysis of fission product revaporization in a BWR reactor cooling system during a station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.W.; Schmidt, E.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the re-evaporization of volatile fission product from a boiling water reactor (BWR) cooling system following a core meltdown accident in which the core debris penetrates the reactor vessel has been performed. The BWR analyzed has a Mark I containment and the accident sequence was a station blackout transient. This work was performed as part of the phenomenological uncertainty study of the Quantification and Uncertainty Analysis of Source Terms for Severe Accidents program at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fission product re-evaporization was identified as one of the important issues in the Reactor Risk Reference Document.

  3. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  4. Practical reactor production of 41Ar from argon clathrate.

    PubMed

    Mercer, J R; Duke, M J; McQuarrie, S A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide 41Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of 40Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of 41Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of 41Ar even with low power reactors. PMID:10855670

  5. Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mnkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30?L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO? availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO? content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39?g?L? ?day? for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4?g?mol?photons? was obtained for the first 6 days of cultivation. PMID:23616347

  6. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  7. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  8. FISSION PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION IN FAST REACTOR OXIDE FUELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1973-01-01

    The reference design of fuel pins for the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) has an internal diameter of only 5.08 mm, but center temperatures in excess of 2000 deg C and average radial temperature gradients of almost 1000 deg C\\/mm are to be expected. These steep temperature gradients provide large driving forces for migration of the various species present and the

  9. Controlled Nucleation Aerosol Reactors: Production of Bulk Silicon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Alam; R. C. Flagan

    1986-01-01

    A new type of aerosol reactor is described. By controlling the rate of gas phase reactions such that vapor diffusion to existing particles is favored over homogeneous nucleation, a small number of seed particles can be grown to supermicron sizes. A model for the influence of growing particles on the rate of homogeneous nucleation has been used to design a

  10. Fission product release and fuel behavior of irradiated light water reactor fuel under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Stockman, H.W.; Reil, K.O. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Fisk, J.W. (Tills (Jack) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-11-01

    The annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Source Term (ST) Experiment program was designed to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under well-controlled light water reactor severe accident conditions. The ST-1 Experiment was the first of two experiments designed to investigate fission product release. ST-1 was conducted in a highly reducing environment at a system pressure of approximately 0.19 MPa, and at maximum fuel temperatures of about 2490 K. The data will be used for the development and validation of mechanistic fission product release computer codes such as VICTORIA.

  11. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  12. Lactic acid production by immobilized Lactobacillus casei in recycle batch reactor: a step towards optimization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Appadurai Senthuran; Vasanthe Senthuran; Rajni Hatti-Kaul; Bo Mattiasson

    1999-01-01

    Different nutritional and process parameters influencing lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei, adsorbed to Poraver beads in a recycle batch reactor system, were studied in an attempt to set up a system having a long operational lifetime and permitting use of high substrate concentrations for maximal conversion to the product. The presence of lactose, even as a minor fraction of

  13. Production of liquid fuels with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Quade; D. L. Vrable; L. Green Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An exploration is made of the technical, economic and environmental impact feasibility of integrating coal liquefaction methods directly and indirectly with a nuclear reactor source of process heat, with stress on the production of synthetic jet fuel. Production figures and operating costs are compared for indirect conventional and nuclear processes using Lurgi-Fischer-Tropsch technology with direct conventional and nuclear techniques employing

  14. A review of corrosion product transport and radiation field buildup in boiling water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chien C. Lin

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt-60 is the major radiation source in the boiling water reactor (BWR) for personnel exposure during shutdown maintenance. The Co-60 activity is produced by neutron activation of cobalt with other corrosion products deposit on fuel surfaces, and is released into the coolant and deposited on primary system piping walls in the system. The transport phenomena of corrosion products in the

  15. Reactor production and processing of radioisotopes for therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.; Beets, A.L.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear reactors continue to play an important role in providing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. Many reactor-produced radioisotopes are ``neutron rich`` and decay by beta-emission and are thus of interest for therapeutic applications. This talk discusses the production and processing of a variety of reactor-produced radioisotopes of current interest, including those produced by the single neutron capture process, double neutron capture and those available from beta-decay of reactorproduced radioisotopes. Generators prepared from reactorproduced radioisotopes are of particular interest since repeated elution inexpensively provides many patient doses. The development of the alumina-based W-188/Re-188 generator system is discussed in detail.

  16. Production of electron neutrinos at nuclear power reactors and the prospects for neutrino physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Xin; H. T. Wong; C. Y. Chang; C. P. Chen; H. B. Li; J. Li; F. S. Lee; S. T. Lin; V. Singh; F. Vannucci; S. C. Wu; Q. Yue; Z. Y. Zhou

    2005-01-01

    High flux of electron neutrinos(nue) is produced at nuclear power reactors through the decays of nuclei activated by neutron capture. Realistic simulation studies on the neutron transport and capture at the reactor core were performed. The production of 51Cr and 55Fe give rise to monoenergetic nue's at Q-values of 753 keV and 231 keV and fluxes of 8.310-4 and 3.010-4nue\\/fission,

  17. Modeling and design of ultraviolet reactors for disinfection by-product precursor removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fariborz Taghipour; Angelo Sozzi

    2005-01-01

    UV-photolysis and photo-initiated oxidation are promising technologies for water disinfection and the degradation of some organic precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Due to the complexity of UV systems and the interaction of many parameters, the simulation of UV reactors for design optimization is crucial for the successful application of UV-based technologies. In this study, a UV-reactor model integrating photolysis-kinetics and

  18. The rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, David J.

    Determining the rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor is complex because of the number of isotopes involved, different types of decay, half-lives of the isotopes, and some isotopes decay into other radioactive isotopes. Traditionally, a simplified rule of 7s and 10s is used to determine the dose rate from nuclear weapons and can be to estimate the dose rate from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. An experiment was designed to determine the dose rate with respect to time from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. The experiment exposed 0.5 grams of unenriched Uranium to a fast and thermal neutron flux from a TRIGA Research Reactor (Lakewood, CO) for ten minutes. The dose rate from the fission products was measured by four Mirion DMC 2000XB electronic personal dosimeters over a period of six days. The resulting dose rate following a rule of 10s: the dose rate of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor decreases by a factor of 10 for every 10 units of time.

  19. Development of alloy 718 tubular product for nuclear reactor internals

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-01-01

    The Upper Internals Structure (UIS) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) provides mixing and flow direction of the core outlet flow. Alloy 718 tubes are the major components used in the UIS to provide this flow direction. The UIS is located directly above the reactor core and is exposed to a severe environment. This environment consists of high temperature sodium, alternating temperatures induced by mixing high temperature core assembly outlet flow with cooler core assembly outlet flow and rapid changes in temperature of the core outlet flow. The paper presents the UIS configuration, functions and environmental conditions that led to the selection of Alloy 718 as the material used to protect the basic UIS structure and to provide flow direction. The paper describes the tube fabrication process, the development of a finish sanding procedure and the results of high temperature thermal cycle testing.

  20. Production Test IP0381AFP, Irradiation of oversize fuel elements in the C Reactor overbored process channel facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clinton

    1961-01-01

    A significant portion of the planned production.gain expected from the FY 60 Reactor Plant Improvement Program was directly related to overboring the existing graphite channels. The overbore contemplated was a modest 200 mil enlargement (which would not require enlarging the reactor shield penetrations) at those reactors which were the last to require tube replacement. This was all that appeared feasible

  1. Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors IV: Preliminary estimation of dust production due to plasma disruptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takuro Honda; Takashi Okazaki; Yasushi Seki; Isao Aoki; Tomoaki Kunugi

    1996-01-01

    Dust production due to plasma disruptions has been investigated using a safety analysis code, which can calculate the plasma dynamics and thermal characteristics of fusion reactor structures simultaneously. We selected two fusion reactor designs in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) and the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The ITER\\/EDA will adopt beryllium for the

  2. MHTGR: New production reactor summary of experience base

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Worldwide interest in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) stems from the capability of the system to retain the advanced fuel and thermal performance while providing unparalleled levels of safety. The small power level of the MHTGR and its passive systems give it a margin of safety not attained by other concepts being developed for power generation. This report covers the experience base for the key nuclear system, components, and processes related to the MHTGR-NPR. 9 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Seismic analysis of fuel and target assemblies at a production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Wang, Y.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the unique modeling and analysis considerations used to assess the seismic adequacy of the fuel and target assemblies in a production reactor at Savannah River Site. This confirmatory analysis was necessary to provide assurance that the reactor can operate safely during a seismic event and be brought to a safe shutdown condition. The plant which was originally designed in the 1950's required to be assessed to more current seismic criteria. The design of the reactor internals and the magnitude of the structural responses enabled the use of a linear elastic dynamic analysis. A seismic analysis was performed using a finite element model consisting of the fuel and target assemblies, reactor tank, and a portion of the concrete structure supporting the reactor tank. The effects of submergence of the fuel and target assemblies in the water contained within the reactor tank can have a significant effect on their seismic response. Thus, the model included hydrodynamic fluid coupling effects between the assemblies and the reactor tank. Fluid coupling mass terms were based on formulations for solid bodies immersed in incompressible and frictionless fluids. The potential effects of gap conditions were also assessed in this evaluation. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Process and reactor design for biophotolytic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Tamburic, Bojan; Dechatiwongse, Pongsathorn; Zemichael, Fessehaye W; Maitland, Geoffrey C; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2013-07-14

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has the ability to produce molecular hydrogen (H2), a clean and renewable fuel, through the biophotolysis of water under sulphur-deprived anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to advance the development of a practical and scalable biophotolytic H2 production process. Experiments were carried out using a purpose-built flat-plate photobioreactor, designed to facilitate green algal H2 production at the laboratory scale and equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometry system to accurately measure H2 production rates in real time. The nutrient control method of sulphur deprivation was used to achieve spontaneous H2 production following algal growth. Sulphur dilution and sulphur feed techniques were used to extend algal lifetime in order to increase the duration of H2 production. The sulphur dilution technique proved effective at encouraging cyclic H2 production, resulting in alternating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii recovery and H2 production stages. The sulphur feed technique enabled photobioreactor operation in chemostat mode, resulting in a small improvement in H2 production duration. A conceptual design for a large-scale photobioreactor was proposed based on these experimental results. This photobioreactor has the capacity to enable continuous and economical H2 and biomass production using green algae. The success of these complementary approaches demonstrate that engineering advances can lead to improvements in the scalability and affordability of biophotolytic H2 production, giving increased confidence that H2 can fulfil its potential as a sustainable fuel of the future. PMID:23689756

  5. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  6. Evaluation of Neutron Cross Section of 27 Fission Product Nuclides Important for Fast Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shungo IIJIMA; Tsuneo NAKAGAWA; Yasuyuki KIKUCHI; Masayoshi KAWAI; Hiroyuki MATSUNOBU; Koichi MAKI; Sin-iti IGARASI

    1977-01-01

    Results of evaluation of neutron cross sections are presented for 27 fission product nuclides selected as being most important for fast reactor calculation. The cross sections considered are total, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and capture cross sections in the energy range from thermal to 15 MeV. Thermal and resonance cross sections were calculated from resonance parameters. The calculated thermal capture

  7. Isotopic alloying to tailor helium production rates in mixed-spectrum reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Mansur; A. F. Rowcliffe; M. L. Grossbeck; R. E. Stoller

    1986-01-01

    The insoluble inert gas helium has been found to produce significant changes in the irradiation response of structural materials when introduced at levels in the appm range and above. In the structural materials for future fusion reactors, (n,..cap alpha..) transmutation reactions induced at a high rate by the 14 MeV component of the neutron spectrum will lead to helium production

  8. Venting of fission products and shielding in thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmi, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Most thermionic reactors are designed to allow the fission gases to escape out of the emitter. A scheme to allow the fission gases to escape is proposed. Because of the low activity of the fission products, this method should pose no radiation hazards.

  9. Modeling and static optimization of the ethanol production in a cascade reactor. I. Modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Dourado; G. Goma; U. Albuquerque; Y. Sevely

    1987-01-01

    Let us consider the modeling of a cascade reactor for the production of ethanol. The rates of reaction in alcoholic fermentation are modeled so that it can assume both ethanol and substrate inhibition, in relation to the observed results. A nonstructured model, based on biomass, substrate, and ethanol concentrations, is developed and identified. It is a complex model, this being

  10. Simultaneous Cyclic Scheduling and Control of Tubular Reactors: Single Production Lines

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    of the tubular reactor is represented by a set of nonlinear partial differential equations that are merged with the set of algebraic equations representing the optimal schedule production model. By using the method of lines, the process dynamic behavior is approximated by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential

  11. Simultaneous Cyclic Scheduling and Control of Tubular Reactors: Parallel Production Lines

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    to a system of one-dimensional partial differential equations. For solving the MIDO problems we transform them into a mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLP). We use the method of lines for spatial discretization, whereasSimultaneous Cyclic Scheduling and Control of Tubular Reactors: Parallel Production Lines Antonio

  12. Lumped fission product neutron cross sections based on ENDF\\/BV for fast reactor analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Liaw; H. Henryson

    1983-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a lumped fission product neutron cross-section library based on ENDF\\/B-V data suitable for fast reactor applications have been completed. Both one- and two-lump models have been investigated in detail. Fission product inventories at various burnup steps were calculated by the EPRI-CINDER-2 code and used as weighting functions for lumping. This paper addresses several important issues

  13. Upgrading of the reactor waste obtained during borax production from tincal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Boncukcuo?lu; H Er?ahan

    1999-01-01

    Boron ores are used in the production of various boron compounds. One of the most important of them is borax obtained from tincal. During borax production a large quantity of the boron oxide (B2O3) is lost with the reactor waste. Also, this waste causes different environmental problems when it discharged directly to the environment.In this study, the evaluation of the

  14. A molten Salt Am242M Production Reactor for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The use of Am242m holds great promise for increasing the efficiency nuclear thermal rocket engines. Because Am242m has the highest fission cross section of any known isotope (1000's of barns), its extremely high reactivity may be used to directly heat a propellant gas with fission fragments. Since this isotope does not occur naturally, it must be bred in special production reactors designed for that purpose. The primary advantage to using molten salt reactors for breeding Am242m is that the reactors can be reprocessed continually yielding a constant rate of production of the isotope. Once built and initially fueled, the reactor will continually breed the additional fuel it needs to remain critical. The only feedstock required is a salt of U238. No enriched fuel is required during normal operation and all fissile material, except the Am242m, is maintained in a closed loop. For a reactor operating at 200 MW several kilograms of Am242m may be bred each year.

  15. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION VIA A COMMERCIALLY READY INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2004-07-21

    The porous stainless steel substrate commercially available from Pall offers great potential for large-scale membrane based high temperature gas separations. Our proposed project involves the deposition of the M&P carbon molecular sieve-based hydrogen membrane on AccuSep substrate as a membrane to reactor water-gas-shift reaction. However, the AccuSep substrate was originally designed for liquid phase applications . During the 1st half, this commercial substrate has been modified and improved with regard to its surface topography and end seals. The substrate is now suitable for the deposition of the CMS membrane for hydrogen separation according to the characterization we preformed. In addition, 40{angstrom} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane layers have been deposited on the improved AccuSep substrate successfully. The SEM, EDX and pore size distribution analysis indicate that the 40{angstrom} membrane is extremely thin, and defect free with a narrow pore size distribution around 40{angstrom} primarily. As the above results suggest, we have made significant progress in preparing a high quality nominal 40{angstrom} (actually 50{angstrom}) layer on the Pall substrate. During the 2nd half of Year 1, we will (1) continue this development work with a focus on eliminating the high pore size peak and (2) begin the CMS layer deposition on the 40{angstrom} deposited AccuSep.

  16. Hydrogen Production by High Temperature Electrolysis with Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi; Fujiwara, Seiji; Kasai, Shigeo; Yamada, Kazuya [Toshiba Corporation: 1 Toshiba-cho, Fuchu, Tokyo, 183-8511 (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we report our design of high temperature electrolysis plant system and the analysis results. The system efficiency increases with the increase of the steam utilization in the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) or the decrease of the hydrogen recycle (hydrogen recycle flow to product hydrogen flow) ratio,. The system efficiency is nearly independent of the SOEC operating temperature and pressure, and the air to product O{sub 2} ratio. In this study, the maximum system efficiency is 56.3%. (authors)

  17. Production of anhydrous, crystalline boron oxide in fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kocaku?ak; K. Akay; T. Ayok; H. J. Koro?lu; M. Koral; . T. Sava?i; R. Tolun

    1996-01-01

    Industrial production of boron oxide is via fusion of boric acid at 5501000 C. The glassy melt thus obtained is then cooled until solid; crushed, ground and then sieved to allow classification according to particle size and distribution. The melting of boric acid is both the most critical and costly stage of all these operations, because boron oxide is highly

  18. Hydrogen Production by High Temperature Electrolysis with Nuclear Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Ogawa; Seiji Fujiwara; Shigeo Kasai; Kazuya Yamada

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report our design of high temperature electrolysis plant system and the analysis results. The system efficiency increases with the increase of the steam utilization in the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) or the decrease of the hydrogen recycle (hydrogen recycle flow to product hydrogen flow) ratio,. The system efficiency is nearly independent of the SOEC operating

  19. Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, S. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 54-1717, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 24-207, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Massie, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., NW12-230, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options for disposal of fission gas wastes. In each option, lithostatic pressure, a kilometer or more underground, eliminates the pressure driving force for noble gas release and dissolves any untrapped gas in deep groundwater or into incorporated solid waste forms. The options, challenges, and potential for these methods to dispose of gaseous fission products are described. With this research, we hope to help both MSRs and other advanced reactors come one step closer to commercialization. (authors)

  20. Biodiesel production from palm oil using combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor.

    PubMed

    Choedkiatsakul, I; Ngaosuwan, K; Cravotto, G; Assabumrungrat, S

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the production of biodiesel from palm oil using a combined mechanical stirred and ultrasonic reactor (MS-US). The incorporation of mechanical stirring into the ultrasonic reactor explored the further improvement the transesterification of palm oil. Initial reaction rate values were 54.1, 142.9 and 164.2 mmol/L min for the mechanical-stirred (MS), ultrasonic (US) and MS-US reactors, respectively. Suitable methanol to oil molar ratio and the catalyst loading values were found to be 6 and 1 of oil, respectively. The effect of ultrasonic operating parameters; i.e. frequency, location, and number of transducer, has been investigated. Based on the conversion yield at the reactor outlet after 1 h, the number of transducers showed a relevant role in the reaction rate. Frequency and transducer location would appear to have no significant effect. The properties of the obtained biodiesel (density, viscosity, pour point, and flash point) satisfy the ASTM standard. The combined MS-US reactors improved the reaction rate affording the methyl esters in higher yield. PMID:24418101

  1. Ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Demirci, A; Pometto, A L; Ho, K L

    1997-10-01

    Biofilms are natural forms of cell immobilization in which microorganisms attach to solid supports. At ISU, we have developed plastic composite-supports (PCS) (agricultural material (soybean hulls or oat hulls), complex nutrients, and polypropylene) which stimulate biofilm formation and which supply nutrients to the attached microorganisms. Various PCS blends were initially evaluated in repeated-batch culture-tube fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATCC 24859) in low organic nitrogen medium. The selected PCS (40% soybean hull, 5% soybean flour, 5% yeast extract-salt and 50% polypropylene) was then used in continuous and repeated-batch fermentation in various media containing lowered nitrogen content with selected PCS. During continuous fermentation, S. cerevisiae demonstrated two to 10 times higher ethanol production in PCS bioreactors than polypropylene-alone support (PPS) control. S. cerevisiae produced 30 g L-1 ethanol on PCS with ammonium sulfate medium in repeated batch fermentation, whereas PPS-control produced 5 g L-1 ethanol. Overall, increased productivity in low cost medium can be achieved beyond conventional fermentations using this novel bioreactor design. PMID:9439005

  2. Degradation of organic compounds and production of activated species in Dielectric Barrier Discharges and Glidarc reactors

    E-print Network

    Cormier, Jean Marie; Khacef, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Major sterilization mechanisms are related to atoms and radicals, charged parti-cles, excited molecules, ozone, and UV radiation. The ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) are well known as evildoers. These species are easily created in ambient air and water and they live long enough to reach the cell and attack the organic matter. Test molecules conversion in dry and wet air is studied using Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) and Gliding Arc Reactors (GAR). The effects of tem-perature and energy deposition into the media on the active species production and then on the organic compounds degradation are presented for two non thermal plasma reactors: DBD and GAR. Main production species investigated are OH, O3, NOx, CO and CxHyOz by-products. It is shown from experiment analysis that the reactive species production is quite different from one reactor to another. GAR and pulsed DBD are two chemical processing ways in which the temperature of heavy species in ionized gas is determinant. By reviewing the species producti...

  3. Cephalosporin C production by a highly productive Cephalosporium acremonium strain in an airlift tower loop reactor with static mixers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Holzhauer-Rieger, K; Bayer, T; Schgerl, K

    1993-04-01

    The production of cephalosporin C (CPC) and its precursors penicillin N (PEN N), deacetoxycephalosporin C (DAOC) and deacetylcephalosporin C (DAC), with a highly productive strain of Cephalosporin acremonium, was investigated in an 80-1 airlift tower loop reactor with four static mixer modules (Type SMV, Sulzer) (ATLRM) on a complex medium containing 50 g l-1 peanut flour (PF). The most important key parameters such as glucose concentration and cell mass concentration were monitored during a fed-batch cultivation process. The concentrations of products CPC, PEN N, DAOC an DAC were determined on line by HPLC. The influences of four motionless mixers on the dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), oxygen transfer rate, the cell growth and the CPC production, as well as the reactor performance, were evaluated. The results were compared with the performance of an airlift tower loop reactor (ATLR) without static mixers as well as with a stirred tank reactor (STR). A comparison of cultivations in the ATLRM and ATLR with 50 g l-1 PF indicates that the obtained maximal CPC concentration and the (CPC + DAC + DAOC) concentration were 7% and 22% higher in the ATLRM (4.96 and 7.46 g l-1) than in the ATLR (4.63 and 6.13 g l-1) respectively. The maximal CPC volumetric productivity in the ATLRM (55.1 mg l-1 h-1) was also considerably higher than that in the ATLR (48.5 mg l-1 h-1). The specific power input was reduced from 2.36 to 1.5 kW m-3, the specific productivity pertaining to the power input was improved from 1.96 to 3.31 g W-1. On the other hand, cultivation in the ATLRM had a lower maximum CPC concentration and volumetric productivity than those in STR (7.2 g l-1 and 71.2 mg l-1 h-1) with the same medium due to the lower shear stress levels and the lower specific power input (1.5 vs. 3.0 kW m-3); but the specific power imput-based yield coefficient was in the ATLRM (3.31 g W-1) higher than in the STR (2.40 g W-1). By increasing the amount of PF, it was possible to enhance the CPC concentration and volumetric productivity in the STR. However, the performance of the ATLRM was limited to using a medium containing maximal 50 g l-1 PF because of the high viscosity of the medium, the limited energy input and thus the limited oxygen supply. PMID:7763560

  4. Fission products from the damaged Fukushima reactor observed in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Bihari, rpd; Dezs?, Zoltn; Bujts, Tibor; Manga, Lszl; Lencss, Andrs; Dombvri, Pter; Csige, Istvn; Ranga, Tibor; Mogyorsi, Magdolna; Veres, Mihly

    2014-01-01

    Fission products, especially (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (NPP) were detected in many places worldwide shortly after the accident caused by natural disaster. To observe the spatial and temporal variation of these isotopes in Hungary, aerosol samples were collected at five locations from late March to early May 2011: Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI, Debrecen, East Hungary), Paks NPP (Paks, South-Central Hungary) as well as at the vicinity of Aggtelek (Northeast Hungary), Tapolca (West Hungary) and Btaapti (Southwest Hungary) settlements. In addition to the aerosol samples, dry/wet fallout samples were collected at ATOMKI, and airborne elemental iodine and organic iodide samples were collected at Paks NPP. The peak in the activity concentration of airborne (131)I was observed around 30 March (1-3 mBq m(-3) both in aerosol samples and gaseous iodine traps) with a slow decline afterwards. Aerosol samples of several hundred cubic metres of air showed (134)Cs and (137)Cs in detectable amounts along with (131)I. The decay-corrected inventory of (131)I fallout at ATOMKI was 2.10.1 Bq m(-2) at maximum in the observation period. Dose-rate contribution calculations show that the radiological impact of this event at Hungarian locations was of no considerable concern. PMID:24437973

  5. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Yau, W.F. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  6. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yau, W.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  7. Design of Production Test IP381AFP, Irradiation of oversize fuel elements in the C Reactor overbored process channel facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Hodgson; M. A. Clinton

    1961-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that large incentives exist for overboring the reactor process channels approximately 500 mils in the C and five old reactors, under the updated Plant Improvement Program. Conservative estimates of the incentives for overboring indicate a payout period of about two years for the proposed work, an increase in plutonium production of 15--18%, derived from increased conversion

  8. High-temperature reactor fuel fission product release and distribution at 1600 to 1800 degrees C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Schenk; H. Nabielek

    1991-01-01

    The essential feature of small, modular high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the inherent limitation in maximum accident temperature to below 1600° C combined with the ability of coated particle fuel to retain all safety-relevant fission products under these conditions. To demonstrate this ability, spherical fuel elements with modern TRISO particles are irradiated and subjected to heating tests. Even after extended heating

  9. A scalable membrane gradostat reactor for enzyme production using Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Govender; E. P. Jacobs; W. D. Leukes; V. L. Pillay

    2003-01-01

    This is the first demonstration of process scale-up of a membrane gradostat reactor for continuous enzyme production using Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME446. The fungus was immobilised by reverse filtration on to externally unskinned, ultrafiltration capillary membranes and then nutrient gradients were induced across the biofilm. A 10-fold scale-up from a single capillary bioreactor to a 2.4l multi-capillary unit resulted in a

  10. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales) detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production. PMID:23167984

  11. Optimal product distribution from laminar flow reactors: Newtonian and other power-law fluids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith L. Levien; Octave Levenspiel

    1999-01-01

    In tubular reactors viscous fluids are in laminar flow. For reactions in series this gives a product distribution different from either plug flow or mixed flow. More importantly, laminar flow depresses the maximum amount of intermediate that can be obtained when compared to plug flow. Here we treat the simple case of an elementary two-step mechanism:(1)[A?R?S]Three special cases of the

  12. Continuous screening of base-catalysed biodiesel production using New designs of mesoscale oscillatory baffled reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anh N. Phan; Adam P. Harvey; Martin Rawcliffe

    2011-01-01

    Base-catalysed biodiesel production was continuously screened using new designs of mesoscale oscillatory baffled reactors. Experiments were carried out at very low flow rates, less than 2ml\\/min, which would be in the laminar flow regime in non oscillatory, steady state. Initially central disc baffles and helically wound wires were used, but provided insufficient mixing at this scale as demonstrated by glycerol

  13. A review of existing gas-cooled reactor circulators with application of the lessons learned to the new production reactor circulators

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.S.

    1990-07-01

    This report presents the results of a study of the lessons learned during the design, testing, and operation of gas-cooled reactor coolant circulators. The intent of this study is to identify failure modes and problem areas of the existing circulators so this information can be incorporated into the design of the circulators for the New Production Reactor (NPR)-Modular High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The information for this study was obtained primarily from open literature and includes data on high-pressure, high-temperature helium test loop circulators as well as the existing gas cooled reactors worldwide. This investigation indicates that trouble free circulator performance can only be expected when the design program includes a comprehensive prototypical test program, with the results of this test program factored into the final circulator design. 43 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

    2008-08-01

    A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540C and 900C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

  15. A strategy for intensive production of molybdenum-99 isotopes for nuclear medicine using CANDU reactors.

    PubMed

    Morreale, A C; Novog, D R; Luxat, J C

    2012-01-01

    Technetium-99m is an important medical isotope utilized worldwide in nuclear medicine and is produced from the decay of its parent isotope, molybdenum-99. The online fueling capability and compact fuel of the CANDU()(1) reactor allows for the potential production of large quantities of (99)Mo. This paper proposes (99)Mo production strategies using modified target fuel bundles loaded into CANDU fuel channels. Using a small group of channels a yield of 89-113% of the weekly world demand for (99)Mo can be obtained. PMID:21816619

  16. Hydrogen production from rice winery wastewater in an upflow anaerobic reactor by using mixed anaerobic cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanqing Yu; Zhenhu Zhu; Wenrong Hu; Haisheng Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Continuous production of hydrogen from the anaerobic acidogenesis of a high-strength rice winery wastewater by a mixed bacterial flora was demonstrated. The experiment was conducted in a 3.0-l upflow reactor to investigate individual effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) (224h), chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in wastewater (1436g COD\\/l), pH (4.56.0) and temperature (2055C) on bio-hydrogen production from the wastewater.

  17. Production of polygalacturonases by Aspergillus oryzae in stirred tank and internal- and external-loop airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Roselei Claudete; da Silveira, Maurcio Moura

    2012-11-01

    The production of endo- and exo-polygalacturonase (PG) by Aspergillus oryzae was assessed in stirred tank reactors (STRs), internal-loop airlift reactors (ILARs) and external-loop airlift reactors (ELARs). For STR production, we compared culture media formulated with either pectin (WBE) or partially hydrolyzed pectin. The highest enzyme activities were obtained in medium that contained 50% pectin in hydrolyzed form (WBE5). PG production in the three reactor types was compared for WBE5 and low salt WBE medium, with additional salts added at 48, 60 and 72h (WBES). The ELARs performed better than the ILARs in WBES medium where the exo-PG was the same concentration as for STRs and the endo-PG was 20% lower. These results indicate that PG production is higher under experimental conditions that result in higher cell growth with minimum pH values less than 3.0. PMID:22940313

  18. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view.

  19. A novel membrane-integrated fermentation reactor system: application to pyruvic acid production in continuous culture by Torulopsis glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideki SawaiTakashi; Takashi Mimitsuka; Shin-ichi Minegishi; Masahiro Henmi; Katsushige Yamada; Sakayu Shimizu; Tetsu Yonehara

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a novel bio-reactor system, the membrane-integrated fermentation reactor (MFR), for\\u000a efficient continuous fermentation. The MFR, equipped with an autoclavable polyvinylidene difluoride membrane, has normally\\u000a been used for biological wastewater treatment. The productivity of the MFR system, applied to the continuous production of\\u000a pyruvic acid by the yeast Torulopsis glabrata, was remarkably high. The volumetric

  20. Feasibility study Part I - Thermal hydraulic analysis of LEU target for {sup 99}Mo production in Tajoura reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bsebsu, F.M.; Abotweirat, F. [Reactor Department, Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Cente, P.O. Box 30878 Tajoura, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)], E-mail: Bsebso@yahoo.com, E-mail: abutweirat@yahoo.com; Elwaer, S. [Radiochemistry Department, Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Cente, P.O. Box 30878 Tajoura, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)], E-mail: samiwer@yahoo.com

    2008-07-15

    The Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDRC), Libya, will implement the technology for {sup 99}Mo isotope production using LEU foil target, to obtain new revenue streams for the Tajoura nuclear research reactor and desiring to serve the Libyan hospitals by providing the medical radioisotopes. Design information is presented for LEU target with irradiation device and irradiation Beryllium (Be) unit in the Tajoura reactor core. Calculated results for the reactor core with LEU target at different level of power are presented for steady state and several reactivity induced accident situations. This paper will present the steady state thermal hydraulic design and transient analysis of Tajoura reactor was loaded with LEU foil target for {sup 99}Mo production. The results of these calculations show that the reactor with LEU target during the several cases of transient are in safe and no problems will occur. (author)

  1. Advances in biofilm reactors for production of value-added products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuan-Chen Cheng; Ali Demirci; Jeffrey M. Catchmark

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are defined as microbial cell layers, which are irreversibly or reversibly attached on solid surfaces. These attached\\u000a cells are embedded in a self-produced exopolysaccharide matrix, and exhibit different growth and bioactivity compared with\\u000a suspended cells. With their high biomass density, stability, and potential for long-term fermentation, biofilm reactors are\\u000a employed for the fermentation and bioconversion, which need large amount

  2. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The projected size of the INL 300 kW pilot model reactor would be about 15% that of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. Including the safety net factor the projected INL pilot reactor size would be 25-30% of the PPG 300 kW hot wall plasma pilot reactor. Due to the modularity of the INL plasma reactor and the energy cascading effect from the upstream plasma to the downstream plasma the energy utilization is more efficient in material processing. It is envisioning that the material through put range for the INL pilot reactor would be comparable to the PPG 300 kW pilot reactor but the energy consumption would be lower. The INL hybrid plasma technology is rather close to being optimized for scaling to a pilot system. More near term development work is still needed to complete the process optimization before pilot scaling.

  3. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Catchmark, Jeff M; Demirci, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS) were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L) that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L). The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93%) and similar crystal size (5.2 nm) to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to the control BC. The results clearly demonstrated that implementation of PCS within agitated fermentation enhanced BC production and improved its mechanical properties and thermal stability. PMID:19630969

  4. Study and comparison of two enzyme membrane reactors for fatty acids and glycerol production

    SciTech Connect

    Molinari, R.; Santoro, M.E.; Drioli, E. (Univ. of Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Inst. on Membranes and Chemical Reactors-CNR, Arcavacata di Rende (Italy))

    1994-11-01

    Two enzyme membrane reactors (EMR), (1) with one substrate (olive oil) in an oil-in-water emulsion (E-EMR) and (2) with two separated liquid phases (oil and water) (TSLP-EMR), have been studied for the conversion of the triglycerides to fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme was Candida cylindracea lipase confined on the pressurized face or entrapped in the sponge side of capillary ultrafiltration membranes. Two methods for immobilizing the enzyme in the TSLP-EMR were used: ultrafiltration on a virgin membrane and ultrafiltration on glutaraldehyde pretreated membranes. A multiple use of the reactor was obtained immobilizing the enzyme on the membrane preactivated with glutaraldehyde. The TSLP-EMR showed a specific activity of 0.529 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) versus a specific activity of 0.170 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) of the E-EMR. The rate of fatty acid production in the TSLP-EMR was linear with time showing no enzyme deactivation in an operating time of 80 h. The kinetics observed in the two reactors was different: an equilibrium reaction product-inhibited for the E-EMR and an apparent irreversible reaction of zero order for the TSLP-EMR. Taking into account that in the TSLP-EMR, compared to the E-EMR, (1) the specific activity was higher, (2) the specific rate was constant with the time, and (3) the two products were already separated after the reaction, the TSLP-EMR configuration seems the more convenient.

  5. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Andrey [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Wilfried [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  6. Process development and modeling of fluidized-bed reactor with coimmobilized biocatalyst for fuel ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, May Yongmei

    This research focuses on two steps of commercial fuel ethanol production processes: the hydrolysis starch process and the fermentation process. The goal of this research is to evaluate the performance of co-immobilized biocatalysts in a fluidized bed reactor with emphasis on economic and engineering aspects and to develop a predictive mathematical model for this system. The productivity of an FBR is higher than productivity of a traditional batch reactor or CSTR. Fluidized beds offer great advantages over packed beds for immobilized cells when small particles are used or when the reactant feed contains suspended solids. Plugging problems, excessive pressure drops (and thus attrition), or crushing risks may be avoided. No mechanical stirring is required as mixing occurs due to the natural turbulence in the fluidized process. Both enzyme and microorganism are immobilized in one catalyst bead which is called co-immobilization. Inside this biocatalyst matrix, starch is hydrolyzed by the enzyme glucoamylase to form glucose and then converted to ethanol and carbon dioxide by microorganisms. Two biocatalysts were evaluated: (1) co-immobilized yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase. (2) co-immobilized Zymomonas mobilis and glucoamylase. A co-immobilized biocatalyst accomplishes the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process). When compared to a two-step process involving separate saccharification and fermentation stages, the SSF process has productivity values twice that given by the pre-saccharified process when the time required for pre-saccharification (15--25 h) was taken into account. The SSF process should also save capital cost. The information about productivity, fermentation yield, concentration profiles along the bed, ethanol inhibition, et al., was obtained from the experimental data. For the yeast system, experimental results showed that: no apparent decrease of productivity occurred after two and half months, the productivity was 25--44g/L-hr (based on reactor volume), the average yield was 0.45 g ethanol/g starch, the biocatalyst retained physical integrity and contamination did not affect fermentation. For the Z. mobilis system the maximum volumetric productivity was 38 g ethanol/L-h, the average yield was 0.51 g ethanol/g starch and the FBR was successfully operated for almost one month. In order to develop, scale-up and economically evaluate this system more efficiently, a predictive mathematical model that is based on fundamental principles was developed and verified. This model includes kinetics of reactions, transport phenomena of the reactant and product by diffusion within the biocatalyst bead, and the hydrodynamics of the three phase fluidized bed. The co-immobilized biocatalyst involves a consecutive reaction mechanism The mathematical descriptions of the effectiveness factors of reactant and the intermediate product were developed. Hydrodynamic literature correlations were used to develop the dispersion coefficient and gas, liquid, and solid holdup. The solutions of coupled non-linear second order equations for biocatalyst bead and reactor together with the boundary conditions were solved numerically. This model gives considerable information about the system, such as concentration profiles inside both the beads and column, flow rate and feed concentration influences on productivity and phase hold up, and the influence of enzyme and cell mass loading in the catalyst. This model is generic in nature such that it can be easily applied to a diverse set of applications and operating conditions.

  7. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors -- Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Maziar Rostamian; Gannon Johnson; Mie Hiruta; Gabriel P. Potirniche; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati; Akira Tokuhiro

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation, and experimental testing of graphite moderators in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. The potential of carbonaceous particulate generation due to frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the ensuing entrainment and transport into the gas coolant are safety concerns at elevated temperatures under accident scenarios such as air ingress in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The safety concerns are due to the documented ability of carbonaceous particulates to adsorb fission products and transport them in the primary circuit of the pebble bed reactor, thus potentially giving rise to a relevant source term under accident scenarios. Here, a finite element approach is implemented to develop a nonlinear wear model in air environment. In this model, material wear coefficient is related to the changes in asperity height during wear. The present work reports a comparison between the finite element simulations and the experimental results obtained using a custom-designed tribometer. The experimental and computational results are used to estimate the quantity of nuclear grade graphite dust produced from a typical anticipated configuration. In Part II, results from a helium environment at higher temperatures and pressures are experimentally studied.

  8. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

    1996-11-12

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

  9. Agglomerated carbon nanotubes and its mass production in a fluidized-bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Wei, Fei; Gu, Guangsheng; Yu, Hao

    2002-10-01

    The microstructure and fluidization characteristics distinctive of agglomerated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated. The CNT agglomerates have a low bulk density and broad size distribution under 100 ?m and can be fluidized when the superficial gas velocity is higher than 0.005 m/s. Several flow regions under different gas velocities were identified. Based on the agglomerate fluidization of CNTs, a method was developed for the mass production of CNTs in an agglomerate fluidized-bed reactor (AFBR), which can be easily scaled up as a continuous process.

  10. Environmental characterization of two potential locations at Hanford for a new production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.C.; Becker, C.D.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.; Imhoff, K.L.; McCallum, R.F.; Myers, D.A.; Page, T.L.; Price, K.R.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Rice D.G.; Schreiber D.L.; Skumatz L.A.; Sommer D.J.; Tawil J.J.; Wallace R.W.; Watson D.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes various environmental aspects of two areas on the Hanford Site that are potential locations for a New Production Reactor (NPR). The area known as the Skagit Hanford Site is considered the primary or reference site. The second area, termed the Firehouse Site, is considered the alternate site. The report encompasses an environmental characterization of these two potential NPR locations. Eight subject areas are covered: geography and demography; ecology; meteorology; hydrology; geology; cultural resources assessment; economic and social effects of station construction and operation; and environmental monitoring. 80 refs., 68 figs., 109 tabs.

  11. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John (Jack) K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/Bs) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  12. Method of production H/sub 2/ using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source

    DOEpatents

    Paulson, L.E.

    1988-05-13

    A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300/degree/ to 1400/degree/F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices. 1 fig.

  13. Determination of Optimal Process Flowrates and Reactor Design for Autothermal Hydrogen Production in a Heat-Integrated Ceramic Microchannel Network

    E-print Network

    Damodharan, Shalini

    2012-07-16

    fuels for transportation, stationary and portable power applications for reduced carbon emissions. Fuel cells operating on hydrogen emit water as their sole by-product, providing clean, emission free power. While hydrogen may be produced from solar... conduction heat losses via packaging [54]. Therefore, ceramic substrates offer enhanced reactor performance by increasing thermal efficiency of the system. Ceramic monolithic reactors consisting of parallel channels with small diameters, offer a higher...

  14. Enhancement of Sulphide Production in Anaerobic Packed Bed Bench-scale Biofilm Reactors by Sulphate Reducing Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Teresa Alvarez; Tania Pozzo; Bo Mattiasson

    2006-01-01

    Two biofilm reactors, using pumice stone and Poraver as biofilm supports, were run, based on the optimization of sulphide\\u000a production using a factorial design. The maximum H2S concentrations reached were 10 and 15mm, respectively, both being appropriate for metal precipitation in effluents. The set-up of the pumice stone biofilm reactor\\u000a is suitable for application in the mining area in the

  15. Bio-hydrogen production from organic wastes in a pilot plant reactor and its use in a SOFC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. La Licata; F. Sagnelli; A. Boulanger; A. Lanzini; P. Leone; P. Zitella; M. Santarelli

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate dark anaerobic fermentation in a pilot scale reactor (V=35l) under batch conditions for the production of bio-H2 as a clean and sustainable vector of energy. The inoculum of the reactor was an anaerobic wastewater sludge, previously treated with HCl 1N for 24h at pH 3 in order to inhibit the methanogenic bioactivity.

  16. Effect of reactor surface on production of bacterial cellulose and water soluble oligosaccharides by Gluconacetobacter hansenii PJK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nasrullah Shah; Jung Hwan Ha; Joong Kon Park

    2010-01-01

    The effect of agar plates on the bacterial cellulose (BC) production in a static culture was investigated in order to find\\u000a the role of agar component as a surface modifying agent. Two types of surface modified reactors (SMRs: SMRD and SMRB) were\\u000a prepared by coating the bottom of the reactors with agar dissolved in distilled water and basal medium, respectively.

  17. Reservoir characterization of the Mississippian Ratcliffe, Richland County, Montana, Williston Basin. Topical report, September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, M.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Mississippian Ratcliffe in portions of Richland County, MT. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity and methods for improved recovery. The report covers investigations of geology, petrography, reservoir engineering and seismic. The Ratcliffe is a low permeability oil reservoir which appears to be developed across much of the study area and occurs across much of the Williston Basin. The reservoir has not been a primary drilling target in the study area because average reserves have been insufficient to payout the cost of drilling and completion despite the application of hydraulic fracture stimulation. Oil trapping does not appear to be structurally controlled. For the Ratcliffe to be a viable drilling objective, methods need to be developed for (1) targeting better reservoir development and (2) better completions. A geological model is presented for targeting areas with greater potential for commercial reserves in the Ratcliffe. This model can be best utilized with the aid of 3D seismic. A 3D seismic survey was acquired and is used to demonstrate a methodology for targeting the Ratcliffe. Other data obtained during the project include oriented core, special formation-imaging log, pressure transient measurements and oil PVT. Although re-entry horizontal drilling was unsuccessfully tested, this completion technology should improve the economic viability of the Ratcliffe. Reservoir simulation of horizontal completions with productivity of three times that of a vertical well suggested two or three horizontal wells in a 258-ha (640-acre) area could recover sufficient reserves for profitable drilling.

  18. Fatty acids production from hydrogen and carbon dioxide by mixed culture in the membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Man; Ding, Zhao-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-10-15

    Gasification of waste to syngas (H2/CO2) is seen as a promising route to a circular economy. Biological conversion of the gaseous compounds into a liquid fuel or chemical, preferably medium chain fatty acids (caproate and caprylate) is an attractive concept. This study for the first time demonstrated in-situ production of medium chain fatty acids from H2 and CO2 in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor by mixed microbial culture. The hydrogen was for 100% utilized within the biofilms attached on the outer surface of the hollow-fiber membrane. The obtained concentrations of acetate, butyrate, caproate and caprylate were 7.4, 1.8, 0.98 and 0.42 g/L, respectively. The biomass specific production rate of caproate (31.4 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was similar to literature reports for suspended cell cultures while for caprylate the rate (19.1 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was more than 6 times higher. Microbial community analysis showed the biofilms were dominated by Clostridium spp., such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri. This study demonstrates a potential technology for syngas fermentation in the hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactors. PMID:23941982

  19. Integrated side-stream reactor for biological nutrient removal and minimization of sludge production.

    PubMed

    Coma, M; Rovira, S; Canals, J; Colprim, J

    2015-01-01

    Integrated processes to reduce in situ the sludge production in wastewater treatment plants are gaining attention in order to facilitate excess sludge management. In contrast to post-treatments, such as anaerobic digestion which is placed between the activated sludge system and dewatering processes, integrated technologies are placed in the sludge return line. This study evaluates the application of an anoxic side-stream reactor (SSR) which creates a physiological shock and uncouples the biomass metabolism and diverts the activity from assimilation for biosynthesis to non-growth activities. The effect of this system in biological nutrient removal for both nitrogen and phosphorus was evaluated for the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic reactors. The RedOx potential within the SSR was maintained at -150 mV while the sludge loading rate was modified by increasing the percentage of recycled activated sludge feed to the SSR (0 and 40% at laboratory scale and 0, 10, 50 and 100% at pilot scale). The use of the SSR presented a slight reduction of phosphorus removal but maintained the effluent quality to the required discharge values. Nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 75 to 86% while reducing the sludge production rate by 18.3%. PMID:25860709

  20. Gasification of refuse derived fuel in a fixed bed reactor for syngas production

    SciTech Connect

    Dalai, Ajay K. [Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ajay.dalai@usask.ca; Batta, Nishant [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Eswaramoorthi, I. [Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Schoenau, Greg J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Steam gasification of two different refuse derived fuels (RDFs), differing slightly in composition as well as thermal stability, was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure. The proximate and ultimate analyses reveal that carbon and hydrogen are the major components in RDFs. The thermal analysis indicates the presence of cellulose and plastic based materials in RDFs. H{sub 2} and CO are found to be the major products, along with CO{sub 2} and hydrocarbons resulting from gasification of RDFs. The effect of gasification temperature on H{sub 2} and CO selectivities was studied, and the optimum temperature for better H{sub 2} and CO selectivity was determined to be 725 deg. C. The calorific value of product gas produced at lower gasification temperature is significantly higher than that of gas produced at higher process temperature. Also, the composition of RDF plays an important role in distribution of products gas. The RDF with more C and H content is found to produce more amounts of CO and H{sub 2} under similar experimental conditions. The steam/waste ratio showed a notable effect on the selectivity of syngas as well as calorific value of the resulting product gas. The flow rate of carrier gas did not show any significant effect on products yield or their distribution.

  1. Studies of Plutonium-238 Production at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lastres, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chandler, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a versatile 85 MW{sub th}, pressurized, light water-cooled and -moderated research reactor. The core consists of two fuel elements, an inner fuel element (IFE) and an outer fuel element (OFE), each constructed of involute fuel plates containing high-enriched-uranium (HEU) fuel ({approx}93 wt% {sup 235}U/U) in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in an Al matrix and encapsulated in Al-6061 clad. An over-moderated flux trap is located in the center of the core, a large beryllium reflector is located on the outside of the core, and two control elements (CE) are located between the fuel and the reflector. The flux trap and reflector house numerous experimental facilities which are used for isotope production, material irradiation, and cold/thermal neutron scattering. Over the past five decades, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its agencies have been producing radioisotope power systems used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for unmanned, long-term space exploration missions. Plutonium-238 is used to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) because it has a very long half-life (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 89 yr.) and it generates about 0.5 watts/gram when it decays via alpha emission. Due to the recent shortage and uncertainty of future production, the DOE has proposed a plan to the US Congress to produce {sup 238}Pu by irradiating {sup 237}Np as early as in fiscal year 2011. An annual production rate of 1.5 to 2.0 kg of {sup 238}Pu is expected to satisfy these needs and could be produced in existing national nuclear facilities like HFIR and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Reactors at the Savannah River Site were used in the past for {sup 238}Pu production but were shut down after the last production in 1988. The nation's {sup 237}Np inventory is currently stored at INL. A plan for producing {sup 238}Pu at US research reactor facilities such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL has been initiated by the US DOE and NASA for space exploration needs. Two Monte Carlo-based depletion codes, TRITON (ORNL) and VESTA (IRSN), were used to study the {sup 238}Pu production rates with varying target configurations in a typical HFIR fuel cycle. Preliminary studies have shown that approximately 11 grams and within 15 to 17 grams of {sup 238}Pu could be produced in the first irradiation cycle in one small and one large VXF facility, respectively, when irradiating fresh target arrays as those herein described. Important to note is that in this study we discovered that small differences in assumptions could affect the production rates of Pu-238 observed. The exact flux at a specific target location can have a significant impact upon production, so any differences in how the control elements are modeled as a function of exposure, will also cause differences in production rates. In fact, the surface plot of the large VXF target Pu-238 production shown in Figure 3 illustrates that the pins closest to the core can potentially have production rates as high as 3 times those of pins away from the core, thus implying that a cycle-to-cycle rotation of the targets may be well advised. A methodology for generating spatially-dependent, multi-group self-shielded cross sections and flux files with the KENO and CENTRM codes has been created so that standalone ORIGEN-S inputs can be quickly constructed to perform a variety of {sup 238}Pu production scenarios, i.e. combinations of the number of arrays loaded and the number of irradiation cycles. The studies herein shown with VESTA and TRITON/KENO will be used to benchmark the standalone ORIGEN.

  2. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATION PRODUCTS IN REMAINING IN REMAINING K-, L- AND C-REACTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, D.; Webb, R.

    2010-09-30

    An analytic model and calculational methodology was previously developed for P-reactor and R-reactor to quantify the radioisotopes present in Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor tanks and the surrounding structural materials as a result of neutron activation of the materials during reactor operation. That methodology has been extended to K-reactor, L-reactor, and C-reactor. The analysis was performed to provide a best-estimate source term input to the Performance Assessment for an in-situ disposition strategy by Site Decommissioning and Demolition (SDD). The reactor structure model developed earlier for the P-reactor and R-reactor analyses was also used for the K-reactor and L-reactor. The model was suitably modified to handle the larger Creactor tank and associated structures. For all reactors, the structure model consisted of 3 annular zones, homogenized by the amount of structural materials in the zone, and 5 horizontal layers. The curie content on an individual radioisotope basis and total basis for each of the regions was determined. A summary of these results are provided herein. The efficacy of this methodology to accurately predict the radioisotopic content of the reactor systems in question has been demonstrated and is documented in Reference 1. As noted in that report, results for one reactor facility cannot be directly extrapolated to other SRS reactors.

  3. Estimate of LOCA-FI plenum pressure uncertainty for a five-ring RELAP5 production reactor model

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code (RELAP5) is used to perform best-estimate analyses of certain postulated Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) in SRS production reactors. Currently, the most limiting DBA in terms of reactor power level is an instantaneous double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A six-loop RELAP5 K Reactor model is used to analyze the reactor system behavior dozing the Flow Instability (FI) phase of the LOCA, which comprises only the first 5 seconds following the DEGB. The RELAP5 K Reactor model includes tank and plenum nodalizations having five radial rings and six azimuthal sectors. The reactor system analysis provides time-dependent plenum and tank bottom pressures for use as boundary conditions in the FLOWTRAN code, which models a single fuel assembly in detail. RELAP5 also performs the system analysis for the latter phase of the LOCA, denoted the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) phase. Results from the RELAP analysis are used to provide boundary conditions to the FLOWTRAN-TF code, which is an advanced two-phase version of FLOWTRAN. The RELAP5 K Reactor model has been tested for LOCA-FI and Loss-of-Pumping Accident analyses and the results compared with equivalent analyses performed with the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code (TRAC). An equivalent RELAP5 six-loop, five-ring, six-sector L Reactor model has been benchmarked against qualified single-phase system data from the 1989 L-Area In-Reactor Test Program. The RELAP5 K and L Reactor models have also been subjected to an independent Quality Assurance verification.

  4. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  5. ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-03-10

    The water gas shift reaction (WGSR) plays a major role in increasing the hydrogen production from fossil fuels. However, the enhanced hydrogen production is limited by thermodynamic constrains posed by equilibrium limitations of WGSR. This project aims at using a mesoporous, tailored, highly reactive calcium based sorbent system for incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} product which drives the equilibrium limited WGSR forward. In addition, a pure sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced simultaneously. A detailed project vision with the description of integration of this concept with an existing coal gasification process for hydrogen production is presented. Conceptual reactor designs for investigating the simultaneous water gas shift and the CaO carbonation reactions are presented. In addition, the options for conducting in-situ sorbent regeneration under vacuum or steam are also reported. Preliminary, water gas shift reactions using high temperature shift catalyst and without any sorbent confirmed the equilibrium limitation beyond 600 C demonstrating a carbon monoxide conversion of about 80%. From detailed thermodynamic analyses performed for fuel gas streams from typical gasifiers the optimal operating temperature range to prevent CaO hydration and to effect its carbonation is between 575-830 C.

  6. ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-04-01

    Hydrogen production by the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) is equilibrium limited due to thermodynamic constrains. However, this can be overcome by continuously removing the product CO{sub 2}, thereby driving the WGSR in the forward direction to enhance hydrogen production. This project aims at using a high reactivity, mesoporous calcium based sorbent (PCC-CaO) for removing CO{sub 2} using reactive separation scheme. Preliminary results have shown that PCC-CaO dominates in its performance over naturally occurring limestone towards enhanced hydrogen production. However, maintenance of high reactivity of the sorbent over several reaction-regeneration cycles warrants effective regeneration methods. We have identified sub-atmospheric calcination (vacuum) as vital regeneration technique that helps preserve the sorbent morphology. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the significance of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of diluent gas, and sorbent loading on the kinetics of calcination and the morphology of the resultant CaO sorbent. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, has been envisioned as a potential diluent gas due to its better thermal properties resulting in effective heat transfer. A novel multi-fixed bed reactor was designed which isolates the catalyst bed from the sorbent bed during the calcination step. This should prevent any potential catalyst deactivation due to oxidation by CO{sub 2} during the regeneration phase.

  7. Geologic setting of the New Production Reactor within the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Fallaw, W.C. [Furman Univ., Greenville, SC (United States). Dept. of Geology; McKinney, J.B. [Exploration Resources, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The geology and hydrology of the reference New Production Reactor (NPR) site at Savannah River Site (SRS) have been summarized using the available information from the NPR site and areas adjacent to the site, particularly the away from reactor spent fuel storage site (AFR site). Lithologic and geophysical logs from wells drilled near the NPR site do not indicate any faults in the upper several hundred feet of the Coastal Plain sediments. However, the Pen Branch Fault is located about 1 mile south of the site and extends into the upper 100 ft of the Coastal Plain sequence. Subsurface voids, resulting from the dissolution of calcareous portions of the sediments, may be present within 200 ft of the surface at the NPR site. The water table is located within 30 to 70 ft of the surface. The NPR site is located on a groundwater divide, and groundwater flow for the shallowest hydraulic zones is predominantly toward local streams. Groundwater flow in deeper Tertiary sediments is north to Upper Three Runs Creek or west to the Savannah River Swamp. Groundwater flow in the Cretaceous sediments is west to the Savannah River.

  8. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Andrey; Degueldre, Claude; Kaufmann, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe2O4] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin.

  9. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  10. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  11. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. J.; Dean, C. J.; Nichols, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library.

  12. Determination of production biology of cladocera in a reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents from a nuclear production reactor. [Par Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Vigerstad, T J

    1980-01-01

    The effects on zooplankton of residence in a cooling reservoir receiving hyperthermal effluents directly from a nuclear-production-reactor were studied. Rates of cladoceran population production were compared at two stations in the winter and summer of 1976 on Par Pond located on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC. One station was located in an area of the reservoir directly receiving hyperthermal effluent (Station MAS) and the second was located about 4 km away in an area where surface temperatures were normal for reservoirs in the general geographical region (Station CAS). A non-parametric comparison between stations of standing stock and fecundity data for Bosmina longirostris, taken for the egg ratio model, was used to observe potential hyperthermal effluent effects. There was a statistically higher incidence of deformed eggs in the Bosmina population at Station MAS in the summer. Bosmina standing stock underwent two large oscillations in the winter and three large oscillations in the summer at Station MAS compared with two in the winter and one in the summer at Station CAS. These results are consistent with almost all other Par Pond studies which have found the two stations to be essentially similar in spectra composition but with some statistically significant differences in various aspects of the biology of the species.

  13. Gluconic acid production from sucrose in an airlift reactor using a multi-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Agnes Cristina Oliveira; Furlan, Felipe Fernando; Badino, Alberto Colli; Tardioli, Paulo Waldir

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose from sugarcane is produced in abundance in Brazil, which provides an opportunity to manufacture other high-value products. Gluconic acid (GA) can be produced by multi-enzyme conversion of sucrose using the enzymes invertase, glucose oxidase, and catalase. In this process, one of the byproducts is fructose, which has many commercial applications. This work concerns the batch mode production of GA in an airlift reactor fed with sucrose as substrate. Evaluation was made of the influence of temperature and pH, as well as the thermal stability of the enzymes. Operational conditions of 40C and pH 6.0 were selected, based on the enzymatic activity profiles and the thermal stabilities. Under these conditions, the experimental data could be accurately described by kinetic models. The maximum yield of GA was achieved within 3.8h, with total conversion of sucrose and glucose and a volumetric productivity of around 7.0gL(-1)h(-1). PMID:25326720

  14. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values. PMID:18656347

  15. Analysis of fission product revaporization in a BWR reactor cooling system during a station blackout accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.W.; Schmidt, E.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary analysis of fission product revaporization in the Reactor Cooling System (RCS) after the vessel failure. The station blackout transient for BWR Mark I Power Plant is considered. The TRAPMELT3 models of evaporization, chemisorption, and the decay heating of RCS structures and gases are adopted in the analysis. The RCS flow models based on the density-difference between the RCS and containment pedestal region are developed to estimate the RCS outflow which carries the revaporized fission product to the containment. A computer code called REVAP is developed for the analysis. The REVAP is incorporated with the MARCH, TRAPMELT3 and NAUA codes of the Source Term Code Pack Package (STCP). The NAUA code is used to estimate the impact of revaporization on environmental release. The results show that the thermal-hydraulic conditions between the RCS and the pedestal region are important factors determining the magnitude of revaporization and subsequent release of the volatile fission product. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-03-10

    Hydrogen production cannot be maximized from fossil fuels (gas/coal) via the WGS reaction at high temperatures as the WGS-equilibrium constant K{sub WGS} (= [CO{sub 2}][H{sub 2}]/[CO][H{sub 2}O]), falls with increasing temperatures. However, CO{sub 2} removal down to ppm levels by the carbonation of CaO to CaCO{sub 3} in the temperature range 650-850 C, leads to the possibility of stoichiometric H{sub 2} production at high temperature/pressure conditions and at low steam to fuel ratios. Further, CO{sub 2} is also captured in the H{sub 2} generation process, making this coal to hydrogen process compatible with CO{sub 2} sequestration goals. While microporous CaO sorbents attain <50% conversion over cyclical carbonation-calcination, the OSU-patented, mesoporous CaO sorbents are able to achieve >95% conversion. Novel calcination techniques could lead to an ever-smaller footprint, single-stage reactors that achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production at high temperatures and pressures for on/off site usage. Experimental results indicate that the PCC-CaO sorbent is able to achieve complete conversion of CO for 240 seconds as compared to only a few seconds with CaO derived from natural sources.

  17. Long-term formation of microbial products in a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Rittmann, Bruce E; Fang, Fang; Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-07-01

    Activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) is subjected to alternating feast-and-famine conditions, which may result in the enhanced production of microbial products: extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and internal storage products (X(STO)). In this work, the long-term formation of these three microbial products by activated sludge in an SBR is investigated using an expanded unified model with a parallel experimental study. We also use the model to compare the impacts in an SBR to those in a continuous-flow activated sludge system. The model captures all experimental trends for all components with solids retention time (SRT) for global steady state and within a cycle. At an SRT of 20 days, the active microorganisms constitute about 28% of the mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS); the remaining biomass is comprised of residual inert biomass (X(I)) of 40%, EPS of 31%, and X(STO) of approximately 1%. The active biomass becomes a smaller fraction with the increasing SRT, while the inert biomass becomes increasingly dominant. For soluble components, effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) is dominated by SMP, which varies to some degree in a cycle, peaking as external substrate becomes depleted. Within the SBR cycle, external substrate (S) declines strongly in the first part of the cycle, and SMP shows a small peak at the time of S depletion. X(STO) is the only biomass component that varies significantly during the cycle. It peaks at the time that the input substrate (S) is depleted. Simulation for a continuous-flow activated sludge system and comparison with an SBR reveals that the constant "famine" conditions of the continuous system lead to lower EPS and X(STO), but higher MLVSS and X(I). PMID:20537674

  18. Organics removal from landfill leachate and activated sludge production in SBR reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klimiuk, Ewa [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Fisheries, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Sloneczna St. 45G, 10-957 Olsztyn (Poland); Kulikowska, Dorota [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Fisheries, Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Sloneczna St. 45G, 10-957 Olsztyn (Poland)]. E-mail: dorotak@uwm.edu.pl

    2006-07-01

    This study is aimed at estimating organic compounds removal and sludge production in SBR during treatment of landfill leachate. Four series were performed. At each series, experiments were carried out at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12, 6, 3 and 2 d. The series varied in SBR filling strategies, duration of the mixing and aeration phases, and the sludge age. In series 1 and 2 (a short filling period, mixing and aeration phases in the operating cycle), the relationship between organics concentration (COD) in the leachate treated and HRT was pseudo-first-order kinetics. In series 3 (with mixing and aeration phases) and series 4 (only aeration phase) with leachate supplied by means of a peristaltic pump for 4 h of the cycle (filling during reaction period) - this relationship was zero-order kinetics. Activated sludge production expressed as the observed coefficient of biomass production (Y {sub obs}) decreased correspondingly with increasing HRT. The smallest differences between reactors were observed in series 3 in which Y {sub obs} was almost stable (0.55-0.6 mg VSS/mg COD). The elimination of the mixing phase in the cycle (series 4) caused the Y {sub obs} to decrease significantly from 0.32 mg VSS/mg COD at HRT 2 d to 0.04 mg VSS/mg COD at HRT 12 d. The theoretical yield coefficient Y accounted for 0.534 mg VSS/mg COD (series 1) and 0.583 mg VSS/mg COD (series 2). In series 3 and 4, it was almost stable (0.628 mg VSS/mg COD and 0.616 mg VSS/mg COD, respectively). After the elimination of the mixing phase in the operating cycle, the specific biomass decay rate increased from 0.006 d{sup -1} (series 3) to 0.032 d{sup -1} (series 4). The operating conditions employing mixing/aeration or only aeration phases enable regulation of the sludge production. The SBRs operated under aerobic conditions are more favourable at a short hydraulic retention time. At long hydraulic retention time, it can lead to a decrease in biomass concentration in the SBR as a result of cell decay. On the contrary, in the activated sludge at long HRT, a short filling period and operating cycle of the reactor with the mixing and aeration phases seem the most favourable.

  19. 76 FR 37888 - Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Dawson and Richland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ...Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 991X] Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C.--Discontinuance...Dawson and Richland Counties, Mont. Yellowstone Valley Railroad, L.L.C. (YVRR...1\\ Applicant's name was formerly Yellowstone Valley Railroad, Inc. See Watco...

  20. MOVPE growth of GaAs and InP based compounds in production reactors using TBAs and TBP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Beccard; D. Schmitz; J. Knauf; G. Lengeling; F. Schulte; H. Jurgensen

    1996-01-01

    For many MOVPE users the decision to switch production completely to TBP and TBAs may still be difficult as long as it is not proven that all III-V materials can be grown with TBAs\\/TBP in the same class of reactors. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that these precursors can replace arsine and phosphine for the growth of

  1. Release of fission products from fuel during the in-vessel phases of severe nuclear reactor accidents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1983-01-01

    We discuss the phenomena involved in the release of volatile fission products during the in-vessel phases of a severe nuclear reactor accident. To date, much effort has been placed on the release of noble fission gases from solid fuel grains to grain surfaces and edges, the release of those gases from the fuel matrix, and the mechanical response of the

  2. Fission product release from a pressurized water reactor defective fuel rod: effect of thermal cycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kurka; A. Harrer; P. Chenebault

    1979-01-01

    The emission of fission gases and iodines by a pressurized water reactor fuel rod containing a defect when it is initially put in the reactor is studied experimentally using a pressurized water loop in the Siloe reactor at Grenoble. The initial leakage is simulated by making a small hole near the upper end of the rod. The rare gases and

  3. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power

  4. Maximizing production and polymer quality (MWD and composition) in emulsion polymerization reactors with limited capacity of heat removal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Vicente; J. R Leiza; J. M Asua

    2003-01-01

    In this work, an on-line control strategy based on reaction calorimetry was used to maximize the production of styrene\\/n-butyl acrylate latex with desired copolymer composition and molecular weight distribution in reactors with limited capacity of heat removal. For this purpose, nonlinear model-based controllers were used to maximize the production maintaining simultaneously the ratios of each comonomer concentration and of the

  5. ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, C

    2009-01-16

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

  6. Dual-mode cultivation of Chlorella protothecoides applying inter-reactors gas transfer improves microalgae biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Santos, C A; Nobre, B; Lopes da Silva, T; Pinheiro, H M; Reis, A

    2014-08-20

    Chlorella protothecoides, a lipid-producing microalga, was grown heterotrophically and autotrophically in separate reactors, the off-gases exiting the former being used to aerate the latter. Autotrophic biomass productivity with the two-reactor association, 0.0249gL(-1)h(-1), was 2.2-fold the value obtained in a control autotrophic culture, aerated with ambient air. Fatty acid productivity was 1.7-fold the control value. C. protothecoides heterotrophic biomass productivity was 0.229gL(-1)h(-1). This biomass' fatty acid content was 34.5% (w/w) with a profile suitable for biodiesel production, according to European Standards. The carbon dioxide fixed by the autotrophic biomass was 45mgCO2L(-1)h(-1) in the symbiotic arrangement, 2.1 times the control reactor value. The avoided CO2 atmospheric emission represented 30% of the CO2 produced in the heterotrophic stage, while the released O2 represented 49% of the oxygen demand in that stage. Thus, an increased efficiency in the glucose carbon source use and a higher environmental sustainability were achieved in microalgal biodiesel production using the proposed assembly. PMID:24862195

  7. Evaluating Carriers for Immobilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Ethanol Production in a Continuous Column Reactor.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye-Geun; Kim, Yi-Ok; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated a more practical and cost-effective immobilization carriers for ethanol production using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three candidate materials-rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust-were tested for their cell-adsorption capacity and operational durability. Derivatizations of rice hull, rice straw, and sawdust with the optimal concentration of 0.5 M of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl chloride hydrochloride (DEAE HCl) resulted in > 95% adsorption of the initial yeast cells at 2 hr for DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-sawdust and in only approximately 80% adsorption for DEAE-rice straw. In addition, DEAE-sawdust was found to be a more practical carrier for immobilizing yeast cells in terms of operational durability in shaking flask cultures with two different speeds of 60 and 150 rpm. Furthermore, the biosorption isotherms of DEAE-rice hull, -rice straw, and -sawdust for yeast cells revealed that the Qmax of DEAE-sawdust (82.6 mg/g) was greater than that of DEAE-rice hull and DEAE-rice straw. During the 404-hr of continuous column reactor operation using yeast cells immobilized on DEAE-sawdust, no serious detachment of the yeast cells from the DEAE-sawdust was recorded. Ethanol yield of approximately 3.04 g/L was produced steadily, and glucose was completely converted to ethanol at a yield of 0.375 g-ethanol/g-glucose (73.4% of the theoretical value). Thus, sawdust is a promising practical immobilization carrier for ethanol production, with significance in the production of bioethanol as a biofuel. PMID:25346601

  8. Performance of co-immobilized yeast and glucoamylase in a fluidized bed reactor for fuel ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.Y.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Davison, B.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Spurrier, M.A.; Webb, O.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The performance of co-immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucoamylase was evaluated in a fluidized bed reactor. Soluble starch and yeast extract were used as feed stocks. The biocatalyst performed well and demonstrated no significant loss of activity or physical integrity during 10 weeks of continuous operation. The reactor was easily operated and required no pH control. No operational problems were encountered from bacterial contaminants even though the reactor was operated under non-sterile conditions over the entire course of experiments. Productivities ranged between 25 to 44 g ethanol L{sup -1} h{sup -1}. The experiments demonstrated that ethanol inhibition and bed loading had significant effects on bed performance.

  9. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C green microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led to an increased understanding of the acceptable ranges for process parameters and additional reduction in required operating times. Another result of this test program was to double the kernel production rate. Following the development tests, approximately 40 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels have been produced for use in coater scale up tests, and approximately 10 kg of low enriched uranium UCO kernels for use in the AGR-2 experiment.

  10. Corrosion product deposits on boiling-water reactor cladding: Experimental and theoretical investigation of magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A.; Degueldre, C.; Wiese, H.; Ledergerber, G.; Valizadeh, S.

    2011-09-01

    Recent Eddy current investigations on the cladding of nuclear fuel pins have shown that the apparent oxide layers are falsified due to unexpected magnetic properties of corrosion product deposits. Analyses by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) demonstrated that the deposit layer consists of complex 3-d element oxides (Ni, Mn, Fe) along with Zn, since the reactor operates with a Zn addition procedure to reduce buildup of radiation fields on the recirculation system surfaces. The oxides crystallise in ferritic spinel structures. These spinels are well-known for their magnetic behaviour. Since non-magnetic zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) may become magnetic when doped with even small amounts of Ni and/or Mn, their occurrence in the deposit layer has been analyzed. The magnetic permeability of zinc ferrite, trevorite and jacobsite and their solid solutions are estimated by magnetic moment additivity. From the void history examination, the low elevation sample (810 mm) did not face significant boiling during the irradiation cycles suggesting growth of (Mn0.092+Zn0.752+Fe0.293+)[(Fe1.713+Mn0.032+Ni0.132+)O] crystals with theoretical value of the magnetic permeability for the averaged heterogeneous CRUD layer of 9.5 3. Meanwhile, (Mn0.162+Zn0.552+Fe0.293+)[(Fe1.713+Mn0.042+Ni0.252+)O] crystallizes at the mid elevation (1810 mm) with theoretical magnetic permeability for the CRUD layer of 4.2 1.5 at the investigated azimuthal location. These theoretical data are compared with the magnetic permeability of the corrosion product deposited layers gained from reactor pool side Eddy current (EC) analyses (9.0 1.0 for low and 3.5 1.0 for high elevation). The calculated thicknesses and magnetic permeability values of the deposition layers (estimated by MAGNACROX multifrequency EC method) match together with these estimated using an "ion magnetic moment additivity" model.

  11. Methanol production from carbon dioxide and water vapor in a photochemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ische, K.W.; Foutch,

    1983-06-01

    In this study the process for photochemically converting CO/sub 2/ and water into methanol without using a biological cycle was examined. CO/sub 2/ was humidified by bubbling through distilled water, and fed to batch and continuous flow reactors. One reactor surface was coated with strontium titanate powder. Light was shone through a quartz window opposite the strontium titanate. Ultraviolet light energy was to initiate the reaction of molecules adsorbed on the semiconductor surface creating C/sub 1/ molecules such as methanol. Water to CO/sub 2/ molar ratios and reactor residence time were studied in the continuous flow reactor experiments.

  12. Dry reforming of methane has no future for hydrogen production: Comparison with steam reforming at high pressure in standard and membrane reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ted Oyama; Pelin Hacarlioglu; Yunfeng Gu; Doohwan Lee

    The methane dry-reforming and steam reforming reactions were studied as a function of pressure (120atm) at 973K in conventional packed-bed reactors and a membrane reactors. For the dry-reforming reaction in a conventional reactor the production yield of hydrogen rose and then decreased with increasing pressure as a result of the reverse water-gas shift reaction in which the hydrogen reacted with

  13. Mesophilic hydrogen production in acidogenic packed-bed reactors (APBR) using raw sugarcane vinasse as substrate: Influence of support materials.

    PubMed

    Nunes Ferraz Jnior, Antnio Djalma; Etchebehere, Claudia; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from sugarcane vinasse in anaerobic up-flow packed-bed reactors (APBR) was evaluated. Four types of support materials, expanded clay (EC), charcoal (Ch), porous ceramic (PC), and low-density polyethylene (LDP) were tested as support for biomass attachment. APBR (working volume - 2.3L) were operated in parallel at a hydraulic retention time of 24h, an organic loading rate of 36.2kg-CODm(-3)d(-1), at 25C. Maximum volumetric hydrogen production values of 509.5, 404, 81.4 and 10.3mL-H2d(-1)L(-1)reactor and maximum yields of 3.2, 2.6, 0.4 and 0.05mol-H2mol(-1) carbohydrates total, were observed during the monitoring of the reactors filled with LDP, EC, Ch and PC, respectively. Thus, indicating the strong influence of the support material on H2 production. LDP was the most appropriate material for hydrogen production among the materials evaluated. 16S rRNA gene by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the selection of different microbial populations. 454-pyrosequencing performed on samples from APBR filled with LDP revealed the presence of hydrogen-producing organisms (Clostridium and Pectinatus), lactic acid bacteria and non-fermentative organisms. PMID:25891935

  14. Production of 37Ar in The University of Texas TRIGA reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Egnatuk, Christine M.; Lowrey, Justin; Biegalski, S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Haas, Derek A.; Orrell, John L.; Woods, Vincent T.; Keillor, Martin E.

    2011-06-19

    The detection of {sup 37}Ar is important for on-site inspections for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring. In an underground nuclear explosion this radionuclide is produced by {sup 40}Ca(n,{alpha}){sup 37}Ar reaction in surrounding soil and rock. With a half-life of 35 days, {sup 37}Ar provides a signal useful for confirming the location of an underground nuclear event. An ultra-low-background proportional counter developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is used to detect {sup 37}Ar, which decays via electron capture. The irradiation of Ar gas at natural enrichment in the 3L facility within the Mark II TRIGA reactor facility at The University of Texas at Austin provides a source of {sup 37}Ar for the calibration of the detector. The {sup 41}Ar activity is measured by the gamma activity using an HPGe detector after the sample is removed from the core. Using the {sup 41}Ar/{sup 37}Ar production ratio and the {sup 41}Ar activity, the amount of {sup 37}Ar created is calculated. The {sup 41}Ar decays quickly (half-life of 109.34 minutes) leaving a radioactive sample of high purity {sup 37}Ar and only trace levels of {sup 39}Ar.

  15. Uncertainties in source term calculations generated by the ORIGEN2 computer code for Hanford Production Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1991-03-01

    The ORIGEN2 computer code is the primary calculational tool for computing isotopic source terms for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The ORIGEN2 code computes the amounts of radionuclides that are created or remain in spent nuclear fuel after neutron irradiation and radioactive decay have occurred as a result of nuclear reactor operation. ORIGEN2 was chosen as the primary code for these calculations because it is widely used and accepted by the nuclear industry, both in the United States and the rest of the world. Its comprehensive library of over 1,600 nuclides includes any possible isotope of interest to the HEDR Project. It is important to evaluate the uncertainties expected from use of ORIGEN2 in the HEDR Project because these uncertainties may have a pivotal impact on the final accuracy and credibility of the results of the project. There are three primary sources of uncertainty in an ORIGEN2 calculation: basic nuclear data uncertainty in neutron cross sections, radioactive decay constants, energy per fission, and fission product yields; calculational uncertainty due to input data; and code uncertainties (i.e., numerical approximations, and neutron spectrum-averaged cross-section values from the code library). 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic); Srank, J. [Nuclear Physics Inst. of the Academy of Sciences, Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

  17. Production of ZrC Matrix for Use in Gas Fast Reactor Composite Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Knight, Travis W.; Roberts, Elwyn [Nuclear Materials Laboratory, University of South Carolina 300 Main St, Columbia, SC-29208 (United States); Adams, Thad [Savannah River National Laboratory Materials Technology Division Aiken, SC-29808 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is being considered as a candidate for inert matrix material in composite nuclear fuel for Gas fast reactors due to its favorable characteristics. ZrC can be produced by the direct reaction of pure zirconium and graphite powders. Such a reaction is exothermic in nature. The reaction is self sustaining once initial ignition has been achieved. The heat released during the reaction is high enough to complete the reaction and achieve partial sintering without any external pressure applied. External heat source is required to achieve ignition of the reactants and maintain the temperature close to the adiabatic temperature to achieve higher levels of sintering. External pressure is also a driving force for sintering. In the experiments described, cylindrical compacts of ZrC were produced by direct combustion reaction. External induction heating combined with varying amounts of external applied pressure was employed to achieve varying degrees of density/porosity. The effect of reactant particle size on the product characteristics was also studied. The samples were characterized for density/porosity, composition and microstructure. (authors)

  18. Investigation on a corrosion product deposit layer on a boiling water reactor fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. V.; Restani, R.; Kuri, G.; Degueldre, C.; Valizadeh, S.

    2010-02-01

    Recent investigations on the complex corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel cladding have shown that the observed layer locally presents unexpected magnetic properties. The magnetic behaviour of this layer and its axial variation on BWR fuel cladding is of interest with respect to non-destructive cladding characterization. Consequently, a cladding from a BWR was cut at elevations of 810 mm, where the layer was observed to be magnetic, and of 1810 mm where it was less magnetic. The samples were subsequently analyzed using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), magnetic analysis and X-ray techniques (?XRF, ?XRD and ?XAFS). Both EPMA and ?XRF have shown that the observed corrosion deposit layer which is situated on the Zircaloy corrosion layer consists mostly of 3-d elements' oxides (Fe, Zn, Ni and Mn). The distribution of these elements within the investigated layer is rather complex and not homogeneous. The main phases identified by 2D ?XRD mapping inside the layer are hematite and spinel phases with the common formula M xFe y(M (1-x)Fe (2-y))O 4, where M = Zn, Ni, Mn. It has been shown that the solid solutions of these phases were obtained with rather large differences between the parameter cell of the known spinels (ZnFe 2O 4, NiFe 2O 4 and MnFe 2O 4) and the investigated material. The comparison of EPMA with ?XRD analysis shows that the ratio of Fe 2O 3/MFe 2O 4 (M = Zn, Ni, Mn) phases in the lower sample equals 1/2 and in the higher one 1/1 within the analyzed volume of the samples. It has been shown that this ratio, together with the thickness of the corrosion product deposit layer, effect its magnetic properties.

  19. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

  20. Nuclear model calculations of long-lived isomer production in neutron reactions for fusion reactor technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Chadwick; P. G. Young; A. V. Ignatyuk; A. B. Pashchenko; H. Vonach

    1996-01-01

    Intense neutron fluxes within fusion reactors that are currently being designed will lead to the activation of structural components, and to assess and minimize this radioactivity, nuclear cross sections are needed for neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. We describe research performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Programme on activation cross sections for fusion reactor

  1. Production of human lysozyme in biofilm reactor and optimization of growth parameters of Kluyveromyces lactis K7.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Lysozyme (1,4-?-N-acetylmuramidase) is a lytic enzyme, which degrades the bacterial cell wall. Lysozyme has been of interest in medicine, cosmetics, and food industries because of its anti-bactericidal effect. Kluyveromyces lactis K7 is a genetically modified organism that expresses human lysozyme. There is a need to improve the human lysozyme production by K. lactis K7 to make the human lysozyme more affordable. Biofilm reactor provides high biomass by including a solid support, which microorganisms grow around and within. Therefore, the aim of this study was to produce the human lysozyme in biofilm reactor and optimize the growth conditions of K. lactis K7 for the human lysozyme production in biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS). The PCS, which includes polypropylene, soybean hull, soybean flour, bovine albumin, and salts, was selected based on biofilm formation on PCS (CFU/g), human lysozyme production (U/ml), and absorption of lysozyme inside the support. To find the optimum combination of growth parameters, a three-factor Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used. The results suggested that the optimum conditions for biomass and lysozyme productions were different (27C, pH 6, 1.33vvm for biomass production; 25C, pH 4, no aeration for lysozyme production). Then, different pH and aeration shift strategies were tested to increase the biomass at the first step and then secrete the lysozyme after the shift. As a result, the lysozyme production amount (141U/ml) at 25C without pH and aeration control was significantly higher than the lysozyme amount at evaluated pH and aeration shift conditions (p?

  2. Fission Product Impact Reduction via Protracted In-core Retention in Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Transmutation Scenarios

    E-print Network

    Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde

    2011-08-08

    Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2010 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering FISSION PRODUCT IMPACT REDUCTION VIA PROTRACTED IN...-CORE RETENTION IN VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR (VHTR) TRANSMUTATION SCENARIOS A Dissertation by AYODEJI BABATUNDE ALAJO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  3. Citrus peel influences the production of an extracellular naringinase by Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2 in a stirred tank reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Munish Puri; Aneet Kaur; Colin J. Barrow; Ram Sarup Singh

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2, Gram-positive coccus, a nonpathogenic member of the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus family was isolated from soil and used to produce naringinase in a stirred tank reactor. An initial medium at pH5.5 and\\u000a a cultivation temperature of 30C was found to be optimal for enzyme production. The addition of Ca+2 caused stimulation of enzyme activity. The effect of various physico-chemical

  4. Production of specific-structured triacylglycerols by lipase-catalyzed interesterification in a laboratory-scale continuous reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Mu; X. Xu; C.-E. Hy

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory-scale continuous reactor was constructed for production of specific structured triacylglycerols containing essential\\u000a fatty acids and medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) in the sn-2 and sn-1,3 positions, respectively. Different parameters in the lipase-catalyzed interesterification were elucidated. The reaction\\u000a time was the most critical factor. Longer reaction time resulted in higher yield, but was accompanied by increased acyl migration.\\u000a The concentration

  5. Growth and hyoscyamine production of hairy root cultures of Datura stramonium in a modified stirred tank reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Hilton; M. J. C. Rhodes

    1990-01-01

    The growth and hyoscyamine production of transformed roots of Datura stramonium have been examined in a modified 14-1 stirred tank reactor in both batch and continuous fermentations on media containing half or full strength Gamborg's B5 salts and at three different temperatures. Under a range of conditions, roots grown on half strength B5 salts with 3% w\\/v sucrose had a

  6. Effect of sulfate addition on methane production and sulfate reduction in a mesophilic acetate-fed anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sen-Lin; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Jiang, Xia

    2015-04-01

    A mesophilic anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was operated to evaluate the effect of sulfate addition on methane production and sulfate reduction using acetate as the sole carbon source. The results show that at the organic loading rate of 4.0 g TOC/L/day, the TOC removal efficiencies and the biogas production rates achieved over 95 % and 7000 mL/L/day without sulfate, respectively, and slightly decreased with sulfate addition (500-800 mg/L). Methane production capacities were not influenced significantly with the addition of sulfate, while sulfate reduction efficiencies were not stable with 23-87 % in the acetate-fed reactor. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to analyze the functional microbial compositions of acetate-degrading methane-producing bacteria (MPB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the reactor. The results found that as the increase of sulfate concentration, the proportion of Methanomicrobiales increased up to 58??2 %, while Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina decreased. The dominant methanogens shifted into hydrogenotrophic methanogens from even distribution of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. When hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant, sulfate reduction efficiency was high, while sulfate reduction efficiency was low as acetoclastic methanogens were dominant. PMID:25427678

  7. 10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Floor Layout of Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory, from The Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory at Hanford. General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, Washington, 1961. - D-Reactor Complex, Deaeration Plant-Refrigeration Buildings, Area 100-D, Richland, Benton County, WA

  8. Basic energy efficiency of plasma production in electrical discharge and electron beam reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kuthi, A. [Plasma and Materials Technologies, Inc., Chatsworth, CA (United States); Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R. [First Point Scientific, Inc., Agoura Hills, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in atmospheric pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge of electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. This paper presents a comparative assessment of various non-thermal plasma reactors. The goal of our project is two-fold: (1) to understand the feasibility and scalability of various non-thermal plasma reactors by focusing on the energy efficiency of the electron and chemical kinetics, and (2) to optimize process parameters and provide performance and economic data. Experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, pulsed corona reactor and dielectric-barrier discharge will be presented. These reactors have been used to study the removal of NO{sub x} and a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas decomposition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. The decomposition mechanisms are discussed to illustrate how the chemistry could strongly affect the economics of the process. An analysis of the electron kinetics show that electrical discharge reactors are the most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For pollution control applications requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the sue of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption.

  9. 27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in February 1945 in this case, showing the vertical safety rods (VSRs) and the cables that support them. The rods could be dropped into the pile to effect a rapid shutdown. The four silvered-colored drums on the left contained boron solution and are part of the last ditch safety system. Should the VSRs channels become blocked by an occurrence such as an earthquake, the solution could be dumped into the VSR channels to help shut down the reactor. D-8334 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  10. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  11. The Hanford Site New Production Reactor (NPR) economic and demographic baseline forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Cluett, C.; Clark, D.C. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this is to present baseline employment and population forecasts for Benton, Franklin, and Yakima Counties. These forecasts will be used in the socioeconomic analysis portion of the New Production Reactor Environmental Impact Statement. Aggregate population figures for the three counties in the study area were developed for high- and low-growth scenarios for the study period 1990 through 2040. Age-sex distributions for the three counties during the study period are also presented. The high and low scenarios were developed using high and low employment projections for the Hanford site. Hanford site employment figures were used as input for the HARC-REMI Economic and Demographic (HED) model to produced baseline employment forecasts for the three counties. These results, in turn, provided input to an integrated three-county demographic model. This model, a fairly standard cohort-component model, formalizes the relationship between employment and migration by using migration to equilibrate differences in labor supply and demand. In the resulting population estimates, age-sex distributions for 1981 show the relatively large work force age groups in Benton County while Yakima County reflects higher proportions of the population in the retirement ages. The 2040 forecasts for all three counties reflect the age effects of relatively constant and low fertility increased longevity, as well as the cumulative effects of the migration assumptions in the model. By 2040 the baby boom population will be 75 years and older, contributing to the higher proportion of population in the upper end age group. The low scenario age composition effects are similar. 13 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Low enriched uranium foil plate target for the production of fission Molybdenum-99 in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab

    2009-04-01

    Low enriched uranium foil (19.99% 235U) will be used as target material for the production of fission Molybdenum-99 in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1). LEU foil plate target proposed by University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) will be irradiated in PARR-1 for the production of 100Ci of Molybdenum-99 at the end of irradiation, which will be sufficient to prepare required 99Mo/ 99mTc generators at Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (PINSTECH) and its supply in the country. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for the fission Molybdenum-99 production at PARR-1 has been performed. Power levels in target foil plates and their corresponding irradiation time durations were initially determined by neutronic analysis to have the required neutron fluence. Finally, the thermal hydraulic analysis has been carried out for the proposed design of the target holder using LEU foil plates for fission Molybdenum-99 production at PARR-1. Data shows that LEU foil plate targets can be safely irradiated in PARR-1 for production of desired amount of fission Molybdenum-99.

  13. H 2 production by low pressure methane steam reforming in a PdAg membrane reactor over a Ni-based catalyst: Experimental and modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Iulianelli; G. Manzolini; M. De Falco; S. Campanari; T. Longo; S. Liguori; A. Basile

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest towards pure hydrogen production for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications. Methane steam reforming reaction is one of the most important industrial chemical processes for hydrogen production. This reaction is usually carried out in fixed bed reactors at 3040bar and at temperatures above 850C. In this work, a dense PdAg membrane reactor packed with

  14. Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

  15. Syngas production by thermochemical conversion of CO2 and H2O mixtures using a high-temperature heat pipe based reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chen, Chien-Hua

    2012-10-01

    The design of a new high-temperature, solar-based reactor for thermochemical production of syngas using water and carbon dioxide will be discussed. The reactor incorporates the use of high-temperature heat pipe(s) that efficiently transfer the heat from a solar collector to a porous metal oxide material. Special attention is given to the thermal characteristics of the reactor, which are key factors affecting the overall system efficiency and amount of fuel produced. The thermochemical cycle that is considered is that for ceria based material. Preliminary data acquired from an early stage reactor, operated at temperatures up to 1100oC, is presented and efforts are now underway to increase the operating temperature of the reactor to 1300oC to further increase the efficiency of the thermochemical fuel production process.

  16. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  17. Simple automatic device for real time sampling of gas production by a reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Frattolillo, A. [ENEA-Unita Tecnico Scientifica Fusione-Centro Ricerche Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)

    2006-06-15

    An innovative automatic device, allowing periodically drawing samples of the gases produced by a generic reactor, is presented. The gases evolving during the reaction are collected in a storage manifold, equipped with a variable volume consisting of a stainless steel bellow, whose expansion or contraction is driven by a linear step motor. A capacitive gauge monitors the pressure inside the storage manifold, while a feedback control loop reacts to any pressure change adjusting the variable volume (by means of the step motor) in such a way to keep the pressure at a desired set point P{sub 0}. As long as the reaction proceeds, the gas production results in a progressive expansion of the variable volume, whose instantaneous value is constantly monitored by means of a slide potentiometer, whose lever is rigidly connected to the bellow's moving extremity. Once the bellow's expansion has reached a predetermined volume increment {delta}V, which means that an amount of gas P{sub 0}{delta}V has been produced and collected in the storage circuit, a quantity P{sub 0}V{sub S}{<=}P{sub 0}{delta}V of gas is released to the analysis system. A set of electropneumatic valves, automatically operated by the control system, allows for gas delivery to the analysis equipment and retrieval of the set point pressure, by compression of the variable volume, with no influence on the reaction. All relevant parameters are monitored and logged on a personal computer. The control and data acquisition software, made out using National Instrument LABVIEW trade mark sign , also provides control of the analysis equipment. The ability of the proposed setup to not affect the ongoing process allows real time monitoring (by drawing samples at regular time intervals during the reaction) of the gas production. Moreover, since the amount of gas P{sub 0}V{sub S} drawn at each sampling is always the same, it is possible to establish at a glance whether or not there are changes in the concentration of any component, by directly comparing the results of the analysis of successive samples.

  18. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  19. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  20. A novel membrane-integrated fermentation reactor system: application to pyruvic acid production in continuous culture by Torulopsis glabrata.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Hideki; Mimitsuka, Takashi; Minegishi, Shin-Ichi; Henmi, Masahiro; Yamada, Katsushige; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yonehara, Tetsu

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the performance of a novel bio-reactor system, the membrane-integrated fermentation reactor (MFR), for efficient continuous fermentation. The MFR, equipped with an autoclavable polyvinylidene difluoride membrane, has normally been used for biological wastewater treatment. The productivity of the MFR system, applied to the continuous production of pyruvic acid by the yeast Torulopsis glabrata, was remarkably high. The volumetric productivity of pyruvic acid increased up to 4.2g/l/h, about four times higher than that of batch fermentation. Moreover, the membrane was able to filter fermentation broth for more than 300h without fouling even though the cell density of the fermentation broth reached 600 as OD(660). Transmembrane pressure, used as an indicator of membrane fouling, remained below 5kPa throughout the continuous fermentation. These results clearly indicate that the MFR system is a simple and highly efficient system that is applicable to the fermentative production of a range of biochemicals. PMID:21318623

  1. Continuous hydrogen production from co-digestion of municipal food waste and kitchen wastewater in mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, A; El-Qelish, M

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out to assess the impact of organic loading rate (OLR) on the performance of mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) for H(2) production from a co-digestion of municipal food waste and kitchen wastewater. The reactor was operated at different organic loading rates (OLRs) of 29, 36 and 47 g COD(total)/Ld. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was kept constant at 1.6d. The results showed that increasing the OLR from 29 to 36 g COD(total)/Ld, leads to a significant (p ? 0.01) drop in the H(2) production from 6.00.5 to 5.41.04 L H(2)/d, respectively. However, the H(2) production remained at the same level of 5.31.04 L H(2)/d at increasing the OLR from 36 to 47 g COD(total)/Ld. The H(2) generation was mainly due to conversion of COD (57%) and carbohydrate (81%). Protein and lipids conversion represents only 23.3% and 4.1% respectively for H(2) production. PMID:22446053

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  3. Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

    2013-09-30

    The coal to hydrogen project utilizes the iron/iron oxide looping process to produce high purity hydrogen. The input energy for the process is provided by syngas coming from gasification process of coal. The reaction pathways for this process have been studied and favorable conditions for energy efficient operation have been identified. The Magnetically Stabilized Porous Structure (MSPS) is invented. It is fabricated from iron and silica particles and its repeatable high performance has been demonstrated through many experiments under various conditions in thermogravimetric analyzer, a lab-scale reactor, and a large scale reactor. The chemical reaction kinetics for both oxidation and reduction steps has been investigated thoroughly inside MSPS as well as on the surface of very smooth iron rod. Hydrogen, CO, and syngas have been tested individually as the reducing agent in reduction step and their performance is compared. Syngas is found to be the most pragmatic reducing agent for the two-step water splitting process. The transport properties of MSPS including porosity, permeability, and effective thermal conductivity are determined based on high resolution 3D CT x-ray images obtained at Argonne National Laboratory and pore-level simulations using a lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE)-based mesoscopic model developed during this investigation. The results of those measurements and simulations provide necessary inputs to the development of a reliable volume-averaging-based continuum model that is used to simulate the dynamics of the redox process in MSPS. Extensive efforts have been devoted to simulate the redox process in MSPS by developing a continuum model consist of various modules for conductive and radiative heat transfer, fluid flow, species transport, and reaction kinetics. Both the Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches for species transport of chemically reacting flow in porous media have been investigated and verified numerically. Both approaches lead to correct prediction of hydrogen production rates over a large range of experimental conditions in the laboratory scale reactor and the bench-scale reactor. In the economic analysis, a comparison of the hydrogen production plants using iron/iron oxide looping cycle and the conventional process has been presented. Plant configurations are developed for the iron/iron oxide looping cycle. The study suggests a higher electric power generation but a lower hydrogen production efficiency comparing with the conventional process. Additionally, it was shown that the price of H{sub 2} obtained from our reactor can be as low as $1.7/kg, which is 22% lower than the current price of the H{sub 2} obtained from reforming plants.

  4. Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products

    DOEpatents

    Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

    2012-10-02

    Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

  5. Trace Fission Product Ratios for Nuclear Forensics Attribution of Weapons-Grade Plutonium from Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets

    E-print Network

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2014-08-13

    reactor fuel, can be used in a nuclear weapon when obtained from reactor fuel discharged at a low burnup (1 MWd/kg). Characteristics of plutonium reprocessed from reactor fuel depend on factors such as the reactor type (thermal or fast reactor), fuel...

  6. Molybdenum-99 production from reactor irradiation of molybdenum targets: a viable strategy for enhanced availability of technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Pillai, M R A; Knapp, F F Russ

    2012-08-01

    Fission-produced 99Mo (F 99Mo) is traditionally used for fabrication of 99Mo/99mTc alumina-based column generators. In this paper, several emerging strategies are discussed which are being pursued or have been suggested to overcome the continuing shortages of F 99Mo. In addition to the hopeful eventual success of these proposed new 99Mo and 99mTc production technologies, an additional attractive strategy is the alternative production and use of low specific activity (LSA) 99Mo. This strategy avoids fission and is accomplished by direct activation of molybdenum targets in nuclear reactors, which would preclude sole continued reliance on F 99Mo. The principal focus of this paper is a detailed discussion on the advantages and strategies for enhanced production of LSA 99Mo using an international network of research reactors. Several effective strategies are discussed to obtain 99mTc from LSA 99Mo as well as more efficient use of the alumina-based generator system. The delayed time period between 99Mo production and traditional 99Mo/99mTc alumina column generator manufacture and distribution to user sites results in the loss of more than 50% of 99Mo activity. Another strategy is a paradigm shift in the use of 99Mo by recovering clinical-grade 99mTc from 99Mo solution as an alternative to use of 99Mo/99mTc column generators, thereby avoiding substantial decreased availability of 99Mo from radioactive decay. Implementation of the suggested strategies would be expected to increase availability of 99mTc to the clinical user community by several fold. Additional important advantages for the use of LSA 99Mo include eliminating the need for fission product waste management and precluding proliferation concerns by phasing out the need for high (HEU)- and low (LEU)-enriched uranium targets required for F 99Mo production. PMID:23013668

  7. The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (<1 kDa) and lower percentage of large molecular size (>100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids. PMID:24077152

  8. Influence of organic loading rate on the anaerobic treatment of sugarcane vinasse and biogs production in fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Laura M; Damiano, Elisabeth S G; Silva, Edson L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR) that contained polystyrene particles as a support material for the treatment of vinasse that resulted from the alcoholic fermentation of sugarcane molasses. The AFBR was inoculated with sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor that treated poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. The AFBR was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 24h at a temperature of 30C with influent vinasse concentrations that ranged from 2273 to 20,073mg COD L(-1). The reactor was subjected to increased organic loading rates (OLR) that ranged from 3.33 to 26.19kg COD m(-3) d(-1), with COD removal efficiencies that ranged from 51% to 70% and maximum removal at an OLR of 13.93 2.18kg COD m(-3) d(-1). The maximum biogas productivity was 5.37m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) for an OLR of 25.32kg COD m(-3) d(-1) (average removal of 51%).. PMID:23947710

  9. Evaluation of selected ex-reactor accidents related to the tritium and medical isotope production mission at the FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A.

    1997-11-17

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been proposed as a production facility for tritium and medical isotopes. A range of postulated accidents related to ex-reactor irradiated fuel and target handling were identified and evaluated using new source terms for the higher fuel enrichment and for the tritium and medical isotope targets. In addition, two in-containment sodium spill accidents were re-evaluated to estimate effects of increased fuel enrichment and the presence of the Rapid Retrieval System. Radiological and toxicological consequences of the analyzed accidents were found to be well within applicable risk guidelines.

  10. Reactor service life extension program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Caskey; R. L. Sindelar; R. S. Ondrejcin; E. W. Baumann

    1990-01-01

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The

  11. Hydrogen production for fuel cell application in an autothermal micro-channel reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Reuse; Albert Renken; Katja Haas-Santo; Oliver Grke; Klaus Schubert

    2004-01-01

    Results concerning the coupling of the steam reforming (SR) and total oxidation (TOX) of methanol in a two-passage reactor are presented. A commercially available copper based catalyst is used for the steam reforming. For the total oxidation, a highly active cobalt oxide catalyst was developed. Both catalysts are used in form of thin layers immobilized on the wall of the

  12. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  13. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Lee Coats; James J. Dahl; Parma Edward J. Jr

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by

  14. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  15. Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Judy N

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

  16. Fission product release and fuel behavior of irradiated light water reactor fuel under severe accident conditions. The ACRR ST-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Stockman, H.W.; Reil, K.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fisk, J.W. [Tills (Jack) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Source Term (ST) Experiment program was designed to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under well-controlled light water reactor severe accident conditions. The ST-1 Experiment was the first of two experiments designed to investigate fission product release. ST-1 was conducted in a highly reducing environment at a system pressure of approximately 0.19 MPa, and at maximum fuel temperatures of about 2490 K. The data will be used for the development and validation of mechanistic fission product release computer codes such as VICTORIA.

  17. Characterization of the retained sludge in a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with emphasis on its low excess sludge production.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Matsunaga, Kengo; Kubota, Kengo; Taniguchi, Ryoko; Harada, Hideki; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Okubo, Tsutomu; Uemura, Shigeki; Araki, Nobuo; Yamada, Masayoshi; Yamauchi, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Experiments to characterize retained sludge in a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor fed with upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) treated sewage under moderate conditions were conducted. Plenty of oxygen was supplied through the DHS reactor without aeration and the effluent qualities after the reactor were comparable to activated sludge processes. The average excess sludge production rate was 0.09 g SS g(-1) COD removed. The DHS reactor maintained a high sludge concentration of 26.9 g VSS L(-1) sponge, resulting in a low loading rate of 0.032 g COD g(-1) VSS day(-1). The endogenous respiration rate of DHS sludge was comparable to previously reported aerobic sludges. The numbers of microfauna were one order of magnitude greater than those in activated sludge. The results indicated that low excess sludge production was attributable to the high sludge concentration, sufficient oxygen supply, adequate endogenous respiration rate, and a high density and diversity of microfauna. PMID:23567678

  18. Design of adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. Application to production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. H. de Smet; R. J. Berger; GBMM Marin; J. C. Schouten

    2001-01-01

    Adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas were designed at conditions suitable for the production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells. A steady-state, one-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model was applied in the simulations. Intra-particle concentration gradients were taken into account explicitly, by solving the continuity equations in the catalyst pellet at each position along the fixed-bed

  19. Direct solar thermal splitting of water and on-site separation of the products IV. Development of porous ceramic membranes for a solar thermal water-splitting reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abraham Kogan

    2000-01-01

    A crucial element in the solar thermal water-splitting (STWS) reactor is the porous ceramic membrane that enables separation of hydrogen from the hot water-splitting reaction products. Zirconia porous membranes are manufactured by powder sintering at about 1800C. When such a membrane is exposed in the solar reactor to a higher temperature, it loses its gas permeability due to pore closure

  20. Structural testing of corrugated asbestos-cement roof panels at the Hanford Facilities, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Moustafa, S.E.; Rodehaver, S.M. [Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Frier, W.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report describes a roof testing program that was carried out at the 105KE/KW Spent Fuel Storage Basins and their surrounding facilities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The roof panels were constructed in the mid 1950`s of corrugated asbestos-cement (A/C), which showed common signs of aging. Based on the construction specifications, the panels capacity to meet current design standards was questioned. Both laboratory and in-situ load testing of the corrugated A/C panels was conducted. The objective of the complete test program was to determine the structural integrity of the existing A/C roof panels installed in the 105KE and 105KW facilities. The data from these tests indicated that the roofs are capable of resisting the design loads and are considered safe. A second phase test to address the roof resistance to personnel and roof removal/roofing system installation equipment was recommended and is underway.

  1. Geologic map of the Richland 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

    1993-09-01

    This map of the Richland 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of these quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports. The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey, and the Moses Lake, Ritzville quadrangles have already been released.

  2. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  3. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2000-11-17

    There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx} 1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

  4. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Mie Hiruta; Gannon Johnson; Maziar Rostamian; Gabriel P. Potirniche; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Massimo Bertino; Louis Franzel; Akira Tokuhiro

    2013-10-01

    This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphitegraphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor.

  5. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

    1983-06-10

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  6. Study and comparison of two enzyme membrane reactors for fatty acids and glycerol production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raffaele Molinari; Maria Elena Santoro; Enrico Drioli

    1994-01-01

    Two enzyme membrane reactors (EMR), (1) with one substrate (olive oil) in an oil-in-water emulsion (E-EMR) and (2) with two separated liquid phases (oil and water) (TSLP-EMR), have been studied for the conversion of the triglycerides to fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme was Candida cylindracea lipase confined on the pressurized face or entrapped in the sponge side of capillary

  7. Anaerobic Digestion of Vegetable Wastes for Biogas Production in a Fed-Batch Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Velmurugan; R. Alwar Ramanujam

    2011-01-01

    Vegetable wastes (Banana stem, Cabbage and Ladies finger) were an-aerobically digested in a fed-batch laboratory scale reactor at mesophilic conditions (35 o c). The Organic Loading Rate (OLR) was maintained at 2.25 g\\/l.d with a Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of 30 days. The average methane content in the biogas was 65% and the Methane yield was 0.387 l CH4\\/g VS

  8. Production of hydrogen from thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane in a fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ammendola; R. Chirone; G. Ruoppolo; G. Russo

    2009-01-01

    The Thermo-Catalytic Decomposition (TCD) of methane has been investigated in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor using a copper dispersed on ?-alumina as a catalyst. The effects of both total flow rate and amount of catalyst, i.e. contact time, as well as of reaction temperature and CH4 inlet concentration on CH4 to H2 conversion, amount of carbon deposited on

  9. Cross sections for fuel depletion and radioisotope production calculations in TRIGA reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. Aguilar; R. R. Mazon

    1994-01-01

    For TRIGA Reactors, the fuel depletion and isotopic inventory calculations, depends on the computer code and in the cross sections of some important actinides used. Among these we have U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240 and Pu-241. We choose ORIGEN2, a code with a good reputation in this kind of calculations, we observed the cross sections for these actinides in the libraries

  10. Optimization of material and production to develop fluoroelastomer inflatable seals for sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. K. Sinha; Baldev Raj

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of producing thin-walled fluoroelastomer profiles under continuous, atmospheric-pressure vulcanization conditions in air has been demonstrated by successful manufacture of ?2m diameter test inflatable seals for the 500MWe, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) using a 50\\/50 blend formulation of Viton GBL-200S\\/600S based on advanced polymer architecture (APA). A commercial cold feed screw extruder with 90mm diameter screw was used

  11. Basic energy efficiency of plasma production in electrical discharge and electron beam reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Penetrante; M. C. Hsiao; J. N. Bardsley; B. T. Merritt; G. E. Vogtlin; A. Kuthi; C. P. Burkhart; J. R. Bayless

    1996-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma processing is an emerging technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO) in atmospheric pressure gas streams. Either electrical discharge of electron beam methods can produce these plasmas. This paper presents a comparative assessment of various non-thermal plasma reactors. The goal of our project is two-fold: (1) to understand the feasibility and scalability

  12. Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA); Trapp, Turner J. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

  13. 300 Area process sewer piping upgrade and 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility discharge to the City of Richland Sewage System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by constructing and operating a new process sewer collection system that would discharge to the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The DOE is also considering the construction of a tie-line from the TEDF to the 300 Area Sanitary Sewer for discharging the process wastewater to the City of Richland Sewage System. The proposed action is needed because the integrity of the old piping in the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System is questionable and effluents might be entering the soil column from leaking pipes. In addition, the DOE has identified a need to reduce anticipated operating costs at the new TEDF. The 300 Area Process Sewer Piping Upgrade (Project L-070) is estimated to cost approximately $9.9 million. The proposed work would involve the construction and operation of a new process sewer collection system. The new system would discharge the effluents to a collection sump and lift station for the TEDF. The TEDF is designed to treat and discharge the process effluent to the Columbia River. The process waste liquid effluent is currently well below the DOE requirements for radiological secondary containment and is not considered a RCRA hazardous waste or a State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act dangerous waste. A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination, System (NPDES) permit has been obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for discharge to the Columbia River. The proposed action would upgrade the existing 300 Area Process Sewer System by the construction and operation of a new combined gravity, vacuum, and pressurized process sewer collection system consisting of vacuum collection sumps, pressure pump stations, and buried polyvinyl chloride or similar pipe. Two buildings would also be built to house a main collection station and a satellite collection station.

  14. Effect of internal diffusional restrictions on the hydrolysis of penicillin G: reactor performance and specific productivity of 6-APA with immobilized penicillin acylase.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro; Flores, Sebastin; Wilson, Lorena; Illanes, Andrs

    2011-09-01

    A mathematical model that describes the heterogeneous reaction-diffusion process involved in penicillin G hydrolysis in a batch reactor with immobilized penicillin G acylase is presented. The reaction system includes the bulk liquid phase containing the dissolved substrate (and products) and the solid biocatalyst phase represented by glyoxyl-agarose spherical porous particles carrying the enzyme. The equations consider reaction and diffusion components that are presented in dimensionless form. This is a complex reaction system in which both products of reaction and the substrate itself are inhibitors. The simulation of a batch reactor performance with immobilized penicillin G acylase is presented and discussed for the internal diffusional restrictions impact on effectiveness and productivity. Increasing internal diffusional restrictions, through increasing catalyst particle size and enzyme loading, causes impaired catalyst efficiency expressed in a reduction of effectiveness factor and specific productivity. High penicillin G initial concentrations decrease the impact of internal diffusional restrictions by increasing the mass transfer towards porous catalyst until product inhibition becomes significant over approximately 50 mM of initial penicillin G, where a drop in conversion rate and a maximum in specific productivity are then obtained. Results highlight the relevance of considering internal diffusional restrictions, reactor performance, and productivity analysis for proper catalyst and reactor design. PMID:21505803

  15. Glutamate production from CO{sub 2} by marine cyanobacterium synechococcus sp. using a novel biosolar reactor employing light-diffusing optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Takeyama, Haruko; Sudo, Hiroaki [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)] [and others

    1991-12-31

    A photobioreactor was constructed in the form of a Perspex column 900 mm tall with an internal diameter of 70 mm. The reactor volume was 1.8 L and the light source consisted of a metal-halide lamp to reproduce sunlight. Light was distributed through the culture using a new type of optical fiber that diffuses light out through its surface, perpendicular to the fiber axis. A cluster of 661 light-diffusing optical fibers (LDOFs) pass from the light source through the reactor column (60-cm culture depth) and are connected to a mirror at the top of the reactor. This biosolar reactor has been used for the production of glutamate from CO{sub 2} by the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG040607. We present here details of the construction of the biosolar reactor and characterization of its properties. The effect of light intensity on glutamate production was measured. Carbon dioxide-to-glutarnate conversion ratios were determined at different cell densities: the maximum conversion ratio (28%) was achieved at a cell density of 3{times}10{sup 8} cells/mL. A comparison of glutamate production using the LDOF biosolar reactor described here with production by batch culture using free or immobilized cells showed that use of an optical-fiber biosolar reactor increased glutamate-production efficiency 6.75-fold. We conclude that as a result of its high surface-to-volume ratio (692/m) increased photoproduction of useful compounds may be achieved. Such a system is generally applicable to all aspects of photobiotechnology.

  16. The Ongoing Impact of the U.S. Fast Reactor Integral Experiments Program

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Harold F. McFarlane

    2012-11-01

    The creation of a large database of integral fast reactor physics experiments advanced nuclear science and technology in ways that were unachievable by less capital intensive and operationally challenging approaches. They enabled the compilation of integral physics benchmark data, validated (or not) analytical methods, and provided assurance of future rector designs The integral experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) represent decades of research performed to support fast reactor design and our understanding of neutronics behavior and reactor physics measurements. Experiments began in 1955 with the Zero Power Reactor No. 3 (ZPR-3) and terminated with the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR, originally the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor) in 1990 at the former ANL-West site in Idaho, which is now part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Two additional critical assemblies, ZPR-6 and ZPR-9, operated at the ANL-East site in Illinois. A total of 128 fast reactor assemblies were constructed with these facilities [1]. The infrastructure and measurement capabilities are too expensive to be replicated in the modern era, making the integral database invaluable as the world pushes ahead with development of liquid metal cooled reactors.

  17. Secondary charged particle activation method for measuring the tritium production rate in the breeding blankets of a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovni, Istvn; Szieberth, Mt; Fehr, Sndor

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a new passive technique has been developed for measuring the tritium production rate in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) test blanket modules. This method is based on the secondary charged particle activation, in which the irradiated sample contains two main components: a tritium producing target (6Li or 7Li) and an indicator nuclide, which has a relatively high cross-section for an incoming tritium particle (triton). During the neutron irradiation, the target produces a triton, which has sufficiently high energy to cause the so-called secondary charged particle activation on an indicator nuclide. If the product of this reaction is a radioactive nuclide, its activity must be proportional to the amount of generated tritium. A comprehensive set of irradiations were performed at the Training Reactor of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. The following charged particle reactions were observed and investigated: 27Al(t,p)29Al; 26Mg(t,p)28Mg; 26Mg(t,n)28Al; 32S(t,n)34mCl; 16O(t,n)18F; and O(t,?)18N17. The optimal atomic ratio of the indicator elements and 6Li was also investigated. The reaction rates were estimated using calculations with the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code. The trend of the measured and the simulated data are in good agreement, although accurate data for triton induced reaction cross-sections cannot be found in the literature. Once the technique is calibrated with a reference LSC (Liquid Scintillation Counting) measurement, a new passive method becomes available for tritium production rate measurements.

  18. Method for fabricating wrought components for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and product

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Larry D. (San Diego, CA); Johnson, Jr., William R. (San Diego, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A method and alloys for fabricating wrought components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are disclosed. These wrought, nickel-based alloys, which exhibit strength and excellent resistance to carburization at elevated temperatures, include aluminum and titanium in amounts and ratios to promote the growth of carburization resistant films while preserving the wrought character of the alloys. These alloys also include substantial amounts of molybdenum and/or tungsten as solid-solution strengtheners. Chromium may be included in concentrations less than 10% to assist in fabrication. Minor amounts of carbon and one or more carbide-forming metals also contribute to high-temperature strength.

  19. In situ hydrogen utilization for high fraction acetate production in mixed culture hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Ding, Jing; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Zhaowei; Dai, Kun; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-12-01

    Syngas fermentation is a promising route for resource recovery. Acetate is an important industrial chemical product and also an attractive precursor for liquid biofuels production. This study demonstrated high fraction acetate production from syngas (H? and CO?) in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor, in which the hydrogen utilizing efficiency reached 100% during the operational period. The maximum concentration of acetate in batch mode was 12.5 g/L, while the acetate concentration in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 9 days was 3.6 0.1 g/L. Since butyrate concentration was rather low and below 0.1 g/L, the acetate fraction was higher than 99% in both batch and continuous modes. Microbial community analysis showed that the biofilm was dominated by Clostridium spp., such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium drakei, the percentage of which was 70.5%. This study demonstrates a potential technology for the in situ utilization of syngas and valuable chemical production. PMID:24196583

  20. Nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor: Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production associated anaerobic ammonium oxidation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlin, P.; Harris, E. J.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Mohn, J.; Siegrist, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a major sink for stratospheric ozone. In biological wastewater treatment N2O can be produced via several pathways. This study investigates the dynamics of N2O emissions from a nitritation-anammox reactor, and links its interpretation to the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signature of the emitted N2O. A 400-litre single-stage nitritation-anammox reactor was operated and continuously fed with digester liquid. The isotopic composition of N2O emissions was monitored online with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS; Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Waechter et al., 2008). Dissolved ammonium and nitrate were monitored online (ISEmax, Endress + Hauser), while nitrite was measured with test strips (Nitrite-test 0-24mgN/l, Merck). Table 1. Summary of experiments conducted to understand N2O emissions Experimental conditions O2[mgO2/L] NO2-[mgN/L] NH4+[mgN/L] N2O/NH4+[%] Normal operation <0.1 <0.5 10 0.6 Normal operation, high NH4+ <0.1 <0.5 100 6.1 High aeration 0.5 to 1.5 up to 50 10 and 50 4.9 NO2- addition (oxic) <0.1 <0.5 to 4 10 5.8 NO2- addition (anoxic) 0 <0.5 to 4 10 3.2 NH2OH addition <0.1 <0.5 10 2.5 Results showed that under normal operating conditions, the N2O isotopic site preference (SP = d15N? - d15N?) was much higher than expected - up to 41 - strongly suggesting an unknown N2O production pathway, which is hypothesized to be mediated by anammox activity (Figure 1). A less likely explanation is that the SP of N2O was increased by partial N2O reduction by heterotrophic denitrification. Various experiments were conducted to further investigate N2O formation pathways in the reactor. Our data reveal that N2O emissions increased when reactor operation was not ideal, for example when dissolved oxygen was too high (Table 1). SP measurements confirmed that these N2O peaks were due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor (Figure 1; Table 1). Overall, process control via online N2O monitoring was confirmed to be an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. ReferencesWaechter H. et al. (2008) Optics Express, 16: 9239-9244. Wunderlin, P et al. (2013) Environmental Science & Technology 47: 1339-1348.

  1. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  2. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  3. The possibility of steam explosions for a misseated septifoil in the SRS K Production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L.; Yau, W.W.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, D.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Control rods in the Savannah River Site`s K-reactor are contained within housings composed of seven channels (`septifoils`). Each septifoil is suspended from the top of the reactor and is normally seated on an upflow pin that channels coolant to the septifoil. Forced flow to the septifoil would be eliminated in the unlikely event of a septifoil misseated upon installation, i.e., if the septifoil is not aligned with its upflow pin. If this event were not detected, control rod melting and the interaction of molten metal with water might occur. This paper describes a methodology used to address the issues of steam explosions that might arise by this mechanism. The probability of occurrence of a damaging steam explosion given a misseated septifoil was found to be extremely low. The primary reasons are: (1) the high probability that melting will not occur, (2) the possibility of material holdup by contact with the outer septifoil housing, (3) the relative shallowness of the pool of water into which molten material might fall, (4) the probable absence of a trigger, and (5) the relatively large energy release required to damage a nearby fuel assembly. The methodology is based upon the specification of conditions prevailing within the septifoil at the time molten material is expected to contact water, and upon information derived from the available experimental data base, supplemented by recent prototypic experiments.

  4. The possibility of steam explosions for a misseated septifoil in the SRS K Production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.K.; Hyder, M.L.; Yau, W.W.F. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Smith, D.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Control rods in the Savannah River Site's K-reactor are contained within housings composed of seven channels ( septifoils'). Each septifoil is suspended from the top of the reactor and is normally seated on an upflow pin that channels coolant to the septifoil. Forced flow to the septifoil would be eliminated in the unlikely event of a septifoil misseated upon installation, i.e., if the septifoil is not aligned with its upflow pin. If this event were not detected, control rod melting and the interaction of molten metal with water might occur. This paper describes a methodology used to address the issues of steam explosions that might arise by this mechanism. The probability of occurrence of a damaging steam explosion given a misseated septifoil was found to be extremely low. The primary reasons are: (1) the high probability that melting will not occur, (2) the possibility of material holdup by contact with the outer septifoil housing, (3) the relative shallowness of the pool of water into which molten material might fall, (4) the probable absence of a trigger, and (5) the relatively large energy release required to damage a nearby fuel assembly. The methodology is based upon the specification of conditions prevailing within the septifoil at the time molten material is expected to contact water, and upon information derived from the available experimental data base, supplemented by recent prototypic experiments.

  5. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-12-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  6. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  7. Development of a phenomena identification and ranking table for thermal-hydraulic phenomena during a double-ended guillotine break LOCA in an SRS production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.G.; Ortiz, M.G.; Bolander, M.A.; Wilson, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    A rising level of scrutiny is being directed toward the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors. Improved calculational capabilities are being developed to provide a best estimate analytical process to determine the safe operating margins of the reactors. The Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology, developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support best estimate simulations, is being applied to the best estimate limits analysis for the SRS production reactors. One of the foundational parts of the method is the identification and ranking of all the processes that occur during the specific limiting scenario. The phenomena ranking is done according to their importance to safety criteria during the transient and is used to focus the uncertainty analysis on a sufficient, yet cost effective scope of work. This report documents the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur during a limiting break in an SRS production reactor and their importance to the uncertainty in simulations of the reactor behavior. 9 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Daugherty, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor is a reactor that eliminates the traditional safety concerns of nuclear fission reactors. The US reactor has an insignificant source term and no reasonable criticality accident. Furthermore, the negligible residual after-heat in the reactor renders its shutdown capability comparable or superior to conventional power sources. Fission products are continuously removed at the rate they are produced. The reactor is operated with no excess criticality, hence no criticality accident is reasonably possible. The reactor is controlled safely by its negative temperature coeffiient. The reactor maintains criticality by an internal breeding ratio that is trimmed to be exactly one. The US reactor requires a fluid fuel and on-line, continuous fuel processing. Molten salt fuel was selected for its low vapor pressure at high temperature; adequate solubility of uranium and thorium as fluorides; good compatibility with structural materials; absence of irradiation damage; high negative temperature coefficient and amply developed technology and experience.

  9. Biogas Production from Waste using Biofilm Reactor: Factor Analysis in Two Stages System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Zainol; J. Salihon; R. Abdul-Rahman

    2009-01-01

    Factor analysis was applied to two stages biogas production from banana stem waste allowing a screening of the experimental variables second stage temperature (T), organic loading rates (OLR) and hydraulic retention times (HRT). Biogas production was found to be strongly influenced by all the above experimental variables. Results from factorial analysis have shown that all variables which were HRT, OLR

  10. Analysis of Reference Design for Nuclear-Assisted Hydrogen Production at 750C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego

    2010-01-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis

  11. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-print Network

    J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

    2011-08-23

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

  12. Fission-product yield data from the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.; Raman, S.

    1986-04-01

    The United States and the United Kingdom have been engaged in a joint research program in which samples of fissile and fertile actinides have been incorporated in fuel pins and irradiated in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor in Scotland. The purpose of this portion of the program is to study both the materials behavior and the nuclear physics results - primarily measurements of the fission-product yields in the irradiated samples and secondarily information on the amounts of heavy elements in the samples. In the measurements high-resolution detectors were used to observe and (quantitatively measure) the gamma rays and x rays corresponding to the decay of several long-lived radioisotopes. Two series of measurements were made, one nine months following the end of the irradiation period and another approximately six months later.

  13. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  14. Feed frequency in a sequencing batch reactor strongly affects the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Francesco; Beccari, Mario; Fraraccio, Serena; Zanaroli, Giulio; Majone, Mauro

    2014-06-25

    The production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by activated sludge selected in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has been investigated. Several SBR runs were performed at the same applied organic load rate (OLR), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and feed concentration (8.5 g COD L(-1) of volatile fatty acids, VFAs) under aerobic conditions. The effect of the feeding time was only evaluated with a cycle length of 8h; for this particular cycle length, an increase in the storage response was observed by increasing the rate at which the substrate was fed into the reactor (at a fixed feeding frequency). Furthermore, a significantly stronger effect was observed by decreasing the cycle length from 8h to 6h and then to 2h, changing the feed frequency or changing the organic load given per cycle (all of the other conditions remained the same): the length of the feast phase decreased from 26 to 20.0 and then to 19.7% of the overall cycle length, respectively, due to an increase in the substrate removal rate. This removal rate was high and similar for the runs with cycle lengths of 2h and 6h in the SBR. This result was due to an increase in the selective pressure and the specific storage properties of the selected biomass. The highest polymer productivity after long-term accumulation batch tests was 1.7 g PHA L(-1)d(-1), with PHA content in the biomass of approximately 50% on a COD basis under nitrogen limitation. The DGGE profiles showed that the good storage performance correlated to the development of Lampropedia hyalina, which was only observed in the SBR runs characterized by a shorter cycle length. PMID:24184912

  15. The kinetics of inhibitor production resulting from hydrothermal deconstruction of wheat straw studied using a pressurised microwave reactor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of a microwave synthesis reactor has allowed kinetic data for the hydrothermal reactions of straw biomass to be established from short times, avoiding corrections required for slow heating in conventional reactors, or two-step heating. Access to realistic kinetic data is important for predictions of optimal reaction conditions for the pretreatment of biomass for bioethanol processes, which is required to minimise production of inhibitory compounds and to maximise sugar and ethanol yields. Results The gravimetric loss through solubilisation of straw provided a global measure of the extent of hydrothermal deconstruction. The kinetic profiles of furan and lignin-derived inhibitors were determined in the hydrothermal hydrolysates by UV analysis, with concentrations of formic and acetic acid determined by HPLC. Kinetic analyses were either carried out by direct fitting to simple first order equations or by numerical integration of sequential reactions. Conclusions A classical Arrhenius activation energy of 148 kJmol?1 has been determined for primary solubilisation, which is higher than the activation energy associated with historical measures of reaction severity. The gravimetric loss is primarily due to depolymerisation of the hemicellulose component of straw, but a minor proportion of lignin is solubilised at the same rate and hence may be associated with the more hydrophilic lignin-hemicellulose interface. Acetic acid is liberated primarily from hydrolysis of pendant acetate groups on hemicellulose, although this occurs at a rate that is too slow to provide catalytic enhancement to the primary solubilisation reactions. However, the increase in protons may enhance secondary reactions leading to the production of furans and formic acid. The work has suggested that formic acid may be formed under these hydrothermal conditions via direct reaction of sugar end groups rather than furan breakdown. However, furan degradation is found to be significant, which may limit ultimate quantities generated in hydrolysate liquors. PMID:24678822

  16. Application of amorphous filler metals in production of fusion reactor high heat flux components

    SciTech Connect

    Kalin, B.A.; Fedotov, V.T.; Grigoriev, A.E. [Moscow Engineering Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The technology of Al-Si, Zr-Ti-Be and Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni amorphous filler metals for Be and graphite brazing with Cu, Mo and V was developed. The fusion reactor high heat flux components from Cu-Be, Cu-graphite, Mo-Be, Mo-graphite, V-Re and V-graphite materials were produced by brazing. Every component represents metallic base, to which Be or graphite plates are brazed. The distance between plates was equal 0.2 times the plate height. These components were irradiated by hydrogen plasma with 5 x 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} power. The microstructure and the element distribution in the brazed zone were investigated before and after heat plasma irradiation. Topography graphite plate surfaces and topography of metal surfaces between plates were also investigated after heat plasma irradiation. The results of microstructure investigation and material erosion are discussed.

  17. Interfacing the tandem mirror reactor to the sulfur-iodine process for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-06-02

    The blanket is linked to the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vaporization units and SO/sub 3/ decomposition reactor with either sodium or helium. The engineering and safety problems associated with these choices are discussed. This H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ step uses about 90% of the TMR heat and is best close-coupled to the nuclear island. The rest of the process we propose to be driven by steam and does not require close-coupling. The sodium loop coupling seems to be preferable at this time. We can operate with a blanket around 1200 K and the SO/sub 3/ decomposer around 1050 K. This configuration offers double-barrier protection between Li-Na and the SO/sub 3/ process gases. Heat pipes offer an attractive alternate to provide an additional barrier, added modularity for increased reliability, and tritium concentration and isolation operations with very little thermal penalty.

  18. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youinou, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Veselka, H.; Salvatores, M.; Paul, M.; Pardo, R.; Palmiotti, G.; Palchan, T.; Nusair, O.; Nimmagadda, J.; Nair, C.; Murray, P.; Maddock, T.; Kondrashev, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Jones, W.; Imel, G.; Glass, C.; Fonnesbeck, J.; Berg, J.; Bauder, W.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an update of an on-going collaborative INL-ANL-ISU integral reactor physics experiment whose objective is to infer the effective neutron capture cross sections for most of the actinides of importance for reactor physics and fuel cycle studies in both fast and epithermal spectra. Some fission products are also being considered. The principle of the experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation together with the neutron fluence will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections in different neutron spectra.

  19. Biohydrogen production from Tequila vinasses in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor: effect of initial substrate concentration, temperature and hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Buitrn, Germn; Carvajal, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    The effect of the temperature (25 and 35 degrees C), the hydraulic retention time, HRT, (12 and 24 h) and initial substrate concentration on hydrogen production from Tequila vinasse was studied using a sequencing batch reactor. When 25 degrees C and 12-h HRT were applied, only insignificant biogas quantities were produced; however, using 24 h of HRT and temperatures of 25 and 35 degrees C, biogas containing hydrogen was produced. A maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate of 50.5 mL H(2) L(-1) h(-1) (48 mmol H(2) L(reactor)(-1) d(-1)) and an average hydrogen content in the biogas of 29.2+/-8.8% were obtained when the reactor was fed with 3 g COD L(-1), at 35 degrees C and 12-h HRT. Methane formation was observed when the longer HRT was applied. Results demonstrated the feasibility to produce hydrogen from this waste without a previous pre-treatment. PMID:20655747

  20. [Influences of hydraulic retention time on the ethanol type fermentation hydrogen production system in a hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ye; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yong-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on bio-hydrogen production and operational stability of ethanol-type fermentation was investigated in a hybrid anaerobic baffled reactor (HABR) using brown sugar as substrate. The results showed that five HRTs were examined, ranging from 8 to 36 h. At a HRT of 12 h, the highest hydrogen production rate was achieved [13.86 mmol x (h x L)(-1)], with a COD remove rate of 51.51%, and the pH value of five compartments was between 4.22-4.47. The ethanol and acetate were the predominant metabolites. The ratios of ethanol and acetic acid from the 1th compartment to the 5th compartment were 1.90, 1.94, 1.80, 1.77 and 1.91, respectively. The results demonstrated that the best energy production rate was 11.11 kJ x (h x L)(-1), occurred at a HRT of 12 h. PMID:25158527

  1. Radiological dose assessment for the decontaminated concrete removed from 183-H solar evaporation basins at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kamboj; E. Faillace; C. Yu

    1997-01-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates over a 1,000-year time horizon were calculated for exposure to the decontaminated concrete removed from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The RESRAD computer code, Version 5.62, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy`s manual for developing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation.

  2. Biofuels from Pyrolysis: Catalytic Biocrude Production in a Novel, Short-Contact Time Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: RTI is developing a new pyrolysis process to convert second-generation biomass into biofuels in one simple step. Pyrolysis is the decomposition of substances by heatingthe same process used to render wood into charcoal, caramelize sugar, and dry roast coffee and beans. RTIs catalytic biomass pyrolysis differs from conventional flash pyrolysis in that its end product contains less oxygen, metals, and nitrogenall of which contribute to corrosion, instability, and inefficiency in the fuel-production process. This technology is expected to easily integrate into the existing domestic petroleum refining infrastructure, making it an economically attractive option for biofuels production.

  3. Hydrogen production from banyan leaves using an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Jhang, Syu-Ruei; Yang, Po-Ming; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing

    2014-06-01

    Growth of the hydrogen market has motivated increased study of hydrogen production. Understanding how biomass is converted to hydrogen gas can help in evaluating opportunities for reducing the environmental impact of petroleum-based fuels. The microwave power used in the reaction is found to be proportional to the rate of production of hydrogen gas, mass of hydrogen gas produced per gram of banyan leaves consumed, and amount of hydrogen gas formed with respect to the H-atom content of banyan leaves decomposed. Increase the microwave power levels results in an increase of H2 and decrease of CO2 concentrations in the gaseous products. This finding may possibly be ascribed to the water-gas shift reaction. These results will help to expand our knowledge concerning banyan leaves and hydrogen yield on the basis of microwave-assisted pyrolysis, which will improve the design of hydrogen production technologies. PMID:24721492

  4. Trace Fission Product Ratios for Nuclear Forensics Attribution of Weapons-Grade Plutonium from Fast Breeder Reactor Blankets

    E-print Network

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2014-08-13

    to carry out this research work. The views and conclusions expressed in this thesis are not an official position of the funding agencies. iv NOMENCLATURE CANDU Canada Deuterium Uranium reactor CSR Control Safety Rod DF... Reactor PHWR Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor PuO2 Plutonium Dioxide PUREX Plutonium Uranium Recovery by Extraction v PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RB Radial Blanket RDD Radiological Dispersal Device UO2 Uranium...

  5. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao Wu

    2009-01-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to

  6. Health physics considerations in 131I production at a one megawatt TRIGA reactor

    E-print Network

    Flora, Jason Todd

    1993-01-01

    education and usefulness to society. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT DEDICATION. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . TABLE OF CONTENTS . LIST OF FIGURES. LIST OF TABLES . . . . . INTRODUCTION " 'I APPLICAT4OXS. PRODUCTION METHODS FOR " I, Uranium Fission. Tellurium... in quantities up to 74 GBq. "I in quantities of 3. 7 TBq and above often relied upon the fission of uranium as the method of production. Natural tellurium targets ranging in mass up to 300 grams have been used to produce "I (IAEAI28 1971). The use ofhighly...

  7. Development of a stirred tank reactor system for the production of lignin peroxidases (ligninases) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium BKM-F-1767

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick C. Michel Jr; Eric A. Grulke; C. Adinarayana Reddy

    1990-01-01

    Summary Lignin peroxidases produced byPhanerochaete chrysosporium have several important potential industrial applications based on their ability to degrade lignin and lignin-like compounds. A stirred tank reactor system for the production of lignin peroxidases is described here. Included in this study is an examination of the mechanics of pellet biocatalyst formation and the optimization of an acetate buffered medium. Higher levels

  8. The development of a mechanistic model to investigate the impacts of the light dynamics on algal productivity in a Hydraulically Integrated Serial Turbidostat Algal Reactor (HISTAR)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara C. Benson; Maria T. Gutierrez-Wing; Kelly A. Rusch

    2007-01-01

    A deterministic model was developed to predict microalgal productivity within the Hydraulically Integrated Serial Turbidostat Algal Reactor (HISTAR). HISTAR consists of two turbidostats, which concomitantly inoculate the first of a series of CFSTRs. The CFSTRs function as a biomass amplifier of the inoculated culture. The model included an analysis of the internal light dynamics within each CFSTR and the effect

  9. Continuous production of gibberellic acid in a fixed-bed reactor by immobilized mycelia of Gibberella fujikuroi in calcium alginate beads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jos Edmundo Nava Saucedo; Jean-Nol Barbotin; Daniel Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The continuous production of gibberellic acid with immobilized mycelia of Gibberella fujikuroi was maintained over a hundred days in a tubular fixed-bed reactor. Free mycelium at the beginning of the storage phase was harvested from G. fujikuroi shake-flask culture and was immobilized by ionotropic gelation in calcium alginate beads.

  10. Sludge stabilization at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to operate two laboratory-size muffle furnaces in glovebox HC-21C, located in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The muffle furnaces would be used to stabilize chemically reactive sludges that contain approximately 25 kilograms (55 pounds) of plutonium by heating to approximately 500 to 1000{degrees}C (900 to 1800{degrees}F). The resulting stable powder, mostly plutonium oxide with impurities, would be stored in the PFP vaults. The presence of chemically reactive plutonium-bearing sludges in the process gloveboxes poses a risk to workers from radiation exposure and limits the availability of storage space for future plant cleanup. Therefore, there is a need to stabilize the material into a form suitable for long-term storage. This proposed action would be an interim action, which would take place prior to completion of an Environmental Impact Statement for the PFP which would evaluate stabilization of all plutonium-bearing materials and cleanout of the facility. However, only 10 percent of the total quantity of plutonium in reactive materials is in the sludges, so this action will not limit the choice of reasonable alternatives or prejudice the Record of Decision of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Environmental Impact Statement.

  11. Inspection of surveillance equipment and activities at DOE Field Office, Richland

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The purpose of this inspection was to review surveillance activities by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Office, Richland (RL) and contractor employees at the RL Hanford site for efficiency and economy and compliance with laws and regulations. The scope included surveillance activities, procedures, training, types of surveillance equipment, and management controls over the equipment and activities. We also looked at Departmental policies and procedures regarding the equipment and activities. Allegations of illegal surveillance that came to our attention during the course of this inspection were referred to the Department of Justice. As part of our review, inspectors were on-site at RL from February 11, 1991, through March 1, 1991. Follow-up trips to RL were also made in April, May, and June 1991. We also conducted interviews at Albuquerque, Savannah River, and Germantown of former RL employees and RL contractors who were on travel. Officials from DOE's Office of General Counsel (OGC), Office of Security Affairs, and Office of Safeguards and Security (S S) were also interviewed regarding the Department's purchase and possession of wiretapping and eavesdropping devices. We obtained 75 signed sworn statements from 55 individuals during the course of the inspection. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. F. Knapp; A. L. Beets; S. Mirzadeh; C. W. Alexander; R. L. Hobbs

    1999-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation\\u000a in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.51015 neutrons\\/cm2\\/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety\\u000a of neutron-rich

  13. Large scale production of ?Cr for medical application in a medium flux research reactor: a comparative investigation of Szilard-Chalmers process and direct (n,?) route.

    PubMed

    Vimalnath, K V; Rajeswari, A; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2014-09-01

    The present article reports a systematic assessment on the reactor production of (51)Cr using the Szilard-Chalmers process as well as (50)Cr(n,?)(51)Cr routes. In an attempt to select the most convenient path to undertake large-scale production of (51)Cr, the effectiveness of both the production routes on the basis of target selection, irradiated target processing, yield and specific activity of (51)Cr, was evaluated. An optimized (50)Cr(n,?)(51)Cr production scheme offering (51)Cr of requisite purity is the positive outcome. PMID:24926944

  14. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  15. Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitt

    Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor Closed reactor Active Zone / Phase Te >> T dissociation, excitation etc. plasma wall interaction Passive Zone / Phase Te T recombination, relaxation etc. plasma wall interaction Feed gas Stable products A2 Ak Pel Pel Passive Zone

  16. Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems in a fixed-bed reactor for production of liquid bio-fuels.

    PubMed

    Aysu, Tevfik

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems was performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with and without catalyst at three different temperatures. The effects of pyrolysis parameters including temperature and catalyst on the product yields were investigated. It was found that higher temperature resulted in lower liquid (bio-oil) and solid (bio-char) yields and higher gas yields. Catalysts had different effects on product yields and composition of bio-oils. Liquid yields were increased in the presence of zinc chloride and alumina but decreased with calcium hydroxide, tincal and ulexite. The highest bio-oil yield (39.35%) by weight including aqueous phase was produced with alumina catalyst at 500C. The yields of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by elemental analysis, TGA, FT-IR and GC-MS. 160 different compounds were identified by GC-MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500C. PMID:26000835

  18. Efficient production of methane from artificial garbage waste by a cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor containing carbon fiber textiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A cylindrical bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) containing carbon fiber textiles (CFT; BER?+?CFT) has characteristics of bioelectrochemical and packed-bed systems. In this study, utility of a cylindrical BER?+?CFT for degradation of a garbage slurry and recovery of biogas was investigated by applying 10% dog food slurry. The working electrode potential was electrochemically regulated at ?0.8V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Stable methane production of 9.37L-CH4??L?1??day?1 and dichromate chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) removal of 62.5% were observed, even at a high organic loading rate (OLR) of 89.3g-CODcr??L?1??day?1. Given energy as methane (372.6kJ??L?1??day?1) was much higher than input electric energy to the working electrode (0.6kJ??L?1??day?1) at this OLR. Methanogens were highly retained in CFT by direct attachment to the cathodic working electrodes (52.3%; ratio of methanogens to prokaryotes), compared with the suspended fraction (31.2%), probably contributing to the acceleration of organic material degradation and removal of organic acids. These results provide insight into the application of cylindrical BER?+?CFT in efficient methane production from garbage waste including a high percentage of solid fraction. PMID:23497472

  19. Solar photocatalytic reactor performance for hydrogen production from incident ultraviolet radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Oralli; I. Dincer; G. F. Naterer

    2011-01-01

    Solar based hydrogen production is a promising alternative to methods based on fossil fuels, such as steam methane reforming (SMR) and coal gasification. A more economically viable way of producing hydrogen from water is under active investigation by many researchers, to convert solar energy to chemical energy with higher efficiency. In this paper, supramolecular complexes developed by Brewer (2006) for

  20. Gas Phase Production of Metal Oxide Nanowires Using a Microwave Plasma Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivekanand Kumar; Jeong H. Kim; Mahendra K. Sunkara

    Nanowires have attracted great interest because of their promise in a variety of applications such as electronics, optoelectronics, nano electro-mechanical devices and catalysis. Hence, the synthesis of bulk quantities of nanowires with controlled composition and high crystallinity is important. However, bulk production of nanowires has been a challenge using the techniques known so far. Over the last several years, our

  1. Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath.

  2. Biogas production from banana stem waste: optimisation of 10 l sequencing batch reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Zainol; J. Salihon; R. Abdul-Rahman

    2008-01-01

    The performance of biogas production using banana stem waste in anaerobic system was investigated. Mixed culture for this study was from banana plantation soil and acclimatized in anaerobic condition. The performance was tested under the conditions of various temperatures (26degC-40degC), organic loading rates (OLR) (0.4 g TS\\/l.d-2 gTS\\/l.d), and hydraulic retention times (HRT) (3 d-20 d). Conditions for temperature, OLR

  3. Biodiesel fuel production with solid superacid catalysis in fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Furuta; Hiromi Matsuhashi; Kazushi Arata

    2004-01-01

    Solid superacid catalysts of sulfated tin and zirconium oxides and tungstated zirconia are prepared and evaluated in the trans-esterification of soybean oil with methanol at 200300 C and the esterification of n-octanoic acid with methanol at 175200 C. Tungstated zirconiaalumina is a promising solid acid catalyst for the production of biodiesel fuels from soybean oil because of its high performance

  4. Alpha-galactosidase production and use in a hollow-fiber reactor.

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, K L; Hensley, D E; Gasdorf, H J

    1976-01-01

    Soybean milk serves as a base for a variety of beverages designed for consumption in developing countries. Soybean flour contains raffinose and stachyose considered to be responsible for flatulence often associated with these products (J.J. Rackis, D.H. Honig, D.J. Sessa, and F.R. Steggerda, 1970). alpha-Galactosidase, produced on wheat bran, hydrolyzes the galactooligosaccharides of soybean milk. PMID:944555

  5. Diffusion of gaseous products through a particle surface layer in a fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Daggupati; G. F. Naterer; K. S. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a solid conversion process during hydrolysis and decomposition of cupric chloride in a thermochemical copperchlorine (CuCl) cycle of hydrogen production. Reaction rate constants and the time required for complete solid conversion are determined by a shrinking-core model. Diffusion of gaseous reactant occurs through a film surrounding the particle, after which the reactant penetrates and diffuses through a

  6. Evaluation of biofilm reactor solid support for mixed-culture lactic acid production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Demirci; Anthony L. Pometto; Kenneth E. Johnson

    1993-01-01

    A combination of lactobacilli and biofilm-forming bacteria were evaluated in continuous fermentations for lactic acid production using various supports. Twelve different bacteria, including species of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Streptomyces, Thermoactinomyces, and Thermomonospora were tested for biofilm-forming capabilities. Solid supports that were evaluated in either batch or continuous fermentations were pea gravels, 3M-macrolite ceramic spheres, and polypropylene mixed with 25% of various

  7. Reconstruction of radial fission-product distributions in reactor fuels from a small number of projections

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, B.K.; Phillips, J.R.; Barnes, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Four mathematical techniques for reconstruction of the radial two-dimensional distribution of fission products using projections obtained by nondestructive gamma scanning were evaluated. Reconstruction of a picture from a finite set of projections is mathematically indeterminate; therefore, reconstruction techniques are heuristic, particularly when only a small number of projections are available. Of the techniques evaluated, the filtered backprojection algorithm provided the best reconstruction for simulated gamma-ray sources, as well as for actual irradiated fuel material.

  8. Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PTCA

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C.W.; Hobbs, R.L.

    1998-06-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

  9. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Production of microgram amounts of einsteinium 253 by irradiating californium in a reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Kulyukhin; L. N. Averman; N. B. Mikheev; V. L. Novichenko; I. A. Rumer

    1986-01-01

    ²⁵³Es has been made by irradiating 250 microg of ²⁵²Cf in a neutron flux of 5.10¹⁴ n\\/cm².sec for 500 h. The product, about 1 microg of einsteinium, was separated chromatographically on Aminex resin of particle size 20-25 microm. The eluent was ammonium alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate (0.14 mole\\/liter) at pH 4.95. The purification coefficient for Es from Cf was about 1.10⁵. More extensive

  11. Production of microgram amounts of einsteinium 253 by irradiating californium in a reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyukhin, S.A.; Averman, L.N.; Mikheev, N.B.; Novichenko, V.L.; Rumer, I.A.

    1986-07-01

    /sup 253/Es has been made by irradiating 250 microg of /sup 252/Cf in a neutron flux of 5.10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2/.sec for 500 h. The product, about 1 microg of einsteinium, was separated chromatographically on Aminex resin of particle size 20-25 microm. The eluent was ammonium alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate (0.14 mole/liter) at pH 4.95. The purification coefficient for Es from Cf was about 1.10/sup 5/. More extensive purification can be provided by repeating the process on another column with the same parameters.

  12. A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

    1995-10-01

    An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

  13. Pd based membrane reactor for ultra pure hydrogen production through the dry reforming of methane. Experimental and modeling studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Coronel; J. F. Mnera; E. A. Lombardo; L. M. Cornaglia

    2011-01-01

    A dense PdAg membrane reactor (MR) with 100% hydrogen selectivity packed with either Rh\\/La2O3 or Rh\\/La2O3SiO2 as catalysts was used to carry out the dry reforming of methane. The membrane reactor simulation was performed using a well-known reactor model. For this purpose, we employed the equations derived from complete kinetic studies of the dry reforming of methane reaction in connection

  14. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Kessel, C. E.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  15. Electrochemical enhancement of glucose oxidase kinetics : gluconic acid production with anion exchange membrane reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Hestekin, J.A.; Lin, Y. P.; Frank, J.; Snyder, S.; St. Martin, E.; Energy Systems

    2002-09-01

    Enzyme-catalysed reactions provide a means to perform many industrial processes because they enhance chemical reactions specifically and avoid the formation of by-products and the use of toxic organic solvents. Current enzyme applications range from laundry detergent supplements to the destruction of nerve gas agents. Although enzyme specificity is attractive there are also significant disadvantages to enzymatic catalysis. One of the principal disadvantages being relatively short lifetimes, ranging from a few hours to several days. However, literature has shown that by immobilizing an enzyme on a support matrix, the lifetime of the enzyme is increased since the rigidity of the support matrix helps prevent unfolding. Microfiltration membranes are often a good choice for enzyme attachment. The high surface area in the pores allows for enzyme attachment and reduction of mass transfer limitations.

  16. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  17. Simulation of Radioactive Corrosion Product in Primary Cooling System of Japanese Sodium-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Izumi, Yoshinobu

    Radioactive Corrosion Product (CP) is a main cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance with no breached fuel in fast breeder reactor (FBR) plants. The most important CP is 54Mn and 60Co. In order to establish techniques of radiation dose estimation for radiation workers in radiation-controlled areas of the FBR, the PSYCHE (Program SYstem for Corrosion Hazard Evaluation) code was developed. We add the Particle Model to the conventional PSYCHE analytical model. In this paper, we performed calculation of CP transfer in JOYO using an improved calculation code in which the Particle Model was added to the PSYCHE. The C/E (calculated / experimentally observed) value for CP deposition was improved through use of this improved PSYCHE incorporating the Particle Model. Moreover, among the percentage of total radioactive deposition accounted for by CP in particle form, 54Mn was estimated to constitute approximately 20 % and 60Co approximately 40 % in the cold-leg region. These calculation results are consistent with the measured results for the actual cold-leg piping in the JOYO.

  18. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space.

  20. Production of fissioning uranium plasma to approximate gas-core reactor conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.; Hohl, F.; Kim, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The intense burst of neutrons from the d-d reaction in a plasma-focus apparatus is exploited to produce a fissioning uranium plasma. The plasma-focus apparatus consists of a pair of coaxial electrodes and is energized by a 25 kJ capacitor bank. A 15-g rod of 93% enriched U-235 is placed in the end of the center electrode where an intense electron beam impinges during the plasma-focus formation. The resulting uranium plasma is heated to about 5 eV. Fission reactions are induced in the uranium plasma by neutrons from the d-d reaction which were moderated by the polyethylene walls. The fission yield is determined by evaluating the gamma peaks of I-134, Cs-138, and other fission products, and it is found that more than 1,000,000 fissions are induced in the uranium for each focus formation, with at least 1% of these occurring in the uranium plasma.

  1. Performance of a novel two-phase continuously fed leach bed reactor for demand-based biogas production from maize silage.

    PubMed

    Linke, Bernd; Rodrguez-Abalde, ngela; Jost, Carsten; Krieg, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the potential of producing biogas on demand from maize silage using a novel two-phase continuously fed leach bed reactor (LBR) which is connected to an anaerobic filter (AF). Six different feeding patterns, each for 1week, were studied at a weekly average of a volatile solids (VS) loading rate of 4.5 g L(-1) d(-1) and a temperature of 38C. Methane production from the LBR and AF responded directly proportional to the VS load from the different daily feeding and resulted in an increase up to 50-60% per day, compared to constant feeding each day. The feeding patterns had no impact on VS methane yield which corresponded on average to 330 L kg(-1). In spite of some daily shock loadings, carried out during the different feeding patterns study, the reactor performance was not affected. A robust and reliable biogas production from stalky biomass was demonstrated. PMID:25479391

  2. Enhancing biohydrogen production from chemical wastewater treatment in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) by bioaugmenting with selectively enriched kanamycin resistant anaerobic mixed consortia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Venkata Mohan; G. Mohanakrishna; S. Veer Raghavulu; P. N. Sarma

    2007-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of bioaugmentation strategy in the process of enhancing biohydrogen (H2) production from chemical wastewater treatment (organic loading rate (OLR)6.3kgCOD\\/m3-day) in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) operated at room temperature (282C) under acidophilic microenvironment (pH 6) with a total cycle period of 24h. Parent augmented inoculum (kanamycin resistant) was

  3. Numerical Simulation of Sodium-Water Reaction Products Transport in Steam Generator of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor on Small Water\\/Steam Leak

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riqiang DUAN; Zhou WANG; Xianyong YANG; Rui LUO

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional model of sodium-water reaction product transport in steam generators with a small water\\/steam leak. The model is used to study the effects of thermodynamic parameters of steam generators of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) on the leak response of a small water leak detection system and to optimize the leak detection system design. A

  4. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    The scope of the work reported here, which is the computational study of graphite wear behavior, supports the Nuclear Engineering University Programs project "Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermomechanics Issues for Design and Safety" funded by the US Department of Energy. In this work, modeling and simulating the contact mechanics, as anticipated in a PBR configuration, is carried out for the purpose of assessing the amount of dust generated during a full power operation year of a PBR. A methodology that encompasses finite element analysis (FEA) and micromechanics of wear is developed to address the issue of dust production and its quantification. Particularly, the phenomenon of wear and change of its rate with sliding length is the main focus of this dissertation. This work studies the wear properties of graphite by simulating pebble motion and interactions of a specific type of nuclear grade graphite, IG-11. This study consists of two perspectives: macroscale stress analysis and microscale analysis of wear mechanisms. The first is a set of FEA simulations considering pebble-pebble frictional contact. In these simulations, the mass of generated graphite particulates due to frictional contact is calculated by incorporating FEA results into Archard's equation, which is a linear correlation between wear mass and wear length. However, the experimental data by Johnson, University of Idaho, revealed that the wear rate of graphite decreases with sliding length. This is because the surfaces of the graphite pebbles become smoother over time, which results in a gradual decrease in wear rate. In order to address the change in wear rate, a more detailed analysis of wear mechanisms at room temperature is presented. In this microscale study, the wear behavior of graphite at the asperity level is studied by simulating the contact between asperities of facing surfaces. By introducing the effect of asperity removal on wear rate, a nonlinear wear rate is obtained. The nonlinear wear law proposed in this study serves as a model to predict the effect of changing surface topology on the wear behavior of graphite. This tribological model is valid for applications where mass removal is in the form of powder formation rather than flake or chip formation. Dust explosion tests performed by Poulsen, University of Idaho, under the same project, have revealed that the smallest amount of graphite dust mass that can lead to explosions is three orders of magnitudes larger than the maximum amount predicted to be generated in the present work. Therefore, it is concluded that pebble-pebble frictional contact is not a plausible source of dust generation and subsequent explosion hazard under normal operating conditions or even accident scenarios. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Back propagation neural network modelling of biodegradation and fermentative biohydrogen production using distillery wastewater in a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, K; Sivaraman, E; Mullai, P

    2014-08-01

    In a hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactor, biodegradation in association with biohydrogen production was studied using distillery wastewater as substrate. The experiments were carried out at ambient temperature (341C) and acidophilic pH of 6.5 with constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24h at various organic loading rates (OLRs) (1-10.2kgCODm(-3)d(-1)) in continuous mode. A maximum hydrogen production rate of 1300mLd(-1) was achieved. A back propagation neural network (BPNN) model with network topology of 4-20-1 using Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm was developed and validated. A total of 231 data points were studied to examine the performance of the HUASB reactor in acclimatisation and operation phase. The statistical qualities of BPNN models were significant due to the high correlation coefficient, R(2), and lower mean absolute error (MAE) between experimental and simulated data. From the results, it was concluded that BPNN modelling could be applied in HUASB reactor for predicting the biodegradation and biohydrogen production using distillery wastewater. PMID:24746339

  6. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell grade hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming: A comparative multiple reactor modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Nisha; Kumar, Shashi; Kumar, Surendra

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of a fuel processor based on methanol steam reforming has been carried out to produce fuel cell grade H2. Six reactor configurations namely FBR1 (fixed bed reactor), MR1 (H2 selective membrane reactor with one reaction tube), MR2 (H2 selective membrane reactor with two reaction tubes), FBR2 (FBR1 + preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactor), MR3 (MR1 + PROX), and MR4 (MR2 + PROX) are evaluated by simulation to identify the suitable processing scheme. The yield of H2 is significantly affected by H2 selective membrane, residence time, temperature, and pressure conditions at complete methanol conversion. The enhancement in residence time in MR2 by using two identical reaction tubes provides H2 yield of 2.96 with 91.25 mol% recovery at steam/methanol ratio of 1.5, pressure of 2 bar and 560 K temperature. The exit retentate gases from MR2 are further treated in PROX reactor of MR4 to reduce CO concentration to 4.1 ppm to ensure the safe discharge to the environment. The risk of carbon deposition on reforming catalyst is highly reduced in MR4, and MR4 reactor configuration generates 7.4 NL min-1 of CO free H2 from 0.12 mol min-1 of methanol which can provide 470 W PEMFC feedstock requirement. Hence, process scheme in MR4 provides a compact and innovative fuel cell grade H2 generating unit.

  7. Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hobbs, Randy W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

  8. Ethanol Production from Rice-Straw Hydrolysate Using Zymomonas Mobilis in a Continuous Fluidized-Bed Reactor (FBR)

    SciTech Connect

    deJesus, D.; Nghiem, N.P.

    2001-01-01

    Rice-straw hydrolysate obtained by the Arkenol's concentrated acid hydrolysis process was fermented to ethanol using a recombinant Zymomonas mobilis strain capable of utilizing both glucose and xylose in a continuous fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). The parameters studied included biocatalyst stability with and without antibiotic, feed composition, and retention time. Xylose utilization in the presence of tetracycline remained stable for at least 17 days. This was a significant improvement over the old strain, Z. mobilis CP4 (pZB5), which started to lose xylose utilization capability after seven days. In the absence of tetracycline, the xylose utilization rate started to decrease almost immediately. With tetracycline in the feed for the first six days, stability of xylose utilization was maintained for four days after the antibiotic was removed from the feed. The xylose utilization rate started to decrease on day 11. In the presence of tetracycline using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 48 g/L glucose and 13 g/L xylose at a retention time of 4.5 h, 95% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion occurred. The ethanol concentration was 29 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.48 g/g sugar consumed or 94% of the theoretical yield. Using the Arkenol's hydrolysate diluted to 83 g/L glucose and 28 g/L xylose, 92% xylose conversion and complete glucose conversion were obtained. The ethanol concentration was 48 g/L, which gave a yield of 0.45 g/ g sugar consumed or 88% of the theoretical yield. Maximum productivity of 25.5 g/L-h was obtained at a retention time of 1.9 h. In this case, 84% xylose conversion was obtained.

  9. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view. These evaluations also determined which configurations and options do not appear to be feasible at the current time.

  10. In situ response of bay productivity to nutrient loading from a small tributary: The Delaware Bay-Murderkill Estuary tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voynova, Yoana G.; Lebaron, Karine C.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Ullman, William J.

    2015-07-01

    A small, turbid and nutrient-rich tributary, the Murderkill Estuary, and a large estuarine ecosystem, the Delaware Bay, are tightly linked and form an efficient, tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor during the summer. Nitrate loading from the Murderkill Estuary generates an instantaneous increase in biological oxygen production in the adjacent Delaware Bay. We are able to capture this primary production response with continuous hourly measurements of dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and nitrate. The nitrate influxes from the Murderkill support primary production rates in the Delaware Bay margins that are twice as high as the average production rates measured in the central Bay regions. This elevates chlorophyll in the Bay margins in the summer and fuels metabolism. Tidal transport of the newly produced autochthonous chlorophyll particles from the Bay into the Estuary could also provide a source of labile material to the marshes surrounding the Murderkill, thus perhaps fueling marsh respiration. As a consequence of the tidal coupling between Delaware Bay and the Murderkill Estuary, ecosystem productivity and metabolism in the Bay and Estuary are linked, generating an ecosystem feedback mechanism. Storms modulate this tidally-coupled biogeochemical reactor, by generating significant nitrate and salinity changes. Depending on their magnitude and duration, storms induce large phytoplankton blooms in the Delaware Bay. Such large phytoplankton blooms may occur more often with climate change, since century-long discharge records document an increase in storm frequency.

  11. High organic loading rate on thermophilic hydrogen production and metagenomic study at an anaerobic packed-bed reactor treating a residual liquid stream of a Brazilian biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ferraz Jnior, Antnio Djalma Nunes; Etchebehere, Claudia; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a high organic loading rate (OLR) on thermophilic hydrogen production at an up-flow anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) treating a residual liquid stream of a Brazilian biorefinery. The APBR, filled with low-density polyethylene, was operated at an OLR of 84.2kg-CODm(-3)d(-1). This value was determined in a previous study. The maximum values of hydrogen production and yield were 5,252.6mL-H2d(-1) and 3.7mol-H2mol(-1)total carbohydrates, respectively. However, whereas the OLR remained constant, the specific organic load rate (sOLR) decreased throughout operation from 1.38 to 0.72g-Total carbohydratesg-VS(-1)h(-1), this decrease negatively affected hydrogen production. A sOLR of 0.98g-Total carbohydratesg-VS(-1)h(-1) was optimal for hydrogen production. The microbial community was studied using 454-pyrosequencing analysis. Organisms belonging to the genera Caloramator, Clostridium, Megasphaera, Oxobacter, Thermoanaerobacterium, and Thermohydrogenium were detected in samples taken from the reactor at operation days 30 and 60, suggesting that these organisms contribute to hydrogen production. PMID:25812810

  12. Design modification for the modular helium reactor for higher temperature operation and reliability studies for nuclear hydrogen production processes

    E-print Network

    Reza, S.M. Mohsin

    2009-05-15

    Design options have been evaluated for the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) for higher temperature operation. An alternative configuration for the MHR coolant inlet flow path is developed to reduce the peak vessel temperature (PVT). The coolant inlet...

  13. Design modification for the modular helium reactor for higher temperature operation and reliability studies for nuclear hydrogen production processes

    E-print Network

    Reza, S.M. Mohsin

    2009-05-15

    Design options have been evaluated for the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) for higher temperature operation. An alternative configuration for the MHR coolant inlet flow path is developed to reduce the peak vessel temperature (PVT). The coolant inlet...

  14. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  15. In-situ production of ozone and ultraviolet light using a barrier discharge reactor for wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Oh Jo; Y. S. Mok

    2009-01-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor consisting of water-filled dielectric tube electrodes was used for the treatment\\u000a of wastewater. The inner dielectric tube, which acted as the discharging electrode, was filled with an aqueous electrolyte\\u000a solution. The outer dielectric tube, which served as the other electrode, was in contact with the wastewater, which was grounded.\\u000a The present reactor system was

  16. Co-gasification of different rank coals with biomass and petroleum coke in a high-pressure reactor for H(2)-rich gas production.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, J; Arias, B; Gil, M V; Plaza, M G; Pevida, C; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F

    2010-05-01

    Four coals of different rank were gasified, using a steam/oxygen mixture as gasifying agent, at atmospheric and elevated pressure in a fixed bed reactor fitted with a solids feeding system in continuous mode. Independently of coal rank, an increase in gasification pressure led to a decrease in H(2) + CO production and carbon conversion. Gasification of the different rank coals revealed that the higher the carbon content and reactivity, the greater the hydrogen production. Co-gasification experiments of binary (coal-biomass) and ternary blends (coal-petcoke-biomass) were conducted at high pressure to study possible synergetic effects. Interactions between the blend components were found to modify the gas production. An improvement in hydrogen production and cold gas efficiency was achieved when the coal was gasified with biomass. PMID:20061144

  17. Studies of Smallmouth Black Bass (Micropterus Dolomieu) in the Columbia River near Richland, Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Croswell Henderson; Richard F. Foster

    1957-01-01

    Observations on smallmouth black bass, Micropterus dolomieu, of the Columbia River were possible because of a transplantation program undertaken by local sportsmen and because of studies made by the U. S. Public Health Service and the General Electric Company to evaluate effects of the radioactive effluent from the Hanford reactors. The average bass caught with sport-fishing gear was 15 1\\/2

  18. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Haselow; V. Price; D. E. Stephenson; H. W. Bledsoe; B. B. Looney

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All

  19. Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina)

    E-print Network

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina) Sandia of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being

  20. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-11-08

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of the Use a Chemical Heat Pump to Link a Supercritical Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactor and a Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved steam parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625C and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the nuclear heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted of the combined system comprising a SCW nuclear power generation plant and a chemical heat pump, which provides high-temperature heat to a thermochemical water splitting cycle for hydrogen production. It is concluded that the proposed chemical heat pump permits the utilization efficiency of nuclear energy to be improved by at least 2% without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety. Based on this analysis, further research appears to be merited on the proposed advanced design of a nuclear power generation plant combined with a chemical heat pump, and implementation in appropriate applications seems worthwhile.

  2. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the 192Os(p,n)192Ir reaction: Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide 192Ir.

    PubMed

    Hilgers, K; Sudr, S; Qaim, S M

    2005-07-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide (192)Ir (T(1/2)=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction (192)Os(p,n)(192)Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20 MeV. Thin samples of enriched (192)Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of (192)Ir over the energy range E(p)=16-->8 MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/muA.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of (192)Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product. PMID:15866453

  3. Pyrolysis of high-ash sewage sludge in a circulating fluidized bed reactor for production of liquids rich in heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wu; Jin, Baosheng; Huang, Yaji; Sun, Yu; Li, Rui; Jia, Jiqiang

    2013-01-01

    A circulating fluidized bed reactor was used for pyrolyzing sewage sludge with a high ash content to produce liquids rich in heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds. GC/MS and FTIR analyses showed that heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds and hydrocarbons made up 38.5-61.21% and 2.24-17.48% of the pyrolysis liquids, respectively. A fluidized gas velocity of 1.13 m/s, a sludge feed rate of 10.78 kg/h and a particle size of 1-2mm promoted heterocyclic nitrogenated compound production. Utilizing heterocyclic nitrogenated compounds as chemical feedstock could be a way for offsetting the cost of sewage sludge treatment. PMID:23131621

  4. Fast-Mixed Spectrum Reactor progress report. Results of the FMSR Benchmark calculations and an assessment of current fission product libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Durston, C.; Atefi, B.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1980-06-01

    As part of the Initial Feasibility Study of the Fast Mixed Spectrum Reactor, a series of benchmark calculations were made to determine the sensitivity of the physics analysis to differences in methods and data. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were invited to participate with Brookhaven National Laboratory in the analysis of a FMSR model prescribed by BNL. Detailed comparisons are made including a comprehensive study on the adequacy of the fission product treatments.

  5. Production test IP278-A: Verification of BPA loss bulk temperature surge at the DE-Reactor. Supplement A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1960-01-01

    This report details planning to run a second outage test at the DR-Reactor using the same instrumentation and procedure as an earlier test but increasing the trip-out level from 800 MW up to a maximum of 1200 MW.

  6. Fission-product yield data from the US\\/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. K. Dickens; S. Raman

    1986-01-01

    The United States and the United Kingdom have been engaged in a joint research program in which samples of fissile and fertile actinides have been incorporated in fuel pins and irradiated in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor in Scotland. The purpose of this portion of the program is to study both the materials behavior and the nuclear physics results -

  7. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  8. Production of exopolysaccharides by submerged culture of an enthomopathogenic fungus, Paecilomyces tenuipes C240 in stirred-tank and airlift reactors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun Ping; Kim, Sang Woo; Hwang, Hye Jin; Yun, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of shearing effect on the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) from an enthomopathogenic fungus, Paecilomyces tenuipes C240 in a stirred-tank reactor (STR) and in an airlift reactor (AR). The optimal agitation rate for the production of EPS in the STR was 150 rpm with the mycelial morphology of hairy pellets, where the final concentration and the specific production rate of EPS were 2.33 g l(-1) and 0.312 gg(-1) h(-1), respectively. However, the maximum concentration of biomass (21.06 g l(-1)) in the STR was obtained at a high agitation speed of 300 rpm. The specific production rate of EPS (0.456 gg(-1) h(-1)) in the AR was significantly higher than that achieved in the STR, in which the typical morphological form of mycelium was a loose clump. The three EPS groups in the STR (designated as STR-I, -II, and -III) and two groups of EPS in the AR (designated as AR-I and -II) were obtained from the culture filtrates by a gel filtration chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B. The molecular weights of STR-I, STR-II, STR-III, AR-I, and AR-II were determined to be 1,820, 25, 1.8, 1,160, and 6.7 kDa, respectively. An agitation rate of 150 rpm in the STR was selected as the optimal culture condition for maximum EPS production (2.33 g l(-1)), which was similar to the level achieved in the AR (2.30 g l(-1)). The carbohydrate composition in each EPS was quite different from each other: the major component was glucose (in STR-I, -III, and AR-I), mannose (in STR-II), and arabinose (in AR-II). In contrast, no significant difference in amino acid composition was observed. PMID:15951166

  9. Hydrogen production for PEM fuel cell by gas phase reforming of glycerol as byproduct of bio-diesel. The use of a PdAg membrane reactor at middle reaction temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Iulianelli; P. K. Seelam; S. Liguori; T. Longo; R. Keiski; V. Calabr; A. Basile

    2011-01-01

    Glycerol as a byproduct of biodiesel production represents a renewable energy source. In particular, glycerol can be used in the field of hydrogen production via gas phase reforming for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. In this work, glycerol steam reforming (GSR) reaction was investigated using a dense palladiumsilver membrane reactor (MR) in order to produce pure (or at

  10. Abiotic Controls on H2 Production from Basalt-Water Reactions and

    E-print Network

    Selker, John

    Abiotic Controls on H2 Production from Basalt-Water Reactions and Implications for Aquifer Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 Abiotic production of H2 from basalt reactions, such as those found in the Columbia River Basalt group (CRB). We investigated factors controlling

  11. Multi-Site Capacity, Production and Distribution Planning with Reactor Modifications: MILP Model, Bi-level Decomposition

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    planning for a multi-site system including a number of production sites and markets. Multiple products for instance through changes in piping, and addition of side arm heat exchangers, overhead condensers products varies greatly and can shift over time. Shipping costs from a production site to a customer region

  12. Existing reactor expansion study basis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heacock

    1959-01-01

    The latest HAPO Five Year Program review, HW-59633, forecasts substantial increases in Pu production from the eight existing Hanford reactors over the next several years. These production increases would be attained by a combination of several methods which include increased reactor power levels resulting from higher process water flow rates and coolant bulk outlet temperatures, improved time operated efficiency, higher

  13. Existing reactor expansion study basis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heacock

    1959-01-01

    The latest HAPO Five Year Program review, indicates that significant increases in Pu production from the eight existing Hanford reactors may be achieved. These production increases would be attained by a combination of several methods including increased process water flow rates, reactor coolant outlet temperature, improved time operated efficiency, conversion ratio and induced transient reactivity looses. In order to provide

  14. Novel microfibrous composite bed reactor: high efficiency H2 production from NH3 with potential for portable fuel cell power supplies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ye; Xue, Qingsong; Chen, Li; He, Mingyuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel microfibrous composite bed reactor was developed and was demonstrated for high efficiency hydrogen production by the decomposition of ammonia at moderate temperatures in portable fuel cell power system applications. By using a high-speed and low-cost papermaking technology combined with a subsequent sintering process, sinter-locked three-dimensional microfibrous networks consisting of approximately 3 vol% 8 microm (dia.) nickel microfibers were utilized to entrap approximately 35 vol% 100-200 microm dia. porous Al(2)O(3) support particulates. A CeO(2) promoter and active Ni component were then dispersed onto the pore surface of the entrapped Al(2)O(3) support particulates by a stepwise incipient wetness impregnation method. The microfibrous structure took advantage of a large void volume, entirely open structure, high heat/mass transfer, high permeability, good thermal stability, and unique form factors. Addition of ceria significantly promoted the low-temperature activity of Ni/Al(2)O(3) catalyst particulates incorporated into the micorfibrous structure. The use of fine particles of catalyst significantly attenuated the intraparticle mass transport limitations. As a result, the present novel microfibrous composite bed reactor provided excellent activity and structure stability in ammonia decomposition, as well as low pressure drop and high efficiency reactor design. At a 90% conversion of a 145 sccm ammonia feed rate, the microfibrous entrapped Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst composite bed could provide a 4-fold reduction of catalytic bed volume and a 5-fold reduction of catalytic bed weight (or 9-fold reduction of catalyst dosage), while leading to a reduction of reaction temperature of 100 degrees C, compared to a packed bed with 2 mm dia. Ni/CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) catalyst pellets. This composite bed was capable of producing roughly 22 W of hydrogen power, with an ammonia conversion of 99% at 600 degrees C in a bed volume of 0.5 cm(3) throughout a 100 h continuous test. These initial and promising results established that the microfibrous nickel-based catalyst composites were effective for high efficiency production of hydrogen by ammonia decomposition, while achieving a significant reduction of overall catalytic bed weight and volume. We anticipate our assay to be a new point for small-scale hydrogen production, where the microfibrous catalytic reactors considered in isolation can satisfy several of the most fundamental criteria needed for useful operation. PMID:17180216

  15. Coenzyme Q(10) production by immobilized Sphingomonas sp. ZUTE03 via a conversion-extraction coupled process in a three-phase fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lequan; Ding, Hanbing; Wang, Weijian; Kong, Zhuoyi; Li, Xuanzhen; Shi, Yuping; Zhong, Weihong

    2012-02-10

    A three-phase fluidized bed reactor (TPFBR) was designed to evaluate the potential of CoQ(10) production by gel-entrapped Sphingomonas sp. ZUTE03 via a conversion-extract coupled process. In the reactor, the CoQ(10) yield reached 46.99 mg/L after 8 h of conversion; a high-level yield of about 45 mg/L was maintained even after 15 repetitions (8 h/batch). To fully utilize the residual precursor (para-hydroxybenzoic acid, PHB) in the aqueous phase, the organic phase was replaced with new solution containing 70 mg/L solanesol for each 8 h batch. The CoQ(10) yield of each batch was maintained at a level of about 43 mg/L until the PHB ran out. When solid solanesol was fed to the organic phase for every 8 h batch, CoQ(10) could accumulate and reach a yield of 171.52 mg/L. When solid solanesol and PHB were fed to the conversion system after every 8 h batch, the CoQ(10) yield reached 441.65 mg/L in the organic phase after 20 repetitions, suggesting that the conversion-extract coupled process could enhance CoQ(10) production in the TPFBR. PMID:22226200

  16. A kinetic model for fission-product release and fuel oxidation behaviour for Zircaloy-clad fuel elements under reactor accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Cox, D. S.; Iglesias, F. C.

    1993-12-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the release behaviour of fission product cesium from uranium dioxide fuel during severe reactor accident conditions. The present methodology is based on the results of out-of-pile annealing experiments with irradiated fuel (bare and Zircaloy-clad fuel specimens), subjected to a steam atmosphere at high temperature (1200 to 1700C). In the present framework, the fuel oxidation kinetics is detailed by a surface exchange reaction at the fuel/steam interface. The dependence of the fission product release kinetics on the state of fuel oxidation is treated. This analysis also considers the inhibiting influence of hydrogen, produced as a result of the Zircaloy-steam reaction, on the oxygen potential of the steam environment.

  17. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code and Tritium Transport in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with Hydrogen Production System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2010-06-01

    Abstract A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) was developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in very high temperature reactor (VHTR) systems, including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used in developing the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and various forms of hydrogen coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sinks, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, and 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems, including high temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine processes.

  18. Production of alkaline serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg by Bacillus licheniformis on complex medium in a stirred tank reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe Hiibner; Ulrich Bock; Karl Schiigerl

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis (DSM 641) was cultivated on complex medium in batch and fed-batch operations in a 20-l working volume stirred tank reactor. The medium composition (maltose, glucose, sucrose, fructose, ammonia, phosphate) and O2 and CO2 in the off-gas were monitored on-line; pH, pO2, turbidity, culture fluorescence were monitored in situ; optical density, concentrations of sugars, amino acids, phosphate, proteins, DNA,

  19. Analysis of production reactor response during a postulated Loss-of-River Water event using CONTAIN/SR

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kula, K.R.; Wooten, L.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jenkins, T.B. (Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the CONTAIN/SR computer code, developed at the Savannah River Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) applications, which is used to analyze K Reactor plant conditions following a design basis earthquake to assist post-accident recovery planning. The postulated event, a Loss-of-River Water (LORW) accident, requires analysis of the K Reactor confinement system assuming seismic event-caused loss of forced air flow through Radiologically Controlled (RCAs) and other building areas, including adjoining personnel and auxiliary equipment zones. The CONTAIN/SR code calculations predict the expected environment in the K Reactor building with a seismically-qualified flow path for natural circulation, under design basis conditions specifying a 50 gal/min leak of tritiated heavy water. Despite loss of active fan flow, preferential air flow patterns are calculated to flow from clean'' areas towards the RCAs. Ventilation characteristics of the building reduce tritiated water vapor concentrations to habitable levels, assuming plastic suits and clean breathing air supplies are available. Unprotected dose rates to recovery workers in the heat exchanger zone of the building will range from 120 mrem/hour to 780 mrem/hour, depending on evaporation conditions near spilled heavy-water pools. It is concluded habitability issues for recovery are not driven by temperature concerns in reactor building zones. However, the results indicate radiological suits with cool air supplies will assure adequate conditions for operators and recovery teams, and mitigate tritium uptake hazards from splashing or other direct contact mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of production reactor response during a postulated Loss-of-River Water event using CONTAIN/SR

    SciTech Connect

    O`Kula, K.R.; Wooten, L.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jenkins, T.B. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the CONTAIN/SR computer code, developed at the Savannah River Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) applications, which is used to analyze K Reactor plant conditions following a design basis earthquake to assist post-accident recovery planning. The postulated event, a Loss-of-River Water (LORW) accident, requires analysis of the K Reactor confinement system assuming seismic event-caused loss of forced air flow through Radiologically Controlled (RCAs) and other building areas, including adjoining personnel and auxiliary equipment zones. The CONTAIN/SR code calculations predict the expected environment in the K Reactor building with a seismically-qualified flow path for natural circulation, under design basis conditions specifying a 50 gal/min leak of tritiated heavy water. Despite loss of active fan flow, preferential air flow patterns are calculated to flow from ``clean`` areas towards the RCAs. Ventilation characteristics of the building reduce tritiated water vapor concentrations to habitable levels, assuming plastic suits and clean breathing air supplies are available. Unprotected dose rates to recovery workers in the heat exchanger zone of the building will range from 120 mrem/hour to 780 mrem/hour, depending on evaporation conditions near spilled heavy-water pools. It is concluded habitability issues for recovery are not driven by temperature concerns in reactor building zones. However, the results indicate radiological suits with cool air supplies will assure adequate conditions for operators and recovery teams, and mitigate tritium uptake hazards from splashing or other direct contact mechanisms.

  1. Ethylene production by ODHE in catalytically modified Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-?) membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Lobera, M Pilar; Escolstico, Sonia; Garcia-Fayos, Julio; Serra, Jos M

    2012-08-01

    Process intensification by the integration of membranes and high-temperature reactors offers several advantages with regard to conventional process schemes, that is, energy saving, safe operation, reduced plant/unit size, and higher process performance, for example, higher productivity, catalytic activity, selectivity, or stability. We present the study of oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at 850 C on a catalytic membrane reactor based on a mixed ionic-electronic conducting membrane. The surface of the membrane made of Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-?) has been activated by using different porous catalytic layers based on perovskites. The layer was deposited by screen printing, and the porosity and thickness was studied for the catalyst composition. The different catalyst formulations are based on partial substitution of A- and B-site atoms of doped strontium ferrite/cobaltites (A(0.6)Sr(0.4)Co(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(3-?) and Ba(0.6)Sr(0.4)BO(3-?)) and were synthesized by an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-citrate complexation route. The use of a disk-shaped membrane in the reactor enabled the direct contact of gaseous oxygen and hydrocarbons to be avoided, and thus, the ethylene content increased. High ethylene yields (up to ?81 %) were obtained by using a catalytic coating based on Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-?), which included macropores produced by the addition of graphite platelets into the screen-printing ink. The promising catalytic results obtained with this catalytically modified membrane reactor are attributed to the combination of 1) the high activity, as a result of the high temperature and oxygen species diffusing through the membrane; 2) the control of oxygen dosing and the low concentration of molecules in the gas phase; and 3) suitable fluid dynamics, which enables appropriate feed contact with the membrane and the rapid removal of products. PMID:22791570

  2. Influence of the cycle length on the production of PHA and polyglucose from glycerol by bacterial enrichments in sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Grate, Helena; Palmeiro-Snchez, Tania; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, Jos Luis; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-12-01

    PHA, a naturally occurring biopolymer produced by a wide range of microorganisms, is known for its applications as bioplastic. In recent years the use of agro-industrial wastewater as substrate for PHA production by bacterial enrichments has attracted considerable research attention. Crude glycerol as generated during biodiesel production is a waste stream that due to its high organic matter content and low price could be an interesting substrate for PHA production. Previously we have demonstrated that when glycerol is used as substrate in a feast-famine regime, PHA and polyglucose are simultaneously produced as storage polymers. The work described in this paper aimed at understanding the effect of the cycle length on the bacterial enrichment process with emphasis on the distribution of glycerol towards PHA and polyglucose. Two sequencing batch reactors where operated with the same hydraulic and biomass retention time. A short cycle length (6 h) favored polyglucose production over PHA, whereas at long cycle length (24 h) PHA was more favored. In both communities the same microorganism appeared dominating, suggesting a metabolic rather than a microbial competition response. Moreover, the presence of ammonium during polymer accumulation did not influence the maximum amount of PHA that was attained. PMID:23835920

  3. Conversion of Molybdenum-99 production process to low enriched uranium: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of HEU and LEU target plates for irradiation in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab; Muhammad, Atta

    2012-09-01

    Technetium-99m, the daughter product of Molybdenum-99 is the most widely needed radionuclide for diagnostic studies in Pakistan. Molybdenum-99 Production Facility has been established at PINSTECH. Highly enriched uranium (93% 235U) U/Al alloy targets have been irradiated in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for the generation of fission Mo-99, while basic dissolution technique is used for separation of Mo-99 from target matrix activity. In line with the international objective of minimizing and eventually eliminating the use of HEU in civil commerce, national and international efforts have been underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from HEU to LEU (LEU; <20% 235U enrichment) targets. To achieve the equivalent amount of 99Mo with LEU targets, approximately 5 times uranium is needed. LEU aluminum uranium dispersion target has been developed, which may replace existing HEU aluminum/uranium alloy targets for production of 99Mo using basic dissolution technique. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations were performed for safe irradiation of targets in the core of PARR-1.

  4. H2 production from simulated coal syngas containing H2S in multi-tubular Pd and 80 wt% Pd-20 wt% Cu membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Howard, B.H.; Ciocco, M.V.; Morreale, B.

    2007-12-01

    99.7% conversion of CO in a simulated syngas feed containing 53% CO, 35% H2 and 12% CO2 was achieved via the watergas shift (WGS) reaction in a counter-current Pd multi-tube membrane reactor (MR) at 1173 K and 2 s residence time. This conversion is significantly greater than the 32% equilibrium conversion associated with a conventional (non-membrane) reactor primarily due to the high rate of H2 extraction from the reaction zone through the Pd membranes at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, nearly complete H2 recovery was attained in the permeate, resulting in the simultaneous production of a high-pressure CO2 (>99%) retentate stream after condensation of the steam. When Pd80 wt%Cu tubes were used in the reactor, a significantly lower CO conversion of 68% was attained at comparable residence times, probably due to the lower H2 permeance of the alloy. When H2S was added to the syngas feed and the H2S-to-H2 ratio was maintained below the threshold required for thermodynamically stable sulfides to form, the Pd and Pd80 wt%Cu MRs retained their mechanical integrity and H2 selectivity, but a precipitous drop in CO conversion was observed due to deactivation of the catalytic surface. The Pd and Pd80 wt%Cu MRs were observed to fail within minutes after increasing the H2S-to-H2 ratio to levels above that expected for thermodynamically stable sulfides to form, as evidenced by rupturing of the membrane tubes. SEMEDS analyses of the membranes suggested that at high H2S-to-H2 ratios, the H2S compromised the mechanical integrity of the MRs by preferentially attacking the grain boundary region.

  5. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  6. Carbon-coated ceramic membrane reactor for the production of hydrogen by aqueous-phase reforming of sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Neira D'Angelo, M F; Ordomsky, V; Schouten, J C; van der Schaaf, J; Nijhuis, T A

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen was produced by aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of sorbitol in a carbon-on-alumina tubular membrane reactor (4 nm pore size, 7 cm long, 3 mm internal diameter) that allows the hydrogen gas to permeate to the shell side, whereas the liquid remains in the tube side. The hydrophobic nature of the membrane serves to avoid water loss and to minimize the interaction between the ceramic support and water, thus reducing the risks of membrane degradation upon operation. The permeation of hydrogen is dominated by the diffusivity of the hydrogen in water. Thus, higher operation temperatures result in an increase of the flux of hydrogen. The differential pressure has a negative effect on the flux of hydrogen due to the presence of liquid in the larger pores. The membrane was suitable for use in APR, and yielded 2.5 times more hydrogen than a reference reactor (with no membrane). Removal of hydrogen through the membrane assists in the reaction by preventing its consumption in undesired reactions. PMID:24989121

  7. ANALYSIS OF SEPCTRUM CHOICES FOR SMALL MODULAR REACTORS-PERFORMANCE AND DEVELOPMENT

    E-print Network

    Kafle, Nischal

    2011-04-26

    and for keeping me motivated. v NOMENCLATURE BWR Boiling Water Reactor FP Fission Products LWR Light Water Reactor IRIS International Reactor Innovative and Secure MA Minor actinides MHR Modular High Temperature Reactor MWe Megawatt Electric 239Pu... ........................................................................................... 30 vii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 The reactor schematic of International reactor innovative and secure (IRIS) ........ 4 2 The reactor schematic of Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) ............................ 6 3 Reactor core...

  8. Biodiesel from microalgae oil production in two sequential esterification\\/transesterification reactors: Pinch analysis of heat integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Snchez; K. Ojeda; M. El-Halwagi; V. Kafarov

    New sources of biomass for biofuels production had been studied in recent years. Microalgae as oil donors for biodiesel production are a very attractive alternative due to their several benefits but it still is a process that must overcome several technological barriers. Oil composition and the amount of free fatty acid (FFA) makes the microalgae oil a difficult yet promising

  9. CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-12-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

  10. Quality and availability of fission-products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rasmussen

    1965-01-01

    The information contained in this report was copied from carts used for discussions at Richland on May 4--6, 1965. Representatives of the Martin Company, US Rubber company, General Electric -- HAPO, and AEC-RL00 were present. The data represent the best current information on the quantity, quality, and availability of each fission product considered, i.e., strontium-90, cesium-137, promethium-147, and cerium-144.

  11. Flow reactor studies of aromatic hydrocarbon photo-oxidation products using on-line gas/particle separation and MS-MS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Julie

    Particulate matter in the atmosphere is a major pollutant that contributes to climate change, reduced visibility and negative human health impacts. Secondary particulate matter formed from the photo-oxidation of hydrocarbons significantly contributes to the particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere. However, at this time there is a lack of understanding of the chemical reactions that produce the secondary particulate matter. To further the knowledge in this area, a system was developed to investigate the composition of hydrocarbon photo-oxidation products in the gas and particle phase. The system consists of a gas phase photochemical flow reactor for hydrocarbon oxidation, a Counter Flow Membrane Denuder (CFMD) for online gas/particle separation and an APCI MS-MS (TAGA 6000E) for composition analysis. This system has been used to study the HO initiated oxidation of three aromatic hydrocarbons, toluene, m-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The products formed during the experiment were a complex mixture of organic species in both the gas and particle phase. A wide variety of species were identified in these experiments including aromatic ring retaining, non-aromatic ring retaining, straight chained and five member ring (furan) products. These products contained both single and multiple functional groups including alcohol, aldehyde, carboxylic acid, ketone, nitro, quinone, furanone and furandione. Identification of these products provides the ground work for the establishment of a set of hydrocarbon markers for use in ambient studies. Markers can be used for source identification of individual hydrocarbons and classes of hydrocarbons and ultimately for use in pollution control strategies.

  12. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  13. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Mausner, L. F.; Garland, M. A.

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology, and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by ?- emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for the production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  14. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Mausner, Leonard [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Garland, Marc A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  15. TRICHECO tritium chemistry compatibility: tritium production and extraction from ceramic materials facility-installation at TRIGA RC1 ENEA C.R.E. Casaccia reactor-feasibility and theoretical evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Festinesi; E. Santoro; G. L. Reis

    1991-01-01

    In the framework of collaboration between ENEA and Canadian Fuels Fusion Technology (CFFTP), the TRIGA Operating Exercise Staff (ENEA-Servizi Technologici) designed a facility named TRICHECO. This facility permits tritium process production and extraction from ceramic materials in view of the European research engagement. This research is developed in order to choose the breeder of the next fusion reactor. The ENEA

  16. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  17. Production of sorption functional media (SFM) from clinoptilolite tailings and its performance investigation in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Qi, Jingyao; Chi, Liying; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Ke; Li, Xin

    2013-02-15

    The few reuse and large stockpile of zeolite tailings led to a series of social and environmental problems. This study investigated the possibility of using the zeolite tailings as one of principal raw materials to prepare sorption functional media (SFM) by a high temperature sintering process. The SFM was used to serve as a biomedium in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor for domestic wastewater treatment, and its purification performance was examined. The physical, chemical and sorption properties of SFM were also determined. The microstructure of the SFM was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results revealed that: (1) zeolite tailings could be used to produce the SFM under the optimal sintering parameters; (2) the sorption and desorption isotherm of ammonia nitrogen on SFM could be well described by the Langmuir formula; (3) in terms of removing organic matter, ammonia nitrogen, turbidity and colourity, the performance of the biofilter with SFM was superior to that with haydite; and (4) SFM BAF has a stronger adaptability to low temperature (6-11C) for NH(3)-N removal compared to haydite BAF. Therefore, the SFM produced from the zeolite tailings was suitable to serve as the biomedium in the domestic wastewater treatment. PMID:23287409

  18. Radiological dose assessment for the decontaminated concrete removed from 183-H solar evaporation basins at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1997-01-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates over a 1,000-year time horizon were calculated for exposure to the decontaminated concrete removed from the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The RESRAD computer code, Version 5.62, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy`s manual for developing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Currently, the concrete is not being used. Four potential exposure scenarios were developed for the land area where the decontaminated concrete will be stored. In Scenario A industrial use of the land is assumed; in Scenario B recreational use of the land is assumed; in Scenario C residential use of the land is assumed; and in Scenario D (a plausible but unlikely land-use scenario), the presence of a subsistence farmer in the immediate vicinity of the land is assumed. For Scenarios A and B, water used for drinking is assumed to be surface water from the Columbia River; for Scenarios C and D, groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the storage area is the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock. Conservative parameters values were used to estimate the radiation doses. The results of the evaluation indicate that the US Department of Energy`s dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, C, and D are 0.75, 0.022, 29, 29 mrem/yr, respectively. An uncertainty analysis was performed to determine which parameters have the greatest impact on the estimated doses. The doses in Scenarios C and D were found to be very sensitive to the magnitude of the irrigation rate.

  19. Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Environmental Safety Health (ES and H) FY 2000 and FY 2001 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    REEP, I.E.

    2000-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the Safety and Health (S&H) resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 2000 and 2001 information and data contained in the Richland Operations Environment, Safefy and Health Fiscal Year 2002 Budget-Risk Management Summary (RL 2000a) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2001 activities are based on the President's Amended Congressional Budget Request of $689.6 million for funding Ofice of Environmental Management (EM) $44.0 million for Fast Flux Test Facility standby less $7.0 million in anticipated DOE, Headquarters holdbacks for Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); and $55.3 million for Safeguards and Security (SAS). Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2003 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2001. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2001 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H guidance contained in the FY 2002 Field Budget Call (DOE 2000).

  20. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The model system d...

  1. TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.0510-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

  2. Startup of the New 200 West Pump-and-Treat, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington - 13214

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Mark E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Simmons, Sally [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, Washington (United States); Morse, John [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    On June 28, 2012, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) completed the construction and acceptance testing for a new 2,500 gallon-per-minute (gpm) pump-and-treat (P and T) system in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. This system is designed to remove Tc-99, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene (TCE), nitrate, and total and hexavalent chromium from groundwater using ion exchange, anoxic and aerobic bioreactors, and air stripping. The system will eventually remove uranium from groundwater using ion exchange as well. The startup of the P and T system is important because it will ensure that contaminants from the 200 West Area never reach the Columbia River. When fully operational, the 200 West P and T will include approximately 23 extraction wells and 21 injection wells. The extraction wells are 8 inches in diameter, are completed with well screens 100 feet or more in length, and are distributed throughout the central portion of the 5-square-mile carbon tetrachloride plume. The injection wells are also 8 inches in diameter and are installed up-gradient of the plumes to recharge the aquifer and down-gradient of the plumes for flow-path control. Groundwater in the 200 West Area is approximately 250 feet below ground surface, and the aquifer is 200 feet or more in thickness. All of the contaminants (except nitrate) are found within the perimeter of the carbon tetrachloride plume and occur at various depths throughout the aquifer. The 200 West P and T consists of two separate buildings to conduct groundwater treatment. The RAD building contains an ion exchange system to remove Tc-99 from groundwater at a maximum flow rate of 600 gpm. The RAD building only accepts water from those extraction wells showing elevated Tc-99 concentrations. Groundwater initially fills an influent tank, is then pumped through particulate filters (to remove suspended materials), and then passes through two parallel treatment trains containing Purolite{sup R} A530E resin (which has been proven effective in removing Tc-99). The water is then transferred to the biological treatment building for further treatment. When the lead vessel in each of the two treatment trains becomes fully loaded with Tc-99, the Purolite A530E resin is transferred to a separate tank where it is heated to 160 deg. F to remove volatile organics prior to disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The biological treatment building has a maximum flow capacity of 2,500 gpm. Groundwater from the nonradiological extraction wells and treated groundwater from the RAD building are initially pumped into an equalization tank and then into two parallel fluidized bed reactors (FBRs). The FBRs contain granulated activated carbon in suspension for microbes to populate, a carbon-based food source for the microbes to eat (e.g., MicroCg{sup TM}, molasses, or sodium lactate), and nitrate for the microbes to breathe (represents 'anoxic' conditions that contain little or no dissolved oxygen). The FBRs are maintained at a temperature between 55 deg. F and 90 deg. F, and at a pH between 6.5 and 6.8, to maximize microbial growth. The FBRs break down the nitrate, reduce the hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium, and break down a good portion of the carbon tetrachloride and TCE. From the FBRs, groundwater is pumped through a carbon separation tank, then through a splitter box that divides the water evenly between four membrane bioreactors (MBRs) that further break down the contaminants. The MBRs have aeration capacity to provide sufficient oxygen for maintaining the aerobic biological process. The MBRs use submerged membranes for filtration. Vertically strung fibers are found in the membrane zone where a vacuum draws water through tiny pores in the fibers. The liquid is then pumped to air strippers to remove any volatile organics that have passed through the bioreactors. Solids from the MBRs are pumped to rotary drum thickeners and centrifuges for dewatering prior to lime being added to kill the bacteria and control odor. The conditioned sludge is then

  3. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosenthal; Murray Wilford

    2009-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and

  4. Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

  5. Microbial production of hydrogen and ethanol from glycerol-containing wastes discharged from a biodiesel fuel production plant in a bioelectrochemical reactor with thionine.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Yagishita, Tatsuo

    2007-10-01

    H(2) and ethanol production from glycerol-containing wastes discharged from a biodiesel fuel production plant by Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC 12010 was demonstrated in bioelectrochemical cells. Thionine as an exogenous electron transfer mediator was reduced by E. aerogenes, and was re-oxidized by a working electrode applied at +0.2 V against a Ag/AgCl reference electrode by a potentiostat (electrode system). At the initial glycerol concentration of 110 mM, 92.9 mM glycerol was consumed in the electrode system with 2 mM thionine after 48 h. On the other hand, the concentration of glycerol consumed was only 50.3 mM under the control conditions without thionine and the electrodes (normal fermentation). There are no differences in the yields of H(2) and ethanol against glycerol consumed between the control conditions and the conditions with the electrode system. A pH of 6.0 was suitable for the H(2) production in the range between pH 6 and pH 7.5 in the electrode system. At pH values of 7.0 and 7.5, H(2) production decreased and formate was remarkably produced in the reaction solution. The rates of both glycerol consumption and the H(2) and ethanol production increased as the thionine concentration and the surface area of the working electrode increased. After 60 h, 154 mM of the initial 161 mM glycerol concentration in the wastes was consumed in the electrode system, which is a 2.6-fold increase compared to the control experiment. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2007;98: 340-348. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:17390385

  6. Measurement of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident

    E-print Network

    S. MacMullin; G. K. Giovanetti; M. P. Green; R. Henning; R. Holmes; K. Vorren; J. F. Wilkerson

    2012-10-03

    We present measurements of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 days following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products I-131 and Cs-137 were measured with maximum activities of 4.2 +/- 0.6 mBq/m^3 and 0.42 +/- 0.07 mBq/m^3 respectively. Additional activity from I-131, I-132, Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137 and Te-132 were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

  7. Measurement of Airborne Fission Products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA from the Kukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Accident

    SciTech Connect

    MacMullin, S. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Giovanetti, G. K. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Green, M. P. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Henning, R. [Univ, of North Carolina & Triangle Universities Nucl. Lab - Durham, NC; Holmes, R. [Univ. North Carolina-Chapel & Univ. of Illinois-Urbana; Vorren, K. [University of North Carolina / Triangle Universities Nuclear Lababoratory, Durham; Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We present measurement results of airborne fission products in Chapel Hill, NC, USA, from 62 d following the March 11, 2011, accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Airborne particle samples were collected daily in air filters and radio-assayed with two high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The fission products 131I and 137Cs were measured with maximum activity concentrations of 4.2 0.6 mBq/m3 and 0.42 0.07 mBq/m3 respectively. Additional activity from 131,132I, 134,136,137Cs and 132Te were measured in the same air filters using a low-background HPGe detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF).

  8. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  9. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  10. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  11. Process for recovering useable products from by-product ammonium nitrate formed in the manufacture of nuclear reactor fuels or breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Morschl, P.; Zimmer, E.

    1980-02-05

    Radiation-contaminated ammonium nitrate is heated in solution to about 100/sup 0/C in the presence of finely powdered calcium oxide or lithium hydroxide. Ammonia and water vapor are given off leaving an alkaline or alkaline earth nitrate which can then be safely decomposed by calcination into a metal oxide and oxides of nitrogen. The metal oxide can be recycled in a continuation of the process. The oxides of nitrogen can be passed through water to produce nitric acid useable in dissolving oxides of fissionable materials and the ammonia may be used in aqueous solution to react with nitrates of nuclear fuel or breeder metals in the very process that produces the by-product ammonium nitrate. Thus, all by-products and reagents can be reconverted and recycled.

  12. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  13. Tritium production and distribution in a zircaloy-clad Li 7Pb 2 assembly irradiated in the oak ridge research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmer, R. G.; Gohar, Y.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hall, M. M.; Hins, A. G.; Krsul, J. R.; Mattas, R. F.; Summers, J. R.; Maroni, V. A.; Senn, R. L.

    1983-10-01

    A specimen of Li 7Pb 2 (lithium in natural abundance) contained in a Zircaloy capsule was irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor Poolside Facility for ~ 700 h. The design of the irradiation assembly (designated TBC-07) permitted operational control of the breeder material at a temperature of (390 25)C throughout the irradiation. The amount of tritium determined to be present in the capsule parts during post-irradiation chemical analysis was (52 5)Ci, corresponding to the burnup of ~ 8% of the original 6Li in the capsule. The estimated tritium production based on simple neutronics calculations, using an assumed total flux of 1.2 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 s, was ~56 Ci. The value derived from a limited dosimetry measurement on the TBC-07 thermocouple wire was ~ 80 Ci. The axial tritium distribution profile along the Zircaloy capsule wall and the Li 7Pb 2 cylinder indicated a nonuniform temperature during irradiation, with the capsule ends probably being at lower temperature than the center region. There was no evidence of tritium loss from the experiment during or after irradiation. Metallurgical analysis of the Li 7Pb 2 after irradiation revealed the presence of a unique network of hexagonal bubbles wherein facets are preferentially aligned along crystallographic planes and are also rich in lithium.

  14. Fouling potential evaluation of soluble microbial products (SMP) with different membrane surfaces in a hybrid membrane bioreactor using worm reactor for sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Yu; Ding, Yi; Chen, Lin; Wang, Haoyu

    2013-07-01

    The fouling characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMP) in the membrane bioreactor coupled with Static Sequencing Batch Worm Reactor (SSBWR-MBR) were tested with different types of membranes. It was noted that the flux decrements of S-SMP (SMP in SSBWR-MBR) with cellulose acetate (CA), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyether sulfones (PES) membranes were respectively 6.7%, 8.5% and 9.5% lower compared to those of C-SMP (SMP in Control-MBR) with corresponding membranes. However, for both the filtration of the C-SMP and S-SMP, the CA membrane exhibited the fastest diminishing rate of flux among the three types of membranes. The surface morphology analysis showed that the CA membrane exhibited more but smaller protuberances compared to the PVDF and PES. The second minimums surrounding each protruding asperity on CA membrane were more than those on the PVDF and PES membranes, enhancing the attachment of SMP onto the membrane surface. PMID:23685647

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

  16. A Compact Nuclear Fusion Reactor for Space Flights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anatoly F. Nastoyashchiy; Anatoly F

    2006-01-01

    A small-scale nuclear fusion reactor is suggested based on the concepts of plasma confinement (with a high pressure gas) which have been patented by the author. The reactor considered can be used as a power setup in space flights. Among the advantages of this reactor is the use of a D3He fuel mixture which at burning gives main reactor products

  17. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E. [Williams Research, P.O. Box 554, Los Alamos, NM87544 (United States)

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  18. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Process integration of membrane reactor for steam methane reforming for hydrogen separation with CO 2 capture in power production by natural gas combined cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bita Najmi; Mohammad Soltanieh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper simulation results for integration of CO2 pre-combustion capture by steam methane reforming (SMR) in membrane reactors (MR) with natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC) power plants are presented. The integrated combined cycle was simulated by GTPRO (Thermoflow) simulator along with the results from simulation of membrane reactor for SMR process developed in this work. The results show

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HO AND DO AS MODERATORS FOR HETEROGENEOUS PRESSURIZED REACTORS FOR PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM AND USEFUL POWER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weisner

    1952-01-01

    An attempt is made to compare the relative merits of light and heavy ; water as moderating materials for pressurized, uranium-fueled reactors which ; operate at temperatures high enough to enable useful power to be generated. ; Because of the inherent need for pressurization with water moderated reactors, in ; which the moderator operates above its atmospheric saturation temperature, and

  1. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997, chemical explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site,Richland, Washington - final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerton, R.E.

    1997-07-25

    On May 14, 1997, at 7:53 p.m. (PDT), a chemical explosion occur-red in Tank A- 109 in Room 40 of the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (Facility) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, approximately 30 miles north of Richland, Washington. The inactive processing Facility is part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). On May 16, 1997, Lloyd L. Piper, Deputy Manager, acting for John D. Wagoner, Manager, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), formally established an Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the explosion in accordance with DOE Order 225. 1, Accident Investigations. The Board commenced its investigation on May 15, 1997, completed the investigation on July 2, 1997, and submitted its findings to the RL Manager on July 26, 1997. The scope of the Board`s investigation was to review and analyze the circumstances of the events that led to the explosion; to analyze facts and to determine the causes of the accident; and to develop conclusions and judgments of need that may help prevent a recurrence of the accident. The scope also included the application of lessons learned from similar accidents within DOE. In addition to this detailed report, a companion document has also been prepared that provides a concise summary of the facts and conclusions of this report, with an emphasis on management issues (DOE/RL-97-63).

  2. URANIUM TRIOXIDE IN A FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. C. Philoon; E. F. Sanders; W. T. Trask

    1960-01-01

    A continuous method for the production of uranium trioxide from uranyl ; nitrate solution was developed, and its advantages over the batch process pointed ; out. Uranyl nitrate and fluidizing air are sprayed into the reactor, heat being ; supplied by molten heat transfer salt. The UO product overflows from the ; reactor into a packaging station. The best range

  3. Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

    1993-07-01

    Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

  4. Theory, design, and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, including operational health physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.R.

    1985-10-01

    A comprehensive evaluation was conducted of the radiation protection practices and programs at prototype LMFBRs with long operational experience. Installations evaluated were the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Richland, Washington; Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), Idaho Falls, Idaho; Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) Dounreay, Scotland; Phenix, Marcoule, France; and Kompakte Natriumgekuhlte Kernreak Toranlange (KNK II), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. The evaluation included external and internal exposure control, respiratory protection procedures, radiation surveillance practices, radioactive waste management, and engineering controls for confining radiation contamination. The theory, design, and operating experience at LMFBRs is described. Aspects of LMFBR health physics different from the LWR experience in the United States are identified. Suggestions are made for modifications to the NRC Standard Review Plan based on the differences.

  5. Cross-section measurement of the 169 Tm p,n reaction for the production of the therapeutic radionuclide 169 Yb and comparison with its reactor-based generation.

    PubMed

    Spahn, I; Takcs, S; Shubin, Yu N; Trknyi, F; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2005-08-01

    The radionuclide (169)Yb (T(1/2)=32.0 d) is potentially important for internal radiotherapy. It is generally produced using a nuclear reactor. In this work the possibility of its production at a cyclotron was investigated. A detailed determination of the excitation function of the (169)Tm(p,n)(169)Yb reaction was done over the proton energy range up to 45 MeV using the stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The integral yield of (169)Yb was calculated. Over the optimum energy range E(P)=16-->7 MeV the yield amounts to 1.5 MBq/micro Ah and is thus rather low. A comparison of this production route with the established (168)Yb(n,gamma)(169)Yb reaction at a nuclear reactor is given. The (169)Yb yield via the reactor route is by several orders of magnitude higher than by the cyclotron method. The latter procedure, however, leads to "no-carrier-added" product. PMID:15919210

  6. Effect of medium composition and sludge removal on the production, composition, and architecture of thermophilic (55 degrees C) acetate-utilizing granules from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed Central

    Ahring, B K; Schmidt, J E; Winther-Nielsen, M; Macario, A J; de Macario, E C

    1993-01-01

    A thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor degrading acetate was started by applying published methods (W. M. Wiegant and A. W. A. de Man, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 28:718-77, 1986) for production of granules dominated by Methanothrix spp. The reactor was inoculated with thermophilic digested sludge. No granules were observed during the first 7 months of start-up of the UASB reactor. However, after the concentrations of potassium, phosphate, ammonium, and magnesium in the medium were gradually increased, granules developed, indicating that there was a critical concentration of one or more of the ions required for production of granules from the starting material. After several years of stable operation, the effect of removing 60% of the granular sludge was investigated. Immunologic qualitative and quantitative studies showed that removal of the granular sludge resulted in an increase in the number of the predominant methanogens, antigenically related to Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina mazeii S-6, and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H and GC1. These changes were accompanied by modifications of the microanatomy of the granules, as demonstrated histochemically and immunohistochemically. The results indicated that different catabolic pathways dominated in different regions of the granules, i.e., acetate oxidation in the middle of the granules, where there is a low acetate concentration, and an aceticlastic reaction in the outer surfaces, with a high acetate concentration. The results also showed that removal of granules from a UASB reactor which has been under steady-state operation for a long period can improve the reactor's performance via formation of denser and larger granules with improved microbial activities. Images PMID:8368841

  7. Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-07-01

    The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

  8. Pretreatment of defatted wheat germ proteins (by-products of flour mill industry) using ultrasonic horn and bath reactors: effect on structure and preparation of ACE-inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Ma, Haile; Yu, Xiaojie; Liu, Bin; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Pan, Zhongli

    2013-11-01

    The ultrasonic horn and bath reactors were compared based on production of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from defatted wheat germ proteins (DWGP). The DWGP was sonicated before hydrolysis by Alcalase. Degree of hydrolysis, ACE-inhibitory activity, surface hydrophobicity, fluorescence intensity, free sulfhydryl (SH), and disulfide bond (SS) were determined. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity of DWGP hydrolysate was obtained at power intensity of 191.1 W/cm(2) for 10 min in the ultrasonic horn reactor. The fixed frequency of 33 kHz and the sweep frequency of 402 kHz resulted in the maximum ACE-inhibitory activity. The combined irradiation of dual fixed frequency (24/68 kHz) produced significant increase in ACE-inhibitory activity compared with single frequency (33 kHz). The ultrasonic probe resulted in significant higher ACE-inhibitory activity compared with ultrasonic bath operating at single or dual fixed and sweep frequencies. The changes in conformation of the DWGP due to sonication were confirmed by the changes in fluorescence intensity, surface hydrophobicity, SHf and SS contents and they were found in conformity with the ACE-inhibitory activity in case of the ultrasonic horn reactor but not in bath reactor. PMID:23642775

  9. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  10. Assessment of Environmental Impact of Reactor Facilities in Kazakhstan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. K. Kadyrzhanov; S. N. Lukashenko; V. N. Lushchenko

    The two main reactor facilities in Kazakhstan today are the WWR-K research reactor close to Almaty and the BN-350 fast reactor in Aktau on the Caspian Sea. The WWR-K reactor is operated as a source of neutrons for irradia- tion of materials, production of radioisotopes, and basic neutron physics. Until 1998, BN-350 was operated as a power reactor to produce

  11. Outdoor culture of a cyanobacterium with a vertical flat-plate photobioreactor: effects on productivity of the reactor orientation, distance setting between the plates, and culture temperature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Zhang; N. Kurano; S. Miyachi

    1999-01-01

    The ability of a photobioreactor to fix CO2 was evaluated with the thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechocystis aquatilis SI-2. The reactor consisted of three to five flat plates of transparent acrylic plastic standing upright and in parallel\\u000a and giving a 0.015-m light path. The reactor was 0.8?m high and 1?m long with 9?l working volume. The effects of the orientation\\u000a of the

  12. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  13. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L. (Stanford, CA); Bachmann, Andre (Palo Alto, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  14. (Reactor dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-09-13

    The lead in most aspects of research reactor design and use passed from the USA about 15 years ago, soon after the construction of the HFIR and HFBR. The Europeans have consistently upgraded and improved their existing facilities and have built new ones including the HFR at Grenoble and ORPHEE at Saclay. They studied ultra-high flux concepts ({approximately}10{sup 20}/m{sup {minus}2}{center dot}s{sup {minus}1}) about 10 years ago, and are in the design phase of a new, highly efficient medium flux reactor to be built at Garching, near Munich in Germany. A visit was made to Interatom, the firm -- the equivalent of the Architect/Engineer for the ANS project -- responsible, under contract to the Technical University of Munich, for the new Munich reactor design. There are many similarities to the ANS design, and we reviewed and discussed technical and safety aspects of the two reactors. A request was made for some new, hitherto proprietary, experimental data on reactor thermal hydraulics and cooling that will be very valuable to the ANS project. I presented a seminar on the ANS project. A visit was made to Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and knowledge was gained from Dr. Kuchle, a true pioneer of ultra-high flux reactor concepts, of their work. Dr. Kuchle kindly reviewed the ANS reference core and cooling system design (with favorable conclusions). I then talked with researchers working on materials irradiation damage and activation of structural materials by neutron irradiation, both key issues for the ANS. I was shown some new techniques they have developed for testing materials irradiation effects at high fluences, in a short time, using accelerated particle beams.

  15. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  16. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Richland, Washington, May 20--May 23, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted May 20--23, 1991 at Richland, Washington. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendix A. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  17. Estimated airborne release of plutonium from the Exxon Nuclear Mixed Oxide Fuel Plant at Richland, Washington as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, J.; Schwendiman, L.C.; Ayer, J.E.; Owzarski, E.L.

    1980-02-01

    The potential airborne releases of plutonium from postulated damage sustained by the Exxon Nuclear Company's Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant at Richland, Washington, as a result of various levels of wind and earthquake hazard, are estimated. The releases are based on damage scenarios that range up to 250 mph for wind hazard and in excess of 1.0 g ground acceleration for seismic hazard, which were developed by other specialists. The approaches and factors used to estimate the releases (inventories of dispersible materials at risk, damage levels and ratios, fractional airborne releases of dispersible materials under stress, atmosphere exchange rates, and source term ranges) are discussed. Release estimates range from less than 10/sup -7/ g to greater than 14 g of plutonium over a four-day period.

  18. Plasma core reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall. Results of calculations for outward-directed radiant energy fluxes corresponding to radiating temperatures of 2000 to 5000 K indicate total operating pressures from 80 to 650 atm, centerline temperatures from 6900 to 30,000 K, and total radiated powers from 25 to 2500 MW, respectively. Applications are described for this type of reactor such as (1) high-thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) highly efficient systems for generation of electricity, and (3) hydrogen or synthetic fuel production systems using the intense radiant energy fluxes.

  19. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  20. Advanced Reactors Around the World

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Debu

    2003-09-01

    At the end of 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were operating around the globe and providing 17% of the world's electricity. Although the rate of population growth has slowed, recent United Nations data suggest that two billion more people will be added to the world by 2050. A special report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that electricity demand would grow almost eight-fold from 2000 to 2050 in a high economic grown scenario and more than double in a low-growth scenario. There is also a global aspiration to keep the environment pristine. Because of these reasons, it is expected that a large number of new nuclear reactors may be operating by 2050. Realization of this has created an impetus for the development of a new generation of reactors in several countries. The goal is to make nuclear power cost-competitive with other resources and to enhance safety to a level that no evacuation outside a plant site would be necessary. It should also generate less waste, prevent materials diversion for weapons production, and be sustainable. This article discusses the status of next-generation reactors under development around the world. Specifically highlighted are efforts related to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and its six reactor concepts for research and development: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR); Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR); Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR); and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). Also highlighted are nuclear activities specific to Russia and India.

  1. Nuclear weapons and power-reactor plutonium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amory B. Lovins

    1980-01-01

    1-10 that for making nuclear bombs, 'reactor-grade' plutonium produced by the normal operation of uranium-fuelled power reactors is necessarily much inferior to specially made 'weapons-grade' Pu: so infe- rior in explosive power or predictability that its potential use by amateurs is not a serious problem and that governments would instead make the higher-performance weapons-grade Pu in special production reactors. Although

  2. Fuel-element failures in Hanford single-pass reactors 1944--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. To estimate the doses, the staff of the Source Terms Task use operating information from historical documents to approximate the radioactive emissions. One source of radioactive emissions to the Columbia River came from leaks in the aluminum cladding of the uranium metal fuel elements in single-pass reactors. The purpose of this letter report is to provide photocopies of the documents that recorded these failures. The data from these documents will be used by the Source Terms Task to determine the contribution of single-pass reactor fuel-element failures to the radioactivity of the reactor effluent from 1944 through 1971. Each referenced fuel-element failure occurring in the Hanford single-pass reactors is addressed. The first recorded failure was in 1948, the last in 1970. No records of fuel-element failures were found in documents prior to 1948. Data on the approximately 2000 failures which occurred during the 28 years (1944--1971) of Hanford single-pass reactor operations are provided in this report.

  3. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2005-02-01

    Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. Successful in-situ resources utilization (ISRU) will require component technologies which provide optimal size, weight, volume, and power efficiency. Microchannel reactors enable the efficient chemical processing of in situ resources. The reactors can be designed for the processes that generate the most benefit for each mission. For instance, propellants (methane) can be produced from carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using the Sabatier reaction and ethylene can be produced from the partial oxidation of methane. A system that synthesizes ethylene could be the precursor for systems to synthesize ethanol and polyethylene. Ethanol can be used as a nutrient for Astrobiology experiments, as well as the production of nutrients for human crew (e.g. sugars). Polyethylene can be used in the construction of habitats, tools, and replacement parts. This paper will present recent developments in miniature chemical reactors using advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and microchannel technology to support ISRU of Mars and lunar missions. Among other applications, the technology has been demonstrated for the Sabatier process and for the partial oxidation of methane. Microchannel reactors were developed based on ceramic substrates as well as metal substrates. In both types of reactors, multiple layers coated with catalytic material are bonded, forming a monolithic structure. Such reactors are readily scalable with the incorporation of extra layers. In addition, this reactor structure minimizes pressure drop and catalyst settling, which are common problems in conventional packed bed reactors.

  4. Reformer and membrane modules plant powered by a nuclear reactor or by a solar heated molten salts: Assessment of the design variables and production cost evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. De Falco; D. Barba; S. Cosenza; G. Iaquaniello; L. Marrelli

    2008-01-01

    The application of hydrogen selective membranes in steam reforming plants may play an important role in converting natural gas or heavy hydrocarbons into hydrogen in a very efficient way. Providing the reaction heat by sources as solar heated molten salts or a fluid heated in a nuclear reactor may further increase the overall energy efficiency of the system and pave

  5. Observations of the boiling process from a downward-facing torispherical surface: Confirmatory testing of the heavy water new production reactor flooded cavity design

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

    1995-06-01

    Reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiments were performed in the CYBL facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The boiling flow pattern outside the RPV bottom head shows a center pulsating region and an outer steady two-phase boundary layer region. The local heat transfer data can be correlated in terms of a modified Rohsenow correlation.

  6. Fusion reactor design studies. [ARIES Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-10-12

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources. (LSP)

  7. Fuel element study for Reactor Overbore Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Stringer; W. A. Blanton

    1960-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that large incentives exist for overboring the reactor process channels approximately 500 mils in the C and five old reactors under the proposed Plant Improvement Program. Conservative estimates of the incentives for overboring indicate a payout period of about two years for the proposed work, an increase in plutonium production of 15--18%, derived from increased conversion

  8. BURNABLE POISONS IN SMALL POWER REACTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Smith; J. Jeffrey

    1959-01-01

    In the design of small reactors suitable for propulsion purposes the ; need for a large amount of excess reactivity to compensate for the effects of ; depletion and fission product poisoning leads to a difficult engineering problem ; in the accommodation of an adequate amount of control rods to shut the reactor ; down. Moreover, unless a complex control

  9. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

  10. Non-equilibrium radiation nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    An externally moderated thermal nuclear reactor is disclosed which is designed to provide output power in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The reactor is a gaseous fueled nuclear cavity reactor device which can operate over wide ranges of temperature and pressure, and which includes the capability of processing and recycling waste products such as long-lived transuranium actinides. The primary output of the device may be in the form of coherent radiation, so that the reactor may be utilized as a self-critical nuclear pumped laser.

  11. Fast reactor programme

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Srinivasan

    1973-01-01

    India's fast reactor programme is described in detail. A 15 MW(e) Fast ; Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) under construction in the Reactor Research Centre at ; Kalpakkam, will provide experience in construction and operation of a sodium ; cooled fast reactor. Fuel and material testing is an essential aspect of fast ; reactor development. For this purpose, FBTR will serve

  12. Chemical performance and high temperature characterization of micromachined chemical reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Srinivasan; S. L. Firebaugh; I.-M. Hsing; J. Ryley; M. P. Harold; K. F. Jensen; M. A. Schmidt

    1997-01-01

    Chemical throughput, product distribution, and lifetime studies have been conducted in Si micromachined chemical reactors (microreactors) for catalytic partial oxidation reactions. Experiments using Pt-catalyzed NH3 oxidation as model reaction show that conversion and selectivity behavior of conventional reactors can be reproduced in the microreactor. Highly flammable gases that explode in conventional reactors have been safely oxidized in the microreactor. Packaging

  13. A novel membrane reactor for ozone water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel Heng; King Lun Yeung; Malik Djafer; Jean-Christophe Schrotter

    2007-01-01

    A novel membrane reactor was designed for the ozonolysis of refractory organic pollutants in water. The reactor employed a membrane contactor and a membrane separator in a concentric arrangement to affect a uniform ozone distribution along the reactor length, while allowing the simultaneous membrane separation and production of clean water. An alumina capillary membrane contactor and a ZSM-5 zeolite pervaporation

  14. Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S; Cheekatamarla, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F

    2013-11-19

    A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

  15. BEHAVIOR OF CONSTANT RATE AEROSOL REACTORS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An aerosol reactor is a gaseous system in which fine particles are formed by chemical reaction in either a batch or flow process. Such reactors are used to study the aerosol formation process, as in a smog reactor, or to generate a product such as a pigment or a catalytic aerosol...

  16. A Semi-Batch Reactor Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derevjanik, Mario; Badri, Solmaz; Barat, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This experiment and analysis offer an economic yet challenging semi-batch reactor experience. Household bleach is pumped at a controlled rate into a batch reactor containing pharmaceutical hydrogen peroxide solution. Batch temperature, product molecular oxygen, and the overall change in solution conductivity are metered. The reactor simulation

  17. Critical assessment of thorium reactor technology

    E-print Network

    Drenkhahn, Robert (Robert A.)

    2012-01-01

    Thorium-based fuels for nuclear reactors are being considered for use with current and future designs in both large and small-scale energy production. Thorium-232 is as abundant on Earth as lead, far more common than all ...

  18. Reactor monitoring with Neutrinos Michel Cribier

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    production. Nevertheless the net balance in plutonium is positive and a standard pressurized water power reactor produces around 200 kg of plutonium per year. Every fission of a fissile isotope produce two

  19. Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

  20. Antineutrino monitoring for heavy water reactors.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Eric; Huber, Patrick; Jaffke, Patrick; Shea, Thomas E

    2014-07-25

    In this Letter we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a nonproliferation measure. An above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet IAEA verification goals for reactor plutonium inventories. While detectors with the needed spectral sensitivity have been demonstrated below ground, additional research and development is needed to demonstrate an above-ground detector with this same level of sensitivity. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shut down, provided very low detector backgrounds can be achieved. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to reestablish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary. PMID:25105612

  1. Photocatalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

    1999-01-19

    A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

  2. Hydrogen production by reforming of simulated hot coke oven gas over nickel catalysts promoted with lanthanum and cerium in a membrane reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongwei Cheng; Xionggang Lu; Yuwen Zhang; Weizhong Ding

    2009-01-01

    Catalysts of Ni\\/Mg(Al)O promoted with lanthanum and cerium were tested in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} (BCFNO) membrane reactor by catalytic partial oxidation of simulated hot coke oven gas (COG) with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. Analysis of the catalysts suggested that the hydrotalcite precursor after thermal treatment lead to a good dispersion of nickel

  3. Two phase mathematical model for a bio-trickling reactor for the production of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) from deeply hydrodesulfurized diesel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mukhopadhyaya; R. Chowdhury; P. Bhattacharya

    2005-01-01

    A trickle bed reactor (TBR) having a diameter of 0.066m and a height of 0.6m has been used for the bio-desulfurization of hydrotreated diesel fraction having sulfur concentration in the range of 200540ppm. Rhodococcus sp. (NCIM 2891, Pune) has been used to degrade the residual organo-sulfur compounds present in deeply hydrodesulfurized diesel. The microorganisms have been immobilized on the packing

  4. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-03-01

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework, we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency. We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO +), and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA, and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation, and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo-based approach, which provides an overall site-dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes, and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of ten years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  5. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-print Network

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  6. Environmental Information Document: L-reactor reactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr. (comp.)

    1982-04-01

    Purpose of this Environmental Information Document is to provide background for assessing environmental impacts associated with the renovation, restartup, and operation of L Reactor at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). SRP is a major US Department of Energy installation for the production of nuclear materials for national defense. The purpose of the restart of L Reactor is to increase the production of nuclear weapons materials, such as plutonium and tritium, to meet projected needs in the nuclear weapons program.

  7. POTENTIAL USE OF ACTIVATED CARBON TO RECOVER TC-99 FROM 200 WEST AREA GROUNDWATER AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO MORE EXPENSIVE RESINS HANFORD SITE RICHLAND WASNINGTON

    SciTech Connect

    BYRNES ME; ROSSI AJ; TORTOSO AC

    2009-12-03

    Recent treatability testing performed on groundwater at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, has shown that Purolite{reg_sign} A530E resin very effectively removes Tc-99 from groundwater. However, this resin is expensive and cannot be regenerated. In an effort to find a less expensive method for removing Tc-99 from the groundwater, a literature search was performed. The results indicated that activated carbon may be used to recover technetium (as pertechnetate, TCO{sub 4}{sup -}) from groundwater. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used activated carbon in both batch adsorption and column leaching studies. The adsorption study concluded that activated carbon absorbs TCO{sub 4}{sup -} selectively and effectively over a wide range of pH values and from various dilute electrolyte solutions (< 0.01 molarity). The column leaching studies confirmed a high adsorption capacity and selectivity of activated carbon for TCO{sub 4}{sup -}. Since activated carbon is much less expensive than Purolite A530E resin, it has been determined that a more extensive literature search is warranted to determine if recent studies have reached similar conclusions, and, if so, pilot testing of 200-ZP-1 groundwater wi11 likely be implemented. It is possible that less expensive, activated carbon canisters could be used as pre-filters to remove Tc-99, followed by the use of the more expensive Purolite A530E resin as a polishing step.

  8. Hydrogen production from coke oven gas over LiNi\\/?-Al 2O 3 catalyst modified by rare earth metal oxide in a membrane reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhibin Yang; Yunyan Zhang; Weizhong Ding; Yuwen Zhang; Peijun Shen; Yuding Zhou; Yong Liu; Shaoqing Huang; Xionggang Lu

    2009-01-01

    The performance of LiNi\\/-Al2O3 catalysts modified by rare earth metal oxide (La2O3 or CeO2) packed on BCFNO membrane reactor was discussed for the partial oxidation of methane (POM) in coke oven gas (COG) at 875 C. The NiO\\/?-Al2O3 catalysts with different amounts of La2O3 and CeO2 were prepared with the same preparation method and under the same condition in order

  9. Oxidation products of INCONEL alloys 600 and 690 in pressurized water reactor environments and their role in intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Ferguson; Hugo F. Lopez

    2006-01-01

    In this work, thermodynamic arguments for the stability of Ni and Cr compounds developed under pressurized water reactor environments\\u000a (\\u000a $$P_{H_2 O} $$\\u000a and\\u000a $$P_{H_2 } $$\\u000a ) were experimentally tested. A mechanism is proposed to explain crack initiation and propagation alloy 600 along the grain\\u000a boundaries, where Cr2O3 has formed from the leaching of Cr from the matrix, leaving

  10. Heat-generating nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, G.; Fajeau, M.; Labrousse, M.; Lerouge, B.; Minguet, J.

    1981-01-20

    A reactor vessel filled with coolant fluid is divided by a wall into an upper region and a lower region which contains the reactor core, part of the coolant fluid in the upper region being injected into the lower region. The injection flow rate is regulated as a function of the variations in pressure in the lower region by means of a baffle-plate container which communicates with a leak-tight chamber and with a storage reservoir, a flow of fluid from the chamber to the reservoir being established only at the time of a reduction in the rate of injection into the container. The reactor can be employed for the production of hot water which is passed through a heat exchanger and supplied to a heating installation.

  11. Nuclear reactor engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Glasstone; A. Sesonske

    1982-01-01

    A book is reviewed which emphasizes topics directly related to the light water reactor power plant and the fast reactor power system. Current real-world problems are addressed throughout the text, and a chapter on safety includes much of the postThree Mile Island impact on operating systems. Topics covered include Doppler broadening, neutron resonances, multigroup diffusion theory, reactor kinetics, reactor control,

  12. Reactor safety method

    DOEpatents

    Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  13. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  14. Simplifying microbial electrosynthesis reactor design.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Cloelle G S; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodward, Trevor; Lovley, Derek R; Butler, Caitlyn S

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, an artificial form of photosynthesis, can efficiently convert carbon dioxide into organic commodities; however, this process has only previously been demonstrated in reactors that have features likely to be a barrier to scale-up. Therefore, the possibility of simplifying reactor design by both eliminating potentiostatic control of the cathode and removing the membrane separating the anode and cathode was investigated with biofilms of Sporomusa ovata. S. ovata reduces carbon dioxide to acetate and acts as the microbial catalyst for plain graphite stick cathodes as the electron donor. In traditional 'H-cell' reactors, where the anode and cathode chambers were separated with a proton-selective membrane, the rates and columbic efficiencies of microbial electrosynthesis remained high when electron delivery at the cathode was powered with a direct current power source rather than with a potentiostat-poised cathode utilized in previous studies. A membrane-less reactor with a direct-current power source with the cathode and anode positioned to avoid oxygen exposure at the cathode, retained high rates of acetate production as well as high columbic and energetic efficiencies. The finding that microbial electrosynthesis is feasible without a membrane separating the anode from the cathode, coupled with a direct current power source supplying the energy for electron delivery, is expected to greatly simplify future reactor design and lower construction costs. PMID:26029199

  15. Simulation of direct reduction reactor by the grain model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. M. Nouri; H. Ale Ebrahim; E. Jamshidi

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model is developed for simulating the behavior of a direct reduction moving bed reactor for the production of sponge iron. The pellet scale model is based on a grain model with product layer resistance. The reactor is modeled through a nonisothermal, steady state, heterogeneous model. Model predictions show good agreement with the data of Foolad

  16. Hydrogen, nuclear energy, and the advanced high-temperature reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles W Forsberg

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been proposed as an energy source to produce hydrogen (H2) from water. An examination of systems issues in this paper indicates that the infrastructure of H2 consumption is now compatible with the production of H2 by nuclear reactors. Alternative H2 production processes were examined to define the requirements such processes would impose on the nuclear reactor. These

  17. PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Ryan 1989-

    2011-04-20

    The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes...

  18. Techno-economic study of hydrogen production by High Temperature Electrolysis coupled with an EPR, SFR or HTR - Water steam production and coupling possibilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Rivera-Tinoco; C. Mansilla; C. Bouallou; F. Werkoff

    The potentialities of massive hydrogen production by High Temperature Electrolysis coupled with three nuclear reactors (the European Pressurized Reactor, the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor and the Very High Temperature Reactor) were studied in terms of perspectives and costs. First, we present the features of producing water steam by using the three nuclear reactors. Secondly, we present the hydrogen production cost for

  19. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland

    2002-09-30

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  20. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland

    2000-06-30

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  1. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  2. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  3. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR (SBCR)TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard A. Toseland, Ph.D

    2000-06-01

    The major technical objectives of this program are threefold: (1) to develop the design tools and a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamics of a slurry bubble column 0reactor to maximize reactor productivity, (2) to develop the mathematical reactor design models and gain an understanding of the hydrodynamic fundamentals under industrially relevant process conditions, and (3) to develop an understanding of the hydrodynamics and their interaction with the chemistries occurring in the bubble column reactor. Successful completion of these objectives will permit more efficient usage of the reactor column and tighter design criteria, increase overall reactor efficiency, and ensure a design that leads to stable reactor behavior when scaling up to large diameter reactors.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  5. Hydrogen production by reforming of simulated hot coke oven gas over nickel catalysts promoted with lanthanum and cerium in a membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hongwei Cheng; Xionggang Lu; Yuwen Zhang; Weizhong Ding [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing

    2009-05-15

    Catalysts of Ni/Mg(Al)O promoted with lanthanum and cerium were tested in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor by catalytic partial oxidation of simulated hot coke oven gas (COG) with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. Analysis of the catalysts suggested that the hydrotalcite precursor after thermal treatment lead to a good dispersion of nickel forming the solid solution NiO-MgO and spinel (Ni,Mg)Al{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The promoted catalysts had higher oxygen permeation flux, better catalytic activity, and better resistance to carbon formation, which will be promising catalysts in the catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hot COG. 29 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, CO and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of OH, CHn, CO, CO, and CC gradually disappeared from 400C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident. PMID:26093253

  7. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Treatability study of 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) combined with 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) to reduce excess sludge production in a sequence batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Chi; Guo, Wan-Qian; Chen, Chuan; Yang, Shan-Shan; Jin, Wen-Biao; Ren, Nan-Qi; Zheng, He-Shan; Du, Juan-Shan; Liu, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the synergistic effects of a novel combined uncoupler of TCS and TCP on excess activated sludge reduction during a 60-day operation using a sequence batch reactor (SBR). Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to obtain the optimal dosage of the combined uncoupler. The results of 60-day operation demonstrated the combined uncoupler had effectively reduced the sludge yield by approximately 52%, without serious affecting the substrate removal efficiency. The high sludge reduction rate revealed that it was feasible and effective to utilize a combined uncoupler to limit excess activated sludge. The three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy analysis of activated sludge with different metabolic uncouplers indicated that tryptophan, tyrosine protein-like substances and tryptophan, tyrosine amino-like substances were reduced by adding a combined uncoupler. Moreover, the variation of sludge components provided a better understanding of the effects of uncouplers on activated sludge reduction. PMID:23856019

  9. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  10. RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratorys (INLs) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

  11. Advanced PPA Reactor and Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Aske, James; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Greenwood, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of a second generation Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) reactor is currently underway as part of NASA s Atmosphere Revitalization Resource Recovery effort. By recovering up to 75% of the hydrogen currently lost as methane in the Sabatier reactor effluent, the PPA helps to minimize life support resupply costs for extended duration missions. To date, second generation PPA development has demonstrated significant technology advancements over the first generation device by doubling the methane processing rate while, at the same time, more than halving the required power. One development area of particular interest to NASA system engineers is fouling of the PPA reactor with carbonaceous products. As a mitigation plan, NASA MSFC has explored the feasibility of using an oxidative plasma based upon metabolic CO2 to regenerate the reactor window and gas inlet ports. The results and implications of this testing are addressed along with the advanced PPA reactor development work.

  12. Tritium release from lithium silicate and lithium aluminate, in-reactor and out-of-reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johnson; A. B. Jr

    1965-01-01

    Considerable technology has developed for production of tritium in metallic target systems. At normal N-Reactor temperatures ( 300°C), aluminum-lithium alloys appear to offer a satisfactory system for tritium production. However, reactor safety requirements have generated interest in a target system which will hold the lithium in place at temperatures to 1200°C. At the same time, gas retention at irradiation temperatures

  13. Stripper-reactor for volatile cobalt recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, K.C.; Broussard, T.R.; Pitre, J.K.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described for removing cobalt values from the crude product of a cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation reaction which comprises: (a) contacting said crude product in a stripper-reactor with a stream of stripping gas in the presence of water and an organic acid to entrain volatile cobalt carbonyl in said stripping gas, whereby said entrained volatile cobalt carbonyl are taken out overhead and organic hydroformylation reaction products and water containing water soluble cobaltous salts are taken out as bottoms; (b) withdrawing said organic hydroformulation reaction products and said water containing water soluble cobaltous salts from said stripper-reactor; (c) withdrawing the stripping gas with said entrained volatile cobalt carbonyl from said stripper-reactor; (d) refluxing the withdrawn stripping gas with said entrained volatile cobalt carbonyl thereby producing a concentrated volatile cobalt carbonyl and a reflux product; (e) withdrawing said concentrated volatile cobalt carbonyl from the reflux means; and (f) recycling said reflux product to a location on said stripperreactor which is capable of forming a stripping zone in the upper portion of said stripper-reactor and a reaction zone in the lower portion of said stripper-reactor.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  15. Ethanol production from glucose and xylose by immobilized Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus at 70 C in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.

    PubMed

    Sittijunda, Sureewan; Toms, Ana Faria; Reungsang, Alissara; O-thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-09-01

    The newly isolated extreme thermophilic ethanologen Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus was immobilized in different support materials in order to improve its ethanol production ability. In batch fermentation, a maximum ethanol yield of 1.36 mol mol(-1) consumed sugars was obtained by T. pentosaceus immobilized on rapeseed straw. Additionally, immobilized T. pentosaceus' ethanol production was improved by 11% in comparison to free cells. In continuous mode, it was shown that hydraulic retention time (HRT) affected ethanol yield, and a dramatic shift from ethanol to acetate and lactate production occurred at an HRT of 6 h. The maximum ethanol yield and concentration, 1.50 mol mol(-1) consumed sugars and 12.4 g l(-1), were obtained with an HRT of 12 h. The latter represented an improvement of 60% in relation to previously obtained results. This indicates that immobilization of T. pentosaceus is an effective strategy to improve its ethanol production ability. PMID:23845708

  16. Removing Undesired Fine Powder From Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagella, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized-bed reactor produces highly pure polycrystalline silicon particles with diameters approximately greater than 400 micrometers. Operates by pyrolysis of silane in reaction zone, which is bed of silicon seed particles fluidized by flow of silane and carrier gas. Above reaction zone, gas mixture flows rapidly enough to entrain silicon powders, but not larger seed and product particles. Entrained particles swept out of reactor. Applicable to other processes such as production of fine metal and ceramic powders where control of sizes of product needed.

  17. SOME CHEMICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Jr

    1958-01-01

    A number of reports on fusion or fusion-fission reactors has been ; reviewed to enumerate some of the chemical and chemical engineering problems that ; will be associated with this program for economic power production. Some of ; these problems, which have either been stated or implied are: (1) production of ; and initial tritium inventory of at least 40

  18. Application of Reactor Antineutrinos: Neutrinos for Peace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suekane, F.

    2013-02-01

    In nuclear reactors, 239Pu are produced along with burn-up of nuclear fuel. 239Pu is subject of safeguard controls since it is an explosive component of nuclear weapon. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is watching undeclared operation of reactors to prevent illegal production and removal of 239Pu. In operating reactors, a huge numbers of anti electron neutrinos (?) are produced. Neutrino flux is approximately proportional to the operating power of reactor in short term and long term decrease of the neutrino flux per thermal power is proportional to the amount of 239Pu produced. Thus rector ?'s carry direct and real time information useful for the safeguard purposes. Since ? can not be hidden, it could be an ideal medium to monitor the reactor operation. IAEA seeks for novel technologies which enhance their ability and reactor neutrino monitoring is listed as one of such candidates. Currently neutrino physicists are performing R&D of small reactor neutrino detectors to use specifically for the safeguard use in response to the IAEA interest. In this proceedings of the neutrino2012 conference, possibilities of such reactor neutrinos application and current world-wide R&D status are described.

  19. Oxidation products of INCONEL alloys 600 and 690 in pressurized water reactor environments and their role in intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Lopez, Hugo F.

    2006-08-01

    In this work, thermodynamic arguments for the stability of Ni and Cr compounds developed under pressurized water reactor environments ( P_{H_2 O} and P_{H_2 } ) were experimentally tested. A mechanism is proposed to explain crack initiation and propagation alloy 600 along the grain boundaries, where Cr2O3 has formed from the leaching of Cr from the matrix, leaving behind a porous Ni-rich region. The mechanism is based on the thermodynamic potential for the transformation of a protective NiO surface layer into an amorphous nonprotective Ni(OH)2 gel. This gel would also form along the grain boundaries and when hydrogenated steam reaches the porous Ni-rich regions. Crack initiation is then favored by tensile stressing of the grain boundary regions, which can easily rupture the gelatinous film. The leaching of matrix Cr to form nonprotective CrOOH gel at the crack tip followed by the exposure of fresh porous Ni to the environment could explain crack propagation in INCONEL alloy 600. The proposed crack initiation mechanism is not expected to occur in alloy 690 where a protective Cr2O3 film covers the entire metal surface. However, crack propagation along the grain boundaries in alloy 600 and precracked alloy 690 is expected to be active as hydroxide-forming reactions weaken the boundaries.

  20. High-speed roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene using a concentric tube CVD reactor

    E-print Network

    Polsen, Erik S.

    We present the design of a concentric tube (CT) reactor for roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on flexible substrates, and its application to continuous production of graphene on copper foil. In the CTCVD reactor, ...

  1. l-Arabinose production from sugar beet arabinan by immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus in a packed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong-Su; Lim, Yu-Ri; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-02-01

    The immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus produced continuously an average of 16.5 gl(-1)l-arabinose from 20 gl(-1) sugar beet arabinan at pH 5.0 and 75C for 216 h, with a productivity of 9.9 gl(-1)h(-1) and a conversion yield of 83%. PMID:22099373

  2. l-Arabinose production from sugar beet arabinan by immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus in a packed-bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeong-Su Kim; Yu-Ri Lim; Deok-Kun Oh

    The immobilized endo- and exo-arabinanases from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus produced continuously an average of 16.5gl?1l-arabinose from 20gl?1 sugar beet arabinan at pH 5.0 and 75C for 216h, with a productivity of 9.9gl?1h?1 and a conversion yield of 83%.

  3. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  4. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  5. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelevkin, V. M.; Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  8. Silver reactor reclamation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Malody; T. R. McKenzie; C. W. Pollock

    1959-01-01

    Two spent Redox reactors were transported to U-Plant for regeneration. The old saddle coating material was removed by flushing with water and sodium thiosulfate. The reactors were dried by pulling air through them and regenerated by spraying the Berl saddles with a 5 molar solution of silver nitrate. When the reclamation process was completed and the first reactor was removed

  9. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  10. The effect of Stirring Rate on Dissolution of Colemanite and Particle Size of Gypsum Crystals during the Boric Acid Production in a Batch Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Erdo?du; G. . akal; I. Ero?iu; S. zkar

    2004-01-01

    One of the most commonly used boron compounds, boric acid, is produced by dissolving colemanite (2CaO-3B203-5H20) in aqueous sulfuric acid whereby gypsum (CaS04-2H20) is formed as a byproduct. In this study it was aimed to investigate the effect of stirring rate on the dissolution of colemanite and particle size of gypsum formed during the boric acid production. The experiments were

  11. Reactor vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  12. Zeolite-combined plasma reactor for decomposition of toluene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S.-M. Oh; H.-H. Kim; H. Einaga; A. Ogata; S. Futamura; D.-W. Park

    2006-01-01

    Toluene was decomposed in a surface-discharge plasma reactor and the combined effect of zeolite in the plasma reactor was studied. The decomposition of toluene and the product compositions depended on the reactor configuration and the capacity of zeolite to adsorb toluene. Toluene adsorbed on the zeolite (micro-pores) was not properly decomposed in the head of the plasma (P1), while it

  13. DANGER COEFFICIENTS FOR THE ENRICO FERMI FAST BREEDER REACTOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1957-01-01

    Danger coefficients are presented for eleven materials of interest in ; the Fermi Fsst Breeder Reactor-U²³⁵, U²³⁸, Pu²³⁹, B¹°, ; stainless steel, Na²³, C\\/s up 12\\/, Zr, Mo, and fission products. The ; reactor was mocked-up by one-dimensional spherical and cylindrical ; representations. Danger coefficients were calculated by perturbation theory, ; using the reactor period as the eigenvalue 0⁻⁻⁷ sec.

  14. Safety analysis of plasma anomaly consequences in fusion reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Honda; T. Okazaki; Y. Seki; T. Kunugi; I. Aoki

    1995-01-01

    Plasma anomaly consequences in the ITER-CDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Conceptual Design Activity) reactor have been investigated by using a comprehensive safety analysis code for fusion reactors. In this paper, the analysis results are shown for power excursion, disruptions, ex-vessel LOCA and dust production due to disruption. The code will be modified to apply it to the ITER-EDA (Engineering Design Activity)

  15. Radiation effects in materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The 14-MeV neutrons produced in a fusion reactor result in different irradiation damage than the equivalent fluence in a fast breeded reactor, not only because of the higher defect generation rate, but because of the production of significant concentrations of helium and hydrogen. Although no fusion test reactor exists, the effects of combined displacement damage plus helium can be studied in mixed-spectrum fission reactors for alloys containing nickel (e.g., austenitic stainless steels). The presence of helium appears to modify vacancy and interstitial recombination such that microstructural development in alloys differs between the fusion and fission reactor environments. Since mechanical properties of alloys are related to the microstructure, the simultaneous production of helium and displacement damage impacts upon key design properties such as tensile, fatigue, creep, an crack growth. Through an understanding of the basic phenomena occurring during irradiation and the relationships between microstructure and properties, alloys can be tailored to minimize radiation-induced swelling and improve mechanical properties in fusion reactor service.

  16. Radiation effects in materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    The 14-MeV neutrons produced in a fusion reactor result in different irradiation damage than the equivalent fluence in a fast breeder reactor, not only because of the higher defect generation rate, but because of the production of significant concentrations of helium and hydrogen. Although no fusion test reactor exists, the effects of combined displacement damage plus helium can be studied in mixed-spectrum fission reactors for alloys containing nickel (e.g., austenitic stainless steels). The presence of helium appears to modify vacancy and interstitial recombination such that microstructural development in alloys differs between the fusion and fission reactor environments. Since mechanical properties of alloys are related to the microstructure, the simultaneous production of helium and displacement damage impacts upon key design properties such as tensile, fatigue, creep, and crack growth. Through an understanding of the basic phenomena occurring during irradiation and the relationships between microstructure and properties, alloys can be tailored to minimize radiation-induced swelling and improve mechanical properties in fusion reactor service.

  17. Production of Depleted UO2Kernels for the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Program for Use in TRISO Coating Development

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.

    2004-12-02

    The main objective of the Depleted UO{sub 2} Kernels Production Task at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to conduct two small-scale production campaigns to produce 2 kg of UO{sub 2} kernels with diameters of 500 {+-} 20 {micro}m and 3.5 kg of UO{sub 2} kernels with diameters of 350 {+-} 10 {micro}m for the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Program. The final acceptance requirements for the UO{sub 2} kernels are provided in the first section of this report. The kernels were prepared for use by the ORNL Metals and Ceramics Division in a development study to perfect the triisotropic (TRISO) coating process. It was important that the kernels be strong and near theoretical density, with excellent sphericity, minimal surface roughness, and no cracking. This report gives a detailed description of the production efforts and results as well as an in-depth description of the internal gelation process and its chemistry. It describes the laboratory-scale gel-forming apparatus, optimum broth formulation and operating conditions, preparation of the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate stock solution, the system used to provide uniform broth droplet formation and control, and the process of calcining and sintering UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O microspheres to form dense UO{sub 2} kernels. The report also describes improvements and best past practices for uranium kernel formation via the internal gelation process, which utilizes hexamethylenetetramine and urea. Improvements were made in broth formulation and broth droplet formation and control that made it possible in many of the runs in the campaign to produce the desired 350 {+-} 10-{micro}m-diameter kernels, and to obtain very high yields.

  18. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  19. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  20. Fission reactors and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.