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  1. Prazosin treatment suppresses increased vascular permeability in both acute and passively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the lewis rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmuntz, E.A.; Brosnan, C.F.; Norton, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor, has been found to suppress the clinical and histologic expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. This effect appears to be specific for the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor. To determine the effect of this drug on vascular permeability to serum proteins and inflammatory cells, leakage of serum proteins into the central nervous system (CNS) was measured with (/sup 125/I)albumin, and quantitation of cellular inflammation was determined by an estimation of total DNA. The results show that in both actively induced and passively transferred models of the disease, treatment with prazosin significantly suppresses leakage of serum proteins into the CNS but does not significantly suppress the increase of DNA. The results of the (/sup 125/I)albumin studies additionally support the conclusion that the extent of vascular permeability to serum proteins in the spinal cord is a significant correlate of clinical disease. The results of the DNA estimation were at variance with the histologic evidence of cellular infiltration. The authors conclude that treatment with prazosin has a significant effect on the development of vascular edema in EAE. These results additionally validate a role for the adrenergic receptor in the development of EAE, and support the hypothesis that the primary site of action of prazosin is on the vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor.

  2. Prazosin

    MedlinePlus

    ... time taking prazosin, you should take it before you go to bed. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take prazosin exactly as directed. ...

  3. Prazosin in the treatment of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Green, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often follows a chronic course, and the disorder is resistant to treatment with antidepressants and cognitive-behavioral therapy in a proportion of patients. Prazosin, an a1-adrenoceptor blocker, has shown some promise in treating chronic PTSD. A review of this literature was conducted via a search of MEDLINE and SUMMON, using keywords such as PTSD, prazosin, treatment, and resistance. At least 10 clinical studies of prazosin in the treatment of PTSD, including open-label and randomized controlled trials, have been published. All of these studies support the efficacy of prazosin either for treating nightmares and improving sleep or for reducing the severity of PTSD. Treatment of PTSD with prazosin is usually initiated at a dose of 1 mg, with monitoring for hypotension after the first dose. The dose is then gradually increased to maintenance levels of 2-6 mg at night. Studies of military patients with PTSD have used higher doses (e.g., 10-16 mg at night). Prazosin has also been studied in younger and older adults with PTSD and in patients with alcohol problems, in whom it was found to reduce cravings and stress responses. Prazosin offers some hope for treating resistant cases of PTSD in which recurrent nightmares are problematic, with a relatively rapid response within weeks. It is suggested that large-scale civilian trials of prazosin be done, as well as studies concerning the use of prazosin in acute PTSD and as a potential preventive agent. PMID:25036580

  4. Prazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, C F; Goldmuntz, E A; Cammer, W; Factor, S M; Bloom, B R; Norton, W T

    1985-01-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, has been found to suppress the clinical and histological expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. Suppression was more significant in females than in males and was a dose-dependent phenomenon. Analysis of the effect of other adrenergic receptor antagonists supports the conclusion that the suppressive effect of prazosin is a consequence of blockade of the alpha 1-receptor since treatment with either the alpha 2-antagonist yohimbine or the beta-antagonist propranolol exacerbated the disease, whereas treatment with the long-acting mixed alpha 1/alpha 2-antagonist phenoxybenzamine had some suppressive activity. Treatment with prazosin was also able to suppress clinical and histological signs of EAE in animals sensitized by adoptive transfer with activated spleen or lymph node cells. Whether prazosin acts through altering vascular permeability or the immune response, or both, remains to be determined. Images PMID:2994053

  5. Treatment of Nightmares With Prazosin: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Simon; Espinel, Zelde; Lapid, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    Nightmares, frequently associated with posttraumatic stress disorder and clinically relevant in today's world of violence, are difficult to treat, with few pharmacologic options. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence for the use of prazosin in the treatment of nightmares. A comprehensive search was performed using the databases EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, from their inception to March 9, 2012, using keywords prazosin and nightmares/PTSD or associated terms (see text). Two authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts and selected relevant studies. Descriptive data and outcomes of interest from eligible studies were extracted by 1 author, and checked by 2 others. The risk of bias of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was assessed independently by 2 reviewers. Articles met criteria for inclusion if prazosin was used to treat nightmares, and outcome measures included nightmares or related symptoms of sleep disorders. Our search yielded 21 studies, consisting of 4 RCTs, 4 open-label studies, 4 retrospective chart reviews, and 9 single case reports. The prazosin dose ranged from 1 to 16 mg/d. Results were mixed for the 4 RCTs: 3 reported significant improvement in the number of nightmares, and 1 found no reduction in the number of nightmares. Reduced nightmare severity with use of prazosin was consistently reported in the open-label trials, retrospective chart reviews, and single case reports. PMID:22883741

  6. Prazosin for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder sleep disturbances.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa J

    2008-05-01

    An estimated 70-87% of patients who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience sleep disruption. These patients have distressing dreams or nightmares in which the traumatic event is reexperienced, and they also have difficulty in falling or staying asleep. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the treatment of choice for PTSD, but with the exception of fluvoxamine, they are often ineffective or only partially effective for sleep problems. Sedative-hypnotics may be helpful in the short term but are associated with tolerance and addiction potential. In the central nervous system, alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors are known to be important in both the startle and sleep responses. Stimulation of these receptors may contribute to PTSD-related trauma-content nightmares. Prazosin, a highly lipophilic alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor blocker that is traditionally used to treat hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia, has been shown to decrease the occurrence of trauma nightmares in both combat veterans and patients with non-combat-related PTSD. The available data, although mostly from open-label trials, suggest that this agent also improves sleep quality and patients' sense of wellbeing and ability to function in daily activities. The optimum dose is unknown; however, a dose-related response appears to be evident. Clinicians should monitor for orthostatic hypotension, usually seen early in therapy, when prazosin is started in patients with PTSD. PMID:18447662

  7. Preliminary findings concerning the use of prazosin for the treatment of posttraumatic nightmares in a refugee population.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Lorin; Bentley, Jacob; Strachan, Eric; Barbato, Anna; Raskind, Murray

    2009-11-01

    Prazosin, a centrally active alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, has reduced nightmares and sleep disturbances in placebo-controlled studies involving patients with combat and civilian related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this retrospective chart review, we analyzed data from 23 refugees diagnosed with chronic PTSD who were treated with prazosin. The recurrent distressing dreams item of the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used to quantify nightmare severity. A Clinical Global Impressions-Change (CGI-C) score assessed change in overall PTSD severity exclusive of nightmares. Using a paired-samples t-test, we found that CAPS scores decreased significantly (p <0.0005) from baseline after 8 weeks of treatment with a stable dose of prazosin. Overall PTSD severity was "markedly improved" in 6 patients, "moderately improved" in 11 patients, and "minimally improved" in 6 patients. These data provide preliminary support for the use of prazosin in targeting reduction of trauma-related nightmares and promoting improvement of global clinical status within an international sample of severely traumatized refugee patients. PMID:19934720

  8. Effects of oral prazosin on total plasma digoxin levels.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Tokgözoğlu, L; Oto, A; Oram, E; Uğurlu, S

    1988-01-01

    Prazosin and digoxin are frequently coadministered in clinical practice. To determine the effects of oral prazosin treatment on steady-state digoxin levels, 20 patients receiving a constant maintenance dose of digoxin, who had normal renal and liver functions and were not receiving any other treatment, were given 5 mg of prazosin for 3 days. Plasma digoxin levels were measured before, on days 1 and 3 of prazosin treatment, and after prazosin had been discontinued. It was found that prazosin significantly increased plasma digoxin levels. On discontinuation of prazosin digoxin levels returned to their previous values. PMID:3371837

  9. Effect of adrenergic blockers, carvedilol, prazosin, metoprolol and combination of prazosin and metoprolol on paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zubairi, Maysaa B.; Ahmed, Jawad H.; Al-Haroon, Sawsan S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate hepatoprotective potential of carvedilol, prazosin, metoprolol and prazosin plus metoprolol in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male rabbits were divided into six groups, six in each, group 1 received distilled water, group 2 were treated with paracetamol (1 g/kg/day, orally), group 3, 4,5 and 6 were treated at a dose in (mg/kg/day) of the following: Carvedilol (10 mg), prazosin (0.5 mg), metoprolol (10 mg), and a combination of metoprolol (10 mg) and prazosin (0.5 mg) respectively 1 h before paracetamol treatment. All treatments were given for 9 days; animals were sacrificed at day 10. Liver function tests, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) in serum and liver homogenates were estimated. Histopathological examinations of liver were performed. Results: Histopathological changes of hepatotoxicity were found in all paracetamol-treated rabbits. The histopathological findings of paracetamol toxicity disappeared in five rabbits on prazosin, very mild in one. In carvedilol group paracetamol toxicity completely disappeared in three, while mild in three rabbits. Paracetamol hepatotoxicity was not changed by metoprolol. In metoprolol plus prazosin treated rabbits, moderate histopathological changes were observed. Serum liver function tests and MDA in serum and in liver homogenate were elevated; GSH was depleted after paracetamol treatment and returned back to the control value on prior treatment with prazosin. MDA in serum and liver homogenate, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin were significantly decreased after carvedilol and prazosin plus metoprolol treatments. Conclusion: Carvedilol and prazosin are hepatoprotective in paracetamol hepatotoxicity, combination of prazosin and metoprolol have moderate, and metoprolol has a little hepatoprotection. PMID:25538338

  10. Chronic treatment with prazosin or duloxetine lessens concurrent anxiety-like behavior and alcohol intake: evidence of disrupted noradrenergic signaling in anxiety-related alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, Mary J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders have been linked to increased anxiety, and enhanced central noradrenergic signaling may partly explain this relationship. Pharmacological interventions believed to reduce the excitatory effects of norepinephrine have proven effective in attenuating ethanol intake in alcoholics as well as in rodent models of ethanol dependence. However, most preclinical investigations into the effectiveness of these drugs in decreasing ethanol intake have been limited to acute observations, and none have concurrently assessed their anxiolytic effects. The purpose of these studies was to examine the long-term effectiveness of pharmacological interventions presumed to decrease norepinephrine signaling on concomitant ethanol self-administration and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats with relatively high levels of antecedent anxiety-like behavior. Methods Adult male Long-Evans rats self-administered ethanol on an intermittent access schedule for eight to ten weeks prior to being implanted with osmotic minipumps containing either an a1-adrenoreceptor antagonist (prazosin, 1.5 mg/kg/day), a β1/2-adrenoreceptor antagonist (propranolol, 2.5 mg/kg/day), a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (duloxetine, 1.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (10% dimethyl sulfoxide). These drugs were continuously delivered across four weeks, during which animals continued to have intermittent access to ethanol. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed on the elevated plus maze before treatment and again near the end of the drug delivery period. Results Our results indicate that chronic treatment with a low dose of prazosin or duloxetine significantly decreases ethanol self-administration (P < 0.05). Furthermore, this decrease in drinking is accompanied by significant reductions in the expression of anxiety-like behavior (P < 0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that chronic treatment with putative inhibitors of central noradrenergic signaling may attenuate ethanol intake via a

  11. Two Case Reports on Use of Prazosin for Drug Dreams.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Ganesh; Popoola, Oluwole; Campbell, Austin; Nemetalla, Marina A

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse and dependence is estimated to cost roughly $700 billion annually including direct and indirect care in the United States. Drug dreams (DD), or using dreams, are a reportedly common phenomenon among patients with substance abuse, and have been postulated as triggers for relapse. Prazosin is an alpha-1 receptor antagonist originally approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hypertension. Prazosin passes the blood brain barrier easily, contributing to central and cognitive effects. Prazosin's efficacy has been demonstrated in the management of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and associated nightmares. We present the cases of two patients with substance use disorder experiencing DD which resolved after the addition of prazosin during an acute psychiatric hospitalization. To our knowledge, this is the first time treatment of DD with prazosin has been reported in the literature. Both patients reported an alleviation of their DD after the medication was initiated. The effect was immediate and results were seen on the same night of the initial dose. The precise mechanism of this effect is unclear, but we hypothesize it is related to the decrease in noradrenaline effects at α-1 adrenoreceptors in the brain, similar to the effect on nightmares in PTSD. The key limitation is the low number of patients and lack of follow up presented in this report. No causal relationship can be established between the use of prazosin and resolution of DD in our patients. PMID:26900667

  12. Prazosin

    MedlinePlus

    ... when not treated, can cause damage to the brain, heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and other parts of ... fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat chest pain painful erection of the penis that lasts for hours

  13. Comparative Meta-Analysis of Prazosin and Imagery Rehearsal Therapy for Nightmare Frequency, Sleep Quality, and Posttraumatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Seda, Gilbert; Sanchez-Ortuno, Maria M.; Welsh, Carolyn H.; Halbower, Ann C.; Edinger, Jack D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: In this meta-analysis, we compare the short-term efficacy of prazosin vs. IRT on nightmares, sleep quality, and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Methods: Reference databases were searched for randomized controlled trials using IRT or prazosin for nightmares, sleep disturbance, and/or PTSS. Effect sizes were calculated by subtracting the mean posttest score in the control group from the mean posttest score in the treatment group, and dividing the result by the pooled standard deviation of both groups. Mixed effects models were performed to evaluate effects of treatment characteristics, as well as sample characteristics (veteran vs. civilian) on treatment efficacy. Results: Four studies used prazosin, 10 used IRT alone or in combination with another psychological treatment, and 1 included a group receiving prazosin and another group receiving IRT. Overall effect sizes of both treatments were of moderate magnitude for nightmare frequency, sleep quality, and PTSS (p < 0.01). Effect size was not significantly different with type of treatment (psychological vs. pharmacological) on nightmare frequency (p = 0.79), sleep quality (p = 0.65), or PTSS, (p = 0.52). IRT combined with CBT for insomnia showed more improvement in sleep quality compared to prazosin (p = 0.03), IRT alone (p = 0.03), or IRT combined with another psychological intervention, (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Although IRT interventions and prazosin yield comparable acute effects for the treatment of nightmares, adding CBT for insomnia to IRT seems to enhance treatment outcomes pertaining to sleep quality and PTSS. More randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up are warranted. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 9. Citation: Seda G, Sanchez-Ortuno MM, Welsh CH, Halbower AC, Edinger JD. Comparative meta-analysis of prazosin and imagery rehearsal therapy for nightmare frequency, sleep quality, and posttraumatic stress. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(1):11

  14. Low-dose prazosin in combination with 5-HT6 antagonist PRX-07034 has antipsychotic effects.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Renny; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Irupannanavar, Shantaveer

    2015-01-01

    An extensive amount of research has focused on the development of new pharmacological agents to treat schizophrenia. Varying from person to person, schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disease with symptoms of positive, negative, and cognitive deficits. PRX-07034, a 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor antagonist has been evaluated for its potential in treating obesity and cognitive deficits. This study evaluated PRX-07034 (0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg body mass, by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection), in combination with a low dose of prazosin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), for its antipsychotic potential. The research utilized a stereotypy assay, an open field test, an object recognition task, and prepulse inhibition. Dizocilpine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, was also administered in the above-mentioned assays as a psychomimetic. The combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin alleviated stereotypy and hyperlocomotor activity while enhancing memory in an object recognition task, and reversed sensory-gating deficits induced by dizocilpine. Examination of the medial prefrontal cortex revealed that a combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin reduced the dizocilpine-mediated increase of 5-HT. These results suggest that the combination of a 5-HT6 antagonist with low doses of prazosin could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25429515

  15. Investigation of the atypical glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous prazosin salts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokesh; Popat, Dharmesh; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript studied the effect of counterion on the glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous salts of prazosin. Three amorphous salts of prazosin, namely, prazosin hydrochloride, prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate were prepared by spray drying, and characterized by optical-polarized microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the glass transition and recrystallization temperature of amorphous salts. Glass transition of amorphous salts followed the order: prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate ~ prazosin hydrochloride. Amorphous prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate showed glass transition, followed by recrystallization. In contrast, amorphous prazosin hydrochloride showed glass transition and recrystallization simultaneously. Density Functional Theory, however, suggested the expected order of glass transition as prazosin hydrochloride > prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate. The counterintuitive observation of amorphous prazosin hydrochloride having lower glass transition was explained in terms of its lower activation energy (206.1 kJ/mol) for molecular mobility at Tg, compared to that for amorphous prazosin mesylate (448.5 kJ/mol) and prazosin tosylate (490.7 kJ/mol), and was further correlated to a difference in hydrogen bonding strength of the amorphous and the corresponding recrystallized salts. This study has implications in selection of an optimal amorphous salt form for pharmaceutical development. PMID:24310595

  16. The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin enhances sleep continuity in fear-conditioned Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    Laitman, Benjamin M.; Gajewski, Nicholas D.; Mann, Graziella L.; Kubin, Leszek; Morrison, Adrian R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is well described in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and likely has significant functional consequences. Fear-conditioned rodents may offer an attractive model of the changes in sleep that characterize PTSD. Following fear conditioning (FC), Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a strain known to be particularly stress-sensitive, have increased REMS fragmentation that can be quantified as a shift in the distribution of REMS episodes towards the more frequent occurrence of sequential REMS (inter-REMS episode interval ≤ 3 min) vs. single REMS (interval > 3 min). The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin has demonstrated efficacy in normalizing sleep in PTSD. To determine the utility of fear-conditioned WKY rats as a model of sleep disturbances typical of PTSD and as a platform for the development of new treatments, we tested the hypothesis that prazosin would reduce REMS fragmentation in fear-conditioned WKY rats. Sleep parameters and freezing (a standard measure of anxiety in rodents) were quantified at baseline and on days 1, 7, and 14 following FC, with either prazosin (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle injections administered prior to testing in a between-group design. Fear conditioning was achieved by pairing tones with a mild electric foot shock (1.0 mA, 0.5 s). One, 7, and 14 days following FC, prazosin or vehicle was injected, the tone was presented, freezing was measured, and then sleep was recorded from 11 AM to 3 PM. WKY rats given prazosin, compared to those given vehicle, had a lower amount of seq-REMS relative to total REMS time 14 days after FC. They also had a shorter non-REMS latency and fewer non-REMS arousals at baseline and on days 1 and 7 after FC. Thus, in FC rats, prazosin reduced both REMS fragmentation and non-REMS discontinuity. PMID:24246572

  17. Prazosin addition to fluvoxamine: A preclinical study and open clinical trial in OCD.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Klompmakers, André; Figee, Martijn; Fluitman, Sjoerd; Vulink, Nienke; Westenberg, Herman G M; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in psychiatric disorders may be "augmented" through the addition of atypical antipsychotic drugs. A synergistic increase in dopamine (DA) release in the prefrontal cortex has been suggested to underlie this augmentation effect, though the mechanism of action is not clear yet. We used in vivo microdialysis in rats to study DA release following the administration of combinations of fluvoxamine (10 mg/kg) and quetiapine (10 mg/kg) with various monoamine-related drugs. The results confirmed that the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 (0.05 mg/kg) partially blocked the fluvoxamine-quetiapine synergistic effect (maximum DA increase dropped from 325% to 214%). A novel finding is that the α1-adrenergic blocker prazosin (1 mg/kg), combined with fluvoxamine, partially mimicked the effect of augmentation (maximum DA increase 205%; area-under-the-curve 163%). As this suggested that prazosin augmentation might be tested in a clinical study, we performed an open clinical trial of prazosin 20 mg addition to SRI in therapy-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder applying for neurosurgery. A small, non-significant reduction in Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) scores was observed in 10 patients and one patient was classified as a responder with a reduction in Y-BOCS scores of more than 25%. We suggest that future clinical studies augmenting SRIs with an α1-adrenergic blocker in less treatment resistant cases should be considered. The clinical trial "Prazosin in combination with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor for patients with Obsessive Compulsive disorder: an open label study" was registered at 24/05/2011 under trial number ISRCTN61562706: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN61562706. PMID:26712326

  18. Responsiveness of superficial hand veins to phenylephrine in essential hypertension. Alpha adrenergic blockade during prazosin therapy.

    PubMed

    Eichler, H G; Ford, G A; Blaschke, T F; Swislocki, A; Hoffman, B B

    1989-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension show an increase in vascular resistance. It is unclear whether this is caused by structural changes in the arterial wall or by hyperresponsiveness of vascular smooth muscle to endogenous alpha adrenergic agonists. Using the dorsal hand vein compliance technique we compared the changes in diameter of superficial veins in response to phenylephrine, an alpha 1 adrenergic receptor agonist, and to nitroglycerin, a venorelaxant, in patients with essential hypertension and in normotensive subjects. The dose of phenylephrine that produced 50% of maximal venoconstriction (ED50) in the hypertensive subjects was 257 ng/min (geometric mean; log mean +/- SD was 2.41 +/- 0.54). In the control subjects the ED50 was 269 ng/min (geometric mean; log mean was 2.43 +/- 0.43). Maximal response (Emax) for phenylephrine was 84 +/- 13% in the hypertensive subjects and 90 +/- 6% in the control subjects. Differences in the group means of the ED50 (P = 0.92) or the Emax (P = 0.27) were not significant. There were no significant differences in the ED50 (P = 0.54) or the Emax (P = 0.08) for nitroglycerin between the two groups. These results show no evidence for a generalized change in alpha adrenergic responsiveness in hypertension and support the concept that increased blood pressure responses to alpha adrenergic stimulation in hypertensives are due to structural and geometric changes in the arterial wall rather than to an increased responsiveness of postsynaptic alpha adrenergic receptors. The phenylephrine studies were repeated in seven hypertensive patients during treatment with prazosin, an alpha 1 adrenergic antagonist. The mean dose ratio of the shift in phenylephrine ED50 (ED50 during prazosin therapy/ED50 before prazosin therapy) was 6.1. This indicates that small doses of prazosin (1-2 mg) cause significant in vivo shifts in the dose-response relationship of alpha adrenergic agonists. The dorsal hand vein compliance technique is useful in

  19. Low-Dose Prazosin Alone and in Combination with Propranolol or Naltrexone: Effects on Ethanol- and Sucrose-Seeking and Self-Administration in the P Rat

    PubMed Central

    Verplaetse, Terril L.; Czachowski, Cristine L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Evidence suggests that the noradrenergic system mediates ethanol-reinforcement. However, preclinical studies suggest that noradrenergic antagonists block other oral reinforcers indicating possible unwanted secondary medication effects. Methods This study examined combinations of low-dose prazosin with propranolol or naltrexone using a behavioral paradigm that separately assesses reinforcer-seeking and self-administration. Male alcohol-preferring (P) rats (n=20/experiment) were trained to complete a response requirement (RR) resulting in access to 1% sucrose (n=10) or 10% ethanol (n=10) for 20min. Rats received vehicle, prazosin alone (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg; intraperitoneally (IP)) or prazosin in combination with propranolol (5 mg/kg (IP); Exp1) or in combination with naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg (subcutaneously (SC); Exp2). Results For Exp1, prazosin alone effectively decreased sucrose-seeking more than ethanol-seeking, but decreased ethanol self-administration only. Propranolol alone effectively decreased ethanol-seeking more than sucrose-seeking and decreased ethanol intake only. At some dose combinations, there was a greater attenuation of ethanol and sucrose intake relative to either drug alone. For Exp2, prazosin alone and naltrexone alone were effective in decreasing ethanol-seeking and intake only. Combination treatment was more effective than either drug alone at decreasing ethanol-seeking and consumption and sucrose intake, but not sucrose-seeking. Conclusions Propranolol and naltrexone alone were specific to ethanol indicating that low doses of either medication may be beneficial in treating alcohol use disorders. Prazosin in combination with propranolol or naltrexone was more effective than either drug alone, but also reduced sucrose-reinforced behaviors. These data suggest that the noradrenergic system is a viable target for developing treatment approaches for problem drinkers. PMID:25743758

  20. Targeting the Noradrenergic System in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prazosin Trials.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Marini, Stefano; Serroni, Nicola; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Mazza, Monica; Tempesta, Daniela; Valchera, Alessandro; Fornaro, Michele; Pompili, Maurizio; Sepede, Gianna; Vellante, Federica; Orsolini, Laura; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that may develop after exposure to a life-threatening trauma. As veterans and armed forces may deal with diverse health problems compared with civilians, they have a greater risk for psychiatric disorders, including PTSD, than civilians, even if the disorder may be also frequent in the general population. PTSD is associated with significant comorbidity, especially with mood disorders and substance abuse. Moreover, the suicide risk is higher in PTSD patients than in the general population. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), atypical antipsychotics and benzodiazepines are commonly employed in the management of PTSD, but often these treatments fail or are discontinued due to adverse effects. It has been demonstrated that high noradrenergic activity may be associated with hyperarousal, trauma nightmares and sleep disturbances in PTSD subjects, probably through the stimulation of α -1 adrenergic receptors in the brain prefrontal cortex. The α -1 adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin decreases noradrenaline effects at brain α-1 adrenoreceptors and may be a promising agent in the treatment of PTSD, as some studies have found it effective and well tolerated. Therefore, the present review is aimed to examine the role of noradrenergic system in the pathophysiology of PTSD. Moreover, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of prazosin in PTSD patients. Meta-analysis was used to combine data from multiple studies and better estimate the effect of prazosin on specific outcomes. We found prazosin to be significantly more efficacious than placebo in reducing distressing dreams in PTSD patients, even though our results should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies included in our quantitative synthesis. PMID:25944011

  1. Thought suppression and treatment outcome in late-life depression.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Z; Cheavens, J S; Compton, J S; Thorp, S R; Lynch, T R

    2005-01-01

    This study examined severity of depression, age of onset, and thought suppression as predictors of treatment outcome. Measures were taken pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at six-month follow-up in 34 depressed older adults receiving the treatment protocol described in Lynch, Morse, Mendelson & Robins (Dialectical behavior therapy for depressed older adults, American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 11, 33-45, 2003). Severity and chronicity of depression and higher levels of thought suppression were associated with higher depressive symptoms six months after treatment. Findings are consistent with research suggesting that severity and chronicity of depression predict poor clinical outcome. In addition, these results provide preliminary evidence that the tendency to cope with unwanted thoughts by deliberate attempts to not experience such thoughts may be an important pre-treatment predictor of outcome among depressed older adults. Larger studies are needed to explore whether thought suppression mediates long-term recovery from depression. PMID:15841830

  2. Prazosin displays anticancer activity against human prostate cancers: targeting DNA and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ssu-Chia; Chueh, Shih-Chieh; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Li, Tsia-Kun; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Liao, Cho-Hwa; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Guh, Jih-Hwa

    2007-10-01

    Quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, in particular doxazosin and terazosin, are suggested to display antineoplastic activity against prostate cancers. However, there are few studies elucidating the effect of prazosin. In this study, prazosin displayed antiproliferative activity superior to that of other alpha1-blockers, including doxazosin, terazosin, tamsulosin, and phentolamine. Prazosin induced G2 checkpoint arrest and subsequent apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3, DU-145, and LNCaP cells. In p53-null PC-3 cells, prazosin induced an increase in DNA strand breaks and ATM/ATR checkpoint pathways, leading to the activation of downstream signaling cascades, including Cdc25c phosphorylation at Ser216, nuclear export of Cdc25c, and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1 phosphorylation at Tyr15. The data, together with sustained elevated cyclin A levels (other than cyclin B1 levels), suggested that Cdk1 activity was inactivated by prazosin. Moreover, prazosin triggered mitochondria-mediated and caspase-executed apoptotic pathways in PC-3 cells. The oral administration of prazosin significantly reduced tumor mass in PC-3-derived cancer xenografts in nude mice. In summary, we suggest that prazosin is a potential antitumor agent that induces cell apoptosis through the induction of DNA damage stress, leading to Cdk1 inactivation and G2 checkpoint arrest. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated caspase cascades are triggered to induce apoptosis in PC-3 cells. PMID:17971903

  3. Comparative bioavailability study of two brands of prazosin-containing tablets in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guelen, P J; Janssen, T J; Lam, M H; Vree, T B; Exler, P S

    1990-10-19

    The bioavailability of two prazosin formulations was studied in 12 healthy volunteers. 1 Subject left the study. Based on the statistical tests of the pharmacokinetic parameters of prazosin in 11 volunteers, such as t 1/2, Cmax, tmax and AUC, it could be concluded that both preparations had comparable bioavailabilities. PMID:2255586

  4. NON-NIGHTMARE DISTRESSED AWAKENINGS IN VETERANS WITH POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER: RESPONSE TO PRAZOSIN

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Charles E.; Taylor, Fletcher B.; McFall, Miles E.; Barnes, Robert F.; Raskind, Murray A.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-two veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed for trauma-related nightmares (NM) and non-nightmare distressed awakenings (NNDA) before and after treatment with the alpha-1 adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin at an average bedtime dose of 9.6 mg/day. Ratings combining frequency and intensity dimensions of NM decreased from 3.6 ± 2.6 to 2.2 ± 2.4 (p<0.05), NNDA from 5.2 ± 1.7 to 2.1 ± 2.4 (p<0.01), and sleep difficulty from 7.2 ± 8 to 4.1 ± 2.3 (p<0.01) per week. These results suggest that increased brain adrenergic activity may contribute to the pathophysiology of both NM and NNDA in PTSD. PMID:18720392

  5. Vasodilatation with captopril and prazosin in chronic heart failure: double blind study at rest and on exercise.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, J; Canepa-Anson, R; Norell, M S; Poole-Wilson, P; Sutton, G

    1986-03-01

    A double blind cross over study was performed to compare the long term hormonal, haemodynamic, and clinical responses to specific inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (captopril) and of the alpha 1 adrenoceptors of the sympathetic system (prazosin) both at rest and during upright exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. Sixteen patients completed one month's treatment with each drug. During conventional diuretic treatment (control) plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and noradrenaline were increased at rest and on exercise. Control left ventricular filling pressures were raised, and correlated significantly with plasma renin activity both at rest and on exercise. Systemic vascular resistance was increased at rest, and its reduction during exercise correlated inversely with the increase in plasma renin activity and plasma noradrenaline. After one month's treatment with captopril there were reductions in plasma aldosterone, weight, left ventricular filling pressure, and systemic vascular resistance at rest and on exercise. Dyspnoea was relieved and exercise capacity increased. The greater fall in systemic vascular resistance on exercise no longer correlated with the increase in plasma renin activity. During treatment with prazosin there were increases in plasma noradrenaline and, transiently, in plasma aldosterone. Fluid retention occurred, and left ventricular filling pressure was unchanged. Compared with control values systemic vascular resistance was reduced at rest but not on exercise. Dyspnoea and exercise capacity did not improve. In chronic heart failure, vasodilatation by inhibition of the alpha adrenergic system with prazosin causes compensatory stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and does not result in clinical benefit. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with captopril causes secondary vasodilatation at rest and on exercise and results in improvement in symptoms and exercise capacity. PMID

  6. Metabolism of prazosin in rat and characterization of metabolites in plasma, urine, faeces, brain and bile using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS).

    PubMed

    Erve, J C L; Vashishtha, S C; Ojewoye, O; Adedoyin, A; Espina, R; Demaio, W; Talaat, R E

    2008-05-01

    1. Prazosin, 2-[4-(2-furanoyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-4-amino-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, is an antihypertensive agent that has been used safely since 1976 and is currently being investigated for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. The in vivo metabolism of prazosin in rat was first reported in 1977, although at the time analytical techniques were not as sophisticated, nor were the mass spectrometers as sensitive, as today. Recently, the in vitro metabolism of prazosin in rat liver microsomes and cryopreserved hepatocytes was investigated using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), which revealed new metabolic pathways. 2. In the present work, rat in vivo metabolism was reinvestigated using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography, or chip-based nanoflow electrospray ionization, with the aim of identifying metabolites revealed by the in vitro studies and any new metabolites. 3. It is reported that prazosin was metabolized in rats to produce the metabolites observed in vitro. In addition, new phase I metabolites, M18, M20 and M21, were formed and conjugation with glucose or taurine formed the new phase II metabolites, M16 and M19, respectively. 4. Evidence for bioactivation of prazosin included detection of ring-opened metabolites (M4 and M7) and a cysteinyl-glycine conjugate (M17). Further support to the structure of the ring-opened metabolite M7 was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on M7 isolated from urine. PMID:18421626

  7. The Measurement and Treatment of Suppression in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joanna M.; Hess, Robert F.; Cooperstock, Jeremy R.; To, Long; Thompson, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    performance advantage is a measure of the "balance point" and is a direct measure of suppression. This technique has been validated psychophysically both in control13,14 and patient6,9,11 populations. In addition to measuring suppression this technique also forms the basis of a novel form of treatment to decrease suppression over time and improve binocular and often monocular function in adult patients with amblyopia12,15,16 . This new treatment approach can be deployed either on the goggle system described above or on a specially modified iPod touch device15. PMID:23271400

  8. Comparative effects of pinacidil and prazosin on blood pressure, weight, plasma volume, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and the renal kallikrein-kinin system in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R J; Weinberg, M S

    1987-12-01

    Patients with essential hypertension were randomized to treatment with either prazosin or pinacidil, a new direct-acting vasodilator. Factors that might modulate the antihypertensive response and result in pseudotolerance to these drugs were measured before initiation of therapy and following 12 weeks of treatment. Despite significant reductions in blood pressure, pinacidil and prazosin did not produce an increase in plasma volume, did not activate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and did not interfere with the renal kallikrein-kinin system. The data fail to reveal evidence of physiologic compensatory changes that would lead to the development of pseudotolerance. PMID:3330989

  9. Combined treatment with atorvastatin and minocycline suppresses severity of EAE.

    PubMed

    Luccarini, Ilaria; Ballerini, Clara; Biagioli, Tiziana; Biamonte, Filippo; Bellucci, Arianna; Rosi, Maria Cristina; Grossi, Cristina; Massacesi, Luca; Casamenti, Fiorella

    2008-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). An approach to improve MS treatment is to identify a rational combination of new medications or existing therapies that impact different aspects of the disease process. Statins are effective in the treatment of MS animal models and are promising candidates for future treatment. Minocycline ameliorates clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and exhibits several anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this study, we tested whether the combination of these two drugs could produce beneficial effects in EAE mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG). Our findings show that combined treatment, compared to using the medications alone, resulted in a significant reduction in disease severity, in both the acute and chronic phases of the disease, along with attenuation of inflammation, demyelination and axonal loss. Stereological analysis revealed that the combined treatment significantly guarded against neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Moreover, a significant suppression of anti-MOG antibody production in animals treated with the two medications was found. In conclusion, our findings prove that this combination of drugs is neuroprotective and suppresses the severity of EAE. Furthermore, this pharmacological approach appears to be promising as a future therapeutic strategy to control MS. PMID:18346732

  10. Advances in the Design and Synthesis of Prazosin Derivatives over the Last Ten Years

    PubMed Central

    Desiniotis, Andreas; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mechanistic, translational and pharmacological studies led to the identification, preferred localization, binding characteristics, structure and functional properties of α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) subtypes in the bladder neck, bladder and prostate gland. The evidence gathered on α1-ARs, provided a molecular platform for the development of subtype selective antagonists, resulting in more effective approaches targeting those receptors for the treatment of outlet bladder obstruction and benign prostate hyperplasia. Areas Covered This review provides a comprehensive synopsis of advances over the last decade, in the design and optimization of Prazosin, Doxazosin, Terazosin quinazoline-based derivatives as clinically effective α1-AR antagonists. Furthermore, it discusses evidence on the metabolic and growth interference action by these agents, in addition to their smooth-muscle relaxing effects. The new action recognition emerges from compelling data on the inhibitory effect of quinazoline-based antagonists on primary tumor growth and progression to metastasis. In addition to the cellular findings in the prostate, functional validation and therapeutic impact of selected lead pharmaceutically optimized derivatives in the context of impairing vascularity and triggering tumor apoptosis, are also summarized. Expert Opinion The expanding knowledge on targeting intracellular signalling pathways driving the cellular response via an α1-AR dependent and independent antagonistic action, must be invested towards the optimization of new agents that while bypassing AR, exhibit improved pharmacological efficacy against human cancer. PMID:22148952

  11. The potential for prazosin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in causing hypoxia in tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burney, I. A.; Maxwell, R. J.; Griffiths, J. R.; Field, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, changes in tumour metabolic status were studied in a transplanted rat fibrosarcoma following the administration of vasodilators. Mean Arterial Blood Pressure (MABP) was monitored simultaneously. Two vasodilators were studied, prazosin and CGRP, which altered the NMR parameters Pi/sigma P, beta NTP,Pi, PCr/Pi and PME/Pi in a dose dependent manner. There was a good correlation between the various NMR parameters; for analysis, Pi/sigma P was used for convenience. With increasing doses of vasodilator, Pi/sigma P increased and the MABP decreased. Reduction in pHNMR showed a correlation with decreasing MABP following the administration of prazosin but not after CGRP. Both prazosin and CGRP produced changes in 31P NMR spectra consistent with a reduction in tumour blood flow. The results for prazosin and CGRP were comparable and showed a 15-20% increase in Pi/sigma P for a 20% reduction in MABP. These results were compared with those from hydralazine. With hydralazine an acceptable reduction in blood pressure (up to approximately 25%) has little effect and may even alter NMR parameters consistent with an increase in blood flow, a reduction of approximately 40% is required for a significant decrease in flow. Both prazosin and CGRP are shown to be far more effective than hydralazine in causing tumour hypoxia at a clinically acceptable reduction in blood pressure. CGRP may be the more suitable for clinical use because of its short half life, its capability to achieve controlled hypotension and the relatively few side effects associated with its use. PMID:1911217

  12. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Murahata, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Asami; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 40 µg/kg medetomidine intramuscularly and saline (as the control), 160 µg/kg prazosin, or 40, 160 or 480 µg/kg atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 hr later. Volume, pH and specific gravity of urine; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level; and creatinine, osmolality and electrolyte levels in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine, but not prazosin, antagonized medetomidine-induced diuresis. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine, but was not dose dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed medetomidine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality and increases in plasma osmolality and free-water clearance. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP level, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine initially and temporarily increased plasma AVP levels, suggesting that this may partly influence the antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of medetomidine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors, but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats. PMID:24107430

  13. Lack of specific (/sup 3/H) prazosin binding sites in dog and rabbit cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, P.M.; Banner, W. Jr.; Duckles, S.P.

    1984-11-19

    In order to explore the characteristics of alpha adrenergic receptors on cerebrovascular smooth muscle, specific binding sites for the alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic ligand, (/sup 3/H) prazosin, were studied in blood vessel homogenates. No specific (/sup 3/H) prazosin binding was found in either rabbit or dog cerebral arteries, but specific binding was demonstrated in the rabbit saphenous and ear arteries. In the ear artery /sup 3/H-prazosin binding was saturable with a K/sub d/ of 0.51 +/- 0.20 nM and a Bmax of 89 +/- 29 fmoles/mg protein. To confirm the adequacy of our membrane preparation, homogenates of both dog and rabbit cerebral arteries showed saturable specific binding with two different ligands: one for muscarinic receptors, (/sup 3/H)(-) quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and one for alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors, (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. The results of these studies demonstrate a lack of alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors on cerebral blood vessels, confirming functional studies showing only a weak contractile response to norepinephrine. 29 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Quiet engine program: Turbine noise suppression. -Volume 1: General treatment evaluation and measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, A.; Hehmann, H.; Radecki, K.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic treatment was developed for jet engine turbine noise suppression. Acoustic impedance and duct transmission loss measurements were made for various suppression systems. An environmental compatibility study on several material types having suppression characteristics is presented. Two sets of engine hardware were designed and are described along with engine test results which include probe, farfield, near field, and acoustic directional array data. Comparisons of the expected and the measured suppression levels are given as well as a discussion of test results and design techniques.

  15. Treatment of pastures with diflubenzuron suppresses Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diflubenzuron is an insect growth regulator labeled for application to pastures and rangeland to suppress grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) populations. Livestock are permitted access to land immediately after treatment. We hypothesized that the development and survivorship of horn fly Haematobia ...

  16. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats.

    PubMed

    Murahata, Yusuke; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 2 mg/kg BW xylazine intramuscularly, and saline (as the control); 160 μg/kg BW prazosin; or 40, 160, or 480 μg/kg BW atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 h later. Urine and blood samples were collected 10 times over 8 h. Urine volume, pH, and specific gravity; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentration; and creatinine, osmolality, and electrolyte values in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine antagonized xylazine-induced diuresis, but prazosin did not. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine but not dose-dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed xylazine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality, and the increase in free water clearance. Glomerular filtration rate, osmolar clearance, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were not significantly altered. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP concentration, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine increased plasma AVP concentration initially and temporarily, suggesting that this may in part influence antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of xylazine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. PMID:25356000

  17. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats

    PubMed Central

    Murahata, Yusuke; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 2 mg/kg BW xylazine intramuscularly, and saline (as the control); 160 μg/kg BW prazosin; or 40, 160, or 480 μg/kg BW atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 h later. Urine and blood samples were collected 10 times over 8 h. Urine volume, pH, and specific gravity; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentration; and creatinine, osmolality, and electrolyte values in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine antagonized xylazine-induced diuresis, but prazosin did not. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine but not dose-dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed xylazine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality, and the increase in free water clearance. Glomerular filtration rate, osmolar clearance, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were not significantly altered. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP concentration, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine increased plasma AVP concentration initially and temporarily, suggesting that this may in part influence antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of xylazine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. PMID:25356000

  18. A Pilot Trial of Prazosin, an Alpha-1 Adrenergic Antagonist, for Comorbid Alcohol Dependence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Tracy L.; Malte, Carol A.; Dietel, Bergetta; Tell, Dana; Pocock, Ian; Lyons, Robert; Varon, Dana; Raskind, Murray; Saxon, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) commonly co-occur and are associated with greater symptom severity and costs than either disorder alone. No pharmacologic interventions have been found to decrease both alcohol use and PTSD symptom severity relative to matched placebo. Prazosin, an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy reducing PTSD and AD symptoms among individuals with one or the other disorder and may be useful in addressing comorbid PTSD/AD. Methods Prazosin and matched placebo were compared in the context of an outpatient 6-week double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial involving 30 individuals with comorbid PTSD/AD. Medication was titrated to 4mg q AM, 4mg q PM and 8mg qhs by the end of week 2. Participants in both conditions received five Medical Management sessions. Information regarding alcohol use, craving, and PTSD was gathered daily using a telephone Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system. Results Participants randomized to prazosin had a greater reduction in percent days drinking per week and percent days heavy drinking per week between baseline and week 6 than did placebo participants. No significant differences were detected within or between groups in change from weeks 1 to 6 in total PTSD symptoms. Participants in the prazosin condition reported drowsiness on significantly more days than those in the placebo condition. Conclusions Consistent with the extant research evaluating medications for comorbid PTSD/AD, the current evaluation of prazosin also found decreased alcohol consumption but no medication effect on PTSD symptomatology. PMID:25827659

  19. Suppressed or enhanced antibody responses in vitro after BCG treatment of mice: importance of BCG viability.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Brown, I N; Sljivić, V S

    1979-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, BCG, is known to be capable of either enhancing or suppressing various immune responses. Using a standard technique and number of organisms, some of the parameters predetermining whether enhancement or supression will occur have been investigated. Dead BCG given intravenously into mice caused an enhancement of the antibody response in vitro to sheep erythrocytes. In contrast, the same number of viable organisms caused suppression if given intravenously but enhancement if given subcutaneously. The inclusion of 25% or more killed organisms in an intravenous inoculum of fully viable organisms changed suppression to enhancement. Treatment of BCG infected mice with streptomycin lessened the suppression but did not change it to enhancement. The possible causes of suppression are discussed. PMID:391696

  20. Development and evaluation of treatment paradigms for the suppression of smoking behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Dericco, D A; Brigham, T A; Garlington, W K

    1977-01-01

    A multiple-baseline component-analysis design was employed to assess the effectiveness of three treatment programs for suppressing the cigarette smoking behavior of 24 subjects. Sartiation, cognitive control, and continger shock procedures were evaluated. The results demonstrated a consistent relationship between contingent shock and suppression of smoking. It was further indicated that subjects should be exposed to the number of sessions necessary to achieve total suppression in order to gain maximally from treatment and to avoid relapse. Neither the satiation component nor the cognitive control component was correlated with clear, permanent decrements in smoking frequencies. To date no other treatment program has demonstrated the dramatic effects ofethe contingent shock procedures used in the present study. PMID:885824

  1. Surface treatment method for 1/f noise suppression in reactively sputtered nickel oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Park, Seung-Man; Lee, Hee Chul

    2012-07-01

    A surface treatment method combined with O2 plasma treatment and Ar+ bombardment is proposed for 1/f noise suppression in a reactively sputtered NiO film as a micro-bolometer sensing material. The 1/f noise power spectral density on a sample prepared by the proposed surface treatment method prior to the contact formation is suppressed to a level roughly 18 times lower than that on an untreated sample. The improved noise characteristic can be ascribed to the cooperative effects of the two steps in the proposed surface treatment method. In its effects, the oxygen plasma treatment is supposed to increase the Ni3+ component on the surface of the NiO film, which in turn increases the hole concentration on the surface. Additional Ar+ bombardment is expected to remove contaminants on the surface of the NiO film, leading to a low contact resistance.

  2. The α1 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Reduces Heroin Self-Administration in Rats with Extended Access to Heroin Administration

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell, Thomas N.; Walker, Brendan M.; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration in dependent rats. Prazosin, an α1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). The data show that the α1-adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended drug access, while also stimulating their food intake by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. PMID:18703080

  3. Suppression of surface crystallization on borosilicate glass using RF plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sunghyun; Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Jin, Joo-Young; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2014-10-01

    Surface crystallization on a commercial grade borosilicate glass wafer, Borofloat® 33, is effectively prevented against 3 h of thermal reflow process at 850 °C. Surface plasma treatment with three different reactive gases, CF4, SF6, and Cl2, has been performed prior to the annealing. The effect of plasma treatment on surface ion concentration and nucleation of cristobalite were examined through optical microscope and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The dominant cause that suppresses crystallization was verified to be the increase of surface ion concentration of alumina during the plasma treatment. Both CF4 and SF6 treatment of no less than 30 s showed significant efficacy in suppressing crystallization by a factor of more than 112. Average surface roughness and the optical transparency were also enhanced by a factor of 15 and 3, respectively, compared to untreated sample.

  4. The effect of prazosin pretreatment on hyperthermia produced by noradrenaline in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Szreder, Z

    1991-01-01

    1. Hyperthermia produced by noradrenaline (NA) was accompanied by increased metabolic rate and vasoconstriction of ear skin vessels and a fall in evaporation heat loss. 2. Prazosin (PRA), administered as a single injection, decreased of hyperthermia elicited by NA mainly of attenuation the processes concerned with the heat production and increased of heat loss from respiratory tract and ear skin surface. 3. PRA administered in a 3 hr infusion did not only produce an abolishment of NA-induced hyperthermia but also exerted a hypothermizing effect. 4. PRA introduced intracerebroventricularly also induced a decline in core temperature, inhibiting the metabolic rate stimulated by this amine. 5. These results seem to suggest that NA-caused hyperthermia may be controlled through central adrenergic structures, which are effectively blocked by PRA. Besides, we have presented one more proof concerning the antihyperthermizing activity of PRA and its central point of activity catch. PMID:1869019

  5. Emotional suppression tendencies as predictors of symptoms, mood, and coping appraisals during AC chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schlatter, Melanie C; Cameron, Linda D

    2010-08-01

    Tendencies to suppress negative emotions have been shown to predict adjustment to cancer and cancer progression. We examined whether emotional suppression, in terms of both general and emotion-specific tendencies, predict symptom reports, mood states, and coping appraisals during adriamycin/doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide/cytoxan chemotherapy for breast cancer. Forty participants completed a measure yielding scores for anxiety suppression, anger suppression, depression suppression, and total emotional suppression. They then reported their experiences of 34 physical symptoms, mood, and coping efficacy on a daily basis for the duration of treatment (84 days). Mixed model analyses revealed that emotional suppression predicted lower reports of symptoms that are vague, well-known, and potentially embarrassing side effects of chemotherapy (e.g., fatigue and constipation). Emotional suppression and particularly anger suppression predicted higher reports of symptoms relating to immune function and cardiovascular arousal (e.g., mouth sores and heart palpitations) and with appraisals of poorer coping. The three suppression tendencies exhibited distinctive patterns of relationships with symptoms, mood, and coping appraisals, suggesting that anxiety suppression, anger suppression, and depression suppression have partially independent relationships with symptomatic and mood processes. The findings highlight the potential importance of emotional suppression for understanding symptom and coping responses during chemotherapy. PMID:20652465

  6. Comparative study on pharmacokinetics and in vivo alpha1-adrenoceptor binding of [3H]tamsulosin and [3H]prazosin in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, T; Yamada, S; Deguchi, Y; Kimura, R

    1999-04-01

    The plasma concentration, total radioactivity and in vivo alpha1-adrenoceptor binding in rat tissues after intravenous (i.v.) injection of [3H]tamsulosin were measured and they were compared with those obtained after the injection of [3H]prazosin. The plasma concentration of [3H]tamsulosin was consistently higher than that of [3H]prazosin, with 1.4 times greater areas under the curve (AUC(0-infinity)) of plasma concentration. As there was a significantly lower value of apparent volume of central compartment (Vd(c)) and distribution volume at steady state (Vd(ss)) for [3H]tamsulosin than [3H]prazosin with little difference in elimination rate constant (beta), the higher concentration of [3H]tamsulosin in plasma might be associated mainly with the smaller volume of distribution. The ratio of total radioactivity in tissues to the plasma unbound concentration of [3H]tamsulosin after i.v. injection of the ligand was consistently lower than that of [3H]prazosin. These observations suggest that [3H]tamsulosin is distributed in rat tissues in a more limited manner than [3H]prazosin. A significantly lower level of in vivo specific binding of [3H]tamsulosin than [3H]prazosin was observed in the spleen, heart and liver. Further, the apparent dissociation constant (Kd) and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) for in vivo specific [3H]tamsulosin binding were considerably lower than those for [3H]prazosin binding. Therefore, these findings suggest that [3H]tamsulosin labels preferentially a subpopulation of the alpha1-adrenoceptor sites in rat tissues labeled by [3H]prazosin. In conclusion, the present study has shown that there is a significant difference in the pharmacokinetics and in vivo alpha1-adrenoceptor binding characteristics between tamsulosin and prazosin. PMID:10328564

  7. Food Thought Suppression Inventory: Test-retest reliability and relationship to weight loss treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rachel D; Ivezaj, Valentina; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the test-retest reliability of the Food Thought Suppression Inventory (FTSI) and its relationship with weight loss during weight loss treatment. Participants were 89 adults with and without binge eating disorder (BED) recruited through primary care for weight loss treatment who completed the FTSI twice prior to starting treatment. Intra-class correlations for the FTSI ranged from .74-.93. Participants with BED scored significantly higher on the FTSI than those without BED at baseline only. Percent weight loss from baseline to mid-treatment was significantly negatively correlated with the FTSI at baseline and at post-treatment. Participants reaching 5% loss of original body weight by post-treatment had significantly lower FTSI scores at post assessment when compared to those who did not reach this weight loss goal. While baseline binge-eating episodes were significantly positively correlated with baseline FTSI scores, change in binge-eating episodes during treatment were not significantly related to FTSI scores. The FTSI showed satisfactory one week test-retest reliability. Higher levels of food thought suppression may impair individuals' ability to lose weight while receiving weight loss treatment. PMID:27112114

  8. Treatment of NZB/NZW mice with total lymphoid irradiation: long-lasting suppression of disease without generalized immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Arndt, R.; Okada, S.; Ward, R.; Thach, A.B.; Strober, S.

    1986-05-01

    We used total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; total dose = 3400 rad) to treat the lupus-like renal disease of 6-mo-old female NZB/NZW mice. Similar to our past studies, this treatment resulted in a marked prolongation of survival, decrease in proteinuria, and decrease in serum anti-DNA antibodies compared with untreated littermate controls. Although there was no evidence of disease recurrence in TLI-treated mice until after 12 mo of age, the in vitro proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin by NZB/NZW spleen cells recovered within 6 wk such that responses were greater than control NZB/NZW animals. A similar recovery and overshoot after TLI were evident in the primary antibody response to the T cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Both the total and IgG anti-SRBC antibody responses after TLI were greater than those of untreated NZB/NZW controls, and were comparable with those of untreated non-autoimmune mice. Despite this increased response to mitogens and antigens after TLI, we noted a decrease in spontaneous splenic IgG-secreting cells and a decrease in IgG but not IgM antinuclear antibody production. Nonspecific suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response were detectable in the spleens of NZB/NZW mice early after TLI. However, the disappearance of suppressor cells was not associated with recrudescence of disease activity. Furthermore, transfer of large numbers of spleen cells from TLI-treated NZB/NZW mice did not result in disease suppression in untreated age-matched recipients. In summary, treatment of NZB/NZW mice with TLI results in a prolonged remission in autoimmune disease, which is achieved in the absence of generalized immunosuppression.

  9. Molecular exploration of the α(1A)-adrenoceptor orthosteric site: binding site definition for epinephrine, HEAT and prazosin.

    PubMed

    Maïga, Arhamatoulaye; Dupont, Mélanie; Blanchet, Guillaume; Marcon, Elodie; Gilquin, Bernard; Servent, Denis; Gilles, Nicolas

    2014-12-20

    Despite the physiological and pharmacological importance of the α1A-adrenoreceptor, the mode of interactions of classical agonists and radioactive ligands with this receptor is not yet clearly defined. Here, we used mutagenesis studies and binding experiments to evaluate the importance of 11 receptor sites for the binding of (125)I-HEAT, (3)H-prazosin and epinephrine. Only one residue (F312) commonly interacts with the three molecules, and, surprisingly, D106 interacts only with epinephrine in a moderate way. Our docking model shows that prazosin and HEAT are almost superimposed into the orthosteric pocket with their tetralone and quinazoline rings close to the phenyl ring of the agonist. PMID:25447534

  10. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sin-Hyeog; Barchan, Dora; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C.

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR α-subunit (Hα1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Hα1-205–induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. J. Clin. Invest. 104:1723–1730 (1999). PMID:10606626

  11. Suppression of ongoing experimental myasthenia by oral treatment with an acetylcholine receptor recombinant fragment.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S; Souroujon, M C

    1999-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. In an attempt to develop an antigen-specific therapy for MG, we administered a nonmyasthenogenic recombinant fragment of AChR orally to rats. This fragment, corresponding to the extracellular domain of the human AChR alpha-subunit (Halpha1-205), protected rats from subsequently induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) and suppressed ongoing EAMG when treatment was initiated during either the acute or chronic phases of disease. Prevention and suppression of EAMG were accompanied by a significant decrease in AChR-specific humoral and cellular responses. The underlying mechanism for the Halpha1-205-induced oral tolerance seems to be active suppression, mediated by a shift from a T-helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2/Th3 response. This shift was assessed by changes in the cytokine profile, a deviation of anti-AChR IgG isotypes from IgG2 to IgG1, and a suppressed AChR-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Our results in experimental myasthenia suggest that oral administration of AChR-specific recombinant fragments may be considered for antigen-specific immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis. PMID:10606626

  12. Bindings of /sup 3/H-prazosin and /sup 3/H-yohimbine to alpha adrenoceptors in the guinea-pig stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T.; Nishikawa, H.

    1988-01-01

    Alpha adrenoceptor subtypes have been investigated by radioligand binding study in guinea-pig stomach using /sup 3/H-prazosin and /sup 3/H-yohimbine. The specific /sup 3/H-prazosin binding to guinea-pig stomach was saturable and of high affinity with a Bmax of 33 fmol/mg protein. Specific /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding to the tissue was also saturable and of high affinity with a Bmax of 150 fmol/mg protein. Adrenergic drugs competed for /sup 3/H-prazosin binding in order of prazosin > phentolamine > methoxamine > norepinephrine > clonidine > epinephrine > yohimbine. These drugs competed for /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding in order of yohimbine > phentolamine > clonidine > epinephrine > norepinephrine > prazosin > methoxamine. They also examined whether dopamine receptors exist in guinea-pig stomach, using radioligand binding study. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone, /sup 3/H-apomorphine, /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-domperidone was not detectable in the stomach. Dopaminergic drugs such as dopamine, haloperidol, domperidone and sulpiride competed for /sup 3/H-prazosin binding in order of haloperidol > domperidone > dopamine > sulpiride. Metoclopramide, sulpiride and dopamine competed for /sup 3/H-yohimbine binding in order of metoclopramide > sulpiride > dopamine.

  13. Diurnal suppression of EGFR signalling by glucocorticoids and implications for tumour progression and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lauriola, Mattia; Enuka, Yehoshua; Zeisel, Amit; D’Uva, Gabriele; Roth, Lee; Sharon-Sevilla, Michal; Lindzen, Moshit; Sharma, Kirti; Nevo, Nava; Feldman, Morris; Carvalho, Silvia; Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Kedmi, Merav; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Chen, Alon; Solmi, Rossella; Wiemann, Stefan; Schmitt, Fernando; Domany, Eytan; Yarden, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and nuclear receptors for steroid hormones is essential for body homeostasis, but the cross-talk between these receptor families is poorly understood. We observed that glucocorticoids inhibit signalling downstream of EGFR, an RTK. The underlying mechanism entails suppression of EGFR’s positive feedback loops and simultaneous triggering of negative feedback loops that normally restrain EGFR. Our studies in mice reveal that the regulation of EGFR’s feedback loops by glucocorticoids translates to circadian control of EGFR signalling: EGFR signals are suppressed by high glucocorticoids during the active phase (night-time in rodents), while EGFR signals are enhanced during the resting phase. Consistent with this pattern, treatment of animals bearing EGFR-driven tumours with a specific kinase inhibitor was more effective if administered during the resting phase of the day, when glucocorticoids are low. These findings support a circadian clock-based paradigm in cancer therapy. PMID:25278152

  14. Exenatide Treatment Causes Suppression of Serum Ghrelin Levels following Mixed Meal Test in Obese Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Topyildiz, Figen; Kiyici, Sinem; Gul, Zulfiye; Sigirli, Deniz; Guclu, Metin; Kisakol, Gurcan; Cavun, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of exenatide treatment on serum ghrelin levels in obese female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods. Fourteen female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus being treated with metformin and exenatide were enrolled. A mixed meal test was applied to the patients while continuing with their daily medications. Blood samples were taken before and at 60, 120, and 180 minutes following mixed meal test to measure serum total ghrelin, glucose, and insulin levels. The following week, exenatide treatment of the patients was paused for 24 hours and the same experimental procedures were repeated. Results. Serum ghrelin levels were suppressed significantly at 180 minutes with exenatide treatment compared with baseline (294.4 ± 57.5 versus 234.5 ± 59.4 pg/mL) (p < 0.001). Serum ghrelin levels at 180 minutes were statistically different when percentage change in serum ghrelin levels after mixed meal tests with and without exenatide usage were compared (p = 0.001). Estimated total area under the curve values for serum ghrelin concentrations was also significantly lower with exenatide compared with omitted treatment (p = 0.035). Conclusion. These results suggest that the effect of exenatide on weight loss may be related with the suppression of serum ghrelin levels, which is an orexigenic peptide. PMID:26998491

  15. The cytotoxicity of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin is linked to an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Robert; Stracke, Anika; Ebner, Nadine; Zeller, Christian Wolfgang; Raninger, Anna Maria; Schittmayer, Matthias; Kueznik, Tatjana; Absenger-Novak, Markus; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2015-12-01

    Since the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (PRZ) was introduced into medicine as a treatment for hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, several studies have shown that PRZ induces apoptosis in various cell types and interferes with endocytotic trafficking. Because PRZ is also able to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, its cytotoxicity is a focus of interest in cancer research. Besides inducing apoptosis, PRZ was shown to serve as a substrate for an amine uptake mechanism originally discovered in neurones called transport-P. In line with our hypothesis that transport-P is an endocytotic mechanism also present in non-neuronal tissue and linked to the cytotoxicity of PRZ, we tested the uptake of QAPB, a fluorescent derivative of PRZ, in cancer cell lines in the presence of inhibitors of transport-P and endocytosis. Early endosomes and lysosomes were visualised by expression of RAB5-RFP and LAMP1-RFP, respectively; growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ and uptake inhibitors were also tested. Cancer cells showed co-localisation of QAPB with RAB5 and LAMP1 positive vesicles as well as tubulation of lysosomes. The uptake of QAPB was sensitive to transport-P inhibitors bafilomycin A1 (inhibits v-ATPase) and the antidepressant desipramine. Endocytosis inhibitors pitstop(®) 2 (general inhibitor of endocytosis), dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (cholesterol chelator) inhibited the uptake of QAPB. Bafilomycin A1 and methyl-β-cyclodextrin but not desipramine were able to preserve growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ. In summary, we confirmed the hypothesis that the cellular uptake of QAPB/PRZ represents an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P. Endocytosis of QAPB/PRZ depends on a proton gradient, dynamin and cholesterol, and results in reorganisation of the LAMP1 positive endolysosomal system. Finally, the link seen between the cellular uptake of PRZ and cell death implies a still unknown pro

  16. Photodynamic therapy with simultaneous suppression of multiple treatment escape pathways (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Z.; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    We introduce photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposomes (PMILs) for photodynamic tumor cell and microvessel damage in synchrony with photo-initiation of tumor-confined, multikinase inhibitor release. The PMIL is a biodegradable delivery system comprised of a nanoliposome carrying a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A, BPD) in its bilayer. A multikinase inhibitor-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticle is encapsulated within the liposome, which acts a barrier to nanoparticle erosion and drug release. Following intravenous PMIL administration, near infrared irradiation of tumors triggers photodynamic therapy and initiates tumor-confined drug release from the nanoparticle. This talk presents promising preclinical data in mouse models of pancreatic cancer utilizing this concept to suppress the VEGF and MET signaling pathways—both critical to cancer progression, metastasis and treatment escape. A single PMIL treatment using low doses of a multikanse inhibitor (cabozantinib, XL184) achieves sustained tumor reduction and suppresses metastatic escape, whereas combination therapy by co-administration of the individual agents has significantly reduced efficacy. The PMIL concept is amenable to a number of molecular inhibitors and offers new prospects for spatiotemporal synchronization of combination therapies whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  17. Acthar gel treatment suppresses acute exacerbations in a murine model of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Matthew F; Libbey, Jane E; Oh, Luke; Jordan, Shaun; Fujinami, Robert S

    2015-06-01

    Acthar gel is indicated for the treatment of acute exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. Its effects on immune cells during a relapse are unknown. This study investigated the effects of Acthar in an animal model of relapsing-remitting MS, using SJL/J mice sensitized with myelin peptide. All animal studies were reviewed and approved by the University of Utah Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and conducted in accordance with the guidelines prepared by the Committee on Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, Institute of Laboratory Animals Resources, National Research Council. Mice injected with Acthar to treat the second attack had a significantly lower mean clinical score during relapse and a significantly reduced cumulative disease burden compared to Placebo gel-treated mice. Furthermore, Acthar treatment ameliorated inflammation/demyelination in the spinal cord and markedly suppressed ex vivo myelin peptide-induced CD4(+) T cell proliferation. PMID:25410153

  18. Terazosin for the treatment of trauma-related nightmares: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Nirmalani-Gandhy, Anjali; Sanchez, Deborah; Catalano, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    The selective α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin has been shown in multiple studies to be effective in targeting trauma-related nightmares in posttraumatic stress disorder. There are limited data regarding the effectiveness of another selective α1-adrenergic antagonist terazosin for the treatment of trauma-related nightmares. We present 4 cases in which terazosin was effectively used to treat nightmares as a second-line agent after prazosin failure. Further studies are needed to validate terazosin as an alternative to prazosin for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder-related nightmares. PMID:25970279

  19. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4+ cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as ‘pretreated in EHI’ if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Results: Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4+ cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4+ cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4+ cell count, differences in CD4+ cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Conclusion: Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI. PMID:26636925

  20. Viral suppression in adolescents on antiretroviral treatment: A review of the literature and critical appraisal of methodological challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ferrand, Rashida A; Briggs, Datonye; Ferguson, Jane; Penazzato, Martina; Armstrong, Alice; MacPherson, Peter; Ross, David A; Kranzer, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication adherence is often sub-optimal for adolescents with HIV, and establishing correct weight-based antiretroviral therapy dosing is difficult, contributing to virological failure. This review aimed to determine the proportion of adolescents achieving virological suppression after initiating ART. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched. Studies published between January 2004 and September 2014 including ≥ 50 adolescents taking ART and reporting on the proportion of virological suppressed participants were included. Results From a total of 5316 potentially relevant citations, 20 studies were included. Only 8 studies reported the proportion of adolescents that were virologically suppressed at a specified time point. The proportion of adolescents with virological suppression at 12 months ranged from 27%-89%. Conclusion Adolescent achievement of HIV virological suppression was highly variable. Improved reporting of virological outcomes from a wider range of settings is required to support efforts to improve HIV care and treatment for adolescents. PMID:26681359

  1. The relation of weight suppression and body mass index to symptomatology and treatment response in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Berner, Laura A; Shaw, Jena A; Witt, Ashley A; Lowe, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Weight suppression, the difference between highest past weight and current weight, is a robust predictor of clinical characteristics of bulimia nervosa; however, the influence of weight suppression in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been little studied, and to our knowledge, no study to date has investigated the ways in which the relevance of weight suppression in AN may depend upon an individual's current body mass index (BMI). The present study investigated weight suppression, BMI, and their interaction as cross-sectional and prospective predictors of psychological symptoms and weight in AN. Women with AN completed depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II) and eating disorder symptomatology measures (Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire and Eating Disorders Inventory-3) at residential treatment admission (N = 350) and discharge (N = 238). Weight suppression and BMI were weakly correlated (r = -.22). At admission, BMI was positively correlated with all symptom measures except Restraint and Depression scores. Weight suppression was also independently positively correlated with all measures except Weight Concern and Body Dissatisfaction subscale scores. In analyses examining discharge scores (including admission values as covariates), the admission weight suppression × BMI interaction consistently predicted posttreatment psychopathology. Controlling for weight gain in treatment and age, higher admission weight suppression predicted lower discharge scores (less symptom endorsement) among those with lower BMIs; among those with higher BMIs, higher weight suppression predicted higher discharge scores. These results are the first to our knowledge to demonstrate that absolute and relative weight status are joint indicators of AN severity and prognosis. These findings may have major implications for conceptualization and treatment of AN. PMID:24016010

  2. Suppression of bovine lymphocyte responses to mitogens following in vivo and in vitro treatment with dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Oldham, G; Howard, C J

    1992-01-15

    Gnotobiotic calves given intramuscular injections of dexamethasone (DM, 0.5 mg kg-1 day-1) showed marked changes in haematological parameters including a neutrophilia and a lymphopaenia. Not only was there a reduction in the numbers of circulating mononuclear cells, but there was also a significant (P less than 0.01) decrease in the in vitro responsiveness of the remaining circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes to the mitogens, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Responses to all three mitogens were suppressed to a similar degree. Analysis of the circulating mononuclear cell sub-populations before and during DM treatment demonstrated a selective depletion of B cells; the T lymphocyte sub-population that expresses the gamma/delta form of T cell receptor, are CD2-, CD5+, CD8-, CD4- and constitute a major population in peripheral blood of calves. In vitro studies in gnotobiotic and conventional calves confirmed that DM was highly inhibitory for PHA responses but, in contrast to the in vivo findings, showed little effect of DM on ConA responses. Expression of surface antigens after 72 h in vitro culture in the presence of DM were little affected with the exception of BoCD8 and MHC II, which showed increased and decreased expression, respectively. These observations would suggest that distinct mechanisms are involved in glucocorticosteroid suppression of the responses to these two mitogens. PMID:1534431

  3. Chronic treatment with anti-bipolar drugs suppresses glutamate release from astroglial cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Song, Dan; Yan, Enzhi; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-05-01

    Astroglial cells are fundamental elements of most neurological diseases, including bipolar disorders in which astrocytes show morphological and functional deficiency. Here we report the suppression of astroglial glutamate release by chronic treatment with three anti-bipolar drugs, lithium salt (Li(+)), carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA). Release of glutamate was triggered by transient exposure of astrocytes to ATP (which activated purinoceptors) and 45 mM K(+) (which depolarised cell membrane to ~-30 mV). In both types of stimulation glutamate release was regulated by Ca(2+) entry through plasmalemmal channels and by Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) intracellular stores. Exposure of astroglial cultures to Li(+), CBZ and VPA for 2 weeks led to a significant (more than 2 times) inhibition of glutamate release, which may alleviate the hyperactivity of the glutamatergic transmission in the brain of patients with bipolar disorders and thus contribute the underlying mechanism of drug action. PMID:25676933

  4. Optimization of suppression for two-element treatment liners for turbomachinery exhaust ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.; Zwick, J. W.; Vukelich, S. I.; Minner, G. L.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    Sound wave propagation in a soft-walled rectangular duct with steady uniform flow was investigated at exhaust conditions, incorporating the solution equations for sound wave propagation in a rectangular duct with multiple longitudinal wall treatment segments. Modal analysis was employed to find the solution equations and to study the effectiveness of a uniform and of a two-sectional liner in attenuating sound power in a treated rectangular duct without flow (M = 0) and with uniform flow of Mach 0.3. Two-segment liners were shown to increase the attenuation of sound as compared to a uniform liner. The predicted sound attenuation was compared with measured laboratory results for an optimized two-segment suppressor. Good correlation was obtained between the measured and predicted suppressions when practical variations in the modal content and impedance were taken into account. Two parametric studies were also completed.

  5. The effect of omeprazole pre-treatment on rafts formed by reflux suppressant tablets containing alginate.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, P W; Little, S L; Baxter, T

    2005-01-01

    Alginate-based reflux suppressant preparations provide symptom relief by forming a physical barrier on top of the stomach contents in the form of a neutral floating gel or raft. This study investigated whether reduced acidity in the stomach brought about by omeprazole pre-treatment affected the formation and gastric residence time of alginate rafts. It was a balanced, cross-over study in 12 healthy non-patient volunteers following a single dose of two indium-111-labelled alginate tablets in the presence or absence of 3 days' pre-treatment with omeprazole. Raft formation and gastric residence, in the presence of a technetium-99m-labelled meal, were assessed by gamma scintigraphy for 3 h after alginate tablet administration. The relative raft-forming ability of alginate tablets after omeprazole compared with alginate tablets alone was 0.950 with 95% confidence intervals of 0.882 and 1.018. Pre-treatment and co-administration with omeprazole has no significant effect on the raft-forming ability of alginate tablets. PMID:15938591

  6. Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Methods for the Determination of Alfuzosin, Doxazosin, Terazosin and Prazosin in Pharmaceutical Formulations, Plasma and Urine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Wu, Hao; Guo, Shiwen; Shi, Yating; DU, Juanli; Zhu, Panpan; DU, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric ionic liquid-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been successfully prepared as adsorbents for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of four drugs, namely alfuzosin, doxazosin, terazosin and prazosin, from pharmaceutical preparations, urine samples and plasma samples. The four drugs were detected by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Several extraction parameters, including the pH of the solution; the type, ratio and volume of the desorbing reagent; the amount of adsorbent; the time of the extraction and desorption processes; and the addition of NaCl, were investigated and optimized. Linear responses were determined for the four drugs in the concentration range of 0.5 - 45 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection values for alfuzosin, doxazosin, terazosin and prazosin, which were defined as three times the standard deviation of a blank sample, were determined to be 0.035, 0.034, 0.027 and 0.028 ng mL(-1) (n = 11), respectively. Furthermore, this new method gave preconcentration factors of 114.5, 111.3, 111.1 and 108.5 for these four drugs. PMID:27396658

  7. Alpha-adrenoceptors in dog mesenteric vessels--subcellular distribution and number of ( sup 3 H)prazosin and ( sup 3 H)rauwolscine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, A.G.; Ahmad, S.; Kwan, C.Y.; Daniel, E.E. )

    1990-04-01

    Binding of the alpha-adrenergic antagonists ({sup 3}H)prazosin and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine to well-characterized subcellular membrane fractions isolated from dog mesenteric arteries and veins was studied. Binding of both ligands was saturable with Kd values of 0.5 +/- 0.1 nM for ({sup 3}H)prazosin and 5.85 +/- 0.85 nM for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine in arteries, and 0.87 +/- 0.4 nM for ({sup 3}H)prazosin and 6.6 +/- 1.5 nM for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine in veins. In veins, the maximum number of binding sites for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine was higher than that for ({sup 3}H)prazosin, whereas in arteries the maximum number of binding sites for each ligand was similar. In microsomes from dog aorta, the maximum number of bindings sites for ({sup 3}H)prazosin was higher than that for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine. Neuronal membrane contamination in these studies was minimized by dissection procedures and evaluated by the comparison of ({sup 3}H)saxitoxin binding in various preparations. Only mesenteric veins responded functionally to agonists acting on alpha 2 adrenoceptors. This study thus identified two distinct populations of ({sup 3}H)prazosin and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine binding sites in the plasma membranes of dog mesenteric vessels and suggests that a much higher density of alpha 2-compared to alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites is required for a contractile response.

  8. Proton Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Is Not Associated With Post-Treatment Testosterone Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Henderson, Randal H.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li Zuofeng; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph A.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Three independent studies of photon (x-ray) radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer have demonstrated evidence of testosterone suppression after treatment. The present study was undertaken to determine whether this would also be the case with conformal protons. Methods and Materials: Between August 2006 and October 2007, 171 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled and underwent treatment according to University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute institutional review board-approved PR01 and PR02 protocols. Of the 171 patients, 18 were excluded because they had received androgen deprivation therapy either before (n = 17) or after (n = 1) RT. The pretreatment serum testosterone level was available for 150 of the remaining 153 patients. These 150 patients were included in the present study. The post-treatment levels were compared with the pretreatment levels. Results: The median baseline pretreatment serum testosterone level was 357.9 ng/dL. The median post-treatment testosterone value was 375.5 ng/dL at treatment completion (p = .1935) and 369.9 ng/dL (p = .1336), 348.7 ng/dL (p = .7317), 353.4 ng/dL (p = .6996), and 340.9 ng/dL (p = .1669) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after proton therapy, respectively. Conclusions: Conformal proton therapy to the prostate, as delivered using University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute PR01 and PR02 protocols, did not appear to significantly affect the serum testosterone levels within 24 months after RT.

  9. Examining the relative effects of fire weather, suppression and fuel treatment on fire behaviour--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Penman, T D; Collins, L; Price, O F; Bradstock, R A; Metcalf, S; Chong, D M O

    2013-12-15

    Large budgets are spent on both suppression and fuel treatments in order to reduce the risk of wildfires. There is little evidence regarding the relative contribution of fire weather, suppression and fuel treatments in determining the risk posed from wildfires. Here we undertake a simulation study in the Sydney Basin, Australia, to examine this question using a fire behaviour model (Phoenix Rapidfire). Results of the study indicate that fire behaviour is most strongly influenced by fire weather. Suppression has a greater influence on whether a fire reaches 5 ha in size compared to fuel treatments. In contrast, fuel treatments have a stronger effect on the fire size and maximum distance the fire travels. The study suggests that fire management agencies will receive additional benefits from fuel treatment if they are located in areas which suppression resources can respond rapidly and attempt to contain the fires. No combination of treatments contained all fires, and the proportion of uncontained fires increased under more severe fire weather when the greatest number of properties are lost. Our study highlights the importance of alternative management strategies to reduce the risk of property loss. PMID:24211380

  10. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    -241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  11. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Johannes F; Horwitz, Joshua A; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H; Seaman, Michael S; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Walker, Bruce D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-07-28

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117,a broad and potent neutralizing antibody against the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 Env protein, during analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Results show that two or four 30 mg kg(-1) 3BNC117 infusions,separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated.Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound of 5-9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks, respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals,emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape.However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml(-1), and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9-19 weeks.We conclude that the administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952

  12. MTDH is an oncogene in multiple myeloma, which is suppressed by Bortezomib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongbao; Feng, Zhenqing; Yang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Metadherin (MTDH) is identified as an oncogene in multiple cancers including breast cancer, bladder cancer and endometrial cancer. However, the function of MTDH in multiple myeloma (MM) is still unexplored. In this study, we disclose that MTDH is an oncogene in MM. This is characterized by an elevation mRNA level of MTDH and chromosomal gain of MTDH locus in MM cells compared to normal samples. Moreover, MTDH expression significantly increased in MMSET translocation (MS) subgroup, one of the high-risk subgroups in MM, and was significantly correlated with MM patients' poor outcomes in Total Therapy 2 (TT2) cohort. Further knockdown of MTDH expression by shRNA in MM cells induced cell apoptosis, inhibited MM cells growth in vitro and decreased xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Interestingly, opposite to TT2, MM patients with high-MTDH expression showed favorable survival outcomes in the TT3 cohort, while Bortezomib treatment was the major difference between TT2 and TT3 cohort. Furthermore we proved that Bortezomib suppressed pre- and post-transcription levels of MTDH expression of MM cells in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our studies demonstrated that MTDH is a transcriptional gene of MMSET/NFκB /MYC signaling in MM cells, which is inhibited by Bortezomib treatment. PMID:26683226

  13. Chronic retinoic acid treatment suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in close correlation with depressive-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ji; Meng, Fan-Tao; Qi, Xin-Rui; Chen, Lin; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Joëls, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies have highlighted an association between retinoid treatment and depressive symptoms. As we had shown before that chronic application of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) potently activated the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, we here questioned whether RA also induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a form of structural plasticity sensitive to stress and implicated in aspects of depression and hippocampal function. RA was applied intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) to adult rats for 19 days after which animals were subjected to tests for depressive-like behavior (sucrose preference) and spatial learning and memory (water maze) performance. On day 27, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and astrogliosis was quantified using BrdU (newborn cell survival), PCNA (proliferation), doublecortin (DCX; neuronal differentiation), and GFAP (astrocytes) as markers. RA was found to increase retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) protein expression in the hippocampus, suggesting an activation of RA-induced signaling mechanisms. RA further potently suppressed cell proliferation, newborn cell survival as well as neurogenesis, but not astrogliosis. These structural plasticity changes were significantly correlated with scores for anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, but not with water maze performance. Our results suggest that RA-induced impairments in hippocampal neurogenesis correlate with depression-like symptoms but not with spatial learning and memory in this design. Thus, manipulations aimed to enhance neurogenesis may help ameliorate emotional aspects of RA-associated mood disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26860546

  14. Urea cycle gene expression is suppressed by PFOA treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, M W; Wallace, K B

    2010-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), with an array of industrial uses, is one of the most common perfluoroalkyl acids. Resistance to biological degradation and a global distribution are characteristics that have caused PFOA to become a frequent subject of toxicological studies. PFOA treatment in rodents causes peroxisome proliferation, mitochondrial biogenesis, and transactivation of PPARs. Prior work has shown urea cycle gene expression to be reduced in mice by another PPARalpha ligand, WY14643. In light of these findings, the aim of our investigation was to determine if PFOA treatment in rats alters expression of genes responsible for ureogenesis. 30 mg/kg of PFOA was administered to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats via oral gavage for 28 days and their livers were harvested. Gene transcription was measured using real time PCR and protein expression was determined through western blotting. We observed a decrease in mRNA for the coordinately expressed urea cycle genes Cps1, Ass1, and Asl; mRNA of the ammonia generating Gls2 was also reduced. Protein amounts for CPS1, ASS1, and OTC were all decreased in the PFOA treated rats, and interestingly there was an increase in the amount of S133 phosphorylated CREB, which is a regulator of urea cycle gene transcription. We conclude that the transactivation of PPARalpha by PFOA leads to a metabolic shift that favors the catabolism of lipids over proteins, thereby suppressing urea cycle gene expression. Our findings provide further evidence of the effect of PFOA on intermediary metabolism in rodents and add valuable information in assessing the potential risks of PFOA exposure. PMID:20452409

  15. Allosteric interactions between the antagonist prazosin and amiloride analogs at the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Mynett, A; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    2000-03-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that amilorides can interact with a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. In this study, the question was explored as to whether the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor also possesses an equivalent allosteric site. The six amilorides examined strongly increased the dissociation rate of the antagonist [(3)H]prazosin from the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. With the parent amiloride, the dissociation data were well fitted by an equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, compatible with amiloride acting at a defined allosteric site on the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor. In contrast, the dissociation data for [(3)H]prazosin in the presence of the amiloride analogs were not compatible with the equation derived from a one-allosteric-site model, but could be fitted well by an equation derived from a two-allosteric-site model. However, certain individual parameters could not be resolved. The observed dissociation rate constants increased steeply with increasing amiloride analog concentration, and in some cases the data could be fitted with a logistic equation. The slope factors calculated from such fits were 1.2 to 2.1. It is concluded that the structure-binding relationships of the amilorides at the alpha(1A)- and alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors are different. The interactions of the five amiloride analogs, but not the parent amiloride, with the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor are compatible with the presence of two (but not one) allosteric sites, and is thus more complex than that found for the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. PMID:10692482

  16. Using topography to meet wildlife and fuels treatment objectives in fire-suppressed landscapes.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Emma C; Viers, Joshua H; Quinn, James F; North, Malcolm

    2010-11-01

    Past forest management practices, fire suppression, and climate change are increasing the need to actively manage California Sierra Nevada forests for multiple environmental amenities. Here we present a relatively low-cost, repeatable method for spatially parsing the landscape to help the U.S. Forest Service manage for different forest and fuel conditions to meet multiple goals relating to sensitive species, fuels reduction, forest products, water, carbon storage, and ecosystem restoration. Using the Kings River area of the Sierra Nevada as a case study, we create areas of topographically-based units, Landscape Management Units (LMUs) using a three by three matrix (canyon, mid-slope, ridge-top and northerly, southerly, and neutral aspects). We describe their size, elevation, slope, aspect, and their difference in inherent wetness and solar radiation. We assess the predictive value and field applicability of LMUs by using existing data on stand conditions and two sensitive wildlife species. Stand conditions varied significantly between LMUs, with canyons consistently having the greatest stem and snag densities. Pacific fisher (Martes pennanti) activity points (from radio telemetry) and California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) nests, roosts, and sightings were both significantly different from uniform, with a disproportionate number of observations in canyons, and fewer than expected on ridge-tops. Given the distinct characteristics of the LMUs, these units provide a relatively simple but ecologically meaningful template for managers to spatially allocate forest treatments, thereby meeting multiple National Forest objectives. These LMUs provide a framework that can potentially be applied to other fire-dependent western forests with steep topographic relief. PMID:20872142

  17. Using Topography to Meet Wildlife and Fuels Treatment Objectives in Fire-Suppressed Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Viers, Joshua H.; Quinn, James F.; North, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Past forest management practices, fire suppression, and climate change are increasing the need to actively manage California Sierra Nevada forests for multiple environmental amenities. Here we present a relatively low-cost, repeatable method for spatially parsing the landscape to help the U.S. Forest Service manage for different forest and fuel conditions to meet multiple goals relating to sensitive species, fuels reduction, forest products, water, carbon storage, and ecosystem restoration. Using the Kings River area of the Sierra Nevada as a case study, we create areas of topographically-based units, Landscape Management Units (LMUs) using a three by three matrix (canyon, mid-slope, ridge-top and northerly, southerly, and neutral aspects). We describe their size, elevation, slope, aspect, and their difference in inherent wetness and solar radiation. We assess the predictive value and field applicability of LMUs by using existing data on stand conditions and two sensitive wildlife species. Stand conditions varied significantly between LMUs, with canyons consistently having the greatest stem and snag densities. Pacific fisher (Martes pennanti) activity points (from radio telemetry) and California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) nests, roosts, and sightings were both significantly different from uniform, with a disproportionate number of observations in canyons, and fewer than expected on ridge-tops. Given the distinct characteristics of the LMUs, these units provide a relatively simple but ecologically meaningful template for managers to spatially allocate forest treatments, thereby meeting multiple National Forest objectives. These LMUs provide a framework that can potentially be applied to other fire-dependent western forests with steep topographic relief. PMID:20872142

  18. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Soules, Thomas F.; Fochs, Scott N.; Rotter, Mark D.; Letts, Stephan A.

    2011-02-22

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

  19. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Soules, Thomas F.; Fochs, Scott N.; Rotter, Mark D.; Letts, Stephan A.

    2008-12-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  20. The advantages of subtotal thyroidectomy and suppression of TSH in the primary treatment of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Crile, G. Jr.; Antunez, A.R.; Esselstyn, C.B. Jr.; Hawk, W.A.; Skillern, P.G.

    1985-06-01

    Patients between the ages of 6 and 45 years with distant metastases from papillary carcinoma of the thyroid can be treated as effectively by subtotal thyroidectomy and suppressive doses of thyroid hormone as by total thyroidectomy followed by treatment with iodine 131 (/sup 131/I). Moreover, distant metastases can be treated by either /sup 131/I or suppression as effectively after they are apparent on x-ray as they can be when treated in a subclinical stage. Therefore, in patients younger than 45 years old it is rarely necessary to perform a total thyroidectomy or to do frequent postoperative scans. In patients older than 44 or younger than 7 who have distant metastases or extensive involvement of both lobes, total or almost total thyroidectomy is justified if it can be done with minimal morbidity. In patients of this age group whose tumors fail to respond to suppressive doses of thyroid, /sup 131/I should be used. In view of the importance of diagnostic related groups (DRG) to the economy of hospitals, we note that the cost of total thyroidectomy, ablation by /sup 131/I, and intermittent body scans is at least three times that of less radical procedures which, in conjunction with suppression by thyroid feeding, give the same survival with less morbidity.

  1. Bisphosphonate treatment of type I diabetic mice prevents early bone loss but accentuates suppression of bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Lindsay M.; Tekalur, Srinivasan Arjun; Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa J.; McCabe, Laura R.

    2016-01-01

    Type I (T1) diabetes is an autoimmune and metabolic disease associated with bone loss. Previous studies demonstrate that T1-diabetes decreases osteoblast activity and viability. Bisphosphonate therapy, commonly used to treat osteoporosis, is demonstrated to inhibit osteoclast activity as well as osteoblast apoptosis. Therefore, we examined the effect of weekly alendronate treatments on T1-diabetes induced osteoblast apoptosis and bone loss. Bone TUNEL assays identified that alendronate therapy prevents the diabetes-induced osteoblast death observed during early stages of diabetes development. Consistent with this, alendronate treatment for 40 days was able to prevent diabetes-induced trabecular bone loss. Alendronate was also able to reduce marrow adiposity in both control diabetic mice compared to untreated mice. Mechanical testing indicated that 40 days of alendronate treatment increased bone stiffness but decreased the work required for fracture in T1-diabetic and alendronate treated mice. Of concern at this later time point, bone formation rate and osteoblast markers, which were already decreased in diabetic mice, were further suppressed in alendronate treated diabetic mice. Taken together, our results suggest that short term alendronate treatment can prevent T1-diabetes-induced bone loss in mice, possibly in part by inhibiting diabetes onset associated osteoblast death, while longer treatment enhanced bone density but at the cost of further suppressing bone formation in diabetic mice. PMID:25641511

  2. Effect of concanavalin A treatment on the allogeneic response of mice to challenge with P 815 mastocytoma: interleukin 2 treatment reverses concanavalin A suppression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, R D; Merdian, D J

    1984-05-01

    Mice injected repeatedly with concanavalin A (Con A) prior to and following challenge with P 815 mastocytoma are suppressed in their cell-mediated cytotoxicity responses. Earlier studies showed that pretreatment of the animals with silica to affect macrophage (M phi) functions reversed the Con A suppression. In the present paper we have shown that peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) induced/activated by ip injection of Con A were able to transfer suppression to normal mice. Separation of the PEC populations into adherent and nonadherent cells abrogated their capacity to transfer suppression. It was further shown that Con A is not functioning in this in vivo system to block effector activity of cytotoxic cells on target cells, and PEC induced with Con A were not directly cytotoxic to target P 815 cells. Finally, we were able to show that the cytotoxicity response of Con A-suppressed mice could be enhanced by treatment with concentrated culture supernatants of normal mouse spleen cells, rich in interleukin 2 (IL 2) activity. Attempts to detect a recently described mouse serum inhibitor of IL 2 in normal or Con A-treated mice were unsuccessful and spleen cells from Con A-treated mice lost their capacity to generate IL 2 in vitro when cultured under appropriate conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that suppression of cell-mediated immune responses in Con A-treated mice results from interruption of the normal generation of IL 2 helper effects necessary for the activation of cytotoxic effector T cells in vivo. PMID:6424952

  3. Comparison of relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles from rabbits by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists; prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin.

    PubMed

    Seo, K K; Lee, M Y; Lim, S W; Kim, S C

    1999-02-01

    Alpha1a-adrenergic receptor (AR) primarily mediates the contraction of the prostatic and cavernous smooth muscles. Among clinically available alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), tamsulosin has a modest selectivity for alpha1A- and alpha1D- over alpha1B-ARs. To compare the effects of various alpha1-AR antagonists on relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles, isometric tension studies with relatively selective (tamsulosin) and non-selective (prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin) alpha1A-AR antagonists, were conducted in the cavernous and trigonal muscle strips of rabbits (n=10 each). Tamsulosin had the strongest inhibitory effect on contraction of trigonal smooth muscle among the various alpha1-AR antagonists, and the inhibitory activities of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin were not statistically different. All alpha1-AR antagonists caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the cavernous muscle strips. Tamsulosin was shown to have greater potency than prazosin (more than 100-fold), doxazosin (more than 1000-fold), and terazosin (more than 1000-fold), in relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle. In conclusion, tamsulosin might be the most effective drug among the four commonly used alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of BPH. Tamsulosin might be a potential substitute for phentolamine in combination with vasoactive agents as an intracavernous injection therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10102527

  4. Effects of single and repeated treatment with antidepressants on apomorphine-induced yawning in the rat: the implication of alpha-1 adrenergic mechanisms in the D-2 receptor function.

    PubMed

    Delini-Stula, A; Hunn, C

    1990-01-01

    Acute (10 or 20 mg/kg IP) and subchronic (2 x 5 or 10 mg/kg IP daily for 7 days) effects of desipramine, imipramine, maprotiline, (+)- and (-)-oxaprotiline enantiomers as well as selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors citalopram and ifoxetine on yawning, induced by low doses of apomorphine, were investigated in the rat. In addition, the effects of alpha-1 receptor agonist adrafinil and antagonist prazosin were also tested. After acute treatment, desipramine, the stereoselective NA-uptake inhibiting (+)-enantiomer of oxaprotiline, and the alpha-1 agonist adrafinil, markedly and significantly suppressed yawning. Prazosin, in contrast, clearly potentiated it. This potentiating effect was abolished by the pretreatment with (+)-oxaprotiline and adrafinil. Other drugs were inactive. After subchronic administration, yawning was antagonized by NA-uptake-inhibiting antidepressants, including imipramine and maprotiline. By comparison to the acute treatment, the inhibitory effects of desipramine and (+)-oxaprotiline were considerably enhanced. Neither selective 5-HT-uptake inhibitors nor (-)-oxaprotiline (levoprotiline) were active. Antidepressants therefore modulate the functional activity of D-2 receptors, activated by low doses of apomorphine, predominantly by the virtue of their noradrenergic enhancing properties. This modulatory effect appears to be mediated by alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. PMID:1971448

  5. Suppression of bovine lymphocyte function by treatment with physiologic concentrations of cortisone

    SciTech Connect

    Ojo-Amaize, E.A.; Paape, M.J.; Guidry, A.J.; Mayer, H.K.

    1986-03-01

    The blastogenic response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) (8 cows) to capsular antigen extract of Staphylococcus aureus, PHA and LPS was measured in vitro using /sup 5/H-thymidine pulse labelling. isolated PBL were treated in vitro for 6-8 days with 10, 25 and 45 ng/ml cortisone. These concentrations simulate serum corticosteroid levels during environmental stress, acute clinical mastitis and ACTH therapy, respectively. To determine the minimal concentration of cortisone that would induce suppression, PBL were also incubated with increasing concentrations of cortisone starting at 10 pg/ml. All concentrations of cortisone caused a significant (P<0.01) depression of lymphocyte blastogenic response to S. aureus, PHA and LPS. Macrophage depletion experiments showed no macrophage suppressor effects. Both the blastogenic response of untreated peripheral blood lymphocytes to S. aureus, PHA and LPS and the degree to which that response was suppressed by cortisone differed significantly among cows. Results indicate that cortisone levels found during physiological stress and after therapeutic administration of ACTH can suppress lymphocyte function.

  6. Effects of clonidine, prazosin and phentolamine on heart rate and coronary sinus catecholamine concentration during cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation in spinal dogs

    PubMed Central

    Cavero, I.; Dennis, T.; Lefèvre-Borg, Françoise; Perrot, P.; Roach, A.G.; Scatton, B.

    1979-01-01

    1 In spinal dogs, continuous electrical stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve produced a transient rise in aortic blood pressure and a sustained increase in both heart rate and coronary sinus blood flow. The latter effects were accompanied by a significant elevation in the coronary sinus plasma noradrenaline concentration without significant changes in the levels of dopamine and adrenaline. The concentrations of the three catecholamines in thoracic aorta plasma were not significantly changed by cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation. 2 Clonidine (20 μg/kg, i.v.), given during cardioaccelerator nerve stimulation, increased both mean aortic blood pressure and coronary sinus blood flow and decreased heart rate and coronary sinus venous plasma noradrenaline overflow. 3 Phentolamine (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) completely antagonized these effects of clonidine. Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) inhibited by only 43 and 38% the respective reductions in heart rate and noradrenaline overflow elicited by clonidine. 4 On termination of cardioaccelerator stimulation (about 10 min after either prazosin or phentolamine), heart rate and coronary sinus noradrenaline overflow returned to control prestimulation levels. 5 Phentolamine or prazosin, administered alone during stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve, increased heart rate and noradrenaline overflow into the coronary sinus plasma. However, intravenous phentolamine and prazosin, in contrast to desipramine (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.) or tyramine (1.0 mg, i.a.), failed to change the tachycardia resulting from the local administration of noradrenaline into the sinus node artery (i.a.). 6 These results show that in spinal dogs the clonidine-induced reduction in heart rate (elevated by electrical stimulation of the cardioaccelerator nerve) is accompanied by a fall in the quantity of noradrenaline overflowing into the coronary sinus plasma. The latter effect is presumably the result of an action of clonidine on cardiac presynaptic

  7. Interdental caries incidence and progression in relation to mutans streptococci suppression after chlorhexidine-thymol varnish treatments in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Twetman, S; Petersson, L G

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate interdental caries incidence and progression in relation to the effect of antibacterial varnish treatments in schoolchildren anticipated at caries risk. After a screening procedure, 110 healthy children (8-10 years) with moderate and high counts of salivary mutans streptococci (MS) were invited to join a 2-year longitudinal study. At baseline, MS were enumerated at all mesial interdental sites of the first permanent molars with a chair-side technique. The children were then treated 3 times within 2 weeks by interdental spot applications with a 1% chlorhexidine/thymol-containing varnish (Cervitec). Follow-up samples of saliva and plaque were collected 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after onset of treat. Caries prevalence, incidence and progression of the selected approximal surfaces were scored from bitewing radiographs exposed at baseline and after 2 years. Sixty-three children of the same age formed a non-varnish-treated reference group. Reduction of caries incidence and progression was dearly dependent on the outcome of the antibacterial treatment. A significantly (P< 0.01) higher progression score was found among children who exhibited a less marked suppression of interdental MS levels compared with those with high suppression and the children of the reference group. The results suggest that a suppression of MS in interdental plaque may be an important event to prevent and arrest approximal caries development in schoolchildren at risk. Monitoring the effect of antibacterial agents in a site-specific way could therefore be advocated. PMID:10480280

  8. Data on sulforaphane treatment mediated suppression of autoreactive, inflammatory M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sanjima; Konkimalla, V. Badireenath

    2016-01-01

    Any chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease (e.g. arthritis) associated pathogenesis directs uncontrolled accumulation of both soluble forms of collagens in the synovial fluids and M1 macrophages around inflamed tissues. Despite of few studies demonstrating efficiency of Sulforaphane (SFN) in suppressing arthritis associated collagen restricted T cells or fibroblasts, its effects on macrophage polarity and plasticity are less understood. Recently, we reported regulation of phenotypic and functional switching by SFN in induced and spontaneously differentiating human monocytes [1]. Here, flow cytometry, western blot and ELISA derived data demonstrated that SFN inhibited in vitro inflammatory responses developed by soluble human collagens (I–IV) induced auto-reactive M1 type monocyte/macrophage model. PMID:27222853

  9. Data on sulforaphane treatment mediated suppression of autoreactive, inflammatory M1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanjima; Konkimalla, V Badireenath

    2016-06-01

    Any chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease (e.g. arthritis) associated pathogenesis directs uncontrolled accumulation of both soluble forms of collagens in the synovial fluids and M1 macrophages around inflamed tissues. Despite of few studies demonstrating efficiency of Sulforaphane (SFN) in suppressing arthritis associated collagen restricted T cells or fibroblasts, its effects on macrophage polarity and plasticity are less understood. Recently, we reported regulation of phenotypic and functional switching by SFN in induced and spontaneously differentiating human monocytes [1]. Here, flow cytometry, western blot and ELISA derived data demonstrated that SFN inhibited in vitro inflammatory responses developed by soluble human collagens (I-IV) induced auto-reactive M1 type monocyte/macrophage model. PMID:27222853

  10. The peripubertal gender-dysphoric child: puberty suppression and treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Olson, Johanna; Garofalo, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Gender-nonconforming youth are emerging at increasingly younger ages, and those experiencing gender dysphoria are seeking medical care at, or sometimes even before, the onset of puberty. Youth with gender dysphoria are at high risk for depression, anxiety, isolation, self-harm, and suicidality at the onset of a puberty that feels wrong. Medical providers would benefit from understanding interventions that help gender-nonconforming children and youth thrive. The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists to block the onset of an undesired puberty in youth with gender dysphoria is a relatively new practice, particularly in the United States. These medications shut down the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), and the production of either testosterone or estrogen is temporarily halted. Puberty blocking allows a young person to explore gender and participate more fully in the mental health therapy process without being consumed by the fear of an impending developmental process that will result in the acquisition of undesired secondary sexual characteristics. GnRH agonists have been used safely for decades in children with other medical conditions, including central precocious puberty. Potential side effects of GnRH agonists include diminished bone density, injection site problems, emotional instability, and weight gain. Preliminary data have shown GnRH agonists to be very helpful in improving behavioral and overall functioning outcomes. Puberty suppression should ideally begin in the first stages of pubertal development and can be given via intramuscular or subcutaneous injections, or via an implant that is inserted in the upper arm. Monitoring to assure suppression of the HPG axis should occur regularly. Gender-nonconforming youth who remain gender dysphoric can go on to receive cross-sex hormones for phenotypic gender transition when they are older. GnRH agonists have changed the landscape of medical intervention for youth with gender dysphoria and

  11. Suppression of Gαs Synthesis by Simvastatin Treatment of Vascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Ruqin; Shiroto, Takashi; Sartoretto, Juliano L.; Michel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    These studies explore the effects of statins on cyclic AMP-modulated signaling pathways in vascular endothelial cells. We previously observed (Kou, R., Sartoretto, J., and Michel, T. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14734–14743) that simvastatin treatment of endothelial cells leads to a marked decrease in PKA-modulated phosphorylation of the protein VASP. Here we show that long-term treatment of mice with simvastatin attenuates the vasorelaxation response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol, without affecting endothelin-induced vasoconstriction or carbachol-induced vasorelaxation. We found that statin treatment of endothelial cells dose-dependently inhibits PKA activation as assessed by analyses of serine 157 VASP phosphorylation as well as Epac-mediated Rap1 activation. These effects of simvastatin are completely reversed by mevalonate and by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, implicating geranylgeranylation as a critical determinant of the stain response. We used biochemical approaches as well as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods with a cAMP biosensor to show that simvastatin treatment of endothelial cells markedly inhibits cAMP accumulation in response to epinephrine. Importantly, simvastatin treatment significantly decreases Gαs abundance, without affecting other Gα subunits. Simvastatin treatment does not influence Gαs protein stability, and paradoxically increases the abundance of Gαs mRNA. Finally, we found that simvastatin treatment inhibits Gαs translation mediated by Akt/mTOR/eIF4/4EBP. Taken together, these findings establish a novel mechanism by which simvastatin modulates β-adrenergic signaling in vascular wall, and may have implications for cardiovascular therapeutics. PMID:22144680

  12. Sulfasalazine Treatment Suppresses the Formation of HLA-B27 Heavy Chain Homodimer in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Su-Qin; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocytic antigen-B27 heavy chain (HLA-B27 HC) has the tendency to fold slowly, in turn gradually forming a homodimer, (B27-HC)₂ via a disulfide linkage to activate killer cells and T-helper 17 cells and inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to trigger the IL-23/IL-17 axis for pro-inflammatory reactions. All these consequences lead to the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sulfasalazine (SSA) is a common medication used for treatment of patients with AS. However, the effects of SSA treatment on (B27-HC)₂ formation and on suppression of IL-23/IL-17 axis of AS patients remain to be determined. In the current study, we examine the (B27-HC)₂ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the mean grade of sarcoiliitis and lumbar spine Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI) scores of 23 AS patients. The results indicated that AS patients without (B27-HC)₂ on PBMC showed the lower levels of mean grade of sarcoiliitis and the lumbar spine BASRI scores. In addition, after treatment with SSA for four months, the levels of (B27-HC)₂ on PBMCs were significantly reduced. Cytokines mRNA levels, including TNFα, IL-17A, IL-17F and IFNγ, were also significantly down-regulated in PBMCs. However, SSA treatment did not affect the levels of IL-23 and IL-23R mRNAs. PMID:26729099

  13. Modulation of the gut microbiota with antibiotic treatment suppresses whole body urea production in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined whether changes in the gut microbiota induced by clinically relevant interventions would impact the bioavailability of dietary amino acids in neonates. We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the gut microbiota in neonatal pigs receiving no treatment (control), intravenously administ...

  14. Suppressive Effects of Resveratrol Treatment on The Intrinsic Evoked Excitability of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meftahi, Gholamhossein; Ghotbedin, Zohreh; Eslamizade, Mohammad Javad; Hosseinmardi, Narges; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has a wide range of desirable biological actions. Despite a growing body of evidence indicating that resveratrol induces changes in neu- ronal function, little effort, if any, has been made to investigate the cellular effect of res- veratrol treatment on intrinsic neuronal properties. Materials and Methods This experimental study was performed to examine the acute effects of resveratrol (100 µM) on the intrinsic evoked responses of rat Cornu Ammonis (CA1) pyramidal neurons in brain slices, using whole cell patch clamp re- cording under current clamp conditions. Results Findings showed that resveratrol treatment caused dramatic changes in evoked responses of pyramidal neurons. Its treatment induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the after hyperpolarization amplitude of the first evoked action potential. Resveratrol-treated cells displayed a significantly broader action potential (AP) when compared with either control or vehicle-treated groups. In addition, the mean instantaneous firing frequency between the first two action potentials was significantly lower in resveratrol-treated neurons. It also caused a significant reduction in the time to maximum decay of AP. The rheobase current and the utilization time were both significantly greater following resveratrol treatment. Neurons exhibited a significantly depolarized voltage threshold when exposed to resveratrol. Conclusion Results provide direct electrophysiological evidence for the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on pyramidal neurons, at least in part, by reducing the evoked neural activity. PMID:26464825

  15. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treatment Suppresses Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Fujimoto, Masashi; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Nakano, Fumi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-09-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of anti-VEGF therapy on EBI after SAH. C57BL/6 male mice underwent sham or filament perforation SAH modeling, and vehicle or two dosages (0.2 and 1 μg) of anti-VEGF antibody were randomly administrated by an intracerebroventricular injection. Neuroscore, brain water content, immunoglobulin G staining, and Western blotting were performed to evaluate EBI at 24-48 h. To confirm the role of VEGF, anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 (a major receptor of VEGF) antibody was intracerebroventricularly administered and the effects on EBI were evaluated at 24 h. A higher dose, but not a lower dose, of anti-VEGF antibody significantly ameliorated post-SAH neurological impairments and brain edema at 24-48 h post-SAH. Post-SAH blood-brain barrier disruption was also inhibited by anti-VEGF antibody. The protective effects of anti-VEGF antibody were associated with the inhibition of post-SAH induction of VEGF, VEGFR-2, phosphorylated VEGFR-2, interleukin-1β and a matricellular protein tenascin-C (TNC). Anti-VEGFR-2 antibody also suppressed post-SAH neurological impairments and brain edema associated with VEGFR-2 inactivation and TNC downregulation. These findings demonstrated that VEGF causes post-SAH EBI via VEGFR-2 and TNC and that anti-VEGF therapy is effective for post-SAH EBI. PMID:26289408

  16. Counteraction by combined treatment with high dose of oestrogen and somatostatin of mammary growth suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H; Koshimizu, U; Sakagami, N

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between somatostatin (SMS) and high doses of oestrogen on mammary gland growth was examined in C3H/He virgin mice. Mammary gland growth was significantly suppressed by the subcutaneous implantation of pellets of oestradiol benzoate diluted to 1/1000 or 1/500 or by injection twice daily of 50ng SMS 201-995 between 25 and 55 days of age. However, the mammary gland growth of mice receiving SMS and oestrogen in combination was markedly stimulated compared to that of mice given the respective agents. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of somatostatin and oestrogen on mammary growth were apparently counteracted by the treatment in combination. PMID:2908772

  17. A personal light-treatment device for improving sleep quality in the elderly: dynamics of nocturnal melatonin suppression at two exposure levels.

    PubMed

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Bierman, Andrew; Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2009-05-01

    Light treatment has been used as a non-pharmacological tool to help mitigate poor sleep quality frequently found in older people. In order to increase compliance to non-pharmacological light treatments, new, more efficacious light-delivery systems need to be developed. A prototype personal light-treatment device equipped with low brightness blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (peak wavelength near 470 nm) was tested for its effectiveness in suppressing nocturnal melatonin, a measure of circadian stimulation. Two levels of corneal irradiance were set to deliver two prescribed doses of circadian light exposure. Eleven older subjects, between 51 and 80 yrs of age who met the selection criteria, were exposed to a high and a low level of light for 90 min on separate nights from the personal light-treatment device. Blood and saliva samples were collected at prescribed times for subsequent melatonin assay. After 1 h of light exposure, the light-induced nocturnal melatonin suppression level was about 35% for the low-light level and about 60% for the high-light level. The higher level of blue light suppressed melatonin more quickly, to a greater extent over the course of the 90 min exposure period, and maintained suppression after 60 min. The constant exposure of the low-light level resulted in a decrease in nocturnal melatonin suppression for the last sampling time, whereas for the high-light level, suppression continued throughout the entire exposure period. The present study performed with healthy adults suggests that the tested personal light-treatment device might be a practical, comfortable, and effective way to deliver light treatment to those suffering from circadian sleep disorders; however, the acceptance and effectiveness of personal light-treatment devices by older people and by other segments of the population suffering from sleep disorders in a real-life situation need to be directly tested. PMID:19444752

  18. Suppression of seed rot and preemergence of chickpea by seed treatments with fluorescent pseudomonads in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, M; Sharifi-Tehrani, A

    2006-01-01

    Species of Pythium isolated from rotted chickpea seeds and damped-off seedlings and chickpea soils at experimental field of Agriculture faculty of Tehran University in Karaj area that caused seed rot and preemergence damping-off of chickpea were Pyhium ultimum var. ultimum. One of the most important of soilborne fungal pathogens of the chickpea in Iran is seed rot and preemergence damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum Trow. Consequently, growers can expect as much as > 80% reduction in stand and yield if measures are not taken to control Pythium. Currently, most commercial seeds of chickpea are treated with pesticides. Fluorescent pseudomonads applied to seed are known to reduce soilborne diseases of chickpea caused by Pythium spp. In this study rotted chickpea seeds and diseased seedlings and soil samples were collected from experimental field in Karaj. Soils and roots used as sources of bacteria were collected from field. Fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated by plating samples on S1 and King's Medium B (KMB). Bacteria were preserved in 0.1 M MgSO4 for long-term storage; and NAG (containing 2% glucose) slants and plates at 4 degrees C short-term storage. Of 20 fluorescent pseudomonads isolated on S1 medium, 2 isolates selected for next tests. All strains significantly increased emergence as compared to the infested control in greenhouse trial; isolate Pf-4 consistently provided the best protection against Pythium. Seedling emergence from all bacteria seed treatments was statistically lower than the chemical treatments. All strains significantly increased fresh weight of chickpea as compared to the infested control in greenhouse trial. Seed treatment with metalaxyl were statistically better than captan in sterilized soil. In nonsterilized soil collected from the field artificially infested with P. ultimum, all strains significantly increased fresh weight of chickpea as compared to the infested control in greenhouse trial. Seedling emergence from seed treatment

  19. Suppression of oncoprotein Her-2 and DNA damage after treatment with Flavan-3- ol vitis labrusca extract.

    PubMed

    Scola, Gustavo; Fernandes Correia Laurino, Claudia Cilene; Menin, Eveline; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and breast cancer are the most prevalent cancers in the world with high morbidity and mortality. Although there are effective drugs for treating advanced stages of liver and breast cancers, the prognosis for patients with liver cancer remains poor, and patients with breast cancer show considerable mortality. Therefore, it is crucial to explore new therapeutic agents for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. This study examined the anti-carcinogenic effect of Vitis labrusca seed extract (VLE), which is a component of winery waste, on liver (HepG2) and breast cancers (MCF-7) cells. The results found in this study demonstrated VLEinduced DNA damage in liver and breast cancer cells. VLE treatment in both cell lines was accompanied by high NO production and upregulation of p53. A significant decrease in total PARP expression was also found in HepG2 cells. In the MCF-7 cell line, VLE treatment increased the expression of Bax and AIF, and decreased total PARP expression. Surprisingly, VLE suppressed Her-2 expression in HepG2 cells and caused a subtle, but significant downregulation of Her-2 in MCF-7 cells. The possible anti-carcinogenic effect of VLE reported in this study suggests the potential of this extract to be used for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of different kinds of cancers. PMID:23343084

  20. Suppression of aflatoxin B1- or methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome aberrations in rat bone marrow cells after treatment with S-methyl methanethiosulfonate.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Nakamura, Y; Nakamura, Y

    1997-10-24

    The suppressive effect of S-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)- or methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced chromosome aberrations (CA) in rat bone marrow cells was studied. MMTS significantly suppressed CA induced by both AFB1 (an indirect-acting carcinogen) and MMS (a direct-acting carcinogen). Suppression was observed at all periods (6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h) after AFB1 or MMS treatment and in all doses of AFB1 (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or MMS (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg) investigated. AFB1-induced CA was potently suppressed by MMTS given between 2 h before and 6 h after the AFB1 injection. The suppression of AFB1-induced CA by MMTS paralleled the dose of MMTS when MMTS was given in a dose range of 1-20 mg/kg body weight. MMS-induced CA was potently suppressed by MMTS given between 2 h before and 2 h after the MMS injection. The suppressive effect of MMTS on MMS-induced CA paralleled the dose of MMTS when MMTS was given in a dose range of 1-15 mg/kg body weight. Diphenyl disulfide, which modifies -SH groups in proteins like MMTS, also significantly suppressed both AFB1- and MMS-induced CA. Although other mechanisms are not excluded, the suppression of carcinogen-induced CA by MMTS may result from the ability of MMTS to modify -SH groups in proteins. The juices of cabbage and onion, which contain considerable amounts of MMTS and S-methyl-L-cysteinesulfoxide (the precursor of MMTS), also significantly suppressed AFB1- or MMS-induced CA. These results suggest that MMTS is a possible chemopreventive agent against cancer. PMID:9393623

  1. Olopatadine hydrochloride suppresses hot flashes induced by topical treatment with tacrolimus ointment in rats.

    PubMed

    Satake, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Junichi; Tamura, Tadafumi; Amano, Toru; Kobayashi, Katsuya

    2015-10-15

    Tacrolimus ointment is prescribed for patients with atopic dermatitis, although it is known to cause transient burning sensations and hot flashes in the applied skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine), an antiallergic agent with a histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonistic activity, on the incidence of hot flashes induced by topical treatment with tacrolimus ointment in rats. Consequently, the skin temperature was increased by the topical application of tacrolimus ointment in rats, and the rise in skin temperature was inhibited by pretreatment with olopatadine in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitory effect of olopatadine on tacrolimus-induced skin temperature elevation was significantly more potent than that of cetirizine hydrochloride, other antiallergic agent with H1R antagonistic activity, at doses in which both agents exhibit comparable H1R antagonistic activity in rats. These results suggest that H1R antagonistic activity-independent mechanism contribute to the inhibitory effect of olopatadine on tacrolimus-induced skin temperature elevation. Olopatadine also significantly inhibited increases in vascular permeability and nerve growth factor production in the skin induced by topical tacrolimus treatment. Thus, the onset of hot flashes in rats is quantitatively determined by measuring the skin temperature and olopatadine attenuates hot flashes induced by topical tacrolimus ointment in rats, suggesting that the combination application with olopatadine and tacrolimus ointment is useful for improving medication adherence with tacrolimus ointment treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:26362749

  2. Suppressed spontaneous secretion of growth hormone in girls after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Moëll, C; Garwicz, S; Westgren, U; Wiebe, T; Albertsson-Wikland, K

    1989-01-01

    The spontaneous secretion of growth hormone during a 24 hour period and the response of growth hormone to growth hormone releasing hormone was studied in 13 girls who had received treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia that included cranial irradiation with 20-24 Gy in 12-14 fractions. At the time of investigation the girls were at varying stages of puberty and had normal concentrations of thyroid hormones. The mean interval between the end of treatment and investigation was 4.6 years. The mean age at onset of the disease was 3.2 years and at investigation 10.7 years. The average attained height equalled -0.3 SD at onset, and -1.0 SD at the time of investigation. Secretion of growth hormone was substantially reduced compared with controls and did not increase during puberty. A prompt rise in growth hormone secretion was seen after injection of growth hormone releasing hormone, but the mean maximum growth hormone concentration was, however, only 25 mU/l. There was no correlation between the 24 hour secretion and growth hormone response to growth hormone releasing hormone, or the time since irradiation. These results confirm earlier work that suggested that girls who had received treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, that included cranial irradiation, have a comparative growth hormone insufficiency characterised by normal prepubertal growth and slow growth during puberty because of an inability to respond to the increased demands for growth hormone at that time. PMID:2494952

  3. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  4. Suppression of Myocardial Injury Markers following Percutaneous Coronary Interventions by Pre-treatment with Carvedilol

    PubMed Central

    Moloudi, Abdolrasoul; Sabzi, Feridoun; Rashidi, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrospective studies and clinical trials have indicated that β-receptor blockers have an influential role in improving survival and reducing risk of recurrent infarction in patients with myocardial infarction. However, there is still controversy regarding the effects of β-receptor blockers on the markers of myocardial infarction following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the pre-treatment effect of Carvedilol on markers of myocardial injury in patients undergoing elective PCI. Method and Materials In this clinical trial patients undergoing elective PCI were categorized randomly in the Carvedilol group including 100 patients who received two doses of 12.5 mg, 6 and 12 hours prior to PCI, and the control group (105 patients). Blood samples were obtained to analyse cardiac biomarker, 12 and 24 hours after PCI. Results The clinical features were not significantly different between the two groups. A increase in the level of Troponin I was observed in the control group 24 hours following PCI (P=0.042), whereas this rise in troponin I was slight and insignificant in the Carvedilol group (P>0.05). some difference was observed between the two groups in regard to the level of CPK-MB after PCI (P=0.041). Conclusion The findings of our study indicate that pre-treatment with Carvedilol confers cardio-protection by limiting the rise of markers of myocardial injury following PCI. PMID:24757599

  5. Surface treatment of zinc anodes to improve discharge capacity and suppress hydrogen gas evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yung-Da; Fey, George Ting-Kuo

    The shape change and redistribution of zinc anode material over the electrode during repeated cycling have been identified as the main factors that can limit the life of alkaline zinc-air batteries. Li 2O-2B 2O 3 (lithium boron oxide, LBO) glass with high Li + conductivity and stability can be coated on the surface of zinc powders. The structures of the surface-treated and pristine zinc powders were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, ESCA and BET analyses. XRD patterns of LBO-coated zinc powders revealed that the coating did not affect the crystal structure. TEM images of LBO-coated on the zinc particles were compact with an average passivation layer of about 250 nm. The LBO layer can prevent zinc from coming into direct contact with the KOH electrolyte and minimize the side reactions within the batteries. The 0.1 wt.% LBO-coated zinc anode material provided an initial discharge capacity of 1.70 Ah at 0.5 V, while the pristine zinc electrode delivered only 1.57 Ah. A surface-treated zinc electrode can increase discharge capacity, decrease hydrogen evolution reaction, and reduce self-discharge. The results indicated that surface treatment should be effective for improving the comprehensive properties of anode materials for zinc-air batteries.

  6. Chloroquine enhances the efficacy of cisplatin by suppressing autophagy in human adrenocortical carcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xia, Leilei; Wang, Xianjin; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Chuandong; Shen, Zhoujun

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that chloroquine (CQ) enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy. However, little is known about whether CQ could enhance the efficacy of cisplatin (DDP) in the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). In this study, we explore the efficacy and mechanism by which CQ affects DDP sensitivity in human ACC in vitro and in vivo. Methods The autophagic gene Beclin-1 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the protein levels were analyzed using immunoblotting assays of ACC tissues and normal adrenal cortex tissues. The ACC SW13 cells were treated with DDP and/or CQ. The cell viability assay was performed using the MTT method. Qualitative autophagy detection was performed by monodansylcadaverine staining of autophagic vacuoles. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining was used to count cell apoptosis by flow cytometry. The autophagy-related protein (Beclin-1, LC3, and p62) and apoptosis relative protein (Bax and Bcl-2) levels were evaluated with Western blot analysis. Furthermore, a murine model of nude BALB/c mice bearing SW13 cell xenografts was established to evaluate the efficacy of concomitant therapy. Results The expression of the autophagic gene Beclin-1 was significantly downregulated in ACC tissues compared to normal adrenal cortex tissues. The Beclin-1 protein level in ACC tissues was lower than that in normal adrenal cortex tissues (P<0.05). In vitro concomitant therapy (DDP and CQ) was more effective in restraining SW13 cell proliferation. DDP could promote cell apoptosis and induce autophagy in SW13 cells. Concomitant therapy further promoted cell apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. In vivo, we found that concomitant therapy was more potent than DDP monotherapy in inhibiting the growth of xenografted tumors and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Conclusion The antitumor ability of DDP was related to autophagy activity, and the concomitant therapy (DDP and CQ) could be an

  7. IVIg immune reconstitution treatment alleviates the state of persistent immune activation and suppressed CD4 T cell counts in CVID.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Santos, Bianca A N; Carvalho, Karina I; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6-12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:24130688

  8. Autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine suppressed re-recurrence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma following 29 unsuccessful treatments with extensive conventional therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Inui, Toshio; Ohno, Tadao

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine after primary resection has been shown to suppress the recurrence of hepatitis B virus-associated HCC, but the effect of this treatment on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related disease has not yet been clarified. Here, we report a case of a patient with repeat recurrent HCC that was associated with HCV who had endured 29 episodes of HCC recurrence despite a variety of therapy using conventional methods. Finally, treatment with a single course of autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine resulted in suppression of potential further re-recurrence of HCC for more than 43 months without any additional treatment. PMID:22789008

  9. Radioiodine Treatment and Thyroid Hormone Suppression Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Adverse Effects Support the Trend toward Less Aggressive Treatment for Low-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klein Hesselink, E.N.; Links, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) has steadily increased, with especially a growing number of low-risk patients. Whereas DTC used to be treated rather aggressively, it is now acknowledged that aggressive treatment does not affect outcome for low-risk patients and that it can induce adverse effects. In this review an overview of the most clinically relevant adverse effects of radioiodine treatment and thyroid hormone suppression therapy (THST) is presented, and the trend toward less aggressive treatment for low-risk patients is outlined. Salivary gland dysfunction occurs in roughly 30% of patients, and is probably due to the concentration of radioiodine in the salivary glands by the sodium/iodide symporter. Beta radiation from radioiodine can result in sialoadenitis and eventually fibrosis and loss of salivary function. Furthermore, patients can experience bone marrow dysfunction following radioiodine treatment. Although this is in general subclinical and transient, patients that receive very high cumulative radioiodine doses may be at risk for more severe bone marrow dysfunction. THST can induce adverse cardiovascular effects in patients with DTC, such as diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and also adverse vascular and prothrombotic effects have been described. Finally, the effects of THST on bone formation and resorption are outlined; especially postmenopausal women with DTC on THST seem to be at risk of bone loss. In the past years, advances have been made in preventing low-risk patients from being overtreated. Improved biomarkers are still needed to further optimize risk stratification and personalize medicine. PMID:26279993

  10. Suppression of caries-related microorganisms in dentine lesions after short-term chlorhexidine or antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Michael J; Haak, Rainer; Schütt-Gerowitt, Heidi; Kneist, Susanne; Noack, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of a chlorhexidine varnish and an antibiotic paste in suppressing the cultivable microflora of deep dentine cavities in a stepwise excavation procedure. Subsequent to enamel preparation and removal of the central biomass, infected dentine was sampled from the cavity floor. Ten cavities each were either covered with the 1% chlorhexidine- and 1% thymol-containing varnish Cervitec (CE), the demeclocycline hydrocortisone-containing ointment Ledermix (LE) or received no treatment as control (CO). A compomer composite was used as intermediate restorative. Cavities were reassessed after 6 weeks and again dentine samples were microbiologically investigated for total viable counts, mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. After 6 weeks a significant reduction of the total viable counts was observed in the LE group (p = 0.011) compared to the control, whereas no differences were found in the CE group (p > 0.05). Mutans streptococci were rarely recovered at baseline and after 6 weeks. Compared to the CO group counts of lactobacilli were significantly reduced in the CE and LE groups (p < 0.05). Lactobacillus species were frequently recovered at baseline and after 6 weeks of observation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus was the predominant species in all samples investigated. Application of CE or LE resulted in reduced counts of lactobacilli after a period of 6 weeks. Although none of the materials completely eliminated the viable microorganisms, the use of LE was more effective than CE in reducing the total anaerobic microorganisms associated with carious dentine. PMID:15316187

  11. Simulating Patterns of Patient Engagement, Treatment Adherence, and Viral Suppression: A System Dynamics Approach to Evaluating HIV Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brian; Palma, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract System dynamics (SD) modeling belongs to the rapidly evolving, interdisciplinary field of system science research. This field adds value to more traditional health research by contributing to the design and testing of complex integrated models of change, to examine health system performance and patient outcomes. Using selected milestones in HIV care management to frame our simulation research, we created a SD model to examine three patient subgroups of women of color (WOC) represented in our multi-site cohort, classified by their health care seeking status at baseline. Asked to reflect on their circumstance 6 months prior to enrollment in the MSE cohort, 53% noted they were receiving some care (In Care, n=341), 31% that they had been seeking care (Seeking Care, n=201), and 16% that they were undecided about seeking care (i.e., answered that they may or may not look for care) for treatment of their HIV (May or May Not Seek Care, n=103). Our SD model compared simulated patterns of patient retention over 24 months in relation to: (1) access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), (2) adherence to ART, and (3) viral suppression. Assessed patterns yielded insights about system capacities and constraints in the context of the SPNS initiative under evaluation. PMID:25561309

  12. Resveratrol Treatment after Status Epilepticus Restrains Neurodegeneration and Abnormal Neurogenesis with Suppression of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Geetha A.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Xiaolan; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug therapy, though beneficial for restraining seizures, cannot thwart status epilepticus (SE) induced neurodegeneration or down-stream detrimental changes. We investigated the efficacy of resveratrol (RESV) for preventing SE-induced neurodegeneration, abnormal neurogenesis, oxidative stress and inflammation in the hippocampus. We induced SE in young rats and treated with either vehicle or RESV, commencing an hour after SE induction and continuing every hour for three-hours on SE day and twice daily thereafter for 3 days. Seizures were terminated in both groups two-hours after SE with a diazepam injection. In contrast to the vehicle-treated group, the hippocampus of animals receiving RESV during and after SE presented no loss of glutamatergic neurons in hippocampal cell layers, diminished loss of inhibitory interneurons expressing parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in the dentate gyrus, reduced aberrant neurogenesis with preservation of reelin + interneurons, lowered concentration of oxidative stress byproduct malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha, normalized expression of oxidative stress responsive genes and diminished numbers of activated microglia. Thus, 4 days of RESV treatment after SE is efficacious for thwarting glutamatergic neuron degeneration, alleviating interneuron loss and abnormal neurogenesis, and suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation. These results have implications for restraining SE-induced chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:26639668

  13. Treatment with connexin 46 siRNA suppresses the growth of human Y79 retinoblastoma cell xenografts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burr, Diana B; Molina, Samuel A; Banerjee, Debarshi; Low, Derek M; Takemoto, Dolores J

    2011-04-01

    Tumors with a hypoxic component, including human Y79 retinoblastoma cells, express a specific gap junction protein, Connexin 46 (Cx46), which is usually only found in naturally hypoxic tissues such as the differentiated lens. The aim of this study was to investigate if Cx46 downregulation would suppress Y79 tumor formation in vivo. Five-week old nude mice were subcutaneously implanted with human Y79 retinoblastoma cells and treated with intratumor siRNA injections of 30 μg Cx46 siRNA (n = 6), 30 μg non-silencing siRNA (n = 6), or no siRNA treatment (n = 6) every 2 days for a maximum of 10 treatments. Tumor volume (TV) was calculated from the recorded caliper measurements of length and width. Excised tumors were measured and weighed. Western blot analyses were performed to evaluate Cx46 and Cx43 expression in tumors which received Cx46 siRNA, non-silencing siRNA, or no siRNA treatment. Tumor histopathology was used to assess tumor features. Cx46 siRNA treated Y79 tumors had a reduced TV (287 mm(3) ± 77 mm(3)) when compared to the tumors of mice receiving the negative control siRNA (894 mm(3) ± 218 mm(3); P ≤ 0.03) or no siRNA (1068 mm(3) ± 192 mm(3); P ≤ 0.002). A 6-fold knockdown of Cx46 and a 3-fold rise in Cx43 protein expression was observed from western blots of tumors treated with Cx46 siRNA compared to mice treated with non-silencing siRNA. Knockdown of Cx46 with siRNA had an antitumor effect on human Y79 retinoblastoma tumors in the nude mouse model. The results suggest that anti-Cx46 therapy may be a potential target in the future treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:21320488

  14. Suppression of BCG cell wall induced delayed-type hypersensitivity by BCG pre-treatment. I. Induction of adherent suppressor cells by live BCG injection and their characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Yamamoto, K I; Kakinuma, M; Ishihara, C; Azuma, I

    1981-01-01

    Previous injections of live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in mice produced a suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) induced by oil-treated BCG cell walls (CW). This phenomenon was analysed by the macrophage migration inhibition (MI) test in which peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from live BCG-injected mice were mixed with PEC from BCG CW-immunized mice, with the result that the former cells suppressed the MI activity in the latter. We considered the Mi test to be a reliable method for demonstrating the existence of suppressor cells induced by the injection of live BCG. Moreover, we found that the adherent cells of PEC possessed a suppressive effect which was retained even after treatment with either anti-mouse Ig or anti-brain associated theta (BA theta) antigen; that the PEC from mice injected with live BCG on at least the 12th day before cell harvesting showed the suppression; and that the suppression operated across the H-2 barrier. PMID:6450731

  15. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  16. Trends and Disparities in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Virologic Suppression Among Newly Treatment-Eligible HIV-Infected Individuals in North America, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, David B.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Hessol, Nancy A.; Horberg, Michael A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Napravnik, Sonia; Patel, Pragna; Silverberg, Michael J.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Willig, James H.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Crane, Heidi M.; Collier, Ann C.; Samji, Hasina; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Gill, M. John; Klein, Marina B.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Gange, Stephen J.; Benson, A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Platt, Aaron; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Althoff, Keri N.; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2013-01-01

    Background. Since the mid-1990s, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have improved in potency, tolerability, ease of use, and class diversity. We sought to examine trends in treatment initiation and resulting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virologic suppression in North America between 2001 and 2009, and demographic and geographic disparities in these outcomes. Methods. We analyzed data on HIV-infected individuals newly clinically eligible for ART (ie, first reported CD4+ count <350 cells/µL or AIDS-defining illness, based on treatment guidelines during the study period) from 17 North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design cohorts. Outcomes included timely ART initiation (within 6 months of eligibility) and virologic suppression (≤500 copies/mL, within 1 year). We examined time trends and considered differences by geographic location, age, sex, transmission risk, race/ethnicity, CD4+ count, and viral load, and documented psychosocial barriers to ART initiation, including non–injection drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and mental illness. Results. Among 10 692 HIV-infected individuals, the cumulative incidence of 6-month ART initiation increased from 51% in 2001 to 72% in 2009 (Ptrend < .001). The cumulative incidence of 1-year virologic suppression increased from 55% to 81%, and among ART initiators, from 84% to 93% (both Ptrend < .001). A greater number of psychosocial barriers were associated with decreased ART initiation, but not virologic suppression once ART was initiated. We found significant heterogeneity by state or province of residence (P < .001). Conclusions. In the last decade, timely ART initiation and virologic suppression have greatly improved in North America concurrent with the development of better-tolerated and more potent regimens, but significant barriers to treatment uptake remain, both at the individual level and systemwide. PMID:23315317

  17. Suppression of pokeweed mitogen-stimulated immunoglobulin production in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Strober, S.; Kansas, G.S.; Terrell, C.P.; Engleman, E.G.

    1984-02-01

    Patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI, 200 rad). The authors previously reported long-lasting clinical improvement in this group associated with a persistent decrease in circulating Leu-3 (helper subset) T cells and marked impairment of in vitro lymphocyte function. In the present experiments, they studied the mechanisms underlying the decrease in pokeweed mitogen stimulated immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion observed after TLI. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBL) from TLI-treated patients produced 10-fold less Ig (both IgM and IgG) in response to pokeweed mitogen than before radiotherapy. This decrease in Ig production was associated with the presence of suppressor cells in co-culture studies. By using responder cells obtained from normal individuals (allogeneic system), PBL from eight of 12 patients after TLI suppressed Ig synthesis by more than 50%. In contrast, PBL from the same patients before TLI failed to suppress Ig synthesis. PBL with suppressive activity contained suppressor T cells, and the latter cells bore the Leu-2 surface antigen. In 50% of the patients studied suppressor cells were also found in the non-T fraction and were adherent to plastic. Interestingly, the Leu-2/sup +/ cells from TLI-treated patients were no more potent on a cell per cell basis than purified Leu-2/sup +/ cells obtained before TLI. Additional experiments suggested that the suppression mediated by T cells after TLI is related to the increased ratio of Leu-2 to Leu-3 cells observed after radiotherapy.

  18. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F.; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Antoni, Anna Degli; Galluzzo, Clementina M.; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but <37 copies/ml), and quantifiable HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA <37 copies/ml. Most of them (59/90, 65.6%) had full suppression, with the remaining (31/90, 34.4%) showing low-level viremia (median: 11.9 copies/ml; IQR 7.4–16.3). Among the 17 women with quantifiable viral load, median HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46–251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and

  19. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for nightmare disorder.

    PubMed

    Nadorff, Michael R; Lambdin, Karen K; Germain, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Interest in the treatment of nightmares has greatly increased over the last several years as research has demonstrated the clinical significance of nightmare disorder. This paper provides an overview of nightmare disorder, its clinical relevance, and the leading treatments that are available. In particular, the paper defines nightmare disorder and then summarize the recent literature examining the clinical relevance of nightmare disorder, including its relation to post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychiatric conditions. The relation between nightmares and suicidality is also discussed. Recent findings on the treatment of nightmare with imagery rehearsal therapy and prazosin are then summarized. Lastly, the paper comments on potential future uses of nightmare treatment including using imagery rehearsal therapy or prazosin as a first-line intervention for post-traumatic stress disorder and using these treatments as an adjunctive therapy to reduce suicide risk in those at risk of suicide with nightmares. PMID:24892897

  20. Efficient Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Combination Treatment with miR-122 Antagonism and Direct-acting Antivirals in Cell Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanwei; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Murai, Kazuhisa; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Funaki, Masaya; Honda, Masao; Murakami, Seishi; Yi, Minkyung; Tang, Hong; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) show effective antiviral activity with few side effects. However, the selection of DAA-resistance mutants is a growing problem that needs to be resolved. In contrast, miR-122 antagonism shows extensive antiviral effects among all HCV genotypes and a high barrier to drug resistance. In the present study, we evaluated three DAAs (simeprevir, daclatasvir, and sofosbuvir) in combination with anti-miR-122 treatment against HCV genotype 1a in cell cultures. We found that combination treatments with anti-miR-122 and a DAA had additive or synergistic antiviral effects. The EC50 values of simeprevir in simeprevir-resistant mutants were significantly decreased by combining simeprevir with anti-miR-122. A similar reduction in EC50 in daclatasvir-resistant mutants was achieved by combining daclatasvir with anti-miR-122. Combination treatment in HCV-replicating cells with DAA and anti-miR-122 sharply reduced HCV RNA amounts. Conversely, DAA single treatment with simeprevir or daclatasvir reduced HCV RNA levels initially, but the levels later rebounded. DAA-resistant mutants were less frequently observed in combination treatments than in DAA single treatments. In summary, the addition of miR-122 antagonism to DAA single treatments had additive or synergistic antiviral effects and helped to efficiently suppress HCV replication and the emergence of DAA-resistant mutants. PMID:27484655

  1. Dasatinib suppression of medulloblastoma survival and migration is markedly enhanced by combining treatment with the aurora kinase inhibitor AT9283

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, William; Liu, Jingbo; Yuan, Liangping; Zhang, Hongying; Schneiderjan, Matthew; Cho, Yoon-Jae; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) expresses Src kinase, while aurora kinase A overexpression correlates with poor survival. We thus investigated novel combination treatment with dasatinib and AT9283, inhibitors of Src and aurora kinase, respectively, on MB growth in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with each drug significantly reduced cell viability and combined treatment markedly potentiated this response. AT9283 induced p53 expression, autophagy, and G2/M cell-cycle arrest, while combined treatment induced S phase arrest. Dasatinib treatment caused tumor regression in vivo. Activated Src was detected in 44% MB analyzed. We conclude that further evaluation of this combination therapy for MB is highly warranted. PMID:25107642

  2. Increased Histone Deacetylase Activity Involved in the Suppressed Invasion of Cancer Cells Survived from ALA-Mediated Photodynamic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Tzu; Tsai, Yi-Jane; Lee, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have found that cancer cells survived from 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) have abnormal mitochondrial function and suppressed cellular invasiveness. Here we report that both the mRNA expression level and enzymatic activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) were elevated in the PDT-derived variants with dysfunctional mitochondria. The activated HDAC deacetylated histone H3 and further resulted in the reduced migration and invasion, which correlated with the reduced expression of the invasion-related genes, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), paternally expressed gene 1 (PEG1), and miR-355, the intronic miRNA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate the reduced amount of acetylated histone H3 on the promoter regions of MMP9 and PEG1, supporting the down-regulation of these two genes in PDT-derived variants. These results indicate that HDAC activation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction could modulate the cellular invasiveness and its related gene expression. This argument was further verified in the 51-10 cybrid cells with the 4977 bp mtDNA deletion and A375 ρ0 cells with depleted mitochondria. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction might suppress tumor invasion through modulating histone acetylation. PMID:26473836

  3. Treatment Combining X-Irradiation and a Ribonucleoside Anticancer Drug, TAS106, Effectively Suppresses the Growth of Tumor Cells Transplanted in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Nakajima, Takayuki; Kon, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Akira; Kuwabara, Mikinori . E-mail: kuwabara@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the in vivo antitumor efficacy of X-irradiation combined with administration of a ribonucleoside anticancer drug, 1-(3-C-ethynyl-{beta}-D-ribo-pentofuranosyl)cytosine (TAS106, ECyd), to tumor cell-transplanted mice. Methods and Materials: Colon26 murine rectum adenocarcinoma cells and MKN45 human gastric adenocarcinoma cells were inoculated into the footpad in BALB/c mice and severe combined immunodeficient mice, respectively. They were treated with a relatively low dose of X-irradiation (2 Gy) and low amounts of TAS106 (0.1 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg). The tumor growth was monitored by measuring the tumor volume from Day 5 to Day 16 for Colon26 and from Day 7 to Day 20 for MKN45. Histologic analyses for proliferative and apoptotic cells in the tumors were performed using Ki-67 immunohistochemical and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining. The expression of survivin, a key molecule related to tumor survival, was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: When X-irradiation and TAS106 treatment were combined, significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in both types of tumors compared with mice treated with X-irradiation or TAS106 alone. Marked inhibition of tumor growth was observed in half of the mice that received the combined treatment three times at 2-day intervals. Parallel to these phenomena, the suppression of survivin expression and appearance of Ki-67-negative and apoptotic cells were observed. Conclusions: X-irradiation and TAS106 effectively suppress tumor growth in mice. The inhibition of survivin expression by TAS106 is thought to mainly contribute to the suppression of the tumor growth.

  4. Bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture after long-term suppressive levothyroxine treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mendonça Monteiro de Barros, Graziella; Madeira, Miguel; Vieira Neto, Leonardo; de Paula Paranhos Neto, Francisco; Carvalho Mendonça, Laura Maria; Corrêa Barbosa Lima, Inayá; Corbo, Rossana; Fleiuss Farias, Maria Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) seems not to be decreased in young patients given long-term suppressive doses of levothyroxine (LT4), but information regarding the bone microstructure in these patients is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine whether supraphysiologic doses of LT4, initiated during childhood or adolescence for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), have any detrimental effects on bone microarchitecture as evaluated by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). Seventeen patients (27.3 ± 7.1 years old) with DTC with subclinical hyperthyroidism since adolescence and 34 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to determine the areal BMD at the lumbar spine, hip, and proximal third of the radius. Volumetric BMD and structural parameters of the trabecular and cortical bone were assessed by HR-pQCT of the distal radius and distal tibia. DTC patients were given suppressive doses of LT4 starting at a mean age of 12.6 years, and the mean duration of treatment was 14.2 years. In DTC patients, clinical parameters did not correlate with DXA or HR-pQCT parameters. No differences were found between the patients and controls with respect to BMD and Z scores at any site evaluated by DXA, and no differences were found in the bone microstructure parameters evaluated by HR-pQCT. This cross-sectional study suggests that long-standing suppressive therapy with LT4 during the attainment of peak bone mass may have no significant adverse effects on bone density or microarchitecture. PMID:26056020

  5. Photodynamic treatment (ALA-PDT) suppresses the expression of the oncogenic Bcr-Abl kinase and affects the cytoskeleton organization in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Pluskalová, Michaela; Peslová, Gabriela; Grebenová, Dana; Halada, Petr; Hrkal, Zbynek

    2006-06-01

    K562 is the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived cell line that expresses high levels of chimeric oncoprotein Bcr-Abl. The deregulated (permanent) kinase activity of Bcr-Abl leads to continuous proliferation of K562 cells and their resistance to the apoptosis promotion by conventional drugs. The photodynamic treatment (PDT) based on the application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and irradiation with blue light (ALA-PDT) resulted in the suppression of K562 cells proliferation. It was followed by a necrosis-like cell death [K. Kuzelová, D. Grebenová, M. Pluskalová, I. Marinov, Z. Hrkal, J. Photochem. Photobiol. B 73 (2004) 67-78]. ALA-PDT led to the perturbation of the Hsp90/p23 multichaperone complex of which the Bcr-Abl is the client protein. Bcr-Abl protein was suppressed whereas the bcr-abl mRNA level was not affected. Further on, we observed several changes in the cytoskeleton organization. We detected ALA-PDT-mediated disruption of filamental actin structure using FITC-Phalloidin staining. In connection with this we uncovered certain cytoskeleton organizing proteins involved in the cell response to the treatment. Among these proteins, Septin2, which plays a role in maintaining actin bundles, was suppressed. Another one, PDZ-LIM domain protein 1 (CLP36) was altered. This protein acts as an adaptor molecule for LIM-kinase which phosphorylates and thus inactivates cofilin. Cofilin was indeed dephosphorylated and could thus be activated and operate as an actin-depolymerizing factor. We propose the scheme of molecular response of K562 cells to ALA-PDT. PMID:16495075

  6. Fetal pancreas transplantation in miniature swine. IV. Suppression of DTH and MLR responses by treatment with ultraviolet light-irradiated peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Taura, Y.; Stein, E.; Miyazawa, K.; Mullen, Y. )

    1990-07-01

    Irradiation of peripheral blood lymphocytes of miniature swine with ultraviolet light prevented them from initiating proliferative responses in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions and also reduced IL-2 production in these MLRs. When pigs were injected in a series of 4-5 weekly transfusions with UV-irradiated allogeneic PBL differing at the MHC, PBL of recipient pigs progressively responded less strongly to donor PBL in MLRs over the treatment period. These pigs also gave negligible delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to donor PBL at the end of the treatment period. Of the seven UV-irradiated PBL-treated pigs, four produced no antidonor PBL antibody and three produced antibody. Serum from the three antibody-producing pigs also suppressed MLRs of unrelated PBL. By contrast, pigs that received a series of injections of untreated allogeneic PBL gave strong DTH responses to donor PBL and heightened proliferation in MLRs with donor PBL, and all produced antidonor PBL antibody.

  7. Suppressive effect of post- or pre-treatment of aspirin metabolite on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Shin, Seizai; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-01-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) of mitomycin C (MMC) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of bio-antimutagenicity and/or preventive effect of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA) and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in D. melanogaster using post- and pre-treatments. As for the post-treatment, SA reduced the numbers of large single and twin spots. GA reduced the small single and large single spots, and GUA reduced the single spots, large single and twin spots. The inhibition of GUA is slightly stronger than that of any other metabolites; the inhibition percentage is 49 at the dose of 5 mg/bottle. On the other hand, as for the pre-treatment, aspirin, SUA, GA and DHBA reduced the numbers of small single spots. SUA, GE and DHBA reduced the number of large single spots. Aspirin and its metabolites did not reduce the number of twin spots. The results of the present study suggest that SA, GA and GUA repair or replicate DNA-damage by MMC and SUA, GA, GUA and DHBA prevent DNA-damage by MMC. It is suggested that secondary cancer is prevented by aspirin post-treatment without losing the medicinal effectiveness (anti-tumor activity). Therefore, we consider there are effective doses and/or administration timing of aspirin and MMC to prevent secondary cancer. PMID:17275250

  8. A Traditional Chinese Medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong Suppresses Pain through Modulation of Cytokines and Prevents Adverse Reactions of Morphine Treatment in Bone Cancer Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yan; Sun, Kefu; He, Xueming; Li, Jinxuan; Dong, Yanbin; Zheng, Bin; Tan, Xiao; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Treating cancer pain continues to possess a major challenge. Here, we report that a traditional Chinese medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong (XAT) can effectively suppress pain and adverse reactions following morphine treatment in patients with bone cancer pain. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used for patient's self-evaluation of pain intensity and evaluating changes of adverse reactions including constipation, nausea, fatigue, and anorexia, respectively, before and after treatment prescriptions. The clinical trials showed that repetitive oral administration of XAT (200 mL, bid, for 7 consecutive days) alone greatly reduced cancer pain. Repetitive treatment with a combination of XAT and morphine (20 mg and 30 mg, resp.) produced significant synergistic analgesic effects. Meanwhile, XAT greatly reduced the adverse reactions associated with cancer and/or morphine treatment. In addition, XAT treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased the endogenous anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 in blood. These findings demonstrate that XAT can effectively reduce bone cancer pain probably mediated by the cytokine mechanisms, facilitate analgesic effect of morphine, and prevent or reduce the associated adverse reactions, supporting a use of XAT, alone or with morphine, in treating bone cancer pain in clinic. PMID:26617438

  9. Suppression of human breast tumors in NOD/SCID mice by CD44 shRNA gene therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Van Pham, Phuc; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Duong, Thuy Thanh; Nguyen, Tam Thanh; Truong, Nhung Hai; Phan, Nhan Lu Chinh; Vuong, Tue Gia; Pham, Viet Quoc; Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Nguyen, Kha The; Nguyen, Nhung Thi; Nguyen, Khue Gia; Khat, Lam Tan; Van Le, Dong; Truong, Kiet Dinh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer stem cells with a CD44+CD24− phenotype are the origin of breast tumors. Strong CD44 expression in this population indicates its important role in maintaining the stem cell phenotype. Previous studies show that CD44 down-regulation causes CD44+CD24− breast cancer stem cells to differentiate into non-stem cells that are sensitive to antitumor drugs and lose many characteristics of the original cells. In this study, we determined tumor suppression in non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice using CD44 shRNA therapy combined with doxorubicin treatment. Methods Tumor-bearing non-obese severe combined immunodeficiency mice were established by injection of CD44+CD24− cells. To track CD44+CD24− cells, green fluorescence protein was stably transduced using a lentiviral vector prior to injection into mice. The amount of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector used for transduction was based on CD44 down-regulation by in vitro CD44 shRNA transduction. Mice were treated with direct injection of CD44 shRNA lentiviral vector into tumors followed by doxorubicin administration after 48 hours. The effect was evaluated by changes in the size and weight of tumors compared with that of the control. Results The combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin strongly suppressed tumor growth with significant differences in tumor sizes and weights compared with that of CD44 down-regulation or doxorubicin treatment alone. In the combination of CD44 down-regulation and doxorubicin group, the tumor weight was significantly decreased by 4.38-fold compared with that of the control group. Conclusion These results support a new strategy for breast cancer treatment by combining gene therapy with chemotherapy. PMID:22649280

  10. Capparis ovata treatment suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression and ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ozgun-Acar, Ozden; Celik-Turgut, Gurbet; Gazioglu, Isil; Kolak, Ufuk; Ozbal, Seda; Ergur, Bekir U; Arslan, Sevki; Sen, Alaattin; Topcu, Gulacti

    2016-09-15

    Since ancient times, Capparis species have been widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. Our recent investigations have suggested Capparis ovata's potential anti-neuroinflammatory application for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study was designed to precisely determine the underlying mechanism of its anti-neuroinflammatory effect in a mouse model of MS. C. ovata water extract (COWE) was prepared using the plant's fruit, buds, and flower parts (Turkish Patent Institute, PT 2012/04,093). We immunized female C57BL/6J mice with MOG35-55/CFA. COWE was administered at a daily dose of 500mg/kg by oral gavage either from the day of immunization (T1) or at disease onset (T2) for 21days. Gene expression analysis was performed using a Mouse Multiple Sclerosis RT² Profiler PCR Array, and further determinations and validations of the identified genes were performed using qPCR. Whole-genome transcriptome profiling was analyzed using Agilent SurePrint G3 Mouse GE 8X60K microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to brain sections of the control and treated mice to examine the degree of degeneration. COWE was further fractionated and analyzed phytochemically using the Zivak Tandem Gold Triple Quadrupole LC/MS-MS system. COWE remarkably suppressed the development of EAE in T1, and the disease activity was completely inhibited. In the T2 group, the maximal score was significantly reduced compared with that of the parallel EAE group. The COWE suppression of EAE was associated with a significantly decreased expression of genes that are important in inflammatory signaling, such as TNFα, IL6, NF-κB, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCK10. On the other hand, the expression of genes involved in myelination/remyelination was significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analysis further supported these effects, showing that the number of infiltrating immune cells was decreased in the brains of COWE-treated animals. In addition, differential

  11. Differential suppression of ethylene biosynthesis and receptor genes in 'Golden Delicious' apple by preharvest and postharvest 1-MCP treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvista™, a spraying formulation of 1-MCP, is a recently available tool for managing preharvest on-tree fruit maturation whereas SmartFresh™ is the widely-used treatment for postharvest handling and storage. In the current study, the timing of pre-harvest application and its effects on fruit ripeni...

  12. An open-label, multicentre study to assess the safety and efficacy of a novel reflux suppressant (Gaviscon Advance) in the treatment of heartburn during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindow, S W; Regnéll, P; Sykes, J; Little, S

    2003-04-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of a novel reflux suppressant, Gaviscon Advance, in the treatment of heartburn during pregnancy. The study was an open-label, multicentre, phase IV study in general practice and antenatal clinics in the UK and Republic of South Africa. Pregnant women (< or = 38 weeks gestation; n=150) aged 18-40 years suffering from heartburn were instructed to take Gaviscon Advance 5-10 ml, as required, to relieve symptoms. The main outcome measures were the efficacy rating of the study medication by the investigator and women after four weeks using a five-point efficacy scale. After four weeks the investigators' and women's rating of efficacy was 'very good' or 'good' in 88% and 90% of women, respectively. Most women (57%, n=83) reported symptom relief within 10 minutes. Thus Gaviscon Advance effectively and rapidly treats heartburn during pregnancy. Its use during pregnancy presents no known significant safety concerns for mother or child. PMID:12723718

  13. Favourable outcome in idiopathic ventricular fibrillation with treatment aimed at prevention of high sympathetic tone and suppression of inducible arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Crijns, H. J.; Wiesfeld, A. C.; Posma, J. L.; Lie, K. I.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--In the absence of an obvious cause for cardiac arrest, patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation are difficult to manage. A subset of patients has inducible arrhythmias. In others sympathetic excitation plays a role in the onset of the cardiac arrest. This study evaluates a prospective stepped care approach in the management of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, with therapy first directed at induced arrhythmias and secondly at adrenergic trigger events. SETTING--University Hospital. PATIENTS--10 consecutive patients successfully resuscitated from idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. INTERVENTIONS--Programmed electrical stimulation to determine inducibility, followed by serial drug treatment. Assessment of pre-arrest physical activity and mental stress status by interview, followed by beta blockade. Cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in non-inducible patients not showing significant arrest related sympathetic excitation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Recurrent cardiac arrest or ventricular tachycardia. RESULTS--Five patients were managed with serial drug treatment and four with beta blockade. In one patient a defibrillator was implanted. During a median follow up of 2.8 years (range 6 to 112 months) no patient died or experienced defibrillator shocks. One patient had a recurrence of a well tolerated ventricular tachycardia on disopyramide. CONCLUSIONS--Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation may be related to enhanced sympathetic activation. Prognosis may be favourable irrespective of the method of treatment. Whether the present approach enhances prognosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation remains to be determined. However, it may help to avoid potentially hazardous antiarrhythmic drugs or obviate the need for implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:7488456

  14. Lactobacillus farciminis treatment suppresses stress induced visceral hypersensitivity: a possible action through interaction with epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ait‐Belgnaoui, A; Han, W; Lamine, F; Eutamene, H; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L; Theodorou, V

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress induced increase in colonic paracellular permeability results from epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction and is responsible for stress induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD). The probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis releases spontaneously nitric oxide (NO) in the colonic lumen in vivo and exerts anti‐inflammatory effects. This study aimed: (i) to evaluate the effects of L farciminis on stress induced hypersensitivity to CRD and increase in colonic paracellular permeability; and (ii) to ascertain whether these effects are NO mediated and related to changes in colonocyte myosin light chain phosphorylation (p‐MLC). Methods Female Wistar rats received either 1011 CFU/day of L farciminis or saline orally over 15 days before partial restraint stress (PRS) or sham‐PRS application. Visceral sensitivity to CRD and colonic paracellular permeability was assessed after PRS or sham‐PRS. Haemoglobin was used as an NO scavenger. Western blotting for MLC kinase, MLC, and p‐MLC were performed in colonic mucosa from L farciminis treated and control rats after PRS or sham‐PRS. Results PRS significantly increased the number of spike bursts for CRD pressures of 30–60 mm Hg as well as colonic paracellular permeability. L farciminis treatment prevented both effects, while haemoglobin reversed the protective effects of L farciminis. p‐MLC expression increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after PRS, and L farciminis treatment prevented this increase. Conclusion L farciminis treatment prevents stress induced hypersensitivity, increase in colonic paracellular permeability, and colonocyte MLC phosphorylation. This antinociceptive effect occurs via inhibition of contraction of colonic epithelial cell cytoskeleton and the subsequent tight junction opening, and may also involve direct or indirect effects of NO produced by this probiotic. PMID:16507583

  15. Suppression of current fluctuations in a crossed E×B field system for low-voltage plasma immersion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, I.; Keidar, M.; Ostrikov, K.; Yu, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma transport in a hybrid dc vacuum arc plasma source for ion deposition and plasma immersion treatment is considered. It is found that external crossed electric and magnetic fields near the substrate can significantly reduce the relative amplitude of ion current fluctuations If at the substrate surface. In particular, If decreases with the applied magnetic field when the bias voltage exceeds 300 V, thus allowing one to reduce the deviations from the rated process parameters. This phenomenon can be attributed to an interaction between the metal-plasma jet from the arc source and the discharge plasma in the crossed fields.

  16. [Effect of plasma-treatment on suppression of drug adsorption to the surface of plastic infusion bag].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Y; Nishimura, K; Kuzuya, M

    1999-12-01

    Plastics has been widely used at the hospitals and dominates the field of the manufacture of infusion bag sets and packaging materials as a disposable product. Recently, it has been reported, however, that expected drug effects could not be obtained owing mainly to the drug adsorption to the surface of plastic bags observed when several injection drugs such as nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, diazepam, and insulin were injected mixedly into a certain plastic intravenous bags. And there is a possibility of the occurrence of chemical reactions between the added drugs and the surface of plastic bags. We also can not deny the possibility of the dissolution of softener from the plastic bags. On the other hand, we have been working on the nature of plasma treatment of polymer surfaces by irradiation of low temperature plasma and its pharmaceutical application studies. In this study, we obtained the data concerning the effect of plasma treatment on the reduction of adsorption of insulin to the surface of ethylene-vinylacetate (EVA) bag. PMID:10630098

  17. Repeated landscape-scale treatments following fire suppress a non-native annual grass and promote recovery of native perennial vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Long, A. Lexine; Decker, Cheryl E.; Johnson, Katie A.; Walsh, Kathleen; Miller, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive non-native species pose a large threat to restoration efforts following large-scale disturbances. Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) is a non-native annual grass in the western U.S. that both spreads quickly following fire and accelerates the fire cycle. Herbicide and seeding applications are common restoration practices to break the positive fire-invasion feedback loop and recover native perennial species, but their interactive effects have infrequently been tested at the landscape-scale and repeated in time to encourage long-lasting effects. We determined the efficacy of repeated post-fire application of the herbicide imazapic and seeding treatments to suppressBromus abundance and promote perennial vegetation recovery. We found that the selective herbicide reduced Bromus cover by ~30 % and density by >50 % across our study sites, but had a strong initial negative effect on seeded species. The most effective treatment to promote perennial seeded species cover was seeding them alone followed by herbicide application 3 years later when the seeded species had established. The efficacy of the treatments was strongly influenced by water availability, as precipitation positively affected the density and cover of Bromus; soil texture and aspect secondarily influenced Bromus abundance and seeded species cover by modifying water retention in this semi-arid region. Warmer temperatures positively affected the non-native annual grass in the cool-season, but negatively affected seeded perennial species in the warm-season, suggesting an important role of seasonality in a region projected to experience large increases in warming in the future. Our results highlight the importance of environmental interactions and repeated treatments in influencing restoration outcomes at the landscape-scale.

  18. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor suppresses coronary arteriosclerotic changes and vasospastic responses induced by chronic treatment with interleukin-1 beta in pigs in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, A; Shimokawa, H; Kadokami, T; Fukumoto, Y; Owada, M K; Shiraishi, T; Nakaike, R; Takayanagi, T; Egashira, K; Takeshita, A

    1995-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that chronic treatment with IL-1 beta induces coronary arteriosclerotic changes and vasospastic responses to autacoids in pigs in vivo and that those responses are importantly mediated by PDGF. The receptors for PDGF and other major growth factors are known to have tyrosine kinase activity. We therefore investigated the effects of a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ST 638, on those responses induced by IL-1 beta in our swine model. Intimal thickening and coronary vasospastic responses to serotonin and histamine were induced at the site of the coronary artery where IL-1 beta was chronically and locally applied. These responses were significantly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by cotreatment with ST 638. In addition, ST 494, which is an inactive form of ST 638, did not inhibit those responses. The treatment with ST 638 alone did not affect the coronary vasoconstricting responses to the autacoids. Immunoblotting using an antibody to phosphotyrosines confirmed the inhibitory effects of ST 638 on the tyrosine phosphorylations induced by IL-1 beta. These results thus suggest that tyrosine kinase activation may play an important role in mediating the effects of IL-1 beta, while also suggesting that ST 638 has an inhibitory effect on the arteriosclerotic changes and vasospastic responses to autacoids in our swine model in vivo. Images PMID:7657803

  19. Effect of combined treatment with salvage radiotherapy plus androgen suppression on quality of life in patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Andrew; Choo, Richard . E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Szumacher, Ewa; Cheung, Patrick; Deboer, Gerrit; Chander, Sarat

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of salvage radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence or PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a phase II study. Quality of life was prospectively assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-Item Version 3.0 with the added prostate cancer-specific module at baseline and predefined follow-up visits. Results: Patients experienced a significant increase in bowel dysfunction (23%) by the end of RT (p < 0.0001). This bowel dysfunction improved after RT but remained slightly elevated (5-10%) throughout the 2-year AS period. This extent of residual bowel dysfunction would be considered of minimal clinical importance. A similar, but less pronounced, pattern of change did occur for urinary dysfunction. Erectile function showed no change during RT, but had an abrupt decline (10%) with initiation of AS that was of moderate clinical significance (p < 0.01). None of the other QOL domains demonstrated a persistent, significant change from baseline that would be considered of major clinical significance. Conclusion: The combined treatment with salvage RT plus 2-year AS had relatively minor long-term effects on QOL.

  20. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27102611

  1. Tamoxifen with ovarian function suppression versus tamoxifen alone as an adjuvant treatment for premenopausal breast cancer: a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shunchao; Li, Kai; Jiao, Xin; Zou, Huawei

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian function suppression (OFS) significantly downregulates the concentration of plasma estrogens. However, it is unclear whether it offers any survival benefits if combined with adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in premenopausal women. This meta-analysis was designed to assess data from previous studies involving adjuvant tamoxifen treatment plus OFS in premenopausal breast cancer. Methods Electronic literature databases (PubMed, Embase, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials published prior to February 1, 2015. Only randomized controlled trials that compared tamoxifen alone with tamoxifen plus OFS for premenopausal women with breast cancer were selected. The evaluated endpoints were disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Four randomized controlled trials comprising 6,279 patients (OFS combination, n=3,133; tamoxifen alone, n=3,146) were included in the meta-analysis. There was no significant improvement in disease-free survival or overall survival with addition of OFS in either the whole population or the hormone receptor-positive subgroup. The risk of distant recurrence was not reduced with the addition of OFS in the whole population. A subgroup analysis showed that addition of OFS significantly improved overall survival in patients who were administered chemotherapy. Conclusion Based on the available studies, concurrent administration of OFS and adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for premenopausal women with breast cancer has no effect on prolonging disease-free survival and overall survival, excluding patients who were administered chemotherapy. It should not be widely recommended, except perhaps for women who were hormone-receptor positive and who were also administered adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26109867

  2. Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic oncoprotein suppresses angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer: implications in resistance to photodynamic treatment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, M. I.; Giatromanolaki, A.; Skarlatos, J.; Kosma, L.; Apostolikas, N.; Beroukas, K.

    1998-07-01

    PDT cytotoxicity is likely to occur through photooxidative reactions. In that way mechanisms that define poor oxygenation should be involved in defining resistance to photo-dynamic treatment (PDT). On the other hand bcl-2 anti- apoptotic protein has been shown to delay cell death and protect cells from toxic oxidative products. We examined 134 specimens from T1,2-NO,1 staged patients treated with surgery alone. Specimens were immunohistochemically examined for vascular grade using the JC70 MoAb, and bcl-2 oncoprotein expression. Bcl-2 expression correlated with low vascular grade. Only 3/27 of bcl2+ case had high angiogenesis vs. 34/107 of cases without bcl-2 expression. In the present study we provide evidence that bcl-2 overexpression directly suppresses angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer, which obviously results in decreased blood supply and oxygenation. This finding implies that reduced intratumoral angiogenesis and immortalizing oncoprotein overexpression are linked to each other and may have a role in defining tumors resistant to PDT.

  3. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin-related allergic inflammatory mechanism in an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Min young; Kim, Dong Hye; Lee, Hae Jin; Choi, Eung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Congenitally or early impaired skin barrier as the first event starting the 'atopic march' in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients can increase allergen penetration that results in sensitization, even in the airways, followed by asthma and allergic rhinitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine existing in high levels in AD skin and is considered as a novel therapeutic target for atopic disease. We generated oxazolone (Ox)-induced AD-like (Ox-AD) hairless mice and divided them into four groups according to the therapeutic challenges: topical glucocorticoid, pimecrolimus, emollient, and control (acetone-only treated). We assessed the functional studies of skin barrier, epidermal expressions of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), TSLP and antimicrobial peptides (AMP), and serum IgE in each group. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment improved AD-like skin lesions and barrier functions, and restored the epidermal expression of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, PAR-2, and TSLP, in Ox-AD mice. The improvement was relatively better with the glucocorticoid than pimecrolimus. Epidermal AMP expression was restored by topical glucocorticoid, but not pimecrolimus. Our result showed that topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus improved the AD-like skin lesions and barrier impairment by suppressing TSLP-related allergic inflammation. PMID:25786383

  4. Suppression of tumor angiogenesis by metformin treatment via a mechanism linked to targeting of HER2/HIF-1α/VEGF secretion axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaochun; Tang, Shouching; Sun, Xin; Feng, Xuefei; Li, Yan; Bao, Gang; Li, Pingping; Mao, Xiaona; Wang, Maode; Liu, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis is currently considered as one of the major antitumor strategies for its protective effects against tumor emergency and later progression. The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been demonstrated to significantly inhibit tumor angiogenesis based on recent studies. However, the mechanism underlying this anti-angiogenic effect still remains an enigma. In this study, we investigated metformin-induced inhibitory effect on tumor angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Metformin pretreatment significantly suppressed tumor paracrine signaling-induced angiogenic promotion even in the presence of heregulin (HRG)-β1 (a co-activator of HER2) pretreatment of HER2+ tumor cells. Similar to that of AG825, a specific inhibitor of HER2 phosphorylation, metformin treatment decreased both total and phosphorylation (Tyr 1221/1222) levels of HER2 protein and significantly reduced microvessel density and the amount of Fitc-conjugated Dextran leaking outside the vessel. Furthermore, our results of VEGF-neutralizing and -rescuing tests showed that metformin markedly abrogated HER2 signaling-induced tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF secretion. Inhibition of HIF-1α signaling by using RNAi or YC-1, a specific inhibitor of HIF-1α synthesis, both completely diminished mRNA level of VEGF and greatly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation promoted by HER2+ tumor cell-conditioned medium in both the absence and presence of HRG-β1 pretreatment. Importantly, metformin treatment decreased the number of HIF-1α nucleus positive cells in 4T1 tumors, accompanied by decreased microvessel density. Our data thus provides novel insight into the mechanism underlying the metformin-induced inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and indicates possibilities of HIF-1α-VEGF signaling axis in mediating HER2-induced tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26625311

  5. Suppression of tumor angiogenesis by metformin treatment via a mechanism linked to targeting of HER2/HIF-1α/VEGF secretion axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichang; Li, Guangyue; Wang, Yaochun; Tang, Shouching; Sun, Xin; Feng, Xuefei; Li, Yan; Bao, Gang; Li, Pingping; Mao, Xiaona; Wang, Maode; Liu, Peijun

    2015-12-29

    Anti-angiogenesis is currently considered as one of the major antitumor strategies for its protective effects against tumor emergency and later progression. The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been demonstrated to significantly inhibit tumor angiogenesis based on recent studies. However, the mechanism underlying this anti-angiogenic effect still remains an enigma. In this study, we investigated metformin-induced inhibitory effect on tumor angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Metformin pretreatment significantly suppressed tumor paracrine signaling-induced angiogenic promotion even in the presence of heregulin (HRG)-β1 (a co-activator of HER2) pretreatment of HER2+ tumor cells. Similar to that of AG825, a specific inhibitor of HER2 phosphorylation, metformin treatment decreased both total and phosphorylation (Tyr 1221/1222) levels of HER2 protein and significantly reduced microvessel density and the amount of Fitc-conjugated Dextran leaking outside the vessel. Furthermore, our results of VEGF-neutralizing and -rescuing tests showed that metformin markedly abrogated HER2 signaling-induced tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF secretion. Inhibition of HIF-1α signaling by using RNAi or YC-1, a specific inhibitor of HIF-1α synthesis, both completely diminished mRNA level of VEGF and greatly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation promoted by HER2+ tumor cell-conditioned medium in both the absence and presence of HRG-β1 pretreatment. Importantly, metformin treatment decreased the number of HIF-1α nucleus positive cells in 4T1 tumors, accompanied by decreased microvessel density. Our data thus provides novel insight into the mechanism underlying the metformin-induced inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and indicates possibilities of HIF-1α-VEGF signaling axis in mediating HER2-induced tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26625311

  6. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro. PMID:27158376

  7. Piperine treatment suppresses Helicobacter pylori toxin entry in to gastric epithelium and minimizes β-catenin mediated oncogenesis and IL-8 secretion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer initiation has been studied widely. The objective of our present study was to evaluate the effect of a single compound piperine on H. pylori infection and its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects in vitro. Cytotoxicity was tested by Ez-cytox cell viability assay kit. Effects of piperine on H. pylori toxin gene expression and IL-8 expression in mammalian cells during infection were assessed by RT-PCR. Effects of piperine on toxin entry into host cells, E-cadherin cleavage by H. pylori, and the changes in H. pylori mediated β-catenin expression and IL-8 secretion were determined by immunoblotting. Piperine treatment restrained the entry of CagA and VacA into AGS cells. Piperine administration in H. pylori infection reduced E-cadherin cleavage in stomach epithelium. In addition, H. pylori induced β-catenin up-regulation was reduced. Piperine administration impaired IL-8 secretion in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. As we reported previously piperine restrained H. pylori motility. The possible reason behind the H. pylori inhibition mechanism of piperine could be the dwindled motility, which weakened H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. The reduced adhesion decreased the toxin entry thereby secreting less amount of IL-8. In addition, piperine treatment suppressed H. pylori protease led to reduction of E-cadherin cleavage and β-catenin expression resulting in diminished β-catenin translocation into the nucleus thus decreasing the risk of oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the preliminary report of piperine mediated H. pylori infection control on gastric epithelial cells in-vitro. PMID:27158376

  8. Treatment with Tie2-siRNA in combination with carboplatin suppresses the growth of Ishikawa human endometrial carcinoma cell xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FEIFEI; XUN, QINGYING; ZHOU, HUAIJUN

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that tumor angiogenesis is important in cancer development, and studies on blocking angiogenesis to treat tumors have become one of the most promising and active fields in anticancer research. The present study investigated the effect of siRNA targeting the tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (Tie2) gene in combination with carboplatin in a mouse model of endometrial carcinoma in an attempt to elucidate the role of Tie2 in the carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma via angiogenesis, in order to establish a basis for the development of complementary molecule targeting and chemotherapeutic actions. Ishikawa cells were used to establish a human endometrial carcinoma nude mouse tumor xenograft model. Tie2-siRNA (20 μg/mouse) and/or carboplatin (25.0 mg·kg−1) were administered as the treatment strategy. Real-time PCR and western blotting were used to evaluate the expression levels of Tie2 mRNA and protein and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the vessel density of the tumor tissues. The present data demonstrated that Tie2-siRNA and/or carboplatin were able to suppress the growth of endometrial xenografts in vivo and attenuate the expression of Tie2 mRNA and protein, as assessed by real-time PCR and western blotting. Furthermore, immunohistochemical assessment showed that the vessel density of the tumors decreased with treatment. The present results suggest that treatment with Tie2-siRNA or carboplatin alone was able to inhibit the growth of human endometrial carcinoma nude mouse xenografts markedly and decrease the expression of Tie2. The combination of Tie2-siRNA and carboplatin increased the therapeutic effect of carboplatin which may eliminate the tumor microenvironment, increase the apoptosis of tumor cells, normalize the abnormal tumor vessels and increase the efficiency of chemotherapy for endometrial carcinoma with carboplatin. The synergy of Tie2-siRNA in combination with carboplatin may involve the regulation of other

  9. Combination External Beam Radiation and Brachytherapy Boost With Androgen Suppression for Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Initial Report of CALGB 99809

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, Mark D.; McGinnis, Lamar S.; Keuttel, Michael R.; DiBiase, Steven J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy (TPPB) can be used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to provide a high-dose conformal boost to the prostate. The results of a multicenter Phase II trial assessing safety of combination of EBRT and TPPB boost with androgen suppression (AST) in treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer are present here. Materials and Methods: Patients had intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Six months of AST was administered. EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles was administered to 45Gy followed by TPPB using either {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd to deliver an additional 100Gy or 90Gy. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute CTC version 2 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring systems. Results: Sixty-three patients were enrolled. Median follow-up was 38 months. Side effects of AST including sexual dysfunction and vasomotor symptoms were commonly observed. Apart from erectile dysfunction, short-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was noted in 21% and 7%, primarily genitourinary related. Long-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicities were noted in 13% and 3%. Two patients had Grade 3 dysuria that resolved with longer follow-up. The most common Grade 2 long-term toxicity was urinary frequency (5%). No biochemical or clinical evidence of progression was noted for the entire cohort. Conclusions: In a cooperative group setting, combination EBRT and TPPB boost with 6 months of AST was generally well tolerated with expected genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. Further follow-up will be required to fully assess long-term toxicity and cancer control.

  10. Experimental evaluation of a spinning-mode acoustic-treatment design concept for aircraft inlets. [suppression of YF-102 engine fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Rice, E. J.; Homyak, L.

    1980-01-01

    An aircraft-inlet noise suppressor method based on mode cutoff ratio was qualitatively checked by testing a series of liners on a YF-102 turbofan engine. Far-field directivity of the blade passing frequency was used extensively to evaluate the results. The trends and observations of the test data lend much qualitative support to the design method. The best of the BPF liners attained a suppression at design frequency of 19 dB per unit length-diameter ratio. The best multiple-pure-tone linear attained a remarkable suppression of 65.6 bB per unit length-diameter ratio.

  11. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  12. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  13. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  14. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  15. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  16. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  17. Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a Raft-Forming Alginate Reflux Suppressant (Liquid Gaviscon) for the Treatment of Heartburn during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Strugala, Vicki; Bassin, Julian; Swales, Valerie S.; Lindow, Stephen W.; Dettmar, Peter W.; Thomas, Edward C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) and the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are common in pregnancy. These symptoms are transient and mostly resolve postpartum but have a negative impact on quality of life. Here, we present a prospective clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an alginate raft-forming oral suspension that is licensed for use in pregnancy. The study was a multicentre, prospective, open-label, and baseline-controlled study of Liquid Gaviscon (LG) in the treatment of heartburn in pregnant women with current symptoms of heartburn and/or reflux requiring treatment (recruited 144). The efficacy of the study medication was rated by the investigator (primary endpoint) and patient. Treatment was deemed to be a success in 91% of patients as judged by the investigator (95% CI 85.0–95.3) and 90% (95% CI 84.1–94.8) when assessed by the patient themselves. Very few adverse events or serious adverse events were reported that were considered to be related to the study medication, and these were consistent with the normal population incidences. Serum sodium levels remained unchanged. This prospective open-label study in a large number of pregnant women has shown that LG is both safe and highly efficacious in the treatment of heartburn and GER symptoms in pregnancy. PMID:23209926

  18. Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a Raft-Forming Alginate Reflux Suppressant (Liquid Gaviscon) for the Treatment of Heartburn during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Strugala, Vicki; Bassin, Julian; Swales, Valerie S; Lindow, Stephen W; Dettmar, Peter W; Thomas, Edward C M

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER) and the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are common in pregnancy. These symptoms are transient and mostly resolve postpartum but have a negative impact on quality of life. Here, we present a prospective clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of an alginate raft-forming oral suspension that is licensed for use in pregnancy. The study was a multicentre, prospective, open-label, and baseline-controlled study of Liquid Gaviscon (LG) in the treatment of heartburn in pregnant women with current symptoms of heartburn and/or reflux requiring treatment (recruited 144). The efficacy of the study medication was rated by the investigator (primary endpoint) and patient. Treatment was deemed to be a success in 91% of patients as judged by the investigator (95% CI 85.0-95.3) and 90% (95% CI 84.1-94.8) when assessed by the patient themselves. Very few adverse events or serious adverse events were reported that were considered to be related to the study medication, and these were consistent with the normal population incidences. Serum sodium levels remained unchanged. This prospective open-label study in a large number of pregnant women has shown that LG is both safe and highly efficacious in the treatment of heartburn and GER symptoms in pregnancy. PMID:23209926

  19. Suppression of volatile production in tomato fruit exposed to chilling temperature and alleviation of chilling injury by a pre-chilling heat treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chilling exposure of tomato fruit to 5 °C for less than 5 days at mature green stage does not cause visual symptom of chilling injury (CI), however, it is unknown whether such conditions would impact flavor quality (internal CI) after ripening, and if a pre-chilling heat treatment could alleviate in...

  20. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B.; Gill, M. John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. Methods A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Results Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. Conclusions The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here

  1. Combined treatment of epigallocatechin gallate and Coenzyme Q10 attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via suppression of oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation and cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Al-Mohaimeed, Noura; Al-Shaikh, Yazeed; Tyagi, Poonam; Banu, Naheed; Hasan, Shirin; Arjumand, Sadia

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin (CP), a platinum based anticancer drug is used as one of the first-line therapy for the treatment of different types of solid tumors. However, CP-induced side effects particularly, nephrotoxicity is a major concern. A single nephrotoxic dose (7 mg/kg body weight) of CP was administered in rats with or without, pre and post combined multidoses of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) (15 and 5 mg/kg body weight respectively). CP administration resulted in marked increase in the nephrotoxic parameters with alterations in the oxidative and nitrosative stress markers. The concentration of inflammatory, as well as apoptotic markers were markedly up-regulated in the kidney of the CP-treated group. Furthermore, CP resulted in histological injury in the renal tissues. Combined antioxidant treatment significantly (p < 0.01) attenuated CP-induced oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic parameters. Moreover, an improvement in the histopathological changes confirmed the nephroprotective effect of antioxidant treatment. In conclusion, our study indicates that the combinatorial multidoses of EGCG and CoQ10 ameliorate the cisplatin-mediated pathogenesis by improving renal oxidative/nitrosative status, inflammation and apoptosis and thus can be used as a promising protective agent to increase the efficacy of the drug by minimizing its major side effect i.e. nephrotoxicity. PMID:27265264

  2. Short-term and long-term treatment with propafenone: determinants of arrhythmia suppression, persistence of efficacy, arrhythmogenesis, and side effects in patients with symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Zehender, M; Hohnloser, S; Geibel, A; Furtwängler, A; Olschewski, M; Meinertz, T; Just, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the clinical criteria predicting the short and long-term efficacy of propafenone, an agent with class IC antiarrhythmic activity and a broad pharmacological profile. DESIGNS--Prospective study of propafenone at doses of 450 to 900 mg/day during a six week dose titration period (including a placebo phase with two separate 24 Holter recordings). Responders to treatment were followed for one year. PATIENTS--One hundred patients with frequent ventricular arrhythmias (greater than 30 extrasystoles/h) of Lown class III and IVA/B and without evidence of myocardial infarction within the past six months. ANALYSIS--Multivariate regression analysis of spontaneous arrhythmia variability and of different clinical variables to determine the short and long-term efficacy and safety of propafenone. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Propafenone 450 mg/day was effective in 30/100 patients (30%), and at 600 mg/day another 14 responded. The efficacy of propafenone correlated with a low spontaneous arrhythmia variability and, as shown by multivariate analysis, with a lower patient age (p less than 0.05). When the dose was increased to 900 mg/day a further six (12%) patients responded. However, with increasing doses of propafenone, the one year probability of effective treatment decreased from 86% (450 mg/day) to 67% (600 mg/day) and to 44% (900 mg/day). After restudying the patients at three, six, and 12 months and after dose adjustment in 11/44 patients (25%), 31 patients (70%) remained responders. Loss of permanent antiarrhythmic efficacy was best predicted by the initial dose that achieved a response. No patient died suddenly or had arrhythmogenic effects during Holter monitoring. Side effects occurred in 36% of patients but these rarely limited long-term treatment. CONCLUSIONS--A younger age, low spontaneous arrhythmia variability, and particularly a low titration dose were the best predictors of the short and long term efficacy of propafenone. All other responders

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus integrase inhibitors efficiently suppress feline immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and provide a rationale to redesign antiretroviral treatment for feline AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Andrea; Pistello, Mauro; D'Ostilio, Daniela; Zabogli, Elisa; Taglia, Fabiana; Mancini, Fabiola; Ferro, Stefania; Matteucci, Donatella; De Luca, Laura; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Ciervo, Alessandra; Chimirri, Alba; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Background Treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been hampered by the absence of a specific combination antiretroviral treatment (ART). Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are emerging as a promising new drug class for HIV-1 treatment, and we evaluated the possibility of inhibiting FIV replication using INSTIs. Methods Phylogenetic analysis of lentiviral integrase (IN) sequences was carried out using the PAUP* software. A theoretical three-dimensional structure of the FIV IN catalytic core domain (CCD) was obtained by homology modeling based on a crystal structure of HIV-1 IN CCD. The interaction of the transferred strand of viral DNA with the catalytic cavity of FIV IN was deduced from a crystal structure of a structurally similar transposase complexed with transposable DNA. Molecular docking simulations were conducted using a genetic algorithm (GOLD). Antiviral activity was tested in feline lymphoblastoid MBM cells acutely infected with the FIV Petaluma strain. Circular and total proviral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. Results The calculated INSTI-binding sites were found to be nearly identical in FIV and HIV-1 IN CCDs. The close similarity of primate and feline lentivirus IN CCDs was also supported by phylogenetic analysis. In line with these bioinformatic analyses, FIV replication was efficiently inhibited in acutely infected cell cultures by three investigational INSTIs, designed for HIV-1 and belonging to different classes. Of note, the naphthyridine carboxamide INSTI, L-870,810 displayed an EC50 in the low nanomolar range. Inhibition of FIV integration in situ was shown by real-time PCR experiments that revealed accumulation of circular forms of FIV DNA within cells treated with L-870,810. Conclusion We report a drug class (other than nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors) that is capable of inhibiting FIV replication in vitro. The present study helped establish L-870,810, a compound successfully tested in

  4. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C; Wilky, Breelyn A; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  5. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  6. Transgenic expression of walleye dermal sarcoma virus rv-cyclin gene in zebrafish and its suppressive effect on liver tumor development after carcinogen treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Huiqing; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Qing, Wei; Wu, Yi Lian; Paul, Thomas A; Casey, James W; Her, Guor Muor; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2010-11-01

    A retrovirus homologue gene of cellular cyclin D₁, walleye dermal sarcoma virus rv-cyclin gene (orf A or rv-cyclin), was expressed in the livers of zebrafish under the control of liver fatty acid-binding protein (lfabp) promoter. To prevent possible fatality caused by overexpression of the oncogene, the GAL4/upstream activation sequence (GAL4/UAS) system was used to maintain the transgenic lines. Thus, both GAL4-activator [Tg(lfabp:GAL4)] and UAS-effector [Tg(UAS:rvcyclin)] lines were generated, and the rv-cyclin gene was activated in the liver after crossing these two lines. Since no obvious neoplasia phenotypes were observed in the double-transgenic line, cancer susceptibility of the transgenic fish expressing rv-cyclin was tested by carcinogen treatment. Unexpectedly, transgenic fish expressing rv-cyclin gene (rvcyclin+) were more resistant to the carcinogen than siblings not expressing this gene (rvcyclin-). Lower incidences of multiple and malignant liver tumors were observed in rvcyclin+ than in rvcyclin- fish, and the liver tumors in the rvcyclin+ group appeared later and were less malignant. These results suggest that expression of rv-cyclin protects the fish liver from carcinogen damage and delays onset of malignancy. These findings indicate that transgenic fish models are powerful systems for investigating mechanisms of inhibition and regression of liver tumors. PMID:20052603

  7. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (NVP-BKM120) suppresses the growth of established patient-derived GBM xenografts and prolongs survival in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Netland, I A; Førde, H E; Sleire, L; Leiss, L; Rahman, M A; Skeie, B S; Miletic, H; Enger, P Ø; Goplen, D

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are aggressive brain tumours with a dismal prognosis, despite combined surgery, radio- and chemotherapy. Close to 90 % of all GBMs harbour a deregulated PI3K pathway, which is essential in regulating central cellular functions such as proliferation, cell growth, motility and survival. Thus, PI3K represents a potential target for molecular therapy in GBM. We investigated the anti-tumour efficacy of the PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (NVP-BKM120) in GBM cell lines in vitro and in vivo, when treatment was initiated after MRI-confirmed tumour engraftment. We found that buparlisib inhibited glioma cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner, demonstrated by MTS assay, manual cell count and BrdU incorporation. A dose dependent increase in apoptosis was observed through flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, by immunocytochemistry and western blot, we found a dose dependent inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, buparlisib prolonged survival of nude rats harboring human GBM xenografts in three independent studies and reduced the tumours' volumetric increase, as determined by MRI. In addition, histological analyses of xenograft rat brains showed necrotic areas and change in tumour cell nuclei in buparlisib-treated animals. The rats receiving buparlisib maintained their weight, activity level and food- and water intake. In conclusion, buparlisib effectively inhibits glioma cell proliferation in vitro and growth of human GBM xenografts in nude rats. Moreover, the compound is well tolerated when administered at doses providing anti-tumour efficacy. Thus, buparlisib may have a future role in glioma therapy, and further studies are warranted to validate this compound for human use. PMID:27283525

  8. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  9. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  10. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  11. Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  12. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  13. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  14. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  15. Monotherapy with lopinavir/ritonavir versus standard of care in HIV-infected patients virologically suppressed while on treatment with protease inhibitor-based regimens: results from the MoLo study.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Nicola; Poli, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Pan, Angelo; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Soria, Alessandro; Viale, Pierluigi; Di Biagio, Antonio; Quirino, Tiziana; Viganò, Paolo; Bonfanti, Paolo; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Fortino, Ida; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    This study compared the cost-efficacy ratios of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy (LPV/r-MT) and of standard of care in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. The results of the efficacy and safety analyses are presented. We conducted a multicentre, randomised, open-label trial of HIV-infected adults on stable treatment, with HIV- RNA <50 copies/mL, randomised to continue the ongoing regimen (cART-arm) or to switch to LPV/r (400/100 mg BID) MT (MT-arm). Time to virological rebound (VR = confirmed HIV-RNA ?50 copies/mL) was estimated by Ka- plan-Meier method and changes in laboratory values during follow-up were evaluated by univariate mixed-linear models. Ninety-four patients were randomised and analysed (43 in the MT-arm and 51 in the cART-arm). Five (four in the MT and 1 in the cART-arm; p=0.175) had VR, but time to VR did not statistically differ between the two arms (p=0.143). Major PI mutations were not detected at VR. Patients on MT had significant increases in total choles- terol [difference in mean change between MT and cART arm: 0.77 (±0.30) mg/dL per month; p=0.012] and eGFR [difference in mean change between MT and cART arm: 0.24 (±0.11) mL/min/1.73 m2 per month; p=0.029]. LPV/r-MT seems safe in most patients and should be considered in patients who have developed kidney toxicity from tenofovir. PMID:25387282

  16. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  17. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  18. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  19. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  20. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  1. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  2. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  3. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  4. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  5. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  6. Glechoma hederacea Suppresses RANKL-mediated Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J.K.; Erkhembaatar, M.; Gu, D.R.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, C.H.; Shin, D.M.; Lee, Y.R.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Glechoma hederacea (GH), commonly known as ground-ivy or gill-over-the-ground, has been extensively used in folk remedies for relieving symptoms of inflammatory disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of GH are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GH constituents inhibit osteoclastogenesis by abrogating receptor activator of nuclear κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced free cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations. To evaluate the effect of GH on osteoclastogenesis, we assessed the formation of multi-nucleated cells (MNCs), enzymatic activity of tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP), expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), and [Ca2+]i alterations in response to treatment with GH ethanol extract (GHE) in primarily cultured bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMMs). Treatment of RANKL-stimulated or non-stimulated BMMs with GHE markedly suppressed MNC formation, TRAP activity, and NFATc1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, GHE treatment induced a large transient elevation in [Ca2+]i while suppressing RANKL-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations, which are essential for NFATc1 activation. GHE-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and was inhibited by 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP), inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), but was independent of store-operated Ca2+ channels. Notably, after transient [Ca2+] elevation, treatment with GHE desensitized the VGCCs, resulting in an abrogation of RANKL-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations and MNC formation. These findings demonstrate that treatment of BMMs with GHE suppresses RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis by activating and then desensitizing DHP-sensitive VGCCs, suggesting potential applications of GH in the treatment of bone disorders, such as periodontitis, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24850617

  7. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  8. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  9. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  10. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  11. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  12. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  13. Ovarian follicular growth suppression by long-term treatment with a GnRH agonist and impact on small follicle number, oocyte yield, and in vitro embryo production in Zebu beef cows.

    PubMed

    Batista, E O S; Vieira, L M; Sá Filho, M F; Dias, E A R; Bayeux, B M; Accorsi, M F; Monteiro, F M; Souza, A H; Baruselli, P S; D'Occhio, M J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate small follicle number, oocyte yield, and in vitro embryo production (IVEP) in Zebu beef cows treated long term with a GnRH agonist to suppress ovarian follicular growth. Nelore (Bos indicus) cows (n = 20) showing regular estrous cycles were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 10, placebo ear implant without a GnRH agonist); GnRH agonist (n = 10, GnRH agonist ear implant containing 9.4-mg deslorelin). All cows underwent an ovum pick-up (OPU) session 14 days (Day 14) before the start of treatments (Day 0) followed by seven OPU-IVEP procedures at 30-day intervals (Days 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180). Semen from a single batch of a previously tested bull was used for all the IVEP. Cows treated with agonist reported a decrease over time in the proportion of animals with a (CL; P ≤ 0.05) and large follicles (>10 mm, P ≤ 0.05). These cows had a lesser number of medium + large follicles (>5 mm; 1.74 ± 0.5 vs. 4.13 ± 0.5; P ≤ 0.05), greater number of small follicles (2-5 mm; 44.3 ± 2.8 vs. 30.8 ± 1.8; P ≤ 0.05), greater yield of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs; 21.0 ± 2.3 vs. 15.6 ± 1.9; P ≤ 0.05), greater proportion of COCs cultured (79.2 vs. 73.9%; P ≤ 0.05), COCs cleaved (10.6 ± 1.5 vs. 6.8 ± 1.1, P ≤ 0.05), and cleaved rate (52.8 vs. 44.3%; P ≤ 0.05) compared with control cows. The number (3.4 ± 0.7 vs. 3.0 ± 0.6; P > 0.05) and proportion (16.5 vs. 19.1%; P > 0.05) of blastocysts produced were similar between agonist and control cows, respectively. The study has shown that Zebu beef cows treated long term with a GnRH agonist had follicular growth restricted to small follicles. This did not compromise the ability of oocytes to undergo IVF and embryonic development. PMID:26924682

  14. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  15. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  16. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4(+) T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  17. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  18. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  19. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  20. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis. PMID:17909897

  1. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  2. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  3. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs. PMID:26023877

  4. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  5. Suppression of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by 15-deoxyspergualin.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, T; Da-Lin, Y; Satoh, J; Tabira, T

    1987-12-01

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG), a novel antitumor antibiotic, was tested for treatment of acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Lewis rats. Clinical and histologic signs of EAE by active sensitization with myelin basic protein were profoundly inhibited by prophylactic administration of DSG in a dose-dependent manner. By the treatment during the inductive phase, the onset of EAE was significantly delayed. Antigen-specific proliferation of lymph node cells and the ability of spleen cells to transfer EAE were suppressed but concanavalin A-induced lymphocyte proliferation was not altered. Passive EAE induced with an encephalitogenic T cell line was also prevented by DSG-treatment, although DSG did not suppress but rather augmented the activation of T cells in vitro. Taken together, DSG is not a non-specific lymphocyte toxin but a unique immunomodulator that can suppress both inductive and effector phases of EAE. PMID:3502003

  6. Design and performance of duct acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motsinger, R. E.; Kraft, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The procedure for designing acoustic treatment panels used to line the walls of aircraft engine ducts and for estimating the resulting suppression of turbofan engine duct noise is discussed. This procedure is intended to be used for estimating noise suppression of existing designs or for designing new acoustic treatment panels and duct configurations to achieve desired suppression levels.

  7. Selenite suppression of cadmium-induced testicular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, M M; Xu, C; Ladd, P A

    1997-01-15

    The characteristic apoptotic ladder-like patterns of rat testicular DNA on agarose gel electrophoresis which results from treatment with CdCl2 are suppressed by the administration of Na2SeO3. The examination of testicular tissue using an ELISA programmed cell death detection procedure confirmed this selenite suppression of cadmium-induced apoptosis. The administration of the Na2SeO3 at either 0.5, 1, 2 h prior to or 0.5, 1, 2 h after the administration of the CdCl2 appear to be almost equally effective at suppressing the apoptotic response. These results are in accord with previous studies on the Na2SeO3 suppression of cadmium induced necrotic changes in tissues and suggest that Na2SeO3 interferes with both necrosis and apoptosis. PMID:9020518

  8. Suppressive drug interactions between antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2014-04-24

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Cokol and colleagues report a systematic study of drug interactions between antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur more frequently than previously realized and come in different flavors with interesting implications. PMID:24766845

  9. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  10. Bacterial rRNA Genes Associated with Soil Suppressiveness against the Plant-Parasitic Nematode Heterodera schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Bei; Valinsky, Lea; Gao, Xuebiao; Becker, J. Ole; Borneman, James

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify bacteria involved in soil suppressiveness against the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii. Since H. schachtii cysts isolated from the suppressive soil can transfer this beneficial property to nonsuppressive soils, analysis of the cyst-associated microorganisms should lead to the identification of the causal organisms. Our experimental approach was to identify bacterial rRNA genes (rDNA) associated with H. schachtii cysts obtained from soil mixtures with various levels of suppressiveness. We hypothesized that we would be able to identify bacteria involved in the suppressiveness by correlating population shifts with differing levels of suppressiveness. Soil treatments containing different amounts of suppressive and fumigation-induced nonsuppressive soils exhibited various levels of suppressiveness after two nematode generations. The 10%-suppressive-soil treatment contained numbers of eggs per gram of soil similar to those of the 100%-suppressive-soil treatment, indicating that the suppressive factor(s) had been transferred. Bacterial rDNA associated with H. schachtii cysts were identified using a culture-independent method termed oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes. Bacteria from five major taxonomic groups (Actinobacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, and γ-Proteobacteria) were identified. Three bacterial rDNA groups contained clones that were more prevalent in the highly suppressive soil treatments than in the less suppressive treatments, indicating a potential involvement in the H. schachtii suppressiveness. When these three groups were examined with specific PCR analyses performed on H. schachtii cysts that developed in soils treated with three biocidal compounds, only one bacterial rDNA group with moderate to high sequence identity to rDNA from several Rhizobium species and uncultured α-proteobacterial clones was consistently associated with the highly

  11. Neurotropin Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Cell Death through Suppression of NF-κB and JNK in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bi; Roh, Yoon Seok; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Cheng; Naiki, Mitsuru; Masuda, Koichi; Seki, Ekihiro

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory response and cell death in hepatocytes are hallmarks of chronic liver disease, and, therefore, can be effective therapeutic targets. Neurotropin® (NTP) is a drug widely used in Japan and China to treat chronic pain. Although NTP has been demonstrated to suppress chronic pain through the descending pain inhibitory system, the action mechanism of NTP remains elusive. We hypothesize that NTP functions to suppress inflammatory pathways, thereby attenuating disease progression. In the present study, we investigated whether NTP suppresses inflammatory signaling and cell death pathways induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in hepatocytes. NTP suppressed nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation induced by IL-1β and TNFα assessed by using hepatocytes isolated from NF-κB-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mice and an NF-κB-luciferase reporter system. The expression of NF-κB target genes, Il6, Nos2, Cxcl1, ccl5 and Cxcl2 induced by IL-1β and TNFα was suppressed after NTP treatment. We also found that NTP suppressed the JNK phosphorylation induced by IL-1β and TNFα. Because JNK activation contributes to hepatocyte death, we determined that NTP treatment suppressed hepatocyte death induced by IL-1β and TNFα in combination with actinomycin D. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NTP attenuates IL-1β and TNFα-mediated inflammatory cytokine expression and cell death in hepatocytes through the suppression of NF-κB and JNK. The results from the present study suggest that NTP may become a preventive or therapeutic strategy for alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in which NF-κB and JNK are thought to take part. PMID:25470242

  12. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Maenhoudt, C; Santos, N R; Fontbonne, A

    2014-06-01

    Unfortunately, the overpopulation of dogs is still a problem in the majority of countries and even though surgical methods of sterilization, the most traditional and commonly used technique, have been intensively performed, the impact on the dog population is negligible. The neutering of companion animals as ovariohysterectomy (spaying) or orchidectomy (castration) has its limitations because of the cost, the need of a surgical environment and the risk of surgical and/or anaesthetical complications (ACCD 2009). In fact, surgical castration has been banished in some northern European countries and has limited acceptance in other countries. In a survey performed in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 56.5% of the owners of adopted shelter dogs were against the surgical procedure for different reasons (Soto et al. 2005). Currently, the options for contraception, defined as suppression of fertility are based on hormonal treatment. The treatments can be divided into analogues of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), progestins and androgens. Other possibilities of contraception are via the immunological system with vaccinations against GnRH, the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and the zona pellucida proteins. Finally, there is also the intra-epididymal or intratesticular injection of sclerosing substances in dogs. Mechanical devices to disrupt fertility are not used anymore due to the side effects. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs will be reviewed in order of use and possible impact on the dog population. PMID:24947862

  13. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  14. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  15. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery. PMID:15055225

  16. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  17. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  18. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  19. Recent results about fan noise: Its generation, radiation and suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fan noise including its generation, radiation characteristics, and suppression by acoustic treatment is studied. In fan noise generation, results from engine and fan experiments, using inflow control measures to suppress noise sources related to inflow distortion and turbulence, are described. The suppression of sources related to inflow allows the experiments to focus on the fan or engine internal sources. Some of the experiments incorporated pressure sensors on the fan blades to sample the flow disturbances encountered by the blades. From these data some inferences can be drawn about the origins of the disturbances. Also, hot wire measurements of a fan rotor wake field are presented and related to the fan's noise signature. The radiation and the suppression of fan noise are dependent on the acoustic modes generated by the fan. Fan noise suppression and radiation is described by relating these phenomena to the mode cutoff ratio parameter. In addition to its utility in acoustic treatment design and performance prediction, cutoff ratio was useful in developing a simple description of the radiation pattern for broadband fan noise. Some of the findings using the cutoff ratio parameter are presented.

  20. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  1. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  2. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin; Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin; Rice, Robert H.

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte

  3. The Evolution of Alpha-Blockers for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-blockers have been evaluated for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) for 30 years, from early trials with the nonselective α-inhibitor phenoxybenzamine to short-acting (prazosin) then long-acting (terazosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, alfuzosin) selective α1-antagonists. All of the α-blockers evaluated have demonstrated comparable effectiveness, and the evolution of α-blocker therapy for BPH has therefore focused primarily on improving convenience and tolerability. Although all of the long-acting α1-blockers are well tolerated, only tamsulosin and alfuzosin SR are administered without the requirement for dose titration. Alfuzosin has the additional advantage over tamsulosin of a lower incidence of ejaculatory dysfunction. Studies of subtype-selective α1-antagonists have not demonstrated superior efficacy or improved tolerability over the existing long-acting α1-blockers. PMID:17215999

  4. The Factors Related to CD4+ T-Cell Recovery and Viral Suppression in Patients Who Have Low CD4+ T Cell Counts at the Initiation of HAART: A Retrospective Study of the National HIV Treatment Sub-Database of Zhejiang Province, China, 2014

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin; Pan, Xiaohong; Dou, Zhihui; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Peng, Zhihang; Zheng, Jinlei; Zhang, Jiafeng; Yang, Jiezhe; Xu, Yun; Jiang, Jun; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Jianmin; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Since China has a unique system of delivering HIV care that includes all patients’ records. The factors related to CD4+ T-cell recovery and viral suppression in patients who have low CD4+ T cell counts at the initiation of HAART are understudied in the China despite subsequent virological suppression (viral load < 50 copies/mL) is unknown. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the national HIV treatment sub-database of Zhejiang province to identify records of HIV+ patients. Patient records were included if they were ≥ 16 years of age, had an initial CD4 count < 100 cells/μL, were on continuous HAART for at least one year by the end of December 31, 2014; and achieved and maintained continued maximum virological suppression (MVS) (< 50 copies/ml) by 9 months after starting HAART. The primary endpoint for analysis was time to first CD4+ T cell count recovery (≥ 200, 350, 500 cells/μL). Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify the risk factors for CD4+ T cell count recovery to key thresholds (200–350, 350–500, ≥ 500 cells/μL) by the time of last clinical follow-up (whichever occurred first), key thresholds (follow-up date for analysis), with patients still unable to reach the endpoints being censored by the end December 31, 2014 (follow-up date for analysis). Results Of the 918 patients who were included in the study, and the median CD4+ T cell count was 39 cells/μL at the baseline. At the end of follow-up, 727 (79.2%), 363 (39.5%) and 149 (16.2%) patients had return to ≥ 200, 350, and 500 cells/μL, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the rate of patients with CD4+ count recovery to ≥ 200, 350, and 500 cells/μL after 1 year on HAART was 43.6, 8.6, and 2.5%, respectively, after 3 years on treatment was 90.8, 46.3, and 17.9%, respectively, and after 5 years on HAART was 97.1, 72.2, and 36.4%, respectively. The median time to return to 200–350, 350–500, ≥ 500cells

  5. Weed Suppression by Seven Clover Species

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; O'Donovan, John T.

    2001-01-01

    Used as cover crops, clover species may differ in their ability to suppress weed growth. Field trials were conducted in Alberta, Canada to measure the growth of brown mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], in mowed and nonmowed production, as influenced by alsike (Trifolium hybridum L.), balansa [T. michelianum Savi var. balansae (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson [T. incarnatum (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson (T. incarnatum L.), Persian (T. resupinatum L.), red (T. pratense L.), and white Dutch (T. repens L.) clover and fall rye (Secale cereale L.). In 1997, clovers reduced mustard biomass in nonmowed treatments by 29% on a high- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboroll) at Edmonton and by 57% on a low- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboralf) at Breton. At Edmonton, nonmowed mustard biomass was reduced by alsike and berseem clover in 1996 and by alsike, balansa, berseem, and crimson clover in 1997. At Breton, all seven clover species suppressed weed biomass. A negative correlation was noted among clover and mustard biomass at Edmonton but not at Breton. The effects of mowing varied with location, timing, and species. Mowing was beneficial to crop/weed proportion at Edmonton but not at Breton. Mowing at early flowering of mustard large-seeded legumes and sweetclover (Melilotus offici) produced greater benefit than mowing at late flowering. With early mowing, all clover species suppressed mustard growth at Edmonton. Clovers reduced mustard regrowth (g plant21 ) and the number of mustard plants producing regrowth. The characteristics of berseem clover (upright growth, long stems, high biomass, and late flowering) would support its use as a cover crop or forage in north-central Alberta.

  6. Leuprolide acetate suppresses pedophilic urges and arousability.

    PubMed

    Schober, Justine M; Kuhn, Phyllis J; Kovacs, Paul G; Earle, James H; Byrne, Peter M; Fries, Ruth A

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was compared with cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented by leuprolide acetate (LA) for suppression of pedophilic behavior. Five male pedophiles (M age, 50 years; range, 36-58) were administered LA by Depo injection for 12 months, followed by saline placebo for 12 months. Testosterone levels, sexual interest preference by visual reaction time (Abel Assessment), penile tumescence (Monarch Penile Plethysmography, PPG), as well as strong sexual urges toward children and masturbatory frequency involving thoughts of children (polygraph), were measured every 3 months. On LA, testosterone decreased to castrate levels. Penile tumescence was significantly suppressed compared with baseline, but sufficient response remained to detect pedophilic interest. Pedophilic interest was also detected by visual reaction times. When asked about having pedophilic urges and masturbating to thoughts of children, all subjects self-reported a decrease. Polygraph responses indicated subjects were not deceptive. On placebo, testosterone and physiologic arousal eventually rose to baseline. As noted by polygraph, at baseline and on placebo, subjects were deceptive regarding increased pedophilic urges and masturbatory frequency. Interest preference, as measured by Abel Assessment and Monarch PPG, was generally unchanged throughout the study. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented with LA significantly reduced pedophilic fantasies, urges, and masturbation; however, pedophilic interest did not change during 1 year of therapy. Deceptive responses by polygraph suggested that self-report was unreliable. Follow-up utilizing objective measures is essential for monitoring efficacy of treatment in pedophilia. Our study supports the premise that suppression of pedophilic behavior is possible. LA may augment cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and help break the sequence leading to a re-offense. PMID:16362253

  7. Stimulus Fractionation by Interocular Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zadbood, Asieh; Lee, Sang-Hun; Blake, Randolph

    2011-01-01

    Can human observers distinguish physical removal of a visible stimulus from phenomenal suppression of that stimulus during binocular rivalry? As so often happens, simple questions produce complex answers, and that is the case in the study reported here. Using continuous flash suppression to produce binocular rivalry, we were able to identify stimulus conditions where most – but not all – people utterly fail to distinguish physical from phenomenal stimulus removal, although we can be certain that those two equivalent perceptual states are accompanied by distinct neural events. More interestingly, we find subtle variants of the task where distinguishing the two states is trivially easy, even for people who utterly fail under the original conditions. We found that stimulus features are differentially vulnerable to suppression. Observers are able to be aware of existence/removal of some stimulus attributes (flicker) but not others (orientation), implying that interocular suppression breaks down the unitary awareness of integrated features belonging to a visual object. These findings raise questions about the unitary nature of awareness and, also, place qualifications on the utility of binocular rivalry as a tool for studying the neural concomitants of conscious visual awareness. PMID:22102839

  8. Charmonium suppression in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S. |

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of {psi} and {psi}{prime} production from experiment NA50 at the CERN SPS are compared to calculations based on a hadronic model of charmonium suppression developed previously. Data on centrality dependence and total cross sections are in good accord with these predictions. Uncertainties in theoretical quantities such as NA50`s L parameter are discussed.

  9. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  10. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  11. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  12. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  13. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. PMID:26716881

  14. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  15. Suppression of coronavirus replication by cyclophilin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  16. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  17. [Suppression of sexual activity and reproduction in male small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Mihsler, Lisa; Wagner, Henrik; Wehrend, Axel

    2016-06-16

    Handling and husbandry of male small ruminants after sexual maturity often become difficult. Castration is currently the most reliable solution to this problem. Medicinal procedures for temporary inhibition of the gonad function could provide an alternative. Following a short overview of surgical castration, the current knowledge on the application of vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH agonist in rams and billy goats is presented in a literature overview. In rams, GnRH vaccination has been used successfully for temporary suppression of the reproduction function, regardless of an animal's age at the time of therapy initiation. Fewer investigations are available for the billy goat. A complete suppression of spermatogenesis was not achieved in all cases. Currently, treatment with GnRH agonists does not represent a relible method for the suppression of gonad function. PMID:27189125

  18. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  19. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  20. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Juliet J.

    2015-01-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5th century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the “let it ride” philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  1. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  2. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  3. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  4. Non-Antidepressant Long-Term Treatment in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    PubMed

    Kerbage, Hala; Richa, Sami

    2013-02-01

    Introduction: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent and disabling condition that occurs after exposure to a traumatic event, and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the first-line treatment approach for this disorder. However, a large proportion of patients remain symptomatic and other pharmacological agents have been investigated, based on the understanding of the underlying biological dysfunctions of PTSD. Methods: We conducted a review of the literature on the pharmacological options for PTSD other than the antidepressants, using MedLine and Web of Science databases, with search terms including the pharmacologic class of each agent plus PTSD, or pharmacotherapy, or fear conditioning. The literature review covered articles published until august 2012, including reviews and original articles. Results: Agents like antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, anti-adrenergic agents, have been studied in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), with general positive results for antipsychotics, especially as adjunct therapy, and for prazosin for sleep-related disturbances. However, one important target for novel medications is the modulation of the fear conditioning process, through the alteration of retrieval/reconsolidation or enhancement of fear extinction. This is traditionally targeted in prolonged exposure therapy, but pre-clinical findings from studies investigating agents like propanolol, clonidine, N-Methyl-D-aspartic Acid Receptor (NMDAR) compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and cannabinoids, indicate promising results in affecting the fear conditioning process and thus improving PTSD core symptoms. Discussion: Antipsychotics can be considered a reasonable alternative option to PTSD, with the largest body of evidence for risperidone, even though larger RCTs are warranted. Prazosin is also a promising agent, especially for sleep-related disturbances, while anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines lack

  5. Alisertib (MLN8237) an Investigational Agent suppresses Aurora A and B activity, inhibits proliferation, promotes endo-reduplication and induces apoptosis in T-NHL cell lines supporting its importance in PTCL treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenqing; Spier, Catherine; Liu, Xiaobing; Agarwal, Amit; Cooke, Laurence S.; Persky, Daniel O; Chen, Deyu; Miller, Thomas P.; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are a diverse group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) that carry a poor prognosis and are in need of effective therapies. Alisertib (MLN8237) an investigational agent that inhibits Aurora A Ser/Thr kinase has shown activity in PTCL patients. Here we demonstrate that aurora A and B are highly expressed in T-cell lymphoma cell lines. In PTCL patient samples aurora A was positive in 3 of 24 samples and co-expressed with aurora B. Aurora B was positive in tumor cells in 22 of 32 samples. Of the subtypes of PTCL, aurora B was over-expressed in PTCL (NOS) [73%], T-NHL (100%), ALCL (Alk-Neg) [100%] and AITL [100%]. Treatment with MLN8237 inhibited PTCL cell proliferation in CRL-2396 and TIB-48 cells with an IC50 of 80-100 nM. MLN8237 induced endo-reduplication in a dose and time dependent manner in PTCL cell lines leading to apoptosis demonstrated by flow cytometry and PARP-cleavage at concentrations achieved in early phase clinical trials. Moreover, inhibition of HisH3 and aurora A phosphorylation was dose dependent and strongly correlated with endo-reduplication. The data provide a sound rationale for aurora inhibition in PTCL as a therapeutic modality and warrants clinical trial evaluation. PMID:23153524

  6. Small molecule tolfenamic acid and dietary spice curcumin treatment enhances antiproliferative effect in pancreatic cancer cells via suppressing Sp1, disrupting NF-kB translocation to nucleus and cell cycle phase distribution.

    PubMed

    Basha, Riyaz; Connelly, Sarah F; Sankpal, Umesh T; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Patel, Hassaan; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Shelake, Sagar; Tabor-Simecka, Leslie; Shoji, Mamoru; Simecka, Jerry W; El-Rayes, Bassel

    2016-05-01

    Combination of dietary/herbal spice curcumin (Cur) and COX inhibitors has been tested for improving therapeutic efficacy in pancreatic cancer (PC). The objective of this study was to identify agent with low toxicity and COX-independent mechanism to induce PC cell growth inhibition when used along with Cur. Anticancer NSAID, tolfenamic acid (TA) and Cur combination were evaluated using PC cell lines. L3.6pl and MIA PaCa-2 cells were treated with Cur (5-25μM) or TA (25-100μM) or combination of Cur (7.5μM) and TA (50μM). Cell viability was measured at 24-72h posttreatment using CellTiter-Glo kit. While both agents showed a steady/consistent effect, Cur+TA caused higher growth inhibition. Antiproliferative effect was compared with COX inhibitors, Ibuprofen and Celebrex. Cardiotoxicity was assessed using cordiomyocytes (H9C2). The expression of Sp proteins, survivin and apoptotic markers (western blot), caspase 3/7 (caspase-Glo kit), Annexin-V staining (flow cytometry), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle phase distribution (flow cytometry) was measured. Cells were treated with TNF-α, and NF-kB translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus was evaluated (immunofluorescence). When compared to individual agents, combination of Cur+TA caused significant increase in apoptotic markers, ROS levels and inhibited NF-kB translocation to nucleus. TA caused cell cycle arrest in G0/G1, and the combination treatment showed mostly DNA synthesis phase arrest. These results suggest that combination of Cur+TA is less toxic and effectively enhance the therapeutic efficacy in PC cells via COX-independent mechanisms. PMID:27133426

  7. Best practice guide for the treatment of nightmare disorder in adults.

    PubMed

    Aurora, R Nisha; Zak, Rochelle S; Auerbach, Sanford H; Casey, Kenneth R; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Karippot, Anoop; Maganti, Rama K; Ramar, Kannan; Kristo, David A; Bista, Sabin R; Lamm, Carin I; Morgenthaler, Timothy I

    2010-08-15

    Prazosin is recommended for treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)-associated nightmares. Level A. Image Rehearsal Therapy (IRT) is recommended for treatment of nightmare disorder. Level A. Systematic Desensitization and Progressive Deep Muscle Relaxation training are suggested for treatment of idiopathic nightmares. Level B. Venlafaxine is not suggested for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level B. Clonidine may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level C. The following medications may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares, but the data are low grade and sparse: trazodone, atypical antipsychotic medications, topiramate, low dose cortisol, fluvoxamine, triazolam and nitrazepam, phenelzine, gabapentin, cyproheptadine, and tricyclic antidepressants. Nefazodone is not recommended as first line therapy for nightmare disorder because of the increased risk of hepatotoxicity. Level C. The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares based on low-grade evidence: Exposure, Relaxation, and Rescripting Therapy (ERRT); Sleep Dynamic Therapy; Hypnosis; Eye-Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR); and the Testimony Method. Level C. The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of nightmare disorder based on low-grade evidence: Lucid Dreaming Therapy and Self-Exposure Therapy. Level C No recommendation is made regarding clonazepam and individual psychotherapy because of sparse data. PMID:20726290

  8. A limited CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide therapy regimen induces sustained suppression of allergic airway inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kozy, Heather M.; Lum, Jeremy A.; Sweetwood, Rosemary; Chu, Mabel; Cunningham, Cameron R.; Salamon, Hugh; Lloyd, Clare M.; Coffman, Robert L.; Hessel, Edith M.

    2015-01-01

    Background CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) are potent inhibitors of Th2-mediated allergic airway disease in sensitized mice challenged with allergen. A single treatment has transient effects but a limited series of treatments has potential to achieve clinically meaningful sustained inhibition of allergic airway disease. Objective To optimize the treatment regimen and determine the mechanisms of action in mice of an inhaled form of CpG-ODN being developed for human asthma treatment. Methods A limited series of weekly intranasal 1018 ISS (CpG-ODN; B-class) treatments were given to ragweed allergen-sensitized mice chronically exposed to allergen during and after the 1018 ISS treatment regimen. Treatment effects were evaluated by measuring effect on lung Th2 cytokines and eosinophilia as well as lung dendritic cell function and T cell responses. Results Twelve intranasal 1018 ISS treatments induced significant suppression of BAL eosinophilia and IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 levels and suppression was maintained through 13 weekly ragweed exposures administered after treatment cessation. At least 5 treatments were required for lasting Th2 suppression. CpG-ODN induced moderate Th1 responses but Th2 suppression did not require IFN-γ. Th2 suppression was associated with induction of a regulatory T cell response. Conclusion A short series of CpG-ODN treatments results in sustained suppression of allergic lung inflammation induced by a clinically relevant allergen. PMID:24464743

  9. Adrenocortical suppression in cats given megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Chastain, C B; Graham, C L; Nichols, C E

    1981-12-01

    Megestrol acetate was given orally to 8 cats at a dose of 2.5 mg every other day for 2 weeks and to 8 cats at a dose of 5.0 mg every day for 2 weeks. Four cats were designated nontreated controls. Pre-ACTH-stimulated plasma concentrations of cortisol (hydrocortisone) and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion (IV) were determined on each of the 20 cats given megestrol acetate. Cats were restrained with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride during blood sample collection and large-dose glucose infusion. Adrenocortical function and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion were reevaluated for 4 weeks--after 1st and 2nd weeks of megestrol acetate treatment of the treated groups, and after 1st and 2nd weeks when treatment was stopped (ie, experiment weeks 3 and 4). Each week a cat from the control group and 2 cats from the 2 treated groups were selected to determine the changes occurring during the experiment for that week; after collection of plasma samples, each week's 5 selected cats were euthanatized and necropsied. Significant impairment of adrenocortical function and alteration of adrenocortical morphology occurred with both treated groups. The most severe adrenocortical alterations occurred in the cats 1 week after megestrol acetate was no longer given (ie, experiment week 3). Megestrol acetate-induced adrenocortical suppression contributed to the death of 1 cat. It was concluded that if stress occurs to cats on treatment or soon after treatment with megestrol acetate, glucocorticoids should be supplemented. The effects of megestrol acetate on glucose tolerance were overshadowed by the unforeseen intolerance caused by chemical restraint with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride. PMID:6280517

  10. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  11. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. PMID:25721871

  12. Distracted by cues for suppressed memories.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Paula T; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    We examined the potential cost of practicing suppression of negative thoughts on subsequent performance in an unrelated task. Cues for previously suppressed and unsuppressed (baseline) responses in a think/no-think procedure were displayed as irrelevant flankers for neutral words to be judged for emotional valence. These critical flankers were homographs with one negative meaning denoted by their paired response during learning. Responses to the targets were delayed when suppression cues (compared with baseline cues and new negative homographs) were used as flankers, but only following direct-suppression instructions and not when benign substitutes had been provided to aid suppression. On a final recall test, suppression-induced forgetting following direct suppression and the flanker task was positively correlated with the flanker effect. Experiment 2 replicated these findings. Finally, valence ratings of neutral targets were influenced by the valence of the flankers but not by the prior role of the negative flankers. PMID:25904596

  13. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues. PMID:17848022

  14. Food thought suppression: a matched comparison of obese individuals with and without binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rachel D; Masheb, Robin M; Grilo, Carlos M

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary studies of non-clinical samples suggest that purposely attempting to avoid thoughts of food, referred to as food thought suppression, is related to a number of unwanted eating- and weight-related consequences, particularly in obese individuals. Despite possible implications for the treatment of obesity and eating disorders, little research has examined food thought suppression in obese individuals with binge eating disorder (BED). This study compared food thought suppression in 60 obese patients with BED to an age-, gender-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched group of 59 obese persons who do not binge eat (NBO). In addition, this study examined the associations between food thought suppression and eating disorder psychopathology within the BED and NBO groups and separately by gender. Participants with BED and women endorsed the highest levels of food thought suppression. Food thought suppression was significantly and positively associated with many features of ED psychopathology in NBO women and with eating concerns in men with BED. Among women with BED, higher levels of food thought suppression were associated with higher frequency of binge eating, whereas among men with BED, higher levels of food thought suppression were associated with lower frequency of binge eating. Our findings suggest gender differences in the potential significance of food thought suppression in obese groups with and without co-existing binge eating problems. PMID:22051359

  15. Drug-induced graves disease from CTLA-4 receptor suppression.

    PubMed

    Borodic, Gary; Hinkle, David M; Cia, Yihong

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, useful for treatment of metastatic melanoma, blocks CTLA-4 mediated T-cell suppression and can also cause a Graves ophthalmopathy like syndrome. Epidemiologic study has linked variant polymorphisms of CTLA-4 receptor gene to the presence of thyroid eye disease. The combination of these observations suggests CTLA-4 mediated T-cell functions are important to the pathogenesis of thyroid-associated eye disease. PMID:21242854

  16. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  17. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  18. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  19. Social Mimicry Enhances Mu-Suppression During Action Observation.

    PubMed

    Hogeveen, Jeremy; Chartrand, Tanya L; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2015-08-01

    During social interactions, there is a tendency for people to mimic the gestures and mannerisms of others, which increases liking and rapport. Psychologists have extensively studied the antecedents and consequences of mimicry at the social level, but the neural basis of this behavior remains unclear. Many researchers have speculated that mimicry is related to activity in the human mirror system (HMS), a network of parietofrontal regions that are involved in both action execution and observation. However, activity of the HMS during reciprocal social interactions involving mimicry has not been demonstrated. Here, we took an electroencephalographic (EEG) index of mirror activity-mu-suppression during action observation-in a pretest/post-test design with 1 of 3 intervening treatments: 1) social interaction in which the participant was mimicked, 2) social interaction without mimicry, or 3) an innocuous computer task, not involving another human agent. The change in mu-suppression from pre- to post-test varied as a function of the intervening treatment, with participants who had been mimicked showing an increase in mu-suppression during the post-treatment action observation session. We propose that this specific modulation of HMS activity as a function of mimicry constitutes the first direct evidence for mirror system involvement in real social mimicry. PMID:24532320

  20. Pharmacological treatment of comorbid PTSD and substance use disorder: recent progress.

    PubMed

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Rosenheck, Robert; Petrakis, Ismene

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has identified a strong association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD), necessitating the development of treatments that address both conditions. Some pharmacotherapies are effective for the treatment of PTSD and SUD alone, however; no medications have been proven to be effective for the combination of these conditions. We review the recent advances in pharmacological treatment of comorbid PTSD and SUD. A randomized clinical trial of sertraline, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), did not show overall efficacy for comorbid PTSD and alcohol dependence (AD), although it may have efficacy among light drinkers. Another clinical trial demonstrated the efficacy of both disulfiram and naltrexone for the treatment of AD in individuals with PTSD. A more recent clinical trial suggested that norepinephrine uptake inhibitors may also have efficacy for the treatment of comorbid PTSD and AD. In animal and preliminary human studies, brain norepinephrine and glutamate/GABA have emerged as potential treatment targets for comorbid PTSD and SUD. Noradrenergic medications that are promising for comorbid PTSD and SUD include prazosin, guanfacine, and atomoxetine. Promising glutamate/GABA medications include topiramate, memantine, acamprosate, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and ketamine. The safety and efficacy of these medications for the treatment of PTSD and SUD need to be tested in controlled clinical trials. PMID:24035645

  1. Food for thought: examining the relationship between food thought suppression and weight-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rachel D; Tantleff-Dunn, Stacey

    2010-08-01

    The current study sought to extend previous eating behaviors and thought suppression literature by assessing the relationship between food thought suppression and weight-related outcomes. Three hundred and twelve overweight/obese community men and women completed self-report measures of thought suppression, weight history, and eating behaviors. Women were more likely than men to endorse food thought suppression, as were individuals who currently were dieting, when compared with those nondieters. Food thought suppression also predicted binge eating, food cravings, and other eating disordered symptoms. Results have implications for obesity and support further exploration of third wave interventions, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness, in the treatment of obesity. PMID:20434065

  2. Hybrid optimal scheduling for intermittent androgen suppression of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito; di Bernardo, Mario; Bruchovsky, Nicholas; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-12-01

    We propose a method for achieving an optimal protocol of intermittent androgen suppression for the treatment of prostate cancer. Since the model that reproduces the dynamical behavior of the surrogate tumor marker, prostate specific antigen, is piecewise linear, we can obtain an analytical solution for the model. Based on this, we derive conditions for either stopping or delaying recurrent disease. The solution also provides a design principle for the most favorable schedule of treatment that minimizes the rate of expansion of the malignant cell population.

  3. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  4. Suppression of Premature Termination Codons as a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Kim M.; Wang, Dan; Conard, Sara E.; Bedwell, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we describe our current understanding of translation termination and pharmacological agents that influence the accuracy of this process. A number of drugs have been identified that induce suppression of translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs; also known as nonsense mutations) in mammalian cells. We discuss efforts to utilize these drugs to suppress disease-causing PTCs that result in the loss of protein expression and function. In-frame PTCs represent a genotypic subset of mutations that make up ~11% of all known mutations that cause genetic diseases, and millions of patients have diseases attributable to PTCs. Current approaches aimed at reducing the efficiency of translation termination at PTCs (referred to as PTC suppression therapy) have the goal of alleviating the phenotypic consequences of a wide range of genetic diseases. Suppression therapy is currently in clinical trials for treatment of several genetic diseases caused by PTCs, and preliminary results suggest that some patients have shown clinical improvements. While current progress is promising, we discuss various approaches that may further enhance the efficiency of this novel therapeutic approach. PMID:22672057

  5. SUPPRESSION OF DIELECTRONIC RECOMBINATION DUE TO FINITE DENSITY EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, D.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Korista, K. T.; Ferland, G. J.; Badnell, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (n{sub e} = 1 cm{sup -3}) and finite (n{sub e} = 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) densities. We find that the denser case is significantly more ionized due to suppression of DR, warranting further studies of density effects on DR by detailed collisional-radiative calculations which utilize state-of-the-art partial DR rate coefficients. This is expected to impact the predictions of the ionization balance in denser cosmic gases such as those found in nova and supernova shells, accretion disks, and the broad emission line regions in active galactic nuclei.

  6. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Erica S; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard P; Zink, Erika M; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Waters, Katrina M; Metz, Thomas O; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Polyak, Stephen J

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin, a characterized extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), suppresses cellular inflammation. To define how this occurs, transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies were performed in human liver and T cell lines. Cellular stress and metabolic pathways were modulated within 4 h of silymarin treatment: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed silymarin suppression of glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Anti-inflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e., 24 h) silymarin exposure, with suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory mRNAs and signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO). Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that silymarin inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, whereas silymarin inhibition of mTOR required DDIT4. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Thus, natural products activate stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory cellular phenotype. Natural products like silymarin may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation. PMID:26186142

  7. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jikun; Sandison, George A.; Hsi, Wen-Chien; Ringor, Michael; Lu, Xiaoyi

    2006-10-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity.

  8. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  9. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  10. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  11. Mechanisms of suppression in mixed allogeneic chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-08-01

    Cells with the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation are found in the spleens of whole-body-irradiated (WBI) mixed allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplant recipients in the early weeks after BMT. Previous studies have indicated that suppression is mediated by null cells similar to natural suppressor (NS) cells (1), and have ruled out several possible trivial explanations for the suppressive effect. We report here the results of additional experiments designed to assess possible mechanisms of suppression. We compared the cell populations after 5 days' incubation of cultures containing normal responding splenocytes plus irradiated allogeneic stimulator cells, with or without a cocultured suppressive chimeric splenocyte population. The data indicate that total viable cell yields are only slightly reduced, if at all, in suppressed cultures, but that the proportion of T cells is markedly reduced as measured at the end of the incubation period. Splenocytes from early BMT recipients do not appear to proliferate during the suppression of a mixed lymphocyte culture, and such populations represent only 15% of cells at the end of the 5-day incubation period. Suppression is strongest when the suppressive population is added at the initiation of MLC, and is lost if addition is delayed beyond day 3. Suppression can be overcome by T cell growth factor (TCGF)--and, to a lesser extent, by recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), although resting suppressive populations do not consume appreciable amounts of these lymphokines. These results therefore suggest that suppression in MLC may occur primarily during the induction of helper T lymphocytes.

  12. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  13. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ralevski, Elizabeth; Olivera-Figueroa, Lening A; Petrakis, Ismene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture) is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. PMID:24648794

  14. The Effects of Stress Exposure on Prefrontal Cortex: Translating Basic Research into Successful Treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Arnsten, Amy F T; Raskind, Murray A; Taylor, Fletcher B; Connor, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Research on the neurobiology of the stress response in animals has led to successful new treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in humans. Basic research has found that high levels of catecholamine release during stress rapidly impair the top-down cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while strengthening the emotional and habitual responses of the amygdala and basal ganglia. Chronic stress exposure leads to dendritic atrophy in PFC, dendritic extension in the amygdala, and strengthening of the noradrenergic (NE) system. High levels of NE release during stress engage low affinity alpha-1 adrenoceptors, (and likely beta-1 adrenoceptors), which rapidly reduce the firing of PFC neurons, but strengthen amygdala function. In contrast, moderate levels of NE release during nonstress conditions engage higher affinity alpha-2A receptors, which strengthen PFC, weaken amygdala, and regulate NE cell firing. Thus, either alpha-1 receptor blockade or alpha-2A receptor stimulation can protect PFC function during stress. Patients with PTSD have signs of PFC dysfunction. Clinical studies have found that blocking alpha-1 receptors with prazosin, or stimulating alpha-2A receptors with guanfacine or clonidine can be useful in reducing the symptoms of PTSD. Placebo-controlled trials have shown that prazosin is helpful in veterans, active duty soldiers and civilians with PTSD, including improvement of PFC symptoms such as impaired concentration and impulse control. Open label studies suggest that guanfacine may be especially helpful in treating children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Thus, understanding the neurobiology of the stress response has begun to help patients with stress disorders. PMID:25436222

  15. The effects of stress exposure on prefrontal cortex: Translating basic research into successful treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arnsten, Amy F.T.; Raskind, Murray A.; Taylor, Fletcher B.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the neurobiology of the stress response in animals has led to successful new treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in humans. Basic research has found that high levels of catecholamine release during stress rapidly impair the top-down cognitive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), while strengthening the emotional and habitual responses of the amygdala and basal ganglia. Chronic stress exposure leads to dendritic atrophy in PFC, dendritic extension in the amygdala, and strengthening of the noradrenergic (NE) system. High levels of NE release during stress engage low affinity alpha-1 adrenoceptors, (and likely beta-1 adrenoceptors), which rapidly reduce the firing of PFC neurons, but strengthen amygdala function. In contrast, moderate levels of NE release during nonstress conditions engage higher affinity alpha-2A receptors, which strengthen PFC, weaken amygdala, and regulate NE cell firing. Thus, either alpha-1 receptor blockade or alpha-2A receptor stimulation can protect PFC function during stress. Patients with PTSD have signs of PFC dysfunction. Clinical studies have found that blocking alpha-1 receptors with prazosin, or stimulating alpha-2A receptors with guanfacine or clonidine can be useful in reducing the symptoms of PTSD. Placebo-controlled trials have shown that prazosin is helpful in veterans, active duty soldiers and civilians with PTSD, including improvement of PFC symptoms such as impaired concentration and impulse control. Open label studies suggest that guanfacine may be especially helpful in treating children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. Thus, understanding the neurobiology of the stress response has begun to help patients with stress disorders. PMID:25436222

  16. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  17. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  18. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  19. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  20. Leucocyte suppression in treatment of 72 patients with paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Addo, E; Poon-King, T

    1986-05-17

    72 patients who had ingested more than 10 ml 20% or 24% liquid paraquat concentrate were treated for 2 weeks with high doses of dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide, forced diuresis with liberal potassium supplements, and, to eliminate paraquat from the gut, Fuller's earth suspension, activated charcoal, and magnesium sulphate. 52 patients (72%) survived. Serum paraquat concentrations were measured retrospectively in samples from 25 patients. 18 had levels of 2-76 mg/l; 6 survived and 12 died. The other survivors were a patient with a serum level of 0.5 mg/l at 24 h and 6 with positive urine tests but no measurable paraquat in serum collected 8-16 h after admission. PMID:2871379

  1. An Effective Secondary Electron Emission Suppression Treatment For Copper MDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Long, Kenwyn J.; Jensen, Kenneth A.; Roman, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Untreated oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper, commonly used for MDC electrodes, exhibits relatively high secondary electron emission characteristics. This paper describes a specialized ion-bombardment procedure for texturing copper surfaces which sharply reduces the emission properties relative to untreated copper. The resulting surface is a particle-free, robust, uniformly highly-textured all-metal structure. The use of this process requires no modifications to copper machining, brazing, or other MDC normal fabrication procedures. The flight TWT for a planned NASA deep space probe, the Cassini Mission, will incorporate copper MDC electrodes treated with the method described here.

  2. Dust suppression in swine feed using soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Mankell, K O; Janni, K A; Walker, R D; Wilson, M E; Pettigrew, J E; Jacobson, L D; Wilcke, W F

    1995-04-01

    Dust generation from swine feed (corn-soybean meal diet) treated with soybean oil was investigated using a cement mixer in a plywood box. Airborne total dust concentrations in the box were measured gravimetrically using a vacuum pump and filters while 12-kg feed samples were constantly mixed. The treatment factors were soybean oil concentration (0, 1, and 3%), corn bulk density (normal, 730 kg/m3 and low, 600 kg/m3), time of oil addition (before vs after grinding the corn), and storage time (0, 7, and 14 d). The feed was a mixture of soybean meal, base mix, and adjusted amounts of ground corn and soybean oil. Adding soybean oil after grinding at 1 and 3% levels to feed made with normal-bulk density corn suppressed total dust generation (3.39 and .99 mg/m3, respectively) (P < .001) compared with the no oil treatment (29.1 mg/m3). The 3% soybean oil treatment suppressed dust generation (.99 mg/m3) more than the 1% soybean oil treatment (3.39 mg/m3) (P < .001). Adding soybean oil after grinding the corn suppressed dust generation more than adding the oil to the corn before grinding for every oil level (P < .001). More dust was generated by feed made from low-bulk density corn than by feed made with normal-bulk density corn at every oil level (P < .001). There was no evidence of any storage time or treatment x storage time interactions. PMID:7628976

  3. Using unplanned fires to help suppressing future large fires in Mediterranean forests.

    PubMed

    Regos, Adrián; Aquilué, Núria; Retana, Javier; De Cáceres, Miquel; Brotons, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Despite the huge resources invested in fire suppression, the impact of wildfires has considerably increased across the Mediterranean region since the second half of the 20th century. Modulating fire suppression efforts in mild weather conditions is an appealing but hotly-debated strategy to use unplanned fires and associated fuel reduction to create opportunities for suppression of large fires in future adverse weather conditions. Using a spatially-explicit fire-succession model developed for Catalonia (Spain), we assessed this opportunistic policy by using two fire suppression strategies that reproduce how firefighters in extreme weather conditions exploit previous fire scars as firefighting opportunities. We designed scenarios by combining different levels of fire suppression efficiency and climatic severity for a 50-year period (2000-2050). An opportunistic fire suppression policy induced large-scale changes in fire regimes and decreased the area burnt under extreme climate conditions, but only accounted for up to 18-22% of the area to be burnt in reference scenarios. The area suppressed in adverse years tended to increase in scenarios with increasing amounts of area burnt during years dominated by mild weather. Climate change had counterintuitive effects on opportunistic fire suppression strategies. Climate warming increased the incidence of large fires under uncontrolled conditions but also indirectly increased opportunities for enhanced fire suppression. Therefore, to shift fire suppression opportunities from adverse to mild years, we would require a disproportionately large amount of area burnt in mild years. We conclude that the strategic planning of fire suppression resources has the potential to become an important cost-effective fuel-reduction strategy at large spatial scale. We do however suggest that this strategy should probably be accompanied by other fuel-reduction treatments applied at broad scales if large-scale changes in fire regimes are to be

  4. Using Unplanned Fires to Help Suppressing Future Large Fires in Mediterranean Forests

    PubMed Central

    Regos, Adrián; Aquilué, Núria; Retana, Javier; De Cáceres, Miquel; Brotons, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Despite the huge resources invested in fire suppression, the impact of wildfires has considerably increased across the Mediterranean region since the second half of the 20th century. Modulating fire suppression efforts in mild weather conditions is an appealing but hotly-debated strategy to use unplanned fires and associated fuel reduction to create opportunities for suppression of large fires in future adverse weather conditions. Using a spatially-explicit fire–succession model developed for Catalonia (Spain), we assessed this opportunistic policy by using two fire suppression strategies that reproduce how firefighters in extreme weather conditions exploit previous fire scars as firefighting opportunities. We designed scenarios by combining different levels of fire suppression efficiency and climatic severity for a 50-year period (2000–2050). An opportunistic fire suppression policy induced large-scale changes in fire regimes and decreased the area burnt under extreme climate conditions, but only accounted for up to 18–22% of the area to be burnt in reference scenarios. The area suppressed in adverse years tended to increase in scenarios with increasing amounts of area burnt during years dominated by mild weather. Climate change had counterintuitive effects on opportunistic fire suppression strategies. Climate warming increased the incidence of large fires under uncontrolled conditions but also indirectly increased opportunities for enhanced fire suppression. Therefore, to shift fire suppression opportunities from adverse to mild years, we would require a disproportionately large amount of area burnt in mild years. We conclude that the strategic planning of fire suppression resources has the potential to become an important cost-effective fuel-reduction strategy at large spatial scale. We do however suggest that this strategy should probably be accompanied by other fuel-reduction treatments applied at broad scales if large-scale changes in fire regimes are

  5. Management of Verticillium wilt of potato with disease-suppressive green manures and as affected by previous cropping history

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of potential disease-suppressive rotation crops to reduce potato disease problems and increase crop productivity in a field severely infested with Verticillium wilt was evaluated over three field seasons in Maine. Disease-suppressive rotation treatments consisted of 1) a high glucosinola...

  6. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  7. A Mathematical Model of Intermittent Androgen Suppression for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideta, Aiko Miyamura; Tanaka, Gouhei; Takeuchi, Takumi; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    For several decades, androgen suppression has been the principal modality for treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Although the androgen deprivation is initially effective, most patients experience a relapse within several years due to the proliferation of so-called androgen-independent tumor cells. Bruchovsky et al. suggested in animal models that intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) can prolong the time to relapse when compared with continuous androgen suppression (CAS). Therefore, IAS has been expected to enhance clinical efficacy in conjunction with reduction in adverse effects and improvement in quality of life of patients during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model that describes the growth of a prostate tumor under IAS therapy based on monitoring of the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). By treating the cancer tumor as a mixed assembly of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent cells, we investigate the difference between CAS and IAS with respect to factors affecting an androgen-independent relapse. Numerical and bifurcation analyses show how the tumor growth and the relapse time are influenced by the net growth rate of the androgen-independent cells, a protocol of the IAS therapy, and the mutation rate from androgen-dependent cells to androgen-independent ones.

  8. Amlexanox Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis and Prevents Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Guan, Hanfeng; Li, Jing; Fang, Zhong; Chen, Wenjian; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The activity of protein kinases IKK-ε and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) has been shown to be associated with inflammatory diseases. As an inhibitor of IKK-ε and TBK1, amlexanox is an anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, immunomodulator and used for treatment of ulcer, allergic rhinitis and asthma in clinic. We hypothesized that amlexanox may be used for treatment of osteoclast-related diseases which frequently associated with a low grade of systemic inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of amlexanox on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ovariectomy-mediated bone loss in vivo. In primary bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMs), amlexanox inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption. At the molecular level, amlexanox suppressed RANKL-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs), c-Fos and NFATc1. Amlexanox decreased the expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, MMP9, Cathepsin K and NFATc1. Moreover, amlexanox enhanced osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs. In ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model, amlexanox prevented OVX-induced bone loss by suppressing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that amlexanox suppresses osteoclastogenesis and prevents OVX-induced bone loss. Therefore, amlexanox may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for osteoclast-related diseases, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26338477

  9. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  10. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  11. Compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsicion pepper in potting trials.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Marenco, M; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of soil-borne plant diseases with composts has been widely studied. Composts suppressive to soil-borne pathogens have been detected in various cropping systems. Vegetable plants are generally propagated in pots, allowing the use of suppressive substrates to control zoospore-producing pathogens, like Phytophthora sp. The objective of the present work was to assess compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsici on pepper (cv. Corno di Toro). A municipal compost showing a good suppressive activity in previous trials on vegetable crops was used. Compost was mixed at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) with a commercial peat substrate, used as control. Substrates have been inoculated at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/l with wheat and hemp kernels infested with P. capsici and after one week 10 plants were transplanted for each treatment in 4 trays of 10 liters volume capacity and placed in greenhouse at 20 degrees C. Diseased plants were assessed weekly after transplanting and above-ground biomass of plants was assessed at the end of the trials. Compost applied at 80% significantly controlled the disease at high inoculum density (1 g/l), while at lower inoculums density, 0.25 and 0.5 g/l, reduced compost applications, 40% and 60% respectively, were sufficient to significantly control the disease. The application of compost at 20%, in absence of the pathogen, increased the biomass of pepper plants compared to control. The use of compost based substrates can be a suitable strategy for controlling soil-borne diseases on pepper, but results depends on application rates. PMID:25151829

  12. The calpain-suppressing effects of olesoxime in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jonasz J.; Ortiz Rios, Midea M.; Riess, Olaf; Clemens, Laura E.; Nguyen, Huu P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Olesoxime, a small molecule drug candidate, has recently attracted attention due to its significant beneficial effects in models of several neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington's disease. Olesoxime's neuroprotective effects have been assumed to be conveyed through a direct, positive influence on mitochondrial function. In a long-term treatment study in BACHD rats, the latest rat model of Huntington's disease, olesoxime revealed a positive influence on mitochondrial function and improved specific behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes. Moreover, a novel target of the compound was discovered, as olesoxime was found to suppress the activation of the calpain proteolytic system, a major contributor to the cleavage of the disease-causing mutant huntingtin protein into toxic fragments, and key player in degenerative processes in general. Results from a second model of Huntington's disease, the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse, confirm olesoxime's calpain-suppressing effects and support the therapeutic value of olesoxime for Huntington's disease and other disorders involving calpain overactivation. PMID:27141414

  13. 7 CFR 2902.32 - Dust suppressants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dust suppressants. 2902.32 Section 2902.32... Items § 2902.32 Dust suppressants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or similar sources of dust,...

  14. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  15. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  16. Identifying separate components of surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O.

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision. PMID:26756172

  17. Increasing enemy biodiversity strengthens herbivore suppression on two plant species.

    PubMed

    Straub, Cory S; Snyder, William E

    2008-06-01

    Concern over biodiversity loss, especially at higher trophic levels, has led to a surge in studies investigating how changes in natural enemy diversity affect community and ecosystem functioning. These studies have found that increasing enemy diversity can strengthen, weaken, and not affect prey suppression, demonstrating that multi-enemy effects on prey are context-dependent. Here we ask how one factor, plant species identity, influences multi-enemy effects on prey. We focused on two plant species of agricultural importance, potato (Solanum tuberosum), and collards (Brassica oleracea L.). These species share a common herbivorous pest, the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), but vary in structural and chemical traits that affect aphid reproductive rates and which may also influence inter-enemy interactions. In a large-scale field experiment, overall prey exploitation varied dramatically among the plant species, with enemies reducing aphid populations by approximately 94% on potatoes and approximately 62% on collards. Increasing enemy diversity similarly strengthened aphid suppression on both plants, however, and there was no evidence that plant species identity significantly altered the relationship between enemy diversity and prey suppression. Microcosm experiments suggested that, on both collards and potatoes, intraspecific competition among natural enemies exceeded interspecific competition. Enemy species showed consistent and significant differences in where they foraged on the plants, and enemies in the low-diversity treatment tended to spend less time foraging than enemies in the high-diversity treatment. These data suggest that increasing enemy diversity may strengthen aphid suppression because interspecific differences in where enemies forage on the plant allow for greater resource partitioning. Further, these functional benefits of diversity appear to be robust to changes in plant species identity. PMID:18589525

  18. A novel function of syndecan-2, suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, which causes suppression of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Munesue, Seiichi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Kusano, Yuri; Koyama, Yoshie; Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakanishi, Hayao; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Ishimaru, Takeshi; Miyaura, Shuichi; Okayama, Minoru; Oguri, Kayoko

    2007-09-21

    The syndecans comprise a family of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans exhibiting complex biological functions involving the interaction of heparan sulfate side chains with a variety of soluble and insoluble heparin-binding extracellular ligands. Here we demonstrate an inverse correlation between the expression level of syndecan-2 and the metastatic potential of three clones derived from Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL. This correlation was proved to be a causal relationship, because transfection of syndecan-2 into the higher metastatic clone resulted in the suppression of both spontaneous and experimental metastases to the lung. Although the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and its cell surface activators, such as membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2, were similar regardless of the metastatic potentials of the clones, elevated activation of MMP-2 was observed in the higher metastatic clone. Removal of heparan sulfate from the cell surface of low metastatic cells by treatment with heparitinase-I promoted MMP-2 activation, and transfection of syndecan-2 into highly metastatic cells suppressed MMP-2 activation. Furthermore, transfection of mutated syndecan-2 lacking glycosaminoglycan attachment sites into highly metastatic cells did not have any suppressive effect on MMP-2 activation, suggesting that this suppression was mediated by the heparan sulfate side chains of syndecan-2. Actually, MMP-2 was found to exhibit a strong binding ability to heparin, the dissociation constant value being 62 nM. These results indicate a novel function of syndecan-2, which acts as a suppressor for MMP-2 activation, causing suppression of metastasis in at least the metastatic system used in the present study. PMID:17623663

  19. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  20. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  1. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  2. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  3. Chitin nanofibrils suppress skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ryotaro; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Nagashima, Masaaki; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of chitin nanofibril (CNF) application via skin swabs on an experimental atopic dermatitis (AD) model. AD scores were lower, and hypertrophy and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis were suppressed after CNF treatment. Furthermore, inflammatory cell infiltration in both the epidermis and dermis was inhibited. CNFs also attenuated histological scores. The suppressive effects of CNFs were equal to those of corticosteroid application; however, chitin did not show these effects. CNF application might have anti-infllammatory effects via suppression of the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In an early-stage model of experimental AD, CNFs suppressed AD progression to the same extent as corticosteroids. They also suppressed skin inflammation and IgE serum levels. Our findings indicate that CNF application could aid in the prevention or treatment of AD skin lesions. PMID:27112880

  4. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  5. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  6. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  7. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  8. On-off control of burst high frequency electrical stimulation to suppress 4-AP induced seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate, using model simulations and animal experiments, the efficiency and the side effects of burst high frequency stimulation combined with on-off control in seizure suppression. Approach. A modified mathematical hippocampal seizure model was created to provide evidence of the eligibility of this approach. In the experimental setup, two recording electrodes were inserted into bilateral septal CA1 of the hippocampus, and a stimulation electrode was placed on the ventral hippocampal commissure of a rat. After seizures had been induced by 4-aminopyridine treatment, on-off control stimulation was used to suppress the seizures at 20 s intervals. The stimulation time, cumulative charge and post-stimulation suppression were used to assess the effects of burst duration. Main results. The results showed that burst stimulation could suppress the seizures during the control period and burst stimulation of a shorter duration could keep the seizure suppressed with less effort. By decreasing the burst duration, the cumulative stimulation time became shorter, the delivered cumulative charge became lower, and the cumulative time of post-stimulation suppression became longer. Significance. The on-off control stimulation not only prolonged the duration of suppression but also avoided the side effects of the conversion of seizure patterns. In particular, decreasing the specified burst duration increased the efficiency of the burst stimulation.

  9. Examining the impact of distraction on tic suppression in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W

    2008-11-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by motor and/or vocal tics. Tics are thought to be temporarily suppressible, and it is believed that suppression requires significant attentional resources. The aim of the current study was to examine the impact of an attention-demanding distraction task on tic suppression. A secondary aim was to examine whether performance on that task decreased during concomitant periods of suppression. Nine children with TS, ages 9-15, participated in the study. An alternating treatment design was used to compare three conditions, free-to-tic baseline (BL), reinforced tic suppression (SUP) and reinforced tic suppression plus a distraction task (SUP+DIS). Tic frequencies were significantly higher during BL conditions than both SUP and SUP+DIS conditions, and tic frequencies during SUP and SUP+DIS did not differ. Accuracy on the distraction task decreased during SUP+DIS as compared to BL. Results suggest that contextual distractions may not negatively impact tic frequencies. In addition, accuracy on an attention-demanding task may be impacted if a child is simultaneously suppressing. PMID:18774126

  10. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  11. Sulindac suppresses beta-catenin expression in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anjia; Song, Zibo; Tong, Chang; Hu, Dong; Bi, Xiuli; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Yang, Wancai

    2008-03-31

    Sulindac has been reported to be effective in suppressing tumor growth through the induction of p21WAF1/cip1 in human, animal models of colon cancer and colon cancer cells. In this study, we treated human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and lung cancer cell line A549 as well as colon cancer cell line SW620 with sulindac to observe the effects of sulindac in other tissue sites. In all cell lines, proliferation was significantly inhibited by sulindac after 24 and 72 h of treatment. Apoptosis was induced by sulindac in both lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells but was not induced in breast cancer cells. Western blots showed that p21 protein level were induced by sulindac in lung cancer cells and colon cancer cells, but not in breast cancer cells. However, the suppression of beta-catenin, a key mediator of Wnt signaling pathway, was seen in all three cell lines with sulindac administration. Further studies revealed that transcriptional activities of beta-catenin were significantly inhibited by sulindac and that the inhibition was sulindac dosage-dependent. The transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1 and cdk 4 were also dramatically downregulated. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that the efficacy of sulindac in the inhibition of cell proliferation (rather than the induction of apoptosis) might be through the suppression of beta-catenin pathway in human cancer cells. PMID:18291362

  12. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado Del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG)-responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68(+) macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr(-/-) mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr(-/-) mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  13. Suppression of Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization by Curcumin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Zhang, WeiWei; Yuan, Songtao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Yang, Qin; Yuan, DongQing; Wang, Feng; Liu, QingHuai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of curcumin on the development of experimental choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Methods C57BL/6N mice were pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of curcumin daily for 3 days prior to laser-induced CNV, and the drug treatments were continued until the end of the study. The CNV area was analyzed by fluorescein-labeled dextran angiography of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid flat mounts on day 7 and 14, and CNV leakage was evaluated by fluorescein angiography (FA) on day 14 after laser photocoagulation. The infiltration of F4/80 positive macrophages and GR-1 positive granulocytes were evaluated by immunohistochemistry on RPE-choroid flat mounts on day 3. Their expression in RPE-choroid complex was quantified by real-time PCR (F4/80) and Western blotting (GR-1) on day 3. RPE-choroid levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 were examined by ELISA on day 3. Double immunostaining of F4/80 and VEGF was performed on cryo-sections of CNV lesions on day 3. The expression of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)−1α in the RPE-choroid was determined by Western blotting. Results Curcumin-treated mice had significantly less CNV area (P<0.05) and CNV leakage (P<0.001) than vehicle-treated mice. Curcumin treatment led to significant inhibition of F4/80 positive macrophages (P<0.05) and GR-1 positive granulocytes infiltration (P<0.05). VEGF mainly expressed in F4/80 positive macrophages in laser injury sites, which was suppressed by curcumin treatment (P<0.01). Curcumin inhibited the RPE-choroid levels of TNF-α (P<0.05), MCP-1 (P<0.05) and ICAM-1 (P<0.05), and suppressed the activation of NF-κB in nuclear extracts (P<0.05) and the activation of HIF−1α (P<0.05). Conclusion Curcumin treatment led to the suppression of CNV development

  14. The treatment of tics.

    PubMed

    Singer, H S

    2001-03-01

    Tics are the essential component of a variety of disorders, notably Tourette syndrome. Because the mere presence of tics does not require therapeutic intervention, criteria are essential for determining a functional disability. Suggested tic-suppressing treatments have been extremely diverse, including hydrotherapy, behavioral treatments, pharmacotherapy, botulinum toxin, immunomodulatory therapy, and surgery. This manuscript reviews each of these approaches with emphasis on more recent pharmacologic trials. PMID:11898516

  15. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  16. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  17. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  18. Attention modulates sensory suppression during back movements.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Lore; Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2013-06-01

    Tactile perception is often impaired during movement. The present study investigated whether such sensory suppression also occurs during back movements, and whether this would be modulated by attention. In two tactile detection experiments, participants simultaneously engaged in a movement task, in which they executed a back-bending movement, and a perceptual task, consisting of the detection of subtle tactile stimuli administered to their upper or lower back. The focus of participants' attention was manipulated by raising the probability that one of the back locations would be stimulated. The results revealed that tactile detection was suppressed during the execution of the back movements. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 revealed that when the stimulus was always presented to the attended location, tactile suppression was substantially reduced, suggesting that sensory suppression can be modulated by top-down attentional processes. The potential of this paradigm for studying tactile information processing in clinical populations is discussed. PMID:23454431

  19. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  20. Vasopressin Effectively Suppresses Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Park, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Yun-Hee; You, Young-Ah; Kim, In Cheul; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2013-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (VP) is neurohypophysial hormone has been implicated in stimulating contractile activity of the male reproductive tract in the testis. Higher levels of VP decrease sperm count and motility. However, very little is known about the involvement of VP in controlling mammalian reproductive process. The goal of this study was to confirm that effect of VP receptor (AVPR2) on sperm function in capacitation condition. Deamino [Cys 1, D-ArgS] vasopressin (dDAVP), an AVPR2 agonist that operates only on AVPR2, was used. Also, Mouse spermatozoa were incubated with various concentrations of dDAVP (10−11–10−5 M) and sperm motility, capacitation status, Protein Kinase A activity (PKA), tyrosine phosphorylation, fertilization, and embryo development were assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis, Combined Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence, Western blotting, and in vitro fertilization, respectively. AVPR2 was placed on the acrosome region and mid-piece in cauda epididymal spermatozoa, but the caput epididymal spermatozoa was mid-piece only. The high dDAVP treatment (10−8 and 10−5 M) significantly decreased sperm motility, intracellular pH and PKA substrates (approximately 55 and 22 kDa) and increased Ca2+ concentration. The highest concentration treatment significantly decreased PKA substrate (approximately 23 kDa) and tyrosine phosphorylation (approximately 30 kDa). VP detrimentally affected capacitation, acrosome reaction, and embryo development. Treatment with the lowest concentration (10−11 M) was not significantly different. Our data have shown that VP stimulates ion transport across sperm membrane through interactions with AVPR2. VP has a detrimental effect in sperm function, fertilization, and embryonic development, suggesting its critical role in the acquisition of fertilizing ability of mouse spermatozoa. These research findings will enable further study to determine molecular mechanism associated with fertility in

  1. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  2. Suppression of the Primordial Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumurtushaa, Gansukh; Koh, Seoktae; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We study the primordial gravitational waves induced by space-space condensate inflation model. For modes that cross the comoving horizon during matter dominated era, we calculate the energy spectrum of gravitational waves. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves for our model has significantly suppressed in the low frequency range. The suppression occurs due to the phase transition during the early evolution of the Universe and depends on model parameter.

  3. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  4. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  5. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  6. Viral re-suppression and detection of drug resistance following interruption of a suppressive NNRTI-based regimen

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Zoe; Phillips, Andrew; Cohen, Cal; Neuhaus, Jacquie; Baxter, John; Emery, Sean; Hirschel, Bernard; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Stephan, Christoph; Lundgren, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Background Interruption of an NNRTI-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use. Methods Patients in the drug-conservation arm of SMART who interrupted a fully suppressive NNRTI-regimen were evaluated. From 2003, SMART recommended interruption of an NNRTI by: a staggered-interruption, where the NNRTI was stopped before the NRTIs; or by replacing the NNRTI with another drug before interruption. Simultaneous-interruption of all ARVs was discouraged. Re-suppression rates four-to-eight months after re-initiating NNRTI-therapy were assessed, as was the detection of drug-resistance mutations within two months of the treatment interruption in a subset (N=141). Results Overall, 601/688 (87.4%) patients who re-started an NNRTI achieved viral re-suppression. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for achieving re-suppression was 1.94 (1.02-3.69) for patients with a staggered-interruption and 3.64 (1.37-9.64) for those with a switched-interruption compared to patients with a simultaneous-interruption. At least one NNRTI-mutation was detected in the virus of 16.4% patients with simultaneous-interruption, 12.5% patients with staggered-interruption and 4.2% patients with switched-interruption. Fewer patients with detectable mutations (i.e. 69.2%) achieved HIV-RNA≤400 copies/mL compared to those in whom no mutations were detected (i.e. 86.7%), p=0.05. Conclusions In patients who interrupt a suppressive NNRTI-regimen, the choice of interruption-strategy may influence re-suppression rates when re-starting a similar regimen. NNRTI drug-resistance mutations were observed in a relatively high proportion of patients. These data provide additional support for a staggered- or switched-interruption strategy for NNRTI drugs. PMID:18981767

  7. Associations between weight suppression and dimensions of eating disorder psychopathology in a multisite sample.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Shaw, Jena A; Crosby, Ross D; Feig, Emily H; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Hill, Laura; Le Grange, Daniel; Powers, Pauline; Lowe, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that weight suppression, the difference between an individual's highest historical body weight and current body weight, may play a role in the etiology and/or maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), and may also impact ED treatment. However, there are limited findings regarding the association between weight suppression and dimensions of ED psychopathology, particularly in multi-diagnostic ED samples. Participants were 1748 adults (94% female) from five sites with a variety of DSM-IV ED diagnoses who completed the Eating Disorder Questionnaire, a self-report measure of various attitudinal, behavioral, and medical features of EDs. Four factor analytically derived dimensions of ED psychopathology were examined: (a) weight/shape concerns, (b) binge eating/vomiting, (c) exercise/restrictive eating behaviors, and (d) weight control medication use. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the unique association of weight suppression with each dimension (controlling for ED diagnosis and BMI), as well as the independent unique associations of three interactions: (a) weight suppression×BMI, (b) weight suppression×ED diagnosis, and (c) BMI×ED diagnosis. Results revealed that weight suppression was uniquely associated with all of the ED psychopathology dimensions except binge eating/vomiting. The weight suppression × BMI interaction was significant only for weight/shape concerns, whereas the weight suppression×ED diagnosis was not significant for any of the dimensions. Significant BMI×ED diagnosis interactions were found for all dimensions except weight/shape concerns. Overall, the current results support the salience of weight suppression across multiple dimensions of ED psychopathology, with the exception of binge eating/vomiting. PMID:26343599

  8. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression. PMID:19726579

  9. Oral progestin induces rapid, reversible suppression of ovarian activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R A; Pelican, K M; Brown, J L; Wildt, D E; Ottinger, M A; Howard, J G

    2010-04-01

    The influence of oral progestin (altrenogest; ALT) on cat ovarian activity was studied using non-invasive fecal steroid monitoring. Queens were assigned to various ALT dosages: (1) 0mg/kg (control; n=5 cats); (2) 0.044 mg/kg (LOW; n=5); (3) 0.088 mg/kg (MID; n=6); or (4) 0.352 mg/kg (HIGH; n=6). Fecal estrogen and progestagen concentrations were quantified using enzyme immunoassays for 60 days before, 38 days during and 60 days after ALT treatment. Initiation of follicular activity was suppressed in all cats during progestin treatment, whereas controls continued to cycle normally. Females (n=6) with elevated fecal estrogens at treatment onset completed a normal follicular phase before returning to baseline and remained suppressed until treatment withdrawal. All cats receiving oral progestin re-initiated follicular activity after treatment, although MID cats experienced the most synchronized return (within 10-16 days). Mean baseline fecal estrogens and progestagens were higher (P<0.05) after treatment in HIGH, but not in LOW or MID cats compared to pre-treatment values. The results demonstrate that: (1) oral progestin rapidly suppresses initiation of follicular activity in the cat, but does not influence a follicular phase that exists before treatment initiation; and (2) queens return to normal follicular activity after progestin withdrawal. This study provides foundational information for research aimed at using progestin priming to improve ovarian response in felids scheduled for ovulation induction and assisted breeding. PMID:20051246

  10. Oral progestin induces rapid, reversible suppression of ovarian activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, R.A.; Pelican, K.M.; Brown, J.L.; Wildt, D.E.; Ottinger, M.A.; Howard, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of oral progestin (altrenogest; ALT) on cat ovarian activity was studied using non-invasive fecal steroid monitoring. Queens were assigned to various ALT dosages: 1) 0 mg/kg (control; n = 5 cats); 2) 0.044 mg/kg (LOW; n = 5); 3) 0.088 mg/kg (MID; n = 6); or 4) 0.352 mg/kg (HIGH; n = 6). Fecal estrogen and progestagen concentrations were quantified using enzyme immunoassays for 60 days before, 38 days during and 60 days after ALT treatment. Initiation of follicular activity was suppressed in all cats during progestin treatment, whereas controls continued to cycle normally. Females (n = 6) with elevated fecal estrogens at treatment onset completed a normal follicular phase before returning to baseline and remained suppressed until treatment withdrawal. All cats receiving oral progestin reinitiated follicular activity after treatment, although MID cats experienced the most synchronized return (within 10-16 days). Mean baseline fecal estrogens and progestagens were higher (P < 0.05) after treatment in HIGH, but not LOW or MID cats compared to pre-treatment values. Results demonstrate that: 1) oral progestin rapidly suppresses initiation of follicular activity in the cat, but does not influence a follicular phase that exists before treatment initiation; and 2) queens return to normal follicular activity after progestin withdrawal. This study provides foundational information for research aimed at using progestin priming to improve ovarian response in felids scheduled for ovulation induction and assisted breeding. PMID:20051246

  11. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Trovero, Fabrice; David, Sabrina; Bernard, Philippe; Puech, Alain; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively) blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v) and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs. PMID:26968030

  12. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Trovero, Fabrice; David, Sabrina; Bernard, Philippe; Puech, Alain; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively) blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v) and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs. PMID:26968030

  13. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  14. Prooxidative toxicity and selenoprotein suppression by cerivastatin in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Tews, Martha; Kromer, Andrea; Moosmann, Bernd

    2012-12-17

    Statins are the most widely used drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In spite of their overall favorable safety profile, they do possess serious myotoxic potential, whose molecular origin has remained equivocal. Here, we demonstrate in cultivated myoblasts and skeletal muscle cells that cerivastatin at nanomolar concentrations interferes with selenoprotein synthesis and evokes a heightened vulnerability of the cells toward oxidative stressors. A correspondingly increased vulnerability was found with atorvastatin, albeit at higher concentrations than with cerivastatin. In selenium-saturated cells, cerivastatin caused a largely indiscriminate suppression of selenoprotein biosynthesis and reduced the steady state-levels of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1) and selenoprotein N (SelN). Selenite, ebselen, and ubiquinone were unable to prevent the devitalizing effect of statin treatment, despite the fact that the cellular baseline resistance against tert-butyl hydroperoxide was significantly increased by picomolar sodium selenite. Mevalonic acid, in contrast, entirely prevented the statin-induced decrease in peroxide resistance. These results indicate that muscle cells may be particularly susceptible to a statin-induced suppression of essential antioxidant selenoproteins, which provides an explanation for the disposition of these drugs to evoke adverse muscular side-effects. PMID:23092657

  15. ATP Hydrolyzing Salivary Enzymes of Caterpillars Suppress Plant Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Peiffer, Michelle; Luthe, Dawn S.; Felton, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The oral secretions of herbivores are important recognition cues that can be used by plants to mediate induced defenses. In this study, a degradation of adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) in tomato leaves was detected after treatment with Helicoverpa zea saliva. Correspondingly, a high level of ATPase activity in saliva was detected and three ATP hydrolyzing enzymes: apyrase, ATP synthase and ATPase 13A1 were identified in salivary glands. To determine the functions of these proteins in mediating defenses, they were cloned from H. zea and expressed in Escherichia coli. By applying the purified expressed apyrase, ATP synthase or ATPase 13A1 to wounded tomato leaves, it was determined that these ATP hydrolyzing enzymes suppressed the defensive genes regulated by the jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways in tomato plant. Suppression of glandular trichome production was also observed after treatment. Blood-feeding arthropods employ 5′-nucleotidase family of apyrases to circumvent host responses and the H. zea apyrase, is also a member of this family. The comparatively high degree of sequence similarity of the H. zea salivary apyrase with mosquito apyrases suggests a broader evolutionary role for salivary apyrases than previously envisioned. PMID:22848670

  16. Suppression of benign prostate hyperplasia by Kaempferia parviflora rhizome

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuya; Hayashi, Hirotaka; Matsumura, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kaempferia parviflora rhizome is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of extract from K. parviflora rhizome against 5α-reductase (5αR) were subjected. Furthermore, the effects of the extract from K. parviflorar hizome in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were studied using the model mice. Materials and Methods: Preparations of extracts from the rhizomes of K. parviflora, Curcuma zedoaria and Zingiber officinale, and methoxyflavones isolated from K. parviflora was used for 5αR inhibition assay. The effects of K. parviflora extract on growth suppression for the prostates and seminal vesicles were performed based on the Hershberger's method. The K. parviflora extract was administered to castrated mice for 14 days. Results: K. parviflora extract showed more potent inhibitory activity on 5αR than C. zedoaria and Z. officinale extracts. The active principles were identified as 3,5,7,3’,4’-pentamethoxyflavone and 5,7,3’,4’-tetramethoxyflavone by activity guided fractionation. Furthermore, K. parviflora extract suppressed the weights of prostates and seminal vesicles in BPH model rats by daily administration for 14 days. Conclusion: These results indicate that K. parviflora extract can be a promising agent for the treatment of BPH. PMID:24174827

  17. Sorafenib suppresses JNK-dependent apoptosis through inhibition of ZAK.

    PubMed

    Vin, Harina; Ching, Grace; Ojeda, Sandra S; Adelmann, Charles H; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Dwyer, David W; Ma, Haiching; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Curry, Jonathan L; Ciurea, Ana M; Duvic, Madeleine; Busaidy, Naifa L; Tannir, Nizar M; Tsai, Kenneth Y

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration-approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma and has been combined with numerous other targeted therapies and chemotherapies in the treatment of many cancers. Unfortunately, as with other RAF inhibitors, patients treated with sorafenib have a 5% to 10% rate of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC)/keratoacanthomas. Paradoxical activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in BRAF wild-type cells has been implicated in RAF inhibitor-induced cSCC. Here, we report that sorafenib suppresses UV-induced apoptosis specifically by inhibiting c-jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK) activation through the off-target inhibition of leucine zipper and sterile alpha motif-containing kinase (ZAK). Our results implicate suppression of JNK signaling, independent of the ERK pathway, as an additional mechanism of adverse effects of sorafenib. This has broad implications for combination therapies using sorafenib with other modalities that induce apoptosis. PMID:24170769

  18. Stromal heparan sulfate differentiates neuroblasts to suppress neuroblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Knelson, Erik H.; Gaviglio, Angela L.; Nee, Jasmine C.; Starr, Mark D.; Nixon, Andrew B.; Marcus, Stephen G.; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma prognosis is dependent on both the differentiation state and stromal content of the tumor. Neuroblastoma tumor stroma is thought to suppress neuroblast growth via release of soluble differentiating factors. Here, we identified critical growth-limiting components of the differentiating stroma secretome and designed a potential therapeutic strategy based on their central mechanism of action. We demonstrated that expression of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), including TβRIII, GPC1, GPC3, SDC3, and SDC4, is low in neuroblasts and high in the Schwannian stroma. Evaluation of neuroblastoma patient microarray data revealed an association between TGFBR3, GPC1, and SDC3 expression and improved prognosis. Treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines with soluble HSPGs promoted neuroblast differentiation via FGFR1 and ERK phosphorylation, leading to upregulation of the transcription factor inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). HSPGs also enhanced FGF2-dependent differentiation, and the anticoagulant heparin had a similar effect, leading to decreased neuroblast proliferation. Dissection of individual sulfation sites identified 2-O, 3-O-desulfated heparin (ODSH) as a differentiating agent, and treatment of orthotopic xenograft models with ODSH suppressed tumor growth and metastasis without anticoagulation. These studies support heparan sulfate signaling intermediates as prognostic and therapeutic neuroblastoma biomarkers and demonstrate that tumor stroma biology can inform the design of targeted molecular therapeutics. PMID:24937430

  19. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone suppresses liver fibrogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongwei; Duan, Fangfang; Peng, Peike; Sun, Linlin; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis represents the consequences of a sustained wound healing response to chronic liver injuries, and its progression toward cirrhosis is the major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, anti-fibrotic treatment remains an unconquered area for drug development. Accumulating evidence indicate that oxidative stress plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that PQQ, a natural anti-oxidant present in a wide variety of human foods, exerted potent anti-fibrotic and ROS-scavenging activity in Balb/C mouse models of liver fibrosis. The antioxidant activity of PQQ was involved in the modulation of multiple steps during liver fibrogenesis, including chronic liver injury, hepatic inflammation, as well as activation of hepatic stellate cells and production of extracellular matrix. PQQ also suppressed the up-regulation of RACK1 in activated HSCs in vivo and in vitro. Our data suggest that PQQ suppresses oxidative stress and liver fibrogenesis in mice, and provide rationale for the clinical application of PQQ in the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:25822822

  20. Pyrroloquinoline-Quinone Suppresses Liver Fibrogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Dongwei; Duan, Fangfang; Peng, Peike; Sun, Linlin; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis represents the consequences of a sustained wound healing response to chronic liver injuries, and its progression toward cirrhosis is the major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, anti-fibrotic treatment remains an unconquered area for drug development. Accumulating evidence indicate that oxidative stress plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that PQQ, a natural anti-oxidant present in a wide variety of human foods, exerted potent anti-fibrotic and ROS-scavenging activity in Balb/C mouse models of liver fibrosis. The antioxidant activity of PQQ was involved in the modulation of multiple steps during liver fibrogenesis, including chronic liver injury, hepatic inflammation, as well as activation of hepatic stellate cells and production of extracellular matrix. PQQ also suppressed the up-regulation of RACK1 in activated HSCs in vivo and in vitro. Our data suggest that PQQ suppresses oxidative stress and liver fibrogenesis in mice, and provide rationale for the clinical application of PQQ in the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:25822822

  1. OSCEE fan exhaust bulk absorber treatment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Samanich, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The acoustic suppression capability of bulk absorber material designed for use in the fan exhaust duct walls of the quiet clean short haul experiment engine (OCSEE UTW) was evaluated. The acoustic suppression to the original design for the engine fan duct which consisted of phased single degree-of-freedom wall treatment was tested with a splitter and also with the splitter removed. Peak suppression was about as predicted with the bulk absorber configuration, however, the broadband characteristics were not attained. Post test inspection revealed surface oil contamination on the bulk material which could have caused the loss in bandwidth suppression.

  2. Pattern-Triggered Immunity Suppresses Programmed Cell Death Triggered by Fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Daisuke; Bethke, Gerit; Xu, Yuan; Tsuda, Kenichi; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process for plant innate immunity and development. In plant innate immunity, PCD is believed to prevent the spread of pathogens from the infection site. Although proper control of PCD is important for plant fitness, we have limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating plant PCD. Plant innate immunity triggered by recognition of effectors (effector-triggered immunity, ETI) is often associated with PCD. However pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), which is triggered by recognition of elicitors called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), is not. Therefore we hypothesized that PTI might suppress PCD. Here we report that PCD triggered by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) can be suppressed by PTI in Arabidopsis. FB1-triggered cell death was suppressed by treatment with the MAMPs flg22 (a part of bacterial flagellin) or elf18 (a part of the bacterial elongation factor EF-Tu) but not chitin (a component of fungal cell walls). Although plant hormone signaling is associated with PCD and PTI, both FB1-triggered cell death and suppression of cell death by flg22 treatment were still observed in mutants deficient in jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and salicylic acid (SA) signaling. The MAP kinases MPK3 and MPK6 are transiently activated and inactivated within one hour during PTI. We found that FB1 activated MPK3 and MPK6 about 36–48 hours after treatment. Interestingly, this late activation was attenuated by flg22 treatment. These results suggest that PTI suppression of FB1-triggered cell death may involve suppression of MPK3/MPK6 signaling but does not require JA/ET/SA signaling. PMID:23560104

  3. Functional role of progestin and the progesterone receptor in the suppression of spermatogenesis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Lue, Yanhe; Wang, Christina; Lydon, John P; Leung, Andrew; Li, James; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic progestins such as levonorgestrel (LNG) are used in combination with testosterone (T) in male contraceptive clinical trials to suppress gonadotropins secretion, but whether progestins have additional direct effects on the testis are not known. This study aimed to examine the effect of a potent progestin, (LNG), alone or in combination with testosterone (T) on spermatogenesis in adult rats, and to evaluate the functional role of the progesterone receptors (PRs) in the testis. In comparison with a low dose of LNG treatment in adult rats for 4 weeks, T and T + LNG treatment decreased testicular sperm count to 64.1 and 40.2% of control levels respectively. LNG induced germ cell apoptosis at stages I-IV and XII-XIV; T increased apoptosis at stages VII-VIII; LNG + T treatment induced greater germ cell apoptosis at a wider range of seminiferous epithelial stages. RT-PCR and Western Blots showed that PR was present in testes and up-regulated during suppression of spermatogenesis induced by testicular hormonal deprivation. PR knockout (PRKO) mice had larger testes, greater sperm production, increased numbers of Sertoli and Leydig cells. Suppression of gonadotropin and intratesticular T by GnRH-antagonist treatment induced PR promoter driven LacZ expression in Leydig cells of PRKO mice. This suggests that GnRH-antagonist treatment while inducing germ cell apoptosis also up-regulates PR. We conclude that (i) LNG + T induced greater suppression of spermatogenesis through increase in germ cell apoptosis involving a wider range of seminiferous epithelial stages than either treatment alone, (ii) up-regulation of PR was associated with inhibition of spermatogenesis, (iii) PR knockout mice showed increased sperm production suggesting that testicular PR activated events play a physiological and pharmacological inhibitory role in the testis. These data support the hypothesis that in addition to its known suppressive effects on gonadotropins, progestins may have direct

  4. Suppression on Your Own Terms: Internally Generated Displays of Craving Suppression Predict Rebound Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, W. Michael; Sayette, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on emotion suppression has shown a rebound effect, in which expression of the targeted emotion increases following a suppression attempt. In prior investigations, participants have been explicitly instructed to suppress their responses, which has drawn the act of suppression into metaconsciousness. Yet emerging research emphasizes the importance of nonconscious approaches to emotion regulation. This study is the first in which a craving rebound effect was evaluated without simultaneously raising awareness about suppression. We aimed to link spontaneously occurring attempts to suppress cigarette craving to increased smoking motivation assessed immediately thereafter. Smokers (n = 66) received a robust cued smoking-craving manipulation while their facial responses were videotaped and coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Following smoking-cue exposure, participants completed a behavioral choice task previously found to index smoking motivation. Participants evincing suppression-related facial expressions during cue exposure subsequently valued smoking more than did those not displaying these expressions, which suggests that internally generated suppression can exert powerful rebound effects. PMID:23842957

  5. Best Practice Guide for the Treatment of Nightmare Disorder in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Zak, Rochelle S.; Auerbach, Sanford H.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Karippot, Anoop; Maganti, Rama K.; Ramar, Kannan; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of Recommendations: Prazosin is recommended for treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)-associated nightmares. Level A Image Rehearsal Therapy (IRT) is recommended for treatment of nightmare disorder. Level A Systematic Desensitization and Progressive Deep Muscle Relaxation training are suggested for treatment of idiopathic nightmares. Level B Venlafaxine is not suggested for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level B Clonidine may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level C The following medications may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares, but the data are low grade and sparse: trazodone, atypical antipsychotic medications, topiramate, low dose cortisol, fluvoxamine, triazolam and nitrazepam, phenelzine, gabapentin, cyproheptadine, and tricyclic antidepressants. Nefazodone is not recommended as first line therapy for nightmare disorder because of the increased risk of hepatotoxicity. Level C The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares based on low-grade evidence: Exposure, Relaxation, and Rescripting Therapy (ERRT); Sleep Dynamic Therapy; Hypnosis; Eye-Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR); and the Testimony Method. Level C The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of nightmare disorder based on low-grade evidence: Lucid Dreaming Therapy and Self-Exposure Therapy. Level C No recommendation is made regarding clonazepam and individual psychotherapy because of sparse data. Citation: Aurora RN; Zak RS; Auerbach SH; Casey KR; Chowduri S; Krippot A; Maganti RK; Ramar K; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Lamm CI; Morgenthaler TI. Best practice guide for the treatment of nightmare disorder in adults. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):389-401. PMID:20726290

  6. 40 CFR 279.82 - Use as a dust suppressant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use as a dust suppressant. 279.82... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Use as a Dust Suppressant and Disposal of Used Oil § 279.82 Use as a dust suppressant. (a) The use of used oil as a dust suppressant...

  7. Managing unwanted intrusive thoughts in obsessive-compulsive disorder: relative effectiveness of suppression, focused distraction, and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Najmi, Sadia; Riemann, Bradley C; Wegner, Daniel M

    2009-06-01

    Suppression is one of various mental control techniques that people may use to manage unwanted thoughts. Evidence suggests that it is at best unsustainable and at worst counterproductive. This leads to the question: If suppression is a futile way to respond to unwanted, intrusive thoughts, what is a more effective alternative? In the current study, we evaluated the relative effectiveness of suppression and two alternative mental control techniques-focused distraction and acceptance-on the frequency of intrusions and distress associated with them. Results support the claim that suppression is a counterproductive technique for dealing with unwanted, intrusive thoughts in OCD. However, the harmfulness of suppression was reflected primarily in the magnitude of distress and not in intrusion frequency. Focused distraction and acceptance were the more effective techniques for managing clinically significant intrusive thoughts. We discuss implications for the cognitive treatment for OCD. PMID:19327753

  8. Histidine Augments the Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production by Central Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuka; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Akifumi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Glucose intolerance in type 2 diabetes is related to enhanced hepatic glucose production (HGP) due to the increased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. Previously, we revealed that hepatic STAT3 decreases the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and suppresses HGP. Here, we show that increased plasma histidine results in hepatic STAT3 activation. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histidine-activated hepatic STAT3 reduced G6Pase protein and mRNA levels and augmented HGP suppression by insulin. This suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by histidine was abolished by hepatic STAT3 deficiency or hepatic Kupffer cell depletion. Inhibition of HGP by histidine was also blocked by ICV administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist. Therefore, histidine activates hepatic STAT3 and suppresses HGP via central histamine action. Hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after histidine ICV administration was attenuated in histamine H1 receptor knockout (Hrh1KO) mice but not in neuron-specific insulin receptor knockout (NIRKO) mice. Conversely, hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after insulin ICV administration was attenuated in NIRKO but not in Hrh1KO mice. These findings suggest that central histidine action is independent of central insulin action, while both have additive effects on HGP suppression. Our results indicate that central histidine/histamine-mediated suppression of HGP is a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23474485

  9. A comparison of application methods for suppressing the pecan weevil using beneficial fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecans. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is pathogenic to C. caryae. Our objective was to compare different application methods for suppression of C. caryae adults. Treatments included direct application of B. bassiana (GHA...

  10. Hyaluronic acid reagent suppressed endometriotic lesion formation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiko; Yoshino, Osamu; Osuga, Yutaka; Kodama, Ako; Takamura, Masashi; Nishii, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2010-05-15

    In an animal endometriosis model, the administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) reagent significantly suppressed the formation of endometriotic lesions in both number and weight. This effect was found when HA treatment was conducted at the time of endometrial fragment inoculation. PMID:20356589

  11. Suppressing weed growth after wheat harvest with underseeded red clover in organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined cover crop strategies for suppressing weed growth after harvest of wheat. Two cover crop treatments, red clover (mammoth type) or a mixture of oat and dry p...

  12. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  13. Animal and pasture responses to grazing management of chemically suppressed tall fescue in mixed pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh] with metsulfuran-methyl can mitigate fescue toxicosis and enhance forage nutritive value by suppressing seedhead emergence. A grazing experiment was conducted with steers (2013) and heifers (2014) to evaluate a...

  14. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  15. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  16. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  17. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  18. Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P

    2014-04-24

    One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound ("drug") pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  19. Losartan Attenuates Myocardial Endothelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats via Inhibiting TGF-β/Smad Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao; Peng, Zhenyu; Zu, Changhao; Ma, Jing; Lu, Shijuan; Zhong, Jianghua; Zhang, Saidan

    2016-01-01

    Background Losartan plays an important role in the inhibition of myocardial fibrosis. But the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear. Emerging evidences have indicated that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) plays a crucial role in cardiac fibrosis. Here the present study aims to first investigated the effect of Losartan on EndMT in cardiac fibrosis of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methods Male SHRs were randomly divided into three groups and fed for 12 weeks, namely the SHR group (Group S), the Losartan-treated group (Group L) and the Prazosin-treated group (Group P). Wistar-Kyoto rats served as controls (Group W). The histological changes were evaluated by Masson’s trichrome. Co-expression of CD31 and fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1) were used as the markers of EndMT through immunofluorescence. The expressions of FSP1, CD31, TGF-β, Smad were detected by Western blot analysis. Results It was identified that elevated blood pressure induced a significant increase in myocardial fibrosis and EndMT in SHRs, which was reversed by Losartan and Prazosin treatment. Furthermore, the activity of TGF-β/Smad signaling was detected in the four groups. TGF-β/Smad signaling was activated in SHRs and suppressed by Losartan or Prazosin treatment. Losartan exhibited more efficiently than Prazosin in inhibiting TGF-β/Smad signaling activation, EndMT and myocardial fibrosis. Conclusion These results showed that EndMT played an important role in promoting hypertensive cardiac fibrosis, and that losartan could suppress cardiac fibrosis through the inhibition of EndMT via classical TGF-β/Smad pathway. PMID:27176484

  20. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy. PMID:27354042

  1. Vibration Isolation, Suppression, Steering, and Pointing (VISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Rahman, Zahidul; Kedikian, Roland

    1996-01-01

    The design of a six degree of freedom flight vibration isolation suppression and steering (VISS) subsystem for a mid-wave infrared camera on the top of a spacecraft is presented. The development of a long stroke piezoelectric, redundant, compact, low stiffness and power efficient actuator is summarized. A subsystem that could be built and validated for flight within 15 months was investigated. The goals of the VISS are 20 dB vibration isolation above 2 Hz, 15 dB vibration suppression of disturbances at about 60 Hz and 120 Hz, and +/- 0.3 deg steering at 2 Hz and 4 Hz.

  2. Task motivation influences alpha suppression following errors.

    PubMed

    Compton, Rebecca J; Bissey, Bryn; Worby-Selim, Sharoda

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present research is to examine the influence of motivation on a novel error-related neural marker, error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Participants completed an attentionally demanding flanker task under conditions that emphasized either speed or accuracy or under conditions that manipulated the monetary value of errors. Conditions in which errors had greater motivational value produced greater ERAS, that is, greater alpha suppression following errors compared to correct trials. A second study found that a manipulation of task difficulty did not affect ERAS. Together, the results confirm that ERAS is both a robust phenomenon and one that is sensitive to motivational factors. PMID:24673621

  3. Suppressed conductance in a metallic graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    The linear conductance spectrum of a metallic graphene junction formed by interconnecting two gapless graphene nanoribbons is calculated. A strong conductance suppression appears in the vicinity of the Dirac point. We found that such a conductance suppression arises from the antiresonance effect associated with an edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the junction. The conductance valley due to the antiresonance is rather robust in the presence of the impurity and vacancy scattering. Also the center of the conductance valley can be readily tuned by an electric field exerted on the wider nanoribbon.

  4. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  5. The endocrinologist's office-puberty suppression: saving children from a natural disaster?

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    In the past few years, the introduction and rapid acceptance of puberty suppression has transformed the clinical treatment of children diagnosed with Gender Identity Disorder. This essay analyzes the narratives used by some advocates of this treatment, particularly the elements of saving children from the looming disaster of puberty and from future abject lives of violence and suicide as transgender adults. It briefly addresses the potential implications of this account for the well being of the children brought under clinical purview. PMID:23494333

  6. Pulmonary edema following scorpion envenomation: mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Chaari, Anis; Dammak, Hassen; Samet, Mohamed; Chtara, Kamilia; Chelly, Hedi; Ben Hamida, Chokri; Kallel, Hatem; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2013-01-10

    Scorpion envenomation is common in tropical and subtropical regions. Cardio-respiratory manifestations, mainly cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema, are the leading causes of death after scorpion envenomation. The mechanism of pulmonary edema remains unclear and contradictory conclusions were published. However, most publications confirm that pulmonary edema has been attributed to acute left ventricular failure. Cardiac failure can result from massive release of catecholamines, myocardial damage induced by the venom or myocardial ischemia. Factors usually associated with the diagnosis of pulmonary edema were young age, tachypnea, agitation, sweating, or the presence of high plasma protein concentrations. Treatment of scorpion envenomation has two components: antivenom administration and supportive care. The latter mainly targets hemodynamic impairment and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In Latin America, and India, the use of Prazosin is recommended for treatment of pulmonary edema because pulmonary edema is associated with arterial hypertension. However, in North Africa, scorpion leads to cardiac failure with systolic dysfunction with normal vascular resistance and dobutamine was recommended. Dobutamine infusion should be used as soon as we have enough evidence suggesting the presence of pulmonary edema, since it has been demonstrated that scorpion envenomation can result in pulmonary edema secondary to acute left ventricular failure. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation can be required. PMID:22075406

  7. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers.

    PubMed

    Batty, Mallory; Pugh, Rachel; Rathinam, Ilampirai; Simmonds, Joshua; Walker, Edwin; Forbes, Amanda; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McDermott, Catherine M; Spencer, Briohny; Christie, David; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists) induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers. PMID:27537875

  8. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Batty, Mallory; Pugh, Rachel; Rathinam, Ilampirai; Simmonds, Joshua; Walker, Edwin; Forbes, Amanda; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McDermott, Catherine M.; Spencer, Briohny; Christie, David; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists) induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers. PMID:27537875

  9. Legacy effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation on soil bacterial community composition and production of pathogen-suppressing volatiles

    PubMed Central

    van Agtmaal, Maaike; van Os, Gera J.; Hol, W.H. Gera; Hundscheid, Maria P.J.; Runia, Willemien T.; Hordijk, Cornelis A.; de Boer, Wietse

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that microbial volatiles (VOCs) play an important role in natural suppression of soil-borne diseases, but little is known on the factors that influence production of suppressing VOCs. In the current study we examined whether a stress-induced change in soil microbial community composition would affect the production by soils of VOCs suppressing the plant-pathogenic oomycete Pythium. Using pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal gene fragments we compared the composition of bacterial communities in sandy soils that had been exposed to anaerobic disinfestation (AD), a treatment used to kill harmful soil organisms, with the composition in untreated soils. Three months after the AD treatment had been finished, there was still a clear legacy effect of the former anaerobic stress on bacterial community composition with a strong increase in relative abundance of the phylum Bacteroidetes and a significant decrease of the phyla Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi. This change in bacterial community composition coincided with loss of production of Pythium suppressing soil volatiles (VOCs) and of suppression of Pythium impacts on Hyacinth root development. One year later, the composition of the bacterial community in the AD soils was reflecting that of the untreated soils. In addition, both production of Pythium-suppressing VOCs and suppression of Pythium in Hyacinth bioassays had returned to the levels of the untreated soil. GC/MS analysis identified several VOCs, among which compounds known to be antifungal, that were produced in the untreated soils but not in the AD soils. These compounds were again produced 15 months after the AD treatment. Our data indicate that soils exposed to a drastic stress can temporarily lose pathogen suppressive characteristics and that both loss and return of these suppressive characteristics coincides with shifts in the soil bacterial community composition. Our data are supporting the

  10. Legacy effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation on soil bacterial community composition and production of pathogen-suppressing volatiles.

    PubMed

    van Agtmaal, Maaike; van Os, Gera J; Hol, W H Gera; Hundscheid, Maria P J; Runia, Willemien T; Hordijk, Cornelis A; de Boer, Wietse

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that microbial volatiles (VOCs) play an important role in natural suppression of soil-borne diseases, but little is known on the factors that influence production of suppressing VOCs. In the current study we examined whether a stress-induced change in soil microbial community composition would affect the production by soils of VOCs suppressing the plant-pathogenic oomycete Pythium. Using pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal gene fragments we compared the composition of bacterial communities in sandy soils that had been exposed to anaerobic disinfestation (AD), a treatment used to kill harmful soil organisms, with the composition in untreated soils. Three months after the AD treatment had been finished, there was still a clear legacy effect of the former anaerobic stress on bacterial community composition with a strong increase in relative abundance of the phylum Bacteroidetes and a significant decrease of the phyla Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Chlorobi. This change in bacterial community composition coincided with loss of production of Pythium suppressing soil volatiles (VOCs) and of suppression of Pythium impacts on Hyacinth root development. One year later, the composition of the bacterial community in the AD soils was reflecting that of the untreated soils. In addition, both production of Pythium-suppressing VOCs and suppression of Pythium in Hyacinth bioassays had returned to the levels of the untreated soil. GC/MS analysis identified several VOCs, among which compounds known to be antifungal, that were produced in the untreated soils but not in the AD soils. These compounds were again produced 15 months after the AD treatment. Our data indicate that soils exposed to a drastic stress can temporarily lose pathogen suppressive characteristics and that both loss and return of these suppressive characteristics coincides with shifts in the soil bacterial community composition. Our data are supporting the

  11. Moderate swimming suppressed the growth and metastasis of the transplanted liver cancer in mice model: with reference to nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-B; Zhang, B-H; Zhang, K-Z; Meng, X-T; Jia, Q-A; Zhang, Q-B; Bu, Y; Zhu, X-D; Ma, D-N; Ye, B-G; Zhang, N; Ren, Z-G; Sun, H-C; Tang, Z-Y

    2016-08-01

    Physical activity has been shown to suppress tumor initiation and progression. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is closely related to movement and exhibits antitumor properties. However, whether the suppressive effects of physical activity on tumors was mediated by the nervous system via increased DA level remains unknowns. Here we show that regular moderate swimming (8 min/day, 9 weeks) raised DA levels in the prefrontal cortex, serum and tumor tissue, suppressed growth, reduced lung metastasis of transplanted liver cancer, and prolonged survival in a C57BL/6 mouse model, while overload swimming (16 and 32 min/day, 9 weeks) had the opposite effect. In nude mice that were orthotopically implanted with human liver cancer cell lines, DA treatment significantly suppressed growth and lung metastasis by acting on the D2 receptor (DR2). Furthermore, DR2 blockade attenuated the suppressive effect of moderate swimming on liver cancer. Both moderate swimming and DA treatment suppressed the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of transplanted liver cancer cells. At the molecular level, DR2 signaling inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and expression of TGF-β1 in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrated a novel mechanism by which the moderate exercise suppressed liver cancer through boosting DR2 activity, while overload exercise had the opposite effect, highlighting the possible importance of the dopaminergic system in tumor growth and metastasis of liver cancer. PMID:26686088

  12. Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Satsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukaya, M; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-03-01

    To understand how blood glucose level is lowered by oral administration of vinegar, we examined effects of acetic acid on glucose transport and disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells. Cells were cultured for 15 d in a medium containing 5 mmol/L of acetic acid. This chronic treatment did not affect cell growth or viability, and furthermore, apoptotic cell death was not observed. Glucose transport, evaluated with a nonmetabolizable substrate, 3-O-methyl glucose, also was not affected. However, the increase of sucrase activity observed in control cells (no acetic acid) was significantly suppressed by acetic acid (P < 0.01). Acetic acid suppressed sucrase activity in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Similar treatments (5 mmol/L and 15 d) with other organic acids such as citric, succinic, L-maric, L-lactic, L-tartaric and itaconic acids, did not suppress the increase in sucrase activity. Acetic acid treatment (5 mmol/L and 15 d) significantly decreased the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, maltase, trehalase and lactase) and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, whereas the activities of other hydrolases (alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase-N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase) were not affected. To understand mechanisms underlying the suppression of disaccharidase activity by acetic acid, Northern and Western analyses of the sucrase-isomaltase complex were performed. Acetic acid did not affect the de novo synthesis of this complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels. The antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid may be partially due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity. This suppression seems to occur during the post-translational processing. PMID:10702577

  13. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  14. Thought Suppression in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.; Alatiq, Yousra; Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of negative thoughts has been observed under experimental conditions among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) but has never been examined among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Patients with BD (n = 36), patients with MDD (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 20) completed a task that required unscrambling 6-word strings into 5-word sentences, leaving out 1 word. The extra word allowed the sentences to be completed in a negative, neutral, or “hyperpositive” (manic/goal-oriented) way. Participants completed the sentences under conditions of cognitive load (rehearsing a 6-digit number), reward (a bell tone), load and reward, or neither load nor reward. We hypothesized that patients with BD would engage in more active suppression of negative and hyperpositive thoughts than would controls, as revealed by their unscrambling more word strings into negative or hyperpositive sentences. Under conditions of load or reward and in the absence of either load or reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did controls. Under conditions of reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did patients with MDD. Patients with BD also reported more use of negative thought suppression than did controls. These group differences in negative biases were no longer significant when current mood states were controlled. Finally, the groups did not differ in the proportion of hyperpositive sentence completions in any condition. Thought suppression may provide a critical locus for psychological interventions in BD. PMID:20455608

  15. Sound-suppressing structure with thermal relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. O.; Holowach, J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Sound-suppressing structure comprising stacked acoustic panels wherein the inner high frequency panel is mounted for thermal expansion with respect to the outer low frequency panel is discussed. Slip joints eliminate the potential for thermal stresses, and a thermal expansion gap between the panels provides for additional relative thermal growth while reducing heat convection into the low frequency panel.

  16. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  17. ICE FOG SUPPRESSION USING THIN CHEMICAL FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ice fog suppression experiments on the Fort Wainwright Power Plant cooling pond were conducted during the winters of 1974-76. Baseline information studies occupied a sizeable portion of the available ice fog weather in 1974-75. Hexadecanol was added to the pond and dramatically i...

  18. Suppressed Carrier Synchronizers for ISI Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Simon, Marvin K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate a class of suppressed carrier synchronization loops that are motivated by MAP estimation theory and in the presence of ISI outperform the conventional I-Q loop which is designed on the basis of zero ISI (wideband assumption). The measure of comparison used is the so-called.

  19. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  20. Noise suppression methods for robust speech processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boll, S. F.; Kajiya, J.; Youngberg, J.; Petersen, T. L.; Ravindra, H.; Done, W.; Cox, B. V.; Cohen, E.

    1981-04-01

    Robust speech processing in practical operating environments requires effective environmental and processor noise suppression. This report describes the technical findings and accomplishments during the reporting period for the research program funded to develop real-time, compressed speech analysis-synthesis algorithms whose performance is invariant under signal contamination. Fulfillment of this requirement is necessary to insure reliable secure compressed speech transmission within realistic military command and control environments. Overall contributions resulting from this research program include the understanding of how environmental noise degrades narrow band, coded speech, development of appropriate real-time noise suppression algorithms, and development of speech parameter identification methods that consider signal contamination as a fundamental element in the estimation process. This report describes the research and results in the areas of noise suppression using the dual input adaptive noise cancellation articulation rate change techniques, spectral subtraction and a description of an experiment which demonstrated that the spectral substraction noise suppression algorithm can improve the intelligibility of 2400 bps, LPC-10 coded, helicopter speech by 10.6 points. In addition summaries are included of prior studies in Constant-Q signal analysis and synthesis, perceptual modelling, speech activity detection, and pole-zero modelling of noisy signals. Three recent studies in speech modelling using the critical band analysis-synthesis transform and using splines are then presented. Finally a list of major publications generated under this contract is given.

  1. Quantum origin of suppression for vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitsky, Ja. V.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    By example of a model with a spatially global scalar field, we show that the energy density of zero-point modes is exponentially suppressed by an average number of field quanta in a finite volume with respect to the energy density in the stationary state of minimal energy. We describe cosmological implications of mechanism.

  2. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  3. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  4. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  5. Bastadins, brominated-tyrosine derivatives, suppress accumulation of cholesterol ester in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Keisuke; Kato, Hikaru; Fujiwara, Yukio; Losung, Fitje; Mangindaan, Remy E P; de Voogd, Nicole J; Takeya, Motohiro; Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2015-11-15

    The formation of foam cells in macrophages has been suggested to play an essential role in the progression of early atherosclerotic lesions in vivo and, thus, its suppression is considered to be one of the major approaches for the treatment of atherosclerosis. We isolated eight brominated-tyrosine derivatives, bastadins, from the EtOH extract of the marine sponge Ianthella vasta as inhibitors of the formation of foam cells induced by acetylated low-density lipoproteins in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Bastadin 6 was the strongest inhibitor of foam cell formation due to its suppression of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase. PMID:26403929

  6. The tendency to suppress, inhibiting thoughts, and dream rebound.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Fiona; Bryant, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ironic control theory proposes that suppressing thoughts leads to increased occurrence of the suppressed thought because monitoring for the unwanted thought leads to intrusions. This study investigated the influence of suppressing unwanted thoughts on dream content. One hundred participants who had high or low levels of tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts nominated an intrusive thought, and half of the participants were instructed to suppress that thought for 5 min prior to sleeping. Participants completed a dream diary upon waking, which was subsequently rated by independent raters for dream content. In terms of the 79 participants who reported dreaming, more high suppressors who were instructed to suppress dreamt about the intrusive thought than high suppressors in the control condition. There was no difference between low suppressors in the suppression and control conditions. These results suggest that dream content can be influenced by attempted suppression prior to sleep, and this is particularly apparent in people with a tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts. PMID:16516140

  7. TORC1 Suppression Predicts Responsiveness to RAF and MEK Inhibition in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Ryan B.; Rothenberg, Stephen Michael; Hata, Aaron N.; Faber, Anthony C.; Piris, Adriano; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Brown, Ronald D.; Godfrey, Jason T.; Winokur, Daniel; Walsh, John; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Settleman, Jeffrey; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Haber, Daniel A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    RAF and MEK (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinase) inhibitors are effective in treating patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, most responses are partial and short-lived, and many patients fail to respond at all. We found that suppression of TORC1 activity in response to RAF or MEK inhibitors, as measured by decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6), effectively predicted induction of cell death by the inhibitor in BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines. In resistant melanomas, TORC1 activity was maintained after treatment with RAF or MEK inhibitors, in some cases despite robust suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. In in vivo mouse models, suppression of TORC1 after MAPK inhibition was necessary for induction of apoptosis and tumor response. Finally, in paired biopsies obtained from patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma before treatment and after initiation of RAF inhibitor therapy, P-S6 suppression predicted significantly improved progression-free survival. Such a change in P-S6 could be readily monitored in real time by serial fine-needle aspiration biopsies, making quantitation of P-S6 a valuable biomarker to guide treatment in BRAF-mutant melanoma. PMID:23903755

  8. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  9. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  10. A nonclassical vitamin D receptor pathway suppresses renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ichiaki; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Masato; Abe, Rumi; Nagai, Yu; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Yuka; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Akiko; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily comprises pleiotropic cytokines that regulate SMAD and non-SMAD signaling. TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is known to be involved in tissue fibrosis, including renal fibrosis. Here, we found that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3–bound [1,25(OH)2D3-bound] vitamin D receptor (VDR) specifically inhibits TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction through direct interaction with SMAD3. In mouse models of tissue fibrosis, 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment prevented renal fibrosis through the suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Based on the structure of the VDR-ligand complex, we generated 2 synthetic ligands. These ligands selectively inhibited TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction without activating VDR-mediated transcription and significantly attenuated renal fibrosis in mice. These results indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is independent of VDR-mediated transcriptional activity. In addition, these ligands did not cause hypercalcemia resulting from stimulation of the transcriptional activity of the VDR. Thus, our study provides a new strategy for generating chemical compounds that specifically inhibit TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Since TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is reportedly involved in several disorders, our results will aid in the development of new drugs that do not cause detectable adverse effects, such as hypercalcemia. PMID:24135137

  11. Tumor growth suppression by the combination of nanobubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Omata, Daiki; Nishiie, Norihito; Koshima, Risa; Shiono, Yasuyuki; Sawaguchi, Yoshikazu; Unga, Johan; Naoi, Tomoyuki; Negishi, Yoichi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We previously developed novel liposomal nanobubbles (Bubble liposomes [BL]) that oscillate and collapse in an ultrasound field, generating heat and shock waves. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of cancer therapy using the combination of BL and ultrasound. In addition, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of this cancer therapy. Colon-26 cells were inoculated into the flank of BALB/c mice to induce tumors. After 8 days, BL or saline was intratumorally injected, followed by transdermal ultrasound exposure of tumor tissue (1 MHz, 0-4 W/cm2 , 2 min). The anti-tumor effects were evaluated by histology (necrosis) and tumor growth. In vivo cell depletion assays were performed to identify the immune cells responsible for anti-tumor effects. Tumor temperatures were significantly higher when treated with BL + ultrasound than ultrasound alone. Intratumoral BL caused extensive tissue necrosis at 3-4 W/cm2 of ultrasound exposure. In addition, BL + ultrasound significantly suppressed tumor growth at 2-4 W/cm2 . In vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells (not NK or CD4+ T cells) completely blocked the effect of BL + ultrasound on tumor growth. These data suggest that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in tumor growth suppression. Finally, we concluded that BL + ultrasound, which can prime the anti-tumor cellular immune system, may be an effective hyperthermia strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:26707839

  12. Epigallocatechin-gallate Suppresses Tumorigenesis by Directly Targeting Pin1

    SciTech Connect

    Urusova, Darya V.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Zykova, Tatyana A.; Carper, Andria; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2011-09-01

    The most active anticancer component in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The human peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (Pin1) plays a critical role in oncogenic signaling. Herein, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Pin1/EGCG complex resolved at 1.9 Å resolution. Notably, the structure revealed the presence of EGCG in both the WW and PPIase domains of Pin1. The direct binding of EGCG with Pin1 was confirmed and the interaction inhibited Pin1 PPIase activity. In addition, proliferation of cells expressing Pin1 was inhibited and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model was suppressed. The binding of EGCG with Arg17 in the WW domain prevented the binding of c-Jun, a well-known Pin1 substrate. EGCG treatment corresponded with a decreased abundance of cyclin D1 and diminution of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-l3-acetate–induced AP-1 or NF-κB promoter activity in cells expressing Pin1. Overall, these results showed that EGCG directly suppresses the tumor-promoting effect of Pin1.

  13. Suppression of cardiac alternans by alternating-period-feedback stimulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, S.; Le, Duy-Manh; Mi, Yun-Chieh; Sinha, Sitabhra; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2013-04-01

    Alternans response, comprising a sequence of alternating long and short action potential durations in heart tissue, seen during rapid periodic pacing can lead to conduction block resulting in potentially fatal cardiac failure. A method of pacing with feedback control is proposed to reduce the alternans and therefore the probability of subsequent cardiac failure. The reduction is achieved by feedback control using small perturbations of constant magnitude to the original, alternans-generating pacing period T, viz., using sequences of two alternating periods of T+ΔT and T-ΔT, with ΔT≪T. Such a control scheme for alternans suppression is demonstrated experimentally in isolated whole heart experiments. This alternans suppression scheme is further confirmed and investigated in detail by simulations of ion-channel-based cardiac models both for a single cell and in one-dimensional spatially extended systems. The mechanism of the success of our method can be understood in terms of dynamics in phase space, viz., as the state of activity of the cell being confined within a narrow volume of phase space for the duration of control, resulting in extremely diminished variation in successive action potential durations. Our method is much more robust to noise than previous alternans reduction techniques based on fixed point stabilization and should thus be more efficient in terms of experimental implementation, which has implications for clinical treatment for arrhythmia.

  14. Dopamine D2-like receptor signaling suppresses human osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kubo, Satoshi; Kondo, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-09-01

    Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. Although the relevance of neuroendocrine system to bone metabolism has been emerging, the precise effects of dopaminergic signaling upon osteoclastogenesis remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human monocyte-derived osteoclast precursor cells express all dopamine-receptor subtypes. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists such as pramipexole and quinpirole reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells, cathepsin K mRNA expression, and pit formation area in vitro. These inhibitory effects were reversed by pre-treatment with a D2-like receptor antagonist haloperidol or a Gαi inhibitor pertussis toxin, but not with the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390. Dopamine and dopamine D2-like receptor agonists, but not a D1-like receptor agonist, suppressed intracellular cAMP concentration as well as RANKL-meditated induction of c-Fos and NFATc1 mRNA expression in human osteoclast precursor cells. Finally, the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation in murine bone marrow culture ex vivo. These findings indicate that dopaminergic signaling plays an important role in bone homeostasis via direct effects upon osteoclast differentiation and further suggest that the clinical use of neuroleptics is likely to affect bone mass. PMID:23631878

  15. Changes in blood pressure and vascular adrenergic receptor numbers after isolation stress or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment in the male SHR

    SciTech Connect

    Iams, S.G.; McConnaughey, M.M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported that treatment with testosterone increased blood pressure and alpha adrenergic receptor numbers in tail artery preparations from male SHRs, while gonadectomy had the opposite effect. In this study, they compared the effects of isolation stress and DHT treatment (800 mg/100 B Wt 3X/wk SC) on blood pressure and alpha and beta receptor numbers in tail artery and abdominal aorta preparations. Blood pressures were significantly higher (P<.05) in the stressed group 238 +/- 3 and the DHT treated group 232 +/- 5 vs. sham group 201 +/- 1. There was no clear change in beta receptor numbers (fmol/mg (/sup 3/H)DHA) from the tail arteries or abdominal aortas after DHT, 151 +/- 7 and 119 +/- 1 vs. sham values 155 +/- 5 and 120 +/- 8. Beta receptor numbers were lower in the tail arteries and abdominal aortas from the stressed rats, 139 +/- 5 and 107 +/- 1. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor density (fmol/mg (/sup 3/H) prazosin) was increased in the DHT treated and stressed animals in both tail arteries 270 +/- 16 and 279 +/- 17 and abdominal aortas 231 +/- 13 and 212 +/- 9 when compared to DHT and non-stressed controls, 255 +/- 6 and 206 +/- 5. These results suggest that the alpha/sub 1/ receptor changes seen after androgen treatment may be a result of the increased blood pressure rather than a direct effect of the androgens on vascular smooth muscle.

  16. Paradoxical lateral suppression in the dolphin's auditory system: weak sounds suppress response to strong sounds.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin AYa; Klishin, V O

    1997-09-26

    A paradoxical phenomenon was found in the auditory system of dolphins: weak sounds suppressed the brain responses to much stronger sounds. This occurred when the brain evoked potentials to rhythmic sound amplitude modulations were recorded. The response was markedly suppressed by addition of another sound of higher frequency and down to 40 dB lower intensity than the amplitude-modulated signal. Only the sustained rhythmic response was suppressed while transient on-response was not, thus indicating that the suppression influenced the ability of evoked potentials to follow rapid amplitude modulations. This prevents weak sounds from being masked by stronger ones. It may help a dolphin to perceive weaker echo-signals in the background of stronger emitted pulses. PMID:9347944

  17. Suppressed visual looming stimuli are not integrated with auditory looming signals: Evidence from continuous flash suppression

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Huygelier, Hanne; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee; van Ee, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using binocular rivalry have shown that signals in a modality other than the visual can bias dominance durations depending on their congruency with the rivaling stimuli. More recently, studies using continuous flash suppression (CFS) have reported that multisensory integration influences how long visual stimuli remain suppressed. In this study, using CFS, we examined whether the contrast thresholds for detecting visual looming stimuli are influenced by a congruent auditory stimulus. In Experiment 1, we show that a looming visual stimulus can result in lower detection thresholds compared to a static concentric grating, but that auditory tone pips congruent with the looming stimulus did not lower suppression thresholds any further. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we again observed no advantage for congruent multisensory stimuli. These results add to our understanding of the conditions under which multisensory integration is possible, and suggest that certain forms of multisensory integration are not evident when the visual stimulus is suppressed from awareness using CFS. PMID:26034573

  18. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  19. Naringenin targets ERK2 and suppresses UVB-induced photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Keun; Ha, Su Jeong; Jung, Chang Hwa; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Hoo-Keun; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    A number of natural phytochemicals have anti-photoaging properties that appear to be mediated through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression, but their direct target molecule(s) and mechanism(s) remain unclear. We investigated the effect of naringenin, a major flavonoid found in citrus, on UVB-induced MMP-1 expression and identified its direct target. The HaCaT human skin keratinocyte cell line and 3-dimensional (3-D) human skin equivalent cultures were treated or not treated with naringenin for 1 hr before exposure to UVB. The mechanism and target(s) of naringenin were analysed by kinase assay and multiplex molecular assays. Dorsal skins of hairless mice were exposed to UVB 3 times per week, with a dose of irradiation that was increased weekly by 1 minimal erythema dose (MED; 45 mJ/cm(2) ) to 4 MED over 15 weeks. Wrinkle formation, water loss and water content were then assessed. Naringenin suppressed UVB-induced MMP-1 expression and AP-1 activity, and strongly suppressed UVB-induced phosphorylation of Fos-related antigen (FRA)-1 at Ser265. Importantly, UVB irradiation-induced FRA1 protein stability was reduced by treatment with naringenin, as well as with a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Naringenin significantly suppressed UVB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) activity and subsequently attenuated UVB-induced phosphorylation of p90(RSK) by competitively binding with ATP. Constitutively active MEK (CA-MEK) increased FRA1 phosphorylation and expression and also induced MMP-1 expression, whereas dominant-negative ERK2 (DN-ERK2) had opposite effects. U0126, a MEK inhibitor, also decreased FRA1 phosphorylation and expression as well as MMP-1 expression. The photoaging data obtained from mice clearly demonstrated that naringenin significantly inhibited UVB-induced wrinkle formation, trans-epidermal water loss and MMP-13 expression. Naringenin exerts potent anti-photoaging effects by suppressing ERK2

  20. Endogenous central suppressive mechanisms regulating cough as potential targets for novel antitussive therapies.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; McGovern, Alice E; Farrell, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Cough and the accompanying sensation known as the urge-to-cough are complex neurobiological phenomena dependent on sensory and motor neural processing at many levels of the neuraxis. In addition to the excitatory neural circuits that provide the positive drive for inducing cough and the urge-to-cough, recent studies have highlighted the existence of likely inhibitory central neural processes that can be engaged to suppress cough sensorimotor processing. In many respects, the balance between excitatory and inhibitory central cough control may be a critical determinant of cough in health and disease which argues for the importance of understanding the biology of these putative central inhibitory processes. This brief review summarises the current knowledge of the central circuits that govern voluntary and involuntary cough suppression and posits the notion of targeting central suppressive mechanisms as a treatment for disordered cough in disease. PMID:25704497

  1. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  2. Osthole suppresses seizures in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of osthole {[7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one]--a natural coumarin derivative} in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The antiseizure effects of osthole were determined at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration. Time course of anticonvulsant action of osthole revealed that the natural coumarin derivative produced a clear-cut antielectroshock activity in mice and the experimentally-derived ED(50) values for osthole ranged from 259 to 631 mg/kg. In conclusion, osthole suppresses seizure activity in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. It may become a novel treatment option following further investigation in other animal models of epilepsy and preclinical studies. PMID:19236860

  3. Apple Procyanidins Suppress Amyloid β-Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Toshihiko; Sunagawa, Tadahiro; Kanda, Tomomasa; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Shirasawa, Takuji; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2011-01-01

    Procyanidins (PCs) are major components of the apple polyphenols (APs). We previously reported that treatment with PC extended the mean lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans (Sunagawa et al., 2011). In order to estimate the neuroprotective effects of PC, we investigated the antiaggregative activity of PC on amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregation, which is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. We herein report that PC significantly suppressed Aβ42 aggregation and dissociated Aβ42 aggregates in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that PC is a potent suppressor of Aβ aggregation. Furthermore, PC significantly inhibited Aβ42 neurotoxicity and stimulated proliferation in PC-12 cells. These results suggested that the PC and AP acted as neuroprotective factors against toxic Aβ aggregates. PMID:21826271

  4. SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yuzhu; Qiu, Qingchao; Jiang, Ming; Jin, Renjie; Lehmann, Brian D; Strand, Douglas W; Jovanovic, Bojana; DeGraff, David J; Zheng, Yi; Yousif, Dina A; Case, Thomas C; Yi, Jia; Cates, Justin M; Virostko, John; He, Xiusheng; Jin, Xunbo; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; George, Alfred L; Yi, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis, the main cause of death from cancer, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Experimental design Based on a pattern of reduced expression in human prostate cancer tissues and tumor cell lines, a candidate suppressor gene (SPARCL1) was identified. We used in vitro approaches to determine whether overexpression of SPARCL1 affects cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. We then employed xenograft mouse models to analyze the impact of SPARCL1 on prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Results SPARCL1 expression did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro. By contrast, SPARCL1 did suppress tumor cell migration and invasiveness in vitro and tumor metastatic growth in vivo, conferring improved survival in xenograft mouse models. Conclusions We present the first in vivo data suggesting that SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:23916135

  5. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  6. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  7. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  8. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  9. Suppression of Vortex Induced Vibrations by Fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Yan, Hongmei; Constantinides, Yiannis; Oakley, Owen; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    Fairings are nearly-neutrally buoyant devices, which are fitted along the axis of long circular risers to suppress vortex induced vibrations (VIV) and possibly reduce the drag force. Here we study numerically how VIV can be practically eliminated by using free-to-rotate fairings. Since the mass ratio and rotational inertia are both low for the fairings, direct numerical simulations based on standard flow-structure interaction algorithms fail because of the so-called added mass effect. To resolve this problem we introduce fictitious methods and successfully stabilize the simulations. In particular, we investigate the effect of rotational friction Cf on the stabilization effect of the fairings. We found that there exists a critical value for the rotational friction, and when Cf is close to this value, large oscillations and unsymmetrical trajectories can be observed for the riser but for smaller Cf values VIV are suppressed substantially.

  10. Compton suppression through rise-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvi, S; Celiktas, C

    2007-11-01

    We studied Compton suppression for 60Co and 137Cs radioisotopes using a signal selection criterion based on contrasting the fall time of the signals composing the photo peak with those composing the Compton continuum. The fall time criterion is employed by using the pulse shape analysis observing the change in the fall times of the gamma-ray pulses. This change is determined by measuring the changes in the rise times related to the fall time of the scintillator and the timing signals related to the fall time of the input signals. We showed that Compton continuum suppression is achieved best via the precise timing adjustment of an analog rise-time analyzer connected to a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. PMID:17703943

  11. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  12. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  13. System for Suppressing Vibration in Turbomachine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor); Provenza, Andrew J. (Inventor); Choi, Benjamin B. (Inventor); Bakhle, Milind A. (Inventor); Min, James B (Inventor); Stefko, George L. (Inventor); Kussmann, John A (Inventor); Fougere, Alan J (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for suppressing vibration and noise mitigation in structures such as blades in turbomachinery. The system includes flexible piezoelectric patches which are secured on or imbedded in turbomachinery blades which, in one embodiment, comprises eight (8) fan blades. The system further includes a capacitor plate coupler and a power transfer apparatus, which may both be arranged into one assembly, that respectively transfer data and power. Each of the capacitive plate coupler and power transfer apparatus is configured so that one part is attached to a fixed member while another part is attached to a rotatable member with an air gap there between. The system still further includes a processor that has 16 channels, eight of which serve as sensor channels, and the remaining eight, serving as actuation channels. The processor collects and analyzes the sensor signals and, in turn, outputs corrective signals for vibration/noise suppression of the turbine blades.

  14. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  15. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  16. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  17. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  18. Study of compounds suppressing free radical generation from UV-exposed ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ayako; Tahara, Maiko; Yoshimura, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2007-10-01

    Ketoprofen [(RS)-2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propanoic acid] is widely used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and musculoskeletal injury. However, there is concern regarding its potential for photosensitization as a side effect. Free radicals and active oxygen species generated from ketoprofen on exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light have been implicated in phototoxicity and photosensitization. In this study, we examined the suppressing ability of some compounds for the free radicals and active oxygen species generated by the photodynamic reaction of ketoprofen, to determine a new resist of photosensitization by ketoprofen. Eight compounds, including six known free radical scavengers were individually mixed with ketoprofen, and the mixtures were exposed to UV. Then, the free radicals and the active oxygen species were determined by the electron spin resonance spectrometry to estimate suppressing and scavenging ability of compounds. The compounds that show promise in suppressing superoxide anion generation from UV-exposed ketoprofen were further evaluated using the on-line photo-irradiated superoxide anion detection system. It was confirmed that quercetin, a flavonoid, strongly suppresses the generation of free radicals and active oxygen species from UV-exposed ketoprofen. The experiments using the experimental formulation of an adhesive skin patch of ketoprofen containing quercetine and the Chemiluminescence analyzer (CLA) indicated that quercetin has high potential for use as an excipient in ketoprofen ointments to suppress phototoxicity and photosensitization by ketoprofen. PMID:17917284

  19. Suppressive effects of 3-bromopyruvate on the proliferation and the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is an analogue of pyruvate, which is the final product of glycolysis that enters the citric acid cycle. The present study aimed to investigate the suppressive effects of 3BP on the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells were cultured with 3BP and subjected to an MTS assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell motility was analyzed using a scratch assay. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to determine the expression levels of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9. Proliferation of both cell lines was significantly suppressed by 3BP at 100 µM (P<0.05). The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased after 3BP treatment at 100 µM in both cell lines (P<0.05). Pyknotic nuclei were observed in the cells cultured with 3BP at 100 µM. These results revealed that 3BP suppressed cell proliferation, decreased the expression of cyclin D1, and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. 3BP significantly suppressed motility in both cell lines (P<0.05). The expression level of MMP9 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). 3BP suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9. PMID:26530887

  20. Suppression of Inflammation by Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium Harboring CCL22 MicroRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung Rel; Lee, Seung Seok; Chae, Yang Seok; Kim, Eun Jae; Choi, Ji Hyun; Oh, Sejin; Park, Se Ho; Choung, Ji Tae; Yoo, Young

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, puritic skin disorder. These syndromes result from multifactorial inheritance, with interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In particular, the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 is directly implicated in skin inflammatory reactions and its levels are significantly elevated in serum and correlated with disease severity in AD. We tested the suppression of the CCL22 gene by microRNA (miRNA) and observed the effects in mice with inflammation similar to AD. We used Salmonella as a vector to deliver miRNA. The recombinant strain of Salmonella typhimurium expressing CCL22 miRNA (ST-miRCCL22) was prepared for in vivo knockdown of CCL22. ST-miRCCL22 was orally inoculated into mice and the CCL22 gene suppressed with CCL22 miRNA in the activated lymphocytes. IgE and interleukin-4 were inhibited and interferon-γ was induced after treatments with ST-miRCCL22 and CCL22 was suppressed. Further, Th17 cells were suppressed in the atopic mice treated with ST-miRCCL22. These results suggested that suppression of the CCL22 gene using Salmonella induced anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21823987

  1. 5-Fluorouracil targets thymidylate synthase in the selective suppression of TH17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Peng, Liang; Zhang, Ruihua; Zheng, Zihan; Chen, Chun; Cheung, Ka Lung; Cui, Miao; Bian, Guanglin; Xu, Feihong; Chiang, David; Hu, Yuan; Chen, Ye; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Hongfa; Chen, Shu-hsia; Liu, Kebin; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Sikora, Andrew G.; Li, Liwu; Jiang, Bo; Xiong, Huabao

    2016-01-01

    While it is well established that treatment of cancer patients with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) can result in immune suppression, the exact function of 5-FU in the modulation of immune cells has not been fully established. We found that low dose 5-FU selectively suppresses TH17 and TH1 cell differentiation without apparent effect on Treg, TH2, and significantly suppresses thymidylate synthase (TS) expression in TH17 and TH1 cells but has a lesser effect in tumor cells and macrophages. Interestingly, the basal expression of TS varies significantly between T helper phenotypes and knockdown of TS significantly impairs TH17 and TH1 cell differentiation without affecting the differentiation of either Treg or TH2 cells. Finally, low dose 5-FU is effective in ameliorating colitis development by suppressing TH17 and TH1 cell development in a T cell transfer colitis model. Taken together, the results highlight the importance of the anti-inflammatory functions of low dose 5-FU by selectively suppressing TH17 and TH1 immune responses. PMID:27027355

  2. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  3. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors. PMID:21163748

  4. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  5. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QIAN; GAO, QING; CHEN, KUNLUN; WANG, YIDONG; CHEN, LIJUAN; LI, XU

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, following treatment with curcumin for 24 h, there was a decrease in the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 as well as proteinase activity in EC cells. Moreover, curcumin treatment significantly decreased the levels of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. MEK1 overexpression partially blocked the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin. Combined treatment with ERK inhibitor U0126 and curcumin resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP-2/-9 expression; the invasive capabilities of HEC-1B cells were also inhibited. In conclusion, curcumin inhibits tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 via the suppression of the ERK signaling pathway, suggesting that curcumin is a potential therapeutic agent for EC. PMID:26622667

  6. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Clem, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone’s effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  7. Nifedipine Suppresses Self-Injurious Behaviors in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Bonita L.; Muehlmann, Amber M.; Egami, Kiyoshi; Breese, George R.; Devine, Darragh P.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior is a common problem in many developmental disorders. The neurobiology of this behavior is not well understood, but the differing behavioral manifestations and associations with different disorders suggest that the underlying biological mechanisms are heterogeneous. The behavioral and biological heterogeneity is also evident in several animal models, where different manifestations can be provoked under different experimental conditions. Identifying commonalities among the different mechanisms is likely to be helpful in the design of treatments useful for the broadest populations of patients. The current studies reveal that nifedipine suppresses self-injurious behavior in 4 unrelated animal models: acute administration of high doses of ± BayK 8644 or methamphetamine in mice, dopamine agonist treatment in rats with lesions of dopamine pathways during early development and repeated administration of pemoline in rats. The effect of nifedipine does not appear to be due to nonspecific mechanisms, such as sedation, since other classes of behaviors are unaffected or exaggerated. These results suggest that nifedipine may target a common biological mechanism in the expression of self-injurious behavior, and they suggest it should be considered in the treatment or self-injury in humans. PMID:17047321

  8. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Miriam R; Clem, Brian F

    2015-08-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, α-ketoglutarate, or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone's effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  9. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  10. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on “here and now” experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one’s own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed. PMID:26083379

  11. Modified Beamformers for Coherent Source Region Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Many tomographic source localization algorithms used in biomagnetic imaging assume, explicitly or sometimes implicitly, that the source activity at different brain locations are either independent or that the correlation structure between sources is known. Among these algorithms is a class of adaptive spatial filters known as beamformers, which have superior spatiotemporal resolution abilities. The performance of beamformers is robust to weakly coherent sources. However, these algorithms are extremely sensitive to the presence of strongly coherent sources. A frequent mode of failure in beamformers occurs with reconstruction of auditory evoked fields (AEFs), in which bilateral auditory cortices are highly coherent in their activation. Here, we present a novel beamformer that suppresses activation from regions with interfering coherent sources. First, a volume containing the interfering sources is defined. The lead field matrix for this volume is computed and reduced into a few significant columns using singular value decomposition (SVD). A vector beamformer is then constructed by rejecting the contribution of sources in the suppression region while allowing for source reconstruction at other specified regions. Performance of this algorithm was first validated with simulated data. Subsequent tests of this modified beamformer were performed on bilateral AEF data. An unmodified vector beamformer using whole head coverage misplaces the source medially. After defining a suppression region containing the temporal cortex on one side, the described method consistently results in clear focal activations at expected regions of the contralateral superior temporal plane. PMID:16830939

  12. Effective rapid airframe suppression evaluation (ERASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Michel

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to effectively and rapidly evaluate the impact of airframe suppression on electro-optical/infrared (E-O/IR) system lock-on range. This method is known as the Effective Rapid Airframe Suppression Evaluation (ERASE). It can be used to perform tradeoff analyses with respect to IR suppression systems and evaluate the impact of these systems on E-O/IR systems. This paper discusses a new set of dimensionless equations and how these equations are used to evaluate changes in airframe area, temperature, emissivity, and reflectivity (as a function of earthshine, solar reflections, and skyshine). Since the ERASE code has been formulated as a rapid computational tool (capable of generating over 1000 design variations in minutes), it is ideal for performing design tradeoffs against airframe shaping, thermal control systems, and diffuse reflectivity/emissivity control. Results from the ERASE code are presented using Grumman's System for IR Evaluation/Contrast Generator Code (SIRE/CONGEN) as input.

  13. Echolocation versus echo suppression in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wallmeier, Ludwig; Geßele, Nikodemus; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that blind humans can gather spatial information through echolocation. However, when localizing sound sources, the precedence effect suppresses spatial information of echoes, and thereby conflicts with effective echolocation. This study investigates the interaction of echolocation and echo suppression in terms of discrimination suppression in virtual acoustic space. In the ‘Listening’ experiment, sighted subjects discriminated between positions of a single sound source, the leading or the lagging of two sources, respectively. In the ‘Echolocation’ experiment, the sources were replaced by reflectors. Here, the same subjects evaluated echoes generated in real time from self-produced vocalizations and thereby discriminated between positions of a single reflector, the leading or the lagging of two reflectors, respectively. Two key results were observed. First, sighted subjects can learn to discriminate positions of reflective surfaces echo-acoustically with accuracy comparable to sound source discrimination. Second, in the Listening experiment, the presence of the leading source affected discrimination of lagging sources much more than vice versa. In the Echolocation experiment, however, the presence of both the lead and the lag strongly affected discrimination. These data show that the classically described asymmetry in the perception of leading and lagging sounds is strongly diminished in an echolocation task. Additional control experiments showed that the effect is owing to both the direct sound of the vocalization that precedes the echoes and owing to the fact that the subjects actively vocalize in the echolocation task. PMID:23986105

  14. Is Infant Immunity Actively Suppressed or Immature?

    PubMed Central

    Gervassi, Ana L; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Almost 7 million children under the age 5 die each year, and most of these deaths are attributable to vaccine-preventable infections. Young infants respond poorly to infections and vaccines. In particular, dendritic cells secrete less IL-12 and IL-18, CD8pos T cells and NK cells have defective cytolysis and cytokine production, and CD4pos T cell responses tend to bias towards a Th2 phenotype and promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The basis for these differences is not well understood and may be in part explained by epigenetic differences, as well as immaturity of the infant’s immune system. Here we present a third possibility, which involves active suppression by immune regulatory cells and place in context the immune suppressive pathways of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), CD5pos B cells, and Tregs. The immune pathways that these immune regulatory cells inhibit are similar to those that are defective in the infant. Therefore, the immune deficiencies seen in infants could be explained, in part, by active suppressive cells, indicating potential new avenues for intervention. PMID:25429207

  15. Suppression of Ostwald Ripening by Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable and coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Ostwald ripening must thus be suppressed to stabilize emulsions, e.g. to control the properties of pharmaceuticals, food, or cosmetics. Suppression of Ostwald ripening is also important in biological cells, which contain stable liquid-like compartments, e.g. germ granules, Cajal-bodies, and centrosomes. Such systems are often driven away from equilibrium by chemical reactions and can thus be called active emulsions. Here, we show that non-equilibrium chemical reactions can suppress Ostwald Ripening, leading to stable, monodisperse emulsions. We derive analytical approximations of the typical droplet size, droplet count, and time scale of the dynamics from a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics. We also compare these results to numerical simulations of the continuous concentration fields. Generally, we thus show how chemical reactions can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties in technology and nature.

  16. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  17. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  18. Effects of suppression and appraisals on thought frequency and distress.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Kathleen M; Woody, Sheila R

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive theories of obsessions highlight appraisals of personal significance and thought suppression in the development and maintenance of intrusive thoughts. The current study examined the role of personal significance within the context of a thought suppression paradigm. The primary aim was to examine whether suppression would have differential effects for target thoughts appraised as personally meaningful versus relatively unimportant. A blasphemous thought served as the target thought, and highly religious and nonreligious participants were recruited. Participants completed a two-interval thought suppression task; during interval 1 they were randomly assigned to suppress or not suppress the target thought and during interval 2, all participants were given "do not suppress" instructions. Suppression resulted in sustained frequency of thoughts in contrast to the decline in thought frequency observed for non-suppression. Differential effects of suppression were found across the two groups. Moreover, suppression was associated with increased negative mood and anxiety. Results suggest that suppression of personally meaningful thoughts is a counterproductive strategy. PMID:19765684

  19. 30 CFR 75.1107 - Fire suppression devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fire suppression devices. 75.1107 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107 Fire suppression devices. On...

  20. The ups and downs of J/psi suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-10-17

    An overview of the present status of J/psi suppression in pA and nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented. In both cases, model predictions are summarized and compared to the data. The ''anomalous'' J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions is discussed in some detail. Predictions are also shown for quarkonium suppression at collider energies.

  1. Manipulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities to Induce Suppressive Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease suppressive soils have been documented in a variety of cropping systems, and in many instances the biological attributes contributing to suppressiveness have been identified. While these studies have often yielded an understanding of operative mechanisms leading to the suppressive state, si...

  2. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  3. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  4. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  5. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  6. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  7. Suppression of pulmonary injury in experimental 'Goodpasture's syndrome' by deoxyspergualin (DSP).

    PubMed Central

    Lan, H Y; Nikolic-Paterson, D J; Zarama, M; Kerr, P G; Atkins, R C

    1994-01-01

    DSP is a potent immunosuppressive drug which can prevent allograft rejection and suppress acute rejection episodes. In this study, the ability of DSP to suppress pulmonary injury in experimental Goodpasture's syndrome was investigated. Passive accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease was induced in rats by priming with rabbit IgG, followed 5 days later by injection of rabbit anti-GBM serum (day 0). Groups of five animals were treated with DSP (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally per day) or saline (untreated) from day 0 until being killed on days 1, 7, 14 or 21. At day 1, both DSP-treated and untreated animals exhibited similar pulmonary haemorrhage, oedema, and prominent perivascular leucocyte infiltration. Untreated animals subsequently developed severe widespread pulmonary damage including granulomatous lesions and extensive fibrosis, which correlated with infiltration of macrophages and immune-activated (IL-2R+) mononuclear cells (P < 0.01). Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a known mediator of acute lung damage, was produced by pulmonary mononuclear cells throughout the experimental course. In contrast, DSP treatment resolved pulmonary haemorrhage, prevented the appearance of granulomatous lesions, and resulted in a histologically normal lung structure by day 21. This improvement was associated with a marked suppression of macrophage infiltration (P < 0.001 versus untreated), accumulation of immune activated (IL-2R+) mononuclear cells (P < 0.01 versus untreated), and TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05 versus untreated). DSP treatment also suppressed the deposition of rat anti-rabbit IgG immunoglobulin and C3 along the alveolar basement membrane (P < 0.05 versus untreated). In conclusion, DSP suppressed pulmonary injury in accelerated anti-GBM disease by acting on the local cellular immune response and the systemic humoral immune response. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this could be a useful drug for the treatment of

  8. Experiential avoidance mediates the association between thought suppression and mindfulness with problem gambling.

    PubMed

    Riley, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been shown to be an important etiological and maintenance factor in a wide range psychopathology that includes addictive, anxiety, depressive and impulse control disorders. One common form of EA is thought suppression. Problem gambling causes enormous problems for afflicted individuals and has major social costs for their families and the community. Despite increasing interest in the contribution of EA to a broad range of psychological problems, its association with problem gambling has not previously been empirically investigated. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationship between EA, thought suppression, and mindfulness among a group of 103 treatment seeking problem gamblers. Of particular interest was the extent to which EA accounted for the relationships between problem gambling and the two theoretically opposing constructs: thought suppression and mindfulness. Results showed EA was predictive of problem gambling. Thought suppression was positively associated and mindfulness negatively associated with problem gambling, and these relationships were mediated by EA. Directions for future research are suggested which include the application of treatments for problem gambling that undermine EA, such as acceptance and mindfulness based therapies. PMID:23108594

  9. BMP4/Thrombospondin-1 loop paracrinically inhibits tumor angiogenesis and suppresses the growth of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, R; Osawa, T; Wang, F; Nishii, R; Das, B; Tsuchida, S; Muramatsu, M; Takahashi, T; Inoue, T; Wada, Y; Minami, T; Yuasa, Y; Shibuya, M

    2014-07-17

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has potential as an anticancer agent. Recent studies have suggested that BMP4 inhibits the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs) of neural and colon cancers. Here, we showed that BMP4 paracrinically inhibited tumor angiogenesis via the induction of Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), and consequently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Although HeLa (human cervical cancer), HCI-H460-LNM35 (highly metastatic human lung cancer) and B16 (murine melanoma) cells did not respond to the BMP4 treatment in vitro, the growth of xeno- and allografts of these cells was suppressed via reductions in tumor angiogenesis after intraperitoneal treatment with BMP4. When we assessed the mRNA expression of major angiogenesis-related factors in grafted tumors, we found that the expression of TSP1 was significantly upregulated by BMP4 administration. We then confirmed that BMP4 was less effective in suppressing the tumor growth of TSP1-knockdown cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that BMP4 reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo in a TSP1-dependent manner, which indicates that BMP4 interfered with the stabilization of tumor angiogenesis. In conclusion, the BMP4/TSP1 loop paracrinically suppressed tumor angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment, which subsequently reduced the growth of tumors. BMP4 may become an antitumor agent and open a new field of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:24013228

  10. p-Synephrine Suppresses Glucose Production but Not Lipid Accumulation in H4IIE Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhigang; Lee, Youngil; Lee, Youngki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract p-Synephrine, the primary protoalkaloid in the extract of bitter orange and other citrus species, has gained interest due to its lipolytic activity in adipose tissues. We previously found that p-synephrine stimulates glucose consumption via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in L6 skeletal muscle cells. This study investigated the effect of p-synephrine on glucose production and lipid accumulation in H4IIE rat liver cells. Glucose production was increased in H4llE cells that were incubated in glucose-free medium but decreased dose dependently (1–100 μM) with p-synephrine treatment. Protein levels of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) were also decreased by treatment (4 h) with p-synephrine. Antagonists against α- and β-adrenergic receptors (phentolamine and propranolol) and other inhibitors against signaling molecules did not interrupt p-synephrine-induced suppression in glucose production. However, H7 (an inhibitor of serine/threonine kinases PKA, PKC, and PKG) significantly blocked p-synephrine-induced suppression of glucose production and further increased basal glucose production. Unlike the suppressive effect on glucose production, p-synephrine failed to affect palmitic acid-induced cytoplasmic lipid accumulation. Protein levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC were not changed by p-synephrine. Altogether, p-synephrine can suppress glucose production but does not affect lipid accumulation in H4IIE liver cells. PMID:25379695

  11. KIAA1324 Suppresses Gastric Cancer Progression by Inhibiting the Oncoprotein GRP78.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Muk; Park, Sujin; Kim, Staci Jakyong; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Bona; Kim, Junil; Park, Jinah; Kim, Shin Tae; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in genome and transcriptome analysis have contributed to the identification of many potential cancer-related genes. Furthermore, biological and clinical investigations of the candidate genes provide us with a better understanding of carcinogenesis and development of cancer treatment. Here, we report a novel role of KIAA1324 as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. We observed that KIAA1324 was downregulated in most gastric cancers from transcriptome sequencing data and found that histone deacetylase was involved in the suppression of KIAA1324. Low KIAA1324 levels were associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In the xenograft model, KIAA1324 significantly reduced tumor formation of gastric cancer cells and decreased development of preformed tumors. KIAA1324 also suppressed proliferation, invasion, and drug resistance and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Through protein interaction analysis, we identified GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa) as a KIAA1324-binding partner. KIAA1324 blocked oncogenic activities of GRP78 by inhibiting GRP78-caspase-7 interaction and suppressing GRP78-mediated AKT activation, thereby inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, our study reveals a tumor suppressive role of KIAA1324 via inhibition of GRP78 oncoprotein activities and provides new insight into the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26045166

  12. Inhibition of LSD1 reduces herpesvirus infection, shedding, and recurrence by promoting epigenetic suppression of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James M.; Quenelle, Debra C.; Cardin, Rhonda D.; Vogel, Jodi L.; Clement, Christian; Bravo, Fernando J.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Bernstein, David I.; Krause, Philip R.; Knipe, David M.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of Herpesviruses in the population and the maintenance of lifelong latent reservoirs are challenges to the control of herpetic diseases, despite the availability of antiviral pharmaceuticals that target viral DNA replication. In addition to oral and genital lesions, herpes simplex virus infections and recurrent reactivations from the latent pool can result in severe pathology including neonatal infection and mortality, blindness due to ocular keratitis, and viral-induced complications in immunosuppressed individuals. Herpesviruses, like their cellular hosts, are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin and chromatin modulation machinery that promotes or suppresses gene expression. The initiation of herpes simplex virus infection and reactivation from latency is dependent on a transcriptional coactivator complex that contains two required histone demethylases, LSD1 and JMJD2s. Inhibition of either of these enzymes results in heterochromatic suppression of the viral genome and a block to infection and reactivation in vitro. Here, the concept of epigenetic suppression of viral infection is demonstrated in three animal models of herpes simplex virus infection and disease. Inhibition of LSD1 via treatment of animals with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine results in suppression of viral lytic infection, subclinical shedding, and reactivation from latency in vivo. Phenotypic suppression is correlated with enhanced epigenetic suppression of the viral genome and suggests that, even during latency, the chromatin state of the virus is dynamic. Given the expanding development of epipharmaceuticals, this approach has substantial potential for anti-herpetic treatments with distinct advantages over the present pharmaceutical options. PMID:25473037

  13. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  14. The Potent Humanin Analogue (HNG) Protects Germ Cells and Leucocytes While Enhancing Chemotherapy-Induced Suppression of Cancer Metastases in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Lue, YanHe; Swerdloff, Ronald; Wan, Junxiang; Xiao, Jialin; French, Samuel; Atienza, Vince; Canela, Victor; Bruhn, Kevin W; Stone, Brian; Jia, Yue; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Humanin is a peptide that is cytoprotective against stresses in many cell types. We investigated whether a potent humanin analogue S14G-humanin (HNG) would protect against chemotherapy-induced damage to normal cells without interfering with the chemotherapy-induced suppression of cancer cells. Young adult male mice were inoculated iv with murine melanoma cells. After 1 week, cancer-bearing mice were randomized to receive either: no treatment, daily ip injection of HNG, a single ip injection of cyclophosphamide (CP), or CP+HNG and killed at the end of 3 weeks. HNG rescued the CP-induced suppression of leucocytes and protected germ cell from CP-induced apoptosis. Lung metastases were suppressed by HNG or CP alone, and further suppressed by CP+HNG treatment. Plasma IGF-1 levels were suppressed by HNG with or without CP treatment. To investigate whether HNG maintains its protective effects on spermatogonial stem cells, sperm output, and peripheral leucocytes after repeated doses of CP, normal adult male mice received: no treatment, daily sc injection of HNG, 6 ip injections of CP at 5-day intervals, and the same regimens of CP+HNG and killed at the end of 4 weeks of treatment. Cauda epididymal sperm counts were elevated by HNG and suppressed by CP. HNG rescued the CP-induced suppression of spermatogonial stem cells, sperm count and peripheral leucocytes. We conclude that HNG 1) protects CP-induced loss of male germ cells and leucocytes, 2) enhances CP-induced suppression of cancer metastases, and 3) acts as a caloric-restriction mimetic by suppressing IGF-1 levels. Our findings suggest that humanin analogues may be promising adjuvants to chemotherapy. PMID:26384090

  15. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ... Incontinence Managing Incontinence: A Survey The Patient's Perspective Barriers on Diagnosis and Treatment Personal Stories Contact Us ...

  16. Biochar suppression of N2O emissions from an agricultural soil: effects and potential mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, S. D. C.; Whitaker, J.; McNamara, N. P.; Reay, D. S.

    2012-04-01

    Biochar is biomass that has been heated in a low-oxygen environment to between 350 and 800°C that is subsequently used as a soil amendment. As well as benefits to soil fertility, biochar has potential as a tool to mitigate climate change on a large scale due to its recalcitrance, high carbon content and observed effect of reducing soil greenhouse gas emissions. Previous studies have shown that biochar-amended soil may emit less nitrous oxide (N2O) than soil alone. Our aim was to investigate the effect of fresh, hardwood biochar on N2O emissions from a clay agricultural soil from Lincolnshire, United Kingdom with a combination of field and laboratory studies. We then investigated the mechanism to try to explain the observed suppression of N2O emissions with biochar. In biochar-amended field plots, quarterly greenhouse gas measurements over two years have recorded one occurrence of significant suppression of N2O emissions (80%), with other measurements showing generally low emissions of N2O across all treatments. In laboratory experiments, biochar suppressed N2O emissions following simulated rainfall events in a low-N agricultural soil (72 % suppression), in the same field-moist soil incubated with biochar in the field for 10 months (40 % suppression) and in a relatively high-N soil from a neighbouring field (83 % suppression). We hypothesised that biochar amendment may suppress soil N2O emissions by increasing the water holding capacity (WHC) of the soil, thus rendering the biochar-amended soil less anaerobic compared to control soil at the same gravimetric water content. Water was added to raise soil to the same WHC (87 %) with and without biochar at a range of addition rates. Biochar significantly suppressed N2O emissions with 5 % biochar addition by 67 % and 10 % biochar addition by 98 %. We concluded that the increased WHC of biochar-amended soil could not explain the suppression of N2O emissions. Subsequently, we formulated two hypotheses: (1) that biochar may

  17. C6-ceramide nanoliposome suppresses tumor metastasis by eliciting PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities and regulating integrin affinity modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Hu, Yijuan; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-01-01

    Nanoliposomal formulation of C6-ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid metabolite, presents an effective way to treat malignant tumor. Here, we provide evidence that acute treatment (30 min) of melanoma and breast cancer cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide (NaL-C6) may suppress cell migration without inducing cell death. By employing a novel flow migration assay, we demonstrated that NaL-C6 decreased tumor extravasation under shear conditions. Compared with ghost nanoliposome, NaL-C6 triggered phosphorylation of PI3K and PKCζ and dephosphorylation of PKCα. Concomitantly, activated PKCζ translocated into cell membrane. siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PKCζ or PI3K rescued NaL-C6-mediated suppression of tumor migration. By inducing dephosphorylation of paxillin, PKCζ was responsible for NaL-C6-mediated stress fiber depolymerization and focal adhesion disassembly in the metastatic tumor cells. PKCζ and PI3K regulated cell shear-resistant adhesion in a way that required integrin αvβ3 affinity modulation. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of acute nanoliposomal ceramide treatment in reducing integrin affinity and inhibiting melanoma metastasis by conferring PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities. PMID:25792190

  18. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Evans, Colin E.; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit.—Ashmore, T., Fernandez, B. O., Evans, C. E., Huang, Y., Branco-Price, C., Griffin, J. L., Johnson, R. S., Feelisch, M., Murray, A. J. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate. PMID:25422368

  19. UAV visual signature suppression via adaptive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Melkert, Joris

    2005-05-01

    Visual signature suppression (VSS) methods for several classes of aircraft from WWII on are examined and historically summarized. This study shows that for some classes of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), primary mission threats do not stem from infrared or radar signatures, but from the amount that an aircraft visually stands out against the sky. The paper shows that such visual mismatch can often jeopardize mission success and/or induce the destruction of the entire aircraft. A psycho-physioptical study was conducted to establish the definition and benchmarks of a Visual Cross Section (VCS) for airborne objects. This study was centered on combining the effects of size, shape, color and luminosity or effective illumance (EI) of a given aircraft to arrive at a VCS. A series of tests were conducted with a 6.6ft (2m) UAV which was fitted with optically adaptive electroluminescent sheets at altitudes of up to 1000 ft (300m). It was shown that with proper tailoring of the color and luminosity, the VCS of the aircraft dropped from more than 4,200cm2 to less than 1.8cm2 at 100m (the observed lower limit of the 20-20 human eye in this study). In laypersons terms this indicated that the UAV essentially "disappeared". This study concludes with an assessment of the weight and volume impact of such a Visual Suppression System (VSS) on the UAV, showing that VCS levels on this class UAV can be suppressed to below 1.8cm2 for aircraft gross weight penalties of only 9.8%.

  20. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  1. Perceptions of Sex, Gender, and Puberty Suppression: A Qualitative Analysis of Transgender Youth.

    PubMed

    Vrouenraets, Lieke Josephina Jeanne Johanna; Fredriks, A Miranda; Hannema, Sabine E; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; de Vries, Martine C

    2016-10-01

    International guidelines recommend the use of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonists in adolescents with gender dysphoria (GD) to suppress puberty. Little is known about the way gender dysphoric adolescents themselves think about this early medical intervention. The purpose of the present study was (1) to explicate the considerations of gender dysphoric adolescents in the Netherlands concerning the use of puberty suppression; (2) to explore whether the considerations of gender dysphoric adolescents differ from those of professionals working in treatment teams, and if so in what sense. This was a qualitative study designed to identify considerations of gender dysphoric adolescents regarding early treatment. All 13 adolescents, except for one, were treated with puberty suppression; five adolescents were trans girls and eight were trans boys. Their ages ranged between 13 and 18 years, with an average age of 16 years and 11 months, and a median age of 17 years and 4 months. Subsequently, the considerations of the adolescents were compared with views of clinicians treating youth with GD. From the interviews with the gender dysphoric adolescents, three themes emerged: (1) the difficulty of determining what is an appropriate lower age limit for starting puberty suppression. Most adolescents found it difficult to define an appropriate age limit and saw it as a dilemma; (2) the lack of data on the long-term effects of puberty suppression. Most adolescents stated that the lack of long-term data did not and would not stop them from wanting puberty suppression; (3) the role of the social context, for which there were two subthemes: (a) increased media-attention, on television, and on the Internet; (b) an imposed stereotype. Some adolescents were positive about the role of the social context, but others raised doubts about it. Compared to clinicians, adolescents were often more cautious in their treatment views. It is important to give voice to gender dysphoric

  2. Wogonin suppresses osteopontin expression in adipocytes by activating PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye-min; Li, Ming-xin; Tang, Zhao; Wang, Chang-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone), a major bioactive compound of the flavonoid family, is commonly extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis and possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and is assumed to have anti-diabetes function. Indeed, a current study has shown that it can possibly treat metabolic disorders such as those found in db/db mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of wogonin on osteopontin (OPN) expression in adipose tissue from type 1 diabetic mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) injection. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were converted to 3T3-L1 adipocytes through treatment with insulin, dexamethasone, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR were performed to detect protein expression and mRNA levels, respectively. Results: Wogonin treatment suppressed the increase in serum OPN levels and reduced OPN expression in adipose tissue from STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Administration of wogonin enhanced PPARα expression and activity. Silencing of PPARα diminished the inhibitory effects of wogonin on OPN expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, the levels of c-Fos and phosphorylated c-Jun were reduced in wogonin-treated adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, wogonin treatment dramatically mitigated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK by its specific inhibitor SB203580 increased PPARα activity and decreased OPN expression. Conclusion: Our results suggest that wogonin downregulated OPN expression in adipocytes through the inhibition of p38 MAPK and the sequential activation of the PPARα pathway. Given the adverse effects of high OPN levels on metabolism, our results provide evidence for the potential administration of wogonin as a treatment for diabetes. PMID:26073326

  3. Mechanism of Shope Fibroma Virus-Induced Suppression of Host Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, James C.; Hodes, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of treatment with live or inactivated Shope fibroma virus on host cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis were determined. The incorporation of 3H-thymidine into nuclear DNA was suppressed by both active and inactivated virus, although live virus was more effective. During the early phase of infection, stimulation of host nuclear DNA synthesis of up to 240% of control value was observed in cells infected with active virus. Inhibition of DNA synthesis began at about the 8th h and was maximal by 12 h postinfection. Virus inactivated by ultraviolet-irradiation or heat treatment did not induce viral DNA synthesis but was, nevertheless, able to suppress host DNA synthesis. PMID:4202660

  4. Optimization of sodium fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-01

    This report describes the major areas of revision and optimization of the design of the CRBRP Sodium Fire Suppression System (SFSS) following the confirmatory testing program. The design temperatures for the SFSS were substantially increased after the Large Scale Sodium Fire Test (LSSFT) making the original design inadequate. A redesign of the main features was performed in which the experience in the construction of the LSSFT test article was also utilized for optimization. The design criteria, loads and load combinations and revised design are discussed.

  5. Coherent error suppression in multiqubit entangling gates.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D; Clark, S M; Debnath, S; Hucul, D; Inlek, I V; Lee, K W; Quraishi, Q; Monroe, C

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate a simple pulse shaping technique designed to improve the fidelity of spin-dependent force operations commonly used to implement entangling gates in trapped ion systems. This extension of the Mølmer-Sørensen gate can theoretically suppress the effects of certain frequency and timing errors to any desired order and is demonstrated through Walsh modulation of a two qubit entangling gate on trapped atomic ions. The technique is applicable to any system of qubits coupled through collective harmonic oscillator modes. PMID:23030141

  6. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul J. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Techniques of combining separate but correlated measurements to form a second-order or higher order correlation function to suppress the effects of noise in the initial condition of a system capable of retaining memory of an initial state of the system with a characteristic relaxation time. At least two separate measurements are obtained from the system. The temporal separation between the two separate measurements is preferably comparable to or less than the characteristic relaxation time and is adjusted to allow for a correlation between two measurements.

  7. Suppressing dislocations in normalized hypercubic smearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Normalized hypercubic smearing improves the behavior of dynamical Wilson-clover fermions, but has the unwanted side effect that it can occasionally produce spikes in the fermion force. These spikes originate in the chain rule connecting the derivative with respect to the smeared links to the derivative with respect to the dynamical links, and are associated with the presence of dislocations in the dynamical gauge field. We propose and study an action designed to suppress these dislocations. We present evidence for improved performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. A side benefit is improvement in the properties of valence chiral fermions.

  8. Suppressed $B_s$ decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco

    2011-05-01

    We review three recent results of the CDF collaboration on B{sub s}{sup 0} suppressed decays: the first search for CP-violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay, where two CP-violating asymmetries expected to be zero in the Standard Model are measured, and the observation and the branching ratio measurements of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} K{sup (*)} decays.

  9. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  10. Suppression of Fermi acceleration in composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Kellen Manoela; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2016-09-01

    We study the motion of a composite particle in a one-dimensional billiard with a moving wall. The particle is modeled by two point masses coupled by a harmonic spring. We show that the energy gained by the composite particle is greatly reduced with respect to a single point particle. We show that the amount of energy transferred to the system at each collision with the walls is independent of the spring constant. However, the presence of the spring is responsible for the energy suppression because it diminishes the number of collisions by storing part of the system's energy and reducing the velocity of the particle's center of mass.

  11. Optimal control techniques for active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Keeling, S. L.; Silcox, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Active suppression of noise in a bounded enclosure is considered within the framework of optimal control theory. A sinusoidal pressure field due to exterior offending noise sources is assumed to be known in a neighborhood of interior sensors. The pressure field due to interior controlling sources is assumed to be governed by a nonhomogeneous wave equation within the enclosure and by a special boundary condition designed to accommodate frequency-dependent reflection properties of the enclosure boundary. The form of the controlling sources is determined by considering the steady-state behavior of the system, and it is established that the control strategy proposed is stable and asymptotically optimal.

  12. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  13. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  14. Influence of disease-suppressive strains of Streptomyces on the native Streptomyces community in soil as determined by the analysis of cellular fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J H; Kinkel, L L; Jones, R K

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles was used to distinguish among introduced pathogen- suppressive strains and indigenous strains of Streptomyces spp. isolated from soil of field plots established to test the efficacy of Streptomyces strains PonSSII and PonR in the biological control of potato scab. Reference libraries of fatty acid profiles were developed for a collection of known pathogenic strains and the introduced suppressive strains. Population densities of pathogen-related, suppressive, and saprophytic Streptomyces strains were determined from the relationship of field isolates to mean library profiles using cluster analysis and the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages. Community diversity was similarly determined. Streptomyces strains PonSSII and PonR were distinguished from each other and from the pathogen group (which clustered together) based on fatty acid profiles. The introduced, suppressive strains successfully colonized the soil and represented 2-19% of the isolates sampled over 2 years. The introduction of the suppressive strains inhibited the population of strains related to the pathogen library at each sample date; the pathogen population was substantially lower in soil from treatments where the suppressive strains were introduced compared with the nonamended control. At harvest, the pathogen-related population was suppressed 85-93 and 36-44% in 1991 and 1992, respectively, in treatments with the suppressive strains compared with the nonamended control. Diversity of the community was not affected by the introduced strains, and diversity and equitability indices were similar among treatments at any sample time. The inhibition of the pathogen-related population was correlated with a reduction of scab symptoms observed in the field plots into which the suppressive strains were introduced. Implications of a fundamental shift in the pathogen-related population in response to the introduction of the suppressive strains for long

  15. [Dietetic treatment of hyperlipoproteinemias].

    PubMed

    Louis, J; Antoine, J M; Pointel, J P; Debry, G; Drouin, P

    1983-09-15

    The authors mention the previous conditions to the prescription of a diet for primary hyperlipoproteinemia : definition of the metabolic disease and of its nutritional dependence, precise knowledge of earlier nutritional uses, demonstration of vascular risk factor linked to the hyperlipoproteinemia, i.e. obesity which always requires a hypocaloric diet. A low cholesterol and saturated fatty acid diet reduces by 10% the cholesterolemia, and sometimes exempts from use of medical drugs in moderate hypercholesterolemia. The exceptional hyperchylomicronemia are reduced by drastic reduction of the lipid fraction of the diet, which is compensated by use of MCT. The dietetic treatment of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia depends on their nutritional dependence : an alcohol dependence implies a complete suppression of alcoholic drinks. A glucid dependence implies the suppression of simple carbohydrates and a reduction of the glucidic fraction of the diet. PMID:6314517

  16. [Diet treatment of hyperliproteinemias].

    PubMed

    Louis, J; Antoine, J M; Pointel, J P; Debry, G; Drouin, P

    1983-04-01

    The authors mention the previous conditions to the prescription of a diet for primary hyperlipoproteinemia: definition of the metabolic disease and of its nutritional dependance, precise knowledge of earlier nutritional uses, demonstration of vascular risk factor linked to the hyperlipoproteinemia, i.e. obesity which always requires a hypocaloric diet. A low cholesterol and saturated fatty acid diet reduces by 10% the cholesterolemia, and sometimes exempts from use of medical drugs in moderate hypercholesterolemia. The exceptional hyperchylomicronemia are reduced by drastic reduction of the lipid fraction of the diet, which is compensated by use of MCT. The dietetic treatment of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia depends on their nutritional dependance: an alcohol dependance implies a complete suppression of alcoholic drinks. A glucid dependance implies the suppression of simple carbohydrates and a reduction of the glucidic fraction of the diet. PMID:6346241

  17. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, M. Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach. We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results. In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [-0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg-1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg-1 h-1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance. A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  18. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [−0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg−1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg−1 h−1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  19. Runoff quality impacts of dust suppression using saline water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Rob J.; Squires, Helen

    2010-05-01

    In mining and gas operations, dust generation from unsealed roads is a major problem. Commonly, road watering is used to suppress dust, with the lowest water quality available generally being selected for that purpose. Whilst minimising water usage for the site, that practice does create concerns with respect to potential environmental impacts if runoff from the treated roads has significantly elevated salinity. For coal seam gas operations, the water extracted concurrently with the gas contains predominantly sodium bicarbonate. Therefore, where coal seam gas water is sprayed onto roads, there is potential for elevated sodium in runoff to impact on soil adjoining the roads, but there is no information on the rates of dissolution and mobilisation of soluble salt from the surface of roads that have been sprayed with low quality water to reduce dust. Therefore a rainfall simulator study was carried out to investigate rates of mobilisation of sodium bicarbonate from compacted soil surfaces simulating an unsealed road. The study considered effects of the amount of precipitated sodium bicarbonate on the soil surface and variations in rainfall intensity. Because the soil surfaces were compacted, runoff commenced almost immediately following application of rain. For all treatments with applied surface salt, runoff quality data showed a peak in salt concentration in the first flush of runoff, and relatively rapid reduction through time in those initial concentrations. The magnitude and duration of peak concentrations depended on both rainfall rate and the quantity of salt present on the soil surface. The flush of salts in run-off from the roads occurred very early in the run-off event, when none of the surrounding area would have commenced to run off. Consequently, the relatively small volume of run-off produced directly by the road could be expected to predominantly infiltrate in the table drain adjoining the road. The initial flush of saline water would then be leached to

  20. PACAP suppresses dry eye signs by stimulating tear secretion.

    PubMed

    Nakamachi, Tomoya; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Seki, Tamotsu; Yofu, Sachiko; Kagami, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Shintani, Norihito; Baba, Akemichi; Mark, Laszlo; Lanekoff, Ingela; Kiss, Peter; Farkas, Jozsef; Reglodi, Dora; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is caused by a reduction in the volume or quality of tears. Here, we show that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-null mice develop dry eye-like symptoms such as corneal keratinization and tear reduction. PACAP immunoreactivity is co-localized with a neuronal marker, and PACAP receptor (PAC1-R) immunoreactivity is observed in mouse infraorbital lacrimal gland acinar cells. PACAP eye drops stimulate tear secretion and increase cAMP and phosphorylated (p)-protein kinase A levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands that could be inhibited by pre-treatment with a PAC1-R antagonist or an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Moreover, these eye drops suppress corneal keratinization in PACAP-null mice. PACAP eye drops increase aquaporin 5 (AQP5) levels in the membrane and pAQP5 levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands. AQP5 siRNA treatment of the infraorbital lacrimal gland attenuates PACAP-induced tear secretion. Based on these results, PACAP might be clinically useful to treat dry eye disorder. PMID:27345595

  1. IL-27 suppresses antimicrobial activity in human leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rosane M. B.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens trigger immunosuppressive pathways are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of microbial infection. One pathway that inhibits host defense responses involves the induction of type I interferons and subsequently IL-10, yet the mechanism by which type I IFN induces IL-10 remains unclear. Our studies of gene expression profiles derived from leprosy skin lesions suggested a link between IL-27 and the IFN-β induced IL-10 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-27p28 subunit is upregulated following treatment of monocytes with IFN-β and Mycobacterium leprae, the intracellular bacterium that causes leprosy. The ability of IFN-β and M. leprae to induce IL-10 was diminished by IL-27 knockdown. Additionally, treatment of monocytes with recombinant IL-27 was sufficient to induce the production of IL-10. Functionally, IL-27 inhibited the ability of IFN-γ to trigger antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected monocytes. At the site of disease, IL-27 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions of patients with progressive lepromatous leprosy, correlating and colocalizing with IFN-β and IL-10 in macrophages. Together, these data provide evidence that in the human cutaneous immune responses to microbial infection, IL-27 contributes to the suppression of host antimicrobial responses. PMID:26030183

  2. FXR induces SOCS3 and suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Xu, Zhizhen; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Peng; Huang, Gang; Chen, Shan; Lyu, Xilin; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Yijun; Wang, Shuguang; He, Fengtian

    2015-10-27

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is regarded as a vital repressor in the liver carcinogenesis mainly by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activity. Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR), highly expressed in liver, has an important role in protecting against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it is unclear whether the tumor suppressive activity of FXR involves the regulation of SOCS3. In the present study, we found that activation of FXR by its specific agonist GW4064 in HCC cells inhibited cell growth, induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, elevated p21 expression and repressed STAT3 activity. The above anti-tumor effects of FXR were dramatically alleviated by knockdown of SOCS3 with siRNA. Reporter assay revealed that FXR activation enhanced the transcriptional activity of SOCS3 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay displayed that FXR directly bound to IR9 DNA motif within SOCS3 promoter region. The in vivo study in nude mice showed that treatment with FXR ligand GW4064 could decelerate the growth of HCC xenografts, up-regulate SOCS3 and p21 expression and inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation in the xenografts. These results suggest that induction of SOCS3 may be a novel mechanism by which FXR exerts its anti-HCC effects, and the FXR-SOCS3 signaling may serve as a new potential target for the prevention/treatment of HCC. PMID:26416445

  3. PACAP suppresses dry eye signs by stimulating tear secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nakamachi, Tomoya; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Seki, Tamotsu; Yofu, Sachiko; Kagami, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Shintani, Norihito; Baba, Akemichi; Mark, Laszlo; Lanekoff, Ingela; Kiss, Peter; Farkas, Jozsef; Reglodi, Dora; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is caused by a reduction in the volume or quality of tears. Here, we show that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-null mice develop dry eye-like symptoms such as corneal keratinization and tear reduction. PACAP immunoreactivity is co-localized with a neuronal marker, and PACAP receptor (PAC1-R) immunoreactivity is observed in mouse infraorbital lacrimal gland acinar cells. PACAP eye drops stimulate tear secretion and increase cAMP and phosphorylated (p)-protein kinase A levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands that could be inhibited by pre-treatment with a PAC1-R antagonist or an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Moreover, these eye drops suppress corneal keratinization in PACAP-null mice. PACAP eye drops increase aquaporin 5 (AQP5) levels in the membrane and pAQP5 levels in the infraorbital lacrimal glands. AQP5 siRNA treatment of the infraorbital lacrimal gland attenuates PACAP-induced tear secretion. Based on these results, PACAP might be clinically useful to treat dry eye disorder. PMID:27345595

  4. ERalpha suppresses slug expression directly by transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yin; Xiao, Yi; Wang, Wenting; Yearsley, Kurtis; Gao, Jian-Xin; Barsky, Sanford H

    2008-12-01

    Two of the most common signalling pathways in breast cancer are the ER (oestrogen receptor) ligand activation pathway and the E-cadherin snai1 slug EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) pathway. Although these pathways have been thought to interact indirectly, the present study is the first to observe direct interactions between these pathways that involves the regulation of slug expression. Specifically we report that ligand-activated ERalpha suppressed slug expression directly by repression of transcription and that knockdown of ERalpha with RNA interference increased slug expression. More specifically, slug expression was down-regulated in ERalpha-negative MDA-MB-468 cells transfected with ERalpha after treatment with E2 (17beta-oestradiol). The down-regulation of slug in the ERalpha-positive MCF-7 cell line was mediated by direct repression of slug transcription by the formation of a co-repressor complex involving ligand-activated ERalpha protein, HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1) and N-CoR (nuclear receptor co-repressor). This finding was confirmed by sequential ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) studies. In the MCF-7 cell line, slug expression normally was low. In addition, knockdown of ERalpha with RNA interference in this cell line increased slug expression. This effect could be partially reversed by treatment of the cells with E2. The efficacy of the effect of ERalpha on slug repression was dependent on the overall level of ERalpha. These observations confirmed that slug was an E2-responsive gene. PMID:18588516

  5. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Solt, Laura A; Burris, Thomas P

    2015-05-01

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25800870

  6. IL-27 Suppresses Antimicrobial Activity in Human Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Teles, Rosane M B; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Sarno, Euzenir N; Rea, Thomas H; Ochoa, Maria T; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens trigger immunosuppressive pathways are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of microbial infection. One pathway that inhibits host defense responses involves the induction of type I interferons and subsequently IL-10, yet the mechanism by which type I IFN induces IL-10 remains unclear. Our studies of gene expression profiles derived from leprosy skin lesions suggested a link between IL-27 and the IFN-β induced IL-10 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-27p28 subunit is upregulated following treatment of monocytes with IFN-β and Mycobacterium leprae, the intracellular bacterium that causes leprosy. The ability of IFN-β and M. leprae to induce IL-10 was diminished by IL-27 knockdown. Additionally, treatment of monocytes with recombinant IL-27 was sufficient to induce the production of IL-10. Functionally, IL-27 inhibited the ability of IFN-γ to trigger antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected monocytes. At the site of disease, IL-27 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions of patients with progressive lepromatous leprosy, correlating and colocalizing with IFN-β and IL-10 in macrophages. Together, these data provide evidence that in the human cutaneous immune responses to microbial infection, IL-27 contributes to the suppression of host antimicrobial responses. PMID:26030183

  7. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  8. Treatment intensification with maraviroc (CCR5 antagonist) leads to declines in CD16-expressing monocytes in cART-suppressed chronic HIV-infected subjects and is associated with improvements in neurocognitive test performance: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disease (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Umaki, Tracie; Chew, Glen M.; Chow, Dominic C.; Agsalda, Melissa; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Paul, Robert; Zhang, Guangxiang; Ho, Erika; Hanks, Nancy; Nakamoto, Beau; Shiramizu, Bruce T.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continues to be prevalent (30–50 %) despite plasma HIVRNA suppression with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). There is no proven therapy for individuals on suppressive cARTwith HAND. We have shown that the degree of HIV reservoir burden (HIV DNA) in monocytes appear to be linked to cognitive outcomes. HIV infection of monocytes may therefore be critical in the pathogenesis of HAND. A single arm, open-labeled trial was conducted to examine the effect of maraviroc (MVC) intensification on monocyte inflammation and neuropsychological (NP) performance in 15 HIV subjects on stable 6-month cART with undetectable plasma HIV RNA (<48 copies/ml) and detectable monocyte HIV DNA (>10 copies/106 cells). MVC was added to their existing cART regimen for 24 weeks. Post-intensification change in monocytes was assessed using multiparametric flow cytometry, monocyte HIV DNA content by PCR, soluble CD163 (sCD163) by an ELISA, and NP performance over 24 weeks. In 12 evaluable subjects, MVC intensification resulted in a decreased proportion of circulating intermediate (median; 3.06 % (1.93, 6.45) to 1.05 % (0.77, 2.26)) and nonclassical (5.2 % (3.8, 7.9) to 3.2 % (1.8, 4.8)) CD16-expressing monocytes, a reduction in monocyte HIV DNA content to zero log10 copies/106 cells and in levels of sCD163 of 43 % by 24 weeks. This was associated with significant improvement in NP performance among six subjects who entered the study with evidence of mild to moderate cognitive impairment. The results of this study suggest that antiretroviral therapy with potency against monocytes may have efficacy against HAND. PMID:25227930

  9. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-03-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment. PMID:26884164

  10. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  11. Endotoxin suppresses rat hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, W; Rudling, M; Angelin, B

    1996-01-01

    Endotoxin induces hyperlipidaemia in experimental animals. In the current study, we investigated whether endotoxin alters hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in rats. Endotoxin treatment suppressed hepatic LDL receptor expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Eighteen hours after intraperitoneal injection of increasing amounts of endotoxin, LDL receptor and its mRNA levels were determined by ligand blot and solution hybridization respectively. LDL receptor expression was inhibited by about 70% at a dose of 500 micrograms/100 g body weight. However, LDL receptor mRNA levels were markedly increased in all endotoxin-treated groups at this time point (by 83-136%; P < 0.001). Time-course experiments showed that LDL receptor expression was already reduced by 48% 4 h after endotoxin injection and was maximally reduced (by 63-65%) between 8 and 18 h. Changes in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA showed a different pattern. By 4 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had decreased by 78% (P < 0.001). However, by 8 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had returned to levels similar to controls, and 18 and 24 h after endotoxin injection, they were increased by about 60% (P < 0.05). Separation of plasma lipoproteins by FPLC demonstrated that endotoxin-induced changes in plasma triacylglycerols and cholesterol were due to accumulation of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins among very-low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein and LDL. It is concluded that endotoxin suppresses hepatic LDL receptor expression in vivo in rats. PMID:8611169

  12. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  13. miR-340 suppresses glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daquan; Qiu, Shuwei; Ge, Ruiguang; He, Lei; Li, Mei; Li, Yi; Peng, Ying

    2015-04-20

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRs) contributes to tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of miR-340 is observed in multiple types of cancers. However, the biological function of miR-340 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that expression of miR-340 was downregulated in both glioma cell lines and tissues. Survival of GBM patients with high levels of miR-340 was significantly extended in comparison to patients expressing low miR-340 levels. Biological functional experiments showed that the restoration of miR-340 dramatically inhibited glioma cell proliferation, induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and promoted autophagy and terminal differentiation. Mechanistic studies disclosed that, miR-340 over-expression suppressed several oncogenes including p-AKT, EZH2, EGFR, BMI1 and XIAP. Furthermore, ROCK1 was validated as a direct functional target miR-340 and silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the anti-tumor effect of mR-340. Our findings indicate an important role of miR-340 as a glioma killer, and suggest a potential prognosis biomarker and therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:25831237

  14. Suppression of soil nitrification by plants.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Worthington, Margaret; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ando, Yasuo; Sahrawat, Kanwar Lal; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudhana; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Kishii, Masahiro; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, weakens the soil's ability to retain N and facilitates N-losses from production agriculture through nitrate-leaching and denitrification. This process has a profound influence on what form of mineral-N is absorbed, used by plants, and retained in the soil, or lost to the environment, which in turn affects N-cycling, N-use efficiency (NUE) and ecosystem health and services. As reactive-N is often the most limiting in natural ecosystems, plants have acquired a range of mechanisms that suppress soil-nitrifier activity to limit N-losses via N-leaching and denitrification. Plants' ability to produce and release nitrification inhibitors from roots and suppress soil-nitrifier activity is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI). With recent developments in methodology for in-situ measurement of nitrification inhibition, it is now possible to characterize BNI function in plants. This review assesses the current status of our understanding of the production and release of biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) and their potential in improving NUE in agriculture. A suite of genetic, soil and environmental factors regulate BNI activity in plants. BNI-function can be genetically exploited to improve the BNI-capacity of major food- and feed-crops to develop next-generation production systems with reduced nitrification and N2O emission rates to benefit both agriculture and the environment. The feasibility of such an approach is discussed based on the progresses made. PMID:25711823

  15. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  16. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  17. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Evans, Colin E; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit. PMID:25422368

  18. Adaptive flutter suppression, analysis and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.; Hwang, C.; Joshi, D. S.; Harvey, C. A.; Huttsell, L. T.; Farmer, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of adaptive control have been applied to suppress a potentially violent flutter condition of a half-span model of a lightweight figher aircraft. This marked the confluence of several technologies with active flutter suppression, digital control and adaptive control theory the primary contributors. The control algorithm was required to adapt both to slowly varying changes, corresponding to changes in the flight condition or fuel loading and to rapid changes, corresponding to a store release or the transition from a stable to an unstable flight condition. The development of the adaptive control methods was followed by a simulation and checkout of the complete system and a wind tunnel demonstration. As part of the test, a store was released from the model wing tip, transforming the model abruptly from a stable configuration to a violent flutter condition. The adaptive algorithm recognized the unstable nature of the resulting configuration and implemented a stabilizing control law in a fraction of a second. The algorithm was also shown to provide system stability over a range of wind tunnel Mach numbers and dynamic pressures.

  19. Novel aqueous foams for suppressing VOC emission.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pankaj S; Mohanty, Kishore K

    2004-05-01

    Reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from crude oil/gasoline distribution and storage facilities is important in controlling environmental pollution and enhancing workplace safety. Stable aqueous foam formulations are developed to provide a mass transfer barrier to the emission of VOCs during loading of gasoline. Experiments are carried out in a bench-scale foam cell using liquid hexane as oil. The foam columns of 32 cm in height were able to suppress the plateau concentration of hexane vapors in the effluent by 87% under experimental conditions tested. Vapor suppression increased with foam height but was almost insensitive to liquid viscosity. These experiments are then upscaled from bench-scale to a vessel having an exposed surface area of roughly 2 orders of magnitude higher. Gasoline is used as oil in the upscaled experiments, and the concentrations of volatile hydrocarbons in the effluent are measured during oil loading. A 40-cm-thick foam column is found to reduce the emissions by 96% for foams prepared with deionized water and by 93.8% for foams prepared with 3.5 wt % NaCl brine for 10 h of oil loading. PMID:15180071

  20. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27125275